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VOLUME 1, NUMBER 51 • FEBRUARY 4, 2010

Quiet in the quarry Yule Marble Quarry closes with the recession By Terray Sylvester The Sopris Sun

A worker at the quarry south of Marble basks in a ray of sun. The recession has caused the quarry to halt operations, at least for the winter. Ron Bailey Photography

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or the first time since it reopened in 1990, operations at the Yule Marble Quarry just south of Marble have ceased for the winter, or at least the last few months of it. The culprit behind the closure is the usual one: a down economy that has disrupted the construction market and sapped demand for the delicately veined, cool white marble that has been cut from the quarry as far back as the late 1800s. Citing the added expenses of wintertime operations, Polycor Stone Corp., which currently owns the mine, officially halted operations on Jan. 29. Fifteen people have been laid off, and though the company hopes to reopen the mine in the spring, the closure is a sign of the uncertainty that has crept into what had been a steady source of employment. Polycor has operated the quarry yearround since it purchased it in 2004, but until the economy recovers, the mine may operate only on a project-by-project basis,

as demand dictates. “It’s just a temporary closure,” said Polycor Vice President Francois Darmayan. “We are hoping to be able to work in the summer and quarry the amount of stone we need. Maybe by the summer, if we are lucky enough and the economy is better, we can keep the quarry open.” This isn’t the first time the quarry has closed. It shut down completely between 1941 and 1990, then passed through a handful of owners before being purchased by Polycor. But for now, supply has outpaced demand, explained Kimberley Perrin, who worked as a production assistant at the mine. So Polycor won’t be spending the added money required to operate in the winter. In the cold months, the company must heat the active portion of the mine to at least 34 degrees Fahrenheit, she said. That heat comes at a significant cost: the price of about 3,000 gallons of propane per month.

“That’s just a huge expense,” said Perrin, who has worked at the quarry for eight years. “If you can imagine heating a rock cavern that is 300 by 300 by 300 feet…” The company also must keep the road to the quarry clear of snowfall and avalanches. Quarry employees plow the road themselves, but the company hires a contractor to clear slides, which can easily take a week, entailing added expenses. Until now the demand for the marble from Marble has made the quarry something of an anomaly, at least in comparison to Polycor’s other mines. The Quebec-based business owns about 30 granite, marble and limestone quarries. Most are in Canada, the rest are in the United States. All but one of them open and close in response to demand. “Most them are open upon need. So they are just open when we have projects,” Darmayan said. “Marble was one of the only ones open year-round. It is a beauti-

ful stone – the most beautiful marble in the whole world – which is how we could survive until now with an expensive quarry at 10,000 feet.” But things have changed. Perrin said that the North American marble market has “suffered hugely” with the economic downturn. Some of the quarry’s major customers are stone distributors in the U.S. and Europe, and their pool of customers has shrunk, particularly in the U.S. “Their sales have dried up and, literally, they had no way to pay their invoices to Polycor,” Perrin said. “We’re looking at having product out there and money not coming back in quickly enough.” Though the quarry’s marble has been used for major projects such as, historically, the Lincoln Memorial and, more recently, a skyscraper in the United Arab Emirates, much of the stone these days is used for more mundane items – kitchen MINERS page 12

Carbondale in a crystal ball

Narratives cast in clay

A few thoughts on fear

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Page 7

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Carbondale Commentary

Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 400 words. Letters exceeding that length may be edited or returned for revisions. Include your name and residence (for publication) and a contact email and phone number. Submit letters via email to letters@soprissun.com or via snail mail to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623.

To Ron’s other family

Rebekahs shine on The Sun. Carbondale’s own Rebekahs donated $1,000 to The Sopris Sun, helping us kick off our 2010 fundraising drive. The Sun’s a nonprofit community newspaper that relies on community support of all kinds! To make a donation send a check to The Sopris Sun, P.O. Box 399, Carbondale CO, 81623. Or call Allyn Harvey at 618-2342. Pictured above, from left to right, Sun board members Allyn Harvey and Russ Criswell with Rebekahs Louise Holgate and Donna Natal.

Do the swap and trade This Hidden Gems wilderness proposal is starting to look like a critter put together by a committee. Sorry to hear they dropped the Thompson Creek part – it’s pretty wild. Now I consider myself a pretty good woodsman, in spite of what some people might say about getting “cliffed out” or being told, “It’s just around the next bend,” several hours after dark. But Thompson Creek is one of the few places where I must admit I was lost. Up the head of Middle Thompson if you drop over the ridge in the right place and you pick the right elk trail, you can find Lost Lake. Now, after a few hours of fishing you decide to leave and there is a very easy way off to the left. And you figure you can just circle around and take the old Jeep trail back to the ridge. Well, pretty soon you find yourself in bogs and thick lodge pole with no view and no drainages. That great elk trail disappeared in the last bog and it’s cloudy with no sun. Go try it. It isn’t wilderness. Take your mountain bike. It’s all about recreation. Instead of working to stay in shape, folks sit on their asses all week looking at screens and then demand areas on the weekend where they can exercise and look at scenes. So we have all these different groups arguing about how they get to use up another piece of land for their feet, their bikes, their dogs, their horses, their cows, their motorbikes, By Birdbrain their ATVs, their gas wells and their roads. All with a hand full of “gimmie” and a mouth full of “much obliged.” Then the Division of Wildlife is trying to stick up for the ones that were here first “the critters.” Them old game wardens got a lot of power if you don’t have a fishing license, but when it comes to land use they only got opinions. I got an opinion about this land swap. I’m probably one of 100 people that have ever been on that piece of BLM that Pitkin County thinks is so important to keep. I been into that hilly, dry, oak brush, spider infested sorry country twice. I trespassed both times. First time, as a kid, me and one of them Chaney boys snuck in there to get to some of old Charlie Thomas’ fish in St. John’s reservoir. We wandered on up the hill looking for elk that we had seen from the lake. The second time, I snuck in behind a house on Potato Bill Creek, and walked up the bottom to the south ridge and on into that mess of oak brush. Now, that country is good for elk and deer and both times I went I saw bighorn sheep. They like to graze on the grass and browse where they have an easy escape into Potato Bill. I understand Pitkin County wants to open up this piece of land so the public can use it. So far, I don’t think much of the way the “public” uses a piece of land. What’s wrong with leaving it as it is? Let the critters “use it.” Now I understand that nobody wants to give a rich guy a piece of land. Mr. Wexner says he will put it into a conservation trust. When you look around the rich guys have been pretty good to Carbondale. Ms. Rodgers, John Martin, Bill Fales, Marj Perry and the Nieslaniks have all placed land into conservation easements. In this one I think that land will serve a better purpose under Mr. Wexner’s care than the ever-expanding Pitkin County Trails Company. The last thing this piece of land needs is a bunch of weekend hikers tramping around on it. It’s not like there isn’t lots of public federal land in Pitkin Co.

Cantankerous caterwaulings

2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010

Dear Editor: Editor’s note: This letter was addressed to, “The wonderful people of Carbondale.” We the family and West Coast friends of Ron Robertson want to thank you for your many years of friendship and support for Ron and for the awesome memorial last Saturday. He was blessed to have so many people who knew and cared about him. The warm community and beauty of the Roaring Fork Valley enriched his life and brought out the best in him. He truly found a home. We have always felt a special connection to Carbondale and the Rocky Mountains through Ron. We are so fortunate that he shared Carbondale with us. (We will try to keep it a secret here in California.) We love it there and hope to continue to come visit to renew our bond to this amazing place and to Ron's spirit. Thank you again. Wendy Robertson Castro Valley, Calif.

Speaking of Sutey Dear Editor: Thanks for the article about wildlife on Red Hill and the Sutey Ranch. Although you did a good job of shedding light on important issues, which I hope will help us reach a solution that works for deer, elk and people, I fear you also spread misconceptions about the proposed Sutey land swap. The headline says the Sutey “plan” puts wildlife at risk, when actually what the DOW said is that any future plan for the area should give priority to wildlife. Your headline implies that the land swap itself would be bad for wildlife, when actually it is the land swap which is the last best chance for deer and elk to survive there. If we let Pitkin County sabotage the land swap, as many as 200 homes will be built on the Sutey Ranch, and the wildlife will be doomed. Optimists may hope that the GarCo Commissioners would heed the DOW and tightly limit development on this beautiful old ranch, but recent history suggests that deer and elk shouldn't count on our commissioners for protection. You say that Pitkin County's proposal would “preserve” public access to federal lands. Actually, it would create new access to land that currently provides great wildlife habitat because it is almost completely inaccessible to humans. Also, when you describe this area as being “at the base of Mt. Sopris,” you give the false impression that this is land we currently cross to hike in the area. A more helpful description would be “the gnarly cliffs behind the BRB.” Terray, your statement on KDNK that “it doesn't look like this land swap will be approved” buys into the misconception that Pitkin County is pushing: that this is their land and their decision to make. Ac-

tually, it is as much your land and my land as it is Pitkin County’s. It is up to Congress, and mainly our representative, John Salazar, to approve the land swap. So if any of your readers would like to see the Sutey Ranch preserved, they should tell Rich Baca, in the congressman's Grand Junction office, (970) 245-7107. Thanks for all you do to keep us informed, and thanks for letting me help. Nancy Smith Satank

Support more tennis courts Dear Editor: Attention all tennis players! On Wednesday, Feb. 10, at 7 p.m. there will be a public hearing discussing new tennis courts in Carbondale. It is presently a sad situation that a town of 6,000 citizens has only two playable tennis courts. Even the high school teams must also share these courts. We have an unusual situation of cooperation between Re-1 with Bill Lamont, and the town of Carbondale with Recreation Director Jeff Jackel, supporting construction. Get all your tennisplaying buddies to show up and support this program. Bob Lucas Carbondale

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Carbondale comp plan revision underway By Trina Ortega The Sopris Sun Think about why you moved here or why you stayed here (if you’re one of the rare breed born and raised in Carbondale). Think about what makes it special to live here. Now think about where you would like to see Carbondale in five years, 10 years, 20 years – and beyond. Chances are that the reasons you list in response to those questions are directly connected to the town’s Comprehensive Plan. And a new version of that plan is in the works. With the last round of major developments off of the Planning & Zoning Commission’s agenda, town staff have begun working with the P&Z to develop a new comp plan for Carbondale. The comprehensive planning process is considered the cornerstone of a community’s efforts to define land use patterns into the future. Carbondale’s last comp plan was completed in 2000. Comprehensive planning is generally understood to include planning for social factors beyond the traditional land use plan. A comp plan should best promote the “public health, safety, morals, order, conven-

ience, prosperity and general welfare …” of the citizens, according to the existing Comprehensive Plan. That’s a mouthful and will likely amount to 150-some-odd pages in the final document. But because the document articulates those values of the community, town planners, P&Z members, and engaged citizens are urging residents to provide input and get involved in the comprehensive planning process. “A lot of people think they need to have expertise in hydrology, air quality, transportation and other special areas, but really what the community has to offer is identifying what is important to them. That gets translated into goals and policies,” said Town Manager Tom Baker. A comprehensive plan is the first step in a longer process that can tie into or help define municipal code, land use code/zoning, and budget priorities, he explained. “If the community says affordable housing and transit are important and we have no money for those things, then we have to ask ourselves, ‘How can we attain those resources?’” he said. The P&Z will be considering how to gather and incorporate public input, while

