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Sopris Sun THE

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 50 • JANUARY 28, 2010

On Jan. 25, Janine Cuthbertson (center), Kellie Smith (center left) and a crew of about 40 other volunteers were organizing donations bound for an orphanage in Haiti. Photo by Jane Bachrach

Help for Haiti Local mothers and others dispatch aid to Haitian orphans By Terray Sylvester The Sopris Sun

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n Monday night, Jan. 25, the entryway of the Carbondale Recreation and Community Center was aglow with activity. Forty volunteers, most of them local mothers, had gathered to organize and ship off about 14 pickup truck loads of donations to an orphanage outside of Port-auPrince, the capitol of earthquake-stricken Haiti. “It started from one email and it turned into hundreds of people,” said Janine Cuthbertson, who spearheaded the effort. “It just shows what the [community] network can do here, and the power of that network.” The effort started with a single email a little over a week earlier when reports of the magnitude 7.0 earthquake began to filter in through the media. Cuthbertson said that after hearing about

the quake she was comforting her own 11 month-old daughter, and her thoughts turned toward Haiti. “I was so grateful for the warm, safe house over my head, available food and the knowledge that her cries were solely from a new tooth and not because she was injured, buried under the rubble, starving or lost,” Cuthbertson stated in a press release. She explained that she felt “an overwhelming sadness” for the mothers in Haiti who were, “at the same moment, dealing with unspeakable hardship.” She decided that she would find an organization that would accept donated goods, not just money. The next day she contacted the American Red Cross, UNICEF, the Church of Latter Day Saints and other major aid organizations, but found they would take only monetary contributions. Then an Internet search led her to God’s Littlest Angels, an orphanage in the hills

above Port-au-Prince with offices in Colorado Springs. “I thought,‘Great, I can drive a truck down there,’” she said. The orphanage, home to about 150 children before the earthquake, survived the temblor with its building intact and all of its charges unharmed. It made national news last week when about half of those orphans – dubbed the “Haiti 80” – were adopted into the United States. But when Cuthbertson found the orphanage it had not yet begun stealing headlines. When she learned it would accept material goods she sent out an email to the Roaring Fork Moms, an Internet forum with approximately 45 members. “I knew our moms group had baby supplies, things that a mother would need,” she said. From there the message was picked up by a similar group of mothers in Basalt, forwarded to church mailing lists, posted on the social netHAITI RELIEF page 12

Regulate it

e Nugget no more

Muslims and the media

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Carbondale Commentary Be the power behind e Sun Early last year, when our town found itself without a newspaper, more than a dozen people came together to start The Sopris Sun. Local businesses agreed to advertise, a handful of people donated or loaned us a few thousand dollars, an editor was hired and our newspaper was born. First edition: Feb. 12, 2009. The timing of this venture is remarkable. February 2009 was the darkest of times in the newspaper business, both locally and nationally. The Valley Journal had shut down just a month earlier, and the local dailies in Aspen and Glenwood were cutting staff and merging operations. Two of the nation’s oldest metropolitan newspapers, the Rocky Mountain News and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, announced they were closing for good. So it took a lot of gumption to fire up the presses and start a new newspaper here. And it took a lot of courage for local businesses to put their precious advertising dollars into the start-up Sun. Hopefully, you think we’ve done a good job, in spite of the odds against our success. For those of us volunteering and working at The Sopris Sun, the only model that makes sense for a sustainable newspaper is the nonprofit model. Why? Well, by enabling contributions from readers and supporters like you, the Sun can balance its role as a place to advertise (which traditionally pays the bills) with its mission to provide news and stories that encourage dialogue and build community. Through the nonprofit model, the “publisher” role becomes a community endeavor, and responsibility is entrusted to a volunteer, community-based board of directors. And you can be assured that almost every dollar we spend to put out the paper stays right here in Carbondale. The Sopris Sun is the place where we get to tell the story of Carbondale. It’s the place where we document our quirky town, understand our present challenges and prepare ourselves for the future. Where else besides The Sopris Sun are you going to find full coverage of the developments that shape our town? Or the arts and community organizations that help define us? Or the businesses that drive us? Or the personalities and events that make this such a great place to live? As we enter our second year, The Sopris Sun needs your ongoing support, both as a reader and a financial supporter. How can you help? Let us count the ways: • Come to our party at the Pour House from 5-8 p.m. on Feb. 18 and make a donation. • Become a “Sunscriber,” with an annual donation. With your Sunscription, you help pay for the paper and we promise to deliver your edition each week to a news box, coffee shop or other nearby distribution point. • If you own a business, take out an ad, and perhaps consider donating a percentage of your proceeds during a day, or over a week, to help support the Sun. • Or, if you can afford it, make a larger donation. We are working on the idea of creating a news endowment, and your support is key to making it happen. Carbondale’s reader and financial support for the Sun is vital and necessary for the paper to have as strong a year in 2010 as it did in 2009. We’ve had to be creative in getting through our first year, but hey, that’s what Carbondale is all about, right? With your help, we can make the Sun shine in new and exciting ways. The Sun is a 501(c)3 nonprofit subsidiary of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation. Donations can be made online at soprissun.com or by snail mail at The Sopris Sun, P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. If you’d like to talk to one of the board members, call Allyn Harvey at 618-2342. Look for the paper’s complete contact information online.

During a trip to Bozeman, Mont., Carbondalian Pat Daily focuses on a little local news with two tiny twins – her granddaughters: Sophia Renee (left) and Lyla Rae. Photo courtesy of Pat Daily.

2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010

Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 400 words. Letters exceeding that length may be edited or returned for revisions. Include your name and residence (for publication) and a contact email and phone number. Submit letters via email to letters@soprissun.com or via snail mail to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623.

Cannabis and contention Dear Editor: Banning medical marijuana dispensaries is not the way to protect vulnerable children from acquiring the drug. Virtually every teenager can already get his or her hands on marijuana under our current system of prohibition. Many teenagers say they find it easier to buy cannabis than beer. Marijuana is a remarkably safe, versatile and effective medicine. The AMA voted in November to reverse its previous position and now affirms the therapeutic benefits of marijuana. The feds announced in October that they would loosen guidelines on prosecution of medical marijuana. States, cities and towns all over the country are decriminalizing if not legalizing marijuana. Marijuana is now used by over 25 million Americans annually. Cannabis is currently the largest cash crop in the United States, and marijuana is grown and used all over the planet. Banning drugs actually makes the world a much more dangerous place than it need be. Last year, over 4,000 people died in Mexico’s drug wars. The United States spends more than $50 billion a year on the drug war, yet drugs are more available than ever before. We could save billions, put drug cartels out of business, and stop the violence in Mexico by replacing drug prohibition with a system of legalization and regulation. America’s drug war is a war in part on minorities and students in our own country. Only 13 percent of drug users are African American, yet they account for 67 percent of those sentenced to jail for drug offenses. Between 1999 and 2003, drug arrests on college campuses increased by more than 25 percent, even though illicit drug use among college students remained relatively constant. Last year a student in Michigan was shot and the raid turned up a few “spoonfuls” of marijuana. Recreational drug use is as old as humanity, and has not been stopped by the most draconian laws. When it comes to providing teens with the skills and the confidence to make sound decisions regarding the recreational use of alcohol, pot and other intoxicants, you can provide them with honest, science-based information. You can prioritize safety through personal responsibility and knowledge. You can encourage moderation if youthful experimentation persists. Get on the right side of the marijuana issue. The kids you interact with will think more highly of you for it. Ryan Gordon The Green House A Main Street dispensary

Come out for the comp plan Dear Editor: The Garfield County Planning Commission is seeking public input for the Garfield County Comprehensive Plan 2030. Input from the citizenry is integral in

decision making regarding the future growth and continued vitality of Garfield County. The next round of public input meetings is being held on the following dates and locations: Feb. 2, Glenwood Springs Community Center and Silt Burning Mountain Fire Station #1; Feb. 3, Rifle Health and Human Services Building and the Carbondale Recreation and Community Center; Feb. 4, Parachute/Battlement Mesa Activity Center and the New Castle Community Center. All meetings will begin at 6 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m. Your attendance and involvement is critical to this decision-making process and I hope you will be able to attend. Phil Vaughan Chairman Garfield County Planning Commission

Correction In the Jan. 14 edition we stated that the snowy photo on page 2 was taken this winter. But as one observant reader pointed out, that couldn't have been the case – the building at 311 Main Street is missing. The Sopris Sun regrets the oversight.

Sopris Sun THE

The Sopris Sun is an LLC organized under the 501c3 nonprofit structure of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation. Editor: Terray Sylvester • 618-9112 news@soprissun.com Advertising: Anne Goldberg • 379-5050 anne@soprissun.com Reporters: Trina Ortega • Jeremy Heiman Photographer/Writer: Jane Bachrach Copy Editor: Lynn Burton Ad/Page Production: Terri Ritchie Paper Boy: Cameron Wiggin Sopris Sun, LLC Managing Board of Directors: Russ Criswell • Peggy DeVilbiss Allyn Harvey • Colin Laird Elizabeth Phillips The Sopris Sun is published partly with the support of the Rotary Club of Carbondale

Sopris Sun, LLC • P.O. Box 399 Carbondale, CO 81623

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Dispensary owners: “Regulate it – but not too much” By Jeremy Heiman The Sopris Sun Some Carbondale medical marijuana dispensary owners seem to welcome regulation more than they fear it. Two Carbondale medical marijuana entrepreneurs told The Sopris Sun they look forward to an effort by Carbondale’s town government to convene a working group with the goal of creating a framework in which the medical marijuana industry can operate. The town is taking the first steps toward forming such a group, at the request of the board of trustees. “Let’s all get together and see what everyone’s needs are, and how we can do it collectively to begin with,” said Jami Hill-Miller, co-founder of a dispensary called Sopris LEAF (Locals Emporium of Alternative Farms) located on the third floor above Mi Casita on Main Street.“I appreciate what Carbondale’s doing. I think it’s such a critical step.” Ric Rock, co-owner of Green Miracle Medicinals, said he would be more comfortable with clear boundaries to work within, so that the public would have a better understanding of what’s legal and what’s not, and a better perception of dispensaries. “It’s hard, because we don’t have any strict guidelines in place,” Rock said.“You’re not doing anything that’s wrong, but there’s people out there who think it’s wrong.” Rock said he thinks a limit on the number of dispensaries, as long as the existing establishments are allowed to continue, wouldn’t be a bad thing. “I don’t think any of us would mind that,” he said. There are only so many patients, and they’re already spread thin among six Carbondale dispensaries. “At our shop, we’re pretty slow now,” Rock said. His shop occupies a prominent location on Main Street. “No one’s busting down the doors. We’re just not that busy.” Security is also an issue that the entrepreneurs think could be regulated.

