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Because every town needs a park, a library and a newspaper

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Volume 10, Number 43 | November 29, 2018

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Carbondale Commentary

The views and opinions expressed on the Commentary page do not necessarily reflect those of The Sopris Sun. The Sopris Sun invites all members of the community to submit letters to the editor or guest columns. For more information, email editor Will Grandbois at news@soprissun.com, or call 510-3003.

Making peace with privilege By Judith Ritschard You might have read the story about the white women in Tennessee who recently sauntered around a mall in their hoodies to prove a point. They went to the same mall that had recently handcuffed several black men for breaking the no hoodie policy, and found they were able to walk around dressed however they wanted and remain on the property. This story got me thinking about my own privilege and how important it was for me to finally accept it and make peace with it. There was a time I hated being accused of having privilege. Frankly, I wanted to say to my accusers, “You don’t know me! My life has not exactly been easy. I certainly am not privileged.” Years later I can say without a doubt that I was wrong. I am privileged, and chances are you are too. I suppose I rejected ever having much privilege because I grew up in Aspen surrounded by so much wealth, and unfortunately I was too busy focusing on what I didn’t have. To add to my denial was my mamá’s constant reminders that my sibBy Judith Ritschard lings and I were one generation removed from dirt floors, no indoor plumbing or electricity. It was hard for me to grasp a reality that had been hers and comprehend struggles that were not my own. Now that I’m a mom, I see she was trying to help me keep my privilege in check by helping me focus on all our blessings. What’s not hard for me to understand is how insulting it can be when someone, who doesn’t even know you, assumes your life has been a cakewalk. Tell me how privileged you feel when you’re in the throes of the daily grind? Being human is hard and, I don’t care who you are, life sometimes is a struggle. Not to mention, it takes a very spiritually evolved being to not sometimes get jaded by all the wealth we are surrounded by in this part of the world. But, let’s set the record straight. Being privileged does not mean you are sitting around on your butt all day. It has nothing to do with how hard you work. It does have to do with having advantages in life that we obtain through no effort or choice of our own. Think of it like being born with a certain kit that gets you through life a bit easier. Although I didn’t always see it, my kit is bursting at the seams with privilege. Here are just a few examples of some of the advantages I was born with. • A totally functional body. I have not struggled in life like say, for example, someone who was born deaf or blind or has a mental illness. • I grew up in stable, loving and peaceful home that my parents owned. For that reason I never had to bounce around from school to school, witness domestic violence, nor have I ever missed a single meal in my whole life. • And yes, I did grow up in Aspen. A place that is clean and safe and has a top notch public school system and many other opportunities in the community. There are so many people that can not say they had any of these advantages. As uncomfortable as it may be to admit we have privilege it is important to do so. By accepting our own privilege, like the women at the mall in Tennessee, we can then call out the arrogance or inequality of our privilege and use that to lift and serve others who don’t have the same advantages. In simpler terms, accepting our privilege makes our society a better place for everyone. Yeah, you read that right. That was a big statement but I wholeheartedly believe it to be true. If you take anything from these words just remember being human is hard. We have complex lives and even more complex and unique struggles that are not always apparent. Our privilege is not always apparent either. But, that doesn’t mean it’s not there and it hasn’t benefited us in multiple ways. It’s about time we all check our privilege at the door.

OPINION

Bits & Pieces

Judith Ritschard was born by the sea in Mexico then transplanted to the Roaring Fork Valley where she turned full on mountain girl. You might spot her in her huarache sandals on her townie bike trying to keep up with her two wildlings in Carbondale.

Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 500 words via email at news@soprissun.com or 250 words via snail mail at P.O. Box 399, Carbondale CO 81623. please include your name, town, and contact information. The deadline for submission is noon on Monday.

End U.S. complicity in Yemen’s war Dear Editor: The people of Yemen are witnessing the worst humanitarian crisis in the world. Thousands have been killed since 2015, millions have been displaced, and the country is projected to face the worst famine in 100 years if airstrikes by the Saudi-led coalition do not subside. Estimates released earlier this week approximate that 85,000 Yemeni children have died of starvation since bombing campaigns began over three years ago. Yemen’s war broke out in earnest in March 2015 when the Saudi-led coalition — supported by the United States — launched airstrikes against Houthi rebels who had seized the capital Sana’a six months earlier. These airstrikes have continued unabated for the past three years, killing thousands of civilians at weddings, markets, funerals, and on school trips. Many of the bombs used in these campaigns, including the one which killed at least 40 children on a school bus in August, are American-made. The United States has provided extensive support to the Saudi-led coalition since the war began, assisting with intelligence, supplying targeting advice, selling billions of dollars worth of weapons, and refueling mid-air coalition warplanes carrying out airstrikes. President Trump signed a $110 billion dollar arms deal with the Saudi government last summer and lifted bans on precision-guided munitions, dismissing concerns that the weapons will make targeting civilians even easier. This military assistance, as explicitly stated in 2017 by House Resolution 422, is furthermore unauthorized. Senate Joint Resolution 54, led by Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Mike Lee (R-UT), aims to end U.S. complicity in this devastating conflict and reclaim congressional authority over matters of war. If enacted, S.J.Res 54 will end American military support for the Saudi-led coalition, meaning that the U.S. would cease mid-air refueling, intelligence sharing, and target selection assistance. These measures could not be resumed without congressional approval. The U.S. cannot continue to enable brutal airstrikes and mass starvation in Yemen. Our engagement in the war since 2015 has been a grave moral failure, and S.J. Res 54 constitutes a meaningful opportunity to prioritize moral accountability moving forward. We need to speak out for the Yemeni people and encourage Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet to do the same. Isabel Wolfer Basalt LETTERS page 14

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Jim Calaway, Chair Kay Brunnier Bob Ferguson – Jaywalker Lodge Scott Gilbert – Habitat for Humanity RFV Bob Young – Alpine Bank Peter Gilbert Umbrella Roofing, Inc. Bill Spence and Sue Edelstein Greg and Kathy Feinsinger Carolyn Nelson Jim Noyes Honorary Publishers commit to tax-deductible gifts of $1,000 or more annually. If you’d like to be included please contact Barbara Dills at barbara.dills@gmail.com or 963-5782.

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To inform, inspire and build community. Donate online or by mail. P.O. Box 399 Carbondale, CO 81623 520 S. Third Street #32 970-510-3003 www.soprissun.com Editor Will Grandbois • 970-510-0540 news@soprissun.com Advertising: Carol Fabian • 970-510-0246 adsales@soprissun.com Reporter: Megan Tackett Photographer: Jane Bachrach Graphic Designer: Terri Ritchie Delivery: Tom Sands Current Board Members board@soprissun.com Marilyn Murphy, President Raleigh Burleigh, Vice President Stacey Bernot, Secretary Barbara Dills, Treasurer Debbie Bruell • Cliff Colia Nicolette Toussaint • John Colson Linda Criswell • Klaus Kocher The Sopris Sun Board meets regularly on the second Monday evening of each month at the Third Street Center.

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Mary Margaret O’Gara brought her husband, Steve Standiford, with her in newspaper form when she visited the Fox Glacier on New Zealand’s South Island last year.

2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • www.SoprisSun.com • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

The Sopris Sun, Inc. is a proud member of the Carbondale Creative District The Sopris Sun, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation. Donations to The Sun are fully tax deductible.


