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HACKER SPACE FOR MYTH MAKING | THE MANUAL

PAUL GUZZARDO


This Manual is for artists, architects, urban designers, and storytellers. It’s for anybody else skittish about a descent into flat.

The Manual maps projects and hacks. The projects link streetscapes and data-landscapes. The hacks go after what’s in the way. Endgame is an urban design protocol. A protocol is a recipe. This recipe is for a street in “A City That Thinks.” Hackerspace for Myth Making lays out a line of case studies. The case studies are protocol r + d. They include a nightclub, media labs, theatrical plays, gallery shows, documentary films, street projections, and a line of public installations. They were up-running as private-public culture made the switch over to full-body digital apparel. Remix binds all the projects. The projects pushed remix artists into the street. Shoved them out to map a 2-byte maelstrom. But the Manual is more than a remix handbook or an art scene audit. It’s also a dispatch, a dispatch from a front. The front was St. Louis, Missouri. The St. Louis street was project workshop, scaffold, and catwalk. The projects were arks. They were gear to navigate patterns, kit to weave a course. But there were problems in assembling transit tools. If you want early radar systems on the street you better be ready to go after the bad code. The Manual chronicles a messy cognitive arms race. It traces resistance to the street as a way-station to peer and charts a clamp-down on a radar street.


A St. Louis History -The Short: The last hundred years in St. Louis might be summed up like this: who came and left, who left something that fell down, who launched something that’s everywhere. Marshall McLuhan came. He left a rough map into a net-wandered world. The next one to show was Minoru Yamasaki. He built something big, but his Pruitt-Igoe didn’t stand long. It came down thirty years before his Twin Towers fell. And then there was Monsanto here all the time. St. Louis is where Monsanto flung a mongrel seed into a global village. Project - End Game: The projects that follow set their site on the street. It is a pattern recognition design, build, perform praxis. The praxis is tabbed Recursive Urbanism. Recursive Urbanism uses the street as: • an evolving search engine, a tableau you drift through, synthesizing as you move • a platform to assemble networks to critique the network • a probe into how digital kit edits us. The street has always been the place to get the read on where we’re going. Much of what and who we are emerged on the street. As the data cloud descends, we still need the street. Need it for tricksters to prick at information plutocracies and tricksters to poke at the digitization of everything. We need it to seed myth. Epistemological leaps don’t come easy. They’re messy. The home to McLuhan, Monsanto and where Modernism went bust offers a stage to grapple with the mess.

sweet prologue Monsanto Chemical Works opened its doors in St. Louis in 1901. That was three years before the St. Louis World’s Fair. John Francis Queeny founded the company. Queeny spent 30 years in the pharmaceutical industry. He was an employee all that time, but now he wanted to make his own products for the food and pharmaceutical industries. So he put all his savings into a new venture, everything. He borrowed the rest from a Chicago soft drink supplier. John Queeny named the company after his wife. Her maiden name was Olga Mendez Monsanto. The company’s first product was saccharin. Monsanto made its reputation manufacturing the sweet stuff. From 1903 to 1905 Monsanto’s entire saccharin output was shipped to one company. It was in Georgia. It was Coca Cola.


hackerspace for mythmaking -the manual 1 synoptic visions 2 new crackerjack world 3 feed lot 4 on a ledge 5 grave merry man 6 the dervish in the machine 7 costume shop 8 street kit 9 the hacker cometh 10 tool chest 11 sovereign code 12 tables, tunnels and debris 13 more tables, more debris 14 the myth that got away 15 hitting a wall 16 cyborg on corners

17 progeny 18 bits of passage 19 goya smeared 20 trunk show 21 cartographer’s dilemma 22 spaceport booster 23 a lab 24 bad code a genesis tale 25 a piggish parable 26 bad code case study 27 map perfect 28 dial is stuck 29 a trickster and walkabout epilogue credits


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synoptic visions Aristotle-the founder of civic studies, as of so many others-wisely insisted upon the importance, not only of comparing city constitutions (as he did, a hundred and sixty-three of them), but of seeing our city with our own eyes. He urged that our view be truly synoptic, a word which had not then become abstract, but was vividly concrete, as its make-up shows : a seeing of the city, and this as a whole ; like Athens from its Acropolis, like city and Acropolis together-the real Athens-from Lycabettos and from Piraeus, from hill-top and from sea. Large views in the abstract, Aristotle knew and thus compressedly said, depend upon large views in the concrete. Cities in Evolution | patrick geddes


cities

evolution in


An early lab It was T. H. Huxley’s laboratory. A young Scottish botanist was looking though a microscope, peering at a drop of pond water. A grey great beard loomed over his shoulder. The young man stepped aside. The bearded man’s eye went to the lens, and then he shouted, “look they’re alive.” The young Scot was Patrick Geddes. Charles Darwin was looking and shouting into the drop.


“Cities in Evolution” was published in 1915. It was by Patrick Geddes. It was the first book to link the city to Darwin’s big idea. Geddes was well placed to start. He was a biologist in Thomas Huxley’s laboratory. He left Huxley for the street and then roamed for the rest of his life. Hackerspace author Guzzardo is a Fellow at the Patrick Geddes Institute for Urban Research Institute. The Institute and the Carnegie Foundation for Universities of Scotland marked the centennial of “Cities in Evolution” with a bash. It was called “The City as a Thinking Machine.” Thinking Machine showed off Geddes archival maps, notes and drawings. It also had some new work. One add-on was “A Septic Turn in a Space of Appearance.” It was a looping media installation. It included video depositions from a St. Louis lawsuit and new media documentaries. A tableau strip topped the septic mix.The strip was a fragment from a lost silent film. The silent source was thought to be Dickens’ Bleak House. “A Septic Turn” was also the moniker for a five city pitch, a Dundee, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Plymouth, London lecture tour. The talks used bits from the hacker myth book that follows. Talks were remixed from city to city, ever in search of a tighter narrative about raw elites and bear skinned emperors. It was similar to what Charles Dickens went on the road to do, but he was better at it.


tour then book


24th November 2015, 17:00 Evolution House, Room 2.13, 78 West Port, Edinburgh Led by Paul Guzzardo, Fellow at Geddes Institute for Urban Research, University of Dundee Abstract Paul Guzzardo is returning to Scotland to present this lecture and discussion at PROKALO on his current work, which is part of the public exhibition The City is a thinking Machine. He will discuss his work at the exhibition as well as A Septic Turn.

A Septic Turn offers a contemporary update on Geddes’ citizen survey and Civic Exhibition. The installation details an ongoing lawsuit between the plaintiff Paul Guzzardo and two defendants: Grand Center - a private corporation with statutory development powers in St. Louis, and Washington University - a bioscience research institution. Unlike Charles Dickens’ Bleak House the transactional is secondary here. This is about the role of digital media in collective consciousness and how media shapes the relation of people to places. It’s also about Marshall McLuhan’s role in the intellectual formation of St. Louis, and how Geddes’ synoptic vision got muscled out by a sycophantic one. Project journals and looping multimedia tell the story. The journals contain press, legal pleadings and testimony. Guzzardo’s documentaries and video depositions comprise the multimedia. The documentaries are buildbetterbarrel, the cartographer’s dilemma, and posses | protocol | perp walks. The deposition witnesses are: Emily Pulitzer, collector and founder of the Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts; Heather Woofter, teacher and chair of graduate studies at the Washington University School of Architecture; and Paul Guzzardo, lawyer and media activist/artist.

The exhibition of which this presentation will discuss is a research project whose aim is to evaluate Geddes’ thinking at a time when city regions are under increasing pressure to accommodate new populations without losing sight of their natural heritage and sustainability. Sir Patrick Geddes, the polymathic Scottish planner and botanist, published Cities in Evolution in 1915. This seminal text on civics promoted his Cities Exhibitions which he organised from 1910 onwards. He also proposed local Cities Exhibitions as permanent institutions in each city centre which he argued were a necessary condition for participatory democracy. This important exhibition on Geddes’ thought and work has three parts: city plans from Geddes’ touring Cities Exhibitions; his thinking and lecturing diagrams, drawn from the Archives at the Universities of Dundee, Edinburgh, and Strathclyde; and recent architecture and planning projects by affiliates of the Geddes Institute for Urban Research at the University of Dundee. Geddes’ diagrams have not to our knowledge been exhibited or published before, nor have these plans been brought to the public view since the Outlook Tower closed in 1949.

Lorens Holm, director of the Geddes institute says ‘Geddes sought to transform lives and transform environments. This exhibition is important because it brings together Geddes’ thinking machine diagrams – a key to this thought on civics and cities – with the exemplary city plans he collected for his exhibitions, at a time when our cities are under increasing pressure to accommodate new populations without losing sight of sustainability and citizenship, the key principles for well-being in the built environment.’ The exhibition will take place separately at the University of Dundee, 19th Oct – 11th Dec 2015.


2 A new

crackerjack world the sisters got the invite. they all came


... all came. Showed up through a window, not the door. Jockeys let them in. Jockeys checked them off. Off-shore was Bologna Italy, Bogor, Indonesia, Brcko, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Galway, Ireland, Georgetown, Guyana, Lyon, France, Nanjing, China, Samara, Russia, Stuttgart, Germany, Suwa, Japan, Wuhan, China and Szczecin, Poland. And then there were the namesakes: San Luis Potosí, Mexico and St. Louis, Senegal. But more than Sister Cities were jamming at the club. St. Louis politicos and elites were there. That night they were cheering Clarence Harmon and his first lady, Janet. Mayor Clarence Harmon and Janet shared a birthday. It was their party. The Mayor was turning fifty-nine. Not much said about Janet’s number. But I could have missed it. I was busy. It was my club. The club was Cabool. A lot was going on. The Mayor’s people were on the ground, decked in Sister gear. They were passing out Sister themed-snacks. The remix jockeys were plugged in and perched on a scaffold. The scaffold was the in-out box. It’s where Sister greetings were reformatted, looped, and projected around club Cabool. The band was off scaffold. It pumped out a St. Louie Blues background for e-geo missives and global snacks. And then there was the mundial cake. The mundial slice moment was web cast to all Sisters, and anybody-everybody on line. This was big, and not just big in the Sister City scene. It hadn’t been done much, or ever. Cabool had a thick data pipe, one of the first broadband lines in the midwest. Now it’s nothing. But back then in 1997 it was new, a brand new crackerjack world.


Dear Mayor Harmon It’s very unique and grateful that Global Interactive Mayoral Birthday Party will be held with global scale and global participation. I’m sure it is a new type of International exchange by means of internet. Also we can know it possible to have a party with people all over the world at a time. As Mayor of Suwa, one of your sister cities, I send you my hearty congratulations. And I expect you as global mayor not only mayor for St. Louis. It’s first time for me to participate such a nice party to a distance without asking my driver. I wish to have a chance to eat real cake together not “VIRTUAL” some day. I hope the relationship between St. Louis and Suwa will be promoted more and more in the future. Sincerely yours, Mayor Suwa, Japan Monsieur le Maire, Cher Collegue J’ai bien recu le meaage du 26 septembre 1007 de vos collaborateurs concernant l’organisation de votre soiree anniversaire le 28 octobre prochain. Il m’est agreable de vous transmettre plus vives felicitations et je vous renouvelle mon soutien pour le renforcement des relations entre nos deux villes. Je souhaite succes a votre soiree. Je vous prie d’agreer, Monsieur la Maire, cher Collegue, l’expression de mes sentiments les meilleurs. Raymond BARRE Mayor Lyon, France My Dear Honorable Mayor Special greetings from the City of Georgetown, Guyana. As you celebrate your birthday, we from far away pause to look with great admiration upon your distinguished career. On behalf of my wife, Counsellors and the citizens of our city, I extend to you Honorable Mayor our heartfelt congratulations and best wishes on this occasion of your birth anniversary. We are confident that under your wise leadership the City of St. Louis will play a significant role in making of a better world we all wish for. May you have many more years of service, happiness and good health and may we continue to benefit from your counsel. I once again congratulate you and sincerely wish you all the best. With kind regards, Sincerely yours, Hamilton Green, J.P. Mayor Georgetown, Guyana Hon. Mr. Harmon

Governor State of New Hampshire Dear Mayor Harmon: As Governor of Nebraska, I am pleased to offer you greetings on the occasion of your Global Interactive Mayoral Birthday Party. This occasion is a perfect opportunity to reflect on the memories you have collected through the years, and I hope you will chooseto share some of those moments with your friends and relatives. They will appreciate the unique perspective only you can bring to these cherished stories. Please accept my very best wishes. A birthday is a special day, and your friends have put together a terrific party, so ENJOY! Sincerely, E. Benjamin Nelson Governor State of Nebraska Dear Mayor Harmon: What a great idea for a birthday party—no pounds to gain from too much birthday cake; no worries about whether your card should be sentimental, insulting, humorous, or inspiring; no scheduling conflicts to arrange; no travel plans to make; and no gift to buy. You’ve thought of everything. All we guests have to do is wish you a very happy 59th birthday, and I am pleased to have the opportunity to do that. I hope you wife Janet and your four children, Steven, Kevin, Stephanie and Andrea. I also hope someone remembers to give you one of your favorite treats—chocolate. Unfortunately, I can’t send that by email. St. Louis has always been known as the Gateway to the West, but because of all the progress your administration is making, it is becoming as well known as The Gateway To The 21st Century. Thank you for all you are doing to improve Missouri’s beloved St. Louis and to better the lives of its citizens. Happy Birthday! May your web page be flooded with best wishes. Very truly yours, Mel Carnahan Governor State of Missouri Dear Mayor Harmon: It was great to be 58! Now it’s time to relax and enjoy 59! Through the years you have had many tough challenges and tests, But in retrospect it has only made you stronger, wiser and the best, So on this day of much joy and celebration, I would like to wish you Mayor Harmon, the sincerest congratulations! HAPPY 59th BIRTHDAY!!! Wishing you continued prosperity and happiness always! Elihu M. Harris Mayor Oakland, California

Dear Mayor Harmon: Congratulations on the occasion of your first birthday as Mayor of the City of St. Louis. I’m sure you are looking forward to the challenge and the rewards of that leadership. I have had the privilege of visiting your city several times over the years, and I have enjoyed its beauty, its history, and its amenities. I look forward to another visit soon. Sincerely, Gene M. Pillot Mayor Sarasota, Florida Hon. Mr. Harmon I am so pleased to hear that you are having your first birthday as a mayor. I’d like to express my sincere congratulations to you and wish you a very happy birthday. St. Louis and Nanjing have always seen friendly exchanges since they became sisters. This November, a friendship work-team is going to pay a visit to your city, which will surely enhance the existing friendly relationship between our two cities. Amazing changes have taken place in Nanjing in recent years. I hope you can spare some time for a visit to Nanjing and will someday celebrate your birthday in our city. Finally, I wish you good health and long life and the friendship between St. Louis and Nanjing everlasting. Yours sincerely, Wang Hongmin Mayor of Nanjing, China Dear Mayor Harmon It is a pleasure to wish Mayor Harmon many happy returns of this day, good health and happiness . May success and good luck attend him in all the endeavors and initiatives as Mayor. Sincerely, Yury Tikhonov Head of Foreign Affairs Committee Samara City, Russia Dear Colleague Harmon Happy birthday to you. What a pity that we should meet each other this way. But this is better than nothing. As Mayor of your German sister city Stuttgart. I am of course aware that you have been Mayor of St, Louis April. I have been in office since January, which is only three months longer. By the way, I think it isa wonderful idea to have a global, virtual birthday party! I have asked my secretaries to chill a bottle of champagne to toast you on your birthday. Should you ever come to Stuttgart, just come around and see us. I would be delighted to welcome you at City Hall. you know, I am a big fan of your country. Until then, bye bye.yours, Wolfgang Schuster Mayor Stuttgart, germany


Dear Mayor Harmon: On behalf of the citizens of Detroit, I extend a warm and enthusiastic Happy Birthday on your Global Interactive Mayoral Birthday Party! This is a wonderful idea. I’m pleased to be a part of the festivities. So far, I’m really getting a kick out if it. I don’t have to worry about packing a bag and rushing to the airport. I don’t have to fret about time or fuss with a tuxedo. Just kick back, put on a party hat, sit in front of my computer and enjoy the festivities. Because while St. Louis would naturally be my second choice to go visit and enjoy a good party, there’s no touching a weekend in Motown! Since, I’ve never attended a party on line, however, I need a few pointers on web social etiquette. Is it okay if I help myself to more than one slice of virtual cake? Well, at least I won’t have to worry about calories. Again, best wishes on this most memorable birthday! Sincerely, Dennis W. Archer Mayor Detroit, Michigan Dear Mayor Harmon: It is indeed a pleasure to extend greetings on this very special occasion. Happy 59th Birthday! You have been a source of joy and inspiration to your family and friends over the years, and I am grateful for the opportunity to honor a distinguished fellow Democrat. May you be blessed with joy and happiness on this special day. You have my best wishes for an exciting and enjoyable “Global Interactive Mayoral Birthday Party.” With the kindest regards, I remain Sincerely, Zell Miller Governor State of Georgia Dear Mayor Harmon: As Mayor of Louisville, I join your staff and “web surfers” from miles around in wishing you a happy birthday. It’s an honor to participate in my first ever Global Interactive Birthday Party, although the “virtual” cake leaves a little to be desired! As the new Mayor of St. Louis, I know you are primed and ready to take your city by storm. Speaking as Louisville’s veteran Mayor of more than 12 years, I want to remind you that it is also important to take time out of your busy schedule to celebrate life’s milestones. Fortunately, you seem to be surrounded by dedicated staff members who help you do just that. To help commemorate your birthday celebration, I have declared October 28, 1997, as “Mayor Clarence Harmon Day” in Louisville, Kentucky. I hope you have a memorable birthday party, and send best wishes for a lifetime full of happiness and joy. Sincerely, Jerry E. Abramson Mayor Louisville, Kentucky

Dear Mayor Harmon: Greetings from the City of Newark, California. Have a wonderful birthday and a great year! Sincerely, David W. Smith Mayor Newark, California Dear Mayor Harmon: On behalf of my staff and all the citizens of the state of New Hampshire, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate you on becoming the next Mayor of the City of St. Louis! I deeply regret I cannot join you for birthday cake in person, but I will join you for virtual cake and ice cream on the website. It happens to be my favorite flavor! Best wishes once again. Sincerely, Jeanne Shageen Governor State of New Hampshire Dear Mayor Harmon: As Governor of Nebraska, I am pleased to offer you greetings on the occasion of your Global Interactive Mayoral Birthday Party. This occasion is a perfect opportunity to reflect on the memories you have collected through the years, and I hope you will choose to share some of those moments with your friends and relatives. They will appreciate the unique perspective only you can bring to these cherished stories. Please accept my very best wishes. A birthday is a special day, and your friends have put together a terrific party, so ENJOY! Sincerely, Benjamin Nelson Governor State of Nebraska


What next? as if anything might come; but rather Whither? Whither away? For it is surely of the essence of the evolution concept hard though it be to realise it, more difficult still to apply it that it should not only inquire how this of today may have come out of that of yesterday, but be foreseeing and preparing for what the morrow is even now in its turn bringing towards birth. Cities in Evolution | patrick geddes Patrick Geddes was a message Huxley and Darwin sent to the future. He died in 1932; the same year Aldous Huxley published Brave New World - another dispatch. Geddes left us a tool chest packed with maps. They’re maps to build platforms that glimpse, peer ahead, assess what is coming, and maybe humanize this new place. The Cartographer’s Dilemma | Holm- Guzzardo


patrick geddes on cities and siblings

Cities in Evolution | patrick geddes Here, then, and in the coloured original of course more clearly, we have the first, and (up to the time of its making) the only, fairly accurate picture of the growing of Greater London. This octopus of London, polypus rather, is something curious exceedingly,a vast irregular growth without previous parallel in the world of life perhaps likest to the spreadings of a great coral reef. Like this, it has a stony skeleton, and living polypes call it, then, a “man-reef” if you will. the very word “lines” nowadays most readily suggesting the railways, which are the throbbing arteries, the roaring pulses of the intensely living whole; or, again, suggesting the telegraph wires running beside them, so many nerves, each carrying impulses of idea and action either way. For this exhibition has made a beginning, as yet the most clear and definite beginning, of the comparative study of cities; each shown like a living being, in constant relation to its environment; and with the advantages of this, its limitations too. Like the living being it is, a city reacts upon its environment, and in ever-widening. What really matter nowadays the divisions between innumerable constituent villages and minor boroughs whose historic names are here swallowed up, apparently for ever, like those microscopic plants, those tiny plants and animals, which a big spreading amoeba so easily includes, so resistlessly devours?


3feed lot


Despite the best birthday effort, Mayor Clarence was a one term Mayor.* Still much was done. People were served, or served up. Served as public art. It was a farewell valentine from Clarence, Janet and friends. It was called “The People Project.” “The People Project” was a riff on one city’s slaughter past, Chicago. It stamped another city, St. Louis, into a stick figure feed lot.

*If Sister City votes were counted it might have been different, but that was not to be.


Calling all “creative types” in the greater St. Louis bi–state region. The People Project, a temporary public art exhibit, will be presented in spring and summer 2001 for the enjoyment of our regional bistate area. Projects of this nature are currently sweeping the nation, promoting creativity and raising generous sums of money for deserving charities. In Chicago, New York and other major cities, clearly the most imaginative designs were submitted by members of the creative professions. We are officially announcing a “friendly competition” within our marketplace visàvis designing and creating People Figures for the upcoming 6month exhibition. The People Project Creative Competition will effectively showcase your creativity and imagination to the rest of the world. This is an ideal opportunity to show the citizens of the Windy City, the Big Apple and points beyond precisely what the St. Louis bistate area creatively has to offer. (In other words, I want us to stick it in their oh so smug faces!) The basic tax deductible donation to “adopt” a People Figure for the 6month exhibit is $5,000. If, however, you design and build your own People Figure, you can waive the $1,500 artist’s honorarium, and simply donate $3,500. Your custom designed People Figure can potentially expose your company’s name and creativity to millions of people (via our website and your on the street Figure) for a mere $583 per month a truly innovative marketing opportunity and extremely cost effective proposition. The local, regional and national media coverage generated by The People Project and our Creative Competition will be invaluable.

In response to overwhelming popular demand, The People Project is publishing a full color, softcover souvenir book, cataloging all of the pieces in our People Project family. If you were unable to see every Figure on display during the spring and summer, our Official Book will show you what you missed. “The People Project: GO FIGURE!” would make a very special holiday gift for young and old, locals and tourists alike. Help us celebrate the success of The People Project with the Figures, the artists, the sponsors, and the organizers of this unique regional art event. “The People Project: GO FIGURE!” will be available around December 1st, retailing for $25. (shipping and handling extra). If you’re interested in purchasing this colorful memento of the St. Louis region’s largest temporary art event, click here to contact us. If you’re experiencing problems with the above link, simply email us at info@thepeopleproject.com

Calling all “creative types” in the greater St. Louis bi–state region. The People Project, a temporary public art exhibit, will be presented in spring and summer 2001 for the enjoyment of our regional bistate area. Projects of this nature are currently sweeping the nation, promoting creativity and raising generous sums of money for deserving charities. In Chicago, New York and other major cities, clearly the most imaginative designs were submitted by members of the creative professions. We are officially announcing a “friendly competition” within our marketplace visàvis designing and creating People Figures for the upcoming 6month exhibition. The People Project Creative Competition will effectively showcase your creativity and imagination to the rest of the world. This is an ideal opportunity to show the citizens of the Windy City, the Big Apple and points beyond precisely what the St. Louis bistate area creatively has to offer. (In other words, I want us to stick it in their oh so smug faces!) The basic tax deductible donation to “adopt” a People Figure for the 6month exhibit is $5,000. If, however, you design and build your own People Figure, you can waive the $1,500 artist’s honorarium, and simply donate $3,500. Your custom designed People Figure can potentially expose your company’s name and creativity to millions of people (via our website and your on the street Figure) for a mere $583 per month a truly innovative marketing opportunity and extremely cost effective proposition. The local, regional and national media coverage generated by The People Project and our Creative Competition will be invaluable.

Attention Art Teachers! A FREE 12lesson curriculum is now available from The People Project! The People Project is a St. Louis, BiState regional endeavor. The visual arts activities in the Fun With People curriculum are related to the history of the BiState region, and its symbols and famous sites. Fun With People makes use of a technique called “forced association” where artists combine seemingly unrelated items or ideas in order to produce creative and original designs. The artist or inventor must reinterpret and organize highly disparate elements to make serious, playful, or completely absurd creations. Fun With People will encourage students to be playful and creative with the human figure just as The People Project artists are. The activities presented here are all loosely connected to the topic of representing human figures. They provide you with many options and possibilities. Remember that you want the students to go beyond the predictable and to consider the possibilities. We hope you and your students will have a wonderful time creating new and unusual human figures.

wayback machine a web archive

Several creative companies have already accepted our invitation to participate in The People Project Creative Competition. How can I entice your company to join in on the fun? We are inviting the region’s top creative companies to accept this challenge, and use this innovative venue to shine forth creatively in the public eye. Net proceeds from your Figure’s auction will equally benefit the charity of your choice and art education in our bistate region. Competition prizes will be awarded prior to the Charity Auction in October to helpboost those prizewinning Figures’ bidding potential. The more dazzling and enticing your Figure, the more generous the bids will be to benefit your favorite charity. There’s never been such a unique and exciting public competition for our local creative shops. In fact, your highprofile clients may also want to join in on the fun.

The Greater St. Louis area clearly boasts some of our nation’s best, brightest and most imaginative creative professionals – so please help us promote that amazing talent. I hope you will be joining everyone in the bistate region as they exclaim: “Go Figure!”

A number of sponsors have already selected their designs and artists are being put to work! Check back soon for a sneak preview of area artists in process as they create their one of a kind People Figures. To launch The People Project, local artists were asked to create preliminary People Figures. They were asked to do this as a “dress rehearsal” and to demonstrate the tremendous creative possibilities. The finished People Figures you see on these pages are the result of their work. April 25, 2001 Official Unveiling and Multisite Press Conference On April 25th we will be riding on The People Project bus to four locations around the region for a multisite press conference. The schedule is as follows: 9:00 a.m. Bus departs from downtown St. Louis 9:30 a.m. Press conference and unveiling at O’Fallon, IL City Hall 10:30 a.m. Bus departs from O’Fallon 11:15 a.m. Press conference and unveiling at Kiener Plaza 12:15 a.m. Bus departs from Kiener Plaza 12:45 a.m. Press conference and unveiling in Clayton 1:15 p.m. Bus departs from Clayton 2:00 p.m. Press conference and unveiling at St. Charles City Hall

Please join us for the official launch of the most creative and exciting public arts exhibition our region has ever produced! You may choose to ride on The People Project bus or meet us at one or more of sites along the way. Contact (314)6221250 ext. 102 for more information. October 20, 2001 The People Project Charity Auction.The People Project Charity Auction will be held at the end of the public exhibition on October 20, 2001 at Phillips Selkirk Auctioneers. Selected People Figures will be auctioned online and live. Net proceeds will benefit sponsor designated charities and public art and art education programs in the St. Louis region. More news about this exciting auction to come!

Several creative companies have already accepted our invitation to participate in The People Project Creative Competition. How can I entice your company to join in on the fun? We are inviting the region’s top creative companies to accept this challenge, and use this innovative venue to shine forth creatively in the public eye. Net proceeds from your Figure’s auction will equally benefit the charity of your choice and art education in our bistate region. Competition prizes will be awarded prior to the Charity Auction in October to helpboost those prizewinning Figures’ bidding potential. The more dazzling and enticing your Figure, the more generous the bids will be to benefit your favorite charity. There’s never been such a unique and exciting public competition for our local creative shops. In fact, your highprofile clients may also want to join in on the fun.

The Greater St. Louis area clearly boasts some of our nation’s best, brightest and most imaginative creative professionals – so please help us promote that amazing talent. I hope you will be joining everyone in the bistate region as they exclaim: “Go Figure!”

The “People” have gone home! From April through October, 2001, over 180 People Figures graced the streets of the St. Louis bistate region. Although The People Project is now closed, you can still enjoy our informative web site. Have fun viewing the sculptures, learn about the project and hangout in the interactive fun and games section. Plus, we still have project catalogs and merchandise available sure to be a collectors dream!Thanks to everyone for their support. The People Project was a great success. Go Figure! The People Project – Go Figure! also chronicles The People Project Story, from inception of the original idea, through the People Figures’ creation process, the 6 month exhibit, the Family Reunion, and finally, the Charity Auction. IF YOU: created a Figure, sponsored a Figure, bought an auctioned Figure, provided an installation site for a Figure, walked among the Figures, photographed a Figure, glimpsed Figures from your car, missed some of the Figures, visited Figures with your children or grandchildren, told out of towners about the Figures, taught your students about Figures, argued with your relatives about your favorite Figures, forgot the most outrageous Figures, or if you just want to have a lasting memento of the region’s most talked about public art event of 2001. . . get your personal copy of The People Project – Go Figure! while supplies last. Cost: $30. Proceeds benefit The People Project. For orders or information, please contact:experiencing problems with the above link, simply email us at info@thepeopleproject.com


a critic speaks The artspeak was much in evidence at the unveiling of the People Project a couple of weeks ago in Grand Center. Artists and arts administrators and politicians and corporate and civic leaders were in attendance, all smiling booster smiles at the artspeak catchphrases: “Art is a universal language.” “Art is for everyone.” The People Project would “put art where it belongs -- in daily life,” proclaimed Hizzoner, Clarence Harmon. “Let the artist’s imagination run wild,” heralded Porter Arneill of the Regional Arts Commission (RAC), who’s been charged with spearheading St. Louis’ answer to the cows and pigs and moose and fish and lizards appearing in other urban centers. People Persons: The people behind the people of the People Project Eddie Silva RIVERFRONT TIMES October 04, 2000

With a budget of more than $1 million and four full-time staffers working solely on the People Project at the Regional Arts Commission (an agency whose resources are overburdened as it is), the hope is that everyone in the region will see how wonderful this thing is. The cows were wonderful in Chicago. The pigs were wonderful in Cincinnati. The painted ponies were wonderful in New Mexico. The epidemic of sculpted animal figures in urban landscapes has infected more than 40 North American cities. The sober reality of the People Project is how it exposes the dysfunctions of the region more than it binds the area together. People, unlike pigs or moose or cows or redfish, have no specific claim on St. Louis’ identity (other than there are a lot fewer of them here in the city than there used to be). The organizers of the People Project had to stretch for the universal when public solicitations for a local symbol failed to catch a no-brainer pig. Street People: The People Project Exposes the Dysfunctions of the Region Eddie Silva RIVERFRONT TIMES April 04, 2001


human genome project

The McDonnell Genome Institute at Washington University at St. Louis was one of three National Institute of Health funded largescale genome sequencing centers in the United States. The Institute contributed 25 percent of the finished sequence in the Human Genome Project. The People Project exhibition took place during the sequencing, and “People� were exhibited on the campus. The genome mapping project continued the work earlier begun with the mapping of the drosophila melanogaster, a species of fly known generally as the common fruit fly or vinegar fly.


4

on a ledge

There’s a still. It’s pulled from a video. Can’t see much. The video is dark. Father McNamee is off to the side.

Then a flash, grabbed it.


It was 1993, St. Louis American Institute of Architects Annual Awards. The Jesuit is on stage. He’s up there for the Basilica. It’s a craft award for a life time achievement. But it is not for Father McNamee. The award is for another father and a son. They were glaziers. The father was Paul Heuduck. The son was Arno Heuduck. Paul and Arno Heuduck installed one of the largest mosaic collections in the world, ever. Heuducks and crew were off-on scaffolds for seventy years, hanging on a ledge. Bit by bit they plugged into a myth. Son Arno died weeks after the last mosaic was set. McNamee was on stage with Arno’s widow and family that night. Construction on the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis started in 1908. Except for the mosaics it was done in twenty years. But the mosaics took time. There was a story to tell, a lot to cover up, up there. Sometime in the eighties a Cardinal told McNamee to move it along. Get it done. And he did. That night AIA St. Louis recognized what McNamee managed. That’s why he was on stage with a glaziers’ family.

The transcript that follows is off the audio track of a video taken the night of the AIA award ceremony. The Speaker-Presenter Transcript : …let me tell you a little bit of what I know about the project. It is for glass mosaics. It was completed in March of 89, and the tradesman we are honoring here died in November of that year. We know that he accepted his last contract knowing that he probably was praying that he would live to complete it, and his dream came true. But this isn’t only his lifetime achievement award or his dream. His father before him started in 1923, and if my arithmetic is right, that is pushing seventy years on contributions on one project to create this masterpiece. There’s 83,000 square feet of glass mosaics on the celling of the St. Louis Cathedral. There are seven thousand colors, two hundred shades of gold, forty one million individual pieces, some of them the size of your thumb nail. There is no comparable mosaic in quality or quantity any-place in the western hemisphere, and it’s right here in our own home town. And then this from the short spoken “widow Heuduck.” I am very happy to thank the AIA for this award for my husband. He put in many long hours in the Cathedral.


now some of the jury comments: if there ever was a project deserving of a craftsmanship award this is it fabulous, incredible, truly overwhelming can design intense be exceeded? they gave us back their life of talent and love with great pleasure we award this project

Second Award, Same Night Same Night Fr. McNamee was supposed to be back on stage with me. It was later that evening, another ribbon. But he stayed in his seat. He didn’t come up. The second award was for an add-on. It was an annex to a 1912 Edwardian concert hall. Not particularly sacred. Not so grand. The concert hall was the Sheldon. The Sheldon was set in mid town St. Louis, squeezed between an old theater-vaudeville district and a Jesuit University. The hall was a one time platform for smart chat, a stage for Einstein, Eisenhower and Hemingway. But times and voices change. Things go gritty. The annex looked to try to turn it around. McNamee and I were Sheldon directors, both on the building committee. I was off and on chairman. I pushed the design, sometimes over the disquiet of the board. Just like the Cathedral this project involved scaffolds and catwalks. And maybe a passage into myth, or at least a try. The Sheldon annex picked up a design award. It was a first place. The former Dean of Architecture at Columbia University James Polshek presented it. But it was all still a maybe. Deal not closed. The award was for an unbuilt project.


the annex: described by the national press The Sheldon Theater, a 1912 landmark in St. Louis’s reviving Grand Center district that was threatened with closure last year, is being expanded to the tune of 42,000 sq. ft in an adjoining, now vacant parking facility. The first phrase of the project, to be finished this October and designed by Professor Lorens Holm of Washington University School of Architecture in conjunction with David Davis Associates of St. Louis, includes construction of a 10,000 - sq. ft. glass enclosed atrium. The atrium, which includes a 150 seat black-box theater, provides much needed handicapped accessibility to the Sheldon. Only minor cosmetic restoration to the concert hall is planned, to avoid interfering with its acoustics. The remaining program, to be completed by 1998, includes exterior restoration, new workshop space, and a recording studio. Architectural Record February 1992

described by the architects This Janus project, with its double gesture to the boulevard and to the center of an empty block, with its existing classical front and its mute Large Glass wall, reflects the current urban scenario.The project is fragmentary from its inception. We propose a major new entry with a face to the parking lots at the rear. In this part of the city, the traditional perspectival space of the boulevard had been all but displaced by a shifting horizontal immensity. Instead of attempting to reinstitute the status of the boulevard at the apex of the hierarchy of public urban space , something that assumes a massive redevelopment package, we penetrate the block, occupying strategically, partially, its center: just enough to control and define the space. There is no master plan: how and when the rest of the building will be used is still the territory of the dreams of individuals. The project acknowledges that there are limits to architecture and development: the architect will not solve the world’s (social, economic, environmental ) problems: and the developer cannot provide an inexhaustible resource or the outmoded aspiration. David Davis and Lorens Holm Architects described by James Polshek This project has particular meaning for me because architecture is...about bringing people together not just about bricks and mortar...a place for the performing arts...that brings together... a modern spirit...a spirit of the 21st century, a project about a building that is a landmark...it is an extraordinary undertaking...it was a project that we wanted to encourage the people who were developing it, building it, to go ahead and do it. The plans tell the whole story... sense of context, sense of the struggle, sense in the way the status quo was being struggled. The use of collage, new juxtaposed against that which exists...a spirit and sense of the spatial rigor and the ambiguity of the space... this great wing which unites the new and the old.


hack

a lesson and line in


executive director is fired.

Sheldon renovations gobble up most of $2 million raised to date


internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting internecine fine arts bloodletting

The Sheldon was set to break ground a few days after that St. Louis AIA ceremony, but a problem. It turned out some people didn’t particularly want a sense of struggle or a Janus faced ambiguity. The aphoristic is thin fare for a candied diet. Days from signing the construction contract it unravelled. An internecine fine arts bloodletting began. I was provocateur. Enter the press. Stories leaked and published about management misdeeds. The result was a temporary loss of the Sheldon Foundation’s protected charitable tax status. The architects are discharged. Architects then filed liens on the hall. Eventually the Sheldon’s executive director is fired. The Foundation announces the renovation is on hold. Father McNamee and I are on opposite sides. He stays. I leave. Then nothing for a while, a long while.


Annex Release 2 arrived four years after McNamee and I were on stage-apart. Release 2 was flat. While flat things show up, this was glaringly flat. And there was a program change. Still got from here to there and back, but the “process of passage” was gone. Passage paid no heed.The voids were annulled. Serial boxes packed the old garage. There were art galleries chock-a-block, little rooms, flat things everywhere. Not a void to be heard from.