“I encourage everyone who’s operating like this to exercise precautions,” Hill-Miller said. Surveillance cameras and combination locks have been suggested for dispensaries and marijuana growing operations. Carbondale Trustee Ed Cortez, who supports medical marijuana, said in an interview that safety is one reason he has called for regulation. Incidents involving guns and violence have recently been reported in relation to Denver area dispensaries. “I’m just concerned that something is going to happen in our town that we’re not going to be proud of,” Cortez said. “I don’t want to blow this thing out of proportion,” he said.“Successful, but safe — that’s what we’re after.” Security relates to privacy issues, too, Rock said. Personal information on patients should be limited. “We don’t want to keep personal information in our files, that somebody could take and use if they broke in,” he said. Hill-Miller would also like to see regulations that address confidentiality, both in the way records are handled and in the location of dispensaries. Dispensaries that are too visible to the public might not give patients the privacy they deserve, she said. Hill-Miller said she also thinks dispensaries and growing operations should be licensed, as should the wellness practitioners who work at them — herbalists, nutritionists, massage therapists and others. But both Rock and Hill-Miller are apprehensive about what regulation could mean. One thing they fear is zoning that would banish them to a particular part of town. Currently, several dispensaries are in retail areas. If they were required to move to a different zone district, Hill-Miller said, it would be at considerable cost, because they have spent money on improvements to their current locations, which they are only leasing. “I’ve been in cities where they restrict dispensaries to industrial-type areas,” Hill-

Carbondale has begun to reflect on how best to regulate its budding medicinal marijuana industry. Photo by Jane Bachrach Miller said. The move to regulate and license marijuana dispensaries and growing operations comes out of concern among Carbondale officials over the rapid proliferation of medical marijuana dispensaries and growing operations in town. Carbondale is home to at least six dispensaries. Two instances of reported marijuana growing operations in residential areas were reported in the week of Jan. 4-8, and officials

are concerned that one entire house is being used for a marijuana cultivating operation. The industry has rapidly become more visible since new federal guidelines were issued Oct. 19, 2009, saying the Department of Justice will not prosecute those who use and supply marijuana for medical purposes as long as they conform to state laws. Statewide legalization of medical marijuana took place in 2000, when Coloradoans voted to pass Amendment 20.

Carbondale’s Jake Zamansky bound for Vancouver Olympics By Terray Sylvester The Sopris Sun Carbondale native Jake Zamansky has been named to the U.S. Olympic ski team, and he’ll be joined in Vancouver by another local skier: Alice McKennis from Glenwood Springs. This Tuesday, Jan. 26, the U.S. Ski Team announced the members of the squad bound for the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver, Canada. “Both of them had really good years,” said U.S. Ski Team spokesman Tom Kelly,“So both of them are really good additions to the list.” Zamansky, 28, and McKennis, 20, fall on opposite ends of the experience spectrum, but both of them will be racing in the Olympics for the first time. They join 11 other firsttimers on this year’s ski team. Zamanasky is a veteran World Cup skier. This fall, the upcoming winter looked to him like a make-it-or-break-it season – either he would realize his lifelong dream of making the Olympic team, or he would retire. “This season should be an exciting one for sure,” Zamansky told The Sun during an interview in early November.“I feel like I’ve laid OLYMPICS page 12

Carbondale’s Jake Zamansky has been named to the 2010 Olympic team. Photo courtesy of Jake Zamansky

THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 3


News Briefs The Weekly News Brief The Sopris Sun and the KDNK news department team up each week to discuss recent news from the Roaring Fork Valley. Catch the Brief on KDNK at 7:50 a.m. and at 5:50 p.m. on Thursdays, or find it online at KDNK.org. board on the status of her organization’s numerous projects, including its continued work to develop a loan program.

Trustees endorse clean energy loans The Carbondale Board of Trustees voted unanimously Jan. 19 to send a letter to the Garfield County Commissioners supporting an accelerated effort to develop a low-cost loan program for energy-saving home improvements and home renewable energy systems. In November, the citizens of three neighboring counties voted to authorize the sale of bonds to create a pool of money to finance such loans, under a Colorado program signed into law by the governor in 2008. Colorado House Bill 1350 authorized the formation of energy improvement districts to finance home energy improvement loans, which would be paid back as part of the homeowners’ property tax payments. Garfield County has been looking into the possibility of creating such a program, but has not moved as quickly. The commissioners in November directed county staff to draft documents for setting up a local improvement district for the loan program. The county has been exploring sources of money other than bonding to create a loan fund for renewable energy and energy efficiency loans. The trustees’ vote came after Alice Laird of the Garfield County New Energy Communities Initiative (G-NECI) briefed the

Town election info Town residents interested in absentee ballots for the April 6 Carbondale town election can apply at Town Hall. This year, citizens will elect a new mayor and three seats are open on the Carbondale Board of Trustees. The first day to circulate candidate nominations is Feb. 16. Petitions must be submitted to the town clerk by March 5. The last day to register to vote is March 8. For more information, call 963-2733 or visit Carbondalegov.org.

More county comp plan meetings Garfield County is in the process of updating its Comprehensive Plan. Public meetings will be held to discuss where future growth should occur, the economy, protection of river corridors and preservation of rural character. See the Community Calendar on page 8 and 9 for meeting times and locations. For more information, visit garfieldcomprehensiveplan2030.com.

And the winner is… Glenwood Springs resident Dustin Worley

The finances of feces In a recent report to the Carbondale trustees, Public Works Director Larry Ballenger stated that the Carbondale community used a total of 114,000 dog waste bags in 2009, at a cost of $4,092. Do the math and you’ll discover that the town spends about $.03 on a bag every

time your dog makes a mess. The waste bags in question are the little brown ones available along the Rio Grande Trail, at the Carbondale Nature Park and elsewhere around town. To respond to increased demand, public works installed two new“dog waste stations” at the nature park in 2009.

BLM seeks comments on gas drilling

The Bureau of Land Management is seeking public comments on a natural gas well development proposal approximately nine miles south of Rifle. Laramie Energy II is proposing to develop up to 95 wells on three new and two existing well pads during the next five or six years, beginning this summer. All five well pads would be located on private land, with up to 71 of the proposed wells being drilled directionally into federally owned minerals. The BLM will prepare an Environmental Assessment on Laramie Energy’s master plan. Before it completes the assessment, the agency wants to hear any specific issues, concerns and comments the public would like to see addressed through the assessment. The BLM states that“comments will be most helpful”if received by Feb. 20. Written comments and questions should be directed to the Glenwood Springs Field Office, 2300 River Frontage Road, Silt, CO 81652. Electronic comments may be submitted to gsfomail@co.blm.gov. For more information visit blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/gsfo/GSFO_ MasterPlansOfDevelopment.html.

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Sunday, Jan. 17 At 5:28 p.m. the manager of Domino’s Pizza called to report that a customer was refusing to pay for a pizza delivery. When police contacted the customer, the man explained that he had ordered two medium pizzas, which according to Domino’s advertising, should have cost $5.99 apiece. Instead his bill had come in at $17. After some arguing, the man agreed to return what pizza he hadn’t yet eaten. The manager asked that the customer be charged with theft, but Carbondale police advised him that it was a civil matter.

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rode off with the winning prize from the most recent stimulus campaign raffle on Jan. 23. The prize was a Carbondale cargo cruiser bicycle, supplemented with electric power and an extension for toting loads, and worth about $2,000. Worley said he was excited to hear he won the bike. He said he had been looking for a new bicycle to use to tow his daughter’s trailer. Until now, he’d been making due with a BMX bike. The raffle was held at Aloha Bicycles at 580 Highway 133. It coincided with Aloha’s grand opening. The store was formerly Ute City Cycles. Sherri Harrison, director of the Carbondale Chamber of Commerce, said that Aloha’s owners, Darrin Broome and Nick DeGross, managed to attract “well over 100 people” over the course of the day. The bike was awarded as part of Carbondale’s Go Green, Get Green economic rejuvenation campaign, which is coordinated in part by the Carbondale Chamber of Commerce. The grand prize raffle – for an electric car – will be Feb. 20 at Sopris Liquor and Wine at 1026 Highway 133.

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4 • THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010

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970-963-2172 970-963-2172 970-945-7486 970-945-7486

Wednesday, Jan. 20 At 7:40 a.m. an officer pulled over a driver in the parking lot of the Church at Carbondale because the driver’s windshield was completely covered with snow and ice. The officer learned that the driver’s license had been suspended due to a DUI and issued two citations, one for driving with a suspended license, the other for the limited visibility. Friday, Jan. 22 At 1:09 a.m. a man called from his house on Crystal Road to report that someone was standing in his backyard wearing a wool cap. As it turned out, the fellow in the cap was his tenant.


e Black Nugget no more By Terray Sylvester The Sopris Sun

Carrie Allen tends bar at The Black Nugget. But soon she’ll own the place, and plans to change the name to “Carnahan’s Tavern.” Photo by Jane Bachrach

Cut a rug at Carnahan’s

Carbondale’s newest bar, located at 403 Main Street, will throw a grand opening party on Feb. 5 during the First Friday festivities. Sparkle Motion will provide a live disco soundtrack, kicking off sometime between 9 and 10 p.m.