Trustees weigh tradeoffs of Re-1 affordable housing By Jeremy Heiman The Sopris Sun Last year, 80 teachers left the Roaring Fork School District for greener pastures. That’s almost 20 percent of the teaching staff. Most left because they couldn’t afford housing in the valley. And it’s not a new problem. “That’s been pretty much the same for the last four or five years,”said Judy Haptonstall, superintendent for the district, which serves Basalt, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs. The cost of training each newly hired teacher is about $70,000, Haptonstall said. Much of that expense goes to the state’s required induction program and other training efforts,“to bring them up to speed,” she said. An even higher percentage of the district’s custodians, cooks, bus drivers and other staff members resigns each year, Haptonstall said, either to take higher paying jobs or to seek work where they can afford housing. On Jan. 26, the Carbondale Board of Trustees took another look at a revised plan for an affordable housing development, brought forward by the school district in the hope that it will reduce the turnover of teachers and staff and the related expenses. “This is a crucial, crucial project,” Haptonstall told the trustees. The plan calls for a total of 120 units — 15 single-family houses, 40 condominiums and 65 townhouses — to be built in the heart of Carbondale between Bridges High school and the Third Street Center.The units are expected to range from $118,000 to $350,000 in price. “Basically, we’ll be subsidizing them to the point where the [district’s employees] can afford them,” Haptonstall said, in an interview. These projected prices are quite remarkable. Even in the current depressed real estate market, with 142 units for sale in

Carbondale, only one unit in town is priced less than $150,000. The district and its consultant, architect Chuck Perry of Denver, hope to keep the prices low by making the most efficient use of the land, which the district already owns. The savings will be achieved through density, which will allow the district to spread the cost of planning, construction, and infrastructure – such as utilities and streets – over a larger number of dwellings. Some trustees thought that the drawbacks of added density will be outweighed by the obvious benefits of the project — retaining teachers and making them a part of the community. “The campus feel [of the development] is exciting,”said Trustee Stacey Bernot.“I’m not a big fan of height, and I’m not a big fan of density. But the intent of this project is so much different from the other ones we’ve been seeing.” Ed Cortez echoed the sentiment. “I’m willing to trade the density for the affordability on this one,” he said. An earlier version of the plan called for 89 units, but calculations indicated that the proceeds from the sale of the units would fall short of the costs by about $4 million. But as dense as it is, the current proposal falls short of breaking even by about $1 million. School district officials hope to close the gap by bringing in partners. Garfield County has already agreed to participate in the project, and Haptonstall said she’s hoping RFTA, Valley View Hospital and some local businesses will join up. “We’re open to conversations with any employers,” she said. The trustees discussed not only density on Jan. 26, but other concerns as well: open space, traffic and parking.

working to glean data from other documentation, such as the Economic Road Map Group recommendations, the town’s Community Vision, the Blue Ribbon financial report, and the community survey. “Overall, I think updating the Comp Plan will be an opportunity to get more buy-in from the community, the P&Z, and the trustees so we have a plan we will follow

more closely,”P&Z Chair Ben Bohmfalk told The Sopris Sun.

Next Steps:

The Planning & Zoning Commission meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month at Town Hall. Meetings are open to the public. Written comments may be submitted to Town Hall, c/o P&Z.

Leaders talk about what a comp plan means for Carbondale NAME: Tom Baker

OCCUPATION: Carbondale town manager; former town manager of Basalt; former director of long range planning for Aspen/Pitkin County; former director of Aspen/Pitkin County Housing Authority

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? I would be surprised if very much changed, at least physically, in five years. Given where we’re at now, five years is like the blink of an eye, even 10 years. We might see a new roundabout on Highway 133 and maybe some of the larger developments will get under way within 10 years. It seems like we’re in for an era of more modest growth, and that’s OK. The real change is likely to occur in our behaviors. In Carbondale, community members are already leading the way. By behaviors, I mean the amount of consumption; everyone is more conscious now about their vehicles and about homes, for example. The average person in Carbondale is going have a smaller carbon footprint in the future. Along those lines, trails will be important and some of the trustees are thinking about an in-town shuttle.

What would it take to get us there? The key to the success of any of these plans is community involvement so that the plan that is adopted is the Community’s Plan. In a way, the government really has to buy into the community’s plan, not the opposite. That’s when you see things get implemented. So the key to all of it is community involvement. If we have a “community plan” then people who run for office are likely committed to that vision and once in office will ensure that the vision is followed and implemented. How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? As a community, we’ve got to be invested in the comp plan and then that will be a true guide for us. This is a community vision. Staff and government are here to carry out that vision. The Third Street Center is one example. It was a good idea when Russ [Criswell] and Michael [Hassig] presented it years ago but it wasn’t until there was a confluence between some of our community members and elected officials that it became great. And now it’s coming to fruition. NAME: Ben Bohmfalk

OCCUPATION: Civics and geography teacher at Roaring Fork High School CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: Chairman of Planning and Zoning Commission

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? Very much like it is today, with growth concentrated in our current town boundaries to promote an environmentally friendly, pedestrian- and bike-oriented, compact small town. Hopefully we’ll allow enough growth of smaller residential units in town to continue to welcome newcomers who want to live, work, play, and contribute to our community like we always have. Hopefully we'll have a brewpub by then as well!

What would it take to get us there? We need to update our Comp Plan and our zoning to ensure that future development reflects the community’s values and adds to the quality of life in Carbondale. We need the public to get involved in the process up front so we have a truly representative plan. We need to add design guidelines to our code to ensure that future development is pedestrian-oriented and well designed. And people who are interested in the planning process need to educate themselves about the best practices in land use planning today, including Smart Growth, form-based zoning, Traditional Neighborhood Design, and New Urbanism.

How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? When we revise our Comp Plan this year, we should immediately initiate zoning changes to reconcile our zoning code with our Comprehensive Plan. There are many options for changing zoning, including overlay zone districts that enable property owners to choose to follow the existing zoning or the updated zoning when they build. We need to legalize the type of development the town desires. NAME: Martha Cochran

OCCUPATION: Executive director, Aspen Valley Land Trust

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: Master’s degree in public policy, former Glenwood Springs City Council member, six years on Planning and Zoning, member of the current Garfield County Open Space Committee What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? There will be more of everything — housing, people, commercial establishments, traffic. Carbondale will still be a walkable, bikeable community and more local job creation projects, such as the Third Street Center, will allow people to live and work in town.

What would it take to get us there? Continued focus on the creation of community-based initiatives such as the rec center, Third Street, attainable housing, parks and trails, plus a continued policy of limiting big box development so that small businesses can thrive.

How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? The key element of a Comp Plan is defining the urban boundary. Once that is established, there needs to be a lot of flexibility for adjusting to business vs. residential needs and promoting redevelopment rather than development of the urban area. LOOKING AHEAD page 5

THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010 • 3


News Briefs The Weekly News Brief The Sopris Sun and the KDNK news department team up each week to discuss recent news from the Roaring Fork Valley. Catch the Brief on KDNK at 7:50 a.m. and at 5:50 p.m. on Thursdays, or ďŹ nd it online at KDNK.org.

Olenick takes a gold Carbondale native Peter Olenick triumphed in the ďŹ nal event of the 2010 Winter X Games in Aspen. In the skiing high air event, a new competition this year, Olenick (25) arced 24 feet and 11 inches above the rim of the superpipe. No other competitor broke the 24-foot mark. The runner up, Canadian Justin Dorey, ew to 23 feet, 9 inches.

Citizens sought for town medical marijuana board The Carbondale Board of Trustees is seeking a diverse group of volunteer citizens to serve on the Medical Marijuana Facilities Advisory Group. The purpose is to research and discuss issues related to location and regulation of medical marijuana facilities, and report ďŹ ndings to the Board of Trustees. The group will not debate the merits of the product. The trustees are forming the advisory board in response to the wide range of concerns and comments that they have received from the community. Carbondale citizens interested in participating on the group can submit letters of interest to: Carbondale Medical Marijuana Facilities Advisory Group, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale 81623. Letter may be e-

4 • THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010

mailed to community@carbondaleco.net. The deadline to submit a letter of interest is Wednesday, Feb. 17.

Town solicits comments on sports facility plan The Carbondale Parks and Recreation Commission will be soliciting comments on the proposed community sports complex plan during its regular meeting at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 10. The plan would place new playing ďŹ elds, tennis courts, volleyball courts and trails in the vicinity of North Face Park and Roaring Fork High School. A press release stated that the commission hopes the meeting will attract people with a stake in local youth and adult baseball, soccer, softball and tennis. The meeting will not just focus on the proposed facilities, but will also take up the agreement between the Roaring Fork School District and the town. Information from the meeting will be presented at later meetings of the town trustees and the school board. For more information, call Carbondale Recreation Director Jeff Jackel, at 704-4114.

Church sends health kits to Haiti The members and constituents of Carbondale United Methodist Church have do-

nated more than $3,000 to disaster relief including about $1,000 for health kits that contain a variety of items including a toothbrush, wash cloth, hand towel, bar of soap, ďŹ nger nail clippers, adhesive bandages and more. (See photo page 6.) On Jan. 24 and 31, a group of child and adult volunteers assembled the items into gallon-size bags. The kits, along with kits from the Basalt Community United Methodist Church, were taken to Grand Junction, then to Salt Lake to a distribution center of the United Methodist Committee on Relief, then own to the Dominican Republic to be taken into Haiti to those in need. As of last Sunday, more than 25,000 kits had been sent from

numerous congregations. The church is still accepting donations. For more information, call 963-4461.

Final public u clinics offered GarďŹ eld County Public Health will hold a ďŹ nal, large-scale walk-in u vaccination clinic on Saturday, Feb. 6. The health department will offer vaccinations for seasonal u as well as H1N1. The clinics will take place from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Public Health ofďŹ ce in Glenwood Springs at 2014 Blake Avenue, and at the Rie ofďŹ ce at 195 W. 14th Street. The clinics are open to everyone. For more information, call Public Health at 945-6614 or 625-5200.

Cop Shop WEDNESDAY Jan. 27 At 8:36 p.m. a resident of Lakeside Drive reported strange sounds outside her house. Police responded and found footsteps in the snow indicating that someone had peered in her windows. While they were investigating, they received another call, this one from a resident of nearby Crystal Bridge Road. OfďŹ cers found similar prints there. Then, at 10:24 p.m., another resident of the neighborhood reported that someone had entered his house on Heritage Drive. THURSDAY Jan. 28 At 3:44 a.m. police found a man lying in Main Street near Centennial Park. The man was intoxicated but unhurt. A public works employee, who had arrived on the scene as well, knew the man and offered to take him home. FRIDAY Jan. 29 At 10:33 a.m. the owners of the taco truck on Main Street reported that during the night someone had tagged the truck, broken one of its windows and stolen $15. SATURDAY Jan. 30 At 3:29 p.m. a resident of GarďŹ eld Avenue called the police to report snowmelt running off Second Street and into his basement. Town public works employees responded.