One day a critic who careered in pictures came in to look. He had this to say. I later found that the Sheldon Art Galleries were carved out of an old parking garage adjacent to the beaux-arts-style Sheldon Concert Hall. Loft-like galleries in former industrial spaces have set the style for the presentation of contemporary art from Soho and Chelsea in New York City to the Tate Modern in London. Instead of frankly acknowledging the old building’s history and nature in a similar forthright manner, architect Raymond Maritz created small fussy spaces that have an unpleasant flow, and because the massive columns that hold the building up could not be moved, the sight lines are terrible. Worse yet is the way the space is finished. The floors, for instance, are a cheap parquet (the original concrete would have been more attractive, moreappropriate and less expensive). The space looks like the gallery one would expect at a suburban junior college, not in an urban cultural complex in a city’s up-and-coming cultural neighborhood. David Bonetti, Post Dispatch Visual Arts Critic, June 1, 2003


cursive transcription 1-----D. beat up too much on P. That was a mistake.---Now that we are on the topic of mistakes…---We have suspected for a long time that W had cultivated a relationship with P. W went around D and me. on numerous occasions P. has refused to work with D.on the contract.... and displayed more knowledge of Sheldon financing then ee did . “I’m not going to bid this because the Sheldon cannot afford it.” our fears were confirmed when D, suggested that P. might be talking to W. W turns red….-----After that event things fell into place.. P’s complaint came in the form of a letter (Oct 9) to W., not to D. (to get a bid n closing the roof) This letter was..-----2-----6. And when this came to a head at the Sat. mtg. D. was never consulted, was never even asked his version of is relationship, although P. clearly was.---7. The most important evidence .......directly concerns the contract----on Mon D. learned that Dale was signing off on P’s requests to use his masonry allowance, w/o D.s knowledge on Monday D. learned that W had written $19,000 check on work that D. had not yet signed off on.-----These are direct, unauthorized interactions on the contract.-----looks to me like W. G. has made an end run around DDA. without telling him, without authorization, even in the last meeting .... working directly with Lawler....John Cameron, staff reviewer heritage commission ----Kate Shea, commissioner o/ heritage,-----why did everyone gang up on the architects---why was a decision decided before hand, with the contractor and not with DDA,----annex lower cornice drains --why did Tim & Walter...get together with Lawlor + make a decision and spring it on DDA as if DDA was the enemy---why was D. D. A taken out of the loop-----‘’ “ “ the last person to find out---why did Lawlor to to Walter before he went to DDA----9 Oct Lawler’s letter to Walter (not to DDA)----13 Oct. Tues. DDA get Lawler’s letter------if the whole point is to be a team player why was the whole thing handled in a way that provided maximum divisiveness -----Tim never asked for DDA’s input/point view/recommendations image transcription

the plaza 20 plus years later


grave-merry man


play Keen on flat when Sheldon-release 2 appeared, flat as a tool to tell tales, flat as a prop, flat as a conceit for theater, and flat as rue for myth. But that mise-en-scène required a change of players and plot. Glazers with glass chips step aside, videodisc jockeys step in. It was time for play. The play was “Contagion of the Night.” Contagion took on technology and theology as plot and as stagecraft. It fused interactive video, internet resources, and reconsideration of “the theatre” as architecture. And it snagged some Jonathan Swift and Samuel Butler on the way.


contagion of the night Billed One nun’s crisis of faith and one antichrist’s journey of self-discovery propel this millennial fable. This multi-media camp narrative blends digitally altered Christian iconography and Marian hymns with a host of religious and apocalyptic web sites. Contagion of the Night is the last word on our piety at the altar of technology. Rated “Contagion of the Night: A Wired Apocalyptic Fable” by St. Louisan Paul Guzzardo April 24, was a farcical, at times sacrilegious, theatre-of-theabsurd delight that deepened into a campy and funny romp, pitting dichotomous favorites like good and evil, Y2K and the end of the world, materialism and organized religion. As is typical for director Ian Belton, this artistic endeavor became an event, not just a play. Billed as a “wired apocalyptic fable,” the product was more than pretty packaging that would delight even Lewis Carroll and Jonathan Swift, for the pervasive pormanteau atmosphere of the performance. The set was minimalistic, creating much of the scenery in a cyberworld of live camera feeds, pre-taped scenes and computer generated graphics. These, sometimes blasphemistic scenes filled with biblical puns, were projected on three enormous screens set above the stage on a secondary plane. This gave a tangible impression of depth to both the set and the play. Scorned The play was advertised as “one nun’s crisis of faith and one antiChrist’s journey of self-discovery.” We found it to be a blatant mockery of Catholi cism and of nuns, in particular. “Contagion of the Night” is a satire about the financial woes of a convent, the Sisters of Our Lady, set against the second coming of the Anti-Christ in 2000. In it, nuns are portrayed as greedy, insane and sexually repressed. Our Blessed Mother is held up for particular derision and mockery, and Christianity is trivialized as a contest between two “cosmic jokesters,” God and Satan.


line dance from heaven

or


big data selves an early script


contagion scriped: a software evangelist

Contagion of the Night Scene 3: Petty Preserved Frances Rose, put down your needle. It is my pleasure to introduce Mr. Jose Patel of the Eden’s Software Network. Mr. Patel is with us to demonstrate the latest in Eden software, and I propose a partnership between Eden Software and “The Ladies That Sew.” Mr. Patel. Patel Thank you for allowing me to be with you today. Ladies, do you remember the old days, before the release of Eden’s Obligatory Organizer Software, before the Obligatory Organizer changed your lives? Ladies, I’m here to help you remember. It wasn’t all that long ago when you were lost, wanderers in a wasteland, a wilderness of weddings, baptisms, communions, funerals, and, yes, even that occasional Bar Mitzvah. Path unmarked, forever faced with how much to give, who to give to, and finally whether to give at all. There’s a bag on the table. Patel pours it on the altar cloth. Out comes dog-eared cards and yellowed bits of paper. He stirs through them. This is what is was like, how it used to be, a typical family’s records. Slips, scraps of paper, notes, who brought what, from pie to peas. Every card imaginable -- thank you, sympathy, funeral mass, birthdays, weddings, on and on and on. Seems like pre-history. Patel yanks out a faded, torn piece of paper and reads.

Ah, oh . . didn’t . . . didn’t give a thing. Who didn’t . . . I can’t make this out. Is that an “O” or is it a “C”? I can’t read it. I don’t think any of you dear ladies could either, and that was the real tragedy of it. Too often we’d forget who forgot. We had an obligation not only to ourselves but to those who came after, to remember. To remember the slights, the omissions, the halfhearted gestures. A sloppy paper trail wasn’t enough. Do you for a moment think that anybody other than an autistic savant could keep track of all this? He runs his hands through the mound of paper. And, party games aside, they don’t entertain all that much. Ladies, with Eden Software, ingratitude finally met its match. He pulls out a two CD-ROMs. This was the program that remembered, recorded, and quantified it all. Eden’s Obligatory Organizer proved that the petty can be preserved, that the sins of the mothers and fathers need not be forgotten, that generations of hurt can be stored, only to be recalled with a touch. Think Eden Software when you think of the legacy you can leave your children, and your children can leave their children, and on, and on, and on, and how all those that follow you will be forever spared from giving to the undeserving. The Ladies applaud. Eden has always been by your side, and it hasn’t ended with the Obligatory Organizer. Now there’s more! He whips out a circuit board. end of scene


Video Software Promotion 1

Video Software Promotion 2

License Renewal Mission

Narrators: Francis and Rose Hello. We’re the Ladies that Sew. We make altar cloths. Our cloths are stained with the blood of our Lord. Our Lord’s blood was not shed by the gallon, but drop, by drop, by drop. That’s how it worked for him, and that’s how it works for us. Drops of our Lord’s blood, like the hurts, the abuses, and the seemingly trivial disservices, all add up to your very own crucifixion. The solution - Eden’s Crucifixion Software – a program sensitive to how you hurt. Ladies, we know all there is to know about hurt. The Eden people know all there is to know about probability. Eden Software uses the most sophisticated algorithmic equations. They predict who will hurt you, even before they do. Now you can act first, slam the door on friendships, cut off people before they have the chance to cause you pain. Ladies, celebrate his crucifixion, but for heaven’s sake avoid your own.

Narrator: Jose Patel Rapture doesn’t come in a bottle. It comes in a disc. Eden Software is proud to present the latest in Eden’s personal prayer software line, RAPTURE. Rapture is what you’ve come to expect from the leader in sanctified software. Like Prayer Perfect, with a twenty thousand word theological thesaurus or Eden’s state of the art digital audio where your prayers are actually answered, Rapture shortcuts the arduous ascetic process. Our need to unite with the transcendental, our search for a state of ecstasy is just like theirs. The difference...time, we just don’t have much. It’s difficult enough juggling vocations, business chores, and a host of other obligations. Today who has time to fast for days, let alone weeks on end. And how could anyone manage to schedule years of contemplation and self-reflection. Eden’s Software offers an easier way to the beatific vision. Call now. Operators are waiting.

Sister Margaret Sister Alfreda, what are you doing? (Alfreda is opening a file folder showing multiple images of women in various stages of grief and tears. She uses a digital cut and paste program to insert and paste her face over one of the grieving widows.) Sister Alfreda What did you think I’m doing? It’s license renewal time. I’ve got to get this application in, my personalized auto license renewal. You’ve never applied for a vanity license plate? (Margaret shakes her head no.) Well it’s not as easy, not as easy as they make you think. You can’t assume that they’re going to reissue last years license without, without wanting some sort of, some sort of verification. And it’s not that I’m the only person applying for a Sorrow I plate. It’s a crowded field out there. Sorrow II and Sorrow III, they’re not exactly dozing behind the wheel. What they wouldn’t do to move up a rung on the sorrow hierarchy. Sister, I learned a long time ago, you cannot rest on your past woe.


postivist promps

seesaw as big data conceit

nihilistic double downers

A chain of web searches propped up the Contagion story line, backdrops and players. Results were mixed. It was better six years later, and again a play. The play was Secret - The Josephine Baker FBI Files. Secret wore a digital wrap well. But cloaked or not, both plays veered between positivist prompts and nihilistic double downers. It was a seesaw.


a cross over at a basillica Before Contagion rebooted a Jesus myth, Father McNamee published his Cathedral monograph. The Architecture and Mosaics of the Saint Louis Cathedral was McNamee’s big church atlas. It’s a guide book. The Jesuit used the Cathedral’s mosaics to map the Christian creed. He had it all there, right to the end chapel. McNamee wrote that in 1929 Paul Heuduck, the father, inscribed the Dies Irae on a small gold mosaic dome. The dome is on the brink, the entry into the All Souls Chapel. It’s a flat threshold. Fr. McNamee said the Chapel’s flat ceiling “contrasts sharply with the domical and vaulted ceilings that prevail everywhere else in the Cathedral.” It’s laid low, flat. Dies Irae translates Days of Wrath. Heuduck cut the wrath and the rest of that Latin verse into the dome. The Contagion of the Night disc and video jockeys grabbed the Dies Irae. They remixed it. And then they used it, and other credo bits, to mourn a descent into flat.


6the dervish in the machine

On December 31, 1999, Contagion remix artists turned up on the street. They took an eight story slab, a one time party-wall to party. It was a scrim to mark passage. The “Dies Irae� and an end of time millennium message from Mayor Clarence showed up. It was all part of a bash for a city that thinks and drinks. An archive follows. It’s a chain of emails. They tell what happened. Detail a party and a protocol. The emails layout early r + d into digital techne, streets and us. In this back and forth there are how-to tips on: - using streets as platform to peer - wearing info-network jackets - slipping past sickly sweet tomorrows This cache of emails document a blend of players and worlds: technology, programing, urbanism, government, and the arts. They were New Year Eve party givers and goers, the millennium cast. Their faces and the stage they played on make up the stills that frame this centennial moment.


Subject: RE: Bad News Unfortunately yes, they have decided to spend all $40,000 on fireworks. They will have a show at 6pm and at 12am. I talked with Judy Simms today and we are still working on a countdown device and will continue to market the Millennium on the Mississippi to the media, incorporating all the events occuring and we are also going to try to get her artist to design some sort of logo for the Millennium Event. Let me know what you think. I will still help you in any way that I can. Jodi > -----Original Message----> From: paul guzzardo [SMTP:zio11@stlnet.com] > Sent: Tuesday, October 26, 1999 1:43 PM > To: Angela Pancella; jjordan@dtslp.org > Subject: Fw: Bad News > > jodi- this just came in from jeff - is it true? > paul > -----Original Message----> From: Jeff Edwards < jeff@stlnet.com <mailto:jeff@stlnet.com>> > To: paul guzzardo < zio11@stlnet.com <mailto:zio11@stlnet.com>> > Cc: sshipley@dslp.org <mailto:sshipley@dslp.org> < sshipley@dslp.org > <mailto:sshipley@dslp.org>> > Date: Tuesday, October 26, 1999 2:33 PM > Subject: Bad News > > > I had lunch with scenna, one of those amazingly energetic Downtown STL > Partnership people, and it seems that the offer for $5,000 to fund a > millineum party is no longer an option. > > I don’t know what you heard from Shannon, but we may have to rethink > this whole project. Speaking of which, do you have her e-mail? I > need to drop something on her to check on. > > Really sorry about missing last night- things are beginning to fray. Page 81 From: Angela Pancella <anjelle@accessus.net> To: Buck Doubet <suzannemoak@hotmail.com> Subject: Fw: Fw: SLDC millennium meeting/Metropolis NY Eve party Date: 10/6/1999 5:55:02 PM Hi Suzanne, (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:47:57 AM blank) My name is Angela Pancella and I’m the Managing Director of MediaARTS. Our president, Paul Guzzardo, said that he talked with you about Metropolis’ plans for a New Year’s Eve party and how we might be involved. We have the top floor of the AD Brown building (where we are, at Tucker and Washington) available for a party that night if Metropolis is interested in doing a joint party/fundraiser with us. I am sending a copy of Paul Guzzardo’s email to Cindy Teasdale Basically, we would like to know if you have a budget for this event and whether we could piggyback some of our plans on yours. Angela 771-5742 ---------> From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> > To: Angela Pancella <anjelle@accessus.net> > Subject: Fw: Fw: SLDC millennium meeting/Metropolis NY Eve party > Date: Wednesday, October 06, 1999 11:03 AM > > (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:15:53 AM blank) > -----Original Message----> From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> > To: Cindy Teasdale <Cindy_Teasdale@aismail.wustl.edu> > Date: Tuesday, September 28, 1999 10:39 PM > Subject: Re: Fw: SLDC millennium meeting/Metropolis NY Eve party >

> > >Hi Cindy > >The quick story > >SLDC’s Community Network division wants to produce in conjunction with > Media > >ARTS - a non for profit - that I’m president - a New Years millennium web > >cam projection event - -a variation on the Sinefield wall projection. The > >purpose - in additional to a good party - is to highlight St. Louis’s > >connection with other Metropolitan celebrations - Rome Cairo London et. > >Inaddition to bringing in feeds we also would broadcast the St. Louis event > >over web . > >The background image would be a collage of live web can feeds from various > >foreign sites, while the foreground images areof the St. Louis > celebration. > >We’d have a DJ for a direct Web feed that would run over the real video > >stream. > >It would be great if the Metropolis’s new years party would be part of this > >foreground. > >What follows is a copy of the proposal. It is structured around an > >application the City is filing to have St. Louse Designated as a Millennium > >Community. > >When you get back to town give me a buzz -231-8784. > >thanks Page 278 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <jrudinsk@art.wustl.edu, j0e@hotmail.com> Subject: proposal -New years Date: 9/28/1999 10:40:47 PM 1.Describe how the community will reach out to a broad segment of people and organizations to involve them in their millennium activities? The City of St. Louis’ Community Information Network, working with MediaARTS Alliance (a not-for-profit organization dedicated to broadening awareness of and opportunities for media art) will sponsor a Millennium Celebration website which will be accessible to anyone logging in from around the world. The contents of the website will also be projected onto a monumental downtown wall using a sophisticated LCD projection system As other communities around the globe broadcast their celebrations, these images will be downloaded and projected on the wall, and a webcam will capture images of St. Louis revelers for inclusion on the website. This outdoor projection will permit St. Louis downtown revelers to view celebrations taking place in plazas, piazzas and parks all around the world, while our neighbors in this wired global village will witness an extraordinary tableau – St. Louis’s millennial celebration occurring in front of an alternating background of global millennial celebrations. Making the website a part of downtown celebrations, projected in a public space, keeps its audience from being limited to those with knowledge of and access to computers. Mixing images of St. Louis celebrations with those taking place worldwide symbolizes how the turn of the millennium makes us all citizens of a global community. The wall overlooks one of the busiest intersections downtown, making it an ideal location for a large gathering of people. 2. Describe how the community will design a planning structure to develop its millennium program? (How many people the community envisions will be involved, how often they will meet, etc.) The St. Louis Community Information Network (CIN) hosts the official website of the City of St. Louis. CIN will work closely with MediaARTS Alliance to bring this idea to fruition. MediaARTS will be responsible for finding media artists (“visual jockeys”) with expertise in creating exciting collages of images out of available photos and video. Archival footage from the city’s past (see below) will be accessed through organizations such as the Missouri Historical Society. Local technology companies will be approached for assistance with hardware and software needed to produce this website. 3. Describe how the community plans to carry out the national millennium

theme: “Honor the Past—Imagine the Future.” (Please list the projects you currently have planned or are considering pursuing along with a time-table of major events/activities.) In addition to real-time images of local and global celebrations, which by being presented (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:47:11 AM blank) together on the website conjure the hope of a truly global together on the website conjure the hope of a truly global community, we will project archival footage of St. Louis from decades past. Those who view the site in St. Louis and around the world will see past, present and future come together by means of the most cutting-edge technology available. Page 186 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <Cindy_Teasdale@aismail.wustl.edu> Subject: Re: Fw: SLDC millennium meeting/Metropolis NY Eve party Date: 9/28/1999 10:39:30 PM Hi Cindy The quick story SLDC’s Community Network division wants to produce in conjunction with Media ARTS - a non for profit - that I’m president - a New Years millennium web cam projection event - -a variation on the Sinefield wall projection. The purpose - in additional to a good party - is to highlight St. Louis’s connection with other Metropolitan celebrations - Rome Cairo London et. Inaddition to bringing in feeds we also would broadcast the St. Louis event over web . (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:33:07 AM blank) The background image would be a collage of live web can feeds from various foreign sites, while the foreground images areof the St. Louis celebration. We’d have a DJ for a direct Web feed that would run over the real video stream. It would be great if the Metropolis’s new years party would be part of this foreground. What follows is a copy of the proposal. It is structured around an application the City is filing to have St. Louse Designated as a Millennium Community. When you get back to town give me a buzz -231-8784. thanks Paul g Proposal/application 1.Describe how the community will reach out to a broad segment of people and organizations to involve them in their millennium activities? The City of St. Louis’ Community Information Network, working with MediaARTS Alliance (a not-for-profit organization dedicated to broadening awareness of and opportunities for media art) will sponsor a Millennium Celebration website which will be accessible to anyone logging in from around the world. The contents of the website will also be projected onto a monumental downtown wall using a sophisticated LCD projection system (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:46:55 AM blank) As other communities around the globe broadcast their celebrations, these images will be downloaded and projected on the wall, and a webcam will capture images of St. Louis revelers for inclusion on the website. This outdoor projection will permit St. Louis downtown revelers to view celebrations taking place in plazas, piazzas and parks all around the world, while our neighbors in this wired global village will witness an extraordinary tableau – St. Louis’s millennial celebration occurring in front of an alternating background of global millennial celebrations. Making the website a part of downtown celebrations, projected in a public space, keeps its audience from being limited to those with knowledge of and access to computers. Mixing images of St. Louis celebrations with those taking place worldwide symbolizes how the turn of the millennium makes us all citizens of a global community. The wall overlooks one of the busiest intersections downtown, making it an ideal location for a large gathering of people. 2. Describe how the community will design a planning structure to develop

its millennium program? (How many people the community envisions will be involved, how often they will meet, etc.) (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:45:53 AM blank) The St. Louis Community Information Network (CIN) hosts the official website of the City of St. Louis. CIN will work closely with MediaARTS Alliance to bring this idea to fruition. MediaARTS will be responsible for Page 187

>Status: >> (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:32:08 AM blank) I see no problem with you ordering a DSL line directly from Bell. It would >not go through the phone system. I suspect you will want to use it for your >internet access. Bell would come out and run the line to the building >DSL is available in our area. I’m not sure if they will run the line >directly to your office, so let me know what they tell you. If they bring >it to the building and leave it at the demarcation point (which is >downstairs, basement level of A.D.Brown) then we will have to run a wire to >your office. > Joyce Rudinsky 314/721-1114 Page 326

From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <anjelle@accessus.net> Subject: text Date: 9/2/1999 2:01:59 PM Here is the text for the proposal MediaARTS Alliance MediaARTS Alliance is a non-for profit organization that promotes media art and media artists in St. Louis by broadening public awareness of media art, and assisting media artists in the production and exhibition of media art. From: Sonya Pelli <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Services To: Buck Doubet <jrudinsk@artsci.wustl.edu> MediaARTS Alliance furnish media artist with the tools to create and display Subject: Re: MediaARTS their work. MediaARTS Alliance operates a media laboratory in Downtown St. Date: 10/21/1999 12:07:22 PM Louis. The media arts lab, located on a corner first floor downtown St. Louis (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 space has large street front windows. Multimedia hardware and the digital 12/8/12 10:43:28 AM artists/operators are visible from the street. The publics (pedestrians) who blank) pass by on the street have the opportunity to observe the creative process by Thaks Joyce for the update. I don’t know if this is helpful, but I found a which multimedia artists, using current digital software, make their work. web site that lists webcams in the US and around the world MILLENNIUM COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE http://www.earthcam.com/. Some of this site may have some interesting Millennium Web Broadcast Celebrations implementations. Internet and web camera technology allow communities to web broadcast their Sonya Pelli millennium celebrations over the Internet. Program Manager These global celebrations will have a real - time Internet presence during the St. Louis Community Information Network days and hours before and after midnight December 31 1999. St. Louis Development Corporation (Highlight comment paulguzzardo 1015 Locust, Suite 1200 12/8/12 10:44:01 AM St. Louis, MO 63101 blank) Phone: 314 622-3400 St. Louis will participate in this global virtual millennial party. Web Fax: 314 231-2341 cameras, broadband delivery systems, and LCD projection systems will permit TDD: 314 259-3435 St. Louisians to look and be seen. http://stlouis.missouri.org The City of St. Louis and Media ARTS Alliance will broadcast the St. Louis spelli@stlouis.missouri.org millennial celebration over the Internet. We willl use a sophisticated LCD ----- Original Message ----projection system to project directly from the Internet onto a monumental From: Joyce Rudinsky <jrudinsk@artsci.wustl.edu> downtown wall. To: <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> The up stream web camera broadcast - originating in downtown St. Louis- will Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 1999 8:49 AM be broadcast in real time stream as global celebrations are simultaneously Subject: MediaARTS downloaded and projected on the wall. > Sonya, This outdoor projection will permit St. Louis downtown revelers to view > I am the curator of MediaARTS and have worked with Paul Guzzardo on celebrations taking place in plazas, piazzas and parks all around the world, several while our neighbors in this wired global village will witness an extraordinary > projects over the last few years. tableau – St. Louis’s millennial celebration occurring in front of an > alternating background of global millennial celebrations. > I am sending you a note to let you know that I am researching ideas for Garment District > Millennium web cams. I will be out of town until Monday. I will contact Page 337 you > at the end of next week to discuss ideas From: Joyce Rudinsky <jrudinsk@artsci.wustl.edu> > To: Buck Doubet <zio11@stlnet.com> > I look forward to this project. Subject: RE: MediaARTS > Date: 10/20/1999 2:02:13 PM > Joyce Rudinsky >Reply-To: <pauld@postnet.com> > 314/721-1114 (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 >> 12/8/12 10:31:52 AM Page 332 blank) >From: “Paul Deming” <pauld@postnet.com> >To: “Joyce Rudinsky” <jrudinsk@artsci.wustl.edu> >Subject: RE: MediaARTS >Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 10:25:30 -0500 >MIME-Version: 1.0 >X-Priority: 3 (Normal) >X-MSMail-Priority: Normal >X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V4.72.2106.4 >Importance: Normal


From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <uneed2@macomb.com, jdavenport@webtv.net> Subject: Fw: New Years Eve : a guzzardo web event Date: 12/30/1999 7:35:13 PM if you have your mouse - or any mouse - in hand tomorrow night you might want to click on: HYPERLINK “http://www.stlvirtualpark.org”www.stlvirtualpark.org. that’s it and happy new year paul g (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:57:02 AM blank) St. Louis to Greet Millennium with Revelers from Around the World at MediaARTS’ New Virtual Park Giant Outdoor Video Projection Brings Together Revelers from New York, London, Paris, Munich and St. Louis as they Celebrate the New Year. St. Louis, MO, December 22, 1999--The corner of Tucker and Washington in St. Louis will become a new media version of Times Square this New Year’s Eve as MediaARTS launches its new Virtual Park with a live outdoor event. This event will feature a “media jockey” or digital artist who will combine live webcam footage from Sao Paolo to Tokyo with archival footage from St. Louis, as well as live footage from the “Postcards from the Global Village” party which will be held in the A.D. Brown Building. These images will then be displayed in a giant projection onto the side of a building at the corner of Tucker and Washington. This show at the wall, visible from the street, is free and open to the public. The event will run from 6 pm to 1 am and is very close to St. Louis’ First Night festivities. In addition, the display will available for viewing on and after New Year’s Eve on the Virtual Park website at: HYPERLINK “http://www.stlvirtualpark.org”www.stlvirtualpark.org. “Technology is here and we’re living with it,” says Joyce Rudinsky, MediaARTS’ Curatorial Director. “Up until now technology has increased our sense of isolation. That’s why MediaARTS is using images of gatherings from history and around the world to refashion technology. We’re using it to create a sense of community. That’s why we’re calling the website the Virtual Park.” This website will run all through the year 2000. It is a special collaboration with Saint Louis Community Information Network (CIN), the City’s official website and information network, administered by the St. Louis Development Corporation. With CIN’s help, “stlvirtualpark” was designated by the White House an official Millennium Communities Project. This honor showcases visionary programs across the country which celebrate the millennium. MediaARTS is also collaborating with Metropolis St. Louis to host the multimedia millennium party in the AD Brown building’s top floor. The party will be held on December 31, 1999 from 8:30 pm to 1 am. Tickets can be ordered from Metrotix by calling 534-1111 and asking for “Postcards from the Global Village.” Cost is $60 per person. MediaARTS Alliance promotes media art (art created using new digital and Page 118 information technologies) and media artists in Missouri by broadening public awareness of their work and assisting media artists with production and exhibition. --end-Page 119 >>> >do you plan to come ? >i need to know >because I have to negotiate number with metropolis >Paul >-----Original Message---->From: Suzanne Moak <suzannemoak@hotmail.com> >To: metropolist@electroponics.com <metropolist@electroponics.com> >Date: Monday, December 27, 1999 6:55 PM >Subject: What to wear? >> (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:51:56 AM blank) >>Dear Readers, >> >>I’ve been getting a lot of inquiries about what the “dress code” is for

the >>Metropolis Millennium Party. We are suggesting “Uptown” attire. >> >>This is somewhere between your Saturday Morning jogging outfit and a formal >>tux and ball gown. Now if you want to wear the ball gown, go ahead, but you >>might feel a little overdressed. I would NOT suggest the running suit. >> >>Images from this event will be broadcast all over the world on an >>international website. Now I’m sure a lot of people in the “global village” >>think of St. Louis as a place in the middle of nowhere where we still have >>outhouses and wear Overalls and have hay sticking out of our teeth. So >>let’s show them something different!!! >> >>”Uptown” to me means stylish, cosmopolitan (not like the cleavage baring >>magazine by that title), kind of artsy and NO BASEBALL or COWBOY HATS! >> >>It’s up to you - we will not kick you out if you are inappropriately >dressed >>- you’ll just feel funny all night. >> >>Another note: we will have coat racks available, but no coat check service. >>So I wouldn’t advise you wear your most expensive outdoor wrap, to be on >the >>safe side. The parking lot is close enough to the back entrance where you >>will enter, that you could technically run from your car to the party >>without a coat. >> >>And because this is somewhat of a warehouse space, which I have personally >>walked around in ---I caution you not to wear five-inch stiletto heels. The >>floors are uneven in some places. BE COMFORTABLE!!! >> >>Suzanne >>Your Personal Millennium Wardrobe Consultant >>______________________________________________________ >>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com >> >> >>The Metropolist is a “lightly moderated” open discussion forum on issues Page 155 >>affecting the city of St. Louis. The opinions expressed on the >>Metropolist are not necessarily those of Metropolis St. Louis or the host >>of the list, Electroponics, Inc. >> >>You can unsubscribe from the list at >>http://www2.electroponics.com/maillists.html >> >>Be sure to visit the web page at http://www.mstl.org/ >> >>If you would like to post this to the stl.general usenet newsgroup make >>POST the first line of your email and hit return twice. >> >>>> Page 156 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <jrudinsk@art.wustl.edu, j0e@hotmail.com> Subject: Fw: More Millennium Party Trivia Date: 12/27/1999 7:54:26 PM (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:53:47 AM blank) -----Original Message----From: Suzanne Moak <suzannemoak@hotmail.com> To: metropolist@electroponics.com <metropolist@electroponics.com> Date: Monday, December 27, 1999 6:33 PM

Subject: More Millennium Party Trivia >Just thought I’d add some more tidbits of info about the upcoming party. > >1. We have booked a latin-flavored jazz duo for the first hour. and then >JoeBeukmann of Beige Records will begin his DJ gig with a variety of musical >styles for the rest of the evening. > >2. Included in your admission price are party favors: hats, tiaras, >noisemakers and an engraved commemorative Champagne glass. > >3. We will have a photographer on site who will post photographs of the >party on the Metropolis website and you will have an opportunity to purchase >prints afterward. > >4. There will actually be several Media photographers on site that evening. > >4. This international website that is being inaugurated that evening by >MediaArts in conjunction with St. Louis Development Corporation has been >designated an official Millennium Communities Project by the White House. >The webcam displays on view at our party and from our party will be >accessible through this website: www.virtualpark.org. > >SEE YOU THERE! >Suzanne Moak > >______________________________________________________ >Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com >> >The Metropolist is a “lightly moderated” open discussion forum on issues >affecting the city of St. Louis. The opinions expressed on the >Metropolist are not necessarily those of Metropolis St. Louis or the host >of the list, Electroponics, Inc. > >You can unsubscribe from the list at >http://www2.electroponics.com/maillists.html > >Be sure to visit the web page at http://www.mstl.org/ > >If you would like to post this to the stl.general usenet newsgroup make >POST the first line of your email and hit return twice. > Page 178 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <cholm01@students.bbk.ac.uk> Subject: a mix of things Date: 12/24/1999 9:26:46 AM got your fax. taking it with me to Macomb and will be trying to outline some thoughts. Had a great spur of the moment pot/luck B party Wednesday night - great time Here are some notes that we’ve put together for some grant work that we’re going to be doing after the first. also I pulling out some other text which you might read on all of this, I’m opening documents rather than sending attached filesalso a site to look at http://the-internet-eye.com/reviews/oct99/watching.htm regarding the wall images on the web site- those are the images that won this years AIA un built- they -w with earlier images that I did were entered into - this years PA competition. they were done largely by Ian Caine young Architect - and of course myself. Have a good Xmas - love to mommy to be. We will serve as cowebmaster of stlvirtualpark in conjunction with (incorporate text of millennium plan) CIN, SLDC (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:05:43 AM blank) The website—basic outline: 1.Will be used to make use of current hypermedia technologies to examine history of downtown St. Louis, allowing access to a wide variety of archival

sources, still photos and video streams. These images and archival footage will be provided by various academic, historical and journalistic archives. 2. website will provide a text and multimedia description of proposed downtown development projects, including the Washington Avenue development plan, 2 or 3 others (hotel, Cupples plan) 3. Website will include webcam images of these existing downtown sites. In addition, we will provide multimedia artists the opportunity to comment on past, present and future St. Louis and have their work in a gallery on the site. Visitors can look at downtown’s past, present, and future. Artists can explore relationships of the past to the present, the past to the future, the present to the future. What will be up New Year’s Eve: Sponsor list--All with websites Intermission Magazine Worknet Heuris Lexor Reprinted with permission Swekosky Photo archive Page 189 (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:06:11 AM blank) Separate—webcam to party Joe’s navigation page will lead to webcam websites On the site after the party will be edited streams from the party Using the themes of past present and future Allowing artists to examine issues related to the city, Applying these languages and languages that may be developed during the course of the year Hypermedia, virtual modeling programs—get definitions from Joyce or Joe Our job is to serve as curator and We are going to invite artists to propose projects and use lab to create work created and shown on the web created and shown on the web and the lab created and shown only in the lab artist bios Lorens Holms and Clare Huxley Nell Tenhaaf Send note to Nell—putting together artists for next year (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:06:49 AM blank) Joyce—who are we inviting? Role of the lab SLDC—St. Louis booster Highlighting the presence of multimedia artists in St. Louis, giving a demonstration of the work they have done, by creating a lab and showcasing this work encouraging the production of work, and encouraging multimedia outside of St. Louis to locate here. Through the creative arts, we are presenting St. Louis to the world as a city open and inviting to new technology. We are providing a one-stop forum for software companies, hardware companies, Internet service providers and media artists to meet; the software companies see what the artists wish to develop and what tools they need to develop that. Postcards from the Global Village made use of a website and a lab at the same time to show the nature of St. Louis as a focal point for the technologies and those exploring the limits of this artistic language. In five-year plan lab has two purposes—one is a site where artists will have hardware and software to create and display their work. The lab becomes an educational vehicle to the community at large to begin to understand the process of artists working and seeing their output. Because of the peculiar and exciting nature of this venue, it is an opportunity for the community to observe them working and to see their final output. Education to media artists will increase as more equipment becomes available (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:09:48 AM blank) Website will show media artists outside of St. Louis nature of venue that Page 190

A Bug and A Buck They was a hitch in trying to open those 1999 e-mails. It was code problem. Buck Doubet opened them. Doubet is a programer. But in doing it he left his signature on the emails. Now they all are to Buck Doubet.

(Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:09:43 AM blank) allows artists to use information from the streetcorner. Not in a hermetic closed virtual world but a world which can make use of the urban community. Once they understand the richness of these tools, they will use same creative methods outside of St. Louis. Public at large will increase in understanding the possibilities of this as a participatory artistic medium, not closed to a cybergeek but one which embraces the community—we can educate the public to this. Right now media art can be viewed as closed, exclusionary world, but by showing a lab where the production is more than the software, scanners, etc. but includes this dynamic, interactive relationship with the community—multimedia as developing artistic language—it will better understood and welcomed by the community. Practical methods of getting this across to public—MediaARTS serving as lobbying organization in broad urban design schemes include locales such as information kiosks as well as large screen technologies. We are offering in smaller scale examples of the larger plans. Information kiosk—to take newspaper kiosk and put in terminal, metasearches map systems to a system that provides information and includes wireless connection to the net; not just projection but liquid crystal screens. Large screen technologies(Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:07:54 AM blank) The Millennium Project You are invited to become part of a unique public-private partnership that is being formed to showcase St. Louis’ potential as a worldwide leader in technology. Using the occasion of the new millennium celebrations, the partners will demonstrate how electronic media and the arts can be merged into a new and exciting forum for bringing people and communities closer together. On New Year’s Eve 1999, the City of St. Louis’ Community Information Network, working with MediaARTS Alliance will launch a Millennium Celebration website which will be accessible to anyone logging in from around the world. At the same time, the contents of this website will be projected onto a monumental downtown wall at the corner of Tucker and Washington, using a sophisticated LCD projection system. As other communities around the globe celebrate the coming of the year 2000, images gleaned from around the world will be downloaded and projected on the wall for thousands of St. Louisans to see. At the same time, a webcam will capture images of St. Louis revelers for inclusion on the worldwide website. The domain name-stlvirtualpark.org/.com has been reserved. Also on New Year’s Eve, Metropolis St. Louis (an organization whose mission is to create and promote an environment in the City of St. Louis that attracts and retains young people) will hold their Millennium Party in the AD Brown Building downtown, the building which also houses MediaARTS. Artists from MediaARTS will project their webcam images at the party and feed images of the Metropolis partygoers back to the website. In addition to real-time images of local and global celebrations, which by being presented together on the website conjure the hope of a truly global Page 191 community, we will project archival photographs of St. Louis from decades past. Those who view the site in St. Louis and around the world will see past, present and future come together by means of the most cutting-edge technology available. Making the website part of downtown celebrations, projected in a public space, keeps its audience from being limited to those with knowledge of and access to computers. Mixing images of St. Louis celebrations with those taking place worldwide symbolizes how the turn of the millennium makes us all citizens of a global community. The wall overlooks one of the busiest intersections downtown, making it an ideal location for a large gathering of people. This indoor and outdoor projection will permit St. Louis downtown revelers to view celebrations taking place in plazas, piazzas and parks all around the world, while our neighbors in this wired global village will witness an extraordinary tableau — St. Louis’ millennial celebration occurring in front of an alternating background of global millennial celebrations. (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 4:50:52 PM blank)


and St. Louis Development Corporation I called Hillary Levein(sp?) and left a message - but have not heard anything. I also sent a note to Ray Rinaldi Is it possible that I might speak with someone about (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:26:55 AM blank) the possibility of engaging the PD as a sponsor for in/kind contributions of archival images? Here is the site for the party/web site description and marketing plan we are using to promote the party and the year long web site. http://www.mediaarts.org/millennium.html By way of additional explanation, note the e-mail from Metropolis president Brian Marston describing the event. I can be reached at 231-8784. Thank you for consideration Paul Guzzardo Metropolis St. Louis (http://www.mstl.org/) and MediaARTS (http://www.mediaarts.org/) are teaming up to put on the best New Year’s party in St. Louis. Postcards from the Global Village, the millennial celebration with a digital edge, will be held on the 9th floor of the A.D. Brown Building (1136 Washington Avenue) from 8:30 PM on Friday, December 31, 1999 to 1:00 AM on Saturday, January 1, 2000. The A.D. Brown Building is a former shoe warehouse that was built at the last turn of the century and offers spectacular views of downtown. Images from New Year’s celebrations around the world will be projected onto a large screen at street level on the southeast corner of Tucker and Washington and on screens throughout the party. These images will be woven together with archival photos of St. Louis’s history and live video of downtown festivities to create an ever-changing visual tapestry. The projections will serve as the backdrop for Web cam footage of the party that will be uploaded in real-time to the Internet so that it can be viewed by our neighbors in the wired global village. This online broadcast will inaugurate a new Web site that will showcase our city’s potential as a worldwide leader in technology. . Page 325 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Subject: ?!?! Date: 12/7/1999 4:27:20 PM (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:28:45 AM blank) This millennium party – centered in the heart of the loft district celebrates both the redevelopment and renovation of Downtown St Louis and the important role St. Louis plays in the emerging information technology economy. This year, as we begin rebuilding and renovating Washington Avenue, we see more and more digital technology companies making Washington Avenue home. Page 332 From: Angela Pancella <anjelle@accessus.net> To: Buck Doubet <zio11@stlnet.com> Subject: Re: text Date: 9/2/1999 3:04:28 PM I’m sending my ideas back to you plugged into the specific questions on the Millenium Community application site with some of the questions I still have. 1.Describe how the community will reach out to a broad segment of people and organizations to involve them in their millennium activities. The City of St. Louis, working with MediaARTS Alliance (a not-for-profit (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:35:37 AM blank) organization dedicated to broadening awareness of and opportunities for media art) will sponsor a Millennium Celebration website which will be accessible to anyone logging in from around the world. The contents of the website will also be projected onto a monumental downtown wall using a sophisticated LCD projection system to project directly from the Internet onto a monumental downtown wall.

As other communities around the globe broadcast their celebrations, these images will be downloaded and projected on the wall, and a webcam will capture images of St. Louis revelers for inclusion on the website. This outdoor projection will permit St. Louis downtown revelers to view celebrations taking place in plazas, piazzas and parks all around the world, while our neighbors in this wired global village will witness an extraordinary tableau – St. Louis’s millennial celebration occurring in front of an alternating background of global millennial celebrations. Making the website a part of downtown celebrations, projected in a public space, keeps its audience from being limited to those with knowledge of and access to computers. Mixing images of St. Louis celebrations with those taking place worldwide symbolizes how the turn of the millennium makes us all citizens of a global community. 2.Describe how the community will design a planning structure to develop its millennium program. (How many people the community envisions will be involved, how often they will meet, etc.) [Have no infomation on this.] 3.Describe how the community plans to carry out the national millennium theme: “Honor the Past—Imagine the Future.” (Please list the projects you currently have planned or are considering pursuing along with a time-table of major events/activities.) [Material from #1 might fit better here, or it can simply be restated.] In addition to real-time images of local and global celebrations, which by being presented together on the website conjure the hope of a true global community, we will project archival footage of St. Louis from decades past. Those who view the site in St. Louis and around the world will see past, present and future come together by means of the most cutting-edge technology available. Timetable: [do you think they want a timetable for the planning process or just for the event? And how long would you like the website up--will images be archived for retrieval after the New Year’s Eve Party? Will we be running the website all day December 31-January 1, or just a few hours? And if it’s just a few hours, is it real-time or are the images from earlier celebrations stored and fetched, because of the differences in time zone?] ---------Page 128 From: Sonya Pelli <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> To: Buck Doubet <zio11@stlnet.com> Subject: Re: millennium proposal Date: 9/3/1999 10:11:08 AM Paul: Got it. It reads really well. I’ll check with Kevin, but I think we can probably proceede with the text you provided. I think the idea is great and we should not have a problem getting other people on board. Do you have an idea for a budget yet? If yes, let me know so we can start thinking about possible funding opportunity beside sponsors. Sonya Pelli St. Louis CIN http://stlouis.missouri.org ----- Original Message ----From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Sonya Pelli <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Sent: Friday, September 03, 1999 9:30 AM Subject: Fw: millennium proposal > one more time >>>> > (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:29:53 AM blank) >To: Chuck- Sonya-Kevin > >Here is the text for the millennium application > >I’ll call > >Paul > > > > > > > >>1.Describe how the community will reach out to a broad segment of people > >>and organizations to involve them in their millennium activities

> >> > >>The City of St. Louis’ Community Information Network, working with > >>MediaARTS Alliance (a not-for-profit organization dedicated to broadening > >>awareness of and opportunities for media art) will sponsor a Millennium > >>Celebration website which will be accessible to anyone logging in from > >>around the world. The contents of the website will also be projected onto > >>a monumental downtown wall using a sophisticated LCD projection system > >>As other communities around the globe broadcast their celebrations, these > >>images will be downloaded and projected on the wall, and a webcam will > >>capture images of St. Louis revelers for inclusion on the website. > >>This outdoor projection will permit St. Louis downtown revelers to view > >>celebrations taking place in plazas, piazzas and parks all around the > >>world, while our neighbors in this wired global village will witness an > >>extraordinary tableau - St. Louis’s millennial celebration occurring in > >>front of an alternating background of global millennial celebrations. > >>Making the website a part of downtown celebrations, projected in a public Page 130 > >>space, keeps its audience from being limited to those with knowledge of > and > >>access to computers. Mixing images of St. Louis celebrations with those > >>taking place worldwide symbolizes how the turn of the millennium makes us > >>all citizens of a global community. > >>The wall overlooks one of the busiest intersections downtown, making it an > >>ideal location for a large gathering of people. > >> > >>2.Describe how the community will design a planning structure to develop > >>its millennium program. (How many people the community envisions will be > >>involved, how often they will meet, etc.) > >> > >>The St. Louis Community Information Network (CIN) hosts the official > >>website of the City of St. Louis. CIN will work closely with MediaARTS > >>Alliance to bring this idea to fruition. MediaARTS will be responsible > for > >>finding media artists (“visual jockeys”) with expertise in creating > >>exciting collages of images out of available photos and video. Archival > >>footage from the city’s past (see below) will be accessed through > >>organizations such as the Missouri Historical Society. Local technology > >>companies will be approached for assistance with hardware and software > >>needed to produce this website. > >> > >>3.Describe how the community plans to carry out the national millennium > >>theme: “Honor the Past-Imagine the Future.” (Please list the projects you > >>currently have planned or are considering pursuing along with a time-table > >>of major events/activities.) > >> > >>In addition to real-time images of local and global celebrations, which by > >>being presented together on the website conjure the hope of a truly global > >>community, we will project archival footage of St. Louis from decades > past. > >> Those who view the site in St. Louis and around the world will see past, > >>present and future come together by means of the most cutting-edge > >>technology available. > >> > >> > > > Page 131 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com>

To: Buck Doubet <dda@inlink.com> Subject: Fw: party and sponsors Date: 12/6/1999 10:45:50 AM DAVE FYI PAUL -----Original Message----From: paul guzzardo <HYPERLINK “mailto:zio11@stlnet.com”zio11@stlnet.com> To: Sullivan, Greg <HYPERLINK “mailto:gregs@gasullivan.com”gregs@gasullivan.com> Date: Monday, December 06, 1999 8:56 AM Subject: Fw: party and sponsors Greg I wanted to get back with you and give you an update regarding the millennium event. At the time of our initial conversation and e-mails, the party was a possibility not a certainty. It is now a given. Tickets are being sold - and sales are going well. As a result of your referral WorkNet is on board. It’s great to work with Steve Ulman. In addition to providing the bandwidth for the New Years party - Steve is giving SLDC and MediaARTS the band width to do the year long millennium/downtown/art/ technology site. We’ve reserved the domain names of : stlvirtualpark.com and .org. Also Heuris - has signed on - and is providing additional equipment and technical personnel. Note below is the text from an e-mail that Metropolis president Brian Marston sent out describing event. I think it’s particularly well written, and puts it all in a rounded perspective. While we have the funds to do this party - but we don’t have the dollars for the large wall projector. So we are still at this late date trying to raise money. Here is the site for the party/web site description and marketing plan we are using to promote the party and the year long web site. http://www.mediaarts.org/millennium.html I think it creates a very strong marketing - sponsorship structure. Now that this is not in the abstract - but in fact is going to happen would you have any other suggestion as to sponsorship? Does the RCGA have a list of technology companies who might be responsive? Greg any thing you can do to help would be most welcomed.- and again thank for introducing me to Steve. PAUL Page 357 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <gregs@gasullivan.com> Subject: Fw: party and sponsors Date: 12/6/1999 8:56:17 AM Greg I wanted to get back with you and give you an update regarding the millennium event. At the time of our initial conversation and e-mails, the party was a possibility not a certainty. It is now a given. Tickets are being sold - and sales are going well. As a result of your referral (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:50:10 AM blank) WorkNet is on board. It’s great to work with Steve Ulman. In addition to providing the bandwidth for the New Years party - Steve is giving SLDC and MediaARTS the band width to do the year long millennium/downtown/art/ technology site. We’ve reserved the domain names of : stlvirtualpark.com and .org. Also Heuris - has signed on - and is providing additional equipment and technical personnel. Note below is the text from an e-mail that Metropolis president Brian Marston sent out describing event. I think it’s particularly well written, and puts it all in a rounded perspective.

While we have the funds to do this party - but we don’t have the dollars for the large wall projector. So we are still at this late date trying to raise money. Here is the site for the party/web site description and marketing plan we are using to promote the party and the year long web site. http://www.mediaarts.org/millennium.html I think it creates a very strong marketing - sponsorship structure. Now that this is not in the abstract - but in fact is going to happen would you have any other suggestion as to sponsorship? Does the RCGA have a list of technology companies who might be responsive? Greg any thing you can do to help would be most welcomed.- and again thank for introducing me to Steve. PAUL Metropolis St. Louis (http://www.mstl.org/) and MediaARTS (http://www.mediaarts.org/) are teaming up to put on the best New Year’s party in St. Louis. Postcards from the Global Village, the millennial celebration with a digital edge, will be held on the 9th floor of the A.D. Brown Building (1136 Washington Avenue) from 8:30 PM on Friday, December 31, 1999 to 1:00 AM on Saturday, January 1, 2000. The A.D. Brown Building is a former shoe warehouse that was built at the last turn of the century and offers spectacular views of downtown. Images from New Year’s celebrations around the world will be projected onto a large screen at street level on the southeast corner of Tucker Page 367 and Washington and on screens throughout the party. These images will be woven together with archival photos of St. Louis’s history and live video of downtown festivities to create an ever-changing visual tapestry. The projections will serve as the backdrop for Web cam footage of the party that will be uploaded in real-time to the Internet so that it can be viewed by our neighbors in the wired global village. This online broadcast will inaugurate a new Web site that will showcase our city’s potential as a worldwide leader in technology. A DJ from Beige Records (http://www.beigerecords.com/) will get the groove on with 21st century techno funk. An open bar, appetizers from Favazza’s, a champagne toast at midnight, and a souvenir champagne glass are included in the ticket price. You must be over 21 to attend and uptown attire is suggested. Come with a friend, come by yourself, come with your significant or not-so-significant other...just make sure you don’t miss out on the hottest ticket in town. Tickets are $60 per person and can be purchased by going to any MetroTix outlet (e.g. Famous Barr, Mississippi Nights, Schnucks, and Streetside), calling (314) 534-1111, or clicking over to http://www.mtix.com/eventdetail.asp?engageid=2997&eventid=8251 . Tickets are only available through MetroTix. No tickets will be sold at the door. Page 368 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <pmmakeig@artsci.wustl.edu> Subject: Fw: Metropolis Weekly Update -- Millennium Party Date: 12/5/1999 4:48:54 PM Prem FYI Paul G -----Original Message----From: Brian H. Marston <webguy@fatdays.com> To: Metropolis Presidents Mailing List <MetroPrez@electroponics.com> Date: Sunday, December 05, 1999 3:30 PM Subject: Metropolis Weekly Update -- Millennium Party >Metropolis St. Louis (http://www.mstl.org/) and MediaARTS >(http://www.mediaarts.org/) are teaming up to put on the best New Year’s >party in St. Louis. Postcards from the Global Village, the millennial >celebration with a digital edge, will be held on the 9th floor of the >A.D. Brown Building (1136 Washington Avenue) from 8:30 PM on Friday, >December 31, 1999 to 1:00 AM on Saturday, January 1, 2000. The A.D. >Brown Building is a former shoe warehouse that was built at the last >turn of the century and offers spectacular views of downtown. > >Images from New Year’s celebrations around the world will be projected


A Prototype for a Virtual Park The Millennium Celebration will also serve as a demonstraton of a new concept — The Virtual Park — which can be used to highlight developable aresa, celebrate revitalization, or focus on underutilized civic assets. New wireless technologies, as well as the ever shrinking hardware costs, permit these portable projections to be re-located to other buildings at other St. Louis locations. This creates endless opportunities for the project partners to discuss, promote, and highlight significant developments in the region — the rebirth of Downtown St. Louis, extraordinary arts and cultural events, our unique history, and much more. Further, the use of wall spaces to project Internet images will create attractive new gathering places that will become a highly visible demonstration of the new vitality of Downtown St. Louis. MediaARTS is currently in discussions withthe City to develop a collaborative effort modeled in part on the County’s Laumeier Park. Laumeier operates though a partnership between a nonprofit arts board and the St. Louis County Parks. The nonprofit board curates and owns the sculpture. The County Parks owns the park. This has proven to be a very efficient and mutually beneficial relationship. A CIN and MediaARTS collaboration, in some respects, is even more suitable than the Laumeier arrangement because public institutions are currently creating virtual content, (i.e. special services districts) and community neighborhood are building web sites and generating interactive digital tools. Resources Already Available The Milllennium Project already has secured the use of a number of resources critical to the success of this project. These resources include: Three video projectors Multiple VCRs A 10 X 12 rear projection screen Sound system Video mixer One Mac G3 Multiple webcams Use of the former executive suite of the AD Brown Building for party A disk jockey for the Metropolis party These resources have been donated by the various partners, thereby keeping the overall cost of this project as low as possible. Page 192 In addition, CIN, MediaARTS and Metropolis will all provide staff and volunteer support to ensure that this project runs smoothly and achieves its goals. Promotion The promotional goal of the Millennium Project is to have the Millennium Celebration website viewed by at least one million people on New Year’s Eve. to achieve this goal, a wide range of promotional activities are planned, including: First Night St. Louis, the official St. Louis millennium celebration, has offered to list the Millennium Project in their publicity material. First Night’s festivities will be occurring downtown in close proximity to MediaARTS’ lab. There will be directional signs pointing revelers to MediaARTS’ event from First Night’s venues. The event will also be advertised on the Metropolist, an email discussion group run by Metropolis which has a large subscriber base. Press releases focusing on the different elements of the Project (the website, the party, the outdoor projection) will be sent to area newspapers, television and radio stations. Press release will also be sent to national media to attempt to draw even broader interest in this site among the general public. The website will be promoted on listservs targeting the digital art/new media art community around the world. (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:10:33 AM blank) Sample Timeline of Event The Millennium Project will be a dusk-to-dawn celebration, mixing real-time webcam images with archival footage and videotaped segments. As each time zone around the world reaches midnight, we will focus on that particular location, such as: St. Louis Time Focus Area Around the World

Comments 6 pm 12 midnight in Greenwich Britain’s Millenium Dome: http://www.mirror.co.uk/dome/dome1.htm 7 pm 12 midnight in the Azores (There seem to be no webcams in the Azores. Here would be a good time to visit Antarctica, though the whole continent is on Greenwich Mean Time: Casey Page 193 Station, Antarctica http://www.antdiv.gov.au/stations/casey/video.html 8 pm in St. Louis 12 midnight in Brazil (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 4:50:19 PM blank) 12 midnight in Greenland http://www.tvbox.com.br/index.htm Qaqortoq: http://www.greenweb.gl/optik/dagens/today.htm These are presented just as an example. As places further east of Greenwich will be celebrating the coming of 2000 during our daylight hours, footage from webcams in Berlin, South Africa, Paris, Moscow, Tokyo etc. will be captured beforehand and shown during the course of the evening. The Project does not intend to invest in the coming of the year 2000 any more historical import than it deserves. To reflect this, several webcams visited will show how some are not marking a new millenium at all: for instance, the Africam (http://www.africam.com) will be showing animals hunting through the African bush as they do every night of the year. The Partners Partners in the Millennium Project include nonprofit organizations, government entities and for-profit enterprises which share a desire to promote St. Louis as a worldwide center in the use of modern electronic communications technology. (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:27:44 AM blank) MediaARTS Alliance (http://www.mediaarts.org) MediaARTS is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to broadening awareness of and opportunities for media art. The organization is best known for using – in a collaboration with City Image - LCD projection technology to broadcast the final episode of Seinfeld on a downtown wall in 1998. That event that drew thousands of people to downtown and spawned a series of other downtown gatherings that have begun to contribute to the rebirth of the area. MediaARTS goal is to merge the power of electronic communications technology with the creative excitement of artists from around the world to create a new and exciting forum for people everywhere to experience and enjoy the best of our world. The St. Louis Community Information Network (CIN) hosts the official website of the City of St. Louis. CIN will work closely with MediaARTS Alliance to bring this idea to fruition. Metropolis St. Louis has attracted upwards of 500 people to their recent city-boosting events. They have advertising savvy and the expertise to attract a large gathering to their Millennium Party. MediaARTS will be responsible for finding media artists (“visual ambient jockeys”) with expertise in creating exciting collages of images out of available photos and video. Saint Louis Community Information Network (http://stlouis.missouri.org) Saint Louis Community Information Network (CIN) is the City’s official website and information network, admistered by the St. Louis Development Corporation, the development arm of the city. CIN is an Enterprise Community project aiming to Page 194 supporting a project that establishes Downtown on the cutting edge of media arts. This proposal offers you a tightly focused, highly efficient approach for reaching a broad audience while ensuring you significant brand positioning, market awareness, and enhanced public image opportunities. The benefits to you are significant. For example, as a sponsor at the $5,000 level, your cost per thousand impressions (CPMI) ranges between $2.50 and $5.00. This cost is significantly less than comparable advertising currently available through such well-known website providers as MSN ($15-$47) or Lycos ($15-$85). Next Steps

The Millennium will not wait for anyone. The time to commit to being a part of this unique public-private partnership is now. Please contact Paul Guzzardo at 231-8784 to confirm your interest and reserve your place in the Millennium Project. Page 196 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <editor@slfp.com> Subject: party Date: 12/21/1999 6:00:20 PM here it is “MediaARTS Announces St. Louis’ First Virtual Park” Picture yourself, on New Year’s Eve, getting in the last bit of partying before the curtain finally falls on the 1900s. Now imagine this party is taking place with New York, London, Paris and Munich as your backdrop—but you are on home turf in downtown St. Louis. This may sound like a science fiction setup, but MediaARTS Alliance is making it into a reality. On December 31st, 1999, they will provide the multicultural display in a giant projection on a wall on Tucker at Washington. An artist working in the media lab will pull images of cities and celebrations from webcams and video and project them to the wall. (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:14:44 AM blank) The fun doesn’t stop there. These images will be mixed with archival images of St. Louis’ history and live footage of a millennium party in progress. The entire mix will be collected, projected, and then sent to a special website MediaARTS is setting up for the event at www.stlvirtualpark.org.. Joyce Rudinsky, MediaARTS’ Curatorial Director, sums up the philosophy behind the display like this: “Technology is here, we’re living with it, but up to now technology has created more of a sense of isolation. We are using images of gatherings from history and around the world to refashion technology, to use it to create a sense of community. That’s why the web site will be called a ‘virtual park.’” This website will run all through the year 2000. It is a special collaboration with Saint Louis Community Information Network (CIN), the City’s official website and information network, administered by the St. Louis Development Corporation. With CIN’s help, “stlvirtualpark” was designated an official Millennium Communities Project by the White House. This honor showcases visionary programs across the country which celebrate the millennium. MediaARTS is collaborating with Metropolis St. Louis to host the multimedia millennium party in the AD Brown building’s top floor (tickets can be ordered from Metrotix by calling 534-1111 and asking for “Postcards from the Global Village”). But the show at the wall, visible from the street, is free and open to the public. In addition, the display will be available for viewing at HYPERLINK “http://www.stlvirtualpark.org/”www.stlvirtualpark.org during and after New Year’s Eve night. MediaARTS Alliance promotes media art (art created using new digital and information technologies) and media artists in Missouri by broadening public awareness of their work and assisting media artists with production and exhibition. This is made possible by grants from the Regional Arts Commission and the Missouri Arts Council. More information on this and other events can be found at HYPERLINK “http://www.mediaarts.org”www.mediaarts.org. Page 215 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <jrudinsk@art.wustl.edu, j0e@hotmail.com> Subject: Fw: curious Date: 12/21/1999 12:04:58 PM (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:59:57 AM blank) what a sad fiasco!!! -----Original Message----From: Suzanne Moak <suzannemoak@hotmail.com> To: maigret@mindspring.com <maigret@mindspring.com> Cc: metropolist@electroponics.com <metropolist@electroponics.com> Date: Tuesday, December 21, 1999 11:33 AM Subject: Re: curious >Unfortunately, the Millennium invitations were mailed out about 2 weeks ago

>via first class mail so that they wouldn’t be late. Many of us now fear >that they have ended up in the Bermuda Triangle, a Black Hole, or simply >discarded in the trash and, therefore, people may never receive them. SO I >hope none of you are waiting to order your tickets until you receive your >invitation. Just call METROTIX at 534-1111 or go to www.mtix.com. Check out >the info on the Metropolis Website at www.mstl.org. Remember- we will not be >selling any tickets at the door. > >Also - in answer to a previous query- Party Goers must be 21 or over. > >I would also appreciate if you all could spread the word about “Postcards >from the Global Village” to everyone you know. Tell them about the website >if they want more info. > >Hopefully, the only other way that ALL Metropolites will hear about this >event, is through this month’s newsletter, which SHOULD come out this week. >However, since the same mailhouse is handling that, I don’t trust the timing >on that either. > >Speaking of which, I would like to be able to recommend that Metropolis use >another mailing house due to these numerous snafus and late mailings. As far >as I’m concerned, price is not the issue - RELIABILITY AND TIMELINESS are. >However, I would like some names of any GOOD mailhouses you are familiar >with in the city. We currently use St. Louis Pre-Sort, so don’t suggest >them. Please e-mail your suggestions to me privately. > >Thanks, >Suzanne Moak > >>From: ray harrison <maigret@mindspring.com> >>To: metropolist@electroponics.com >>Subject: curious >>Date: Mon, 20 Dec 1999 21:44:51 -0600 >> >>some would say that’s my middle name... but let’s not get into that. >> >>i did not receive an invitation in the mail for the ‘millennium party: >>postcards from the global village’. i know earlier on there were some >>discussions concerning the printing and mailing of invitations. were these Page 222 (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/9/12 5:31:23 AM blank) From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Subject: Fw: New Year’s eve Date: 12/21/1999 10:50:57 AM Sonya I don’t think that I sent this on to you. Note the matter about the street lights during the other two outdoor projection even the light were turned - off where do we go to take care of this. As Jason indicated this is a critical for a quaintly piece. thanks Paul -----Original Message----From: jyounce@swank.com <jyounce@swank.com> To: zio11@stlnet.com <zio11@stlnet.com> Date: Monday, December 20, 1999 10:11 AM Subject: New Year’s eve >Paul, > >Sorry that we missed each other, however, many circumstances were not >working out so I just got the info that I needed and moved on. > >Anyway, I measured the street with a RoadRunner and found that it is roughly

>200 feet from A.D. Brown building across Tucker to the big brick wall. We >can get a large image, but I would like to keep it to between 65-80 feet so >that we keep it as bright as possible. Last time that Swank did something >like this, we stacked (2) projectors to give us about 5400 lumens. The >projector that we will use for this one will give us about 1000 lumens more. >That will be very helpful considering the size of the image and the fact >that we will not be shooting on a screen, but rather a very pourus surface. > >A few other details: This projector will require (2) dedicated 20amp, 110 >volt circuits. It is imperative that they are dedicated. Also, there are >several street lights that we request are turned off. All the lights >between the A.D. Brown building and the shooting surface, as well as a few >lights on the west side of Tucker next to the Jefferson Arms building, (west >corner of St. Charles and Tucker), and a few lights on the North corner of >the shooting surface, are those that may cause havoc. > >Finally, there are a few logistical issues that I need. I need a >confirmation that we will shoot from the 6th floor. Also, what procedures >do we take for the load-in? We will need to deliver on Thursday, December >30th and pick up on Monday, January 3rd. > >That is about it from my end. Just to let you know, I have a technician and >the projector reserved. I’m sure that we will talk soon. > >P.S. What is the status with sound. If we need to provide any, I need to >know today to book the equipment and reserve a technician. Thanks! > >Jason R. Younce >Swank Audio Visuals Page 224 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <anjelle@accessus.net, jrudinsk@art.wustl.edu, jeff@stlnet.com> Subject: Fw: Update #2 Date: 12/17/1999 3:57:29 PM -----Original Message----From: Sonya Pelli <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> To: Paul Guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> Date: Friday, December 17, 1999 3:42 PM Subject: Update #2 (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:25:39 AM blank) >Paul: >We received confirmation from the White House that we have been approved as >an official Millennium Project. We will receive official documentation next >week. > >I am drafting a press release for SLDC to issue. Hopefully it can be send >out on Monday. > >The Mayor’s greeting has been videotaped and should be delivered to us by >Monday. I’ll let you know when you can by to pick up the tape. > >That is all. > >Sonya > Page 269 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <cshipman@postnet.com> Subject: a millennium event Date: 12/8/1999 10:54:39 AM Mr.. Shipman Hello, earlier we spoke about a millennium event I was producing for MediaARTS


and Washington and on screens throughout the party. These images will >be woven together with archival photos of St. Louis’s history and live >video of downtown festivities to create an ever-changing visual >tapestry. The projections will serve as the backdrop for Web cam >footage of the party that will be uploaded in real-time to the Internet >so that it can be viewed by our neighbors in the wired global village. >This online broadcast will inaugurate a new Web site that will showcase >our city’s potential as a worldwide leader in technology. > >A DJ from Beige Records (http://www.beigerecords.com/) will get the >groove on with 21st century techno funk. An open bar, appetizers from >Favazza’s, a champagne toast at midnight, and a souvenir champagne glass >are included in the ticket price. You must be over 21 to attend and >uptown attire is suggested. Come with a friend, come by yourself, come >with your significant or not-so-significant other...just make sure you >don’t miss out on the hottest ticket in town. > >Tickets are $60 per person and can be purchased by going to any MetroTix >outlet (e.g. Famous Barr, Mississippi Nights, Schnucks, and Streetside), >calling (314) 534-1111, or clicking over to >http://www.mtix.com/eventdetail.asp?engageid=2997&eventid=8251 . >Tickets are only available through MetroTix. No tickets will be sold at >the door. >> >--------------------------------->METROPOLIS VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES >---------------------------------> >Millennium Party >---------------> Page 379 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <anjelle@accessus.net> Subject: Fw: web master Date: 11/24/1999 11:09:46 AM fyi -----Original Message----From: paul guzzardo <HYPERLINK “mailto:zio11@stlnet.com”zio11@stlnet.com> To: Brian Marston <HYPERLINK “mailto:webguy@fatdays.com”webguy@fatdays.com> Date: Wednesday, November 24, 1999 9:10 AM (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 11:02:13 AM blank) Subject: web master Brian I’ve been thinking about the millennium web site and your role. I – in my free associative way - suggested how a year long millennium web site could be expanded to include web cams posed at the sites of downtown development/building projects, projects which are more that just proposed but are in the final design phase. Mixing the cams with the actual design drawings and edgy virtual molding pages is the way to go. I think that this could and should be a full time position. Media Arts and the Community Information Division of SLDC would sponsor it. Possibly technical assistance could also be provide by select downtown software web design firms – who would get some recognition/web presence. This is the reason we need to schedule a meeting with T Reeves. This is a very specific proposal. Nothing about it is vague. It would be a full time webmaster position. It would create a formal structure, which we then could build upon in developing the projection walls et.. The web site would be the basis for the content of everything that is projected. The web site lends itself to a very tight curatoral character. That is important in a new media where both the powers that be and the public don’t know quite what to expect. Think about it, and maybe we can get together and discuss the details and compensation outlines. But certainly if we’re going to set up a meeting with Reeves let’s have a very specific plan and request in mind. I think that this would work. paul Page 502

From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <jrudinsk@art.wustl.edu, j0e@hotmail.com> Subject: Fw: MediaARTS Date: 11/22/1999 6:15:14 PM To: Joe and Joyce Joyce I forwarded your e-mail - which is no being sent on to Joe- to Sonya Pelli - who wrote back and endorsed the scheme. I’ve sent a message to Brian Marston - pres. of Metropolis - to see if he in fact does what to become engaged in this process. I’ve heard nothing from WorkNet since last week. I’ll plan to call them tomorrow PM to finalize WorkNet as our server for this site and even more importantly our broadband pipe. There should only be one of you dealing directly with WorkNet - so at this stage that will be you Joyce. I think we have a basic outline - in place. If you can start so we have something asp - that will help Jim O’Donnel who is beginning some fund raising efforts. (PS to Joyce I know you told me that we’ve got money for Jim O’Donnel from RAC- but do we have something in writing??) I’ll take responsibility for the archival images and sources. Paul -----Original Message----(Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 11:04:16 AM blank) From: Joyce Rudinsky <HYPERLINK “mailto:jrudinsk@artsci.wustl.edu”jrudinsk@artsci.wustl.edu> To: Paul Guzzardo <HYPERLINK “mailto:zio11@stlnet.com”zio11@stlnet.com> Date: Sunday, November 21, 1999 10:14 PM Subject: MediaARTS Paul, Is this enough? Notes for the Millennium Web Site: 1) The index page will be a QuickTime VR movie or a shockwave movie that consists of a collage that appeals to all participating parties. The movie will have links to at least five pages: 1. party web cam 2. street web cam 3. historical images (in a slide show format) 4. message from the mayor 5. interactive, experimental site developed by Joe 2) There will also be a live text component (picture live stock reports). The text will be written by the computer operator and possibly a poet. 3) Live text will also be utilized on the projection that will be seen at MediaARTS or on the large building projection. A text generator will be used with the video mixer. 4) Live sound from the party will be streamed onto the street. 5) I am looking into streaming the party sound to the web site. Joyce Rudinsky 314/721-1114 Page 523 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Subject: Re: a chat Date: 11/16/1999 11:59:44 AM (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 11:04:47 AM blank) Sonya a quick update before your meeting I’ve got a commitment from Worknet to host the millennium site-if we need them versus morNet- and even more important they will provide their brand new satellite broad beam van for the event. This will turn the double MM party Metropolis/Millennium into a public/community first night type event- and suggest the portability of the project - from neighborhood to neighborhood paul -----Original Message----From: paul guzzardo <HYPERLINK “mailto:zio11@stlnet.com”zio11@stlnet.com> To: Sonya Pelli <HYPERLINK “mailto:spelli@stlouis.missouri.org”spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Date: Tuesday, November 16, 1999 8:13 AM Subject: a chat sonya

I’ve a meeting with Metropolis this PM to finalize things - I’d like to speak with you some time this afternoon if at all possible. thanks paul Page 572 (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 11:09:07 AM blank) From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <spelli@stlouis.missouri.org> Subject: some organized thoughts - I hopw Date: 11/15/1999 8:36:10 AM Sonya This is a follow up on our Friday night discussion regarding the collaborative character of the millennium web site. As I see it we’ve got a good start in defining the scope of the millennium web site. This was done in our initial response to the three part criteria set forth in the millennium initiative. Regarding formalization – There are two issues that bear on our collaborations, one is of course money and the other content. Content is simple. This is collaborative – It is agreed that there must be an agreement between both parties as to what goes on the site as well as site design/ structure. Issues of money – well we don’t have any but we will try to raise it. Please note the e-mail that I’m sending you from Greg Sullivan and Worknet. I’ll be making further calls on this today. This very encouraging. I’ve been researching Worknet for other things. I’ll let you know where this goes. Actually the web site becomes the lynch pin to the lot - this first virtual park – The web site will allow us to establish a content base line. I hope this makes scenes but obviously one of the issues involving the lot is not only property rights and development options – but a rigorously defined content. The Millennium Initiative Web site is the structure - at least in this initial period- for all our content. This allows enormous possibilities particularly if we can partner with a with an ISP who wants to use the site as a showcase for streaming video content. So as practical matter the ISP becomes almost the third partner. Sonya this of course is not contract- that can be taken care of latter- maybe I’m just clarifying the obvious – but I thought it might be helpful in connecting the pieces which includes, 1) Millennium Initiative 2) The actual web site )3 The lot 4) The respective roles of SLDC - MediaARTS - Technology Partner/Partners. One other thing – could you send me Lars E-mail . I want to send him a notice on this Judith Berry event. Thanks paul Page 582 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <jeff@stlnet.com> Subject: Fw: The millennium web cam party Date: 11/14/1999 9:40:17 PM Jeff note the message below I’m go to contact Steve Ulman Worknet is a broadband wireless ISP- obviously they interest me for many reasons. How was Saturday night? Sorry I couldn’t be there but had a commitment to attend a play at Forest Park CC Paul From: Sullivan, Greg <HYPERLINK (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 11:09:27 AM blank) “mailto:gregs@gasullivan.com”gregs@gasullivan.com> To: Steve Ulman <HYPERLINK “mailto:SUlman@WorkNET.net”SUlman@WorkNET.net> Cc: Paul Guzzardo (E-mail) <HYPERLINK “mailto:zio11@stlnet.com”zio11@stlnet.com> Date: Saturday, November 13, 1999 8:38 PM Subject: RE: The millennium web cam party

Steve, By copy, I introduce you to Paul Guzzardo. Please, e-mail him directly to get the initial contact. I really like what Paul has going on and I believe it to be something that makes a lot of sense for you to know about. Perhaps, you two can get together to explore the possibilities. If Paul continues on the track he is heading (and can win some local support) he will undoubtedly gain international exposure to St. Louis and the technologies behind his project. Best of luck and, by all means, let me know if there is anything at all I can do to help. gas -----Original Message----From: Steve Ulman [mailto:SUlman@WorkNET.net] Sent: Thursday, November 11, 1999 11:24 AM To: ‘gregs@gasullivan.com’ Subject: FW: The millennium web cam party Greg, Ken Harrington forwarded this message to me, and after reading it I believe that this project is something we may want to get involved in. I would appreciate the introduction you mentioned and I will follow up by phone with you. Thanks for the information. Steve Ulman General Manager, Missouri WorkNet Communcations HYPERLINK “mailto:sulman@worknet.net”sulman@worknet.net 314-719-3478 direct 314-212-5401 fax Page 585 -----Original Message----(Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 11:06:52 AM blank) From: Sullivan, Greg [mailto:gregs@gasullivan.com] Sent: Thursday, November 11, 1999 12:04 AM To: Ken Harrington (E-mail) Subject: FW: The millennium web cam party Ken, Might WorkNet have an interest in providing the Internet hookup for this event. I’m not that involved with these folks, but thought of you as I read this. If you have an interest I will facilitate an introduction. Let me know. gas -----Original Message----From: paul guzzardo [mailto:zio11@stlnet.com] Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 1999 12:37 PM To: Sullivan, Greg Subject: Fw: The millennium web cam party To: Greg Sullivan From: Paul Guzzardo Greetings This is a delayed follow up regarding the millennium party. I wanted to send you an update on what we’re trying to do for the millennium celebration. Metropolis is partnering with MediaARTS in a New Years Eve millennium celebration/party. It’s scheduled for the top floor of the AD Brown building. Metropolis is already promoting the event - as a technology web/cam community celebration. I am also working with Sonya Pelli of SLDC’s Community Information Network. CIN is one of the sponsors. We had a commitment of $5000 from the St. Louis Partnership. Unfortunately the funds were withdrawn and directed towards beefing up the 6: PM firework show. Obviously we’re disappointed but I’m still trying to make this happen. Please note the attached file, which is both a Project description and business/marketing plan. This file is going to be uploaded to a web link at the end of this week. The site will be used for fundraising and promotion. We currently working with a St. Louis Science web designer in constructing this Community Web Cam Millennium Site. The prototype site will be up shortly, and will run for the year. After you’ve had a chance to look this over please give me a call -231-8784. I’d appreciate your thoughts on this. Greg while we currently can do limited inside small screen web projections - I’m hoping to find additional support in order make the outside screen projection happen. This is what I’d like to discuss with you. Thanks

Page 586 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <jimod@earthlink.net> Subject: Fw: The millennium web cam party Date: 11/11/1999 10:31:21 AM Jim The site http://users.accessus.net/~anjelle/millennium.html As I menitoned l think the most critical thing right now is to get the word out to potential sponsors. Obviously we need to get the right people so we can get the finances in place. The sponsor/donors need to understand that the Community Information Network and MediaARTS will be operating and upgrading the site throughout the entire year 2000. (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:49:34 AM blank) This is much more than single event. The web site is to highlight the relationship of new information technologies on Downtown Development. The party is the public high profile kick - off. Karen Isabel - of Mayor Harmon’s staff - indicated that she will be filling the City’s formal application with the Federal Millennium Community Program. This New years Web event and the continuing web site is the crux of the City’s application. ok, Jim that’s it, look forward to hearing from you next wek. Paul Page 603 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <gregs@gasullivan.com> Subject: Re: The millennium web cam party Date: 11/11/1999 10:29:27 AM Greg Got your note. We’ll begin the Amsterdam web cam search - so you can know where and when to “wave.” Immediate concern of course is getting it done. To move this along we’ve opened up a temporary site which has the millennium site/party business plan. This is the file that I earlier sent you. http://users.accessus.net/~anjelle/millennium.html l think the most critical thing right now is to get the word out to potential sponsors. Obviously we need to get the right people so we can get the finances in place. The sponsor/donors need to understand that the Community Information Network and MediaARTS will be operating and upgrading the site throughout the entire year 2000. This is much more than single event. The web site is to highlight the relationship of new information technologies on Downtown Development. The party is the public high profile kick - off. (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:34:21 AM blank) Karen Isabel - of Mayor Harmon’s staff - indicated that she will be filling the City’s formal application with the Federal Millennium Community Program. This New years Web event and the continuing web site is the crux of the City’s application. You asked if this could be done by e-mail, answer yes. Simply getting the word out to selective people the St. Louis technology business world is what we need. ok, Greg that’s it, look forward to hearing from you. Paul Page 604 From: paul guzzardo <zio11@stlnet.com> To: Buck Doubet <anjelle@accessus.net> Subject: Fw: Bad News Date: 10/26/1999 4:25:35 PM (Highlight comment paulguzzardo1 12/8/12 10:37:38 AM blank) -----Original Message----From: Jodi A. Jordan <JJordan@dtslp.org> To: ‘paul guzzardo’ <zio11@stlnet.com> Date: Tuesday, October 26, 1999 4:03 PM


mayor clarence

MILLENNIUM MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR “Hi I’m Mayor Clarence Harmon. The Bible says that Methuselah lived 969 years. Almost a millennium. People in the City of St. Louis will see more in the next few years than Methuselah did in his entire life time. The revitalization of downtown the reinvigoration of the cities neighborhoods and the rapid expansion of a high tech industry. I am proud to be the first mayor of the second millennium and the 21st Century. Happy New Year. “Hi I’m Mayor Clarence Harmon. The Bible says that Methuselah lived 969 years. Almost a millennium. People in the City of St. Louis will see more in the next few years than Methuselah did in his entire life time. The revitalization of downtown the reinvigoration of the cities neighborhoods and the rapid expansion of a high tech industry. I am proud to be the first mayor of the second millennium and the 21st Century. Happy New Year. MILLENNIUM MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR “Hi I’m Mayor Clarence Harmon. The Bible says that Methuselah lived 969 years. Almost a millennium. People in the City of St. Louis will see more in the next few years than Methuselah did in his entire life time. The revitalization of downtown the reinvigoration of the cities neighborhoods and the rapid expansion of a high tech industry. I am proud to be the first mayor of the second millennium and the 21st Century. Happy New Year. MILLENNIUM MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR “Hi I’m Mayor Clarence Harmon. The Bible says that Methuselah lived 969 years. Almost a millennium. People in the City of St. Louis will see more in the next few years than Methuselah did in his entire life time. The revitalization of downtown the reinvigoration of the cities neighborhoods and the rapid expansion of a high tech industry. I am proud to be the first mayor of the second millennium and the 21st Century. Happy New Year. “Hi I’m Mayor Clarence Harmon. The Bible says that Methuselah lived 969 years. Almost a millennium. People in the City of St. Louis will see more in the next few years than Methuselah did in his entire life time. The revitalization of downtown the reinvigoration of the cities neighborhoods and the rapid expansion of a high tech industry. I am proud to be the first mayor of the second millennium and the 21st Century. Happy New Year. MILLENNIUM MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR “Hi I’m Mayor Clarence Harmon. The Bible says that Methuselah lived 969 years. Almost a millennium. People in the City of St. Louis will see more in the next few years than Methuselah did in his entire life time. The revitalization of downtown the reinvigoration of the cities neighborhoods and the rapid expansion of a high tech industry. I am proud to be the first mayor of the second millennium and the 21st Century. Happy New Year.


a city is more than a place in space, it is a drama in time.