KDNK hires second full time journalist Sopris Sun staff KDNK Community Radio in Carbondale has hired multimedia journalist Mathew Katz. Katz is KDNK’s third full-time employee, joining Station Manager Steve Skinner and News and Public Affairs Director Conrad Wilson. “We held some think tanks and did some pondering with community members. What emerged is that it is more important than ever for the community to have a voice and a source of in-depth local news on the radio,” Skinner said. “Mat’s job is to cover crucial local issues in-depth. His multimedia experience will help us project and preserve the stories online in a very dynamic way,” he added. Katz is from Toronto, Ontario in Canada. He spent the past year and a half living in Manhattan, completing a Masters degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, working at the BBC, reporting for NPR’s “Planet Money,” and freelancing for a variety of publications. His radio stories have appeared on NPR and the BBC’s World Service. Katz has traveled to Northern Ireland to report on religious unity in the wake of IRA shootings, roamed the halls of the United Nations to ask Nobel Prize-winning economists why Third-World debt is such a tricky issue, and been forced to freestyle while reporting at an underground hip-hop concert in the Bronx. He's thrilled to bring his quirky brand of in-depth reporting to KDNK. During February, Katz will debut a month-long series of reports on the history of the area from the Ute Indians, to the silver miners to the immigrants to the transportation designers and more. The reports will air Monday through Friday from 7:50-8:00 a.m. and will be posted online at kdnk.org. KDNK is on the air in the Roaring Fork Valley and the Colorado River corridor at 88.1, 88.3 and 88.5 FM.

The sooty lump of raucous fun at the corner of Main and Fourth streets is changing hands, and it’s going to get a bit cleaner in the process. “We’re trying to give it a new face,” said Carrie Allen, who has tended bar at the Nugget for about a year and a half. Now she’s purchasing it along with her husband, Todd Allen. “I’m trying to clean it up enough to get more people in there, but not scare away all of the locals we have now,” she said. A grand opening, with live disco music by Sparkle Motion, is planned during the First Friday festivities on Feb. 5. The couple is slated to assume ownership of the bar on Feb. 1. They hope to unearth a few new diamonds from the establishment, which has a reputation as one of the more rough-and-tumble joints on Main Street. “I think it has a stigma of, ‘Oh gosh, it’s a little rough around the edges,’ when it actually isn’t,” Carrie Allen said. First off, she intends to abandon the coal-mining reference and replace it with “Carnahan’s Tavern.” Carnahan is her maiden name. Then she’ll set about tempting that broader crowd, all while keeping the current clientele, of whom she speaks fondly. “I love my local boys,” she said. She’ll put more sports on TV and tweak the Nugget’s hours a bit, opening earlier on Saturdays, Sundays and big game days. She’ll also offer a broader range of live music. On Saturday evenings, she hopes to bring in some bluegrass and rock ‘n’ roll. “Fun bands,” she said, “older-crowd

dancing music.” But don’t worry, young people, the punk, metal, hard rock and other shows the Nugget is known for will keep coming to Carnahan’s on Friday nights. Still, Carrie Allen thinks a few parts of the bar just need some work. For instance, those lewd carvings on some of the tables? Those will go, but the tables themselves will stay. They’re bolted to the wall and the floor and besides, says Carrie Allen, “They’ve been there for so long, I really like them.” And speaking of lewd, she says the men’s bathroom can stand some attention as well. “I don’t know if you’ve been in there lately,” she laughed. New barstools are in the offing and the Allens plan to put a bit of work into the kitchen. The Black Nugget currently serves only pre-packaged snacks. But Carrie Allen hopes to begin serving a range of bar food – snacks, appetizers and such. To do so, she and Todd will need to bring the kitchen up to code, which may take six to eight months. She’d like to freshen up the general atmosphere as well. With a brighter coat of paint, galvanized steel fixtures and a few other modifications, she hopes to give the place an “industrial eclectic” feel. And aside from some “different bottles of booze” on the shelf, Carrie Allen says that will about do it. She expects to renovate the place gradually over the coming months. This isn’t the first time the bar has changed hands. But Carrie Allen hopes the next transition won’t come again for a long time. Carnahan’s will be her first business and she says she’d like it to be “something I can grow old with.”

Projects vie for town property tax By Jeremy Heiman The Sopris Sun If Carbondale voters resurrect an expiring property tax, it could fund a local bus route or affordable housing, or even save the historic Thompson house. The 1.5-mill property tax enacted in 2000 to fund Carbondale’s streetscape project will expire at the end of this year. But if the tax is placed on the ballot and reauthorized by the voters, it would be put to a different use because streetscape work is winding down. The streetscape project provided street lighting, landscaping, signs, pedestrian safety features and the not-so-popular bulb outs in the curbs downtown. Members of the town council are divided on exactly what the tax would support if reauthorized, but there is no shortage of ideas competing for funding. Trustees Ed Cortez and John Hoffmann had prepared maps and cost estimates on a bus feeder idea that would interlock with RFTA’s planned Bus Rapid Transit project, which is now scheduled to start in 2012. The feeder route would meet upvalley and downvalley buses at the Carbondale park and ride at Village Road, and loop through town. Currently, eight buses per hour travel through downtown at peak times. The feeder route would eliminate that traffic and bring bus service closer to other parts of town. Trustee Pam Zentmyer, an affordable housing advocate, suggested that voters

might favor a project that could give the tax a specific ending date, as an affordable housing project might. It had also been suggested previously that the continued property tax could pay for the purchase of the historic Thompson house if a deal could not be worked out with a prospective developer of the surrounding property. But Mayor Michael Hassig noted that he isn’t optimistic that the town’s main revenue source, sales and use taxes, will return to anything like their former robust levels. He suggested that the mill levy might need to be pressed into service for more basic needs. “I’m not convinced that we won’t be looking at this 1.5 mill and saying we need this for capital improvements,” Hassig said. Capital improvements can be new buildings and equipment or renovations, additions or repairs to existing assets. “I’m all for trying to get this on the ballot in November,” said trustee Frosty Merriott. Under the statewide Tax Payers Bill of Rights, or TABOR amendment, reauthorization of a tax can only be placed on the ballot in a municipal or general election, in April or November of even-numbered years. Carbondale’s municipal property tax is comparatively low, with the mill levy currently in place. Merriott noted that currently the owner of a Carbondale house worth $1 million pays $200 in property tax to the town annually.

THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 5


Scuttlebutt Send your scuttlebutt to Scuttlebutt@SoprisSun.com.

The rrr (ron robertson report)

Ski for Sisu

18th Annual Cross Country Skiathon Fundraiser

A fun, non-competitive family event for skiers of all ages and abilities Refreshments • Awards • Door Prizes Short Course for Youngsters Awards for highest pledges received

Sunday, February 7, 2010 10 am to 3 pm • Registration at 9:30 am Spring Gulch Trail System Turn west on Main Street toward CRMS, continue up hill for 6 miles on Thompson Creek Road (CR108)

nO enTrY Fee

Although this will probably be the final Ron Robertson Report, it won’t be because we have forgotten him. To the contrary. Ron’s artistry, creativity and spirit will forever remain in Carbondale and in the hearts of those who knew him, as demonstrated last Saturday by the outpouring of love and tears at his memorial celebration at the Church at Carbondale. If you attended the event celebrating Ron’s life and didn’t know Ron well before you arrived, you did by the time you left. With eloquence and humor, his close friends and family communicated many stories about him. And from them, it was easy to imagine not only what he was like, but also to see the admiration, respect and love that folks had for him. That love was evident in the program of the event as well. It was evident when about 10 of his closest friends spoke, played music and presented comedy sketches. It was evident in the time and organization it took to set up the different displays of Ron’s projects, and to organize the photos of him and those he loved and played with. Oh, and the grub… The potluck spread prepared for the occasion further proved that Carbondale’s affection for this man will never die.

Brenda Buchanan checks out the the heaping potluck feast at the memorial celebration for Ron Robertson on Jan. 23. Photo by Jane Bachrach

The “greening” of Carbondale The word green means different things to different people. “Go green,”“be green,”“you look green” – maybe to you, “go green” means you can win an electric car. To your best friend, “green” might mean being environmentally conscious and responsible. To some in town, the color green is being taken quite literally. That green house on Main Street, for example, is a children’s consignment store called Alexa’s Closet. But the store’s owner, Donna Maes, told us that some people have come in for The Green House, which is the medical marijuana dispensary located upstairs in the building next door. Donna said at least nine people have walked into her shop asking if the medicinal marijuana is sold in back. Maybe they’re “laundering” marijuana instead of little girls’ clothes back there.

how about our “girl named Sue?” Entry forms available at Summit Canyon, Sunlight Ski & Bike, Independence Run & Hike, Ajax Bike, Aloha Bike, Basalt Bike & Ski, Bristlecone Mountain Sports or at the event. Or email gregf@sopris.net.

Congrats to our Deerfly Diaries columnist, Sue Melus, who received some good news that she will be doing the P.R. for Columbia Sportswear’s hunting and fishing divisions from the comfort of Carbondale for the next six months at least. Sue owns a P.R. and communications business named Melus Outdoors, LLC.

Bundle up and ride!

Help us reach our fundraising goal of $5,000 by collecting sponsorships from friends, family and associates.

The Moonlight Cruisers will ride again on Saturday, Jan. 30. If you wanna join in the fun, grab your hat, gloves and bicycle and meet at Sopris Park at 8 p.m. Our“spokes”woman asked that you please leave your glass containers at home, but bring your friends and your smile.

3.5k, 10k and neW 12.5k LOnG DiSTAnCe LOOp

Getting to know her

Sponsored by

When you stop by the Food Coop next time, you might want to say hello to Melissa Sidelinger, who used to volunteer as a working member but is now training to be the new assistant manager. Melissa has been studying holistic nutrition and has volunteered her time at a Peach Valley CSA for 14 years. Sounds like she has a wealth of knowledge about nutrition so stop by, and after you pick your produce, you can pick her brain.