Carbondale businesses struggle to find, keep long-term employees By Justin Patrick Sopris Sun Correspondent In the past couple of years (and seemingly intensifying over the summer), the labor market in Carbondale has become very tight. The numerous “help wanted” signs posted in windows around town are perhaps the most visible symbol of employers’ struggle to attract — and retain — high quality employees in the Roaring Fork Valley. The statistics affirm this trend. According to the Colorado Workforce Center in Glenwood Springs, a natural unemployment rate is about four percent. Garfield County’s current unemployment rate is 2.9 percent. A number of factors including a tricky resort-affected economy, an affordable housing crisis, a strong national economy, and shifting demographics help explain why local businesses are trying out a number of new strategies to attract reliable, satisfied employees. Kiko Peña owns and operates both Mi Casita restaurant and Sopris Liquor and Wine. “This is the first year we’ve had ‘help wanted’ signs up at both of them throughout the summer,” he said. “There’s slim pickings to say the least. With the job market being what it is, it’s harder to find good help that can represent your store.” Peña laments that many potential employees are being priced out of the Carbondale housing market and are relocating downvalley. That means he has to compete with Glenwood Springs businesses to incentivize employees to commute to Carbondale. He has raised his starting wage by $1.50, and touts perks such as free tastings, fun and educational excursions to distilleries and breweries, and a huge employee discount on products as selling points to attract workers. Even so, he continues to struggle to fill positions. “It’s beating a dead horse, and everybody knows it. There’s a lack of legit affordable housing,” he said. “I don’t know how the normal people make it, it blows my mind.” In addition to the commuting issue, new restaurants opening in town — likely a reflection of a strong tourist economy — are further tapping an already limited labor pool of servers, cooks, bartenders, and dishwashers, he said. Jared Ettelson, owner of the Village Smithy, echoed that sentiment. “I have a hard time finding anyone in the kitchen,” he said. “There was a point that I hired 10 cooks within six months.” Ettelson said he has bumped his base wage by four to five dollars for back of house employees and offers solid vacation benefits and bonuses. He estimates he has spent an additional $25,000 per year to keep up with minimum wage requirements for front of house employees. Ettelson suspects that

part of the problem is a national tone that has frightened Hispanic job seekers. “We are a very Hispanic community. I can’t tell you the last time a non-Hispanic person came looking for a kitchen job.” But, he says, “we’re having a hard time finding people who have papers….It’s a resort area problem.”

High and low Attracting specialized applicants with college degrees for white collar positions is proving no less difficult. Gavin Dahl, General Manager of KDNK, has been struggling to fill a news director position that commands a salary in the $40k range. When he was hired into that position several years ago he struggled to find available housing. “I was sleeping in guest rooms, pet sitting, camping at the KOA and driving back to Denver on weekends. I didn’t find a rental for six weeks,” he said. Casting a national web for candidates is difficult because many are unfamiliar and turned off by the sparse, expensive housing options, if any can be found at all. Though he says KDNK has garnered interest for the position, “I’m very worried that as we try to fill this position, strong candidates won’t be able to relocate,” he said. He applauds the efforts of counties to provide affordable housing but wants to see more.

“We know our local leadership cares about this, but are they doing enough?” The Workforce Center in Glenwood Springs in on the front lines of the challenging labor market. Dawn Bray-Jenks, the Assistant Director there, said there are 204 jobs in Garfield County, and 138 in Pitkin, that need to be filled, and these are only jobs that are registered through the organization’s online system. She said the Workforce is striving diligently to connect the right employees to local businesses. “For both job seekers and employers, we’re an incredible resource. We have a broad gambit of jobs we’re looking to fill. We do hiring events, provide workforce information and education to our businesses. Our goal is to give employers as much support as we can and work with them for their future needs as well,” she said. While the statewide average hourly rate is $29.40, the rate in Garfield is only $23.88, though employees here face a higher cost of living. That may help explain why the labor market is tough on the Western Slope. “As far as a solution, I don’t think anyone has that silver bullet yet,” said Bray-Jenks. “If it wasn’t such a great place to live, boy, that would make the solution so much easier.” The Carbondale Chamber of Commerce is also tackling the labor market challenges. “We’ve noticed a shift away from the

Carbondale businesses are using innovative strategies as well as tried and true techniques to attract and retain workers in a tight labor market. Photos by Justin Patrick traditional employee benefits,” said the Chamber’s Executive Director, Andrea Stewart. “Some examples include flexible schedules rather than traditional office hours, increase in pay rather than a retirement plan, as well as recreation and health and wellness stipends,” she said. She said businesses are thinking more creatively about how to make the relocation process as smooth as possible, and Carbondale is looking to help them do that. While relief may be on the horizon, it could take several years for the balance between supply and demand in the labor market to harmoniously equalize. Issues like affordable housing and an increasing reliance on a commuting workforce do not seem likely to dissipate. The high cost of living is unlikely to subside as the Roaring Fork Valley continues to earn its place as an international resort destination. It may be two years or more before the Hispanic workforce feels safe to apply for certain jobs. Carbondale businesses will continue to have to be creative and persistent to build a reliable workforce. In the end, the quality of life offered by the Roaring Fork Valley may be its saving grace. “We hope the opportunity to live and play in paradise will offset the downsides of the high cost of living,” said Gavin Dahl.

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$2,990 towards goal

Help us reach our year-end fundraising goal of $10,000 by Dec. 21, online at soprissun.com/donate or PO Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623 WEEK 1

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WINTER SOLSTICE

The Sopris Sun, Carbondale’s weekly community connector • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 • 3


Scuttlebutt

Send your scuttlebutt to news@soprissun.com.

Paper dresses

off contacting Volunteer Coordinator Kat Bernat at bernat@carbondalefire.org.

The Sun is excited to announce that graphic designer Terri Ritchie has been accepted into Green is the New Black 2019 with a newspaper-based line! Don’t be alarmed if you see her or some other member of the staff and board going through your recycle bin — it’s just R&D.

Road closed Winter closures take effect Dec. 1 in multiple locations administered by the Bureau of Land Management in Eagle, Garfield and Pitkin counties. Most roads into these seasonally closed areas are gated. The public may notice new gates in some areas like The Crown as the BLM implements its 2015 Travel Management Plan. Other affected areas include Basalt Mountain, Fisher Creek, Light Hill, Red Hill, Williams Hill and Thompson Creek. A complete list and maps are available online at go.usa. gov/xP64j and at the Colorado River Valley Field Office (2300 River Frontage Rd., Silt).

Snow on the mountain Nov. 23 was one of the earliest opening days ever for Sunlight Mountain Resort, with three inches on the ground and more falling. Celebrating the slopes’ 52nd season, skiers and riders were treated to free donuts from local bakery Sweet Coloradough, free mimosas for the adults, and $30 lift tickets.

My hero The American Red Cross is seeking nominations for its Community Hero Award honoring extraordinary acts like first aid, emergency response, disaster preparation or military service in the last year. You can submit online at redcross.org/ColoradoHeroNominate through Dec. 15.

Mr. Plow The Colorado Department of Transportation is still looking for additional permanent and seasonal full-time and part-time highway maintenance workers and snowplow drivers as fall moves towards winter. For temporary highway maintenance employees, CDOT is offering a number of incentives, including increasing the pay rate from $19 an hour to $22 an hour or more for retired maintenance personnel. Additionally, the state Department of Personnel and Administration is providing a sixmonth residency waiver allowing beginning

Stuck in a rut Locals from the Aspen Chorale Society were among the Distinguished Concerts International New York’s “Messiah…Refreshed!” performers at Carnegie Hall, which was lauded by the New York Concert Review. They’ll all be back in town for the Society’s own “Messiah” performances Dec. 14, 15 and 16 in Basalt, Aspen and Glenwood Springs (respectively). Photo by Dan Wright Photography / DCINY Productions. temporary and permanent highway maintenance employees to be hired from out-ofstate. Interested individuals should apply at bit.ly/CDOTcareers2018.

that may be affected by short durations of smoke should contact Chad Sewell at (970) 876-9030.

Where there’s smoke

Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District is not soliciting donations and is not affiliated with the Volunteer Firefighter Alliance. According to a Carbondale Fire press release, the VFA puts most of its donations right back toward fundraising, and none of it goes to local departments. Additionally, despite offering volunteer opportunities, the organization hasn’t furnished any thus far. If you’d like to get involved, you’re better

Smoke may be visible east of Glenwood Springs when crews from the Upper Colorado River Interagency Fire Management burn slash piles generated from a Bureau of Land Management fuels reduction project on Lookout Mountain. Firefighters will wait for favorable conditions to ignite the piles and expect to complete the burning in two days. Anyone with health conditions

Where’s the fire?

Mule deer are now in the heart of their mating season and Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds everyone to be careful around bucks which can act aggressively at this time of year. In fact, a veterinarian in Durango reported this week that a buck deer had attached three dogs in a residential area. The ‘rut’ lasts until about mid-December; if you live in an area where you see lots of deer take precautions like keeping dogs on a leash and staying well clear of anything with antlers.

They say it’s your birthday Folks celebrating another year of life this week include: Kat Rich and Naomi Pulver (Nov. 29); Chuck Dorn (Nov. 30); Marcel Kahhak and Sadie Dickinson (Dec. 1) Elizabeth Robinson, Ted Brochet, Paul Stover and Sierra Palmer (Dec. 2); Rochelle Norwood (Dec. 3); Carol Klein (Dec. 4) John Stroud and Mark Stover (Dec. 5).