It is high time to be staging the civic drama, renewing its long-forgotten ideals. For as we escape from the myths of a homeless individualism we see that the city in one age with acropolis and forum, in another with town house and cathedral has ever been the theatre and stage indispensable for expressing, with any real fullness and adequacy, each individual life.

patrick geddes

patrick geddes - cities in evolution

Patrick Geddes was a man in search of an arena that exposed the archetypal drama(s) of life. Like Charles Dickens he was a player on a brute Hobbesian stage. Both men wanted to change the set.

In the course of elaborating his fundamental graph, Geddes had in fact exposed the archetypal drama of life: and what was even more important, had restored the missing factors of time and change. In the scenario for this drama the actors, the plot and the scenery, the dialogue, the performance, the setting actively bring into existence an interwoven sequence of events whose meaning and purpose no single part, however clearly presented, can possibly convey. lewis mumford - on his teacher and mentor patrick geddes Amphitheaters, open-air stages, and performance spaces in theaters and public halls are standard features in Geddes’s city design reports. He suggests an amphitheater as early as 1904 in his report for Dunfermline and proposes one again in his last city design report from 1925 for Tel Aviv. Without an amphitheater a city is not complete. volker m. welter - biopolis

The film strip is from a fragment of a lost silent film. It’s thought to be based on Bleak House, and believed the first time a Dickens tale was adapted to film.

The remix digerati have to be on the street. We don’t want a generation of creatives secreted in clandestine places, shackled to screens and virtual sites. Or shunted to mutating gaming consoles, where buttons and a directional joystick rein the drift. They have to be on the ground navigating through the digital fog. That’s the place to double, layer and go off in several directions. But they need gear to cut a path in the data maelstrom. They need way stations: places to map, to plot a course, and platforms from which to peer into the city. holm-guzzardo: the cartographer’s dilemma


7

costume shop


The 2000 Birthday Party Wall was a tableau for a costume shop, a scrim ready for players, scripts, and dressers. But production people pick up and leave, costumes change, especially when it comes to fashion. And this was a one time Garment District.

Images and text map the site This archive was extracted from an online National Register of Historic Places Nomination Inventory Index. The Nominations were filed with the United States Department of the Interior-National Park Service for inclusion in the National Register Index. The Director of the Department of Natural Resources Title and the State Historic Preservation Officer certified that the nominated properties were evaluated according to the criteria and procedures set forth by the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service. Certain documents were prepared by Landmarks Association of St. Louis, Inc. Further material was provided by the State Contact Person of the Department of Natural Resources Historic Preservation Program Jefferson City, Missouri. Photographs that accompanied the Historic Places Inventory Nominations were taken in 1986.


street kit

8


a space of appearance The kit was a chain of design projects. They framed out an emptied out stage. The kit got buzz. Because of the buzz I was a director at the Sheldon, pushed a janus face annex, and got on stage, or not, with Fr. McNamee. Kit, projects, and buzz were all after the same thing.


Being seen and being heard by others derive their significance from the fact that everybody sees and hears from a different position.


The space of appearance is a tagline. It’s out of a “how to book” by a German philosopher. The philosopher is Hannah Arendt. The book is The Human Condition. Hannah Arendt’s book is a tool chest for remix tinkers. It’s a check list for designers in a skirmish with the flat. And more than that, when all around hollows out, it’s the map out. Arendt was an idea archeologist. She was keen on the Greek street. She understood that’s where it started. The classical street first time polis is where much of who we are emerged. And it’s on the Greek street where Hannah Arendt starting routing out tools for a space of appearance.


The polis, properly speaking, is not the city-state in its physical location; it is the organization of the people as it arises out of acting and speaking together, and its true space lies between people living together for this purpose, no matter where they happen to be. It is the space of appearance in the widest sense of the word, namely, the space where I appear to others as others appear to me, where men exist not merely like other living or inanimate things but make their appearance explicitly. The end of the common world has come when it is seen only under one aspect and is permitted to present itself in only one perspective. This space does not always exist, and although all men are capable of deed and word, most of themó—like the slave, the foreigner, and the barbarian in antiquity, like the laborer or craftsman prior to the modern age, the jobholder or businessman in our worldó— do not live in it. No man, moreover, can live in it all the time. To be deprived of it means to be deprived of reality, which, humanly and politically speaking, is the same as appearance. To men the reality of the world is guaranteed by the presence of others, by its appearing to all; “for what appears to all, this we call Being, and whatever lacks this appearance comes and passes away like a dream, intimately and exclusively our own but without reality.” ...the reality of the public realm relies on the simultaneous presence of innumerable perspectives and aspects in which the common world presents itself and for which no common measurement or denominator can ever be devised. For though the common world is the common meeting ground of all, those who are present have different locations in it, and the location of one can no more coincide with the location of another than the location of two objects. Being seen and being heard by others derive their significance from the fact that everybody sees and hears from a different position. This is the meaning of public life, compared to which even the richest and most satisfying family life can offer only the prolongation or multiplication of one’s own position with its attending aspects and perspectives. The space of appearance comes into being wherever men are together in the manner of speech and action, and therefore predates and precedes all formal constitution of the public realm and the various forms of government, that is, the various forms in which the public realm can be organized. Its peculiarity is that, unlike the spaces which are the work of our hands, it does not survive the actuality of the movement which brought it into being, but disappears not only with the dispersal of menó—as in the case of great catastrophes when the body politic of a people is destroyed ó—but with the disappearance or arrest of the activities themselves. Wherever people gather together, it is potentially there, but only potentially, not necessarily and not forever.

hannah arendt the human condition


the space where I appear to others as others appear to me, where men exist not merely like other living or their appearance explicitly.


whatever lacks this appearance comes and passes away like a dream, intimately and exclusively our own but without reality.


the reality of the public realm relies on the simultaneous presence of innumerable perspectives and aspects in which the common world presents itself and for which no common measurement or denominator can ever be devised.


The space of appearance comes into being wherever men are together in the manner of speech and action.


9

the hacker cometh


... a trek into the city for me - - my first experience of urban living... All the factories and homes burned cheap soft coal from the Illinois strip mines across the river and belched forth pitch-black smoke all day and all night. St. Louis at that time was one of the most polluted cities in the country because of the cheap soft coal available from strip mines in nearby Illinois. Every house and factory in the city belched clouds of pitch-black smoke, and most of the buildings had been blackened with soot. This sight was a disillusioning shock to me, coming as I did from the rural beauty of Wisconsin and from a village that echoed Venice with its lakes, rivers, and canals, all without a smidgen of soot. ReďŹ&#x201A;ections in Tranquility Maurice McNamee Autobiography


an ever

Father McNamee made his trek to Jesuit training ground in 1928. He began his Doctorate in 1937. 1937 is the year his advisor showed up. The advisor was a Canadian. He was two years younger than McNamee. The advisor wasn’t a Jesuit. He was a hacker. The hacker was Marshall McLuhan. McLuhan came out of Cambridge England. He brought with him to St. Louis a stack of manuals. McLuhan turned one over to McNamee. It was Novum Organum. It’s guide book, an idea atlas by Francis Bacon. McLuhan thought it needed an update. He wanted McNamee to do it. Novum Organum is Latin for “new tools,” tools to navigate between fact and fictive, or what appears to be one or the other. There’s a ship on the manual’s cover. It’s crashing through the Pillars of Hercules. The pillars are sentinels. They’re the myth marks. They stand on both sides of the Strait of Gibraltar. They are the way out. The pillars mark exit from the known, strapped to Mediterranean, that collared place. They point to points unknown, places cloaked. They open up new worlds. There’s a Latin dictum under the pillars. It says multi pertranfibunt & augebitur scientia. “Many will travel and knowledge will be increased.”

Bacon was after a new crackerjack world, and so was McLuhan. McLuhan was in St. Louis seven years. It was off, on. All that time he was a sleuth. He was on the look out, after clues, pillars to shove off of. Bacon wasn’t his only lead. There was another. And McLuhan had another Jesuit. The lead was Peter Ramus. The Jesuit was Walter Ong. McLuhan needed Ong. This clue was faint, no Francis Bacon. Ramus was an obscure 16th century educational reformer. Ramus died when all the old maps were being given a once over. Ramus lost his head on August 23, 1572. But he wasn’t the only one that day. August 23, 1572 was the Saint Bartholomew Massacre. McLuhan had an eye on Ramus, a hunch that he was the place to start, place to track it down, track the change. Follow a trail from voice to print, from ear to eye, the big flip. McLuhan had an inkling that Ramus might be lodestar-code, the man at the center of a map. It turned out McLuhan was on to something. It radiates from Ramus. He’s an ever meme. But to find out why took Fr. Walter Ong years, miles, and a eureka moment.


The Canadian author Douglas Coupland wrote a centennial biography of Marshall McLuhan. The book was part of the “Extraordinary Canadian Series.” In his biography Coupland says that McLuhan formed a posse in St. Louis. The posse included “the first members of Marshall’s personal proto-Warhol Factory, whose ideas helped to codify and articulate the genesis of Media Theory that would explode in 1962.” McLuhan and his St. Louis posse wrote early code. It was to map this digital mesh-up, the network we’re slapped hard against. It was the start.

forming a posse “Marshall applied to the Catholic Saint Louis University, where the head of the literature department, William McCabe, was a Cambridge graduate and surprisingly up to date on developments in the field. St. Louis University was a good gig…Marshall quickly came to enjoy the city and the company of his fellow faculty members, many of whom became lifelong friends and collaborators. He had a posse of colleagues who could deal with him on a high intellectual level and on the same theological plane. Along with Father William McCabe, there was Father Walter Ong, a young Jesuit whom Marshal tutored. There was Bernard Muller-Thym, a philosophy instructor completing his Ph.D. for the University of Toronto’s  Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies. And there was Felix Giovanelli, a language instructor who would later collaborate with Marshall. These men, along with his old Manitoba friend Tom Easterbrook, were the first members of Marshall’s personal proto-Warhol Factory, whose ideas helped to codify and articulate the genesis of Media Theory that would explode in 1962.” Douglas Coupland


show time


Marshall Mcluhan opened in St. Louis. It was his Midwest New Haven. It’s where the road show got started. McLuhan worked up a routine in St. Louis. He found himself a troupe of players, a back-up group. It was a theater man that got McLuhan to Missouri, Father William H. McCabe. Father McCabe was the Chair of the Saint Louis University English Department. He brought McLuhan and posse together. It’s McCabe who pushed Marshall Mcluhan out onto the world stage. Got the Canadian the real first gig, that stand up. Like McLuhan, literature was theater for McCabe. It was an environment to leap into. Father McCabe was one of the first to wade into the Baroque Jesuit stage. It’s the place Lope de Vega and Molière trained as dramatists. For two hundred years Jesuit Baroque theaters were engines of stage technology. They were the gear shops. McCabe chronicled how they introduced a line of stage effects; how they set up machinery to present flying animals, lightning, thunder, riding scenes, processions; everything that made up those tableaux vivants. It’s where all the flat scrims added up to a something more.*

The demons were the merchants of flat. They were the bad code. This St. Louis proto - new media factory was posse playbook and posse backdrop. Like McCabe’s Baroque stage it was a ring to bump, drift through, and blend. It’s where McLuhan and those Catholic boys began to frame an epic Manichean battle. Where they set their site on a dimensionally rivalrous stage. The contest was between see and hear, eye and the ear. There were demons and saints.The demons were the merchants of flat. They were the bad code. * a baroque backstory - a snapshot into Einstein’s space-time


street street copy copy


He (McLuhan)….initiated a practice, which he would continue throughout his life, of enlisting his students as collaborators. One student was a Jesuit named Maurice McNamee, then working on PhD thesis on Francis Bacon. Bacon interested McLuhan as one of the giants of the Renaissance who was steeped in the art of rhetoric, in particular the art of the aphorism. Bacon maintained that the aphorism - the pithy, arresting statement – was useful precisely because it did not explain itself. In its incompleteness and suggestiveness it invited “men to enquire further “ in a subject. The McLuhan who later became famous for his aphorisms notably “The medium is the message” – was intrigued by this use of language. Philip Marchand, “Marshall McLuhan: The Medium and the Messenger” The war, however, actually brought one of the most important influences of my entire academic career into my life in the person of Marshall McLuhan. Father McCabe had kept in touch with Cambridge, and he knew about McLuhan’s work there. Because McLuhan was a Canadian citizen, if he had stayed on at Cambridge, he would have been drafted into the Canadian Air Force. Father offered him a teaching position at St. Louis University, which he accepted. He arrived during the year of my special studies for the master’s degree. In his research on his own dissertation, McLuhan had observed the new light that the two approaches to learning had on Francis Bacon’s thinking and prose styles and suggested that this topic would be good for a dissertation. I had just completed four years of theology in which I had had a firsthand experience of the difference between these two approaches to theology, so I leaped at the suggestion and began my research under Marshall’s guidance. His direction of my work consisted pretty much in his coming to my room once a week, throwing himself on my bed, and talking for a couple of hours about his dissertation. But what he had done on Thomas Nashe’s background and on the consequences of this background on Nashe’s several prose styles was precisely what he wanted me to do on Francis Bacon. It worked out perfectly. I followed up on the primary and secondary sources he recommended, and he came back each week for another chat on what I had absorbed. But whether my work on Bacon did or did not add much to a better understanding of his work, I am very grateful to Marshall McLuhan for pushing me into the study and guiding me throughout it. Maurice McNamee, “Reflections in Tranquility”

Marshall McLuhan has influenced such a wide and diversified audience, from research scholars and scientists in dozens of fields to newspaper publishers, advertising agents, museum directors, poets, business executives, city planners, and computer designers, that It seems impossible to pull all of his activities together under one rubric. Yet I believe it is possible to do just that. Above all and in all and through all, Marshall McLuhan was a teacher.....and McLuhan’s continued concern with the accumulation, storage and circulation of knowledge, which matured in his media studies, owes a great deal to the Saint Louis University milieu. In The Gutenberg GaLaxy I could underline dozens of passages which echo the very wording that used to recur in our animated discussions. For many years, large numbers of people believed and/or hoped that Marshall McLuhan was able to explain everything that was going on in the world. He, of course, never claimed this ability at all, but two factors I have discussed suggest why the impression might exist: his deep sense of the relevance of the past to present, and his interest in knowledge-processes. When these were combined with his later concern with media, you had an exciting triad especially if you remembered that, as I believe he has insisted, the future is a thing of the past. I, myself, have developed my own lines of investigation into noetic activity. Peter Ramus, the French Renaissance philosopher and educational reformer, interested me, from the beginning because of the way he handled knowledge. The dedication, in my Ramus and Talon Inventory, “For Herbert Marshall McLuhan, who started all this.” Walter J Ong, “McLuhan As teacher - The St. Louis Years” Ong stresses the change in human sensibility resulting from the rise of typography, showing “how the use of printing moved the word away from its original association with sound and treated it more as a ‘thing’ in space. The implication of this visual approach for the oral aphorism, and for the compendia of sentences, adages, and maxims which had been the medieval staple of learning, was recession. As Ong puts it (p. 160), .”.. Ramus tends to regard the knowledge which he purveys in his arts as a commodity rather than as a wisdom.” Let us turn a moment to Ong for confirmation of the new passion for quantity and measurement; we find that “the Ramist method appealed primarily to a desire for order, not to a desire for experimentation•••Ramus takes what might be called an itemizing approach to discourse. It is necessary to indicate, as Ong has done, that the obsession with “method” footnote. the Renaissance finds its archetype in “the process of setting up type taken from a font. In each instance, the composition of continuous discourse is a matter of building up discourse by arranging preexisting parts in a spatial pattern.” (p. 168) And it is obvious that Ramus exercised his extraordinary appeal by being close to the new pattern of sensibility that people experienced in their contact with typography. Marshall McLuhan, “The Gutenberg Galaxy”

background for a new media


Ong considered Peter Ramus to be one of the single most Influential figures in this shift, and a symbol of other vast changes taking place at this dawn of the Enlightenment period. Ramus introduced a method of inquiry that tended to eliminate public dialogue and discussion at the level of deeper philosophical and social issues. The motivation for Ramus and many others who followed him was a fascination with a method. Find the quickest, most mechanical and efficient means of attaining some goal. Sets the stage for modern public life in which values are relegated to the positivist discourse. The public sphere becomes the sphere of purely pragmatic relationships. The insight about the difference between the experience of knowing as hearing and the experience of knowing as seeing was Ong’s Eureka (moment). “The great axis in my Ramus work is the shift from an orally oriented culture to a visualist culture. Ramus bridges antiquity and modern technology because he intensified and accentuated the visualist element in verbal cognition. What made this possible for him was the printing press.” ONG ON RAMUS, METHOD, AND THE DECAY OF DIALOGUE. The decay of dialogue involved a shift from a sense of discourse as involving oral-aural give-and-take to a more quiescent development of thought. Ramus’ strong tendency toward quantification of thought. Ong’s work was indispensable from where the modem mind came from. Ramus provided a different way for orators and writers to organize their thought through the use of branching dichotomies arrayed within one another. Visualism, as he refers to this particular tendency in Western culture in Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue deeply affects the human psyche and consciousness. Visualism accentuates the separation of the knower from the known. Thus it favored the development of the thinking function in Western culture from antiquity onward. This accentuation of the thinking function was accompanied by a relative diminishment of the feeling/valuing function, which in turn makes it harder for persons to experience the ineffable depths of the human psyche. Thomas J Farrell, “Walter Ong’s Contributions to Cultural Studies: The Phenomenology of the Word and I-Thou Communication” (an extended-excerpted montage) Among the heros of intellectual history, few can be less heroic than the man at the center of this book. The sixteen century professor Peter Ramus - more properly, Pierre de la Ramee - is remembered for no great discovery. There is no law, entity, doctrine, or discipline for which he is now recalled. Nor, to go by the account of him given by Walter Ong, was he a particularly original or an acute thinker. “Superficially revolutionary” is Ong’s damning verdict but in reality “highly derivative.” The controversies Ramus provoked - and these were many and violent - he often lost, not only because of the radical nature of his views but because of his “demonstrated incompetency.” He was guilty of “obtuseness” and of “gross misreading of classical authors. His thought progressed not through the kind of coherent, constructive development typically claimed by posterity, but in a series of reflex reactions to devastating attacks by colleagues and rivals. No wonder the man contradicted himself willy-nilly and was apparently unable to stick to even the broadest line of argument. At best, Ramus comes across as an inveterate intellectual opportunist. At worse - as seen in his program for subjecting great literary works to desiccating logical analysis - his ideas seem “closer to the view of a madman.” Adrain Jones in the Forward to Walter J. Ong’s “Ramus Method and the Decay of Dialogue.”

more background If print changes then culture changes. old tools and old myths I’m an information scientist I’m an information scientist to make any sense of it what do we need to to do we need to organize it, organize it right so we create what are called organizational systems they are also known as classification systems these are the systems that we use in order to organize information in ways that make sense to the people that use them peter ramus, peter ramus, peter ramus how influential this was in structuring the way that we think how important this was an image that would come to structure the way we think for hundreds, and hundreds, and hundreds of years Lecture -Performance : Everywhere Tableau Lecturer / Performance Artist: David Walczyk The Cartographer’s Dilemma Cycle


meme and massacre

The St. Bartholomewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Massacre, by Frans Hogenberg


From: Paul Guzzardo To: vince@grandcenter.org; cc: Erics@FriedmanGroup.com (Erics@FriedmanGroup.com); Sung Ho Kim (sungho@architecture.wustl.edu); Subject: Media Box -Father Ong Date: Friday, April 02, 2004 10:32:00 AM Attachments: Memo-Grand Center.doc

Sung Ho and I have been asked to present the initial Media Box designs and program outline at the annual Media Ecology conference set at the Rochester Institute of Technology this June. Media Ecology is an academic association that examines how communications affect human perception, understanding, feeling, and values. Media Ecologist looks to the writings of Marshall McLuhan and Father Ong - among others -in establishing the scholarly basis for their research and study.

Dear Vince, As requested here is a brief “summing up” of the relationship between the Media Box Project and the writings of Father Ong of St. Louis University. In our last meeting you indicted that you wanted to send this on to Father Biondi. I’m also attaching to this email the Memorandum earlier provided to your real estate committee. It is included should you wish to send it to Father Biondi. This information shall of course be treated as proprietary and confidential by all parties. During the last few years I’ve been interested in exploring connections between information networks and urban spaces. Father Walter Ong’s writings and particularly his writings on “world as event” and “world as view” were influential in the development of my earlier St. Louis projects, particularly the MediaARTS Media Lab. While terms such as “world as event” and “world as view” might not be easy to explain in a few sentences, I’ve found the ideas behind them, and much of Ong’s writings on communication, clear and helpful in thinking about how to design and program public spaces that promote a reflective citizenry. Father Ong was a humanist. A reflective citizenry was important to Father Ong. He asked how we can retain meaningful possession of the knowledge that we are accumulating. He was aware of the ever increasing gap between information and communication.

The intent of our presentation to these scholars is to demonstrate that the issues with which they grapple can be addressed not only in books and conferences but also on the street. We hope to show how Walter Ong’s writing provide a foundation for an urban design language, a language that will allow our public spaces to once again become the agora where reflective citizens gather. On a final note, Angela Miller, a friend and a professor of American Art History at Washington University, is the senior writer of a new American art survey text book -American Encounters from Beginning to the Present. It’s being published by Prentice Hall and scheduled for release next year. The survey concludes with the work of Frank Gehry. Both of us think that perhaps a future edition of her survey won’t end with another monument builder but with St. Louis’s Walter Ong. Paul


a crackerjack novum mundi


10 tool chest


The St. Louis Posse was ballast couture, a flight jacket for a tera– perabyte world free-fall. Posse shows up in a line of agit prop assemblages, in the form of: documentaries, exhibitions, and lectures. The target for all was myth. The first was “buildbetterbarrel.” It was a documentary. “The Cartographer’s Dilemma” next, an installation, then publication. “A Walk on the Digital Sublime” was a road-show exhibition. “Walk” triggered the documentary POSSE°S | PROTOCOLS | PERP°WALKS. It was agit-prop jacked up. *buildbetterbarrel - nine events in new media was a series of short vignettes that trace the media heritage and folklore of St. Louis, Missouri. Backdrops include Cahokia Mounds, the Chicago lakefront, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, and a street front media lab which was operating on September 11, 2001. *The Cartographer’s Dilemma examined the digital fog of image and sound and how it affects our democratic public sphere and civic identity. It asks why existing noetic economies (knowledge systems) discourage the creation of a public sphere that promotes contest, collaborations and creativity. *A Walk on the Digital Sublime demonstrated two “recursive urbanism” protocols. The protocols are oppositional. One protocol uses the street as an evolving search engine, a tableau you drift through, synthesizing as you move. The other protocol uses the street as a beautiful girl or guy uses a conversation; they keep turning the conversation back on themselves. *POSSES°S | PROTOCOLS | PERP°WALKS tracked how a bogus idea of community provoked a lawsuit, and how a St. Louis elite forfeited and obliterated McLuhan’s United States legacy, and then snagged a White House award while doing it. * the above blurbs were used in various promotional copy.


United We Act: A scoping study and a symposium on connected communities. 12-14 September 2011, Culture Lab Newcastle, UK

.......................................... University of Dundee, Dalhousie (Paul Guzzardo)


buildbetterbarrel nine events in new media buildbetterbarrel is a road movie. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a chain of short vignettes. segments map a new media storyline backdrops include: cahokia mounds a gamersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lounge the chicago lakefront the pulitzer foundation for the arts a st. louis street front media lab in this road movie we meet: two suits and a trickster mounds and mississippians catholic boys and a bible press and we run into an eskimo, the one who started it rolling, Nanook


bbb segment 1 Edgar Alan Poe wrote a story about a whirlpool. He called it “A Descent into the Maelstrom.” It was about a sailor in a small boat that was sucked into a gigantic whirlpool. With all hope lost the sailor watched the currents, the vortex. He saw that some objects didn’t fall, but were whirled up to the level of the sea. By studying the whirlpool, and by cooperating with it, the sailor makes good his escape. But he didn’t do alone; he did it with the help of a barrel. The sailor tied himself to the barrel, and then he threw himself into the Maelstrom. And around, and around they went, but in time the barrel and the sailor rose to the surface. He was saved.

When Walter Ong and Marshall McLuhan showed up Vaudeville was fading, but there were still a lot of empty seats out there, empty seats, hungry eyes and hungry ears.

All his life Marshal McLuhan was obsessed by Edgar Alan Poe’s “A Descent into the Maelstrom.” For McLuhan the maelstrom was a metaphor, a symbol for all the mechanical, technological forces that overpower us, sweep us away: the press, radio, movies, advertising, all around and everywhere, going, whirling faster, faster. McLuhan saw these things as the things that drown us. They empty us out. They leave us hollow. And this maelstrom is now the place where we find ourselves; it’s home. We need the barrel as the way out, to stay whole, the barrel as a new platform.

Find out what happened to our heads, our minds, as a result of that other wave, that printing contraption. Find out what was the upshot of that gift by a Mr. Gutenberg, that bible press. This quest took Walter Ong to obscure libraries and stale archives in France, the Low Countries, and the English Isles. A decade long hunt in search of a grail.

bbb segment 2 Marshall McLuhan got here in a round about way, Manitoba, Canada, Cambridge, England, Madison, Wisconsin. Here is Saint Louis University a Jesuit school. It was more direct for Walter Ong. He came from Kansas City. Ong entered the Jesuit novitiate in 1935. Two years later he was in St. Louis. That’s when the collar came under the tutorage of a trickster, McLuhan. This was in the thirties when Saint Louis University was next door to a razzle-dazzle vaudeville district, a Midwestern Great White Way. Right out the school door was a line of theaters. Vaudeville, the entertainment channel for men, woman and children, at a time when there was only one channel.

They sensed it first. They sensed it changing. The old and the new colliding, speeding up. McLuhan and Ong saw it coming, saw it before almost anyone else. What they saw was a coming wave, another place , another dimension, a place below, between, above. It was electronic. It’s what we call new media. And they were the first ones to hear it. It was McLuhan who sent Walter on a quest, a quest to go back, go back five hundred years to the beginning.

Okay, no Dan Brown or Indian Jones story line here. What came out of this quest were books, books about books. They both wrote books, books on how we see, how we hear, and how we know, books about the interconnectedness of it all, about the faint line separating today from yesterday. And what they wrote began to chip away at the idea of books. And they started writing as the ground began to shift, when print and pictures began to bounce, really bounce, when solids became soft, and when Baker met Winchell and Hoover. It was here, next door to those leave-taking vaudevillians, that McLuhan started his first book, a book about the sights, and the sounds of our razzle-dazzle popular culture, “the bride of razzle-dazzle.” He called it The Mechanical Bride.


Segment 3 - Mound The Stork Club wasn’t the first media platform in the lower 48. This is it. And this ain’t East 53rd Street in Manhattan. This is where our remix artist Baker hails from. It’s on the eastern rim of the American Bottoms. This platform is a mound, Monk’s Mounds, World Heritage site 1.9.8. It’s made of clay, sand, mud and more mud. It goes back a thousand years. It was at the center of the greatest city north of the Rio Grand, for that matter the only city north of the Rio Grand, Cahokia. Once upon a time Cahokia had a population of almost 20,000 people. Cahokia was home to the Mississippian people, and home to over 120 mounds. The mound I’m standing on, named after a group of monks who lived near by, was the biggest and the best of all the mounds. This was, and is, the largest ever man-made earthen plaza. With a series of terraces, a base of 1,000 feet by 800, and over 100 feet high, this was their Media Platform. Mound and myth came together on this platform. This is where the high priests, the 10th century guys in suits, ran it all, and ran it into the ground. This is all that’s left of the Mississippian people. Their communications system broke down – and not just a little – but all the way –a spectacular failure- a media collapse, and one that led to ecological misstep after misstep. Planted too much corn – all in the wrong places – dammed up the wrong creeks, then tried to open them up: result flood, fires, nasty, nasty things. What happened? Why? Priests, the guys in suits, suits without cuffs, the ones in charge of central mud planning just couldn’t quite get it together. It was their job to talk to the guy/gal or the guys/gals up there in the clouds – polytheism was then the rage. Then talk to and to listen to the people down there, and then back and forth, and then up and down. This was how a media platform from our preliterate past was supposed to work: a communication node on top of a big mud pile. But those guys maybe just stayed up here a little too long, here in the Midwest’s first gated community. Didn’t look down, didn’t listen, and when they did it, was too late. The Mississippian’s myth cracked. It was a spectacular media collapse. So this is the place where our remix trickster came from, a place with an old media platform history. But I suspect you might be asking what does a story about the disappearance of people who couldn’t read or write, whose only media tool was their windpipe, have to do with Winchell, Hoover, Baker, and more importantly us today. And for that we have to fast forward a few hundred years and ten miles to the west, to mid town St Louis, and to two good Catholic boys, one with a collar and one with a smirk ……

The buildbetterbarrel segment Mound gave rise to the article “Is There a Digital Future Landscape Terrain?” by Lorens Holm and Paul Guzzardo. It was published in AD Landscape Architecture Site/Non- Site, with Michael Spens, editor. Spens’s Text Follows: Lorens Holm and Paul Guzzardo speculate on a future landscape enriched by digital culture. Rather than provide sanctuary or comfort zones in the event of global environmental collapse, laser\net is a model for exploring landscape terrains that establish ‘agora’-like meeting places as a basis for electronic exchange and progression. Re-mix platforms thus become collaborative sites for all who seek to engage in this rurality. Architecture Site/Non- Site. ...Lorens Holm and Paul Guzzardo assess the potential for a digitalisation and reformulation of the site/non-site parameters in the prevailing urban/rural scenario. They use the metaphor of the Mississippian lost or abandoned city of Cahokin, seen like a laser\net narrative creation for today. The consequent focus on the defoliation of rural cultures and global warming epitomises, to the authors, a ‘style’ of today, and accepts the end-result possibility of environmental death. Holm and Guzzardo anticipate a ‘digital future landscape terrain’, utilising laser/net technology, as a synthesis for a new awareness. Technology is harnessed to good effect, to protect and reformulate landscape ecologies. Michael Spens: Site/Non-Site, Extending the Parameters in Contemporary Landscape.


bbb coda

bbb critiques

The Mechanical Bride was Marshall McLuhan’s first book. Edgar Alan Poe and a barrel open it. McLuhan started the draft of the book shortly after coming to St. Louis. That was almost seventy years ago. It was when he had an office ten miles from the Big Cahokia Mound, an office by that vaudeville district. He was working on his book when he sent Walter Ong off to distant lands in search of things not quite remembered nor understood. It started here. Both men are gone. Father Walter Ong recently died. It was after a long life of trying to understand how an old tool - print technology - changed us as human beings, and how we’re being changed again by this swarm of electronic digital bits, the new maelstrom. Seventy years later the Mound of Mud is still around, and it marks the first collapse. The razzle-dazzle of that vaudeville district is gone, replaced by art-museums, a symphony hall and art galleries, platforms for something. Recently I projected The Mechanical Bride on a museum just a couple of blocks from where these Catholic boys first met. The platform was the Pulitzer Foundation. And this platform had the right mix of lime and sand. It was concrete. That evening the two Catholic sages were joined by two rough guys from the club world. McLuhan, Ong, Winchell and Hoover were the players at the time when things began to change, the brilliant thinkers who saw it first happening, and the pair who started it rolling, faster. But they weren’t alone that night. The remix artist was there, Baker, the trickster who danced in the maelstrom. And maybe that’s all the barrel is, a platform for tricksters to dance in the maelstrom.