From goats to water carriers

Ski for Spring Gulch! FOr FurTher inFOrMATiOin, CALL GreG FiTzpATriCk AT 963-9524. All proceeds to benefit the Mount Sopris nordic Council for the Spring Cross Country Trail System 6 • THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010

Happy birthday to these Aquarians, who are celebrating birthdays this week: Sherry Herrington, Theresa Olander, Shane Holmberg, John Baker and Kelsy Warkentin. If you happen to be an Aquarian, you’re likely to be sociable, have good communication skills and idealistic. But even though you’re sociable, you enjoy your privacy – probably because you like yourselves so much that there’s nobody else you’d rather spend time with. You’re also tactless, and don’t like intimacy or being pinned down. (Disclaimer: Our information is obtained from several different sources so we take no responsibility if you aren’t happy with who you are.)


Speaker to parse public perceptions of Islam By Trina Ortega The Sopris Sun If you knew there were 50,000 Muslims living in Colorado, would you be more fearful of your neighbors? A “yes” answer may be understandable, given the many media portrayals that align Islam with terrorism and violence. But this geographically and culturally diverse religion is not only the planet’s second most popular faith, it is also one of its least understood, at least by the western world. And mainstream Muslims are reaching out to dispel the stereotypes about their community. The Roaring Fork Cultural Council will open a dialogue about how the non-Muslim population can begin to look past those stereotypes in the presentation “Who Speaks for Islam Today?” with Muslim scholar Nabil Echchaibi, an assistant professor in the school of journalism and mass communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The program begins at 7 p.m., Feb. 6, at Thunder River Theatre and will open the council’s second year of presenting nationally and internationally known speakers on cultural, political and ecological issues. Some of the council’s founders have been considering a presentation on Islam for more than a year, says Roy Davidson, who will moderate the discussion. “Americans tend to be fair-minded and tolerant, in general, about people of different faiths or people who don’t have any faith, for that matter,” Davidson said. But on the other hand, events like 9/11 and the Fort Hood shootings have generated fear,

Professor Nabil Echchaibi. Photo courtesy of Nabil Echchaibi

Next Steps

For tickets and more about the Roaring Fork Cultural Council, visit rfculturalcouncil.org. In his blog, nabilechchaibi.com/blog.php, Professor Nabil Echchaibi talks about issues regarding Islam in a new media age. confusion and mistrust, he added. Echchaibi calls the image of Islam offered in mainstream media “very much a caricature.” “There’s a focus on things that are more spectacular … and that’s understandable, given the concerns terrorism has brought to the forefront,” Echchaibi said.“One cannot

help but notice that a lot of these things are connected to Islam or Muslims.” Muslims haven’t always been scrutinized to such a degree, but 9/11 changed the world and hit close to home. American Muslims – some immigrants, some born here – who had previously lived without having to question or defend their beliefs, have been forced to behave more circumspectly. Some have stopped revealing their religious beliefs to avoid attention. “People were having to find answers to questions they didn’t have to answer in the past: What is jihad? Where do the loyalties of Muslim Americans lie — with religion or with citizenship?” Echchaibi said. He believes some of the blame falls on the American media for portraying Islam as a religion that uses violence to fulfill its creed. He also faults the Muslim media for not being more open. Both fail to profile the positive individuals within the Muslim community, he said.” For instance, the “Islam and the Media” conference, held earlier this month at CUBoulder, brought together distinguished speakers from around the world. It was an example of how Muslims and non-Muslims are building bridges between the two worlds. Yet there was no media coverage, Echchaibi said. But a number of Muslims are speaking out — largely via the Internet and niche media — to denounce violence and explain who they really are. Additionally, Echchaibi’s current work at CU, a project called “Understanding Muslim Communities in the Rocky Mountain Region,” focuses on showing that region’s Muslim community

through podcasts, feature stories, clickable maps, audio slideshows and more. The project also aims to gather more data on Muslims living in the West. Estimates show there may be 150,000 to 200,000 Muslims living in the Rocky Mountain States, of which Echchaibi estimates 30,000 to 50,000 live in Colorado. He hopes to refine those numbers further. Echchaibi’s visit is the first in a series of events organized by the cultural council and co-sponsored by Colorado Mountain College and the Thunder River Theatre Company. Upcoming speakers will include former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright in August; business leader Robert K. Steel talking about “Wall Street vs. Main Street” on April 24; and Biblical scholar Elaine Pagels on June 20. Jim Calaway, current co-chair and one of the founders of the council, said the group strives to provide presentations on provocative global topics, and at least one event each year focusing on a local issue. This year the council will host a “Western Water Crisis” program in collaboration with the Roaring Fork Conservancy on Oct. 23. Calaway is in charge of programming and works alongside Craig Rathbun, who manages operations. “The first year we were full for every event. We received great feedback from the community,” Calaway said of last year’s events that included former U.S. Ambassador Henry E. Catto, oceanographer Sylvia Earle and Sioux chief Arvol Looking Horse. “This year will be just as successful.”

THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 7


Community Calendar

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted.

THURSDAY Jan. 28

FRI.-SAT Jan. 29-30

riVerSiDe Ski • The Roaring Fork Conservancy offers an evening ski and natural history discussion from 5-6:30 p.m. along the Rio Grande Trail downstream of Stein Park toward Woody Creek. Free. Register: roaringfork.org/ events. More info: 927-1290.

LiVe MuSiC • “Heart of the Rockies,” featuring Twirp Anderson, Cash Cashman and John Sommers, play from 3-6 p.m. at the Silvertree Hotel, Snowmass Village. More info: 923-3520.

p&z MeeTS • The Carbondale Planning & Zoning Commission meets at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. On the agenda: Town Comprehensive Plan.

Free heALTh SCreeninGS • Mountain Family Health Centers conducts free public health screenings for cholesterol, blood pressure, heart disease risk and more from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at Rite Aid Pharmacy, 1412 Grand Avenue, Glenwood Springs. More info: Sharla Gallegos, 618-3159, or sharla@mountainfamily.org.

phOTOGrAphY preSenTATiOn • The All Valley Photo Alliance presents “The Artful Portrait” by renowned photographer Jim Paussa at 7:30 p.m. at the Third Street Center. Paussa will display his work, tell stories and answer questions. Free to AVPA members, $10 for everyone else. More info: Sue Drinker, sdrinker@drinkerdurrance.com. LiVe MuSiC • Men of Worth, an international Celtic duo, performs live at 7 p.m. in the Glenwood Springs High School auditorium. More info: Sue at 945-8722 or Judy at 945-5384, or gsconcertassn.org. FuLL-MOOn Ski • Join Aspen Cross Country Center instructors and staff for a full-moon tour at 7 p.m. The ski center is at 39551 Highway 82. Snowshoe and ski rentals begin at 6:30 p.m., discounted to $10. More info: 925-2145. LiVe MuSiC • To help kick off the X Games, Pato Banton and The Now Generation perform at 10 p.m. at Rhythm and Brews, 701 Cooper Ave., Glenwood Springs.

FRIDAY Jan. 29

MOVieS • The Crystal Theatre presents “Precious” (R) at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 29-Feb. 4; “Pirate Radio” (R) at 5 p.m. Jan. 30; “Invictus” (PG-13) at 4:45 p.m. Jan. 31. BOBBY MASOn LiVe • Bobby Mason performs from 6-9 p.m. every Friday at Konnyaku, 568 Highway 133 (in La Fontana Plaza across from Ajax Bike Shop). LiVe MuSiC • Papa Midnight plays blues, classic and rock with Cole Campbell at Rivers Restaurant, 2525 Grand Ave, Glenwood Springs, from 9 p.m. to midnight. No cover. More info: 928-8813.

SATURDAY Jan. 30 BeGinner YOGA WOrkShOp • Feyhan Levine teaches ashtanga yoga from 4-6 p.m. at Aspen Health and Harmony, 401 Tree Farm Drive. A vigorous practice open to all levels of

NON - STOP FLIGHTS Denver Atlanta Chicago Los Angeles Salt Lake City San Francisco

practitioners in good physical health. Cost: $25. Pre-registration required: 704-YOGA, info@aspenhealthandharmony.com.

SUNDAY Jan. 31 pOeTrY LiVeS • Live Poetry Night celebrates Australia Day with live music by John Harrison, an open mic for poets, and featured poet Ed Cross from 6:30-9 p.m. at the Hotel Lenado, Aspen. Free. More info: 379-2136. LiVe MuSiC • “Heart of the Rockies,” featuring Twirp Anderson, Cash Cashman, John Sommers and Randy Utterback, play from 3-6 p.m. at the Silvertree Hotel, Snowmass Village. More info: 923-3520.

TUESDAY Feb. 2 GArCO COMp pLAn • Public meetings to gather input on the county’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update will be held from 6-8:30 p.m. at the

Glenwood Springs Community Center and the Silt Fire Protection District Station #1. More info: garfieldcomprehensive plan2030.com. TruSTeeS MeeT • The Carbondale Board of Town Trustees will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall and is scheduled to discuss the Thompson Park development proposal and the downtown overlay district.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 3 SOunDS heALThFuL • Colorado Mountain College presents “Using the Power of Sound,” an evening workshop that explores the power of sound to heal and shift the body. 6-9 p.m. at the CMC Lappala Center. To register, call 963-2172. GArCO COMp pLAn • Public meetings to gather input on the county’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update will be held from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Carbondale Recreation Center and the Rifle Health and Human Services Building. More info: garfieldcomprehensiveplan2030.com. pizzA TuneS • Live music begins at 7 p.m. at White House Pizza at 801 Main Court. Free. More info: 704-9400. LiTerArY niGhTS • Thunder River Theater Company presents a program on author Ray Bradbury and his life-long love of books and writing, with a focus on “Fahrenheit 451.” 7 p.m., Glenwood Springs Branch Library. More info: garfieldlibraries.org.