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Town of Carbondale Special Event Task Force Public Meeting Date The Special Event Task Force reviews special events within Town Parks and Streets. 2019 special events will be reviewed on Wednesday, Dec 5th from 6-7:30 pm at Town Hall Room 2. Meeting is open to all interested citizens. Task Force will present recommendations to Town Trustees in January for approval. For more info e-mail:ebrendlinger@carbondaleco.net

4 • THE SOPRIS SUN • www.SoprisSun.com • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

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Basketball brings student multi-athletes together By Will Grandbois Sopris Sun Staff

THURSDAY, NOV. 29

Ram fans are going to see a lot of familiar faces as the basketball season tips off with the Brenda Patch Tournament. Many kids at Roaring Fork High School play multiple sports, and the usual suspects tend to excel in more than one. “If you look at our starting lineup, it’s the same guys,” said Joe Salinas, who was practicing basketball as soon as the soccer team had its semifinal finish. “We’ve played soccer together for years, but basketball is something we all picked up at the same time.” Year-round activity makes it easy to stay in shape, physically and mentally, noted Gabby Santana. Still, it can be an awkward transition, particularly for the volleyball girls. “It’s a whole new game. We haven’t dribbled in months.” said Logan Erickson. “But it’s the sport that we’re best at. We know we can be good and we take it seriously. More people come, and that makes it more fun.” In Kendall Bernot’s opinion, that’s partially because it’s so fun to watch. “It’s fast paced and it never really stops,” she said. “We always stay for the boys’ game.” Indeed, playing back to back

22

days to go

BRENDA PATCHII Tournament schedule Basalt vs. Coal Ridge (Girls JV), 3 p.m. Coal Ridge vs. Basalt (Boys JV), 4:30 p.m. RFHS vs. Glenwood (Girls JV), 6 p.m.

FRIDAY, NOV. 30 RFHS vs. DSST Byers (Boys JV), 3 p.m. (aux. gym) Rifle vs. Coal Ridge (Girls Varsity), 3 p.m. Coal Ridge vs. Lutheran (Boys Varsity), 4:30 p.m. RFHS vs. Steamboat (Girls Varsity), 6 p.m. RFHS vs. DSST Byers (Boys Varsity), 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, DEC. 1

If you mixed together all the sports Gabby Santana, Logan Erickson, Joe Salinas, Ronald Clemente and Kendall Bernot and their fellow Rams play, you’d get something akin to “Calvinball.” Photo by Will Grandbois on the same court almost makes it one big team. “I think it kind of makes it a competition between the boys and girls, but mostly it’s support,” Santana said. And they also benefit from the support of some of the same friends they’ve played with year after year and season after season. “You play different in dif-

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ferent sports, but I don’t ever have to question that my teammates will be there,” Bernot said. “It’s challenging, but it’s worth it because it makes you a more rounded athlete. Once you’ve done it for a year, you get in the groove and then it’s weird not to have both school and sports.” Indeed, after basketball, many

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of the same kids will go out for track or other spring sports. And while they’ll once again be in shape for the transition, it’s not quite the same — to say nothing of the impending transition to college intramurals. “I’ll miss the team aspect,” Ronald Clemente noted. “I always think I have next year, but now I don’t.”

DSST Byers vs. Coal Ridge (Boys JV), 12 p.m. (aux. gym) 1 Coal Ridge vs. Steamboat (Girls Varsity), 12 p.m. Glenwood vs. Coal Ridge (Girls JV), 1:30 p.m. (aux. gym) DSST Byers vs. Coal Ridge (Boys Varsity), 1:30 p.m. RFHS vs. Basalt (Girls JV), 3 p.m. RFHS vs. Basalt (Boys JV), 4:30 p.m. RFHS vs. Rifle (Girls Varsity), 6 p.m. RFHS vs. Lutheran (Boys Varsity), 7:30 p.m.

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On winter reading and the literature of place By Will Grandbois Sopris Sun Staff Even though many people use fiction as a sort of escape, it’s the familiar elements that connect us to the story. It’s one of the reasons folks have pushed so hard for more stories featuring people of different genders, cultures, classes and perspectives. Even so, it seems like works set in small, Western towns are few and far between — or else caricatured by someone who’s never visited such. Back in June, I reached out authors who, I felt, had captured something of my own experience. I received a short reply and no follow-up from Peter Heller, whose postapocalyptic best seller “Dog Stars” briefly mentions Carbondale and next novel “The Painter” features the North Fork Valley. I heard nothing from Brandon Sanderson, whose fantasy novels show a surprising amount of influence from his home in Utah. I was too discouraged to try to reach James Galvin, although I hand “The Meadow” to anyone who doesn’t seem to understand my need for solitude, much less titans like Terry Tempest Williams or Cormac McCarthy. The one person who did respond was Peter Grandbois. It probably helped that we’re distant relations, which is why I picked up his books in the first place. This isn’t a review (I very much want to steer folks toward the authors sharing their works at the library this weekend), but it’s worth noting that my mother, who lacks the blood relation, read the whole of “Nahoonkara” in a single sit-

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ting. It’s certainly not light summer reading, which is why you’re hearing about it now. In an ideal world, you’d enjoy it by the fireplace as snow piles up outside and in the pages. “I actually think it’s the writer’s job to make the familiar seem new again, to make the reader see things they thought they knew and understood as if for the first time,” Grandbois told me. “I wanted the reader to see the mountains of Colorado as a child might see them, as Zebulon Pike might have experienced them when he first came across the plains.” The idea, he explained, came after a visit to the Frisco Historical Society. He imagined his mother’s three uncles as the Swedish Brothers who had founded the town. “Place informs who we are as human beings,” he noted. “I don’t think we can separate ourselves from our environment.” So when you encounter a familiar landscape written by folks who aren’t intimately acquainted with it, you can feel the difference. “I think we’re waking up to the fact that there is a huge part of this country that isn’t represented, that nobody is talking about,” Grandbois observed. “At Denison University where I teach, we’ve just established a narrative journalism concentration whose primary goal is to tell the stories of people from this nation’s rural areas. So things are changing.” That’s important not only for the folks who haven’t been represented, but by those who have missed that exposure.

Perhaps this old stove, just off the old railroad grade in what was once Marion, could serve as the inspiration for a novel someday. Photo by Will Grandbois “I also think part of why we read is to have empathy with others, to experience different points of view,” Grandbois added. “That’s something that’s in short supply nowadays. Good books can do that. They open our world.” “Nahoonkara” and Grandbois’ other works also integrate a bit of magical realism — a sort of embracing of the unlikely bordering on fantastical that I mostly associate with works in Spanish. According to Grandbois, however, it’s pretty common almost everywhere but the U.S. and England. Our corner of the world, though, seems the perfect candidate for the trope even aside from our Spanish history. “I believe the West is a land of magic,” Grandbois said. “Every time I take a walk in the Colorado mountains I feel that magic and mystery in the air, in the rivers and trees.”

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He’s finding it harder and harder to lose himself in nature, though. “Every time I return everything seems so much more congested and busy… It’s becoming harder and harder to slip away into the mountains and not run into lots of other people,” he wrote. “I think understanding our past goes deeper than that. It’s more than knowing facts and dates. It’s knowing what it was like to live in a time before cell phones or the Internet or Google Maps. It’s about learning how living without those things developed other parts of your brain, even your spirit. I don’t want to downplay the benefits of technology and progress. There are many. But we should always remember those benefits come with a cost.” In the preservation of the past, connection to the present and creation of the future, it probably wouldn’t hurt to pick up a book.