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Leaders look ahead continued om page 3 NAME: Michael Hassig

OCCUPATION: Architect

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: Carbondale P&Z 1993–2002 (chairman 1995–2002); Carbondale Mayor 2002 – present; chairman, Garfield County New Energy Communities Initiative Advisory Board 2008 – present

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? In the next five to 10 years (and beyond) we face huge national and international challenges related to economics, energy and the environment. To assume that we can return to “business as usual” based on ever-increasing levels of personal, state and national debt is delusional and dangerous. To think that energy resources, particularly oil, will continue to grow to meet ever-expanding global demand runs counter to reality; resource depletion is accelerating and discoveries are in no way keeping up. To ignore the future impact of climate change brands us once and for all as the most blind and selfish generation in the planet’s history — and our children will inherit the results. To use the past 25 years as the basis for envisioning the future would be a grievous error, one I hope we don’t commit. So where does this leave Carbondale? We can turn on our TVs and watch the wheels come off or we can craft local responses that use our own financial, social and natural capital. How do we produce more of our own food and energy? How do we keep more of our dollars here in the community? How do we grow responsibly within present town boundaries? How do we reduce vehicle use? What values do we teach our children? Do our actions match our words? The Carbondale I envision in the next decade actively and enthusiastically tackles these challenges, using the same grit and community spirit that’s existed here for 123 years. What would it take to get us there? Acknowledging that these challenges are real and accepting that we need to change how we think and act.

How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? It’s my belief that a “good” comp plan process engages the citizenry in a serious conversation about the future, not just “what do you hope the future will bring,” but rather “these are the trends we’re seeing, let’s build some future scenarios around those trends and plan our responses.” NAME: Bill Lamont

OCCUPATION: Retired city planner (Denver and Boulder)

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: Roaring Fork Re-1 School Board and Garfield County Library District Board member

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? In five years there’s not going be much change in Carbondale. In five to 10 years, it’ll depend

on where the town comes out in regard to its planning. If you took everything on the books now, and assuming the economy comes back, quite a few more housing developments will come in, the Marketplace will probably be developed. There will be a greater range of shopping opportunities for people, such as a new supermarket – whether they want it or not – a supermarket like the one in El Jebel or Glenwood with more choices. We will have a new library in five years, some of the businesses on Main Street will turn over. Beyond that, I think everything else is going be fairly stable. But the big ones will be the development of the Marketplace and the development of additional housing. What would it take to get us there? [For] what will occur in the next five years, the groundwork has already been laid or is being laid right now. Capital improvements don’t happen all that quickly. It takes time.

How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? The important thing is once a community adopts a comprehensive plan that’s the beginning not the end. A lot of people, when they’re done with that they say, “Whew!” put it on shelf and move on to something else. Really, when a comprehensive plan is adopted that’s when the work starts. The important part of a comprehensive plan is addressing how you are going to implement it — How are you going to fund it? Are you going to change laws, like the zoning code? And you need to be thinking about that while you’re developing the plan. Otherwise it’s just wishful thinking. NAME: Laurie Loeb

OCCUPATION: Educator, musician, former journalist and administrator in nonprofit organizations and post-secondary education (all in the Roaring Fork Valley)

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: Former Carbondale trustee, Planning & Zoning commissioner, chair of Zoning Variance Board (13 years), Basalt Water Conservancy District Board member, town Economic Roadmap Group committee, various civic advisory boards; community activist!

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? Moderately increased density and population, lots of public gathering and recreational spaces, excellent trail and transit system, more small, independently-owned business and cooperatives, a “capital” of renewable energy and sustainable growth; increased local production of food; continuation of the arts, fine dining, natural beauty, recreation and “small-town character” emphasized as our strongest assets; continued strong spirit of volunteerism; and a continued diversity of population. What would it take to get us there? A paradigm shift from the outmoded model of growth and development based on cheap energy and labor that flourished over the past couple of decades, and from the belief that success necessitates growth; increased availability of homes for middle-class working people; vigorous protection of our open space, air, and water; more progressive thinking and creativity in town government; continued strong participation of the citizenry leading the way; and elected and appointed officials who aren’t in the growth and development fields and who make decisions that are in the best interests of the population, not bowing to the needs of developers at the expense of our quality of life! How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? Encourage public involvement and respond accordingly; update every five years; codify important components. NAME: Dan Richardson

OCCUPATION: Clean energy consultant

Celebrate the Sun! (even if you’re praying for snow) The Sopris Sun is turning ONE! So we’re throwing a party. Come help the Sun celebrate a full year of publication and become a Sun supporter for 2010!

February 18 • 5-8 p.m. at The Pour House People, music, food and drinks!

SAVE THE DATE

Sopris Sun THE

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: SCoR Board member; former Glenwood Springs City Council member; former RFTA Chairman of the Board; former GSCRA Board member; former youth sports coach

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? I envision it living life on its own terms, like its residents. For as long as I’ve known Carbondale, it has actively shaped its own destiny with a powerfully strong will. I see this manifesting itself further in an ever-growing localized economy, fed by the community’s energy.

What would it take to get us there? Will. Not that there isn’t plenty of that to go around in Carbondale, but as we continue to hone in on the vision of a more sustainable localized economy, we will need to focus that will on what matters most. How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? I’d say don’t wimp out on the process of its creation. Take the time to work through hard issues; insist on robust debates with civility; and don’t be afraid to look elsewhere for ideas. Once it’s printed, keep testing it, but respect the effort and thought from which it was created. LOOKING AHEAD page 12

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THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010 • 5


Scuttlebutt

Send your scuttlebutt to Scuttlebutt@SoprisSun.com.

There’s got to be something in the water … or the burgers After all, something must be contributing to Peter Olenick’s athletic prowess. Congrats to our local hero for capturing gold medal at the X Games by winning skiing high air, the new event that closed out the games. It could be something in the water or it could be something in the burgers at the Red Rock Diner, which is owned by Peter’s dad, Bob.

What about in Jake’s case? Was it something in the water or in the burgers at the RRD? We don’t have the answer but as we already reported, Jake Zamansky also grew up in Carbondale and was recently named to the U.S. Olympic Alpine Ski Team. What you might not know is that Jake will appear on NBC tonight at 7 p.m., when the network will air a profile of Carbondale’s first Alpine Olympic skier. He will also be featured in the documentary, “Truth in Motion: The U.S. Ski Team’s Road to Vancouver.” You can catch the trailer for the documentary at truthinmotion-movie.com.

Helping dogs and Haitians In case you don’t remember the scuttlebutt we published recently about part-time Carbondale resident Dr. Leslie Capin, here’s a reminder: Her Chihuahua, Dr. Papidies, won the “World’s Cutest Dog” competition online and Leslie donated the

prize money, $1 million, to a couple of animal shelters in Denver. Well, according to one of The Sopris Sun’s best gossip gatherers, Leslie also helped organize a medical team of 600 doctors from around the country to go to Haiti. Their final destination is Carrefour Children’s Hospital just outside of Port-au-Prince. As of Jan. 25, the group had made it to the Haitian border. Stay tuned for an update.

We’d like to congratulate Geneviève who is growing her own “little walnut,” as she refers to her pea in the pod due in late July. We know how knowledgeable Geneviève is, but we didn’t know about how polite she is. Geneviève e-mailed our editor and asked if The Sopris Sun would mind if she could use “Scuttlebutt” as “a nickname from time to time.” He naturally gave her official permission, but he didn’t tell her that The Sopris Sun wants royalties for the use of the name.

This is a good story In fact, the play titled “The Budget Meeting,” about superheroes in tough economic times, is a great story. And it was written by Carbondale native Josh Fitzpatrick. The 17-year-old Roaring Fork High School junior was one of two valley teens who had their plays selected for a performance by Theatre Masters, an Aspen-based national organization that awards and highlights young playwrights and actors. Notably, Josh and Anna Holley, a senior at Glenwood Springs High School, whose play is titled “Just a Day at the Doctor,” were the only high schoolers who made the cut. Most of the winners were graduate students. Both plays were recently performed in Aspen at the Black Box Theatre where Josh and Anna were recognized and awarded $200 apiece for their works. Hopefully, a performance at the Thunder River Theatre in Carbondale is in the near future, then … on to Broadway.

The Sopris Sun is an Aquarian, too

From left: Sophia Ulrych (7), Wendy Hayden and Scarlett Carney (3) assemble care packages for earthquake victims in Haiti. The congregation of the Carbondale Community Methodist Church has assembled about 200 such kits. (See story page 4.) Photo by Terray Sylvester

A wee “scuttlebutt” Our columnist Geneviève Joëlle Villamizar, who writes “Getting Grounded,” knows a lot about landscape design, gardening and growing things and offers some interesting thoughts to Sopris Sun readers.

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Although we don’t like to pat ourselves on the back (in public), in this case we’ve decided to break the rules and actually brag about the fact that our first birthday is coming up on Feb. 12. So happy birthday to ourselves! We have to say that our newspaper is a pretty good example of the typical Aquarian in that we like ourselves (obviously), we have good communication skills, and we’re sociable. Because we are sociable we would like you to help us celebrate our first year. We are throwing our birthday party on Thursday, Feb. 18, at the Pour House. For more info, you take a look at our ad on page 5. Along with us, there are some other important Aquarians celebrating their birthdays this week, including Joe Goodman, Ray Bradford, Gloria Miller and Shirley Hunt. Happy belated birthday to Aquarians Laura McCormick and Megan Larsen.


Ceramicist Ginny Beesley may be having too much fun By Jessi Rochel Ginny Beesley traces her artistic origins back to the classes her mother enrolled her in as a child. Originally, Beesley believed herself to be a painter. But then she found ceramics. A native of Lafayette, Ind., Beesley attended the University of Evansville, in her home state. While studying art, she was required to try out all areas of the field. “Ceramics is the one that stuck,” she said. Beesley will join forces with painter Dasa Bausova in February, showcasing her work at the Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities. Their collective show “Works on Paper/Works in Clay,” will premiere during the First Friday festivities, Feb. 5, from 6-8 p.m. Beesley’s collection will be comprised

of mostly cups, many with accompanying stands or pedestals. She notes that some of these stands have started “to become really sculptural” in nature. Porcelain and stoneware are Beesley’s media of choice and she opts for a high-fired finish. This means the clay bakes at about 2300 to 2400 degrees. The higher temperature affects the final colors, resulting in neutral, earthly tones. Beesley incorporates a combination of throwing and hand-sculpting. And even when she throws pieces she alters them in order to create works that are never perfectly round and uniform. Prior to living in Carbondale, Beesley spent eight years in Estes Park. Her sister, a seventh-grade math teacher in Aspen, was

one of the driving forces behind Beesley relocating to the valley. She works at the library in Aspen. “I love it here,” she said. “I don’t drive at all and it’s more of a challenge to get to the trailheads here.” An avid hiker, Beesley also enjoys crosscountry skiing and just being outdoors. When asked if she would ever want to make ceramics a full-time endeavor, Beesley explained that it is a hobby that makes her happy. If it were a career, it would cease to make her happy. “It’s a balance – working, wanting to be outside, and ceramics.” Jokingly, Beesley admits that she often wonders: “Are we too much about fun and happiness?”