TRUE NATURE Healing Arts

connecting with the truth of who we are CONVENIENT Four miles from

Aspen and ten miles from Snowmass Village.

MON

5:30-6:45 pm 7-8 pm

ASHTANGA INSPIRED RESTORATIVE YOGA

TUES

8-9 am 9 am-12 noon 5:30-6:45 pm

YOGA EXPRESS MUSIC TOGETHER YOGA FOR EVERYONE

WED

8:30-10 am 10:15 am-12 noon 12:30-2 pm 7:30-8:30 pm

GENTLE YOGA MUSIC TOGETHER SIRENS MEDITATION

8-9 am 9 am-12 noon 5:30-6:45 pm

YOGA EXPRESS MUSIC TOGETHER YOGA FOR EVERYONE

8:30-10am 11am-5pm

YOGA FLOW 5 ELEMENT ACUPUNCTURE

8:30-9:45 am 10:15-11:15 am 4-6 pm

YOGA FLOW KUNDALINI YOGA WORKSHOPS

8:30-9:45 am 4:30-5:45 pm

YOGA FLOW YOGA WITH GRACE

COMPETITIVE Served by Delta,

Frontier and United Airlines.

ASPEN/PITKIN COUNTY AIRPORT

ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE

Thanks for flying local!

Year-round noise monitoring, wind power purchase and recycling deicing fluids.

visit us at aspenairport.com

THURS

Celebrate the Sun!

FRI

(even if you’re praying for snow) SAT

The Sopris Sun is turning ONE!

YOGA FLOW 8:30-10 am SCHEDULE 10:30 am-12 noon MUSES

SUN

February 11 is our 52nd issue. Drop-in $12 with Punch Pass $10

Reserve ad space now to celebrate your hometown paper! Contact Anne at anne@soprissun.com or 379-5050 549

8 • THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010

www.truenature.us main st. • carbondale, co 963-9900


Further Out Feb. 4

WALDOrF TOur • From 8:25-9:55 a.m. the Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork hosts “Walk Through the Grades,” an insidethe-classroom chance to observe each grade of the school, followed by a Q & A with a faculty member. 16543 Highway 82, on the frontage road a half mile east of Catherine’s Store. Reservations: 963-1960. More info: waldorfcarbondale.org. GArCO COMp pLAn • Public meetings to gather input on the county’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update will be held from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Parachute/Battlement Mesa Activity Center and the New Castle Community Center. More info: garfieldcomprehensiveplan2030.com.

Feb. 5 CLeen YOur FLeeT · The Garfield New Energy Communities Initiative hosts a

Ongoing

TeA DATe • Charlotte Graham hosts tea dates at the Mt. Sopris Historical Society Museum at 499 Weant Blvd. on Wednesdays, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. A chance to chitchat and share stories and photos of local history. All ages welcome, especially the “advanced!” Skype dates available with advance notice. More info: 704-0567 or (970) 306-8771. SpOrTS MeDLeY • Kids in first through fourth grades participate in a variety of sports and activities. Dodgeball, basketball, floor hockey, indoor soccer, scooter races, obstacle courses and more. Mondays and

workshop to teach public and private vehicle fleet managers practical steps to increase energy efficiency and reduce costs. 8 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the Glenwood Springs Community Center in Glenwood Springs. $15 fee includes lunch, materials, and more. Advance registration requested: GarfieldCleanEnergy.com.

Feb. 5-7

WinTerFeST • In Redstone, ice and mixed climbing, ice climbing demos, snowshoe and Nordic racing, dog parade, skijoring, snow sculpting, kids events, live music, beer tasting, and more. Schedule and more info: redstonecolorado.com or 963-6355.

Feb. 5 FirST FriDAY • The First Friday art walk will take place from about 6-9 p.m. Galleries and local businesses host artist receptions and offer extended hours.

Wednesdays from 3:30-4:30 p.m., Feb. 124, at the Carbondale Recreation Center. $35. A junior version for preschoolers will be held 10:30-11 a.m. Feb. 1-17. $30. More info: 704-4190.

LiVe MuSiC • Bela Fleck performs at 8 p.m. at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen. Reserved seating. Tickets: $40 - $60. Tickets and more info: (970) 920-5770. LiVe MuSiC • The Mighty Diamonds perform at 10 p.m. at Rhythm and Brews, 701 Cooper Ave., Glenwood Springs. $20 cover. 18 and over.

Feb. 7 Ski FOr SiSu • The Mount Sopris Nordic Council hosts its annual skiathon fundraiser from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the Spring Gulch Trail System on County Road 108. Refreshments, door prizes, a short course for youngsters and awards for the highest pledges received. More info: Greg Fitzpatrick, 963-9524.

Feb. 9 preSChOOL piX • Aspen Film presents

Parent-Child ‘Peas and Carrots’ Playgroup at the Waldorf School from 9-11 p.m., Tuesdays through Feb. 9. $30/class. More info: waldorfcarbondale.org.

BeGinner B-BALL • Parents interact and learn how to teach their first-time players a variety of basketball skills. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10-10:30 a.m., Feb. 2-18 at the Carbondale Recreation Center. For children ages three to four years. $45. More info: 704-4190.

CASTLe TOurS • Guided tours of the historic Redstone Castle are ongoing throughout the winter, at 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Tickets: Tiffany of Redstone and the Redstone General Store. $15 for adults; $10 for seniors/youth; free under 5. More info: 963-9656 or redstonecastle.us.

pLAYGrOup • Parents of children ages 18 months to three years are invited to join the

AnDerSOn rAnCh Open • Anderson Ranch Arts Center is offering one- and

Thursday January 28

Pato Banton

$20 cover, doors open at 9pm, show starts at 10pm

Friday January 29

Afterlife Nightclub Night

Special DJ to be announced • $5 cover with free beer or well drink coupon

Saturday January 30

Fire in the Asylum with special guest Steve Cook

Sunday January 31

Rasta Rob spinning reggae Texas holdem poker tourney starts at 7pm, no cover

Friday February 5

The Mighty Diamonds

$20 cover, doors open at 9pm, show starts at 10pm

Saturday, February 6 (Bob Marley's Birthday):

Legendary Dennis Walks “the Driffter”

(Bob's close friend) with special guest General Pecos. Find out how to put Haiti relief kits together at UMCOR.ORG and find the kit that you would like to donate. Artist will be donating 10% of merchandise to Haiti.

the best in children’s books on video for kids ages 3 to 6, at 10:15 a.m. at the Children’s Rocky Mountain School at 1493 County Road 106, Bar Fork A. The program will be presented in Spanish starting at 10:45 a.m. More info: aspenfilm.org or 925-6882.

Feb. 10 rOTArY SpeAker • The Rotary Club of Carbondale hosts a presentation about Roundup River Ranch, Paul Newman’s hole-in-the-wall camp. The weekly meeting starts at 7 a.m. at the fire station building at 645 Meadowood Drive. More info: Jay Leavitt, (970) 379-1436. MOunTAineerinG TALk • Dave Hahn, who has summited Everest more times than any other non-Sherpa, tells tales of epic mountain adventures at 7 p.m. at Dos Gringos, 588 Highway 133. More info: 704-0788.

two-day weekend workshops February through April, in painting, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, woodworking and photography. More info: www.andersonranch.org or 923-3181. piLATeS • Coredination Pilates offers mat classes from 5-6 p.m. on Mondays, 8:309:30 a.m on Wednesdays and 5:30-6:30 p.m. on Thursdays. More info: 379-2187. GrOup run • Independence Run and Hike at 995 Cowen Drive leads group runs, Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. Rain, snow, cold, or shine. More info: 704-0909, independencerun@sopris.net.

The Roaring Fork Cultural Council is proud to present

The Mainstream Muslim View of Radical Islam and Al Quaeda Saturday 7:00pm February 6, 2010 Thunder River Theatre in Carbondale Distinguished University of Colorado Professor Nabil Echchaibi, Phd. will attempt to answer hard questions such as “can the Muslim faith coexist with the rest of the world?” and “what is the ultimate agenda of Islam regarding the western world?” Additional Information and Tickets on sale at www.rfculturalcouncil.org now! Or call 704-1515 for information. Ask for Sandy or Craig This program will be sold out prior to the presentation.

701 Cooper Ave. Glenwood Springs • 379-8324 • www.rhythmandbrewslive.com THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 9


Community Briefs relay for Life seeks leaders The American Cancer Society is looking for volunteers to fill leadership positions in the 2010 Roaring Fork Valley Relay for Life. Volunteers are needed to serve as chairs on the luminaria, food and beverage, entertainment, and Web site committees. For more information contact event chair Anne Keeney at 963-2467, 948-6122 or agk@sopris.net. The relay will be held Aug. 13. For more information, visit roaringforkrelay.com.

housing nonprofit grants offered The Glenwood Springs Association of Realtors is now accepting grant applications from nonprofits that provide moderate- to low-income housing service. Applications are due Feb. 5. The Realtors association distributes such grants twice a year. Past recipients have included Habitat for Humanity of the Roaring Fork Valley, Catholic Charities, Feed My Sheeps and Mountain Valley Developmental Services. To be eligible, organizations must be based in Colorado, have a housingrelated request and be a public agency or a nonprofit organization with a 501(c)3 tax status. For more guidelines and applications, visit carhof.org. For information on the local grants call Mandy Murray at 618-3444.