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Carbondale library turns a new page with inaugural Lit Fest By Megan Tackett Sopris Sun Staff

to find a fiction thriller for themselves, then end up also purchasing a coloring book for Lacy Dunlavy didn’t have any problems a grandchild or something for the local hisfinding local authors for the inaugural Lo- tory buff in their life. cal Lit Fest at the Carbondale Branch Li“It’s really interesting to see how these brary Thursday, Nov. 29. authors, they write so many different In fact, the librarian wishes she had things. I can’t imagine that,” she continued. more space to feature more authors. Some of the reason for that — the sheer “It’s just kind of amazing how many concentration of published authors across people in this area write,” she said. “I ac- multiple genres in the area — is because tually had about 15 auof the network that exthors approach me to be ists here to support writpart of it, and I was just ers. Carbondale Writlike, ‘I don’t have space.’” ers’ Group, which meets The final roster inmonthly at the library, is cludes nine people showone piece of that network. casing 19 publications Linda Flynn has served as between them. Book the major organizer the signings and sales will last six years, and she’s highlight the night, and worked closely with Dunnobody will go hungry, lavy for Lit Fest. – Lacy Dunlavy as Dunlavy’s planning “If you have a meeting appetizers and holiday here, I’ll probably corner treats, as well. While the you and ask you to do an event is new to Carbondale, the Lit Fest is event with me, so that’s what I did with a bit of a tradition for Dunlavy. Linda,” Dunlavy laughed. “I’ve done this at every other library Flynn, for her part, has published I’ve worked at,” she said. “In Eagle and three books and is actively working on a Avon, it’s gone really well. And in Car- sequel to “Dream Glasses,” the only ficbondale, it’s even easier, because every- tion she’s penned. one here is already locally minded and so “That book was a lot of fun because freaking creative.” I explored things that didn’t make any The timing is intentional, she continued, sense to me,” she said, adding that most comparing it to the reoccuring Deck the of the book’s plot takes place in Paris. Halls Artisanal Market at the Launchpad. ”I’ve never been to Paris, so the Internet “I try to put it between Thanksgiving was a great resource. All of the locations and Christmas, so it’s kind of gift-mind- in Paris are real, and many of the stories ed,” she explained. “Or you can just buy from there are real, but what happens in something for yourself. There’s all sorts of the bakery is not, and the people are not. genres.” For instance, someone may come When I got close to the end of the book,

“It’s just kind of amazing how many people in this area write.”

It’s also a productive one. “In this last 12-month period, five people from the group have had work published,” she said. “So that to me speaks volumes about what’s going on. It’s not all about what I’m getting out of the group; we’re there to help one another, and I really, really like that.” Of course, there’s more to publishing a work than writing it, as many authors will bemoan. But unlike days of yore, when aspiring authors needed agents and the validation of a traditional publishing house, today, many self publish — which means doing all promotional legwork alone. That’s where Light of the Moon Publishing Division can help, marketer Olivia Savard noted. “People are able to come in and go, ‘Oh, this is perfect beLast year, the Carbondale Branch Library got in the cause I hate doing this,’” she said. holiday spirit with creative decor; this year, it is put- “People can do they want to do: ting the “fest” in festive with the inaugural Lit Fest. they write, and we publish.” Photo by Carla Jean Whitley Most of the featured authors at Thursday’s event utilized Light I didn’t really wanted to say goodbye to of the Moon, Dunlavy noted. With Lit the characters.” Fest, she hopes to create a platform for loThe real-life characters behind the cal authors that’s low stress and gets them books at Lit Fest are no strangers to one in front of local readers. another — quite the opposite. “It’s kind of just a reminder that a lot “The Carbondale Writers’ Group is an of the books that you see in bookstores amazing group,” Flynn said with a smile. in this area are made by local people: “We edit one another’s stuff. Even if I published by local people, edited by local don’t have anything today, the group is people, illustrated by local people! That’s always inspirational, motivational. It’s a really cool,” she said. “We’re not short of good environment.” any creative gene around here, for sure.”

The Sopris Sun, Carbondale’s weekly community connector • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 • 7


Annual Holiday COVER DESIGN Contest

2018

Tai Jacober (center) at Flying Dog Ranch, 2013. Photo by Amy Hadden Marsh

Crystal River Meats goes belly-up; bankruptcy case dismissed

Sopris the

G E ale pt. C’d . De RIN SID P c Re R/S E IN TE ID WN 8 GU 1 20

Carbondale’s community

Because every town needs a park, a library and a newspaper

Sun

supported, weekly newspaper

Volume 9, Number 46 | Decemb

er 21, 2017

Spruce Up The Sun

Zombies

out on the town

This year’s theme is

Let It Snow

The contest is open to grades pre-K through high school.

This year’s winner is…

The Sopris Sun continue d its Spruce Up The Sun cover competit ion this year, soliciting original designs from contestants in pre-K through high school. This year’s theme was “Peace and Love” and over 105 entries were submitted by students from local schools. Our favorite entry came from Anicka Ashcraft, a sixth grader at Aspen Middle School. She captured the essence of peace and love with whimsica l animals singing carols around a tree. The entries incorporated a variety of ways to express peace and love during the holiday season: some figuratively featuring family, friends and/or animals enjoying the holidays together, others were more literal using symbols of this year’s theme in clever ways. First-place winners in the age categories are: Florence Serson (preK-kindergarten), Abby Harris (fi rst grade), Lexi Filiss (second grade), Avery Spencer (third grade), Emmalin e Warner (fourth grade), Emma Charters (fifth grade) and Cynthia Rodriguez (sixth grade and up). Judging such a competit ive contest would not have been possible without the help of the discernin g eyes of staff members at Carbondale Arts (CA) and The Sopris Sun. We would also like to thank all the contestan ts for sharing their creativity and talents. It made judging a truly difficult task. For those contestants who would like to pick up their original artwork, stop by The Sopris Sun office at the Third St. A horde of zombies turned Center (520 S. Third St., out for the annual pub Suite 32). crawl around downtow for the popular eatery’s See pages 12-13 and n Carbondale the evening last supper were grateful visit our webof Oct. 21. Diners lucky not only because they site enough (www.sotoprissun.c were able to enjoy one but also because they were be in Town om) for additionmore dinner before the safe from the insatiabl al restauran winners. t closed, e thirst of creepy creatures like Kelly Hedrick. Thanks again to all who Photo by Jane Bachrach entered.

Cover contest winner:

580 Main S treet Carbondale

Artwork must be on 8 ½” x 11” paper, vertical orientation.

• You may use a variety of media, such as paint, pen and ink, crayon, chalk, markers, etc. • Bright and bold colors are encouraged. • No glitter please.

• Please keep designs 2-dimensional in order for us to scan the artwork for publication.

Let your imagination run wild and get those creative juices flowing.

Anicka Ashcraft, a sixth

• www.mi-casita.net • Deliv er ing from Iron Br idge

grader at Aspen Middle

Happy holidays!

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Contest winners receive the honor of having their artwork printed in the Dec. 20 issue and posted at www.soprissun.com. The deadline for entries is 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7. Drop them off at The Sopris Sun office in the Third Street Center (520 S. Third St., #32) or send them to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623, postmarked by Dec. 3. Please include your name, school, grade, age and phone number ON THE BACK of your entry. For more information, call The Sopris Sun at 970-510-3003 or email terrir@soprissun.com.

8 • THE SOPRIS SUN • www.SoprisSun.com • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

By Amy Hadden Marsh Sopris Sun Correspondent Crystal River Meats, owner of Carbondale restaurant Fatbelly Burgers, has gone out of business. “But, that doesn’t mean we’re not going to start up again,” said Tai Jacober, CEO of CR Holdings Inc., Crystal River Meats’ (CRM) parent company. Jacober recently told The Sopris Sun that all businesses associated with CR Holdings, Inc. have suspended operations. Crystal River Meats is the wholesale distribution arm of the holding company. The situation began in March 2018, when JBC Agricultural Management, the farming and cattle-raising arm of CR Holdings, filed bankruptcy. (Jacober made it clear that the bankruptcy case did not involve CR Holdings – only JBC Ag.) According to court documents, JBC Ag found itself on the losing side of a breach-of-contract complaint filed by two ranches on the Front Range. The story basically goes like this. In 2015, JBC Ag contracted with Southern Cross Ranches to buy grass-fed cattle. But, because the cows delivered were not grassfed, JBC rejected them. Southern Cross claimed that JBC breached the contract, and sued. Jacober told Colorado Bankruptcy Court in 2018 that he thought JBC would ultimately prevail but the company was under-represented during key phases of litigation. JBC Ag lost the suit and was ordered to pay a little over $2,500,000. That judgment is still under appeal.