First Friday happenings

Studio for Art + Works, 978 Euclid Ave., clay works by Alex Watson. The Masri Nar Fire Troupe, Fourth and Main streets, 6:15 p.m. part of the Big Read. Snacks, hot drinks and a bonfire. A. Beadles Fine Art, 225 Main St., fine art photographer Jenny Gummersall and C. Gregory Gummersall’s abstract expressionists paintings. Majid Kahhak, 411 Main St., live painting, 6-8 p.m. Beverages and hors d’oeuvres. Parkside Gallery, 50 Weant Blvd., jewelry by Cathy Crenshaw, Colby June, Natasha Seedorf, Nina Morrow, Carol Martin and Barbara Sophia Ulrych; sculpture by Sherrill Stone and Michael Lindsay.

Pretty personal: Artists tell their stories in decorative plates By Trina Ortega The Sopris Sun When crafting something functional, a clay artist uses her hands to shape a piece. The end result is a mug, cup, bowl, vase or dish that is handled by a person in his or her home. The strength of a craft media such as ceramics comes from its connection to the maker and user through touch and a historical association with the home. The Carbondale Clay Center’s February exhibit will demonstrate that dynamic with a variety of plates crafted by local and national artists. “Pretty Personal” opens with a reception from 6-8 p.m., Friday Feb. 5, at the

The show at the Carbondale Clay Center will include Jason Burnett’s, “How Can I Get Big Muscles?” a handbuilt plate with screenprint image transfers. Courtesy photo

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center at 135 Main St. “Ceramic plates have historically been a form that artists have decorated to tell stories. This exhibition highlights artists that use narratives in their work and the stories they are telling touch on domestic themes questioning identity,” said the clay center’s resident technician Kelly McKibben, who curated the show. The exhibition will include work by Julie Guyot from Tallahassee, Fla., Jason Burnett of North Carolina, and Holly Curcio, K Cesark, Sarah Moore and McKibben of Carbondale. The exhibition includes artists who explore the plates as commemorative objects and souvenirs – vehicles for sharing narra-

tives in a contemporary manner. “I chose artists for this exhibition whose work seeks to examine the home environment and give continuity to the exhibition through a shared functional form,” McKibben said. Each artist will display multiple plates so the viewer gets a strong sense of the artist’s point of view. The plates are beautiful and densely decorated, becoming small worlds in themselves. The plate is a form of expression McKibben uses to find her“domestic identity because it is an object that belongs in a house,” she said. For more information, visit carbondaleclay.org.

Nonprofit highlight WHAT IS ROTARY? Rotary is an organization of over 1.2 million people joined together through a network of 33,000 clubs in over 200 nations and geographic locations around the world. That is where the “International” comes in when you see the Rotary International logo in locations throughout the world, and even in our small town of Carbondale. You may have noticed the Rotary logo in the bus stop shelters on Main Street or on the Memorial Wall at the Evergreen Cemetery, or on smocks worn by local Rotarians ringing the bells outside of City Market during the holidays. Rotarians around the world are working hard by taking part in service projects that address the needs of their respective communities. They also collaborate with Rotarians in other countries to leverage their efforts and financial resources on large projects that advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through the improvement of health, the support of education, and the alleviation of poverty. The 82 members of the Rotary Club of Carbondale are actively involved in projects such as these in countries like Guatemala, Nicaragua and Mexico. They are also helping to support the efforts of Rotarians around the world through The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International, most particularly in the effort to complete the task of eradicating the polio virus from the face of the earth. Most recently, they have also joined in the relief efforts in earthquake-ravaged Haiti, just as they have in Pearlington, Miss., after hurricane Katrina.

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Does making a difference in the lives of those in need both in your home town and around the world interest you? If it does, there is no more powerful organization in the world to effect positive change than Rotary. Join us today by contacting any Rotarian you know or by visiting our website: rotarycarbondale.org today! Carbondale Rotary Club meets Wednesday morning, “SERVICE 7 a.m. at the Fire District Training Center on Highway 133. ABOVE SELF” For information on programs, membership or to attend, call Jay Leavitt, 379-1436. This month’s Rotary Corner is sponsored by Chip Munday

THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010 • 7


Community Calendar THURSDAY Feb. 4 WALDORF TOUR • From 8:25-9:55 a.m. the Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork hosts “Walk Through the Grades,” an inside-theclassroom chance to observe each grade of the school, followed by a Q & A with a faculty member. 16543 Highway 82, on the frontage road a half mile east of Catherine’s Store. Reservations: 963-1960. More info: waldorfcarbondale.org. VALENTINE’S DAY CLAY • Paint a heartshaped bowl for your loved one from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the Carbondale Clay Center, 135 Main St. $25. Also offered on Feb. 6. To reserve space: 963-2529.

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted.

beer tasting and more. Schedule and more info: redstonecolorado.com or 963-6355.

FRIDAY Feb. 5 FREE SMILES • Dr. Jay Heim and Dr. Corey Johnson will participate in the nationwide national dental day for kids, offering free dental care to children in need at their office at 2425 S. Grand Ave., Ste. 109, in Glenwood Springs. Free health screenings will be offered as well. More info: 945-9119. FIRST FRIDAY • The First Friday art walk will take place from about 5-9 p.m. Galleries and local businesses host artist receptions and offer extended hours.

LIBRARY BOARD MEETS • The Garfield County Libraries Board of Trustees meets at 5 p.m. at the Glenwood Springs Branch Library, 413 Ninth St., Glenwood Springs. For ADA needs, call 625-4270 ahead of time.

FIRE DANCERS • The Masri Nar Fire Dance Troupe performs the story of the phoenix at 6:15 p.m. in front of The Gordon Cooper Library. Free.

GARCO COMP PLAN • Public meetings to gather input on the county’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update will be held from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Parachute/Battlement Mesa Activity Center and the New Castle Community Center. More info: garfieldcomprehensiveplan2030.com.

LIVE MUSIC • Bela Fleck performs at 8 p.m. at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen. Reserved seating. Tickets: $40-$60. Tickets and more info:

LIVE MUSIC • Ann Federowicz and John Sommers play from 4:30-6 p.m. at Two Old Hippies at 111 S. Monarch St. in Aspen. More info: 925-7492.

FRI. - SUN. Feb. 5-7 WINTERFEST • In Redstone and nearby: Ice and mixed climbing, ice climbing demos, snowshoe and Nordic racing, dog parade, skijoring, snow sculpting, kids events, live music,

920-5770. LIVE MUSIC • Rivers Restaurant at 2525 S. Grand Ave. in Glenwood Springs hosts Altitude Control at 8:30 p.m. No Cover. LIVE MUSIC • Phat Thai at 343 Main St. hosts DJ Jonasty from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. $3 cover. 21 and older. More info: 963-7001, phatthai.com. LIVE MUSIC • The Mighty Diamonds perform at 10 p.m. at Rhythm and Brews, 701 Cooper Ave., Glenwood Springs. $20 cover. 18 and over.

MOVIES • The Crystal Theatre presents “Precious” (R) at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 5-11;“Pirate Radio” (R) at 5 p.m. Feb. 6. CLOSED Sunday, Feb. 7.

SATURDAY Feb. 6 FREE HEALTH DAY • The WIN Institute at 1460 E.Valley Road in Basalt offers free health lectures, health screenings, workouts and meals starting at 8 a.m. More info: (970) 384-8454, phoenixgym@yahoo.com. PARENTING THRU DIVORCE • A Parenting Through Divorce class runs from 9 a.m. to noon. Required to finalize divorce in many jurisdictions. To register, call Tammy Perry, 963-1010. DRUMMING CLASS • Rhythms of the Heart offers beginner and intermediate handdrumming workshops from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2-4:30 p.m., respectively, at the Carbondale Community School. Drum rentals available thru advance reservation. More info: Laurie, 963-2798. MASQUERADE • The Carnivale Masquerade Bash takes place at 6 p.m. at the Roaring Fork Club Silent Auction ends at 8 p.m. Tickets: $60 in advance, $65 at the door. Proceeds benefit the Early Childhood Center. For tickets: discovercompass.org or 923-5846. SCOTCH TASTING • The Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts presents its third annual Scotch Tasting at 7 p.m. Live bagpipe music by Scott Beach. Tickets and more info: 945-2414; glenwoodarts.org/events.

STEVE’S GUITARS • Steve’s Guitars at 19 N. Fourth St, presents Dan Sheridan and Bobby Mason at 8 p.m. More info: 963-3304, stevesguitars.net. CONTRA DANCE • A community contra dance takes place from 8-10:30 p.m. at the Glenwood Springs Elementary School at 915 School St. Live music by the Last Minute String Band. Non-alcoholic. Beginners, arrive at 7:30 p.m. $8.

SUNDAY Feb. 7 SKI FOR SISU • The Mount Sopris Nordic Council hosts its annual skiathon fundraiser from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Spring Gulch Trail System on County Road 108. Registration at 9:30 a.m. Refreshments, door prizes, a short course for youngsters and awards for the highest pledges received. More info: 963-9524.

MON. & WEDS. Feb. 8, 10 4-H INFO • The Garfield County 4-H Extension hold an informational and signup meeting at 6 p.m. Feb. 8 in the north hall at the Garfield County Fairgrounds in Rifle, and at 6 p.m. Feb. 10 at US Bank in Rifle. More info: (970) 625-3969.

MONDAY Feb. 8 KDNK BOARD MEETS • The KDNK Board of Directors meets at 6 p.m. Feb. 8 at Mason & Morse, 290 Highway 133. Open to the public. More info: Steve Skinner, 963-0139.

TUESDAY Feb. 9 STORYTELLER WORKSHOP • Spellbinders hosts day one of a three-day storytelling workshop from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the new Basalt Library. Workshop contin-

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Community Calendar ues Feb. 11 and 16. More info: (970) 5442389 or spellbinders.org. PRESCHOOL PIX â&#x20AC;˘ Aspen Film presents the best in childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books on video for kids ages 3 to 6, at 10:15 a.m. at the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rocky Mountain School at 1493 County Road 106, Bar Fork A. The program will be presented in Spanish starting at 10:45 a.m. More info: aspenďŹ lm.org or 925-6882. TRUSTEES MEET â&#x20AC;˘ The Carbondale Board of Town Trustees will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall. On the agenda: Village at Crystal

Further Out

Feb. 11

continued î&#x2C6;&#x2021;om previous page

River development proposal.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 10 ROTARY SPEAKER â&#x20AC;˘ The Rotary Club of Carbondale hosts a presentation about Roundup River Ranch, Paul Newmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holein-the-wall camp.The weekly meeting starts at 7 a.m. at the ďŹ re station building at 645 Meadowood Drive. More info: Jay Leavitt, (970) 379-1436. FIREFIGHTER STORYTIME â&#x20AC;˘ GarďŹ eld County Libraries presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fireman Smallâ&#x20AC;? by

prehensive Plan.