CONNECT!ONS Med!aLit moments Consortium for Med!a Literacy- Volume No. 64 Recently, images of Ferguson, MO. have dominated the news, and these images are inevitably associated with public perceptions of St. Louis. Yet at the same time, St. Louis has been the focus of experiments in what it means to be a “mediated city,” as all cities are. For over two decades, Paul Guzzardo, media artist, lawyer, and activist, has made it his life’s work to re-shape the social and media landscape of Saint Louis. One of the recurrent themes in his projects is the dilemma audiences face when they attempt to extract meaning from the constant stream of digital media to which they are exposed. In a semi-feature-length video titled “buildbetterbarrel.” Guzzardo recounts one of the original ‘media literacy moments’ in Marshall McLuhan’s first book, The Mechanical Bride. The book opens with a re-telling of Edgar Allen Poe’s “Descent into the Maelstrom,” a story in which a sailor is quickly sucked into a whirlpool, clings to a barrel, and is vomited back out of the abyss. Like many artists, Guzzardo is not ready to make all things intelligible to his audience, but lessons in media literacy can still be drawn from his work. For example, the “window” segment of “buildbetterbarrel” showcases new media art produced by Guzzardo and his colleagues which provide clear opportunities for navigating the maelstrom through public re-construction of memory. In this segment, digital remix artist Alan Brunettin comments on the short but productive career of Media ARTS lab in Saint Louis, which occupied a downtown storefront lobby from 1999 to the end of 2001. A large array of video screens was mounted in the windows, and the virtual jockeys (VJs) on duty produced and displayed thousands of digital media images--images grabbed from the Internet, remix works, surveillance-as-spectacle webcam videos of people in the vicinity of the storefront, messages about digital media (e.g., “How will the digital agora change the way we interact?”), and images of people from far corners of the globe, especially on New Year’s Eve, 2000. In the days after 9-11, MediaARTS displayed huge memento mori of the attacks--images from ground zero, the list of victims’ names, transcripts of their final phone calls. Many gathered at the corner of Tucker and Washington to watch.

A powerful media literacy lesson is implicit in the work of MedaARTS: the public, which can be so hard to define, can take the immediacy of the real through acts of witness. As Stephen Coleman and Karen Ross write in The Media and the Public, “It is impossible to live in the globalized world without depending upon events, information, and expertise which originate from far away. Machina Memorialis A commonplace blog John Paul Walter ......Edgar Allan Poe’s short story, “The Descent into the Maelstrom,” which so captured McLuhan’s own imagination: The vortices that can form in turbulent water are a familiar sight. Edgar Allan Poe described just such a whirlpool in his short story “A Descent into a Maelstrom” which he published in 1841: “The edge of the whirl was represented by a broad belt of gleaming spray; but no particle of this slipped into the mouth of the terrific funnel…” In this passage, Poe describes one of the crucial features of these rotating bodies of fluid: that they can be thought of as coherent islands in an incoherent flow. As such, they are essentially independent of their environment, surrounded by a seemingly impenetrable boundary and with little, if any, of the fluid inside them leaking out. If you’re thinking that this description has a passing resemblance to a black hole, you’d be right. Haller and Beron-Vera put this similarity on a formal footing by describing the behaviour of vortices in turbulent fluids using the same mathematics that describe black holes. While McLuhan first makes use of Poe’s “A Descent into a Maelstrom” in the Preface to The Mechanical Bride, he returns to it time and again throughout his writings and lectures.1 Based on this MIT article, I’m now thinking about what McLuhan doesn’t pay attention to in Poe’s story, that is the description of the broad belt, what the MIT article calls “coherent islands in an incoherent flow.” What might the media/environmental equivalent of this belt of “coherent islands in an incoherent flow” be? Or is it even relevant because McLuhan clearly positions us within the maelstrom, inside the black hole, and, therefore, beyond the belt? 1. As can be seen in the image above, on pages 150-51 of The Medium Is the Massage, McLuhan and Foire juxtapose an image of the surfing business man with McLuhan’s claim that Poe’s story “The Descent into the Maelstrom” can serve as “a possible stratagem for understanding our predicament, our electrically- configured whirl.” For more context on McLuhan’s use of Poe’s story, see this segment from Kevin McMahon’s documentary McLuhan’s Wake and “Lobby” and “Chapel” from Paul Guzzardo’s “BuildBetterBarrel,” a series of nine new media events that takes its name from McLuhan’s use of Poe’s story.


thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all the barrel is, a platform for tricksters to dance in the maelstrom. and maybe thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all the barrel is,


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11sovereign code


Eric Eldred V. John D. Ashcroft,537 U.S. 186 010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101 010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010 110101010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101 001010110101010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010 010101001010110101010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001 011010010101001010110101010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001 001001011010010101001010110101010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010 001001001001011010010101001010110101010111010001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100 001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010111000010100010010010010110100101010001000101101 000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100100100101101001010100101011010101011101000 101101000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100100100101101001010100101011010101011 101000101101000101010100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100100100101101001010100101 011010101011101000101101000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100100100101101001010 100101011010101011101000101101000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100100100101101 001010100101011010101011101000101101000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100100100 101101001010100101011010101011101000101101000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101000100 100100101101001010100101011010101011101000101101000100010010000001001001110101000010010000101 000100100100101101001010100101011010101011010010101001010110101101101000100000010010011101010 000100100001010010110100101010010101101010101110100010101011010010101001010110101010111010001 010101010011001000010100011001000010100011010100100 q0100010110100010001001000000100100111010 100001001000010100010010010010110100101010010101101010101110110001011010001000100100000010010 011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010111010001011010001000100100000 010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010111010001011010001000100 100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010111010001011010001 000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010111010001011 010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010111010 001011010001000100100000010010011101010000100100001010001001001001011010010101001010110101010

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg author of Eric Eldred V. John D. Ashcroft


“If the human community is to retain meaningful possession of the knowledge it is accumulating, breakthroughs to syntheses of new order are absolutely essential.” Walter Ong - 1962 review of Marshall McLuhan’s “The Gutenberg Galaxy”

Breakthroughs to syntheses are hard to come by. There’s a problem in the code shop. Bug somewhere. Deadbeat, bad code blocks the way. Story Follows: The City of University City commissioned “buildbetterbarrel,” then they banned it, banned it right out of the city library. University City is a St. Louis suburb. It’s a close one, tight at the west. The money for “buildbetterbarrel” came from an earmarked city fund. The source was the city’s cable licensee Charter Communications. The money was part of a 1981 license agreement: get something, give something back. The City’s art bursar CALOP managed it. CALOP stands for “Committee for Access and Local Origination Programming.” CALOP’s inaugural mission read, “fund cultural and educational programs produced locally by film and video makers for broadcast on regional cable channels, focused first on the needs of our citizens and the rich heritage and cultural contributions of our diverse city and region.” Missions and mediums change. Time to tweak. In 2004 the city launched a new Five Year Plan. And while the usual anodyne, saccharin blurbs were there.... - celebrating the rich history, culture and arts of our city and region. - supporting artists in the region, thus increasing the wealth of art and culture in a city founded on the importance of both. -promote regional cultural and artistic offerings.

Now there was something else. The checklist recognized there might more out there. - build a larger and more viable pool of talent supporting and expanding understanding of the arts, culture and education locally. - look favorably on other forms of programming including concerts featuring local artists and locally written and produced dance, theatrical and animated productions. - better position CALOP to engage in new media opportunities.

“buildbetterbarrel” kickstarted Calop’s amended mission. It opened first as a remix concert. The documentary came later. The concert showcased the remix rhetorical superstars of the 1930’s and 40’s, Marshall McLuhan and his grammarians. Posse was the mosaic. Posse was the gist for Paul and Arno Heuduck digerati successors. The dj/vj’s used the concert to map and mythologize. And they did it “Heuduck like,” and in a like venue. This concert was in a de-commissioned chapel, a one time place of worship. This remix digerati - as their glaziers forerunners- wrapped the chapel “in cut and paste plaids.” Their mosaic wasn’t mortared in plaster, but recorded on digital tape. Posse remix-redux found its way into “buildbetterbarrel.” But grammarians, even when packaged with a little house music, get wearisome. So there were an add-ons. Steamboat Willie and the Supremes turned up. The Mouse and The Black Robed 9-some were part of the mix. But even with this ace line up things didn’t work out. Why? What happened? It is detailed in the side-bar emails-memos. They try to explain the ban, the layout, what went wrong. They decode the attempt to link fair-use, copyright, and digital commons to a new media heritage site, and “out” the bad code. Don’t blame The Mouse or Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for why the barrel got banned. Blame it on a bug. This bug blurs the line, clouds what separates public and private realms. Need markers, a little GPS. The challenge is assembling cartographic tools to help “city fathers” and the rest of us.


the images are taken from

the buildbetterbarrel segment â&#x20AC;&#x153;benchâ&#x20AC;? and a post production remix concert,


Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2007 13:55:43 0700

From: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardo1@yahoo.com> Subject: documentary items To: Ed Nickels <ENickels@nucalgon.com>, Cameron Sanders <csanders@mediaresults. com>, Dennis Riggs <director@hectv.org> To: Ed Nickels, Deninis Riggs and Cameron Sanders Thanks for the new CALOP logo animation. It will be used as an insert window in the doc credits. I wanted also to use this email to take time to provide a status report. First of all I am in the process of doing additional post production work, i.e. audio balances and some background additional music. This also includes inserting some voice over material to augment the narrative aspect of the documentary. As discussed in earlier emails, there are groups/associations that are interested in the documentary, specifically as it highlights our metropolitan area’s “rediscovered new media history.” I’m going to send DVD ’s on to them: Geddes Institute, The Media Ecology Association and AMLA (The American Media Literacy Association). I understand, however, that in this first 6 months, any presentation requires authorization by the CALOP board. AMLA http:// www.amlainfo.org/ will shortly be putting a link at their convention site to the buildbetterbarrel blog and two other web sites relating to the documentary. The documentary in addition to being shown at the conference will be remixed on June 23rd at the AMLA convention. The remix will be part of a 2 hour concert and panel. It opens the conference. As you will note, the draft documentary I submitted last month was 36 minutes. I anticipate that the final draft will be closer to 38 minutes. I believe given content and the documentary’s hybrid new media and narrative temperament– this length is necessary, and it does help in pulling in this international circle. I think this is critical if this story is to get out of St. Louis . I wanted to raise this at this time because I understand that the contract references a 30 minute broadcast product. Shaving “buildbeterbarrel” down to 30 minutes I’m afraid would greatly affect the quality and impact of the documentary, specifically in trying to grab a share of this international audience. As a side note my documentary my documentary SECRET (with Kathy Corley) has played a number of times on HECTV, and while not a Calop funded documentary, it runs for 20 minutes. Also I’ve structured the documentary in terms of these “nine events of new media” with that hope that the individual segments could eventually migrate to the new generation of web video distribution models such as www.youtube.com I think this would further St. Louis’s claim to being a genesis of new media. Finally, please advise if I need to send copies of my third quarter bill and invoices to anyone else. It was included in the packet that I dropped off at that the University City Manager’s office. Paul


Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardo1@yahoo.com> 04/18/07 05:37 PM

To Ed Nickels <ENickels@nucalgon.com> cc Subject “buildbetterbarrel�

Mr. Nickels   This is confirm our conversation this afternoon in which you requested a legal memorandum regarding the use of remixed Steam Boat Willy fragments in the â€œFrom the Benchâ€� segment  of â€œbuildbetterbarrelâ€�. I will prepare a short memorandum regarding the segment and the fair use doctrine. I will email it to you later this week.   It is also my understanding that you are contacting Janet Watson regarding the 3rd  quarter disbursement/ billing of $2500 and that a check can be picked up tomorrow.   And of coures thank you for continued support of what I believe will be an important documentary. paul Nu­Calgon Wholesaler Inc., 2008 Altom Ct., St. Louis, MO 63146, is not responsible for errors or omissions in this e­mail message. Any personal comments made in this e­mail do not reflect the views of Nu­Calgon Wholesaler Inc. If you are not the intended recipient, please note that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited and delete this message from your computer. If you wish to not receive future e­mails from Nu­Calgon Wholesaler Inc. reply to the sender and put "delete" in the subject line.

From: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardo1@yahoo.com> To: Eric Friedman <erics@friedmangroup.com>  Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2007 12:48 PM Subject: Fwd: buildbetterbarrel ­ memo

CALGON is a licensed trade name.

fyi Dennis raised the question of copyright and i told ed i give him a memo here it is and mom is better she had the flu and got dehydrated hospitalized but I'm picking her up now Paul

04/18/07 05:37 PM

Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardo1@yahoo.com> wrote: Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2007 10:46:29 ­0700 (PDT) From: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardo1@yahoo.com> Subject: buildbetterbarrel ­ memo To: ENickels@nucalgon.com CC: Dennis Riggs <director@hectv.org> Mr. Nickels  

I received your note regarding the disbursement. I will however not be in today as my mother is ill, and I can not get to St. Louis . But an associate David Keith Holz – a professor of art history at Western Illinois ­University (WIU) will pick up the check tomorrow morning. I should add that WIU has inquired about showing "buildbetterbarrel” next fall.   Also I’ve attached the requested Memorandum. It provides “From the Bench” segment background and addresses the application of the FAIR USE doctrine. I’m copying Dennis Riggs with this.   And again thank you.  Paul Guzzardo

CALGON is a licensed trade name. ENickels@nucalgon.com wrote: Paul, I confirmed late yesterday with Janet that she has the check for you. Any problems, etc. please don't hesitate to get in touch with me. Ed Nickels Nu-Calgon Wholesaler Inc. is not responsible for errors or omissions in this e-mail message. Any personal comments made in this e-mail does not reflect the views of Nu-Calgon Wholesaler Inc. If you are not the intended recipient, please note that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited and delete this message from your computer.

Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardo1@yahoo.com>

To Ed Nickels <ENickels@nucalgon.com> cc Subject “buildbetterbarrel�

Mr. Nickels   This is confirm our conversation this afternoon in which you requested a legal memorandum regarding the use of remixed Steam Boat Willy fragments in the â€œFrom the Benchâ€� segment  of â€œbuildbetterbarrelâ€�. I will prepare a short memorandum regarding the segment and the fair use doctrine. I will email it to you later this week.   It is also my understanding that you are contacting Janet Watson regarding the 3rd  quarter disbursement/ billing of $2500 and that a check can be picked up tomorrow.   And of coures thank you for continued support of what I believe will be an important documentary. paul Nu­Calgon Wholesaler Inc., 2008 Altom Ct., St. Louis, MO 63146, is not responsible for errors or omissions in this e­mail message. Any personal comments made in this e­mail do not reflect the views of Nu­Calgon Wholesaler Inc. If you are not the intended recipient, please note that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited and delete this message from your computer. If you wish to not receive future e­mails from Nu­Calgon Wholesaler Inc. reply to the sender and put "delete" in the subject line. CALGON is a licensed trade name.


fair use memo 1 BACKGROUND : The “buildbetterbarrel’s” event segment “From the Bench” is a video essay on creativity and intellectual property law. This multimedia short uses a digital remix grammar to demonstrate the intellectual property doctrine - FAIR USE. Fair Use is a central part of our copyright system. It allows any of us to quote and reproduce parts – or sometimes all – of copyrighted works, if the use advances creativity and democratic discussion. There are similar free expression safeguards in trademark law. Together, they assure that the owners of “intellectual property” cannot close down the free exchange of ideas. “From the Bench” is also a journalist record of a remix concert. It remixes and edits a live concert video feed. The concert was performed at Winifred Moore auditorium on April 28th. The content for the Winifred Moore concert was initially developed for the February 2006 installation laser/net. The venue was Centrespace Gallery Dundee Scotland. http://www.vrc.dundee. ac.uk/centrespace/2006/lasernet.html Laser/net opened “The City in the Digital Age” which was sponsored by the Geddes Institute for Urban Research, University of Dundee. It was part of a series of symposiums examining the effects of digital technology on civic life and space. Experts were drawn from the fields of geography, urban design and planning, architecture, new media and from law. Laser/net - as a content generating installation - is discussed at length in my article in the current issue of the architectural journal AD. Is There a Digital Future Landscape Terrain? –http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/ jhome/109924136?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0 (Remixed images from “steamboat willy” are in that publication.) The remixed “steamboat willy” footage “From the Bench” falls clearly within the definition of Fair Use. The Disney Corporation has NO MORE right to claim a copyright infringement in “From the Bench” than would Wal-Mart or Halliburton. (On October 27, 2006, unedited video segments “From the Bench” were presented to the School Of Information and Library Science Student Association of the Pratt Institute. http://pratt.edu/~silssa/ .The presentation included a discussion of the fair use doctrine/issues contained in this memorandum.)

fair use memo 2 SPECIFIC CONTENT : “From the Bench” uses a digital remix art practice as a device/strategy to remix a United States Supreme Court oral argument. The case is Eldred v. Ashcroft. 537 U.S. 186 (2003). The sound track’s remixed voices are the voices of the Justices of the United States Supreme Court and of plaintiff Eldred’s counsel Lawrence Lesseg. (Note-The opening audio is from the file sharing case Grokster versus MGM, in which counsel refers to the land mark betamax case, United States Supreme Court decision, Sony Corp of America v. Universal City Studios, 464 U.S. 417 (1984)) Eldred v. Ashcroft was a case heard before the Supreme Court of the United States, challenging the constitutionality of the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. Oral arguments were heard on October 9, 2002, and on January 15, 2003. The Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act is also referred to as the Mickey Mouse extension act. The effect of the Copyright Term Extension Act was to extend copyright law right prior to the date “the mouse” was to go into the public domain. This is why fragments of Steamboat Willy were used in “From the Bench” and why plaintiff’s counsel Lawrence Lesseg voice can be heard talking about Steamboat Bill. Steamboat Bill (1928) is a feature-length comedy silent film featuring Buster Keaton. It was parodied by Walt Disney’s Steamboat Willie. I should add that I am leading a panel addressing “creativity in an information age” at the American Media Literacy Association’s (AMLA) http://www.amlainfo.org/ national media literacy media conference in St. Louis scheduled from June 23-26 It is anticipated that 500 attendees will be at the conference and the accompanying research summit. The panel will discuss this and other issues. And a final thought - I would be happy to arrange for a panel of intellectual property lawyers to discuss fair use. Possible such a panel could proceed or follow a HECTV’s showing of “buildbetterbarrel.” Coupling a panel discussion with the documentary would certainly offer another layer to the documentary, and I would think would be of interest to a broad television audience.

* sometime after the events detailed in the emails and the fair use memos CALOP ceased funding documentary filmmakers

and commentary on SONY CORP. OF AMERICA V. UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS, INC., 464 U.S. 417 (1984) and ELDRED V. ASHCROFT 537 U.S. 186 (2003). In these decisions the United States Supreme Court considers how we construct and tell stories in an information age. “From the Bench” examines the Court’s analysis by using 1) explicit case content 2) the “cut 1) FAIR USE DOCTRINE The original April memorandum provided a detailed and paste” multimedia syntax and grammar that is the subject of the cases. analysis on “the fair use doctrine” and its application to “buildbetterbarrel.” Every citizen has a First Amendment right to comment on governmental polIn that memorandum I mentioned that the National Media Education Liter- icy, and that includes a new media film maker. That right cannot be abridged acy Conference (NMEC) was scheduled in St. Louis in June, and that I’d by a municipal corporation. I am simply exercising my first amendment right be taking part in the Conference. By way of an update, “buildbetterbarrel” of free speech. was shown at NMEC, and the “fair use doctrine” was addressed at the Conference. Speakers discussed the devastating effect restrictive /narrow 3) THE CHILDREN OF UNIVERSITY CITY in my first meeting with your former applications of the “fair use doctrine” had on our nation’s classrooms. A president Cameron Sanders, we discussed the heritage of St. Louis as stopost conference “fair use doctrine” publication was recently released. It is rytelling site. It was at that meeting that Cameron gave me a copy of Calop’s titled “The Cost of Copyright Confusion On Media Literary Education.” It was new 5 year mission. He suggested that I submit a grant for a new media related piece. We talked about St. Louis’s Marshall McLuhan and Father Water funded by the MacArthur Foundation, and is attached. Ong, and why both men were so important to the children of University City. 2) ) FIRST AMENDMENT As discussed in earlier conversations with Calop Marshall McLuhan and Father Water Ong wrote about why we need new representatives THERE IS ANOTHER ISSUE HERE. The “From the Bench” ways to tell stories and to pass them on. They feared what would happen to segment is afforded protection as SPEECH under the First Amendment of future generations if there were obstacles “to the telling and to the passing on theUnited States Constitution and its Missouri counterpart. This overrid- our stories.” This is why I made the documentary “buildbetterbarrel.” ing constitutional right makes a fair use/intellectual property legal analysis somewhat academic and moot. “From the Bench “is both reportage Please find additional comments regarding “buildbetterbarrel.” I believe it would be helpful if I could make a short presentation at an upcoming board meeting. I will be in St. Louis the second week of October through mid November.


buildbetterbarrel went back into production after CALOP banned the barrel. release 2 included a double feature. the add-on was Nanook of the North, the first ever documentary. this time around the storyline entailed two bungling video pirates_ â&#x20AC;&#x153;wannabe internet spam kings.â&#x20AC;? 1) a Japanese voice over pirate, 2) a Bulgarian voice over pirate. script on the right


12

tables, tunnels and debris What makes mass society so difficult to bear is not the number of people involved, or at least not primarily, but the fact that the world between them has lost its power to gather them together, to relate and to separate them. The weirdness of this situation resembles a spiritualistic seance where a number of people gathered around a table might suddenly, through some magic trick, see the table vanish from their midst, so that two persons sitting opposite each other were no longer separated but also would be entirely unrelated to each other by anything tangible.

Hannah Arendt â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Human Conditionâ&#x20AC;?


Arendt wrote about the seance table in 1957. Since then there’s been a change of scrap. “Paste it Notes” gave way to hyper-speed digital buckshot. But it’s still debris, still messy. And that mess is why Ardent matters, and more than a lot of architects and urban designers. Ardent understood debris. She understood the need to step over and out of it into a space of appearance. The German philosopher known for the phrase “the banality of evil” wrote about housekeeping. She wrote about the two spheres, the public and the private realms. About how once upon a time there was a one time wall. But then it tumbled. Arendt agonized about that fall, about the quickening domestic ooze, about the hearth spilling into the street. She knew that housekeeping is tie that binds, that a domestic crave holds the players together. But it’s one meager myth in a cluttered turf. The challenge now is to sit down at a table and assign something other than housekeeping chores. Arendt’s table tale opened an earlier article. It was “Tunnel Vision: An Architecture of Reflexivity.” “Tunnel” started like this. “I had an agenda. I wanted the table back.” A few pages and drawings later “Tunnel Vision” ended this way. “Maybe the table didn’t vanish. Nothing disappears any more. In today’s digital playing field things don’t go away. They sit there. They pile up on top of one another. What’s left is a heap. The communal circle may be busted, but Arendt’s séance table is still there. It’s just covered with debris, so we can’t see it or who’s around it.”

“Tunnel Vision: An Architecture of Reflexivity” was published in the architectural monograph “Displaced : The Work of Fabian Llonch and Gisela Vidalle.” The essay and accompanying graphics detail the design development of a new media prototype. The prototypes were for a chain of light rail stops. A selection follows: The prototype was based upon a study of the transit experience. This design provides a scalable, flexible system that can be adapted to various MetroLink station environments in a modular fashion both in the MetroLink expansion environments and along the existing MetroLink line. The prototype is designed to act as an accessory, and an insertion, into the already advanced and evolved Cross County Metrolink Expansion station design. Its use is not limited to platforms/enclosures, though it can be installed there; it can also be applied to the surrounding environments. Through its skeletal triangular design, this prototype is able to incorporate the extraordinary visual variety and character of the neighborhoods and communities served by the Metro system. It is equally responsive and sensitive to the media art/media artist and the requirements of MetroLink. Media art content of a variety of types and sources can be programmed on the installation’s screens/panels. This fractured ramp is best read as a mining, a boring tool. The tunnel is a horizontal and vertical FORCE. It slips alongside the ground and runs up and down into a data place.


a domestic crave Industrial lofts were a brief to build-live by. They slipped and slid between the private and the public. They were standouts in a congealed public-private blur. Planted on the fuzzy line, it’s what Hannah Arendt moaned. But the blur generated buzz. A shared housekeeping appetite was a magnet. It brought in crowds. Pushed them through the loft gates. And why all the press. The loft projects worked as a pilot, an early recipe platform, a staging ground, a biopsy tool. Lofts took advantage of a housekeeping glow. Gear was pulled off and out of a domestic-scape. Crew auditioned, rehearsed, kit reformatted for the street. The left over bits, bits for reuse were used to assemble a space “to show up.” Some bits follow.

hannah arendt on domesticity ...we see the body of peoples and political communities in the image of a family whose everyday affairs have to be taken care of by a gigantic, nation-wide administration of housekeeping. ...the “idea of Social Economy or collective housekeeping (Volksivirtschaft)” is one of the “three main foci” around which “the political speculation which has permeated economics from the very beginning is found to be crystallized.” ...With the rise of society, that is, the rise of the “household” (oikia) or of economic activities to the public realm, housekeeping and all matters pertaining formerly to the private sphere of the family have become a “collective” concern. In the modern world, the two realms indeed constantly flow into each other like waves in the never-resting stream of the life process itself. The emergence of society—the rise of housekeeping, its activities, problems, and organizational devices—from the shadowy interior of the household into the light of the public sphere, has not only blurred the old borderline between private and political, it has also changed almost beyond recognition the meaning of the two terms and their significance for the life of the individual and the citizen. Since the rise of society, since the admission of household and housekeeping activities to the public realm, an irresistible tendency to grow, to devour the older realms of the political and private as well as the more recently established sphere of intimacy, has been one of the outstanding characteristics of the new realm. What concerns us...is the extraordinary difficulty with which we...understand the decisive division between the public and private realms, ... the dividing line is entirely blurred, because we see the body of peoples and political communities in the image of a family whose everyday affairs have to be taken care of by a gigantic, nation-wide administration of housekeeping.


checksheet ..............


something other than housekeeping chores


more tables, more debris

13


The rag district was quiet when Marilyn and â&#x20AC;&#x153;ambassador to beâ&#x20AC;? Sam Fox sat down at the dinner table, not much happening. The leather and thread works were in decline, city numbers in a tumble. It had been quiet for awhile, except for a movie and a bang. A few years before the tables were set, the loft was backdrop to a cult hit. It was filmed across the street. The windows framed a cinematic set-piece. This film had a terrorist, a plane, and a tall building. The terrorist hijacked the plane, killed the pilot, and crashed plane into a building. The film crew snagged a decommissioned jet plane. Chopped it into pieces. Smuggled remains in one night, and dumped it all on a parking lot across the street. Debris everywhere. This movie had an anti hero and a heartbeat recuse. The hero lands a glider on top of a skyscraper. Then heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s off on the chase. The make believe roof he lands on is a World Trade Tower. But in this fiction the Trade Tower is one of the few things left standing. The movie was Escape from New York.

the myth that got away


the myth that got away


This bang happened seven years before Escape director John Carpenter and crew showed up. It was a few blocks away, in a onetime Irish ghetto. The ghetto was Kerry Patch. Kerry Patch was home to a line of Irish fight clubs. But at the knock down, it was Pruitt - Igoe. The Irish had left, the fight clubs moved on. Pruitt- Igoe was a clutch of buildings, a public housing complex. It opened in 1954. It was acclaimed then. When Pruitt- Igoe fell in March 1972, it was debris before they blew it up. For a lot of “the big-thinkers,” the demolition of Pruitt- Igoe’s is the line in the sand. It’s fall marks the fall. It’s Mayday. It’s the end of Modernism, and it starts the dive through a postmodern looking glass. It’s when maps get messy, really messy. The architect of Pruitt - Igoe was Minoru Yamasaki. Yamasaki was also the architect for the World Trade Towers. When “Escape From New York” was released in 1981, it was described this way. “Escape from New York” is a 1981 American science fiction action film directed by John Carpenter. The film is set in the near future in a crime-ridden United States that has converted Manhattan Island in New York City into a maximum security prison. But none of the press releases said it was filmed near a Yamasaki fall down. Or that the story line involved a highjacked plane that flew into a skyscraper. But then why would they?


Bungled it Two generations of obits in journals, books, films, documentaries, exhibitions missed it. Bungled it. All that copy about modernism, and what started precisely at 3 pm on March 16, 1972, got it wrong. That bigbang hype ignored those fight clubs. Maybe it made sense back then, forty years ago - a wink in time. But now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the ring with something super-sized. Technology hovers. We need a better myth. Need to track down the fight clubs that shadowed the fall.

3 pm on March 16, 1972


Contest is a part of human life everywhere that human life is found.

After a decade of pursuing Peter Ramus, Father Walter Ong continued to map and write with a polymath’s fury. In 1979 he gave a series of talks, “The Messenger Lectures.” They were on contest and ideas. Cornell University Press published them as “Fighting for Life: Contest, Sexuality, and Consciousness.” It was a collar’s fight manual.

Contest has been a major factor in organic evolution and it turns out to have been a major, and organic seemingly essential, factor in intellectual development. Contest operates in many sectors of life-in politics, in sports, in commerce, in the adversary procedures of jurisprudence, to name only a few obvious sectors. The present study concerns itself principally with contest in sectors closer to consciousness as such, that is, with contest as it has entered into the constitution and management of knowledge itself, There are of course structural elements in contest, as is well known to those who watch football games, especially on television, with the analytic playbacks from various angles. Indeed, although it does not consist of structures, contest generates and thrives on structures. Even more, if the conclusions of this book are correct, it generates intellectual structures, the structures that make science itself. Intellectual combat made public many intellectual issues otherwise hidden or obscure, and clarified them. It made accessible publicly apprehensible truth. The potential of intellectual contest to disclose truth lay at the root of Socratic dialogue and lies at the root of the adversary procedure that still prevails in law to this day. The result of individual contest is thus felt outside of the individual contestants in others, in knowledge uttered (that is, etymologically, “outered”), knowledge shared. The present work contends that contest has been and seemingly will remain a constituent of human existence, if in constantly adjusting forms, from the biological base of this existence to its noetic peaks. Contest comes to human kind out of the race’s distant evolutionary past and enters even into the intimacies and ecstasies of self-consciousness. In the human lifeworld, contest catches up some of the lowest dynamics and some of the highest. It is a genetically advantageous factor in organic evolution, indeed in the large an absolutely indispensable factor, one that is the product of natural selection, and thus part of humankind’s genetic heritage, linking us to lower forms of life and them to us. But it is also at the same time an element in humankind’s intellectual development, our development of abstract thought, of noetic distance, and, even beyond that, in the development of the identity of individual human persons, male and female, in finding one’s own person, in saying “I.” Contest is not only a part of humankind’s past but also a part of the future evolution of consciousness itself. How it will serve the future remains to be seen.


Pruitt–Igoe

Coordinates: 38°38′32.24″N 90°12′33.95″W

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pruitt–Igoe was a large urban housing project first

The project was designed by architect Minoru Yamasaki who would later design New York's World Trade Center. It was Yamasaki's first large independent job, performed under supervision and constraints imposed by the federal authorities. The initial proposal provided a mix of high-rise, mid-rise and walk-up buildings. It was acceptable to St. Louis authorities, but exceeded the federal cost limits imposed by the PHA; the

situation; by this time, Pruitt–Igoe had consumed $57 million, an investment that could not be abandoned at

by the Korean War and tensions in the Congress further tightened PHA controls.[6]

After months of preparation, the first building was demolished with an explosive detonation at 3 p.m., on

agency intervened and imposed a uniform building height at 11 floors.[6][11] Shortages of materials caused

occupied in 1954[2] in the U.S. city of St. Louis, Missouri. Living conditions in Pruitt–Igoe began to decline soon after

In 1951, an Architectural Forum article titled "Slum Surgery in St. Louis" praised Yamasaki's original

its completion in 1956.[3] By the late 1960s, the complex had become internationally infamous for its poverty, crime, and segregation. Its 33 buildings were demolished with

proposal as "the best high apartment" of the

year.[12]

Overall density was set at a moderate level of 50 units

explosives in the mid-1970s,[4] and the project has become an icon of urban renewal and public-policy planning failure. The complex was designed by architect Minoru Yamasaki, who also designed the World Trade Center towers and the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport main terminal.

per acre (higher than in downtown slums[6]), yet, according to the planning principles of Le Corbusier and the International Congresses of Modern Architects, residents were raised up to 11 floors above ground in an attempt to save the grounds and ground floor space for communal activity.[13] Architectural Forum praised the layout as "vertical neighborhoods for poor

people".[8] Each row of buildings was supposed

Contents

to be flanked by a "river of trees",[13]

1 History 2 Design and construction 3 Decay 4 Demolition 5 Legacy 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

The Pruitt–Igoe complex was composed of 33 buildings of

11 stories each, located on 57 acres[5] of the Near North Side of St. Louis, Missouri. The four large branching structures in the foreground were the Vaughan Public Housing Complex (also demolished). Also pictured is the Pruitt School (the four-story building near the center of the photo) and St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, both of which still stand.

developing a Harland Bartholomew

concept.[11]

As completed in 1955, Pruitt–Igoe consisted of 33 11-story apartment buildings on a 57-acre (23 ha) site,[14] on St. Louis's lower north side. The complex totaled 2,870 apartments, one of

the largest in the country.[10] The apartments were deliberately small, with undersized kitchen

appliances.[10] "Skip-stop" elevators stopped only at the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth floors, forcing residents to use stairs in an attempt to lessen congestion. The same "anchor floors" were equipped with large communal corridors, laundry rooms,

History

communal rooms and garbage chutes.[13]

During the 1940s and 1950s, the city of St. Louis was overcrowded, with housing conditions in some areas

resembling "something out of a Charles Dickens novel".[5] Its housing stock had deteriorated between the 1920s and the 1940s, and more than 85,000 families lived in 19th century tenements. An official survey from 1947 found that 33,000 homes had communal toilets.[5] Middle-class, predominantly white, residents were leaving the city, and their former residences became occupied by low-income families. Black (north) and white (south) slums of the old city were segregated and expanding, threatening to engulf

Despite federal cost-cutting regulations, Pruitt–Igoe initially cost $36

million,[15]

60% above national

average for public housing.[10] Conservatives attributed cost overruns to inflated unionized labor wages and the steamfitters union influence that led to installation of an expensive heating system;[10] overruns on the heating system caused a chain of arbitrary cost cuts in other vital parts of the building.[11] April 1972. The second, widely televised demolition of a Pruitt–Igoe building that followed the March 16 demolition.[1]

Nevertheless, Pruitt–Igoe was initially seen as a breakthrough in urban renewal.[8] Residents considered it to be "an oasis in the desert" compared to the extremely poor quality of housing they had occupied previously, and considered it to be safe. Some referred to the apartments as "poor man's penthouses".[16]

Despite poor build quality, material suppliers cited Pruitt–Igoe in their advertisements, capitalizing on the national exposure of the project.[8]

the city center.[6] To save central properties from an imminent loss of value, city authorities settled on

Decay

gentrification of existing real estate was considered impractical.[5]

A 1956 Missouri court decision desegregated public housing in the state. In 1957, occupancy of Pruitt–Igoe

redevelopment of the "inner ring" around the central business district.[6] Decay was so profound there that

In 1947, St. Louis planners proposed to replace DeSoto-Carr, a run-down black neighborhood, with new park.[7]

two- and three-story residential blocks and a public The plan did not materialize; instead, Democratic mayor Joseph Darst, elected in 1949, and Republican state leaders favored clearing the slums and replacing them with high-rise, high-density public housing. They reasoned that the new projects would help the city through increased revenues, new parks, playgrounds and shopping 1951:

space.[5]

Darst stated in

We must rebuild, open up and clean up the hearts of our cities. The fact that slums were created with all the intrinsic evils was everybody's fault. Now it is everybody's responsibility to repair the damage.[8]

In 1948, voters rejected the proposal for a municipal loan to finance the change, but soon the situation was changed with the Housing Act of 1949 and Missouri state laws that provided co-financing of public housing projects. The approach taken by Darst, urban renewal, was shared by the Harry S. Truman administration and fellow mayors of other cities overwhelmed by industrial workers recruited during the war.[3] Specifically, St. Louis Land Clearance and Redevelopment Authority was authorized to acquire and demolish the slums of the inner ring and then sell the land at reduced prices to private developers, fostering middle-class return and business growth. Another agency, St. Louis Housing Authority, had to clear land to construct public housing for the former slum dwellers.[6]

By 1950, St. Louis had received a federal commitment under the Housing Act of 1949[9] to finance 5,800 public housing

units.[6]

The first large public housing in St. Louis, Cochran Gardens, was completed in 1953

and intended for low-income whites. It contained 704 units in 12 high-rise buildings[3] and was followed by Pruitt–Igoe, Darst-Webbe and Vaughn. Pruitt–Igoe was intended for young middle-class white and black tenants, segregated into different buildings, Darst-Webbe for low-income white tenants. Missouri public housing remained racially segregated until

1956.[10]

Design and construction In 1950, the city commissioned the firm of Leinweber, Yamasaki & Hellmuth to design Pruitt–Igoe, a new complex named for St. Louisans Wendell O. Pruitt, an African-American fighter pilot in World War II, and William L. Igoe, a former U.S. Congressman. Originally, the city planned two partitions: Captain W. O. Pruitt Homes for the black residents, and William L. Igoe Apartments for whites.[11] The site was bound by Cass Avenue on the north, North Jefferson Avenue on the west, Carr Street on the south, and North 20th Street on the

east.[6]

"horizontal" reorganization of their layout.[15][21]

March 16, 1972.[15] The second one went down April 22, 1972.[15] After more implosions on July 15, the first stage of demolition was over. As the government scrapped rehabilitation plans, the rest of the Pruitt– Igoe blocks were imploded during the following three years; and the site was finally cleared in 1976 with the demolition of the last block. Today, the Pruitt–Igoe site is about half-covered by Gateway Middle School and Gateway Elementary School, combined magnet schools based in science and technology, as well as Pruitt Military Academy, a military-themed magnet middle school. All schools are within the St. Louis Public School district. The other half of the Pruitt–Igoe site is made up of oak and hickory woodland. The Pruitt–Igoe electrical substation is located in the center of this area. The former DeSoto-Carr slums around the Pruitt–Igoe have also been torn down and replaced with low-density, single-family housing.