Jacober told The Sun that he filed bankruptcy to help JBC Ag restructure operations, which is the whole point of filing for Chapter 11. “We wouldn’t be in this situation if we didn’t have a lawsuit that demanded bankruptcy and suspension of operations,” he said. But, because he was unable to remain in business, restructuring was impossible. “If you’re not making money, you can’t restructure debt,” he explained. Consequently, the bankruptcy case was dismissed late last month. “We were hoping that the bankruptcy case would stay around long enough for the appeal to go into effect,” he said. Jacober’s attorneys declined comment. Jacober is still trying to make things work with Crystal River Meats. “I’d like to go back to being the same but also owning the processing element,” he said. His goal is to work with creditors and possibly sell assets, which include equipment and meat inventory. “We will be in negotiations individually, working out a plan,” he said. Crystal River Meats will continue to supply Fatbelly Burgers from existing inventory, and he said that Aspen Ski Co. plans to buy meat this season. Jacober said he’s working day jobs as a cowboy and is still CEO of the holding company. He’s doing his best to handle the problems and maintain relationships that the company developed over the years. “The hard part is knowing you owe people,” he said. “It’s difficult to know how to pay them.”


Student voices heard at Youth Water Summit

Be a GREEN Leader!

By Katia Meyer Youth Water Leadership Program Intern

On Nov. 15, students from all over the valley gathered at the Third Street Center for a day of water and river related presentations, speakers, short films, discussions, and fun during the Healthy Rivers Youth Water Summit. Middle and high school students as well as college students brought their call-to-action projects focused on local water and climate change issues to share with their peers and community leaders, policy makers, and decision makers. New this year was the addition of the “Opportunity Expo”, a career fair-like event during lunch, where students had the chance to connect with local organizations and learn about natural resource focused camps, apprenticeships, internships, and courses they can take advantage of during the summer and as undergraduate students. Part of my role as the Program Intern was to be a member of the Summit Leader Team. We were charged with choosing a logo, building a website, choosing a keynote speaker, building games and interactive activities for the event, and giving input on many other aspects of the summit. One thing this taught me was the value of communication. As a college student, working with everyone from middle and high schoolers to adult leaders to community members brought many unique perspectives to the table and we had to find a way to combine them into one final product that everyone was happy with. I learned how to share my ideas clearly but also truly listen to what others had to say. When organizing participants of the Expo or interviewing local water leaders for my independent research project, I had a chance to further put these skills to the test through countless emails, phone calls, and in-person meetings. After pushing my comfort zone to talk to so many new people, I feel ready for any interview, project, or organizing I might have to do in the future. As the program’s intern, I got to see the summit from a unique perspective. I spent much of it greeting presenters, grabbing last minute signs, facilitating games, and presenting my own call to action project. In between the rush, I witnessed small

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River Watch students Victor Gamez and Melissa Rossi present their group project. Photo by Erin Danneker / Eyedrop Design moments that made the months of preparation worth it. When Christa Sadler, Colorado River advocate and special guest speaker from Flagstaff, asked if anyone had ideas for how to help people care about natural landscapes they might never see, dozens of students jumped up and gave passionate answers. I watched a student who had hardly talked when Sarah and I visited her Riverwatch class weeks prior, beaming with excitement when she answered questions on her group’s project about water rights. I saw students branch out from their school groups to meet new people and have enthusiastic discussions. Everyone who attended the Summit seemed to both teach and learn a great deal in such a short time. If I learned anything from this experience, it’s that every student has a voice, and a powerful one. Some were louder – the first to jump up and reach for a microphone so that everyone could hear what they had to say. Some were quieter – those who reserved their comments for group discussions and needed more encouragement. All of them however, were passionate about issues that matter to them, beaming with optimism and ideas for the future. These days it can be easy to feel like there are ways to solve the problems facing our watershed, but listening to what students have to say could be a great start.

Everyone … seemed to both teach and learn a great deal in such a short time.

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The Sopris Sun, Carbondale’s weekly community connector • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 • 9


Community Calendar THURSDAY Nov. 29

LIT FEST • Mingle with friends and meet local authors over holiday cookies and treats beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Carbondale Branch Library (320 Sopris Ave.). A wide array of genres and works will be featured, including those of Linda Flynn, Clark Heckert, DJ Hill, Casey Hoffmaster, Corrie Karnan, Helen Kline, Larry Rynearson, David Wall, and Duane Ziegler.

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is noon on Monday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted.

FRIDAY Nov. 30

BOOK BINGO • Kids and teens are invited to play bingo and win books beginning at 4 p.m. at the Carbondale Branch Library (320 Sopris Ave.) with snacks and refreshments provided.

THU Nov. 29 – SAT Dec. 15

KIMBERLY AKIMBO • Thunder River Theatre Company (67 Promenade) presents a dark comedy about a teenager with a rare genetic disorder that causes her to age quickly, with shows at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 29 & 30, Dec. 7, 8, 13, 14 and 15 with a 2 p.m. matinee on Dec. 9. Individual tickets run from $15 for students to $30 for adults over 40 at thunderrivertheatre.com.

FRI to THU Nov. 30-Dec. 6

MOVIES • The Crystal Theatre (427 Main St.) presents “Beautiful Boy” (R) at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 30-Dec. 1, Dec. 2, and Dec. 4-6; “The Unruly Mystic: John Muir” presented by Filmmaker Michael Conti, Crazy Wisdom Films (a fundraiser for Sierra Club Roaring Fork) at 5:15 p.m. on Dec. 1. Closed Dec. 3.

AERIAL ARTISTRY • Soaring Sultress explores how and why we decorate trees for the holidays at 6:30 p.m. both nights at the Third Street Center (520 S. Third St.). $10 for adults and $5 for kids. HOT FUSION • Learn and participate in salsa, bal-swing, swango and more at Love Rocks (62 Widget St., El Jebel) then soak in hot springs after. Info and registration at danceadventures@comcast.net.

SALVE MAKING • Learn the basics of homemade salves and body creams with certified herbalist Sarah Morehouse from 6 to 9 p.m. at CMC’s Lappala Center (690 Colorado Ave.). Registration is $25 with a $20 materials fee at coloradomtn.edu. CINE CLUB • “American Honey” screens in English with Spanish subtitles at 7 p.m. with a discussion after as part of The Other America series at KDNK (76 S. Second St.). Entrance by “voluntary cooperation.”

FRI to SAT Nov. 30-Dec. 1

SATURDAY Dec. 1

WINTERFAIRE • Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork (16543 Highway 82) celebrates the season from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with candle dipping, storytelling, “sleeping giant” food and crafts for the family.

HOLIDAY CELEBRATION • Triangle Park in Willits lights up from 4 to 6 p.m. with a holiday tree, Santa and Mrs. Claus, s’mores, horse drawn hayrides, carolers, and an appearance by the Basalt High School Spirit Team, food and hot beverages. MENDELSSOHN • Discover details of the life of Fanny Mendelssohn, sister of Felix Mendelssohn, through a drama/concert performed by Karolina Syrovatkov at 5:30 p.m. at Basalt Regional Library (14 Midland Ave.). SCIENCE NIGHT • The Aspen Science Center partners with Basalt Middle School (51 School St.) for a 6 to 8:30 p.m. hands-on exploration of the universe for grades 4-8. More information at bms.rfsd.k12.co.us. CLASSIC COUNTRY • Acoustic trio Feeding Giants takes over Marble Distilling (150 Main St.) from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.

SONGS OF GOOD CHEER • The Mountain Madrigal Singers present their annual concert at 2 p.m. at the Church of Christ (260 Soccer Field Rd., Glenwood Springs). KID FLICKS 2: More selections from the New York International Children’s Film Fest (recommended for ages 8 and up) show at 3 p.m. at The Temporary (360 Market St., Willits). $8 in advance at tacaw.org or $12 at the door. HOLIDAY GALA • Enjoy music and food while you tour the Historic Thompson House Museum (accessible off Lewies Lane or North Bridge Drive) from 4 to 6 p.m. MUIR MOVIE • “The Unruly Mystic” — a film exploring the remarkable life and influential works of a patron saint of environmental activism and Father of America’s National Parks — screens at 5 p.m. at The Crystal Theatre (427 Main St.) with a chat with filmmaker Michael Conti after. $12 benefits Sierra Club Roaring Fork.

DONATION LOCATIONS

BLUES • Tommy Castro & Mike Zito of Six Strings Down perform at 8 p.m. at The Temporary (360 Market St., Willits). $27 in advance at tacaw.org or $32 at the door.