STORYTELLER WORKSHOP â&#x20AC;˘ Spellbinders hosts day two of a three-day storytelling workshop from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the new Basalt Library. Workshop concludes Feb. 16. More info: (970) 544-2389 or spellbinders.org. DIVORCE CLASS â&#x20AC;˘ A Do It Yourself Divorce Class takes place at 5 p.m. at the PitCo Courthouse in Aspen. Small donation requested, but not required. More info: 920-2828. THURSDAY NIGHT BAR â&#x20AC;˘ Volunteer attorneys offer 15-minute consultations about divorce, custody, renterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights and other legal matters at 5 p.m. at the PitCo Courthouse in Aspen. Bring pertinent paperwork. Small donation requested, but not required. More info: 920-2828. P&Z MEETS â&#x20AC;˘ The Carbondale Planning & Zoning Commission meets at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. On the agenda: Town Com-

Feb. 12-13 MOUNTAINFILM â&#x20AC;˘ Telluride MountainFilm on Tour comes to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School barn starting at 7:30 p.m. both nights. Featuring 16 short ďŹ lms. Buy tickets at CRMS, Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;dale recreation center and Glenwood Music. Adults, $15; students/seniors $10. More info: crms.org.

Feb. 12 CHAMBER MUSIC â&#x20AC;˘ Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents a chamber music concert at the Gathering Center at the Church of Carbondale at 7 p.m. More info: 963-1680 or carbondalearts.com. STEVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GUITARS â&#x20AC;˘ Steveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guitars at 19 N. Fourth St. presents standup comedy with Mark Thomas and Comedy Mercenary Productions at 8 p.m. $12. More info: 9633304, stevesguitars.net.

Wong Herbert Yee and talks by local ďŹ reďŹ ghters at 10:30 a.m. at the Glenwood Springs Library. A ďŹ re station tour follows at 2 p.m. HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING â&#x20AC;˘ The Mount Sopris Historical Society holds its February meeting from 6-8 p.m. at Mi Casita, 580 Main St. Everyone welcome! More info: Call Linda, 963-9371. PIZZA TUNES â&#x20AC;˘ White House Pizza at 801 Main Court presents Steven McLaughlin playing covers of Jimmy Buffet, The Eagles, Bob Dylan and others from 7-10 p.m. More info:

Ongoing

BOBBY MASON LIVE â&#x20AC;˘ Bobby Mason performs from 6-9 p.m. every Friday at Konnyaku, 568 Highway 133 (in La Fontana Plaza across from Ajax Bike Shop). SPORTS MEDLEY â&#x20AC;˘ Kids in ďŹ rst through fourth grades participate in a variety of sports and activities. Dodgeball, basketball, ďŹ&#x201A;oor hockey, indoor soccer, scooter races, obstacle courses and more. Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30-4:30 p.m., Feb. 1-24, at the Carbondale recreation center. $35. A junior version for preschoolers will be held 10:30-11 a.m. Feb. 1-17. $30. More info: 704-4190. BEGINNER B-BALL â&#x20AC;˘ Parents interact and learn how to teach their ďŹ rst-time players a variety of basketball skills. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10-10:30 a.m., Feb. 2-18 at the Carbondale recreation center. For children ages 3 to 4 years. $45. More info: 704-4190. YOGA â&#x20AC;˘ Jeff Jackson teaches yoga from 5:306:45 p.m.Tuesdays and Thursdays at True Nature Healing Arts, 549 Main St.

704-9400. No Cover. MOUNTAINEERING TALK â&#x20AC;˘ Dave Hahn, who has summited Everest 11 times, tells a tale of an epic mountain adventure; 7 p.m. at Dos Gringos, 588 Highway 133. More info: 704-0788. LITERARY NIGHTS â&#x20AC;˘ Thunder River Theatre Company presents a program on author Ray Bradbury and his lifelong love of books and writing, with a focus onâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Fahrenheit 451.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m., Grand Valley Library in Parachute. More info: garďŹ eldlibraries.org.

PLAYGROUP â&#x20AC;˘ Parents of children ages 18 months to 3 years are invited to join the parent-child â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peas and Carrotsâ&#x20AC;? playgroup at the Waldorf School from 9-11 a.m., Tuesdays through Feb. 9. $30/class. More info: waldorfcarbondale.org. TEA DATE â&#x20AC;˘ Charlotte Graham hosts tea dates, 11 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 p.m., at the Mount Sopris Historical Society Museum at 499 Weant Blvd. Chit chat and share stories. More info: 7040567 or (970) 306-8771. CASTLE TOURS â&#x20AC;˘ Guided tours of the historic Redstone Castle are ongoing throughout the winter at 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Tickets: Tiffany of Redstone and the Redstone General Store. $15 for adults; $10 for seniors/youth; under 5 free. More info: 963-9656 or redstonecastle.us. PILATES â&#x20AC;˘ Coredination Pilates offers mat classes from 5-6 p.m. on Mondays, 8:30-9:30 a.m on Wednesdays and 5:30-6:30 p.m. on Thursdays. More info: 379-2187.

Carbondale Community Sports Complex The Roaring Fork School District, in partnership with the Town of Carbondale, is finalizing a proposed Community Sports Complex Master Plan to meet the outdoor recreational and athletic facility needs of school students and town youth & adult sports programs.

All citizens are invited to the Parks & Recreation Commission Meeting on: Wednesday, February 10th, 7:00 p.m. at Town Hall Members of the Parks & Recreation Commission, and town & school district representatives will be discussing the design of the planned improvements and to answer questions from citizens. Please attend as your comments and input to the Parks & Recreation Commission are needed for them to make a final recommendation on the Master Plan to the Carbondale Board of Trustees. For more information: Call Jeff Jackel, Recreation Director, at 704-4114

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THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ FEBRUARY 4, 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 9


IN GRATITUDE to all the organizations and individuals who supported the

FOUNDER: Dr. Ramon Nenadich MAJOR SPONSORS True Nature Healing Arts § Brady Foundation § Sustainable Settings Davi Nikent § Sustaining Tomorrow Today Anahata Healing Arts § Clear Sky Productions Sacred Tree Integrative Healthcare & Wellness Spa GENEROUS CONTRIBUTORS 7UXH %UHZ &RIIHH Í&#x17E; 'RV *ULQJRV Í&#x17E; (FR*RGGHVV (GLEOHV Í&#x17E; 7RULOOHULD /D 5RFD Í&#x17E; 7ZR /HDYHV DQG D %XG Í&#x17E; /D ,VOD 1XHYD Í&#x17E; (O +RUL]RQWH 0LGODQG %DNHU\ Í&#x17E; )DWEHOO\ %XUJHUV Í&#x17E; &LW\ 0DUNHWV LQ &DUERQGDOH (O -HEHO DQG *OHQZRRG 6SULQJV Í&#x17E; <RXU 1DPH +HUH Í&#x17E; -D\ZDONHU /RGJH HOMESTAY HOSTS 6DUD $OF\RQH 7KH $PELDQFH ,QQ $YDODQFKH ,QQ -RKQ 1DQF\ %DUEHH /DXUD %DUWHOV %HWV\ 6FRWW %RZLH &LQG\ %R %XFN 0HUHGLWK 'DQ %XOORFN 2QL %XWWHUĂ&#x20AC;\ -RG\ 7RP &DUGDPRQH %RQQLH &KDQFH $OHFLD (YDQV -LP )LQFK $DURQ *DUODQG 6KHUL *D\QRU 0DU\ 5RE *UDG\ $OLFH *XVWDIVRQ 0DUW\ +DUWPDQ &DUORV +HUUHUD .XUW -RQHV $QQ 6DP -RKQVRQ 5LFKDUG 5LWD 0DUVK -HDQ 2ZHQ /\QQ 5XRII -DF\ 6XQGOLH %HWK :KLWH -RHO 3URFWRU %ULJHWWH 6FKDEGDFK 0DU\ :KHHOHU VOLUNTEERS

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MUSICIANS & CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS

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Community Briefs SEI fundraiser beneďŹ ts Haiti efforts Solar Energy International (SEI) will screen Adrian Belicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2006 award-winning ďŹ lm â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond the Callâ&#x20AC;? at 7 p.m. Feb. 11 at Dos Gringos.The screening is a fundraiser for Sun Energy Power International, the group that SEI friend, alumni, supporter and instructor Walt Ratterman co-founded to complete solar projects in Haiti. Money raised supports search and rescue efforts in Haiti after the devastating earthquake that hit Port-au-Prince on Jan. 12. Ratterman, who remains among the missing, was working there on a series of renewable energy projects with SunEPI for rural hospitals, including Partners in Health. Funds raised also support future solar work in Haiti. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walt is one of the most inspiring, dedicated, courageous and knowledgeable solar advocates I know,â&#x20AC;? said Laurie GuevaraStone, SEI international program manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He never hesitated to do a training for SEI in places that most people would never travel. Walt and his Knightsbridge buddies are known as a cross between Indiana Jones and Mother Theresa, and that is a perfect description for Walt.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond the Callâ&#x20AC;? focuses on Knightsbridge International, a group with which Ratterman was also involved, that delivers humanitarian aid to some of the most dangerous places on earth. There is no charge at the door; donations are welcome.

Food for ďŹ nes During the month of February residents can bring in non-perishable food items to any of the six GarďŹ eld County libraries and

Art Briefs

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fahrenheit 451â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Big Read events As part of the GarďŹ eld County Librariesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Big Read program, the library district and Thunder River Theatre Company will be hosting events to celebrate and explore Ray Bradburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fahrenheit 451â&#x20AC;? in February. GarďŹ eld County Libraries will present Tim Hamilton, artist of the new (and only) authorized adaptation of Bradburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fahrenheit 451.â&#x20AC;? Hamilton will be at the Glenwood Springs Community Center at 7 p.m. Feb. 4 to discuss his book.This event is free, open to the public, and will also feature the art opening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Everyman Projectâ&#x20AC;? sponsored by Alpine Bank, and Kathy Honeaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Altered Book Exhibit. Hamilton lives in Brooklyn and has produced art for The New York Times Book Re-

receive credit on their library card accounts. For every item donated the patron will receive a $1 credit applied toward overdue ďŹ nes (not lost materials or fees). All the items donated will be given to the local LIFT-UP. Last February there were 2,386 items collected by the libraries. For more information, call 625-4270 or stop by your local branch library.

4-H celebrates youth, volunteers GarďŹ eld County 4-H Week 2010 is Feb. 7-13 and will provide recognition to more than 500 youth involved in 4-H programs and its 4-H volunteers. Throughout the week, 4-Hâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ers in GarďŹ eld County will participate in two different public informational sessions titledâ&#x20AC;&#x153;We are 4-Hâ&#x20AC;? that will explain more about 4-H and how to get involved. The ďŹ rst session is at 6 p.m. Feb. 8 in the North Hall at the GarďŹ eld County Fairgrounds in RiďŹ&#x201A;e and the second will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 10 at US Bank - Rose Branch (next to Safeway) in Glenwood Springs. From ecology to gardening to nutrition, more than 500 4-H volunteers in GarďŹ eld County pledge to improve their communities and themselves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By pledging their heads, 4-H volunteers contribute their knowledge and expertise,â&#x20AC;? says Kim Schriver, GarďŹ eld County extension 4-H educator. Whether planning a 4-H Growing Gardeners school garden, teaching consumer education, how to ride a horse or build a rocket, the skills volunteers bring to 4-H strengthen it and help the young people. A variety of 4-H volunteer opportunities are available in GarďŹ eld County. For more information, contact Schriver at 625-3969.

view, Dark Horse Comics, Mad magazine, DC Comics, and Nickelodeon magazine. The Thunder River Theatre Company will offer a series of Literary Nights focusing on Bradbury, his lifelong love of books and writing, and his incendiary novel, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fahrenheit 451.â&#x20AC;? In hour-long programs, TRTC artistic directors Lon Winston and Valerie Haugen will tell Ray Bradburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story. Bradbury couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to go to college. So instead he went to the library. Literary Nights will be presented at 7 p.m. Feb. 10 at the Grand Valley Library in Parachute; 7 p.m. Feb. 13 at the library in RiďŹ&#x201A;e; and 3 p.m. Feb. 28 at the Thunder River Theatre in Carbondale. For more information visit garďŹ eldlibraries.org or call 625-4270.