Legacy Explanations for the failure of Pruitt–Igoe are complex. It is often presented as an architectural failure.[22] But while it is often claimed to have won an award, it never did. The same architects also designed Cochran Gardens elsewhere in St. Louis, which did; the two projects may have been confused over time.[23]

Other critics cite social factors including economic decline of St. Louis, white flight into suburbs, lack of tenants who were employed, and politicized local opposition to government housing projects as factors playing a role in the project's decline. Pruitt–Igoe has become a frequently used textbook case in

architecture, sociology and politics, "a truism of the environment and behavior literature".[23] A noted study of the families who lived in the complex was published in book form in 1970 by Harvard sociologist Lee Rainwater, titled Behind Ghetto Walls: Black Families in a Federal Slum. Controversy over the project remains, based mostly on racial and social-class perspectives. Housing projects of similar architectural design were successful in New York, but St. Louis's fragmented political culture and declining urban core contributed to the project's failure. This was elaborated upon in the Harvard University study on public housing in American cities, and in reports by actual residents. During the Nixon Administration, Pruitt–Igoe was widely publicized as a failure of government involvement in urban renewal, and the destruction of the buildings was dramatized in the media to show the American public that government intervention in social problems only leads to waste, and to justify cutbacks on social and economic "equalization" programs. Wealthy St. Louisans had also objected strongly to the artificial racial integration, and the resulting decrease in property values. The Pruitt–Igoe housing project was one of the first demolitions of modernist architecture; postmodern

architectural historian Charles Jencks called its destruction "the day Modern architecture died."[14][24] Its failure is often seen as a direct indictment of the society-changing aspirations of the International school of architecture. Jencks used Pruitt–Igoe as an example of modernists' intentions running contrary to real-world

social development,[25] though others argue that location, population density, cost constraints, and even specific number of floors were imposed by the federal and state authorities and therefore the failure of the project cannot be attributed entirely to architectural factors.[26]

Footage of the demolition of Pruitt–Igoe was notably incorporated into the film Koyaanisqatsi.[14]

decline.[14]

peaked at 91%, after which it began to Sources differ on how quickly depopulation occurred: according to Ramroth, vacancy rose to one-third

Gallery

capacity by 1965;[15] according to Newman, after a 60%.[13]

certain point occupancy never rose above All authors agree that by the end of the 1960s, Pruitt–Igoe was nearly abandoned and had deteriorated into a decaying, dangerous, crime-infested neighborhood; its architect lamented: "I never thought people were that destructive".[17]

Residents cite a lack of maintenance almost from the very beginning, including the regular breakdown of

An observer could see straight through the buildings of Pruitt–Igoe due to the large number of broken windows.

elevators, as being a primary cause of the deterioration of the project.[16] Local authorities cited a lack of

funding to pay for the workforce necessary for proper upkeep of the buildings.[16] In addition, ventilation was poor, and centralized air conditioning nonexistent.[10] The stairwells and corridors attracted

muggers.[10] The project's parking and recreation facilities were inadequate; playgrounds were added only after tenants petitioned for their installation.

Overview

In 1971, Pruitt–Igoe housed only six hundred people in seventeen buildings; the other sixteen buildings

Artist's conception of Pruitt–Igoe communal space

were boarded up.[18] Meanwhile, adjacent Carr Village, a low-rise area with a similar demographic makeup, remained fully occupied and trouble-free throughout the construction, occupancy and decline of Pruitt– Igoe.[19]

Despite decay of the public areas and gang violence, Pruitt–Igoe contained isolated pockets of relative wellbeing throughout its worst years. Apartments clustered around small, two-family landings with tenants working to maintain and clear their common areas were often relatively successful. When corridors were

shared by 20 families and staircases by hundreds, public spaces immediately fell into disrepair.[19] When the number of residents per public space rose above a certain level, none would identify with these "no man's land[s]" – places where it was "impossible to feel ... to tell resident from intruder".[19] The inhabitants of Pruitt–Igoe organized an active tenant association, bringing about community enterprises. One such example was the creation of craft rooms; these rooms allowed the women of the Pruitt–Igoe to congregate, socialize, and create ornaments, quilts, and statues for sale.

Carr Square, across the street from Pruitt– Igoe

Demolition In 1968, the federal Department of Housing began encouraging the remaining residents to leave Pruitt–

Igoe.[20] In December 1971, state and federal authorities agreed to demolish two of the Pruitt–Igoe buildings with explosives. They hoped that a gradual reduction in population and building density could improve the

Cabrini–Green, in Chicago, USA Robert Taylor Homes, in Chicago, USA Glenny Drive Apartments, in Buffalo, New York, USA Regent Park, in Toronto, Canada St. James Town, in Toronto, Canada Lees Avenue, in Ottawa, Canada Habitations Jeanne-Mance, in Montreal, Canada Ballymun Flats, in Dublin, Ireland Roundshaw Estate, Wallington, Sutton, Surrey Red Road Flats, in Glasgow, Scotland Aylesbury Estate, in London, England Robin Hood Gardens, in Poplar, London, England Bijlmermeer, in Amsterdam, Netherlands Conjunto Urbano Nonoalco Tlatelolco, in Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico Cidade de Deus, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Panel house, in various former communist countries Cité Radieuse and Ville Contemporaine (in French) – Le Corbusier's modernist scheme for urban development Father Panik Village in Bridgeport, Connecticut The Pruitt-Igoe-Myth: An Urban History, 2011 documentary film

once.[15] Authorities considered different scenarios and techniques to rehabilitate Pruitt–Igoe, including conversion to a low-rise neighborhood by collapsing the towers down to four floors and undertaking a

See also

References Notes 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23.

Photo attribution: Ramroth, p. 166 Checkoway, p. 245 Larsen, Kirkendall, p. 61 Mendelssohn, Quinn, p. 163 Larsen, Kirkendall, p. 60 Bristol, 164 Ramroth, p. 169 Ramroth, p. 164 Pub.L. 81–171 (http://www.legisworks.org/congress/81/publaw-171.pdf) Larsen, Kirkendall, p. 62 Hall, p. 256 Alexiou, p. 38–39. Newman, p. 10 "Why the Pruitt-Igoe housing project failed" (http://www.economist.com/blogs/prospero/2011/10/americanpublic-housing). Prospero (blog). The Economist. October 15, 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-17. Ramroth, p. 165 Freidrichs, Chad and Freidrichs, Jaime. "The Pruitt-Igoe Myth: An Urban History" (http://www.pruitt-igoe.com/) (TV documentary) America ReFramed on PBS World (2011) Patterson, p. 336 Larsen, Kirkendall p. 63 Newman, p. 11 Ramroth, p. 171 Leonard Bristol, 163 Bristol, 168

24. Jencks, p.9 25. Jencks, 9 26. Bristol, p. 360

Bibliography Alexiou, Alice Sparberg. Jane Jacobs: Urban Visionary (2006) New Brunswick: Rutgers. Toronto: HarperCollins. ISBN 978-0-8135-3792-4. Birmingham, Elizabeth (1998). "Reframing the Ruins: Pruitt–Igoe, Structural Racism, and African American Rhetoric as a Space for Cultural Critique". Positionen 2:2. Bristol, Katharine (May 1991). "The Pruitt–Igoe Myth" (http://www.pruitt-igoe.com/temp/1991-bristol-pruittigoemyth.pdf) (PDF). Journal of Architectural Education (Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture) 44 (3): 163–171. doi:10.1111/j.1531-314X.2010.01093.x (https://dx.doi.org/10.1111%2Fj.1531314X.2010.01093.x). ISSN 1531-314X (https://www.worldcat.org/issn/1531-314X). Checkoway, Barry (1985). "Revitalizing an Urban Neighborhood: A St. Louis Case Study' " (http://books.google.com/?id=1IRsph2f2FoC&dq=the+metropolitan+midwest&printsec=frontcover). The Metropolitan Midwest (Urbana/Chicago: University of Illinois Press). ISBN 978-0-252-01114-6. Hall, Peter Geoffrey Hall (2004). Cities of Tomorrow: An Intellectual History of Urban Planning and Design in the Twentieth Century (http://books.google.com/?id=zoDEf5__BM8C&printsec=frontcover#PPA260,M1). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated. ISBN 978-0-631-23252-0. Hoffman, Alexander von. "Why They Built the Pruitt–Igoe Project" (http://www.soc.iastate.edu/sapp/PruittIgoe.html). Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University. Jencks, Charles (1984). The Language of Post-Modern Architecture. New York: Rizzoli. ISBN 978-0-84780571-6. Larsen, Lawrence Harold; Kirkendall, Richard Stewart (2004). A History of Missouri: 1953 to 2003 (http://books.google.com/?id=0Pc-wvtps7YC&pg=PA61&dq=Pruitt-Igoe). University of Missouri Press. ISBN 978-0-8262-1546-8. Leonard, Mary Delach (2003). "Pruitt–Igoe Housing Complex" (http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/special/pd125.nsf/0/AB4B1191EB6948C186256E04006BBBCD? OpenDocument). St. Louis Post Dispatch, January 13, 2004. Mendelssohn, Robert E.; Quinn, Michael A. (1985). "Residential Patterns in a Midwesern City: The Saint Louis Experience" (http://books.google.com/? id=1IRsph2f2FoC&dq=the+metropolitan+midwest&printsec=frontcover). The Metropolitan Midwest (Urbana/Chicago: University of Illinois Press). ISBN 978-0-252-01114-6. Montgomery, Roger (1985). "Pruitt–Igoe: Policy Failure or Societal Symptom" (http://books.google.com/? id=1IRsph2f2FoC&dq=the+metropolitan+midwest&printsec=frontcover). The Metropolitan Midwest (Urbana/Chicago: University of Illinois Press). ISBN 978-0-252-01114-6. Newman, Oscar (1996). Creating Defensible Space (http://books.google.com/? id=80w0GEh4ffEC&dq=Oscar+Newman,+Creating+Defensible+Space&printsec=frontcover). Washington, D.C.: DIANE Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7881-4528-5. Patterson, James T. (1997). Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945–1974 (http://books.google.com/? id=fybyR6VFLSoC). Oxford University Press US. ISBN 978-0-19-511797-4. Pipkin, John S. et al. (1983). Remaking the City (http://books.google.com/?id=ms3vRqq33SAC). SUNY Press. ISBN 978-0-87395-677-2. Rainwater, Lee (2006) [1970]. Behind Ghetto Walls: Black Families in a Federal Slum (http://books.google.com/?id=8UwY4qD9ANkC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Behind+Ghetto+Walls). Chicago: Aldine Transaction. ISBN 978-0-202-30907-1. Ramroth, William G. (2007). Planning for Disaster: How Natural and Man-made Disasters Shape the Built Environment (http://books.google.com/?id=BgTpVyDyWDIC). Kaplan Publishing. ISBN 978-1-4195-9373-4. Weisman, Leslie K. (1994). Discrimination by Design: A Feminist Critique of the Man-Made Environment (http://books.google.com/?id=kaLwxBf0ZMMC). University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-06399-2.

Further reading Bristol, Kate; Montgomery, Roger (1987). Pruitt–Igoe: An Annotated Bibliography. Council of Planning Librarians. ISBN 978-0866022057. Cornetet, James (2013). Facadomy: A Critique on Capitalism and Its Assault on Mid-Century Modern Architecture. Process Press. ISBN 978-0988810808. Chuck Palahniuk, "Confessions in Stone" in Stranger than Fiction. (New York: Doubleday, 2004). Wolfe, Tom (1981). From Bauhaus to Our House (http://books.google.com/books?id=Yx25tJgAicC). Farrar, Straus & Giroux. ISBN 0-374-15892-4., chapter 4 Escape to Islip

External links Pruitt-Igoe Photographs collections (http://tjrhino1.umsl.edu/whmc/view.php? description_get=Pruitt+Igoe) at the University of Missouri–St. Louis

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Pruitt-Igoe.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pruitt–Igoe&oldid=655416104" Categories: History of St. Louis, Missouri Public housing in St. Louis, Missouri Residential buildings completed in 1955 Buildings and structures demolished in 1972 Demolished buildings and structures in Missouri Public housing in the United States Urban decay in the United States This page was last modified on 7 April 2015, at 22:34. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

they got it all wrong


society gets it all wrong. Ignatius Loyola founded the Jesuits. Loyola was a Spanish solider. The Jesuits are called “The Society of Jesus” in English, but it’s Compañía de Jesús in Spanish, or “Company of Jesus.” It’s martial. It’s a fight club.


“beautiful” * “beautiful” is what Jimmy Cagney said to Pat O’Brien after O’Brien cold cocked him in the ring. *The Irish Are Us, 1935 Warner Bros.


15

Hitting a wall Goings and gatherings in smartly designed loft spaces won’t meet Arendt’s Greek mark. Won’t bring back vanished tables, let alone all that’s great and radiant. In a skirmish with the flat need some air, need to step outside. Memory Wall was outside. It was perched on the street. It seized the garment district’s history. And it made a little pop history along the way. The art of politics teaches men how to bring forth what is great and radiantó— ta megala kai lampra, in the words of Democritus; as long as the polis is there to inspire men to dare the extraordinary, all things are safe; if it perishes, everything is lost. (206) Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition


> October 9, 1996 > Jean S. Tucker > Center for Metropolitan Studies > University of Missouri > 8001 Natural Bridge Road > Saint Louis, Missouri 63121 > > Re: Public History Project - Washington Avenue Garment District > 1) Art - The prototype poster images I’ve prepared suggest the visually seductive character of this project, and begin to hint at the truly arresting quality of the fullscale projections. > > 2) History - This is about collective memory. It offers a forum to explore collective memory outside the traditional and fixed perimeters of a history museum. The open museum is a subject of much debate within the field of history. The district offers an alternative venue. > > 3) Urban architecture- This proposal references the singular architectural and monumental scale of Washington Avenue, but also acknowledges the “Washington Avenues” in every American city. This proposal is marked by both its particularity and its broad urban applicability. > > 4) Labor- If this project can be reduced to any single theme it is about celebrating the laborers who were once employed in the District, the work they did, and the organizational and associational life that grew out of their work. > > 5) Technology - It is important to be cautious when discussing technology, given the often charged and hyperbolic rhetoric. Digital projection technology and CDROM storage and access systems can be put to use in this project. This has significance beyond the utilitarian. There is an irony in fashioning a memorial to a former technology by using the technology that replaced it. From: Caine, Ian <Ian_C@mackeymitchell.com> To: Buck Doubet <zio11@stlnet.com> Subject: Living Wall Project & Plaza Date: 5/14/1999 7:15:58 PM May 14, 1999 Dear Paul: I was glad that we had the opportunity to talk this week. As I told you then, Jeff Carney and I have been pleased to contribute to your on-going efforts to build a multi-media wall and plaza at the corner of Washington &Tucker. We both feel that the project holds great potential as an architectural project and an important piece of public infrastructure forWashington Ave. I would also like to confirm our desire to involve landscape architect Tim Franke as a co-designer on any future work. Tim is a principal in the local firm of Third Land, Inc. and is a faculty member at the WashingtonUniversity School of Architecture. We believe that Tim’s experience with public landscape projects will enhance our design efforts-particularly those involving the plaza. Furthermore, his position with Third Land will facilitate any future construction documentation efforts, as they become necessary. I look forward to our meeting next Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. in Jeff Edwards’ office. I would like to introduce you both to Tim and hear about your latest plans for the newly acquired lot at Washington & Tucker. Tim, Jeff and I are also interested in gauging your interest in continuing the design process that Jeff and I began last summer. To this end we will bring copies of the work that we have done to date as well as several other projects intended to fuel discussion about design alternatives for the vacant land. Please don’t hesitate to contact me in the meantime if you have any thoughts about the project or next week’s meeting. Thank you. Ian

Paul First, allow me to apologize for not getting back to you sooner. My schedule got sidetracked a bit when my father was put into the hospital last week. All is now well and I’m back at it, but I am sorry for the delay. I have given the challenge facing you a good deal of thought and have discussed your needs with several other consultants. The following are a few general conclusions/recommendations: The concept of “The Wall” at Tucker and Washington is appealing and would add a lot to the downtown revitalization underway and in the planning stages. The concept would be especially appealing if it had a daytime component attached to it, so that downtown workers and daytime visitors could appreciate it as well. Whether this requires a Jumbotron or the equivalent is something I assume still needs to be investigated. However, we should probably build it into the long range plan if not the immediate concept for the wall. One key to gaining underwriters for this project is to establish it as part of the overall plan for downtown. This means we need to sit down with Downtown Inc. and the Downtown Now planners and sell them on the concept (perhaps you have already done some of this?). Everyone agrees that we need to create a basic “sales” kit that can quickly and easily communicate what we are trying to do. Such a kit should be heavy on visuals and emphasize the practical aspects (news, community information, showcasing local resources) of the project as much as the artistic aspects. There was also some thought given to how this project could be linked to the convention center, either as a bulletin board of local activities or as an attraction for conventioneers to visit. An early discussion with the Convention and Visitors Commission would be helpful in flushing this out. There may be a way to sell sponsorships as well as seek underwriting support. This might be along the lines of Internet banner ads which could be projected along with other content. Sponsors could also be featured in special reports on the wall from time to time (along the lines of PBS ads). In addition to selling the concept, we must make sure we also provide proof that the concept will be maintained over time so it does not become a one-shot deal. Do we have the resources to sustain this and how do we demonstrate this? Chad Cooper (he of Metropolis St. Louis and Community Development Agency fame) has expressed some interest in working on this project after the first of the year. He is taking an extended leave of absence from CDA to prepare grad school applications, but is interested in doing some freelance work on the side. I envision him helping out on development of materials and funding calls after January 1. Project Approach : November-December -Paul to convince someone at Washington University to do an artist’s rendering of what this space will look like. Jim to create draft “sales kit” for use in initial feasibility sessions. This will include: One-page synopsis of project Artist’s rendering of The Wall News clippings from previous Wall events Photos of area tod ay December-January -Jim/Paul/Jeff to set up initial “concept” meetings with key constituencies to Once you have had a chance to review/discuss this, I suggest we meet to plan next steps, gather existing materials, and talk strategy. I am available to do so November 17, 18, or 19 before noon each day. I look forward to hearing from you. 530-0659-Jim O’Donnell From: Caine, Ian <Ian_C@mackeymitchell.com> To: Buck Doubet <zio11@stlnet.com> Subject: RE: architectural im ages Date: 2/19/1999 1:24:10 PM paul: what about Sunday afternoon? do you digital files or slides for the website? -----Original Message----From: paul guzzardo [SMTP:zio11@stlnet.com]Sent: Thursday, February 18, 1999 9:41 AMTo: Ian Caine Cc: Joyce RudinskySubject: architectural images Ian What are your plans for the weekend installation.I’d like to get this onto web can you bring teh images on a zip drive? I’m sending this on to Joyce Rudinsky. So we can make arrangements with webmaager to up load to the Media Arts site.

GASPAR -Budget Memorandum Analog Projections One wall - Duration 30 days Personnel-expenses Creative Initiation fee $5000.00 Artistic/Technical $100 per hour - Estimated hours: 40 Artistic/Technical responsibilities: 1) Select - in conjunction with the historical consultants- archival images, 2) Compose collage projections, 3) Select walls for projection sites. This includes evaluating ambient light, brightness of projection images, and size of projections; Historical $100 per hour - Estimated hours: 40 Review archival sources, selection images, and text. Administrative $150 per hour Estimated hours: 40 Coordination of the artistic, technical , historical and maintenance personnel. Maintenance $15 per hour Estimated hours: 252 Operate and monitor projectors. Material/Hardware Three slide projectors are required. Material/Hardware cost 1)Transference of images and text to slides $1000 2) Copying existing slides - $500 3) Monthly Projector Rental-3 projectors 4) Central -control-computer to operate the and integrate these three projectorsJaime what is the hardware available for this and what is the cost 5) Replacement bulbs ---??? Wall It is presumed, given of the non invasive character of this presentation, the wall will be donated by the property owners, and no remuneration will be required. Also because the project does not envision cinematic precise imaging, no expenses to paint or repair the party wall are anticipated. It acknowledges that an “imperfect images” can very powerful in reviving historical memory. Utilities Jaime here I think we can actually get an estimate from Union Electric-local utility company- regarding the cost to operate three slide projectors for an 8 hour period of time. Certainly all we need is some of the technical inf. from the rental companies about the projectors note this also applies to the LCD projectors. I believe that this information is critical and needs to be included in a budget. ---Projections in Excess of 30 days: Budgetary considerations for projections with a duration in excess of 30 daysHistorical as well as certain artistic responsibility personnel costs will remain argely fixed regardless of duration. An extended duration will entail additional administrative and maintenance personnel expenses. It would be appropriate to consider purchasing one or more slide projectors, rather than continue renting. A projector can be purchased for somewhere between x and y. Budgetary considerations for projections on multiple walls:

Again the personnel expenses for historical/artistic consultants will not significantly vary o be effected by either the number of walls nor the duration of the projections. The cost for administrative, maintenance, and the material/hardware will increase. A determination of the whether to rent or purchase is determined by that duration of the projection and not the number of walls. walls. Budget Digital Projections Duration Digital projections because of the cost of imaging equipment, as well as the additional personnel expense associated with digital technology, suggests that any projections should exceed 30 days. Personnel-expenses Creative Initiation fee $5000.00 Artistic/Technical $100 per hour - Estimated hours: __ Artistic/Technical responsibilities: 1) Select - in conjunction with the historical consultants- archival images, 2) Scan images and write the necessary program for single and the collage projections. 3) Compose collage projections, 4) Select walls for projection sites. This includes evaluating ambient light, brightness of projection images, and size of projections; Historical $100 per hour - Estimated hours: 40 Review archival sources, selection images, and text. Administrative $150 per hour Estimated hours: 40 Coordination of the artistic, technical , historical and maintenance personnel. Maintenance $15 per hour Estimated hours: 252 Operate and monitor computer and projectors. Material/Hardware 1) LCD projectors 2) Pentium Processors 3) CD ROM writer


Resolution No.99LCRA6518E


cyborg on corners

16

Memory Wall had a mixed run. Collaborations chased. Connections made, some helpful, some less so. Fragments were inserted, pasted into other “civic wall events,” example that Millennium / Methuselah party. Labor content was rebooted, reformatted in a street media arts lab. That was later, and the lab was part of larger remix. And the lens was different. But things were done. There was something to show. But mostly Memory Wall ended up as a cliché, colonizing other walls, lame, hijacked. Never quite came off. Maybe it’s for the best. It is easy for a public history-art project to slip into a nostalgic set piece. We have enough of those. Don’t need a one-note shrine to “the great he-man cobbler or mistress-seamstress.” Time and talent can be put to a better use. A cornball sink hole is always nearby. And when money is heaped, it’s hard to avoid slipping into.

But Memory Wall aimed to be more than a memorial to industrial flight and a shuttered place. Memory Wall wanted to turn the street into a media ecological dig. It was out “to out the layers.” Make them parade, flip, strut. Do it by retrofitting an empty stage. Bring in some big lens. Park it. Truck in a posse of artists to check out “has been technologies,” techne that hooked and extended the garment workers. Use posse and lens to give back. And then flip the lens on ourselves. We need a recursive road show if we want to push a space of appearance. St. Louis was the place to do it. Two other street players made it singular. One was McLuhan, the other Monsanto. Both shadowed Memorial Wall. McLuhan and Monsanto are the local code, the garment back story. Memory Wall wanted to use the garment district rags, workers and old sewing kit to check out the coming, wearable, digital couture. All the new stuff that hooks, attaches, extends us. It wanted as Hannah Arendt said “to dare the extraordinary.” McLuhan and Monsanto pushed the brief past a formulaic public - art history project. Called for a stage for something more than a flat set piece on wearables shifted to Bangladesh. Because of what Messrs. McLuhan and Queeny unleashed, there was the possibility that this stage, the empty wardrobe, and these dresser ghosts might be a window into an existential road show.


McLuhan’s first book was The Mechanical Bride. He started assembling scraps in St. Louis. And they were scraps, newspaper adverts, cut outs, scribbled notes. TThe Mechanical Bride is a dizzy Heuduck mosaic ride. But there’s an anchor to the book. It’s a dummy. It’s Charlie McCarthy. Charlie is a puppet. He’s known for snappy dialogue just like McLuhan. Charlie is ever paired with Edgar Bergen. Puppeteer Bergen was an actor, a comic strip creator, and a so-so ventriloquist. But McLuhan wasn’t writing a manual for puppeteers, not his audience. McLuhan just wanted to know who is in charge? Where do the voices come from? Who wears who? McLuhan was interested in the interval between our technologies and ourselves, the skin between puppet and puppeteer. Who pulls those strings? McLuhan was keen on how medias and other technologies hook, attach, extend us, just like that seamstress’s needle and the shoe-man’s scissors. He was after a pattern.

charlie on a wall - Text and graphics from Marshall McLuhan’s The Mechanical Bride were projected on The Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts. It was part of an installation entitled “Marshall McLuhan Meets Josephine Baker.” It was produced by Paul Guzzardo and Zlatko Cosic .


Monsanto: Time Line

1901 - Original Monsanto founded as a maker of saccharine by John F. Queeny and named after his wife, Olga Monsanto Queeny. 1920s and 1930s - Manufacturers sulfuric acid and other chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are later implicated in reproductive, developmental and immune system disorders. 1940s - Manufactures plastics and synthetic fabrics 1960s - Establishes agricultural division with focus on herbicides. 1962-1971 - Becomes one of principal companies supplying herbicide known as Agent Orange to U.S. military for use in Vietnam War. Agent Orange is later linked to various health problems, including cancer. 1976 - Commercializes Roundup herbicide, which goes on to be a top seller around the world. 1982 - Some 2,000 people are relocated from Times Beach, Missouri, after area is contaminated with PCB by-product dioxin. Critics say a St. Louis-area Monsanto chemical plant was a source but company denies any connection. 1994 - Wins regulatory approval for its first biotech product, a dairy cow hormone called Posilac. 1996 - Introduces first biotech crop, Roundup Ready soybeans, which tolerate spraying of Roundup herbicide, and then introduced a biotech cotton engineered to resist insect damage. 1997 - Spins off its industrial chemical and fibers business into Solutia, Inc. amid complaints and legal claims about pollution from its plants. Introduces new biotech canola, cotton and corn, and buys foundation seed companies. 1998 - Introduces Roundup Ready corn. 1999 - Monsanto sold off NutraSweet Co. and two other companies. 2000 - Monsanto merged with Pharmacia & Upjohn, and the agricultural division became a wholly owned subsidiary of the “new” Pharmacia. 2000 (October) - Pharmacia spun off its Monsanto subsidiary into a new company, the “new Monsanto.” As part of the deal, Monsanto agreed to indemnify Pharmacia against any liabilities that might be incurred from judgments against Solutia. As a result, the new Monsanto continues to be a party to numerous lawsuits that relate to operations of the old Monsanto. 2005 - Monsanto acquired Emergent Genetics and its Stoneville and NexGen cotton brands. Emergent was the third largest U.S. cotton seed company, with about 12 percent of the U.S. market. Monsanto’s goal was to obtain “a strategic cotton germplasm and traits platform.” 2007 - In June, Monsanto completed its purchase of Delta and Pine Land Company, a major cotton seed breeder, for $1.5 billion. As a condition for approval of the purchase from the Department of Justice, Monsanto was obligated to divest its Stoneville cotton business, which it sold to Bayer, and to divest its NexGen cotton business, which it sold to Americot. Monsanto also exited the pig breeding business by selling Monsanto Choice Genetics to Newsham Genetics LC in November, divesting itself of “any and all swine-related patents, patent applications, and all other intellectual property.” 2008 - Monsanto purchased the Dutch seed company De Ruiter Seeds for €546 million,and sold its POSILAC bovine somatotropin brand and related business to Elanco Animal Health, a division of Eli Lilly in August for $300 million plus “additional contingent consideration.”

in the ring with charlie


No society has ever known enough about its actions to have developed immunity to its new extensions or technologies. Today we have begun to sense that art may be able to provide such immunity. In the history of human culture there is no example of a conscious adjustment of the various factors of personal and social life to new extensions except in the puny and peripheral efforts of artists. The artist picks up the message of cultural and technological challenge decades before its transforming impact occurs. He, then, builds models or Noahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arks for facing the change that is at hand. It is a persistent theme of this book that all technologies are extensions of our physical and nervous systems to increase power and speed. Again unless there were such increases of power and speed, new extensions of ourselves would not occur or would be discarded. When a community develops some extension of itself. it tends to allow all other functions to be altered to accommodate that form. Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man by Marshall McLuhan 1964


Interview August 10, 1997 Fr. McNamee and Fr. Ong St. Louis Post-Dispatch Jeff Daniels McLuhan Two Messengers Maurice McNamee and Walter Ong: World-Class Interpreters of His Ideas

“He had come in hot with the New Criticism, which was very much in the air,” McNamee said as he comfortably settled into an overstuffed chair. McNamee ended up taking all of McLuhan’s classes. His approach to literature changed. He learned how to read.

And in this computer age McLuhan’s theories and stratagems - mostly ignored throughout the ‘70s and ‘80s - have experienced quite a revival. Wired magazine, the bible of cyber surfers and techno heads in the’90s, has anointed McLuhan its virtual patron saint. Media saturation has lead to a McLuhan resurrection, a circumstance that surprises neither McNamee nor Ong, who noted with a wry smile that,

Later on, after McNamee became chairman of the English department, he made practical criticism the heart of the curriculum.

“Marshall’s exactly the kind of thing that pop culture seizes upon but doesn’t understand.”

“Modern criticism turned around the whole approach to literature in this country,” McNamee explained. “And McLuhan was certainly the source of that shift here in St. Louis. All I had to do was solidify it.” Ong, in his Roman collar as opposed to McNamee’s Marcos-style casual wear, agrees that McLuhan had the innate ability to see into the whole context of a work of literature. “He had precocious insights,” Ong recalled, “but he didn’t always know entirely what he was saying. A lot of the things he was saying back then are now only clear in the computer age.”

According to McNamee, the insights into media and technology that McLuhan formulated could be seen in his early work. “He passed along these little aphorisms, and they changed your view of literature,” he noted. “But they also managed to change the way you viewed all your surroundings.” Ong leaned forward in his chair excitedly, using his hands to make a point as he added: “Here’s an example, and this just came to me in the past week,” he said turning to McNamee. “Remember how Marshall used to insist that machines were extensions of human beings? That’s not the way that most people look at them - they look at machines as little animals. “Mac (McLuhan) said that ‘s not the way it is - if you don’t have human beings, then none of the machines run. That was an extremely profound insight, and I don’t think he had an idea of how deep of one it was.”


After McLuhan went North he continued rooting out helpers. Edmund Carpenter was one of them. Carpenter was an anthropologist. He lived with the Eskimos. Between Eskimos and after McLuhan he went to New Guinea to observe the effects of modern communications on tribal peoples. What made Carpenter so extraordinary was that he was the one McLuhan helper who understood fashion. When Carpenter came back from New Guinea he wrote “Oh, What A Blow That Phantom Gave ME!.” The book was on technologies and tribes. There’s a runway show in the book. It’s a one of kind. It’s in a Highland cage. The 20th century’s foremost fashion photographer Irving Penn set it up. Carpenter is in the audience. He’s watching and taking notes. The notes follow. Carpenter called them “Moments Preserved.”

Irving Penn took a series of extraordinary photographs at the 1970 Goroka Agricultural Show, a great gathering of tribes held annually in the Highlands, attended by thousands of villagers, many elaborately plumed & painted. As usual, Penn employed a collapsible, portable studio with one wall open & the camera outside, looking in. The secret of this studio is that it created its own space space without background. The moment subjects stepped across that threshold, they changed totally. All confusion & excitement ceased. Even those outside became still. A sudden intensity possessed everyone. The same subjects who moments before posed comically for tourists, affecting exaggerated poses, now behaved with intense concentration. Their bodies became rigid, their muscles tense; their fingers tightly gripped whatever they touched. When Penn repositioned them, he found their bodies stiff in a way he never found subjects in our society. The crowd outside, looking in, also became rigid. Chaos ceased & the scene became a tableau. If this were merely my account, it might easily be dismissed as something contrived to fit the thesis of this book. But I have tried to record here, as best I remember them, Penn’s own words. And the evidence is also in the photographs.

Why brilliant fashion designers, a notoriously non - analytic breed, sometimes succeed in anticipating the show of things to come better than professional predictors, is one of the most obscure questions in history; and for the historian of culture, one of the most central. Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Extremes - The History of the World From 1914 - 1991

moments preserved

Edmund Carpenter, Oh, What A Blow That Phantom Gave ME!


the velocity of the fashion process* a fashion photographer

Irving Penn

* Andrea Saltzman a fashion designer

* Intellectual Property Law and

the Sumptuary Code, Barton Beebe 123 Harv. L. Rev. 809 (2010)


progeny

17


While Memory Wall’s run may have been mixed, there was “issue,” a spin-off. This one-off had a national profile. It ushered in a celebration of nothing. Gifted a big screen moment -sponsored by big beer- on how “entirely unrelated to each other we are by anything tangible.” In a bent way this author was responsible for the gathering. Got credit for five thousand people coming together to watch a TV show about absolutely nothing. This nothing was the final episode of Jerry Seinfeld. It was a double down on Arendt’s table tale. Polis as RecRoom. It might not have brought forth what is great and radiant—ta megala kai lampra — but the housekeeping was impeccable.


Unlike Seinfeld, Pruitt- Igoe and Escape, some dystopic narratives offer a little more myth-making play. They help change the conversation from the “joy of group housekeeping.”

Dystopic Kid Text (DKT) was one. A nine year-old’s monologue started out as a prologue in “buildbetterbarrel,” then it went its grave merry viral way. It’s a bleak script. But at least you’re not stuck around a table with Jerry Seinfeld and friends.


Dystopic Kid Text

I’m anxious, very anxious. I know man’s natural state is to be overwhelmed with anxiety. His heart all day long gnawed on by fear of death, poverty, or other calamity. That he has no repose, nor pause of his anxiety, but in sleep. And I’m not sleeping well these days. It’s worse for me than it was for Thomas Hobbes. That English philosopher only had to deal with the vicious cycle and maniacal fury of perpetual war, Kids Play. But what about the vicious cycle and maniacal fury of the perpetual digitization of everything? Day after day I have to attend to the absence of hermeneutical structures, the failure of interpretive systems, the compete lack of any probing cartographic tools. You know what this is doing to my tomorrows; solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.


It’s a bleak script. But at least you’re not stuck around a table with Jerry Seinfeld and friends.


bits of passage

In the Gutenberg Galaxy McLuhan quotes George Poulet’s “Studies in Human Time.” He does it right after he talks about the Baroque shifting “the periphery of vision.” Poulet’s passage is about bits of passage and bits of us. While other thinkers and tinkers have said more or less the same, this helps decode McLuhan’s itinerary. “But to renounce the depiction of being for the depiction of Passage is not only an enterprise of unprecedented denudation; it is a task of extreme difficulty. To depict Passage is not simply to seize oneself in an object which fades away and by its own blurring, self appears more distinctly; it is not to paint a portrait of oneself which would be all the more faithful by the disappearance of all the traces of occasions which had led its creation. It is to seize the self at the instant when the occasions remove from it its old form and impose upon it a new one.”


a remix tool

steven pinker the language instinct recursion. A procedure that invokes an instance of itself, and thus can be applied repeatedly to create or analyze entities of any size. These rules embed one instance of a symbol inside another instance of the same symbol (here, a sentence inside a sentence), a neat trick— logicians call it “recursion”—for generating an infinite number of structures. Human language is an embarrassment for evolutionary theory because it is vastly more powerful than one can account for in terms of selective fitness. A semantic language with simple mapping rules, of a kind one might suppose that the chimpanzee would have, appears to confer all the advantages one normally associates with discussions of mastodon hunting or the like. For discussions of that kind, syntactic classes, structure-dependent rules, recursion and the rest, are overly powerful devices, absurdly so. how the mind works Educated understanding is an enormous contraption of parts within parts. Each part is built out of basic mental models or ways of knowing that are copied, bleached of their original content, connected to other models, and packaged into larger parts, which can be packaged into still larger parts without limit. Because human thoughts are combinatorial (simple parts combine) and recursive (parts can be embedded within parts), breathtaking expanses of knowledge can be explored with a finite inventory of mental tools.

the blank slate A fourth is recursion: the ability to embed one thought inside another, so that we can entertain not only the thought that Elvis lives, but the thought that the National Enquirer reported that Elvis lives, that some people believe the National Enquirer report that Elvis lives, that it is amazing that some people believe the National Enquirer report that Elvis lives, and so on. The possible combinations quickly multiply out to unimaginably large numbers. Indeed, the repertoire of sentences is theoretically infinite, because the rules of language use a trick called recursion. A recursive rule allows a phrase to contain an example of itself, as in She thinks that he thinks that they think that he knows and so on, ad infinitum. And if the number of sentence is infinite, the number of possible thoughts and intentions is infinite too, because virtually every sentence expresses a different thought or intention.