SUNDAY Dec. 2

WREATH MAKING • Using a variety of materials, create a unique holiday wreath to decorate your holiday table or door from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. at The Art Base (99 Midland Spur, Basalt). $60 for members and $75 for others. GLAZE DAYS • Create handmade gifts for friends and family with ready-to-paint pre-fired items for $10-20 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Carbondale Clay Center (135 Main St.).

MONDAY Dec. 3

DAM FILMS • Dance, Art, & Music (DAM) Films continue at 8 p.m. at The Temporary (360 Market St., Willits) with “Loving Vincent” — an oil-painted animation about Van Gough. $11 in advance at tacaw.org or $14 at the door.

TUESDAY Dec. 4

MUSIC TRIVIA • At 7 p.m., Carbondale Beer Works (647 Main St.) hosts a 21+ “name that tune” competition for teams of up to six, with a suggested donation of $5 going to support the Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 5

COLOR IN • Get together with friends and your neighbors for coloring, holiday goodies, and hot apple cider at 6:30 p.m. at the Glenwood Springs Branch Library (815 Cooper Ave.). CALENDAR continued on page 11

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10 • THE SOPRIS SUN • www.SoprisSun.com • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

For more information contact Carol Fabian adsales@soprissun.com or 970-510-0246


Community Calendar

continued from page 10

Ongoing

HEALTH THROUGH NUTRITION • Free opportunities include: One-hour consultations Monday mornings by appointment (379-5718) about heart attack and other chronic illness prevention through plant-based whole foods lifestyle with retired family doctor Greg Feinsinger, MD. New at 6 p.m. Tuesdays beginning Oct. 23, a livestream of Just 1 Thing 4 Health’s interviews with featured doctors. At 7 p.m. the first Monday of the month, a Powerpoint presentation about the science behind plantbased nutrition. Finally, at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month, participate in a plant-based potluck. All events take place at the Third Street Center (520 S. Third St.) and are supported by Davi Nikent Center for Human Flourishing. WRITERS GROUP • Wordsmiths of all experience and abilities gather at the Carbondale Branch Library (320 Sopris Ave.) at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of the month. BOOK CLUB • Join friends and fellow readers to discuss great books at Carbondale Branch Library (320 Sopris Ave.) at 4 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month; call 963-2889 for this month’s selection. STORYTIME • Carbondale Branch Library (320 Sopris Ave.) hosts stories, songs and more for ages four and up at 10:30 a.m. Thursdays and three and under at 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Kids must be accompanied by an adult. STORY ART • Carbondale Branch Library (320 Sopris Ave.), in partnership with the Aspen Art Museum, invites kids to learn about artists and create masterpieces of their own at 4 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month. YOUR STORY, YOUR LIFE • A free facilitated workshop for adults, writing your personal history, one story at a time. Facili-

tated by Shelly Merriam, historian/writer/ genealogist. First and third Fridays, 10 a.m. to noon at the Glenwood Springs Branch Library, (815 Cooper Ave.). Info at 945-5958 or gcpld.org.

LOVE ADDICTS • Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous, a 12-step group will meet from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Holland Hills United Methodist Church (167 Holland Hills Rd. Basalt).

meets at the Carbondale Fire Station (300 Meadowood Dr.) at 6:45 a.m. Wednesdays. The Mt. Sopris Rotary meets at White House Pizza (801 Main Ct.) at noon every Thursday.

LIFE DRAWING • Drop in for figure drawing with Staci Dickerson at 6:30 p.m. Mondays at SAW (525 Buggy Cr. Unit C).

RUN AROUND • Independence Run & Hike hosts a run around town Saturdays at 8 a.m. Meet at the store 596 Highway 133 (in La Fontana Plaza) and run various distances, with different routes each week. Info: 704-0909.

YOGA • Get a donation-based introduction to Hatha Yoga Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. at The Launchpad (76 S. Fourth St.).

EVERYTHING UNDER THE SUN • Staff and sources talk about this week’s paper and more at 4 p.m. Thursdays on KDNK (88.1 FM). BLUEGRASS JAM • Bring the instrument of your choice or just your voice for a weekly jam session first and last Sundays at 6:30 p.m. at Steve’s Guitars (19 N. Fourth St.) and all other Sundays at the Glenwood Springs Brew Garden (115 Sixth St.) OPEN MIC • Take the stage at Riverside Grill (181 Basalt Center Circle, Basalt) from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays. Food and drink specials. Free. KARAOKE • The Black Nugget (403 Main St.) and Sandman bring you over 30,000 songs to choose from and a quality sound system to release your inner rockstar at 9 pm. every Thursday. LET’S JUST DANCE • Feel great, have fun and dance Tuesdays at The Third Street Center (520 S. Third St.). Catch a free lesson at 7 p.m., then from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. it’s open dancing with two-step, swing, waltz, line dance, salsa and more. No partner or experience necessary. $8/person; $14/couple. Questions? Call 970-366-6463 or email billypat4@gmail.com. WORLD DANCE • Learn rhythms from various countries and cultures for $12 per class from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Mondays at the Carbondale Community School (1505 Satank Rd.).

RF INSIGHT • Monday Night Meditation meets from 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Roaring Fork Aikikai (2553 Dolores Way) and offers instruction in the Buddhist practice of Vipassana. RFI also offers secular mindfulness at the Carbondale Community School and is working with CMC to provide a class on “Zen and the Art of Dying” — more info at roaringforkinsight.org. MEDITATION • Free silent meditation sessions are held at the Launchpad (76 S. Fourth St.) from 6:45 to 7:30 a.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. MINDFULNESS • The Mindful Life Program in the Third Street Center (520 S. Third St.) offers group sessions Mondays at 7:30 p.m. Admission is by donation and registration is not necessary. Info: mindfullifeprogram.org and 970-633-0163. GRIEF AND LOSS • Pathfinders offers a grief and loss support group every other Monday at 6 p.m., and a caregiver support group every other Wednesday noon. An RSVP is required to Robyn Hubbard at 319-6854. Pathfinders offers support groups from Aspen to Rifle and is located in Carbondale at 1101 Village Rd. Info: pathfindersforcancer.org. ROTARY • The Carbondale Rotary Club

Further Out THURSDAY Dec. 6

WINTER STOKE • Sunlight Mountain Resort presents its third annual Winter Stoke Film Festival, with a series of locally-produced short videos shot and edited by local skiers and riders with the aim of getting us stoked for the season at 6 p.m. at the Third Street Center (520 S. Third St.).

FRIDAY Dec. 7

LIGHT UP CARBONDALE • Visit with Santa beginning at 3 p.m. at The Launchpad (76 S. Fourth St.), duck outside for the big tree lighting on Main and Weant at 5:15 p.m. then over to Fourth Street Plaza for caroling, sleigh rides, a fire and hot chocolate, plus excerpts from Crystal River Ballet’s Nutcracker back at The Launchpad. CUP AUCTION • Quirky mugs, elegant tumblers, wild shot cups, refined tea bowls and everything in between will be up for bid from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 201 Main St., with proceeds benefiting the Carbondale Clay Center. LABOR OF LOVE • KDNK’s silent auction returns to the Village Smithy (26 S. Third St.) from 6 to 9:30 p.m. with local food, drink and music.

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The Sopris Sun, Carbondale’s weekly community connector • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 • 11


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Town Report

Cop Shop

The following items are drawn from Town Manager Jay Harrington’s weekly report to staff, trustees and others. THE SCREWPRESS at the wastewater treatment plant went down, but Timberline arrived to fix it and it is now running smoothly.

ICE SKATE RENTALS are beginning early per public request at $10 for a week. TEMPORARY CLOSURES of the new hiker trail on Red Hill may take place as Singletrack Trails mades additions to the network.

IT SERVICES for the Town are still transitioning to Mitchell and Co. NEW E-BIKES were delivered for the Police Department.

THE SPECIAL EVENTS TASK FORCE will meet at 6 p.m. Dec. 5 at Town Hall. PORTA POTTYS are available in the parks while the bathrooms are closed and under construction for the winter.

LEGAL UPDATES will be provided to local law enforcement in a class put on by Deputy District Attorney Steve Mallory.