SPECIAL THANKS TO Church at Carbondale § Carbondale Recreation and Community Center § Carbondale Community School for sharing their beautiful facilities with the delegates and attendees

Celebrate the Sun!

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The Sopris Sun is turning ONE!

DISCLAIMER: So many people contributed. We may have missed you in this acknowledgement. We extend our apologies if your name is not on the list. 10 â&#x20AC;˘ THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ FEBRUARY 4, 2010

(even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re praying for snow)

K BOO W NO

February 11 is our 52nd issue. Reserve ad space now to celebrate your hometown paper! Ad Reservation Deadline Friday, February 5th

Contact Anne at anne@soprissun.com or 379-5050


A few thoughts on fear By Terray Sylvester The Sopris Sun Dave Hahn has climbed Mount Everest 11 times. A journalist and ski patroller, he has worked as a mountain guide since 1986, scaling Washington’s Mount Rainer at least 245 times, Antarctica’s Vinson Massif about 25 times, and making about two-dozen attempts on Denali in Alaska. But still, a trip up the 2,500-foot face of El Capitan in Yosemite Valley – a wall scaled by hordes of climbers every year – sent a few shivers down his spine. Hahn will tell the tale of that adventure at 7 p.m. Feb. 10 at Dos Gringos. In the meantime, The Sopris Sun’s Terray Sylvester caught up with Hahn to ask for a few of his thoughts on fear. Sopris Sun: Did anything terrifying occur on your recent trip to Antarctica? Hahn: No, and that is OK. I don’t require massive hits of adrenaline, just a steady trickle with the promise of more to come if I’m not careful – or lucky. I was just guiding the highest point in Antarctica, the Vinson Massif, at a little over 16,000 feet. It is a mountain that I know about as well as anybody alive, but I still don’t take it for granted. I still worry about storms and people having accidents and stoves blowing up and airplanes crashing. It is the guide’s job to stay worried and I’d like to think I do it well. The fact that nothing bad happened on the trip doesn’t mean I’ll leave my first aid kit at home next time. Sopris Sun: Of all the horrific things you’ve probably encountered, does any memory in particular stand out?

Hahn: More than the wow-that-rockalmost-took-my-head-off moments, it is the situational dilemmas that I find gut-wrenching. Those times when you made a little mistake and then a little misjudgment … and then you overestimated your own ability … and then you underestimated the possibility for everything else going wrong at once ... those times when you then have to sweat it out and lie awake and puzzle your way out of some jam without getting anyone hurt, those are the horrific times (which I can’t specifically cite without fear of swift legal action... sorry). Thankfully, I can’t remember all the unwashed tent mates. Sopris Sun: As someone who’s had plenty of chances to practice, any thoughts on keeping it together under pressure? Hahn: Just because the pressure is on, don’t forget to laugh when something funny happens and don’t forget to appreciate natural beauty in tough times. Sopris Sun: What are some things to avoid when dealing with petrified clients? Hahn: Their fists? Their lawyers? No, seriously, empathy is important in any“people” job. This doesn’t mean that I haven’t shouted a time or two when I shouldn’t have – increasing someone’s anxiety when I meant to break through it – but the key is to let folks know that fear isn’t a bad or shameful thing, and that one can be petrified and still be useful from time to time. Sopris Sun: Would climbing be any fun without the fear in there as well?

Dave Hahn, near Mount Everest. He’ll give a slide show at 7 p.m. on Feb. 10 at Dos Gringos, 588 Highway 133, presented by the 5Point Film Festival. Courtesy photo Hahn: Yes, I still think it would be a great excuse for hanging out in the mountains and for eating and drinking to excess when back from the mountains. But sure, it is the threat of things going wrong that keeps us sharp and makes the relief so sweet

when we’ve faced our fears. Sopris Sun: And one more… Ever seen a yeti? Hahn: No. I hope the yetis and sasquatches and abominable snowmen of the world have the good sense to stay hidden.

Sports Briefs Ram Sports Update

The RFHS girls varsity basketball team lost to Coal Ridge, 60-21, on Jan. 28. The Lady Rams lost 55-35 to Cedaredge on Jan. 29. The varsity boys team won, 53-43, against Coal Ridge on Jan. 28. They won again the next day against Cedaredge, 53-37. The RFHS basketball squads will play Olathe, Feb. 5, at Olathe; Basalt, Feb. 6, at RFHS; and Aspen, Feb. 9, at Aspen.

THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010 • 11


Miners out of work

continued om page 1

countertops in particular, Darmayan said. Now, buyers appear to be settling for cheaper alternatives. “When people look at buying custom products for their home whether it’s slab or tile or whatever, they say, ‘Hmm, should we do laminate or should we do marble? Let’s do laminate and we’ll replace it in five years,’” Perrin said Polycor began to see demand drop in 2008, and by last year, sales were between a third and a quarter of what they were in 2007. The quarry sold about 120,000 cubic feet of stone in 2007, but only about 40,000 in 2009, Darmayan explained. Though the crew at the quarry recognized they were working in a volatile industry, the closure has come as a surprise, said Gary Bascom, who has worked just about every job in the quarry over the last 20 years. “They [the workers] were surprised by it, but they weren’t angry. We’re like any construction business … it depends on the market,” said Bascom, who was employed as safety director under Polycor. “And when things went south about a year, year and a half ago … we didn’t feel it right off. But we could start seeing it, a little bit less here and there. We thought we’d be able to ride it out.” “We’re hoping right now that this is just temporary,” he added. ”But it’ll be a pretty long time even if we only have to shut down for a couple months.” Though he couldn’t predict how many jobs will be available, or how much stone will need to be produced when the quarry eventually reopens, Darmayan stated that applications from former employees will be considered first. But Bascom and Perrin said that many other members of the crew aren’t waiting around. “A lot of the guys that lived on the other side of the pass, a lot of them will [leave the area] because I heard from all of them that there’s just no one hiring,” Bascom said. “There’s no jobs over there in the Paonia and Delta area.” Welders, electricians, mechanics, heavy-equipment operators – the quarry workers possess resumes that cross over well with oil and gas work, but with energy development down around the local region, few of those jobs are available to newly laid-off miners. Bascom and Perrin said they intend to stay in the area until the spring, though neither had a plan for the interim. For his part, Bascom is hoping the spring thaw will come early, and that by April he and other workers will be driving up the road to pump snowmelt from the quarry again, and keep it, as he put it, “a nice place to work.”

Leaders look ahead continued om page 5 NAME: Bob Schultz

OCCUPATION: President, Robert Schultz Consulting LLC, a land use and strategic planning consultancy with a focus on social ecology

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT: Involved in countless endeavors, professionally and as a volunteer

What do you envision Carbondale to be like in five to 10 years? Not sure what the question means — What I think will occur? What I would like to occur?

What I would like to see: The citizens and town government align around localization, green energy and construction and downtown. Randi Lowenthal’s business incubation center is training dozens of local entrepreneurs each year to develop successful business ventures that meet local and regional needs for food, clothing, shelter, recreation and inspiration. The center of economic activity has shifted toward downtown, as the town and Downtown Preservation Association use the reauthorized tax to implement a Main Street Program that grows the economic viability of the downtown district. Those efforts led to successful implementation of the long-stalled redevelopment between Main Street and Colorado Avenue. The development includes successful retail, arts, recreation and restaurant businesses. The town has partnered with Pitkin County Open Space, the North Thompson Cattlemen’s Association to develop a series of farms and greenhouses that dramatically increase the percentage of locally grown food consumed in local homes and restaurants. The restaurants are known around the state for incredible menus filled with fresh foods. Farming income is supplemented with carefully regulated growing of medicinal pot. The area around the former Carbondale Elementary School has been transformed. The area houses a vibrant nonprofit center (anchored by CCAH, KDNK and SEI), housing for dozens of teachers, vocational training, and greenhouses that provide food to local schools, powered by waste heat from the surrounding uses. Energy conservation and green construction redefine the construction industry. The town leverages local, state, and federal dollars into a comprehensive program to reduce emissions from the built environment by 30 percent below 2010. This involves education for building owners, retrofitting existing homes, and rigorous new construction standards. Talented local craftspersons blend artistry with green thinking to create a new construction ethic, known as the Bonedale ethic. SEI modifies its mission to lead the retrofit revolution. What would it take to get us there?

Other people thinking that these were good ideas.

How can Carbondale make the best use of its Comp Plan? A good Comprehensive Plan will acknowledge and propose actions or inactions that build on the strengths of the community toward meeting a generally held vision that we are striving toward. It will identify what people can do for themselves, to how the town can facilitate people doing for themselves, and what the government must do in order to move toward that vision. The plan will propose a land use plan that balances property rights, economic realities and that vision.

February Yoga of the Heart February 5, 12, 19, 26 • 9 -10 am Yoga of the Heart is a component of the nationally known Dr. Dean Ornish Lifestyle Program for Reversing Heart Disease. The program addresses the effects of stress on heart disease and offers a healing approach to stress reduction. Gentle yoga postures and breathing techniques are done from a chair or lying comfortably on the floor. The course is taught by Diane Agnello, a certified instructor of Yoga of the Heart. Emphasis is on wellness of body, mind and spirit. Sessions are held in the Cardiac Rehabilitation & Wellness gym at Valley View Hospital. A fourclass punch pass is available for $28. For information and registration, call 384-7159 and leave a message.

12 • THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010

HEART MONTH AT VALLEY VIEW HOSPITAL

Look good, feel better

Healthy Eating Classes

Friday, February 5, 9:00 am

Meals on Wheels Valley View Hospital dietician Kim Gordon offers weekly sessions on eating for wellness. Free to Valley View’s Cardiac Wellness members, $7 for non-members. Held in the Cardiac Rehab Conference Room. Preregister by calling 384-7159.

Snacking Strategies Febuary 12, 10:30 am

Snacking sometimes has a bad reputation, but can be a nutritious part of your day. Learn how to snack wisely.

Weight Loss and Maintenance Febuary 19, 10:30 am

Even a small weight loss can benefit your health. Learn strategies and how to implement them.

Diabetes and Nutrition February 26, 10:30 am

If you're homebound due to illness or physical challenges, or surgery, you may find it difficult to prepare a warm meal. Meals on Wheels volunteers deliver healthy lunches from Valley View Hospital to homebound people in Glenwood Springs and Carbondale. Each meal fulfills a third of a person's daily nutritional requirements, and consists of an entree, a vegetable, a salad, a carbohydrate and a dessert, for a nominal charge. Deliveries are scheduled several days a week. For more information, please call 384-6656.