Father William McCabe, the Jesuit who pushed Marshall McLuhan out on a St. Louis stage, wrote about the Jesuit baroque theater. His 1929 Cambridge University dissertation was posthumously published in 1983 as “An Introduction to Jesuit Theater.” An excerpt from the preface follows. “This is the first work on the Jesuit theater to appear in English; it opens up a chapter in the history of drama whose existence has been almost unknown in these lands, its significance hardly suspected. But nowhere has anybody attempted the project I undertake at the outset of the present work, of furnishing a general account of the origins, the rise, and the purpose of the Jesuit theater throughout Europe, its actors, dramatists, and audiences, the nature of the plays produced, the sources for a detailed study of the whole movement and of its significance in the history of drama.” Then later: “Elsewhere in this theater the employment of miraculous and preternatural elements, the introduction of scriptural, mythological, and medieval allegory called for scenic effects that must have required an amazing amount of stage machinery. I can best illustrate the whole subject, perhaps, by a play produced at Rome in 1622 for the canonization of St. Ignatius.” p 58.

the canonization of St. Ignatius Act I, Scene i: A boy speaks as he drops from a cloud to the stage. ii: Europe, Asia, Africa, America, borne through the air in chariots, enter from the four corners of the earth. iv: Here is performed, after Indian fashion, a sportive dance. II, ii: Ignatius enters the church of the Virgin, and the scene changes to a theater. iii: Here is a scene of fighting on foot. IV: The scene changes to the council room of hell. vi: Enter the Evil Genius of Luther, borne through the air in a chariot. vii: The scene changes to Montserrat. IX: A chasm opens, and the Vices come forth one by one, as called. III, iii: The Church, Michael the Archangel, the Good Genii of Europe, Asia, Africa, America appear in the heavens. . .. The church of Montserrat is opened, and Ignatius is seen within before the Virgin’s altar, hanging up and dedicating his arms. ix: A sound is heard, and a Specter appears in the air, surrounded by a great light ... the Specter disappears. IV, iv: A cave is disclosed, in which Ignatius is praying. v: A whistle is heard, and the Moors emerge from ambush. . . after a short conflict, the Spaniards feign flight, to draw the Moors into ambuscade. . .. A Spanish reinforcement rushes on unexpectedly and renews the fight. The Moorish leader, seeing his men outnumbered, challenges the enemy to single combat. ‘ One pair engages ... another pair engages then other pairs together . . . finally the Moorish leader falls. . .. Enter a Moorish army to the rescue. . .. After a brief fight, all • mingle fighting at close quarters, and so leave the stage. v

vi: A voice is heard from heaven: “Strike! strike!” . . . Here a cloud appears, and from the cloud thunder and lightning. . .. While Ignatius prays, a Chorus of Centaurs comes on and tries by its dancing to disturb the Saint in ecstasy. . .. At the Name JESUS, the Centaurs disappear. ix: Heaven opens, disclosing singing Angels forging arms. V, i: Ignatius is borne aloft. . .. Heaven opens and Angels appear in the clouds. iii: The scene changes to the royal court. . .. Scene changes to Montserrat. . .. Scene changes to the sea, with pirate ships and a passenger vessel. iv: The pirates attack and take the lone vessel. ... Azevedo produces an image of the Virgin Mary, which all the efforts of the pirates cannot wrest from his grasp. They cast him overboard with it. Neptune, bearing in his hand the Virgin’s image, rises from the depths, accompanied by a Chorus of Playful Waves, some dancing, some riding on the backs of dolphins. . .. The Waves dance and crown the image with corals.... Scene changes to Montserrat. . .. Scene changes to a private room. v: Scene changes to a field on which are two armies. vi: The Turkish army advances, while Xavier prays apart. . .. The fight goes on until Xavier intervenes, leaving his prayer. . .. The Turks flee, terrified by the apparition of Ignatius above Xavier’s head while he fights. vii: Heaven opens, disclosing Christ in the background. x: A ray of light from heaven falls on the Queen. xi: The Vices fall into a chasm that opens in the ‘I and do not reappear. . .. Michael the Archangel with the Good Genii, is borne aloft to heaven. The four Continents, each in her own chariot, depart by air routes for home.


The chair of the English department, Father William McCabe, offers Marshall McLuhan a research sabbatical. Recently married McLuhan leaves with his bride for Cambridge, England. On his return to St. Louis McLuhan discovers that Father McCabe is assigned to another Jesuit College, and Bernie Muller-Thym has gone to do service in the U.S. Navy. Father Norman Dreyfus replaces McCabe as department chair. McLuhan and Dreyfus are not compatible. McLuhan and family leave for Canada, not to return. Walter Ong goes off in search of Peter Ramus. Father McNamee finishes his thesis on Francis Bacon. He then takes a St. Louis leave but comes back and eventually becomes chair of the University’s English department. Later “the Baroque beckons,”

a posse dissolves, more passage and McNamee becomes an art historian. He publishes, currates and honors a family of glaziers. McNamee traces much to Father McCabe, the Jesuit who set the passage.This is from Father McNamee’s autobiography “Recollections In Tranquility.”

Another of Father McCabe’s courses exposed an entirely new horizon for me. It was a course on the Jesuit theater as it had developed at St. Omers, a Jesuit school on the continent for English Catholic students during the years of persecution in England. It revealed to me for the first time what an important part the Jesuits played in the cultural life of the continent before the suppression. The course was the fruit of Father McCabe’s doctoral dissertation at Cambridge. He showed that the theaters were an integral part of an education in the traditional Jesuit collegium. They centered specifically on the annual production of a spectacular dramatic performance, which sometimes involved most of the students in the college and many of the city population. It was the duty of the rhetoric teacher to write the text of the play and to oversee its production. The settings for these plays were elaborate, demanding the work of expert designers in the baroque manner. Andrea Pozzo was a Jesuit brother and a world-famous theorist on perspective, as well as an accomplished baroque artist himself. Among other things, he designed the fabulous baroque fresco St. Ignatius in Glory on the ceiling of the San Ignazio Chapel of the Roman College. He devoted some of his time to designing sets for the spectacular Jesuit theater productions. The performances included musical accompaniment and formal dance, so training in both areas was part of the curriculum in the pre-suppression Jesuit schools. I was to learn later how completely involved the early Jesuits were in promoting the arts. They commissioned churches all over Europe designed in the elaborate baroque style, so much so that baroque is sometimes called the Jesuit style. The Jesuits certainly did not invent it, but they used it so extensively that it became identified with them. Fr. Maurice McNamee, “Recollections In Tranquility”


The exhibition ran from February 19 to May 15, 2010. It was an overview of Baroque churches found in Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Austria and the United States. The venue was a place once mocked by an art critic for off sync sightlines, cheap parquet floors, and small fussy spaces. It was the Sheldon Gallery. Included in the exhibition were more than thirty five photographs from the book, “The Jesuit Influence on Baroque Architecture.” The book was by Father McNamee. The exhibition was in his memory. Father McNamee died in 2007. He was ninety-eight. When he died, Father McNamee was completing his survey of baroque church architecture. Father McNamee and those Catholic boys were on to something. But the exhibition missed it. It’s not found in pictures of big relics. It’s off in the staging notes, in the margins. It lies somewhere in the tableaus that mark passage. It’s out there on the set that blends our tools and ourselves.

tools and selves


goya smeared

Steven Hall took the pictures. Snapped after John Carpenter Steve Hall took the pictures. Snapped after Carpenterand andthe Escape crew left, before the Sisters came. Hall was a partner in Hedrich Blessing, the Chicago architectural photo stuthe Escape crew left, before the Sisters came. Hall was a dio. It was a brand. It’s said Hedrich Blessing revolutionized the partner in the Chicago architectural photo studio Hedrich way buildings were photographed, how they’re seen. Blessing. The studio was a brand. It’s said Hedrich Blessing revolutionized the way buildings were photographed, how Hall spent a day setting up. The photographs were done in the they’re seen. early evening, when the light was blue gold. He used Polaroids to frame and covered the concrete floor with them. Scraped up Hall spent a day setting up. The photographs were done in Polariods after Hall left. all the the early evening, when the light was blue gold. He used Polaroids to frame. Hall covered the floor with them. After Interior Design Magazine sent Hall to Cabool. They wanted a he left they were scraped up. story on the building and the club. It was for their 1997 Design Yearbook, the year end issue, thier big blow out. The article was Interior Design Magazine sent Hall to Cabool. They wanted a www.cabool.com. story on the building and the club. It was for their 1997 Design Yearbook, the year end issue. It’s their big blow out. Hall’s Cabool pictures got a lot of play. They were serial Steven The article was www.cabool.com. published. Appeared in a line of magazines and books in United States and Europe. One of them was Goya Smeared. It was Steven Hall’s Cabool pictures got play, a lot. They were from the 3rd of May, part of Goya’s savage war cycle - those serial published. Appeared in a line of magazines andscenes booksof horror, brutality and torture. The night Hall was in Cain United States and Europe. Smeared Goya was one bool of a “web jockey” snatched it. Grabbed it off the internet and smeared them. It was from the 3rd of May, part of Goya’s savage war it on a back wall. That’s when Hall clicked. Hall took his picture when museum collections were first being digitized, cycle; those scenes of horror, brutality and torture. The night Hall was in Cabool a “web jockey snatched it”. and those thick data pipes assembled. Hall did it when Goya Grabbed it off the web, and smeared Goya on a back and wall.his kind were just being lunged out. That’s when Hall clicked. Hall took his picture when museum collections were first being digitized, when thick


web short Club Cabool was a St. Louis new media nightclub. It operated in 1997 and 1998. On top of dealing in alcohol, it was an experiment in emerging digital information networks. The night club had the first DSL line in St. Louis and was one of the first St. Louis public venues to install web cameras. Virtual Jockeys mixed selected web sites with live and prerecorded videos, while simultaneously projecting the mix on screens in Cabool. The jockeys were the authors of the evening’s visual amalgam as they blended surveillance and spectacle. A scaffold/kiosk served as a booth / performance stage for these “Digital City Auteurs.”


bit by bit they plugged into a myth


heuduck like crew assembled


jockeys, and remix fellow travelers A post - Arno and Paul Heuduck crew assembled a Cabool mosaic. It included designers (soft and hard) and musicians. Two of them, Jo Beuckman and Paul Davis, went on to found the computer programming artist collective BEIGE. But the urge to remix goes way back, way before BEIGE. Trace it to the verbal arts: grammar, rhetoric, and dialectic. That’s the mix Fr. McCabe flashed on, the mix that sent McLuhan and posse out on the stage. That’s the mosaic that fueled CABOOL.

the cabool archive - press, publications and web shorts. Cabool was a St. Louis new media nightclub. It operated in 1997 and 1998. On top of dealing in alcohol, it was an experiment in emerging digital information networks. Cabool had the first DSL line in St. Louis, and was one of the first St. Louis public venues to install web cameras. Cabool was an “ur-platform” for mixing and mapping our digital ecology. It was a collection hub, “cull and sort” as ambient remix. Cabool’s virtual-jockeys mixed selected web sites with live and prerecorded videos, while simultaneously projecting the mix on screens in Cabool. Cabool’s jockeys were the authors of the evening’s visual amalgam as they blended surveillance and spectacle. Cabool had a scaffold / kiosk. It served as a booth / performance stage for “Digital City Auteurs.” Cabool was designed to examine information networks and digital archives “as an immersive social environment - ecology.” Cabool was a first of its kind (1997-1998), an interactive new media stage. Virtual Jockeys blended surveillance and spectacle. Cabool was an experiment in emerging digital information networks. Cabool offered a glimpse how new information systems could activate the public sphere, as a smart and poetic place. Cabool addressed the performative dynamics of new communications technologies in the public sphere. The process of digital production was showcased on a public platform. Cabool’s web sites were mixed with live and prerecorded videos, while the mix was simultaneously projected on screens. Cabool’s scaffold / kiosk served as a booth / performance stage for this new information generation “net dj.” Cabool was is a tool to probe the effect of pervasive computing on the design and occupation of public space, one more application to try to make sense of things.


www.cabool.com. (design of Club Cabool nightclub) Interior Design; 12/1/1997; Geran, Monica Nightclubs that transcend the traditional parameters of drinking, dancing and date-meeting, and do so by integrating new technologies with established design schemes, no longer rate as red hot news. Sightings of the species aren’t exactly commonplace, but neither are they considered revolutionary. They probably made their debut in yesteryear’s discos, starting with special audio and lighting effects and progressing to all manner of experimental electronics including, nowadays, internet tie-ins. A hip clientele expects nothing less. But still: to find all this in St. Louis? In a vacated 1917 structure as decrepit as its once-thriving neighborhood? And intending, by setting an example, to encourage urban revival for smokestack cities in the midwest generally? Yes to all. The nightclub under discussion is Club Cabool, indeed situated in a visibly age-ravaged building shell that acts as a local reminder of the incompatibility of prosperity and ruin. The project was made possible by a triumvirate of like-minded citizens: Paul Guzzardo, owner, promoter and “conceptor” of the club and its linkage to internet technology; interior designer Lorens Holm, who developed, refined and implemented the concept; and architect of record Ray Simon of St. Louis. Guzzardo bought the structure in 1991, long after the garment and footwear workers, once the economic lifeblood of the district, had abandoned hope and home. He wasn’t really sure what its future should be. Soon, however, incipient signs of the area’s recovery became perceptible, giving rise to the idea of creating a “place of public assembly,” soon narrowed down - an apt term, as will be seen - to a nightclub. (The three 4,500-sq.ft.-each levels above serve as the owner’s office and sometime residence.) But the building’s ravaged countenance, rather than being camouflaged or eradicated, was left exposed. Also retained as found, in this case by necessity, were: the elongated interior, compressed by party walls that strengthen the perception of forced perspective; five concrete columns; and the sloping floor. Preserved by “selective retention” were bathroom sinks, a dumbwaiter-like chute, and stairs updated with new rails. Interrupting the monotony of the 37-ft.-by-135ft. stretch are an angled steel-framed glass-block wall just behind the storefront, forming a weather-sheltered portico; a 10-ft.-tall by 41-ft.-long steel elevation winding in and out two columns; and a mirrored partition that optically recovers, by means of reflection, the space “lost” to bath and utility rooms. Vastly influential in softening and animating the interior are the patination, tinting, texturing and finishing of surfaces, the work of Robin Nelson, an independent expert and consultant in the field. She is credited for stabilization of the broken terra-cotta facade, plastering of ochre-hue planes and columns, and acid-washing, as if with “overlapping veils,” of the central wall/sculpture of steel. Furniture, including custom-made and salvaged items, hews to simple lines; lighting and fixturing are mainly industrial and were bought off the shelf. None of the foregoing would have seen the light of day had it not been for Holm’s resolve to uncover the building skin’s original makeup. His persistence paid off. Found tinder white-painted concrete blocks were two arches - their very existence unsuspected until traced by their adumbrated shadow lines - framed with terra-cotta tiles and surmounted by cornice remnants. Though cited last, the technology connection is, certainly to both spokesmen, inseparable from Cabool’s design story. (The club’s name, it might be noted here, is a bowdlerized version of to “cobble,” as in the area’s erstwhile shoe-making trade, crossed with reference to the mysterious east, as in Afghanistan’s capital.) There are, Holm explains, eight video cameras and several monitors, the former feeding images to the latter as well as to the club’s very own website (see title); some of the equipment is in a mobile kiosk posing as scaffolded tower. Visually projected for the guests’ enjoyment are not only real images of the local scene but also virtual likenesses brought from all the world for intermixing with here andnow reality. Voyeurism, in other words, works in many ways: Nightclub visitors can watch one another within, yet see what’s going in foreign lands far away; and outsiders from heaven-knows-where can visually partake of the frolicking happening on Earth, at Club Cabool specifically. “The goal,” concludes Holm, was “to produce an environment that’s a heterogeneous construction of real spaces and images.” Realization of the intent, however, is anything but virtual.

DisenoInterior Esta premisa domina coda la intervencion. Al trabajar en la fachada, por ejemplo, se descubrieron unos arcos oculros tras unos bloques de hormig6n, que se han recuperado. Asimismo, se dejaron tal cual las deterioradas losetas de barro que revisten el exterior, mientras que en interior, el techo y otras superficies como zocalos y columnas, presentan un aspecco inacabado. Robin Nelson, una especialista en este tipo de crabajos, ha sido la responsable de los crabajos de restauraci6n. Contrasta con esta atm6sfera de decadencia industrial el concepco tecnol6gico que el propietario deseaba imprimir al Club. Cabool reune y muestra las ultimas tecnologfas en el mundo audiovisual y de la comunicaci6n, y es punto de encuentro para usuarios de Internet. Numerosas pantallas de video, algunos terminales de ordenador y un espacio vado reservado para las tecnologias que pueda traer el futuro, manifiesran esta vocaci6n vanguardisra. DIFERENTES AMBIENTES El local es un espacio diafano de 450 m’ y planta rectangular. El acceso se efecrua mediante unas grandes verjas met:Hicas que se abren a un porche. El muro de paves que 10 delimita es uno de los cres elementos que la inrervenci6n ha insertado en el espacio original, ademas de un gran espejo en angulo y el muro de acero oxidado que delimitan la zona de los aseos. El interior es un espacio abierto en el que destacan el ladrillo de los muros perimetrales, las instalaciones vistas, el solado conrinuo de hormigon y la presencia de una hilera de cinco pilares en el centro de la planta. La barta se sin1a adosada al muro de la derecha, junto a una escalera de acero que conduce a las zonas privadas de la planta superior. Frente a ella se han creado varios ambientes: un area de mesas triangulares, denominada “kiosko de equipamiento electr6nico,” el punto de conexi6n a Internet, resuelto con una torte de andamios de

Club Cabool Club Pomo Language: The Web ... a language of fragments, museum collections pulled from walls and booted to a digital place, books hauled from their shelves and reassembled on a screen, ordinary picture albums scrolling somewhere, and chat and more chatter. Venue: Night Club ... a place for voyeurs, a place for information, somewhere between society and disconnection, between isolation and community, where utopian pronouncements of cybersalvation collide with intimations of atomized desperation. Agenda: Punctuation ...the physical space, the venue, the night club, when punctured by the computerized, the virtual, the cyber, lay open the poetic.

WEB SPINNER Paul Guzzardo plans to open Cabool, a downtown nightclub with cyberspace access BY THOMAS CRONE – River Front Times THE FORMULA SEEMS DECEPTIVELY EASY. Sink tons of money into equipment and a few good-looking employees. Come up with a gimmick to get people through the doors. Then ratchet up the alcohol prices to just under the limit your clientele can pay. It’s how you start a club, right? Maybe that’s too easy an answer, the simple-mindedness that finds some of us working in bars rather than owning one. There are all kinds of theories. As Paul Guzzardo, the owner of the soon-to-open Cabool, would phrase it: “It just takes effort and thought.” Pause. “And money.” Yes, money. And that hook. Guzzardo’s spent a good amount of coin on the four-story building located at 1521 Washington, smack in the middle of the Washington/ Locust entertainment district, He’s also got a million ideas about what a club’s all about in these apparently postmodern days; some of which are no-nonsense clues on how to build up a sagging downtown; some of which are deep -- way deep -into cybermysticism. On the first count, Guzzardo wants to be a part of a true; thriving club scene, not be last standing survivor of the topsy-turvy Washington Avenue club wars. “I’m a club owner who owns a building,” he says. “I want something that will be part of the whole. I have a commitment to the club and the block. I want this to be here for a long, long period. That’s what the city needs. Not clubs that burn hot and then smoke. I’m confident that this is the time to open. With the other operators here, Washington is a happening place. It means some thing.” What Cabool “means” is another story entirely. There, again, is that hook. On one level, it’s a beautifully restored space with all kinds of gizmos, from a campy shot-bar, to the building’s original sinks located outside of the restroom, to the glass-block windows, to the freaky half walls dedicated to showing this and that off the Web. The cyber angle’s the simplest one to promote at Cabool. Interestingly enough, Guzzardo is speaking at Forest Park Community College in the Mildred E. Bastian Performing Arts Center at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 17. He’ll deliver a lecture titled “Language: The Web; Venue: Night Club; Agenda: Punctuation.” In effect, a conversation about clubs and what they mean, especially once some wires are hooked up and buttons pushed. His room, according to the talk’s invite, will be “a place for voyeurs, a place for information, somewhere between society and disconnection, between isolation and community, where utopian pronouncements of cybersalvation collide with intimations of atomized desperation.” Which, to cynics, means that you can watch huge video games played before your eyes while you dance and drink. To Guzzardo, though, “It’s important for the city. This indescribable chaos. We have video-editing capabilities onsite. A Web site, a virtual club, with its own real and madeup history. The club can absorb everything from the Web, with eight video cameras linked to our site and going out. There’s a voyeuristic element to clubs, the real and fantasy roles . Here we can pierce that, open it up to an audience ad infinitum.” To bolster his ideas, he’s been invited to all sorts of forums on architecture and he’s clubbed in Barcelona and South America, where “there’s a competition among designers and architects to create many shadows and seductive spaces,” he says. That won’t be a problem at his joint. Nooks and crannies are the rule at Cabool.

DOWNTOWN CLUB INVITES TECHNOLOGY TO THE PARTY St. Louis Post-Dispatch 07-25-1997 IN A BAR SCENE in which a TV satellite setup is considered high tech and vintage furniture and disco balls are considered high design, Cabool, Washington Avenue’s newest nightspot, definitely stands out as high concept. Owner Paul Guzzardo calls his brainchild St. Louis’ first interactive nightclub. To fully appreciate what that means, you almost need a graduate degree in post- modernist theory and a sophisticated understanding of new technology. To Guzzardo, Cabool - at 1521 Washington - isn’t just a bar, but cyberspace’s sister, a place “between society and disconnection” where “new languages and artforms” can be explored. The club’s design is meant to evoke not only an “emerging downtown” and the history of urban architecture, but the layer-like nature of the World Wide Web. Got that? Well, then simply think of Cabool as an upscale nightclub housed in an artfully renovated four-story shoe factory. The club, which can hold up to 400 guests, opens tonight. Hours will be 8 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Thursday through Saturday. Guzzardo hopes to obtain a 3 a.m. liquor license soon. For all of Guzzardo’s faculty-lounge jargon about postmodernism, Cabool is rooted in a very old concept: voyeurism. This is definitely not the place to take the mistress. Live images from the club, which is divided into eight sectors, will be broadcast on the club’s Web site, www.cabool.com, every 10 seconds. Eventually, Guzzardo says, couch potatoes will be able to talk about clubgoers via live chats, which, in turn, will be projected onto the club’s walls so that clubgoers can read what Consuela from Chile or Gustav from Germany has to say about them. “There’s a certain amount you give up when you come here,” said Joe Beuckman, who has developed the club’s computer and video system. “It’s very entertaining to talk about people, to be a voyeur.” While virtual clubgoers are gossiping, their actual counterparts will be dancing, drinking and watching the prosaic - computer programs and the Internet - transformed into the poetic. Traditional disc jockeys and, for lack of a better term, video jockeys will be mixing records with sounds downloaded from the Internet, while images from the Web will be projected onto screens and walls. One moment, the text of Yeats’ “Leda and the Swan” may appear. The next moment, you might see a photo of the prize pig at the Illinois State Fair. Who knows what will follow - a glimpse of a data scrolling or, perhaps, Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.” The point, Guzzardo says, is “to make sense of the cacophony of the Web.” The results promise to be playful, provocative and, probably at times, pretentious. “I’m making use of certain technologies which are the defining technologies of our lives given the altered economy where a working knowledge of spreadsheets, Pagemaker, Photoshop and the more sophisticated network programs are required to earn a livelihood,” said Guzzardo. “I do believe that a large segment of the population whose lives are ordered by this language are going to be fascinated, attracted and engaged by these attempts to aesthetisize it.” That’s a pretty high-falutin’ mission for a watering hole, and some observers aren’t sure clubgoers will want to mix thinking and drinking. “It’s a great idea, but I’m skeptical whether St. Louis is sophisticated enough yet. There’s not even enough cool people in St. Louis to fill my club,” said Blake Brokaw, who owns Tangerine, a hip cocktail lounge at 1405 Washington. “It seems like a thinking man’s bar. When people want to go out, they just want to have fun.” And the cheaper the fun, the better. Guzzardo, however, plans to charge $8 for a guest’s first visit and $5 for subsequent trips, an unheard of price by local standards. Sure, the cover includes a drink and finger food, but what sort of clubgoer will fork over $8 when neighboring nightspots charge only a few bucks?

unheard of price by local standards. Sure, the cover includes a drink and finger food, but what sort of clubgoer will fork over $8 when neighboring nightspots charge only a few bucks? Discriminating ones, hopes Pedro Marquinez, the club’s manager. Marquinez, who has worked at nightclubs in Madrid, says Cabool is trying to be highclass and hip in a city where most clubs are either one or the other. He hasn’t established a dress code, but don’t expect to be welcomed wearing the same T- shirt and sneakers you wore to a Cardinals game. Guzzardo, the son of a labor activist (his father was supportive of labor as Winnebago County administrator in Rockford, Ill.), moved to St. Louis in the 1970s to attend St. Louis University Law School, and has lived here on and off ever since. He bought the Cabool site in 1991 and moved into its second floor almost three years ago. (The remaining two floors are used as office space.) He won’t reveal how much he has spent on Cabool, but he obviously didn’t start with nothing. Guzzardo made considerable money litigating asbestos cases and worker’s compensation cases in the 1980s. Guzzardo, 47, insists that the leap from labor lawyer to nightclub proprietor is a logical one. “I’m intrigued by how changes in technology and marketing define who and what we are. Any club that opens on Washington Avenue is a result of that altered technology,” said Guzzardo. “These buildings were built for grand industrial purposes that housed the working forces. So now these buildings are being occupied by clubs. We no longer produce goods. We are a service industry. And what is the primary service? Entertainment.” To acknowledge that changing history, lead architect Ray Simon spotlighted some of the building’s original features, like the exterior arches and inside columns. A large metal cylinder, initially used to haul materials between floors, now serves as a backdrop for a small performance area. Although Guzzardo says his goal was to create a completely seductive space, Simon considers the interior design playful. A six-ton Serra-esque steel wall dissects the club, which is further divided by walls, mirrors and alleys - the perfect place for grownups to play hide-and-go-seek. “I hope the people who come here see buildings in a new way and the real beautiful nature of these old materials. Most clubs have the painted black walls and all those trite things you’re used to,” said Simon. Guzzardo also considers the design a salute to the building’s past glory and a beacon for the future. “Some of the most gifted and creative people who were alive in the 1920s worked on this block. They fashioned the style of American footwear that became defining and they were from St. Louis. They’re gone. But their progeny are still here and their gifts and their enthusiasms are now directed towards other technologies,” said Guzzardo. “Those technologies are being explored in this building and in this nightclub, and the participants will be creating like their forefathers before them.” Will the participants, i.e. the customers, see it the same way? Maybe not, but that’s OK. “This is a social situation. There’s drinking. There’s dancing. There’s chatting. There’s shouting,” said Guzzardo. “In the end, it’s a club, it’s a club, it’s a club.” Copyright © 1997, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Press

Club brings Web to dance floor BY LINDA TUCCI St. Louis Buisness Journal St. Louis, the Web is coming to a night club near you. Paul Guzzardo, owner of a renovated shoe factory in downtown’s historic garment district, is opening what he claims is St. Louis’ first “truly interactive night club.” On July 25-26, Guzzardo debuts Cabool, a 4,600-square-foot club at 1521 Washington Ave. The club will link its patrons to cyberspace in two ways: via eight i.Jlterior cameras sending images of the club to the Cabool Web site (www.cabool.com)andby projecting data from Web sites on a computer overlooking the dance floor and bar. Guzzardo, an attorney and architect interested in the metaphysical side of contemporary life, describes Cabool as “a place for voyeurs” and its ambience as “somewhere between society and disconnection. isolation and community.” To execute, Guzzardo has hired “virtual disc jockeys,” computer programmers adept at surfing the Web withan eye toward visual information and music which both entertains patrons and creates the “cyber-format” which is Cabool. “This is a punctuation of physical space with cyber information, selected hopefully with a discerning eye to enhance the experience of being in physical space. It’s a new invention,” Guzzardo said. As for Cabool’s clientele, Guzzardo points to the “mixed group of all ages” who now frequent the handful of Washington Avenue clubs such as Velvet lounge and Galaxy Saloon and sec the area as the emerging entertainment district for the city. Guzzardo declined to say how much he has invested in the club. Given the number of hits the Cabool Web site is getting already, it will probably be necessary to upgrade access with a T-line, he said.

CLUB CABOOL Project-Club Cabool Location-St. Louis, MO USA Architect Ray M. Simon Consultants Lorens Holm (design) Robin Nelson (materials) Owner/Designer Paul Guzzardo Photographer Steve Hall- Hedrich Blessing The unusual double entrance to Club Cabool in St. Louis, Missouri, is a result of history filtered through the perception of an architect. The 1521 Building, which was a factory at the turn of the century, was to be turned into club and bar. But removal of the flattile store uncovered remains of a classical revivalist facade. It’s arches outlined by the patched scars of once projecting terra-cotta ornamentation. “This discovery suggested design approach that preserves the original architectural elements in their transformed state while inserting new construction in such a way so as to explore the relationship between authentic and simulated, perceived and represented;’ says architect Ray Simon. The battered facade’s ruinlike quality was retained and highlighted with illumination. A new glass-block and steel storefront was constructed, recessed and oblique to the original facade, creating a space between the original facade and the new entrance. The result is a mysterious. layered entryway made up of light and shadow, old and new, past and present. The architect retained the industrial nature of the interior. Concrete floors and columns, exposed mechanical ducts and chutes were painted, polished, and highlighted. The original sloping concrete floor was used as a design element and referred to again in the sloping bar and slanted steel wall. Nayana Currimbhoy “Designing Entrances For Retail and Restaurant Spaces”


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interview - a media zine 1999 interviewed: Paul Guzzardo interviewer: Sara Roberts subject: Cabool Roberts: Could you explain the relationship between the VAJ and the club audience? What was the dynamic like?

polaroid palimpsest

Guzzardo: Let me answer the question by describing something that happened at the club. And while unusual, it’s still illustrative of the medium and the role of the VAJ, that dj. Princess Diana was killed the last Saturday in August 1997. There was a nice crowd that night. The early club goers were unaware of the accident. That changed when the jockey started projecting the Reuters news bulletins. The projections were text news flashes. Reuters mentioned an accident, Princess Di injured. The jockey operating the equipment downloaded bulletin after bulletin. Then he began projecting “Princess Diana fashion web pages” from People Magazine. The site included dozens of stamp sized photos of Diana, each one a link to full sized images of the “fashion goddess.” Then he surfed the Bloomingdale, Ralph Lauren, and the Barbie Doll home pages. He also visited the WINDSOR page, the official web site of the British Royal Family. They were all part of the mix. By chance he had steady-cam video footage from a Victorian cemetery. So images of floating sepulchers were mixed with the web downloads. Obviously people were transfixed. But of course it wasn’t alway like that.


20

Cub Cabool was content for a morphing multimedia road show. It launched a run of lectures. The lectures pitched an ur-protocol, the shift into a media lab, and drift into the street. On the way it biopsied some bad code.

trunk show

A mix of write-ups and podium one liners follow. Promotion copy, lecture stills, and press are reassembled and recapped. Sum is a “recursive urbanism recipe” for a wiki’d street.


These projects explore the link between street and the remix digerati. The remix digerati are the artists who exalt in fragments, the ones who struggle to assemble order in the digital maelstrom. We need them on the street. We need them as street performers and set designers. We don’t want them secreted in clandestine places, shackled to screens and a google of virtual sites. They need to be on the ground, navigating through the digital fog. But to plot a course they need gear. They need way stations, places to map, platforms to peer. This is about urban platforms designed to produce reflexivity. It looks at it all: the difficulty in installing – who mans them - why creatives have been kept off. But this streetscape critique is not a make-work polemic for the digerati. This is for all “teller of tales.” It’s for anyone who cares how we tell stories in the hybrid realm – this new place we call home. More than a theory jaunt, this aims as at street reportage, a report tethered to a past, a place, and lot of projects. Hopefully this will lead to something meaningful, maybe even some smart urban design plans. The projects gathered artists together who were interested in doubling, layering and going in several places simultaneously. They used tools to inject, to penetrate and overlay. But it was not about city as fun house mirror. Times are too nasty to get trapped in that solipsistic dead-end. This is not about “homo luden.” It is about mappers, “homo carta.” The street has always been the place to tell stories and get some direction where we’re heading. The “first time polis” is where much of who we are emerged. And now more than ever we need the street to find out just how we’re being changed by the sweep of information technologies. It’s the place to grapple with this digitization of everything. But the street’s not doing its job. And time is short. St. Louis, Missouri, is the context for the lecture. It is a place to explore the design-build of new platforms, platforms to launch storytellers, mappers into the digital fog. And it offers a setting to consider the curfew. What’s kept all those media artists off the street?

some presentation copy:

The Lecture: The Emergence of 3G Wireless and the Decline of the Traditional Visual Artist Venue: Mildred E. Bastian Center for the Performing Arts - St. Louis


the praxis is tabbed recursive urbanism it is an urban design protocol it is a green protocol it couples artists and streets it promotes artists as problem solvers; “the cartographic face of artists” good governance demands protocols for ongoing problem solving sustainability requires good governance bad code impedes protocol execution “recursive urbanism” includes debugging software/code

maestro matters


talk posters A Hac kerspace For Myth Making Paul Guzzardo & Alona Martinez-Perez The Board Room, Crawford Building, DJCAD

Tuesday 27 March 2012, 1-3pm This Geddes Fellows Seminar is conducted by Paul Guzzardo and Alona Martinez-Perez. Guzzardo is a lawyer-turned-media activist/artist, based in St. Louis and Buenos Aires. His work in new media looks at the effect of digital information on the design and use of public space, and the relationship between digital technology and the street. Hackerspace comes to Dundee from Belfast. His “Hackerspace” keynote lecture opens at the Ulster Festival of Art and Design. A “Hackerspace” workshop is scheduled the week of March 19th at PLACE, the Northern Ireland architectural center and involves Ulster students, architects and urban designers. This four day Belfast Workshop has been organized by PLACE, the Ulster School of Architecture and Design, and Alona Martinez-Perez, a Belfastbased urbanist, planner and architect. The goal is to generate “on the street prototypes” that intersect with web based social media applications. The workshop also examines FACEBOOK’s “frictionless sharing applications”, and how these “apps” edit us and the street. Guzzardo and Martinez-Perez will present the Belfast Workshop results at the seminar. Guzzardo and Martinez-Perez are Fellows at the Geddes Institute for Urban Research at the University of Dundee. Image: Codling/Guzzardo Poster: McEwan

geddes institute for urban research

Lecture: New Ways to Smear the Street with Our Extended Epistemology - Paul Guzzardo March 3, 2011 VISIONARY URBAN DESIGN Series - The School of Architecture at Pratt Institute - Brooklyn Campus, Higgins Hall Auditorium (61 St. James Place, Brooklyn, New York) Reception 5:30;Lecture 6:00; Q+A 7:00 This lecture is one manʼs sequel to the “Grunch of Giants”. Guzzardo is a protocol designer for a street-scape network commons. Heʼs been out on the street for 15 years doing R+D. His stage is St. Louis. Both as a designer and lawyer heʼs confronted what he calls “bad code”, and what Fuller called the “selfishly successful and entrenched minorities”. Like Fuller, Guzzardo understands that if we want to “smear the street with our extended epistemology”, we better be ready to smear the closed self reinforcing loop thatʼs in the way.

brown bag round table lunch series dundee.ac.uk/geddesinstitute

i n fo : c . y. m c ewa n @ d u n d e e . a c . u k


cartographerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dilemma


The Atlantic Monthly published “The Coming Anarchy” in February 1994. The Atlantic’s lead read: How scarcity, crime, over-population, tribalism, and disease are rapidly destroying the social fabric of our planet. The Coming Anarchy is by Robert Kaplan. It is about global chaos. It’s a dark story; little is left out. Twenty years later Kaplan’s geo-political track is remembered not just for its ghastly eloquence, but its prescience. Kaplan’s Anarchy provoked “The Cartographer’s Dilemma.”