B Class Women’s Open: Athena Dodd Master Men: Larry Smith Men’s Open: Scott Warren C Class Fat Bike Men: Tom Hayles Fat Bike Women: Kaleigh Wisroth Women’s Open: Michelle Smith Men’s Open: Aaron Telian Junior (10-14): Dante Humphrey Junior (15-18): Grant Anson

Also, over the course of last week, Garfield County Sheriff’s deputies took two reports of a sexual assaults outside town limits. Both cases are under investigation.

Town Arborist Mike Callas and his team have been hard at work installing 750 strands of LEDs on the trees around town in preparation for Light Up Carbondale on Dec. 7. Photo by Will Grandbois

i We ask with gratitude that donations be delivered only during

The Near New Store

Business Hours

a sisterhood whose motto is

Tuesday – Friday 10:30 AM - 4 PM

Friendship, love, and truth.

i ALWAYS SEEKING

NEW VOLUNTEERS

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COME IN THE STORE TO FIND OUT MORE

WE ARE YOUR

local, h

All proceeds are donated TO COMMUNITY CAUSES.

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COMPLETELY VOLUNTARY THRIFT.

SUNDAY Nov. 18 at 2:54 a.m. After stopping a pickup for weaving, police arrested the 30-yearold driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol.

•••

The Near New Store Rebekah Lodge,

FRIDAY Nov. 16 at 10:14 a.m. An officer received a safe2tell report.

TUESDAY Nov. 20 at 9:52 a.m. Police arrested a 47-year-old man on an outstanding warrant.

h is run by the

From Nov. 16 through 21, Carbondale Police handled 118 Calls for Service. During that time, officers handled the following cases of note:

JOLLY YOUR HOLIDAY, THE WASTE-FREE WAY

Shop Thrift First! Holiday Decorating Wonderland!

Entertainment Sale Through Holiday Season

Books, Games, Movies, CDs, DVDS, Art Supplies

Watch for our Blowout Christmas Sale Everything Must Go! 12.18~12.21 Tuesday~Friday

VISIT US AT THE STORE FOR MEMBERSHIP APPLICATIONS h 302 MAIN STREET, CARBONDALE 970.963.0340 12 • THE SOPRIS SUN • www.SoprisSun.com • NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018

Please deliver broken, torn and damaged items to the Aspen landfill, which

Accepts textiles for recycling

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TURKEY TROT RESULTSII


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How about chimney fires, air pollution and smoke inhalation hazards?

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While planner Bob Schultzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characterization of the Marketplace property as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a warzoneâ&#x20AC;? would likely be considered apt to those who campaigned on either side, the Town and developers appear to have reached an armistice. With no one from the public seeking to comment, the Board of Trustees unani/RW6LWH,QIRUPDWLRQ mously approved a major site plan review, conditional use permit and requests for alternative compliance and variance for lot 1 of the Carbondale Marketplace subdivision on Nov. 27. Said Mayor Dan Richardson, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty happy with the process and the end result.â&#x20AC;? A new City Market â&#x20AC;&#x201D; long intended as the anchor institution of proposed developments on the former CRMS property northwest of the roundabout â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has already been approved for lots 2-4, while First Bank is planning to make use of lot 5. The 5.37 acre parcel in question is now slated for the Main Street Marketplace, a mixed-use development with around 10,000 square feet of commercial space and 115 rental residential units ranging from â&#x20AC;&#x153;studios on stiltsâ&#x20AC;? to three bedroom townhomes. It likely wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be built all at once, but the 23 deed-restricted units are arranged to develop at the same rate as the rest of the complex, Schultz noted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly variety in the mix,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope that means there will be something for anybody whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking for a rental.â&#x20AC;? %6LWH3ODQ Overall, the proposal looked very similar to what was envisioned during the rezoning process this &DUERQGDOH&RORUDGR time last year and, ac-

cording to Town Planner Janet Buck, was in compliance with the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Unified Development Code. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the complaints was that Carbondale doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what it wants, so the Town spent a bunch of money and a bunch of time to create a comp plan and a UDC thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very prescriptive,â&#x20AC;? Schultz said. /RW6LWH,QIRUPDWLRQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once you embrace that, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a certain beauty to it.â&#x20AC;? $ % The developers were, however, asking for & an exemption from the zoningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front yard maximum setback due $to a ditch easement % & along Main Street, as well as approval of ground-floor residential and an alternative private outdoor space for several tenants. / In addition to several pocket parks, a &RPPRQ 2SHQ6SDFH public path straight to City Market and ' /RW a larger open space/ with a picnic shelter &RPPRQ 2SHQ6SDFH and futsal (5 on 5 soccer) court, most units ' /RW . boast balconies, but developers wanted something special for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;anchorâ&#x20AC;? corner &RORUDG + $YHQX at Main Street and. Hendrick Drive. They proposed a first floor awning to give it a + â&#x20AC;&#x153;landmarkâ&#x20AC;? restaurant or cafe ambiance, with private space for the upstairs residents * ) placed on the roof of adjacent units. (  Trustee Ben Bohmfalk expressed some * trepidation that the residents directly un) ( 0DLQ6WUHHW W. MAIN STREET der the rooftop patio wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have access to it, but that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prove to be a sticking 0DLQ6WUHHW point. Neither did the setback variance, given the reality of the ditch easement, first5)7$ floor â&#x20AC;&#x153;flexâ&#x20AC;? spaces (which could be either In addition to the plans and elevations in the packet, the applicants provided a virtual $FH+DUGZDUH commercial or residential depending on de- tour, which you can view at youtu.be/zq-tNWBONAY. 5)7$ %6LWH3ODQ mand) or exemption from a tight construc$FH+DUGZDUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;The key thing is the price point,â&#x20AC;? he tion timeline. The plan does meet green electric vehicle charging. &DUERQGDOH&RORUDGR code requirements for commercial solar In the end, though, it seemed that that said. Hopefully using these smaller units offset, and Trustee Erica Sparhawk urged top consideration was affordable housing, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to keep it affordable and keep them to at least plan for the possibility of at least for Marty Silverstein. people in Carbondale.â&#x20AC;? 3URSHUW\/LQH

By Will Grandbois Sopris Sun Staff

Acostarse frente a un fuego crepitante suena bastante atractivo en estos dĂ­as frĂ­os y cortos.

Not so much. If you use a wood stove or fireplace, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key to learn

before you burn.

TO SAVE MONEY, AND HAVE A SAFER AND HEALTHIER HOME, REMEMBER THESE THREE TIPS: 1. Have a certified professional inspect and service your wood-burning unit annually. If you smell smoke in your home, something may be wrong. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to clean out dangerous soot build-up to help keep it working properly and avoid chimney fires. 2. Burn dry, seasoned wood. Wet, green, painted, treated wood, and trash should never be options. Start with chemical-free fire starters and dry kindling. Maintain a hot fire and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it smolder. 3. Upgrade to an efficient, EPA-approved wood stove or fireplace insert. Modern wood-burning appliances are more efficient, emitting less smoke and carbon monoxide to keep your home warmer, your fuel bill lower, and your family safer. By burning wise, you can reap all the warmth â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and none of the cold reality â&#x20AC;&#x201D; of your wood fire.

ES LA TEMPORADA DE LEĂ&#x2018;A EN CARBONDALE OTRA VEZ. AQUĂ? HAY 3 CONSEJOS DE LA JUNTA AMBIENTAL DE CARBONDALE. 1. Para seguridad, deje que un profesional inspeccione su estufa de leĂąa y el conducto de humo. 2. No queme mas madera seca. Mantenga un fuego caliente y evite la combustiĂłn lenta que produce humo nocivo. 3. ActualicĂŠ a una estufa o chimenea de madera aprobada por la EPA.

Reduzca las emisiones, queme menos madera, tenga un hogar mĂĄs cĂĄlido y sea seguro. ÂĄGracias!

The Sopris Sun, Carbondaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly community connector â&#x20AC;˘ NOVEMBER 29 - DECEMBER 5, 2018 â&#x20AC;˘ 13


Natural gas explosion takes out trailer Letters

Gross mismanagement

From the archives of the Roaring Fork Valley Journal Nov. 30, 1978 A new corporate entity took over the operations of Anschutz’s Thompson Creek coal mines. The Western Associated Coal Corporation purchased a “fiftyfifty partnership” with Anschutz in the Thompson Creek operation southwest of Carbondale and will become the new operating partner in the venture, to be called the Snowmass Coal Company. Western was a “relatively new” Denver-based coal development company with operating mines in Illinois and Mexico. President Thomas Boettcher indicated that there were no plans to replace either hourly or supervisory personnel at the mines under the new partnership arrangement. In other news… Ken, then 71, and Dorothea, then 69, were preparing to renew their marriage vows on Christmas Eve at the Marble Community Church -- 50 years to the hour from when they exchanged them the first time.