Look Good, Feel Better is a free program to teach beauty techniques to women cancer patients in active treatment, helping them combat the appearancerelated side effects of treatment.

Trained volunteer cosmetologists teach women how to cope with skin changes and hair loss using cosmetics and skin care products donated by the cosmetic industry, and free makeup kits are given to the participants. Women also learn ways to disguise hair loss with wigs, scarves and accessories. To register, please call Jan Bean at 618-9224.

VALLEY VIEW HOSPITAL 1906 BLAKE AVENUE, GLENWOOD SPRINGS • WWW.VVH.ORG • 970.945.6535


e census of 1910 I am thrilled to share my column here in The Sopris Sun once a month, sponsored by the Mount Sopris Historical Society. My fans already know that when this column was published in the Crystal Valley Echo it tended to meander like its namesake into its featured story. That was back when it could spread out in a monthly publication. Runnin’ in faster water now. Thank you, Sopris Sun! “Memoirs” will be briefer in the Sun’s print and online spaces. But the full story each month, with more photos, will continue on my Web site: marbledweller.com. Go check it out.

Memoirs of a River… Up the Crystal by Charlotte Graham This month we learn about the national census – and sense of place – in Carbondale circa 1910. Compared to the 2000 census, which registered 5,196 residents, Carbondale’s population in 1910 was 284. Some readers have that many Facebook friends these days! 1910 was the first 20th century view of Haley’s comet. Carbondale had barely installed electric lights by late 1910, ergo, there was zero light pollution. Fortunately, today,

in most parts of the valley, our sky is still a perfect backdrop for viewing astral travel. Whereas the census today is taken with palm-sized computers and digital GPS units, the 1910 census workers had to travel by horseback or carriage, and their records were carefully hand-scripted in ink. I found that the Glenwood Springs Ford dealer took delivery of seven of the first 1910 Model Ts. There is a photo on my Web site of one of the seven parked at the Redstone Inn. Was someone taking census perchance? Who was the owner? Does anyone know? A zippy 20 minutes today, how many days did that drive between Glenwood and Redstone take in 1910? “Worker bees” dominated the town’s occupation list: farming, mining, railroad, merchants, carpenters, salesmen, servants. It appears that almost all of the heads of families of 1910 came from somewhere else. Some of their descendants are now the most deeply rooted natives in the Roaring Fork and Crystal River valleys. Even though the first indigenous people of this land, the Utes, were 30 years gone by 1910, looking back, there is a sense of close-knit (tribal?) living among the newcomers who found this rich “uninhabited” utopia in this part of Colorado.

When will a root stay rooted? By 1910, Mid-western and Eastern farmers like Grubb, Holland and Holgate had come from Missouri, Illinois and Pennsylvania. They all carved out a piece of this fertile land to make a new hopeful

ARTFUL GIFTS, JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES

Photo contest: No wonder she’s into roots, albeit via Texas! Charlotte Graham, 8, sits at one end of the family sofa, circa 1956. Her maternal grandmother’s grandmother, 80, sits to the far left. But we all have family photos, right? Who has the most generations at one family sitting? Send in a photo of as many generations as possible – not just as many people as possible. The winning photo will be honored in the next “Memoirs,” and the winner will receive a personalized copy of Graham’s book, “Memoirs of a River…Up the Crystal, Vol. 1.” Submission Deadline: Feb. 15. Send dated copies of original photos via snail mail to: Genealogy Game, 795 Serpentine Trail, Marble, CO 81623. For info on sending digital photos, click “contact” at marbledweller.com. life after the Civil War. Some were single families, with many sons and daughters, tilling their own soil. Others were gentlemen farmers with several ranches who fed and housed all their laborers. Yanking on roots those days mostly pulled up potatoes, which became the main cash crop of Carbondale for decades. In 1910, one Irish farmer, Thomas McClure, introduced a new variety of potato called the Red McClure. After nearly disappearing in the ’50s, the ruddy red was reintroduced by Slow Foods Roaring Fork at Potato Day 2009.

The French farmed (Herrin) as did the Swedes (Johnson) and Germans (Sievers, Pings). Don’t you just know those were beautiful farmers’ daughters? Another German, Lieberman, was a baker. I even found a Graham family, Scotch-English, same as my dad’s. I feel so connected to this valley. Maybe we’re related? Coal mining and railroad work was accomplished by Italians: Vellatti, Gallo; Greek: Papas, Malachiesco; Mexican and Spanish: Ruis, Raimeriz; Japanese: Johney, Kakuichi. These and many more laborers and boarders were all listed on the 1910 census.

Mount Sopris Historical Society

CREATIVE EMBELLISHMENTS & SUPPLIES

nYour place for n n artful n

n

Valentine gifts

dancingcoloursstudio.com • 963.2965 968 Main Street • Tues – Sat 12 pm – 6 pm

Seeking Carbondale citizens to serve on the

Carbondale Medical Marijuana Facilities Advisory Group Seeking diverse community representation to research and discuss issues related to medical marijuana facilities and report findings to the Board of Trustees Please submit letters of interest to: Carbondale Medical Marijuana Facilities Advisory Group 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale 81623 community@carbondaleco.net Inquiries: 704-4112

Work crew, c. 1915

Coming Up – Everyone Welcome February 10 11-2 -Tea Date at the Museum 6 pm - Monthly meeting at Mi Casita

March 10 6 pm - Annual Meeting and Board Elections, River Valley Ranch Barn

Where history comes alive. mtsoprishistoricalsociety.org 963-7041

Deadline to submit: February 17, 2010

THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010 • 13


Meaty meal ideas for cold winter nights You come in, shaking off snow and ice, your lips, nose and ears numb or nearly so. Gently caressing you, as opposed to the cold assaulting you when you left, is an incredible aroma – meat, vegetables, spices. It fills the house. In just a few minutes, it will fill you. Welcome to one of the linchpins of nearly every cuisine – the pot au feu of France, Germany’s eintopf, the boiled beef of Louisiana, the humble pot roast and beef stew of America. The ascendancy of slow cookers, aka crock pots, has re-popularized these one-dish meals, but they’ve been around forever because few things work as well as inexpensive meats and lots of time at low moist heat. Like most things, there are several ways to make these masterpieces. They all begin with large meat. I’ve never used a slow cooker, so this will be a big-pot-on-a-stove method. Get just about any inexpensive cut of beef – brisket, rump or pot roast – whichever is on sale during your visit. Lamb works, too, as would deer or elk. Trim it, as much as By Chef George Bohmfalk you have patience for, of bone, gristle, silverskin and fat. Cut into lemon-size chunks and season with salt and pepper. Gather as many onions and carrots as you want, peel and cut them into quarters or so – but not too small, or they’ll fall apart. If you like leeks, parsnips, sunchokes or whatever, include those. Do the same with one or more garlic cloves, depending on your affection for the “stinking rose.” Take about 10 minutes to get this all going. The quick route is to pile all this into a pot, cover with water, or preferably chicken or beef stock, and add a bay leaf or two and a few herbs if you’ve got them: parsley, rosemary and thyme always go into mine. If you want to use wine or beer for part or all of the liquid, go for it. Just be careful not to use a sweet wine, which will be icky, or very strong beer, which will become bitter. Turn the heat to high and get a simmer going. Within a few minutes some scum will probably come to the surface; spend just a moment removing as much of it as you have patience for. Then turn the heat down as low as you can, cover, and go do something fun for a while, checking back every hour or two.

If you have time and desire to brown, get your pot pretty hot and pour in a generous few tablespoons of olive or canola oil. Roll the meat chunks around in flour, shake off the excess, and carefully ease them in without crowding. Leave plenty of space around each piece for the moisture to evaporate, or it will get trapped and turn your pot into a big steam bath, which doesn’t lead to browning. Once your meat is browned, add in the veggies and herbs, pour in the water or stock, and proceed as above. Look in on your creation periodically, which is hard to resist. The liquid should be barely bubbling, or just gently moving around, nearly imperceptibly. It’s nearly impossible to overcook meat this way, on really low heat. Depending on the cut, some meats may become fall-aparttender in three to four hours, while others may take all day or longer. When the meat seems tender enough, decide what you want to do with the liquid. If you’ve used flour to brown the meat, your gravy may already be sufficiently thick and ready to go. If you haven’t, you may prefer the rich, watery broth as is. If you want it thicker, remove all the solid things. While bringing the liquid back to a gentle simmer, mix a couple of tablespoons of either flour or corn starch with about equal amounts of water, milk or some of the cooking liquid, to make a slurry about as thick as cream. Slowly stir or whisk this into the simmering liquid. It will thicken in moments, so you can judge how much to add as you go, depending on how thick you want it. When you’ve got the gravy perfect, add back in the meat and veggies. You could add things like potatoes, pasta, green or lima beans, peas, or cabbage. Let everything bubble around for 10 to 15 minutes until the last additions are done, and call the troops. I’ve just given you about 20 recipes, once you vary the meats, vegetables and liquid. I’m sure there are at least that many cold nights ahead before spring arrives. Bon appétit!

Gently caressing you ... is an incredible aroma – meat, vegetables, spices. It fills the house. In just a few minutes, it will fill you.

that Roared

Ingredients: beef brisket, rump or pot roast, lamb or other large meat pieces Optional: onions, carrots, potatoes, garlic, other vegetables, stock, flour, beer/wine

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The Fork

Bugsy is a Labrador mix around 3-5 years old. He absolutely adores people, and gets along great with other dogs. He’s got a lot of love to give and would love a nice big yard to run in.

Peaceful Oasis $747,000

Panorama Ranch $963,000

Extensive mature landscaping - water feature 3,350 sq. ft. 4 bedroom/3.5 bath home, great location

3,873 sq. ft, 3 bedroom/3 bath 7.48 acres - Totally rebuilt in 2008

PR

IC

E

RE

DU

CE D

Buster Brown is a spunky miniature pinscher. He loves other dogs, and is the perfect dog for small to large sized homes. He has the potential to be a great family dog.

Duke is a young Terrier Mix. Some of his favorite activities are taking long walks, and chasing his tail, often at the same time! He is a great dog for couples and families.

Ralphie is a young Chihuahua mix and is full of spirit. He loves everybody, and would love a warm caring home. Ralphie is the perfect puppy for families.

Keisha is a Labrador mix, and is between 2-3 years old. She’s still a puppy at heart, has a LOT of energy and is looking for someone that loves the outdoors and is very active. She prefers to be the only dog in her pack, but does get along with some other dogs.

Call: Red Hill Animal Health Center

955 Cowen Dr.,Carbondale

704-0403.

14 • THE SOPRIS SUN • FEBRUARY 4, 2010

Aspen Glen $1,349,000

On the Crystal River $1,980,000

5 bedroom/4.5 bath, 5,271 sq. ft. River valley views, $324/sq. ft.