Dodgeball, scooter races and more The Carbondale Recreation and Community Center has all sorts of activities in store for February. The first annual Indoor Snowball Costume Dodgeball Tournament will kick off at 6 p.m., Feb. 13, at the recreation center. Costumes are required, the more ridiculous the better. Prizes will be awarded to the winners of the tournament and to those sporting the funkiest digs. All players

Art Briefs Let your stuff be strutted

The second annual Green is the New Black Fashion Extravaganza has put out a call for entries.The fashion show is now seeking designs for the event, which will take place on the vernal equinox, March 20. This year’s theme is “Rites of Spring.”The show – touted in a press release as“dynamic, alluring and highly entertaining”– will showcase original clothing made from sustainable and/or recycled materials. Designs must be wearable, but not necessarily wearable every day. The deadline for submissions is March 5. For full entry guidelines and more information, call 963-1680 or visit carbondalearts.com. CCAH will host a design workshop from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Third Street Center on Jan. 31. The workshop is a chance for designers and potential designers to come together to create their outfits. Glue guns, sewing machines and cast-off clothing will be available. Participants are encouraged to bring their own materials. Admission is free for CCAH members, $20 for nonmembers.

portrait photographer to speak Nationally renowned photographer Jim Paussa will display some of his best work, tell stories about his experiences and answer questions at “The Artful Portrait,” an event presented by the All Valley Photography Alliance (AVPA) and Carbondale Council for the Arts and Humanities. The event will be held at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 28, at The Third Street Center. Aspen photographer Jim Paussa specializes in 10 • THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010

must be 18 years or older. Pre-registration is required and entry fees are $60 per team. In February the recreation center will also host new sports medley programs for kids. First- through fourth-graders are invited to play a variety of sports from dodgeball and basketball to floor hockey and indoor soccer, as well as unexpected activities like scooter races and navigating obstacle courses. The program will meet Mondays and Wednesday from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 1-24. A separate sports medley program for preschoolage kids will be held Monday and Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 1-17. registration fees required. Call 704-4190 for more information.

Learn to listen to yourself Anahata Healing Arts will host an intuition workshop from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Jan. 30 at Solara at 54 Favre Lane in El Jebel. A press release states that the workshop will help participants listen to their gut feelings and intuition, the “voice that guides us.” It is for those who would like to be more certain of their choices; want to strengthen their energetic fields; work in the healing arts and are sensitive to the energies of others; and/or have already begun to explore their intuition and would like more practice. Admission is $45. For more information call 963-4679.

Brush up on your back flips Attention all break dancers, MCs and DJs. The Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts will host its “Hip Hop Anonymous” hip hop throw-down… but not until Sept. 18. So in other words, you have plenty of time to practice. For more information call 945-2414.

portrait photography. His work ranges from editorial to families to author photos. “The client must like the image today but I also want that image to produce a smile or a tear when it is seen 10 years from now,” Paussa said. “If I’ve done my job correctly that image will have an impact forever.” Admission is free to AVPA members and $10 for the general public. For more information, contact Sue Drinker at sdrinker@drinkerdurrance.com.

Mid-winter drumming Rhythms of the Heart invites you to participate in a mid-winter African-inspired drumming class on Feb. 6 at the Carbondale Community School. Two sessions will be offered. From 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. a “beginning and beyond” course will offer a chance to work on hand technique, agility and rhythmic sensibility, and to “experience the tapestry of multiple patterns played simultaneously.” From 2 to 4:30 p.m., an intermediate course will be offered, requiring good command of bass, tone, slap and polyrhythmic experience and sensibility. People may register for one or both sessions. Advance registration is required. Special rates are available if you register before Feb. 1. Drum rentals are $8. Checks should be payable to Laurie Loeb and sent to P.O. Box 363, Carbondale, CO 81623. Include a note indicating which session(s) you’ll attend, whether you need a drum, as well as your name, email address, and phone number.


Sports Briefs roaring Fork basketball

Basalt snowboarder goes big

The young Lady Ram varsity basketball players are continuing to hone their skills. They cut their teeth against Grand Valley on Jan. 16 but lost 63-40. A game against Gunnison on Jan. 22 went against them as well with a score of 53-38. The Lady Rams haven’t yet won a match, but coach Nancy Zeigel said the players have been learning a good deal. “We’re improving. We’re almost to the point where everyone is scoring,” Zeigel said. “I think the main thing is that these freshmen and sophomores are gaining awesome experience.” The varsity boys’ team won in a close game against Grand Valley on Jan. 16. Coach Larry Williams said that Grand Valley was up by seven points in the fourth quarter, but the Rams managed to even the score before the clock ran out. “And then we got them in overtime,” Williams said. “We made three free throws and they made two.” The final score was 40-39. The boys lost to Gunnison on Jan. 22, 65-53. As of press deadline, Jan. 26, the Rams were in fourth place in the league with a 4-4 league record. Aspen is ranked first. “Aspen is better than everyone else, but I think everyone after Aspen is very close,” Williams said. “Which makes it fun, but it also makes it tense. I think the spectators should have a good time if they come watch.” The Lady Rams will play Coal Ridge at 5:30 p.m. on Jan. 28 at RFHS. They will play Cedaredge on Jan. 29, same time and place. The boys will play the same teams on the same days at RFHS at 7 p.m.

Local snowboarder Molly Wilson took third place against many of the world’s top female snowboarders at the Mammoth Grand Prix in Mammoth, Calif., Jan. 10. Wilson, a Basalt native, faced a slopestyle course featuring a 70-foot table top jump at the top and another 60-foot table top at the bottom. “Molly was fearless out there when faced with some of the biggest terrain park features she’s ever encountered,” said Aspen Valley Ski Club snowboard coach Travis Mclain. “Molly probably went about 80 feet off of that final table top.”

Take the bus to the X-Games There will be no on-site parking available at Buttermilk Mountain during the Winter X Games, Jan. 28-31. Public parking will be available at the Intercept Lot located at the intersection of Highway 82 and Brush Creek Road, 3 miles west of Buttermilk. Visitors are asked to use the free shuttles from there to get to Buttermilk. Service to the event venue runs from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. Other free routes will operate in the area as well. For more information about parking, routes and schedules call 970-925-8484 or visit rfta.com.

Roaring Fork sophomore Sharlene Salinas keeps her eye on the rebound during a game against Aspen on Jan. 15. Photo by Jim Ryan

Check out the latest improvements and available spaces at the Third Street Center.

Only a handful of spaces left!

Contact Colin at 963-5502 / claird@thirdstreetcenter.net for leasing information or to arrange a tour.

A community place promoting inspiration, sustainability and creative exchange THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 11


Haitian relief working site, Facebook, and spread by word of mouth. The next day, Cuthbertson’s back porch began filling with donations. Twelve collection points were established around the valley and they began filling too. “I couldn’t even keep my phone charged this week, it was just ringing off the hook,” she said. She had tapped a need, given people a way to help when they didn’t know how to do so. On Monday night, volunteers were telling her, “Thank you for giving us an opportunity to feel good about ourselves.” Donations ranged from powdered baby formula, infant Tylenol and children’s vitamins to blankets, toothpaste and secondhand clothing. Fifteen pricey portable cribs were donated, and shoes – an especially sought-after item – were collected as well. Local businesses chipped in. Dos Gringos, Eco-Goddess Edibles, Mi Casita, Peppino’s, Uncle Pizza and White House Pizza donated

continued om page 1 food to the 12-hour effort at the recreation center Monday evening. Four Seasons Property Management in Aspen donated a pickup truck, a driver, and a trailer; and John Maas with Koru Building donated a trailer as well. And the local chapter of the international group, Mothers Acting Up, paid for the gas for the drive to Colorado Springs and back. The truckloads of donations were slated to roll off toward the Front Range before sunrise on Wednesday, Jan. 27, after The Sopris Sun’s press deadline. From there they would be loaded onto chartered planes and flown to Haiti. Cuthbertson herself was planning to drive one of the trucks, but on Monday night she was still trying to wrap her mind around how big the effort had become – and how quickly. She had originally set out just to fill the back of her Dodge Dakota pickup. “That was my huge goal. I thought that was a big deal,” she said.

went we would bringing home a community of Haitian babies for sure.” “I don’t know where the journey ends,” she said on Monday. “It’s been such an exciting week that I think it’ll be a really sad drive home. It’ll be a bittersweet ending.”

And she was wishing she could have done more. “I want to get on the plane and hand deliver it. I would go in a heartbeat,” Cuthbertson said, and added that she’s not alone. “I can tell you if these moms got on a plane and

How to help

God’s Littlest Angels: Financial donations can be sent to God’s Littlest Angels, 2085 Crystal River Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80915. Or send them via the Internet at glahaiti.org. The Web site also includes a list of goods needed by the orphanage in Haiti. For more information, contact Holli Bickel: holli@glahaiti.org.

Methodist Church: The Carbondale Community Methodist Church is asking for people to compile inexpensive care packages of specific personal hygiene items. For more information and guidelines on compiling a care package, call 963-4461. Drop them off at 385 S. Second Street. The food co-op: On Friday, Feb. 5, The Carbondale Community Food Co-op will donate 20 percent of sales to the Aspen-based Mercy and Sharing Foundation, helping the children of Haiti.

Zamansky named to Olympic team continued om page 3 the groundwork and now all I need to do is make it happen on race day. I’m at the point in my career where it’s do or die. I need to produce some great results or I’ll be looking for a real job.” And make it happen he did. With a 25th place finish in the giant slalom at Beaver Creek on Dec. 6, 2009, and a 27th place giant slalom finish in Val d’Isere on Dec. 13, he earned the points he needed to be named as

one of the 12 men on the team. Zamansky could not be reached before press deadline Tuesday evening. But on Jan. 20, when it was beginning to look like he would make the team, he posted the following on his blog at jakezamansky.blogspot.com: “The Olympic GS will be held on Feb. 21. This is … something I’ve been working for my whole life. I’m going to go to Vancouver

241

and ski my ass off and win a medal!” This season was McKennis’ first on the World Cup circuit, but she placed steadily in event after event. Her strongest results include a 10th place finish in the downhill at Lake Louise, Canada, on Dec. 12, 2009, and a 22nd place finish in the Super-G at Val d’Isere, France, on Dec. 20. For the men’s team, two giant slaloms and a slalom race are set for Kranjska Gora,

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Slovenia, before the team moves into a preOlympic camp in Park City, Utah. They will arrive in Vancouver Feb. 9 in time for the first downhill training run on Feb. 10. Following a series of three World Cup speed races next weekend in St. Moritz, Switzerland, the women’s team will train at their European base at Zell am See-Kaprun, Austria, until Feb. 5. They’ll arrive in Vancouver on Feb. 9 as well.