Dec. 1, 1988 A natural gas explosion and fire destroyed a woman’s El Jebel trailer. The fire occurred after gas collected under the woman’s trailer, according to Rocky Mountain Natural Gas General Manager Steve Shute. The gas apparently collected because an unidentified third party damaged the underground pipe the previous summer. The resulting stress, coupled with the cold, ultimately cracked the pipe. The gas escaped, traveled eight to 10 feet to the woman’s trailer and ignited at approximately 3:30 a.m. “I was thrown out of bed,” Sue Hamel said. “It’s a miracle we got out of there.” In other news… RE-1 Assistant Superintendent Jim Bader contracted Cliff Colia, who headed the board’s Second Chance program at Colorado Mountain Col-

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lege, to spearhead brainstorming for an alternative high school to combat the district’s dropout rate.

Nov. 29, 1998 The Basalt Board of Trustees voted 4-3 against giving seed money to the Carbondale Affordable Housing Corporation (CAHC), a non-profit organization that had solicited funds from various groups and government entities to create an affordable housing project where employers could house their employees. Trustee LeRoy Duroux said in lieu of money, the board could lend a word of support to CAHC through a letter. In other news… Gregory Lee, owner of the Ship of Fools Restaurant and Bar on Main Street, publicly admitted to a drinking problem before the town council and agreed to sell his business after being arrested by Carbondale police for what would be his third DUI in two years.

Nov. 27, 2008 Steve’s Guitars marked its 10th-year anniversary in the 19 N Fourth St. location — 368 consecutive Fridays of live music. To celebrate the venue’s long-standing mission in presenting live music, Steve Standiford invited some of the artists who helped get the room going: Dan Sheridan, Frank Martin, Don and April Paine, Sue Krehbiel, and Acoustic Mayhem. Over the years, the room also has been used for nonprofit meetings, fundraisers, comedy, conferences, healing courses, birthday parties, band rehearsals and more, Standiford noted. But at the end of the day, he’s never deviated from his core passion, music. “It’s a listening room. We’re not a bar, we’re not a festival,” he said. In other news… The Carbondale Town Council approved a 3-percent water and waste-water rate increase to take effect in January.

Dear Editor: Being a child of parents of the Greatest Generation, as a child I learned the importance of being truthful and to agree to disagree without hostility. After reading Nicollette Toussaint’s column, I researched Trump’s tweet (no mention of firefighters only “gross mismanagement of the forest.” I also researched the passed CA bipartisan bill SB1463 in 2016 regarding fire mitigation through public utilities, which was vetoed by Gov. Brown. An article in the Post Independent last week quoted a resident of Paradise, CA: “Utility company notified her that they would be crossing her property to look at utility lines causing sparks” — days before the fire which destroyed Paradise! Maybe Trump was saying it like it is with “gross mismanagement.” Who else is going to say it? Jo Anne Anderson Carbondale

Rakers wanted Dear Editor: Volunteers are desperately needed to help prevent fires in the 2,285,970 acre White River National Forest. Responsibilities consist of up to 80 hours per week, raking leaves. Please send applications to: Donald J. Trump, The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500 Bruce Gray Carbondale

RFTA thanks Dear Editor: On behalf of the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) Board of Directors and employees, we want to thank the public for its support of RFTA ballot question 7A. We are grateful to you for entrusting RFTA with additional taxpayer revenue, which RFTA will use to improve LETTERS page 15

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Letters from page 14 mobility, protect the environment, reduce automobile congestion, and maintain its services. RFTA gives you its commitment that it will expend this funding wisely. While gratified that 7A passed, the 52 to 48 percent margin of approval was narrow. We understand that RFTA must work hard to demonstrate that it deserves the confidence placed in it by a small majority of the electorate. Throughout the process of implementing the Destination 2040 Plan, RFTA will be committed to transparent communication about the cost and timing of service and capital improvements. More details about the Destination 2040 implementation plan for next year will be presented at the January 10, 2019 Board meeting. Again, we extend our heartfelt appreciation to those who voted in favor of RFTA ballot measure 7A. We are excited and eager to begin delivering on our promises. Thank you for providing RFTA with the resources it needs to serve the region and you! George Newman, Chair Dan Blankenship, CEO

Omen Dear Editor: A misty fencerow A sinister gathering A murder of crows JM Jesse Glenwood Springs

Parting Shots

Steve turns 25 Dear Editor: Steve’s Guitars usually offers one act and starts at 8:30 p.m. on Friday. Their 25th anniversary show on Saturday, Nov. 17 featured five acts and began at 7 p.m. Appropriately, the performers were all locals with strong ties to the venue. Valle Musica, a well-known valley Latin jazz group, was there. Guitarist Pat Winger was Standiford’s roommate 25 years ago. When Standiford moved into the Dinkel Building on Fourth Street, Winger rented the room upstairs for his tailoring and wood artist business. It was luthier Louie Hayes who suggested Standiford move out of his tiny venue on Main Street and in with him in the Dinkel Building. Standiford did and the rest is history. Steve’s Guitars no longer sells guitars,

but has a plethora of them hanging from the ceiling and walls. Standiford’s first singer/songwriter in the new location was Matt Johnson, so it was fitting he led off the anniversary show. The local band Let Them Roar, who has performed at Steve’s so many times they’re considered the house band, finished off the night. A favorite of mine was longtime valley performer Dan Sheridan, who’s song “Big Money” decries what’s happened to Aspen since the billionaires have chased out the millionaires and the ordinary people who work there can’t afford to live there anymore. The story goes Sheridan got fired when he performed that tune at a Skico function. The beautiful acoustic string stylings of the Leonard Curry Trio completed the bill at the anniversary show. Marking how special the occasion was, Standiford’s wife, Mary

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Margaret O’Gara was there. Like myself, O’Gara isn’t much of a night owl and the 8:30 starts are little late for her. Steve’s Guitars is definitely a Carbondale icon. It may be larger than Standiford’s original venue, but it’s not Carnegie Hall, either. The room is cozy and the acoustics are remarkably good. Theater seats and a couch line the walls for the comfort of the audience. What I like the most about the acts Standiford books is you hear a lotta original music. A duo called the Good Time Travelers did a set of music they composed to the boisterous approval of the crowd and came back and said they were gonna do a cover version. They were shouted down. “Do your own stuff,” was the acclamation. Like all of Steve’s Guitars performers, they didn’t disappoint. Fred Malo Jr. Carbondale

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ger Harvesting Area and increases the permit area.

The Gallegos Corporation; P.O. Box 821 Vail, CO 81658 / (970) 926-3737, has filed an application to amend a Regular (112) reclamation permit with the Colorado Mined Land Reclamation Board (the “Board”) under the provisions of the Colorado Land Reclamation Act for the Extraction of Construction Materials. The existing operation is known as the Conger Harvesting Area and is located at or near the corner of Sections 21, 22, 28, Township 11 South Range 88 West, 6th Prime Meridian. The Gallegos Corporation operates under a valid existing 112 Permit (M-1998-022) and wishes to revise the access road location and increase its permit area to 25.67 acres from 23.33 acres. This application revises the location of the access road to the Con-

The proposed date of commencement is ongoing, and the proposed date of completion is plus 30 years. The proposed future use of the land is Wildlife Habitat. Additional information and tentative decision date may be obtained from the Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety, 1313 Sherman Street, Room 215, Denver, Colorado 80203, (303) 866-3567, or at the _Gunnison County Clerk and Recorder’s office; 221 N. Wisconsin Suite #C Gunnison, CO 81230, or the above-named applicants must be in writing and must be received by the Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety by 4:00 p.m. on (Final Date for Comments) December 26, 2018. Published in The Sopris Sun on November 29, 2018.

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The Snow Queen watched with satisfaction as the storm she had summoned prompted a snowball fight at Fourth and Main on Nov. 24. Photos by Will Grandbois

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