4 bedrooms/3.5 baths 4,550 sq. ft. 10 acres, barn, workshop, horses welcome

970.963.5155 lynnk@rof.net

711 Main Street, Carbondale, CO 970.963.5155 www.amorerealty.com


Legal Notices

SECTION 00010

OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, TOWN OF CARBONDALE, GARFIELD COUNTY, COLORADO, SAID PARCEL OF LAND

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID

TOWN OF CARBONDALE 511 COLORADO AVENUE CARBONDALE, COLORADO 81623

Sealed BIDS for construction of the Town of Carbondale Wastewater Treatment Facility Improvements will be received by the City Clerk at the Town of Carbondale City Hall, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado until 2:00pm, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud.

The project consists of approximately 11 separate improvement projects. They include (1) installing a new Headworks step screen and washer/compactor; (2) adding drains to the existing aeration basins; (3) installing a new central scum collection vault and the associated lines; (4) mechanical room piping, pump, and valve improvements; (5) new primary digester valving and piping to facilitate plug flow; (6) new aeration system for both secondary digesters; (7) multistage centrifugal blower motor replacement; (8) external masonry wall repairs to the digester buildings; (9) concrete double-tee roof repairs to the digester buildings; (10) backup power generator installation; and (11) installation of four direct-fired make-up air units . ABid Bond in the amount of 5% of the Total Base Bid is required. Performance and Payment Bonds in the amount of 100% of the Total Contract Price will be required.

A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 10:00am, Wednesday, February 17, 2010, at the Town of Carbondale located at 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado. One set of 24â&#x20AC;?x36â&#x20AC;? drawings and Project Specifications will be furnished for a charge of $30. This information will be available on February 8, 2010, at Schmueser Gordon Meyer, Inc. (SGM), 118 West 6th Street, Suite 200, Glenwood Springs, Colorado. Town of Carbondale Mark OĘźMeara Utility Director

Published FEBRUARY 4, 2010 in The Sopris Sun. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the Carbondale Board of Trustees for the purpose of considering an application to rezone four parcels totaling approximately 24 acres, more or less, to Planned Unit Development and an assessment of the projectĘźs community impacts (Community Impact Assessment) under Sections 18.35.020.I and 18.55.090 of the Municipal Code.

Formerly known as the Crystal River Marketplace site, the property is generally located north of West Main Street, west of Hwy 133 and east of Colorado Rocky Mountain School. The expanded site is divided into four parcels: Parcel 1 is approximately 0.7 acres and is currently zoned Planned Community Commercial. Parcel 2 is approximately 0.2 acres and is also zoned Planned Community Commercial. A portion of Parcel 3, approximately 8.9 acres, is zoned Planned Community Commercial. The remainder of Parcel 3, which is approximately 13 acres, is zoned Commercial/Retail/Wholesale. Parcel 4, which is approximately 1.2 acres is zoned Commercial/Retail/Wholesale. Combined, the parcel of land is described as follows: PARCEL NO. 1

A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE EAST HALF

Unclassifieds

BEING MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING ATA POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, WHENCE THE STREET CENTER MONUMENT LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF EIGHTH STREET AND MAIN STREET IN TOWN OF CARBONDALE, COLORADO, BEARS S 46 '34'02" E 2276.78 FEET; THENCE S 00'05'00" 1335.10 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF MAIN STREET EXTENDED WESTERLY IN SAID TOWN OF CARBONDALE; THENCE N 00'35'02" W 400.24 FEET; THENCE N 00'33'01" E 1093.24 FEET; THENCE 53'41'02" E 439.36 FEET; THENCE N 88'46'49" E 149.65 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, THENCE FOLLOWING THE WESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, 431.45 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 5695.90 FEET, THE CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S 07'16'21" E 431.35 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL BEARINGS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE RELATIVE TO A BEARING OF N 89'57'00" W IN THE CENTERLINE OF MAIN STREET, CARBONDALE, COLORADO. TOGETHER WITH: PARCEL NO. 2

A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NE1/4 SE1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST OF THE SIXTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, CARBONDALE, COLORADO, SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;

BEGINNING AT THE STREET MONUMENT LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF EIGHTH STREET AND MAIN STREET IN THE TOWN OF CARBONDALE, COLORADO; THENCE N 76'49'42" W 1571.89 FEET TO A POINT BEING IN THE CENTER OF A 20.00 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE N 53'06'59" E ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 15.47 FEET, THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S 50'57'07" E 41.35 FEET; THENCE S 27'02'41" W 8.81 FEET; THENCE S 01'04'57" W 104.19 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 106; THENCE N. 89'26'00" W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY 142.07 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY N 00'50'-0" W 236.01 FEET; THENCE N 89'42'26" E 84.45 FEET; THENCE S 00'36'00" E 48.87 FEET; THENCE S 76'43'34" E 79.89 FEET TO A POINT ON THE CENTERLINE OF SAID 20.00 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE S 53'06'55" W ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 54.22 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS:

PARCEL 1, RESUBDIVISION OF VELASQUEZ PROPERTY, ACCORDING TO THE MAP RECORDED MARCH 28, 1988 AS RECEPTION NO. 390757. TOGETHER WITH: PARCEL NO. 3

A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST ON THE 6TH P.M., TOWN OF CARBONDALE, GARFIELD COUNTY, COLORADO AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

ALSO KNOWN AS PARCEL B OF THE SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION PLAT, RECORDED OCTOBER 28, 1985 AS RECEPTION NO. 366044, BEGIN A PORTION OF PARCEL A OF AMENDED RE-SUBDIVISION OF SOUTHLAND CORP. PROPERTY.

DAVID ZAMANSKY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Owner Operated License & Insured

970-963-3891

500 Buggy Circle Carbondale, CO.

Chiropractic with a Twist! www.CarbondaleDC.com

STATE OF COLORADO, COUNTY OF GARFIELD TOGETHER WITH: PARCEL NO. 4

A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED ON LOTS 8 AND 9, SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST OF THE SIXTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, FEDERAL AID PROJECT NO. S 016 (1), WHENCE THE STREET CENTER MONUMENT LOCATED AT THE CENTERS OF EIGHT STREETAND MAIN STREET IN THE TOWN OF CARBONDALE, COLORADO, BEARS S 60'30'30" E 1707.14 FEET;

THENCE SOUTH 89'19'30" WEST 157.00 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 8; THENCE NORTH 0'50' WEST 726.65 FEETALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 8 TO THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 5695.9 FEET A DISTANCE OF 745.0 FEET, THE CHORD OF WHICH BEARS SOUTH 13'01' EAST 743.84 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. COUNTY OF GARFIELD, STATE OF COLORADO

If approved, the property will be rezoned to a Planned Unit Development to allow a mixed-use development project with approximately 300 residential units and approximately 150,000 square feet of commercial uses.

Headache & Back Pain Center of Carbondale Dr. Kent J. Albrecht, B.S., D.C. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 28 years experience 1195 Main St., (next to Crystal Spas) Saturday and evening hours by appointment!

(970) 366-2030

Switch gears to State Farm and save

WITH DISCOUNTS UP TO 40%. Find out why more people trust State Farm for car insurance. See me about our many discounts and find out how much you can save.

Todd Fugate, Agent 590 Hwy 133 #ARBONDALE #/  "US    TODDFUGATEGKU STATEFARMCOM

The applicant is the Peregrine Group Development, LLC for Crystal River Marketplace LLC, 1580 Lincoln Street, Denver, Colorado. Said Public Hearing will be held at the Carbondale Town Hall, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado, at 6:30 p.m. on February 9, 2010.

Copies of the proposed application are on file in the Planning Department office, Town Hall, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado, and may be examined by interested persons during regular working hours, 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The application may also be viewed at www.carbondalegov.org: The Village at Crystal River.

Auto Glass & Side Mirrors

P050127 03/05

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company 3TATE &ARM )NDEMNITY #OMPANY s "LOOMINGTON ), s STATEFARMCOMÂŽ

Doug Dotson, Zoning Administrator

Published FEBRUARY 4, 2010 in The Sopris Sun.

Submit UnclassiďŹ eds to unclassiďŹ eds@soprissun.com by 5 p.m. on Friday. WINTER SPECIAL: $10 off for three consecutive weeks paid in advance!

S.O.U.L. COOKING CLASSES - Sustainable, Organic, Unprocessed & Local.Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., $40 includes lunch! Fresh & Wyld Farmhouse Inn, Paonia. February is Indian Cooking Month! Feb. 10: Dhal, Naan & Curries. Feb. 17, Fabulicious Ferments- Indian Pickles, Chutneys, Lassi,Yogurt. Dava 970-527-4374. 30% off overnight rates for par-

HAPPY HUMP DAY

BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF EIGHTH STREET AND MAIN STREET IN SAID TOWN OF CARBONDALE; THENCE N. 76 DEGREES 49'42"W. 1571.89 FEET; THENCE N. 53 DEGREES 06'55"E. 15.47 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 53 DEGREES 06'55"E. 54.22 FEET; THENCE N. 86 DEGREES 05'41"E. 50.64 FEET; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 47'17"W. 62.73 FEET; THENCE N. 86 DEGREES 33'02"W 20.81 FEET; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 25'47"W. 110.38 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF GARFIELD COUNTY ROAD NO. 106; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 26'00"W. 45.40 FEET ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 04'57"E. 104.19 FEET; THENCE N. 27 DEGREES 02'41"E. 8.81 FEET; THENCE N. 50 DEGREES 57'-07"W. 41.35 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING.

WINDSHIELD REPAIR AUTO GLASS REPLACEMENT

Bring this ad in on Wednesday for

15% OFF your food bill!

ticipants. Willits Farmers Market, Saturdays 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.! WILL PAY $1 for any Grolsch beer bottle or Grolsch-type bottle with resealable cap. Leave message at 927-4629.

Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Personal. Send a smooch to your sweetie via The Sopris Sun. $15 for up to 30 words. Call Anne, 379-5050. GUITAR REPAIRS TOP QUALITY NEW AND USED AFFORDABLE INSTRUMENTS LESSON STUDIOS INTERESTING & ODD ITEMSâ&#x20AC;Ś UKELELES & ACCORDIONS

351 Main Street Historic Downtown Carbondale 963-3553 â&#x20AC;˘ www.skipspourhouse.com

ACTION AUTO COLLISION A Better Body Shop

810B Highway 133 Carbondale

(970) 963-5635

aacollision@gmail.com

www.action-auto-collision

VW Audi Porsche Mercedes BMW

G LE NWOO D MUSIC

INC.

715 COOPER AVE. 928-8628

1978 Harding Road, Paonia, CO

Bed & Breakfast Inn

25% off room rates through March Farm to Table Friday Dinners 6:00pm Seating, $15 Entrees

970.527.4374 â&#x20AC;˘ www.freshandwyldinn.com

Town of Carbondale Business Revolving Loan Fund ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Loans available for new or expanding businesses located within Carbondale town limits For more information: http://rfbrc.org/accesstocapital/carbondaleloanfund.html Roaring Fork Business Resource Center

945-5158

rlowenthal@rfbrc.org

Specializ ing in solar ho t water and radiant heat Patrick Johnson 970-618-1768 p 970-963-4867 f

687 Colorado Ave. Carbondale, CO 81623 solarflair@sopris.net

THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ FEBRUARY 4, 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 15



2010 02 04