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A ticket for a 10-minute yoga vacation By Sujata Stephens Occasionally when people hear that I teach yoga they’ll say,“I could never do yoga because I’m too stiff,” or “I don’t have time to do yoga.”Although a deep fancy yoga posture has tremendous benefits, the simplest of poses done with awareness, optimal alignment and an open heart can magically transform you. In just a few minutes you can enjoy the gifts at the heart of all yoga practices – being present with awareness, in greater clarity, peace and joy. Do you have 10 minutes? Are you ready to recharge? Ready to venture on a journey of simple and accessible yoga? First, read the instructions a few times to familiarize yourself with them. Now turn off your phone and computer, find a clear spot in your room, and get ready for a yoga vacation. • Focusing on the breath cultivates awareness and is both calming and rejuvenating. Sit in a chair or on the floor. Lift the lower back in and up, open the chest wide and let the shoulders relax. Tune into the rhythmic flow of the breath. Breathe deep down into the diaphragm to fully receive the in-breath, and as you breathe out, let go, melting away all tension. With each inhalation greet the breath as a friend. With each exhalation feel an inner smile arise, softening your mouth and eyes. Repeat three to five more times. • Be strong and steady as a mountain. Come to standing with the feet a little apart and parallel, arms by your sides. Spread the toes wide and feel the support of the earth be-

neath you. From the steady support of the legs allow the spine to lift and the chest to open. Bring the palms together in front of the chest and acknowledge the gift of the breath and the gift of this very moment. On the next exhale release the arms back to your sides. As you inhale, sweep your arms out to the sides and all the way up, reaching to the sky.As you exhale float the arms out and down. Repeat three more times. • The standing side bend beautifully opens the sides of the torso and invites a deeper fuller breath. In your standing position inhale and sweep your arms out and up. Keep the breath flowing in and out as you interlace your fingers and reach dynamically up. Your arms lift the front, side and back ribs, while the shoulders relax. Keep extending fully through the arms and exhale, bending sideways to the right. Root the left leg deep down into the earth, breathe into the left ribs and allow your inner smile to spread across the chest. After a couple more breaths, inhale back to upright and exhale both arms to your sides. Observe the freedom and openness on the left side. Now repeat to the

other side. • The standing forward bend releases the spine, back and legs while bringing oxygen to the brain. Stand with the feet hip distance apart and parallel. Place your hands on your hips, inhale and lift your heart. Exhale, bend your knees and fold forward at the hip crease placing your fingertips on the floor. Engage all the muscles of the legs, straightening the legs as much as possible. Let your head hang, relax the neck and soften the jaw. For the next several breaths enjoy the deepening release of the spine. To come up, place the hands on the back of the waist and draw your shoulders away from the floor. Exhaling, press down through the feet. Inhale, lengthen the spine and come up. • Home base in Carbondale is inspired by our majestic soaring mountains. Stand as stable as a mountain with your base anchored into the earth beneath you and your arms by your sides. From your strong foundation feel the lift and openness of your chest and the buoyant lightness of the head as the crown floats toward the sky. Enjoy the rhythmic waves of breath. Be steady and free, radiant and peaceful. As you resume your day, notice how you

Although a deep fancy yoga posture has tremendous benefits, the simplest of poses done with awareness, optimal alignment and an open heart can magically transform you.

Help Support Haiti

Sujata Stephens. Courtesy photo

feel. Are you more relaxed? Even when you don’t have 10 minutes to do the above yoga practice, you can greatly benefit from focusing with awareness on a few slow, deep, easy, diaphragmatic breaths. One of my Hatha yoga teachers suggests that whenever you hear a cell phone ring, use that as a cue to breathe in deep and breathe out long, giving yourself the gift of being fully present. A lyric by Stephens Sondheim sums up the power of awareness available at each moment:“A present for the moment is a moment present.”

Sujata Stephens is a certified anusara yoga teacher who has studied extensively and taught since 1974.

Friday, February 5th 20% of sales on this day will be donated to the Mercy & Sharing Foundation for earthquake relief

Please help us support this important cause

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK M-F 9 AM – 7 PM • SAT 11 AM-7 PM • SUN NOON-6 PM 559 Main Street • 970-963-1375 • www.carbondalecommunityfoodcoop.org

The People of the Carbondale Community United Methodist Church Invite you to

Rethink Your Spirit Walk Sunday 10:30 a.m. Childcare Available

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors It’s what we do. 385 So. 2nd Street, 963-4461 Rev. Wallace D. (Wally) Finley, Pastor, 379-5686 Rev. Dr. Richard Lyons, Pastor 987-4034 Carbondale’s Historic “Mainline” Church Where we take the Bible seriously but not literally.

THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 13


How to make the most of the moment Does mindfulness have anything to do with living in the present moment? The answer is an unqualified “yes.” Mindfulness has everything to do with living in the present moment. What’s going on in your head? Until you know, there can be all sorts of issues of which you are unaware – issues that run your life, partnerships, work and play. If you are unaware of a problem, you can’t do anything to fix it, right? This is where mindfulness comes in. Mindfulness and present-moment living are intimately interconnected. Your mind is busily creating your reality right now, bringing up thoughts about a huge variety of things. Your subconscious mind and habituated thoughts into may be telling your conscious mind that you are By Stephanie tired of your job, or that Stanfield, Phd, Thd your significant other has it out for you. It may busily be creating a list of all the things you need to be doing or all the things you left undone. You may be feeling guilty. Your unconscious mind may be saying all types of critical and unproductive things, or it may be complimenting you and your good works. It is so busy with creating narratives that you don’t really hear and comprehend what is being programmed into your consciousness and back into your unconscious mind. You may just feel a rising sense of anxiety that grows ever larger as your day goes on as this unchecked

Journeys Health

emotional tide increases its stress on you. What is the solution? What can you do when your thoughts keep you helpless and hopeless? The answer is for you to begin a mindfulness practice.

Mindfulness skills help the mind to quiet, allowing a person to be with his or her thoughts and understand what they are broadcasting to mind, body and soul. Once awareness of the thoughts becomes a habit, the focus moves to changing the thoughts. Mindfulness skills have their earliest roots in eastern practices and pay homage to Buddhist mindfulness meditation techniques. These techniques teach people how to calmly and peacefully accept whatever happens to them with minimal emotional reactions, no matter how severe the crisis. Mindfulness skills help the mind to quiet, allowing a person to be with his or her thoughts and understand what they are broadcasting to mind, body and soul. Once awareness of the thoughts becomes a habit, the focus moves to changing the thoughts. Each thought carries with it an emotional context. As the quality of thoughts is improved, the emotion that accompanies these thoughts is improved as well. Stillness enhances the feeling of peacefulness and quiet. This healing space allows the destructive emotions and thoughts to stop their constant

bombardment. Consciously creating a healing space gives you the opportunity to choose your thoughts instead of struggling with the constant flow of thoughts that has become your habit. The benefits of a mindfulness practice include: • Knowing what your thoughts and corresponding emotions are; • A greater sense of peace; • A greater sense of being empowered; • The ability to change unproductive or unhealthy thoughts as they come up; • A sense of increased calm creating a steadier emotional base; • An increase of joy and satisfaction with yourself and your relationships; A mindfulness practice is easy to begin and maintain. • It can be done by yourself or by finding a group where you can practice and get feedback. • Start with belly breathing. Expand your belly out on the inbreath and contract it in on the outbreath. Keep your chest as still as possible. This skill will improve with practice. • Focus on your belly breathing and stilling your mind. • Do this for 5 minutes. • Increase your time daily. • Notice which of your thoughts are the most repetitive and begin changing them. Knowing what your thoughts are, moment by moment, moves you into the present moment. Choosing the thoughts that promote peace empowers your living in the present moment. Being mindful and managing your emotions thoughtfully result in present moment living in its richest and fullest manifestation. Dr. Stanfield teaches a meditation and guided imagery class on Mondays at Colorado Mountain College.

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14 • THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010

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Legal Notices

NOTICE

tail/Wholesale. Parcel 4, which is approximately 1.2 acres is zoned Commercial/Retail/Wholesale. Combined, the parcel of land is described as follows:

PURSUANT TO THE LIQUOR LAWS OF COLORADO

PARCEL NO. 1

CARNAHANʼS TAVERN, LLC 403 MAIN STREET, UNIT G CARBONDALE, CO 81623

HAS REQUESTED THE LIQUOR LICENSING OFFICIALS OF CARBONDALE TO GRANT A TRANSFER OF LIQUOR LICENSE TO SELL MALT, VINOUS, AND SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS FOR CONSUMPTION ON THE PREMISES AT 403 MAIN ST., UNIT G CARBONDALE, CO HEARING ON APPLICATION TO BE HELD AT: CARBONDALE TOWN HALL 511 COLORADO AVENUE CARBONDALE, COLORADO

DATE AND TIME: FEBRUARY 23, 2010 AT 6:30 P.M. DATE OF APPLICATION: JANUARY 19

BY ORDER OF: MICHAEL HASSIG, MAYOR APPLICANTS: CARRIE ALLEN

Information may be obtained from, and Petitions or Remonstranceʼs may be filed with the Town Clerk Carbondale Town Hall, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, CO 81623

Published January 28, 2010 in The Sopris Sun. NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that after February 5, 2010 at 8:00 a.m., at the Gunnison Watershed School District Administrative Offices, 800 N. Boulevard Street, Gunnison, CO 81230, the School District will make final settlement with:

PNCI Construction, Inc., 553 25 ½ Road, Grand Junction, CO 81501 hereinafter called the “Contractor” on the account for the contract for construction of the new Marble Charter School, Phase II, LESS LANDSCAPING, which is located at 420 West Main Street in Marble, CO 81623.

Anyone who has furnished labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, or any other supplies used or consumed on this project, whose claim, therefore, has not been paid may, at any time up to and including the time of final settlement, file with the School District, at its above address, a verified statement of claim of the amount due and unpaid on such claim. Failure to timely file will relieve the School District from any duty to withhold funds for such claim. DATED THIS 30TH DAY OF December 2009, Gunnison Watershed School District RE-1J BY: Roy “Andy” Anderson, Owner Representative Published January 28, 2010 in The Sopris Sun. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the Carbondale Board of Trustees for the purpose of considering an application to rezone four parcels totaling approximately 24 acres, more or less, to Planned Unit Development and an assessment of the projectʼs community impacts (Community Impact Assessment) under Sections 18.35.020.I and 18.55.090 of the Municipal Code.

Formerly known as the Crystal River Marketplace site, the property is generally located north of West Main Street, west of Hwy 133 and east of Colorado Rocky Mountain School. The expanded site is divided into four parcels: Parcel 1 is approximately 0.7 acres and is currently zoned Planned Community Commercial. Parcel 2 is approximately 0.2 acres and is also zoned Planned Community Commercial. A portion of Parcel 3, approximately 8.9 acres, is zoned Planned Community Commercial. The remainder of Parcel 3, which is approximately 13 acres, is zoned Commercial/Re-

HAPPY HUMP DAY

A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE EAST HALF OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, TOWN OF CARBONDALE, GARFIELD COUNTY, COLORADO, SAID PARCEL OF LAND BEING MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING ATA POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, WHENCE THE STREET CENTER MONUMENT LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF EIGHTH STREET AND MAIN STREET IN TOWN OF CARBONDALE, COLORADO, BEARS S 46 '34'02" E 2276.78 FEET; THENCE S 00'05'00" 1335.10 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF MAIN STREET EXTENDED WESTERLY IN SAID TOWN OF CARBONDALE; THENCE N 00'35'02" W 400.24 FEET; THENCE N 00'33'01" E 1093.24 FEET; THENCE 53'41'02" E 439.36 FEET; THENCE N 88'46'49" E 149.65 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, THENCE FOLLOWING THE WESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, 431.45 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 5695.90 FEET, THE CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S 07'16'21" E 431.35 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL BEARINGS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE RELATIVE TO A BEARING OF N 89'57'00" W IN THE CENTERLINE OF MAIN STREET, CARBONDALE, COLORADO. TOGETHER WITH: PARCEL NO. 2

Unclassifieds Valentine’s Personal Let your love know how much you care with a Valentine’s Day Personal in The Sopris Sun’s special Valentine’s Day Unclassifieds. For just $15 you can have up to 30 words to make your feelings known, and make that special person feel special. Send your note to unclassifieds@ soprissun.com. We take checks or credit cards. Questions? Contact Anne at 379-5050.

A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NE1/4 SE1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST OF THE SIXTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, CARBONDALE, COLORADO, SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;

BEGINNING AT THE STREET MONUMENT LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF EIGHTH STREET AND MAIN STREET IN THE TOWN OF CARBONDALE, COLORADO; THENCE N 76'49'42" W 1571.89 FEET TO A POINT BEING IN THE CENTER OF A 20.00 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE N 53'06'59" E ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 15.47 FEET, THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S 50'57'07" E 41.35 FEET; THENCE S 27'02'41" W 8.81 FEET; THENCE S 01'04'57" W 104.19 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 106; THENCE N. 89'26'00" W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY 142.07 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY N 00'50'-0" W 236.01 FEET; THENCE N 89'42'26" E 84.45 FEET; THENCE S 00'36'00" E 48.87 FEET; THENCE S 76'43'34" E 79.89 FEET TO A POINT ON THE CENTERLINE OF SAID 20.00 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE S 53'06'55" W ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 54.22 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS:

PARCEL 1, RESUBDIVISION OF VELASQUEZ PROPERTY, ACCORDING TO THE MAP RECORDED MARCH 28, 1988 AS RECEPTION NO. 390757. TOGETHER WITH:

PARCEL NO. 3 A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST ON THE 6TH P.M., TOWN OF CARBONDALE, GARFIELD

COUNTY, COLORADO AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF EIGHTH STREET AND MAIN STREET IN SAID TOWN OF CARBONDALE; THENCE N. 76 DEGREES 49'42"W. 1571.89 FEET; THENCE N. 53 DEGREES 06'55"E. 15.47 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 53 DEGREES 06'55"E. 54.22 FEET; THENCE N. 86 DEGREES 05'41"E. 50.64 FEET; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 47'17"W. 62.73 FEET; THENCE N. 86 DEGREES 33'02"W 20.81 FEET; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 25'47"W. 110.38 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF GARFIELD COUNTY ROAD NO. 106; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 26'00"W. 45.40 FEET ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 04'57"E. 104.19 FEET; THENCE N. 27 DEGREES 02'41"E. 8.81 FEET; THENCE N. 50 DEGREES 57'-07"W. 41.35 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS PARCEL B OF THE SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION PLAT, RECORDED OCTOBER 28, 1985 AS RECEPTION NO. 366044, BEGIN A PORTION OF PARCEL A OF AMENDED RE-SUBDIVISION OF SOUTHLAND CORP. PROPERTY. STATE OF COLORADO, COUNTY OF GARFIELD

TOGETHER WITH: PARCEL NO. 4

A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED ON LOTS 8 AND 9, SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 88 WEST OF THE SIXTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133, FEDERAL AID PROJECT NO. S 016 (1), WHENCE THE STREET CENTER

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LOG HOUSE DOWNTOWN C’DALE 3BR/2BA for rent. Fenced yard, no smoking, pets. neg., walk anywhere. $1500/mo. plus utilities. mkstrang@earthlink.net or 963-2319. LOST. One vacuum cleaner and maybe other stuff on Highway 133 or other road on January 20. Please call Lynn Burton at 963-1549. S.O.U.L. COOKING CLASSES - Sustainable, Organic, Unprocessed & Local.Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., $40 includes lunch! Fresh & Wyld Farmhouse Inn, Paonia. February is Indian Cooking Month! Feb 3: Saag Paneer & Tandoori. Feb. 10: Dhal, Naan & Curries. Call Dava 970-527-4374. 30% off overnight rates for participants. We’re at Willits Farmers

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ACTION AUTO COLLISION A Better Body Shop

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COUNTY OF GARFIELD, STATE OF COLORADO

If approved, the property will be rezoned to a Planned Unit Development to allow a mixed-use development project with approximately 300 residential units and approximately 150,000 square feet of commercial uses.

The applicant is the Peregrine Group Development, LLC for Crystal River Marketplace LLC, 1580 Lincoln Street, Denver, Colorado. Said Public Hearing will be held at the Carbondale Town Hall, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado, at 6:30 p.m. on February 9, 2010.

Copies of the proposed application are on file in the Planning Department office, Town Hall, 511 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado, and may be examined by interested persons during regular working hours, 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The application may also be viewed at www.carbondalegov.org: The Village at Crystal River. Doug Dotson, Zoning Administrator

Published January 28, 2010 in The Sopris Sun.

25% off room rates through March Farm to Table Friday Dinners 6:00pm Seating, $15 Entrees

GUITAR REPAIRS TOP QUALITY NEW AND USED AFFORDABLE INSTRUMENTS LESSON STUDIOS

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Town of Carbondale Business Revolving Loan Fund ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Loans available for new or expanding businesses located within Carbondale town limits For more information: http://rfbrc.org/accesstocapital/carbondaleloanfund.html Roaring Fork Business Resource Center

945-5158

rlowenthal@rfbrc.org

Market, Saturdays 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.!

SUNNY BREEZE FARM will be at 0526 Highway 133 in Carbondale, near Back Alley Coffee, on Saturday, January 30, 9:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Stop by for our sheep cheese, lamb meat, pork, milk-based soap, wool yarns, and hand-woven wool products, all from our family farm in Craig, CO.

PROFESSIONAL WRITER AVAILABLE for press releases, annual reports, letters and special projects. Call Lynn Burton at 963-1549. SPORTS REPORTER. The Sopris Sun seeks a volunteer to cover prep sports. Call 618-9112.

Specializ ing in solar ho t water and radiant heat

Bed & Breakfast Inn

INTERESTING & ODD ITEMS… UKELELES & ACCORDIONS

351 Main Street Historic Downtown Carbondale 963-3553 • www.skipspourhouse.com

THENCE SOUTH 89'19'30" WEST 157.00 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 8; THENCE NORTH 0'50' WEST 726.65 FEETALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 8 TO THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID STATE HIGHWAY NO. 133; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 5695.9 FEET A DISTANCE OF 745.0 FEET, THE CHORD OF WHICH BEARS SOUTH 13'01' EAST 743.84 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

Submit Unclassifieds to unclassifieds@soprissun.com by 5 p.m. on Friday. $15 for up to 30 words, $20 for 31-50 words. WINTER SPECIAL: $10 off for three consecutive weeks paid in advance!

970.527.4374 • www.freshandwyldinn.com

Bring this ad in on Wednesday for

MONUMENT LOCATED AT THE CENTERS OF EIGHT STREETAND MAIN STREET IN THE TOWN OF CARBONDALE, COLORADO, BEARS S 60'30'30" E 1707.14 FEET;

Patrick Johnson 970-618-1768 p 970-963-4867 f

687 Colorado Ave. Carbondale, CO 81623 solarflair@sopris.net

WINDSHIELD REPAIR AUTO GLASS REPLACEMENT DAVID ZAMANSKY – Owner Operated License & Insured

970-963-3891

500 Buggy Circle Carbondale, CO.

Auto Glass & Side Mirrors

Chiropractic with a Twist! www.CarbondaleDC.com Headache & Back Pain Center of Carbondale Dr. Kent J. Albrecht, B.S., D.C. – 28 years experience 1195 Main St., (next to Crystal Spas) Saturday and evening hours by appointment!

(970) 366-2030 THE SOPRIS SUN • JANUARY 28, 2010 • 15



2010 01 28