“The Cartographer’s Dilemma” started out as an exhibition. The venue was a University Art Gallery. Robert Kaplan was part of the gallery tableau. The University’s announcement lead off with this. The Cartographer’s Dilemma examines the digital fog of image and sound and how it affects our democratic public sphere and civic identity. Tt asks why existing noetic economies (knowledge systems) discourage the creation of a public sphere that promotes contest, collaborations and creativity. The exhibition included sculpture, poster art, paintings, videos and interactive media. Content referenced a Edgar Allan Poe story about a man and a crowd, Samuel Clemens on the misery of uncertainty, and Jorge Luis Borges on cartographers and mania. There was a Walter Benjamin. It was Benjamin’s “Angel of History,” GPS augmented. Next to the “Angel” were three small paintings, miniatures, icon like. Along side the tryptic was a larger painting. It was an “excerpt” taken off a Facebook fan page. It was the same “fan face” as the one on the three icons. It’s A. Q. Khan’s face. It was his fan page. Khan was the father of the Pakistani nuclear bomb. He set the gear in motion, and sent it on byte, and kit by kit, to North Korea, Libya and Iran. Kaplan was part of the ensemble because of the need to map. It is what bound this assemblage together.


this future map —in a sense, the “last map”will be an ever-mutating representation of


to see the twenty-first century truly, one’s eyes must learn a different set of aesthetics. imagine cartography in three dimensions, as if in a hologram. in this hologram would be the overlapping sediments of group and other identities atop the merely two-dimensional color markings of city-states and the remaining nations, themselves confused in places by shadowy tentacles, hovering overhead. this future map -- in a sense, the “last map” - will be an ever-mutating representation of chaos.

to see the twenty-first century truly, one’s eyes must learn a different set of aesthetics. imagine cartography in three dimensions, as if in a hologram. in this hologram would be the overlapping sediments of group and other identities atop the merely two-dimensional color markings of city-states and the remaining nations, themselves confused in places by shadowy tentacles, hovering overhead. this future map -- in a sense, the “last map” - will be an ever-mutating representation of chaos.

to see the twenty-first century truly, one’s eyes must learn a different set of aesthetics. imagine cartography in three dimensions, as if in a hologram. in this hologram would be the overlapping sediments of group and other identities atop the merely two-dimensional color markings of city-states and the remaining nations, themselves confused in places by shadowy tentacles, hovering overhead. this future map -- in a sense, the “last map” - will be an ever-mutating representation of chaos.


interview tri state radio NPR - January 2010 rich egger (re) the current exhibit at the western Illinois art gallery is “the cartographer’s dilemma.” it’s a rather unusual title for an exhibit can you explain that? paul guzzardo (pg) It’s presented with the intent of provoking, creating an ongoing ambiguity. I see it as a magnet for getting people in and looking about. As the kids say, “Cartography rules today.” It represents a bucket of ideas in terms of information culture, in terms of where we are going. Moving through information, and sorting our way as things change. We are all cartographers, artists are cartographer’s. we try to create new paths through a confounding tomorrow. And we are dealing with those issues here. re and how are you trying to deal with those types of issues? do you want to take a particular piece here and talk about it a little bit. pg if you come into the gallery the first piece you are going to see is plexi-case filled with early 20th century and mid 20th century wood blocks stamps. the stamps are all jumbled in the case. If you take a close look you will see that many of them are stamps about making stamps. So the exhibit opens with case - in a chaotic formant- dealing with replication. replication and duplication are critical issues of our time. And that’s the underlying theme of what’s going on both inside the exhibition and outside: internet, information systems and these multiple storage systems which are part of our own extension now. re and this plexiglass case represents representation, duplication the way it used to be. pg correct. but at the same time the people who created the stamps “made stamps about stamps.” they were interested in some sort of reflection on the nature of duplication. so these are not just stamps but these are stamp-makers thinking about what it is like to make stamps talking about stamps, and that’s circular, goes on and on. re is there parallel today represented in this exhibit? pg the exhibit is filled with multimedia and graphics. to appreciate the relationship between duplication and mapping I think you have to do it step by step. that’s how the exhibition was set up. john and i discussed that we would like to have people walk through the exhibition a number of times. hopefully that will lead to the same level of reflection that these early 20th Century stamp makers brought to their craft. re john was pointing to this particular piece over here. perhaps you want to talk about it. pg well this is a large 15 feet by 40 inches graphic. it is an ironic examination of the work of Walter Benjamin. he was one of the critical 20th century thinkers of history and culture. your listeners need to be viewers if they wish to appreciate this. benjamin discussed chaos, history and replication. we try to update it with a GPS system. so we are taking these old ideas from the turn of century to benjamin’s Germany in the 1930s and giving it a fresh face. so those who might not be familiar with this can make the connection between yesterday, today and tomorrow.

re and of course the GPS image here is showing the general area where we are standing right now. pg it say “west adams to brewing storm.” it raises questions about the nature of cartography. how do you map tomorrow and whether or not tomorrow is going to be a “quality place to be in.” re what is brewing storm? it sounds like it should be the name of a coffee shop, but it’s not. pg ha! again people need to come and read the graphic. it deals with walter benjamin’s concept of history. whether or not history is progress or whether is it chaos. and that’s an issue cartographer’s have to deal with. whether this information is nothing but chaos or whether there is some way of sorting through the information, giving it order. the media guru Marshall McLuhan saw the need tof places too peer into the future, into what’s coming. re on another wall we have the painting of a facebook page. can you talk about this a little and why you chose this particular page? pg first of all let me reference the painter and the graphic designer who did the benjamin piece. it’s my colleague jesse codling, a former graduate from here (western illinois university) now in seattle. we’ve worked together on a number of projects. the painter is also a multimedia artist. he and I also worked on a projects. alan brunettin is the painter. this exhibition is a true collaboration involving a number of people that i’ve had the opportunity of working with in the past. now to your question. this is the facebook page of AQ Khan. AQ Khan is the father of the Pakistani nuclear bomb. four years ago the New York Times did a series on AQ Khan. what was ironically referred to as “Nukes Are Us.” it was on the movement of nuclear technology from Pakistan to Iran, North Korea, and Libya. There is a facebook community which celebrates Dr. Khan. The politics of that are obviously of some national concern. the Khan series is part of sequence - it follows the benjamin model of history and chaos. I hope people in the gallery would reflect upon the nature of benjamin’s view of history and these current technologies which create these aggregate communities. and how these communities effect the security of the nation and the world. re you mentioned current technologies referring of course to facebook and the internet. you also have examples here of other types of technologies, projecting images on to a wall. pg this part of the exhibit deals with earlier research and development that i’ve done involving the baker project and samuel clemens, exploring the nature of myth and grammar. i think it is a little more detailed than what we can go into here. new media technologies and the investigation of those technologies can not be done simply in a gallery but like any laboratory need multiple venues to examine and to see how they might be developed. these two particular two exhibitions involve myth. and how we might extract from the past. myths we might use in creating new platforms for cartography. re also in this same room you have a touch screen. is this designed to be interactive?


pg yes. this touch screen was done by david walczyk, a co-curator. he will be here next week, giving a number of presentations. what we have here is a touch screen and a jeweled book. the subject of both “interfaces” is edgar alan poe’s “the man in the crowd.” “the man in the crowd” is the first flaneur narrative. it address the person on the street, moving through the city, and the walk as a form of interface. this exhibition that deals with interface and cartography we wanted to focus on a particular literary source. david walczyk through his touch screen and emily grothus in this jeweled book which contains the text of a man in the crowd begin that process. re let’s step into the other room. here’s a piece that looks as if you were putting some finishing touches on when I arrived here. can you describe it. pg the room that we’re in is formally designed. it has one large projection. it has a sculptural form we call the pod. across from that is a small flat screen video. the pod is a venue. it is to sit and observe a looping video of a child. the pod was designed by a recent graduate of WIU, Jordan Morrell. re so stepping over to the other side there is a space for someone to sit in, and there is a set of headphones here. pg background here. this is a child doing a riff on text by Thomas Hobbes. Thomas Hobbes is the author of the Leviathan, a foundational book on western political thought and computer theory. re so you have that image of a flat screen TV on one end of the room. and on the other end of the room we have images being projected on a wall. pg there’s a large projections of a nine minute video. it examines jorge luis borges’s “Del rigor en la ciencia” or “On Exactitude in Science.” it is a short fable involving cartography by the famous argentine story teller borges. we hope that piece which is both in spanish and english offers and ambient umbrella to this sometimes daunting and complex exhibition. The story is about a place where the cartographer’s wish to make a map the size of a city. after they make the map the size of the city, they are not satisfied with it. they then decide to make a map the size of a state. they make the map and they are unsatisfied. finally they decide to make the map the size of the nation and world. they do. and at that point people are tired of cartography and they ask them to walk away. re and this is a complex exhibit. it might be a bit difficult to follow through this audio tour. might be difficult to follow the first time through. as you mentioned, you are hoping people come through a couple times and pick up on different things. pg the purpose of the exhibition is to invite people to these ideas. for them to spend some time, give some thought, and go to sources. do a little borges reading, think about hobbes, explore the nature of facebook, and then go back to walter benjamin. it’s incredibly rich material.


university installation ledger

the cartographer’s dilemma

1 Duplication Tools: A case filled with wood block stamps. Origin: St. Louis, Mo. The stamps are from early to mid 20th century. A number of the stamps are “meta—stamps” or stamps about making more stamps. Courtesy Paul Guzzardo 2 Navigation Tools: The triptych is “a riff on Walter Benjamin’s riff” on a Paul Klee painting. The painting is “Angelus Novus.” Benjamin (1892-1940) was a German historian and cultural critic. He was the author of the seminal essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” The following quote is from the essay’s epilogue: “The destructiveness of war furnishes proof that society has not been mature enough to incorporate technology as its organ, that technology has not been sufficiently developed to cope with the elemental forces of society.” Jesse Codling, Paul Guzzardo, David Walczyk 3 Facebook Tools – Alan Brunettin The paintings reference “the face and the facebook fan page” of A.Q. Khan. A.Q. Khan is the father of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program. He admitted - and subsequently retracted - being the CEO of what is generally know as “Nukes are Us.” “Nukes are Us” sold nuclear technology to Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Details involving the transactions are murky. 4 Remix and myth tools – Paul Guzzardo This exhibition examines a cartographic arts practice. The practice uses digital tools and toys to navigate through information environments. Remix, as a myth-generating tool, is essential to a cartographic practice. These two “mini-video projections” reference practice research and development. Video 1 – Josephine Baker FBI file video (5 minutes: 40 seconds). The video by Brett Paine Murphy launched a cycle of multimedia productions/content known as “secretbaker.” The cycle included a 2006 installation at this gallery. Further information can be found at www. secretbaker.com Video 2 – Samuel Clemens Remix Concert (15 minutes) - “A Sam Clemens Remix” concert opened the 2007 National Media Education Conference. The concert explored how Clemens’s texts and associated archival imagery might be used to fashion new narrative and myth building platforms. It was a largely improvisational -- thirty-minute multimedia remix performance. Content and further credits can be found at the zioguzz channel on You Tube. 2010 is the centennial anniversary of the death of Samuel Clemens. 5 Poe Man of the Crowd Touch Screen – David Walczyk The Poe Project, now in version 3.0, employs the walking narrative method of writer Edgar Allan Poe (American, 1809 – 1849) with the cut-up method of William Burroughs to reinterpret Poe’s 1840 short story, “The Man of the Crowd.” To literature, Poe introduced the walking narrative, Baudelaire’s flaneur, as a literary device, and Burroughs introduced the cut-up method. Both narrative and method emphasize

the value of constructing and using cut-up method. Both narrative and method emphasize the value of constructing and using radical and alternative perceptual models and tool sets to identify, deconstruct, and reinterpret the privileged meaning of a text. The privileged meaning, often constructed to reinforce hegemonic belief systems, is perceived, cut-up and deconstructed, and then compromised into an alternative meaning - not always in that order. The context of the piece is New York City, but like the Poe and Burroughs’ methods, the context could be pretty much anywhere. It is literature, it is a narrative, it tells multiple stories, some created by you and other created by me. It is a system it’s happening all at once (right now) - but you can only experience it a piece at a time. 6 Poe Man of the Crowd Book - Emily Grothus On the cover, the title and author are written in binary code. 7 Clemens (the navigator) - Kaplan (new aesthetic) Panels - Jesse Codling, Paul Guzzardo 8 Dystopic Kid - Jesse Codling, Paul Guzzardo (2 minutes, 28 seconds) Thomas Hobbes (English philosopher, 1588 – 1679) in his 1651 book “Leviathan” established the foundation for most of Western political philosophy. The “Leviathan” by identifying the nature of “discrete and aggregate,” or the individual in society, also opened the computer era. (Dystopia is the other side of utopia). 9 A Pod - Jordan Morrell The design and construction of the pod is meant to be a representation of a vehicle intended for navigating a landscape of information. The array of ribs all converge at the core of the person occupying the pod, as if all the information being navigated through is filtered to the user.  The physical design of the pod is also important to note.  By using unfinished materials, an exposed framework and a construction method needing no fasteners or glue. The design of the pod is very transparent.  This information is there in the physical object of the pod. This pod may recall the time travel device in H. G. Wells’ “The Time Machine.” 10 Borges: Exactitude of Science - Jesse Codling, Paul Guzzardo (9 minutes: 38 seconds) Jorge Luis Borges (b. Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1899 – d. Geneva, Switzerland, 1986) was the master storyteller of the 20th century. He delighted in repetitions, variances and symmetries. In his writings he crafted surrealistic maps of multiple realities. 11 buildbetterbetter - Alan Brunettin, Jesse Codling, Paul Guzzardo (4 minutes) The nine wall graphics reference Guzzardo’s new media documentary buildbetterbetter. Codling did the wall graphics. The documentary is a chain of short vignettes. Backdrops include Cahokia Mounds, the Chicago lakefront, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, and a St. Louis street front media lab. Dystopic Kid and Nanook open and close the documentary.


The Urban Design Group Journal published “The Cartographer’s Dilemma” - a conversation between Paul Guzzardo and Lorens Holm - in “Urbanism in Scotland,” Spring 2010

“Del rigor en la ciencia” by Jorge Luis Borges was the subject of The Cartographer’s Dilemma’s video short “In this Empire” by Jesse Codling


iterative

iterations post the cartographer’s dilemma exhibition inlcuded a documentary and a publication.

from the documentary Opening Audio Track john graham the main organizer of the exhibition “the cartographer’s dilemma,” and guest curator is paul guzzardo. he is a Western Illinois alumnus from the political science department; however, his interests have branched into exploring information or access to it in the public sphere. And much of his research and design work relates to that theme. paul guzzardo “the cartographer’s dilemma” is a moniker for a series of projects. most of my work involves knowledge and urban space. practically everything i have done for the last ten, fifteen years has either directly or indirectly dealt with issues of the build environment, the new knowledge environment as a result of the last twenty years, in terms of these information systems. And how we might create an interface within public space that responds and sustains a dialogue with this new knowledge environment. Or what we call sometime, “how do we create a wiki on the street?” So in this rather peculiar and odd mix of multimedia, sculpture, painting, behind it all is that question. How do we create that wiki - that wikipedia - that encyclopedia on the street? What are strategies we address? What are the problems we confront? And how do we - and in my capacity both as an attorney and as a designer - deal with the legal as well as the design aspects of what these cities might begin to look like?

from the publication The dilemma in the tera–perabyte world is getting deciphering gear on the street. Without that techne the city is less and less a stage for knowledge creation and synthesis. We need new place making action plans. We need new interfaces on the ground, linking the city space and data-landscapes. Place making that takes no heed of the evolving knowledge environment is no longer sustainable. If the end game is a sustainable city, the city has to be a knowledge generator. And without a street/data/scape interface - new crossover nodes - it’s neither. Time is short. This brief should have been started twenty years ago. That’s when the info-age began slamming us. But it never got written. Now the digital buckshot is coming at hyper-speed. And we’ve got a gaping hole in the city. We’re wedged between a data space and a hard place and left with a shrink-wrapped something or other. “The Cartographer’s Dilemma:” The Urban Design Group Journal: Spring 2010, Urbanism in Scotland, Paul Guzzardo and Lorens Holm


22 spaceport booster

a bleak crackerjack snapshot After he wrote “The Coming Anarchy,” Robert Kaplan came to St. Louis. It was for another book,“An Empire Wilderness: Travels into America’s Future.” Kaplan showed up under the Arch to fill a notebook. An Average American City is the St. Louis chapter. Kaplan wanted to know what role America could play on a dystopic world stage. What’s the American map-mind set. Will American make a difference? What might the world expect? Does America matter? Where’s the dial set? Kaplan moved around and about St. Louis and East St. Louis. He met and talked to rabbis, police officers, politicos, regular folk and country club kinds. One of them was Al Kerth. Kerth was the face of something called St. Louis 2004. St. Louis 2004’s money was used for map r + d, used to move the “sisters” and a nightclubs’s pattern recognition protocol out into the street. St. Louis 2004 backed the street media lab. The money helped a post-Heuduck remix posse find shelter and press on in search of a space of appearance.

....St. Louis, which Kaplan describes as a corporate fortress circled by high-security suburbs of lonely and overworked people, and desperate slums of blacks who are irrelevant to the American economy.” The Wasteland,” Thurston Clarke NYT Book Review, September 06, 1998


Kaplan on Kerth and St. Louis 2004, THE EXCERPT. LATER THAT DAY I parked in a monitored underground garage beneath a tall building, rode an elevator to an upper story, and stepped into a quartz-and-steel lobby, like a mini-atrium, brightly lit by halogen lamps. A series of clocks showed the time in Atlanta, Belfast, Brussels, Beijing, and other places. On a table were foreign newspapers. The silken-voiced receptionist from Fleischman-Hillard International Communications, a public relations firm, ignored me for a few minutes while she transferred voice mail messages and took calls. Then she apologized and escorted me into a room decorated in gray leather and marble with a panoramic view of the Gateway Arch, a short distance away. The Gateway Arch, completed in 1965 to commemorate the “Opening of the West” by Lewis and Clark, is St. Louis’s totem, a shimmering steel rainbow sixty stories high (632 feet from base to apex) rising beside the muddy, reddish Mississippi River. On the eastern side of the river I saw cement silos and frayed brown buildings barely rising above the greenery. Since the late eighteenth century, those lowlands have been known as the “American Bottoms”; today, partially hidden behind a screen of foliage, East St. Louis, Illinois, one of the worst inner-city slums in the United States, worse than north St. Louis where I had just been with Major Hawkins, lies there. But next door to this building on the western side of the river were luxury hotels. “Mr. Kerth will be in shortly,” a secretary told me. “Feel free to phone anywhere.” AI Kerth gave me a hearty “Hello,” then immediately sat down in one of the leather swivel chairs, leaned back, cupped his hands behind his head, and called me by my first name in a booming voice, as if we were old friends. We could have been in Manhattan, Paris, or Milan. Kerth wore a wide bright yellow tie, suspenders made of braided leather, and glasses with fashionable frames. He represented St. Louis 2004, a nonprofit organization marking the centennial of the 1904 World’s Fair and Olympics and the bicentennial of both the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition. Kerth told me that his organization wants to channel “forward-thinking energy for the future.” He handed me a glossy folder with fact sheets enclosed, then walked over to a blackboard, where he wrote; REGION WIDE VISIONARY PROCESS. THIS PROCESS WILL CONSIST OF REGIONAL GOALS IN KEY AREAS: WORK, LEARNING, HEALTH, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND GOVERNANCE. “Income-sustaining jobs, for instance,” said Kerth, lowering his voice as he walked back to the leather chair. “Bio and nanotech jobs. How do we attract them? That is the question St. Louis 2004 must answer.” Will anyone in north St. Louis, or East St. Louis for that matter, be qualified for nanotech jobs? I wondered. “Of course, it helps if we construct a positive environment within which firms can operate. That means good housing, infrastructure, cleaning up poverty stricken areas, and so on.” Kerth continued, “We are in a race with cities around the world. For instance, there may be airports in every city, but there won’t be spaceports. But we plan to have the mid-American spaceport. We believe that private corporations will be regularly sending people in space on orbital and suborbital flights in the twenty-first century. Low-cost, reusable-launch technology will get people from St. Louis to Beijing, for example, in forty-five minutes. Our public relations battle to host the spaceport for mid-America is already on. Lindbergh flew across the Atlantic to win a $25,000 prize. Well, we’re supporting a multimillion-dollar intentional space prize series for advances in aviation technology. We even have an idea for an orbital hotel charging $50,000 for a gravityless weekend honeymoon in space, reached from the St. Louis spaceport.” I was flabbergasted by Kerth’s boosterism. He seemed to me a typical American type of a sort now found in cities around the world, at once very successful and naive. He was so optimistic that all argument seemed pointless. So I just took notes as he spoke.

“An Empire Wilderness : Travels into America’s Future”: The Opening Passage: THE WORLD In the foreseeable future will depend more on the preferences of Americans than on any other single factor. Whether in preserving the balance of power in Europe, in Asia, or in the Middle East or in restructuring the United Nations, the wishes of the United States will be impossible to ignore. America’s enormous technological advantages will sustain it as the military superpower for decades hence. But America’s foreign policy, like that of any other county is an extension of its domestic inclinations and conditions. Thus it is of the utmost importance to understand the direction American society is going in.


paul guzzardo, 9/30/01 12:36 PM -0500, action items and the big picture From: “paul guzzardo” <zio11@mindspring.com> To: “Michelle Cohen” <mcohen@stlouis2004.org>, “Tim Ewing” <time@downtownnow.org>,”Margaret Newman” <mmnewman@earthlink.net> Subject: action items and the big picture. Date: Sun, 30 Sep 2001 12:36:47 -0500 Tim - Michelle - Margie After our meeting I thought it might be helpful for me to organize thoughts on what I see as the fundamentals regarding the media lab, how the lab might be presented to potential funding partners and to the larger community. I thought it would be good to have this before we meet with Al Kerth. Also I’m sending this now to give Margie a chance to take these ideas into account as she prepares a rough budget/ equipment inventory. ISSUES TO BE EXAMINED: audience - multiple labs - fixed versus mobile -technical hardware issues- role of Downtown venue-content issues- artist diversity - inclusion- the IT/ART paradigm. To increase the media lab’s audience we need to design a portable lab system. Currently we do not have a system that can be moved from place toplace. A design allowing the computer, projection and switching equipment to be easily transferred from one storefront to another storefront, in another neighborhood, is not particularly difficult or expensive. A portable system, including a couple of lightweight projectors, portable lap top systems, monitors, and a digital mixer and switcher, can be up, moved and operated with minimal effort and cost. Since the hardware is becoming more efficient and smaller, the only fixed services necessary are the electrical and data lines- a wireless data service would even reduce that problem. These satellite labs would increase the audience the media lab serves and the lab’s visibility. Our credibility is somewhat depended on the size of our audience. Suggested temporary lab venues to be considered are GrandCenter - the loop - CWE - South Grand. Hopefully in addition to the expanded audiences, this would forge partnerships, which would assist funding prospects. The current lab would, of course, still be MEDIA LAB CENTRAL. Its location, both as an entry to the Washington Ave. District and its site across from the Lot, certainly suggests its importance. Not to belabor the point but there is a similar logic between the Media Downtown Lab, the temporary satellite labs, and the relationship between Downtown St. Louis and the Metro area. Downtown is a focal point but not the exclusive gathering place. If we can increase the audience and visibility by using portable labs, possibly we can raise the funds to establish a more robust downtown lab, and expand the downtown media lab to the street, i.e. the lot across the street.

The other issue is inclusion, both in terms of content and community. Placing a lab in a particular neighborhood (even on a temporary basis) offers the opportunity of more inclusive content by referencing particular issues common to those neighborhoods. For this project to become some more than a curiosity piece, it needs to engage a broad range of “participating artists “ in the production of lab content. This isn’t a simple task. The digital divide is real and while MediaARTS and Downtown Now! are in no position to resolve it, there are some things that can be done. We need to try to engage members of the community who have various levels of skill in both the traditional arts and in digital imaging languages. This would open the lab to a larger and certainly more diverse crowd. It also would establish the educational component of the lab. To do this we need tore-think the basic lab paradigm. Rather than seeing the media lab artist as someone who paints or sculpts but uses digital tools, we need to think about. Printed for @ 1 paul guzzardo, 9/30/01 12:36 PM -0500, action items and the big picture the content provider more as a Director, a Director with a collaborative artistic crew. If there is anything that I’ve learned in being one of the few people working in this area, is that the theatrical model (Multimedia Theater) is very helpful and more useful than a traditional artistic/fine art model. The theatrical model works better not only in terms of criteria for creating content but for reasons of inclusion. Projects will take on a more collaborative / inclusive nature with a theatrical model. “Media lab Directors” while serving as the artistic primary voice, would incorporate/assemble other digital and non-digital artist in the preparation and making content. It allows the greatest level of inclusion in a period of “hyper technology flux.” Final Thought- the People Projects ends in the next 30 days. This was the main public art project for the region, and it addressed regionalism and inclusion. As far as I know, there is nothing out there to replace it. The timing might be right for the media lab. paul


â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are in a race with cities around the world. For instance, there may be airports in every city, but there wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be spaceports. But we plan to have the mid-American spaceport. We believe that private corporations will be regularly sending people in space on orbital and suborbital flights in the twenty-first century. Low-cost, reusable - launch technology will get people from St. Louis to Beijing, for example, in forty-five minutes. Our public relations battle to host the spaceport for mid- America is already on.â&#x20AC;? al kerth st. louis 2004


23

a lab


The Media - Arts street media lab opened in 1999. It was towards the river, a few blocks east of Cabool. The lab was a content generator, a factory, post not proto-Warhol. It operated off and on for two plus years. Content: meditations on film and digital editing, digital representationof art/science practice, the effect of IT on social organization, 9/11, the millennium, comic books, and Orwellian media culture. This street smithy had a simple task: take a stab at writing a history of a future and sketch a navigational chart out of a maelstrom. Chart follows.


The virtual ambient jockeys, or the â&#x20AC;&#x153;VAJâ&#x20AC;? as they were then called, kept a Lab Journal. It was a tech check list, project status report, a back-forth, and complaint forum. And maybe somewhere in that Journal is a map still to be deciphered.


mapping tools to steer through tangled intersections of information networks and street corners


The media Lab was located in an windowed first floor corner in downtown St. Louis. Housed in the Lab was a changing inventory of computers, photo imaging and editing equipment, projectors, screens and monitor walls, as well as those djs/vjs who migrated from Cabool. These post text dj/vj artists continued to use digital collage techniques as they sampled the riches of data banks and networks. “Digital art,” for a lack of a better word, was projected on screens and monitor walls facing the street. Inside cameras looking out on the street added an interactive component. Passers-by were the Lab’s customer/consumer. As a form of public street theatre, the Lab critically investigated the role of digital media on our culture by using the producers and consumers of media interchangeably, as actor and as audience. This concurrent, synchronous state of consuming and being consumed is the essence, the hallmark of new media. It is also the dominant DNA of our culture. The Lab was both an animated tableau and a viewing station into the digital city. The Lab, as an example of an urban design prototype for the digital city, was an experiment in recursive urbanism. The Lab’s topical subject-matter included meditations on film and digital editing, digital representation of art/science practice, the effect of IT on social organization, 9/11, the millennium, comic books, and Orwellian media culture. ART FACTORIES This paper described the development of urban prototypes to map the spatial dynamics of the band, critique traditional cultural practices, and resist the “Spectacle.” What follows is video footage documenting media artists experimenting with new mapping tools. They use digital technologies as mapping tools to steer through tangled intersections of information networks and street corners. This video footage records a street front media lab. The lab was the venue for cartographic experiments. It was a viewing station, an ocular device offering a line of sight into a networked city, this new civic ensemble made up of bricks, concrete and data packets. The lab is offered as a prototype for the networked city. DESIGN PROTOTYPES FOR A NETWORKED CITY - AOIR The lab occupied a windowed first floor corner in a downtown building where various applications and delivery systems were showcased 24/7. Housed in the lab was a changing inventory of fat data pipes, computers, photo imaging and editing equipment, projectors, screens and monitor walls. The artists who manned the lab, or virtual ambient jockeys as they were called, offered passers-by a chance to watch digital media types at work. They used digital collage techniques as they sampled the riches of data banks and networks. Their work – the evening’s digital amalgam - was projected on screens and monitor walls facing the street. Cameras inside, looking out on the street, added an interactive face. The lab was a stage for an ongoing “info age” critique. It played out over and over, night after night. It was also a viewing station into a networked city. It was an ocular device offering a line of sight into tangled virtual information infrastructures and street corners. THICKENING THE WORD AND THE RETURN OF THE TRICKSTER The lab was a blended place, a straddled one. It was on the street, a sort of polis update: Release 99…. The lab wrapped a windowed corner in downtown St. Louis. Artists used digital collage, remix to create new urban narratives, to map and remythologize the streetscape. It was street theatre, a tool to advance synthesis and awareness, with the hope that it might lead to collective action. THE CARTOGRAPHER’S DILEMMA


This store front media lab occupied a windowed first floor corner in the former nine story headquarters of the Buster Brown Shoe Co. The lab operated for three years. Housed in it was a changing inventory of computers, photo imaging and editing equipment, projectors, screens and monitor walls. It also housed the relocated “web djs,” shifted from the dance floor to the street. These virtual ambient jockeys in their three-year run at the lab, offered passers-by a chance to watch digital media types at work. The work product - digital art for lack of a better word - was projected on screens and monitor walls facing the street. Cameras inside, looking out on the street, added an interactive face. The topical subject matter included meditations on film and digital editing, digital representation of art/science practice, the effect of IT on social organization, 9/11, the millennium, comic books and Orwellian media culture. The lab was a stage for an ongoing “info age” critique, playing out over and over. Three Cities Conference - New Media Literacy in the Smart City Media arts alliance promotes digital media artist in 1999 Media Arts opened a media lab incubator in the A D Brown Building located in downtown St. Louis. The Lab is at the south east corner of Tucker and Washington Avenue. Passersby could watch digital media artists work and create while their work is simultaneously projected on the screens facing Tucker Avenue. Media Arts focus is on the process of creation as well as the final product. In the modern world of scanners, graphic programs and the internet any image that can be produced can be reproduced. To see the artists work is to gain greater respect for the artists output. This lab incubator is a museum without walls. It engages its audience in the creative process. It has no perimeters or boundaries to limit this new mediums interactive character. There is always room for the unscripted the unexpected, that serendipitous event. Artists in the lab have the opportunity to work with the most cutting edge technology. And the public sees experimental high tech art on the streets of St. Louis and not just on their computer screens. Of special interest to Media Arts are those artists who conjure a sense of place and history while using cutting edge technology. Work done in Media Arts often has as its underlying theme the question, “How can technology create a community space?” Up to this point technology has created a sense of isolation, as solitary workers type on individual computers. Work at the media lab emphasizes watching the artist create the work and projecting images from the world of technology into windows and on to walls. Thus the new digital art, instead of isolating, creates a sense of community. THE LAB, Media Arts Documentary audio track In a world that is always coming to us already emptied, stripped, re-mix breaks it up and circulates it again, and sends it back down the road to become our mythology. From numbing spectacle to a whispered voice, creativity is dependent upon, and cannot escape from, the media environment within which it works. Re-mix is the ecology, where media environment and natural environment converge. Re-mix is an aesthetic of reuse, an ecology of images in its most literal form, a sustainable development of sound and visual images. Is There a Digital Future Landscape Terrain?- Landscape Architecture Site/ Non- Site AD A Project - It stared with an email. The client saw something in a window. The client wanted it. It was a new-media lab. The lab wrapped a windowed corner on a downtown street. Artists were mixing and remixing things in the windows. Night after night tableaux framed virtual jockeys _VJs_ sampled the riches of data banks and digital networks. Their work - the evening’s digital amalgam/the remix - was projected on screens and monitor walls facing the street. Remix was used to create new urban narratives, to map and re-mythologize a streetscape. The client got a first glimpse of how a street/looks sounds when information networks are injected into a concrete public streetscape. The client was Arts in Transit, AIT. AIT was the “public art wing” of Metro. Metro owns and operates the St. Louis metropolitan public transportation system. The system includes MetroLink, the light rail system, and MetroBus, the bus system. Tunnel Vision: An Architecture of Reflexivity

MediaARTS collaborated with HotHouse Theatre Co. and New Line Theatre in their rotating repertory productions of “The Cradle Will Rock” and “It’s All True,” which were performed at the ArtLoft Theatre 1529 Washington Ave. in downtown St. Louis throughout the month of October. MediaARTS, which operates a cutting-edge digital media MediaLab exhibit, is located at 1136 Washington, 3 blocks east of the ArtLoft Theatre. The lab permits the public to watch media artists “spin” graphic art, still and moving video and computer images and footage from cameras on the street into a changing stream of digital art displayed on large video monitors. The lab operates live four nights a week. The goal of MediaARTS is not only to present exciting new media works, but also to invite the public into the process of their creation. It allows the public the opportunity to witness the creative choices the artist is making, and to see the technical inner workings of the software as it is processing the work. It brings a whole new dimension to the concept of “art and theater.” HotHouse Theatre Co. and New Line Theatre’s “The Cradle Will Rock” and “It’s All True” are set in 1937 during the Great Depression, a time of labor unrest and censorship. “The Cradle Will Rock” and “It’s All True” are representative of “agitprop” theatre, a theatre for agitation and propaganda. The “agitprop” movement was a vibrant element of popular political theatre in the 1920s and 1930s. This style is sometime referred to as political street theatre. This unique collaboration allowed MediaARTS, HotHouse Theatre Co. and New Line Theatre to recreate street theater on Washington Avenue in this information, Internet Age. This collaboration among MediaARTS, HotHouse Theatre Co. and New Line Theatre is recognition of the changes taking place as a result of the information revolution. The Internet is now becoming the primary vehicle for political protest and organization. Marginal, disenfranchised and threatened communities who once used the theater are now turning to the Internet to organize, to spread information and tell their stories. On October 19 & 20, 26 & 27, simultaneous with the presentation of the plays at the ArtLoft Theatre, and just three blocks down Washington Ave, digital media artists told a story similar to the stories that were being told in “The Cradle Will Rock” and “It’s All True,” about the means of production, of labor organizations, and about injustice. At the media lab, the story was not told on a stage, or under a proscenium arch but on a rear projection screen, on undulating canvasses and on monitor walls. These media artists/ storytellers, using current digital information technology, fashioned their stories into a digital quilt of images and text from the Internet. At the end of the play each night the actors invited the audience to walk with them the 3 blocks down Washington Ave to the MediaLab. At the Lab the actors, in their period costumes, joined with the MediaARTS’s digital artists to continue telling the story. Promotional Material and a St. Louis Post Dispatch Release “That window I worked in was only a few blocks from where years before a telecom company began testing a new communications technology. The shoes were long gone by then. The company was Microwave Communications Inc, MCI. The Technology – The Internet. I got my night job in the window on account of that cloud. And it was all about show time, public street theater. The cast, actors and audience, were the producers and consumers of our media. The concurrent, synchronous state of consuming media and being consumed by it, is the soul, the mark of NEW media. And it is also the DNA of our time.” buildbetterbarrel - script segment


lab case studies


dDNA (d is for dancing), Nell Tenhaaf Nell Tenhaaf’s work addresses cultural implications of new technologies, and how digital representation links art practice to the biosciences and to Artificial Life. She forges connections between the scientific and artistic worlds, both through works critiquing scientific claims and works in which she adopts a “scientist’s persona.” In this piece Toronto artist Nell Tenhaaf took footage from St. Louis salsa and jitterbug classes and superimposed an animated strand of DNA to make it appear in the midst of the classes, projecting the final footage in the lab’s windows. Those who came to view this work used the piece as a jumping-off point for a larger discussion on dance and cultural mores.

case study 3

New York based Judith Barry came to St. Louis the week of November 14th for a collaborative presentation hosted by Washington University Graduate School of Art and MediaARTS Alliance. Barry was presenting “First and Third,” a video projection featuring commentary on the immigrant experience in America. This work dealt with the immigrant experience in America via memorable images and voices seen and heard from the street corner in the lab’s windows. The subjects in “First and Third” were projected in extreme closeup. This allowed Barry to fill an entire window panel about 6 feet high and wide with a “face.” Setting the work in a window overlooking an urban landscape - making the faces appear to be the cornerstone of the building - reinforced how individuals bringing their lives to this country have become the “building blocks” of America.

case study 4

case study 1 case study 2

FIRST AND THIRD, Judith Barry

AN AUDIO DIALOGUE, Beige Paul Davis, Joe Beuckman, Joe Bonn and Cory Arcangel of the digital art collective Beige set up an audio dialogue between an “inside and outside.” Sound-generating materials were planted on the street and in the MediaArts lab. Captured sounds — people, cars and buses — were processed by these Beige in-house programers. All was looped and repeated, pitch and playback speed changed. In this “sound capturing” there were no electronic instruments or sound generating sources. Every sound used had its source in some real event . Sounds were captured by the microphones: be it people talking into them, cars and busses passing, the performers inside the MediaARTS space giving instructions to the audience outside. “Sum-sound” was played back and combined into a musical framework and broadcast into the street.

programs and processes on parade script excerpt - the Media Arts documentary: “Passersby can watch digital media artists work and create while their work is simultaneously projected on the screens facing Tucker Avenue. Media Arts focus is on the process of creation as well as the final product. In the modern world of scanners, graphic programs and the internet, any image that can be produced can be reproduced. To see the artists’ work is to gain greater respect for the artists’ output. This lab incubator is a museum without walls. It engages its audience in the creative process.”


AGIT-PROP - STREET THEATER AGIT-PROP was a collaborative work of MediaARTS, HotHouse Theatre Co. and New Line Theatre. In the style of political street theatre, audiences were offered the opportunity to observe the impact of information technology on traditional narrative and dramatic art forms and a demonstration of the effect of information technology on social organization and social protest.

case study 7

A preachy piece about media saturated environments played on a continuous loop for ten straight days, twenty-four hours a day. It started out this way, and went on and on..... Digital convergence will affect us spatially. The interchangeability, interactivity, and interconnectedness of data, broadcasting, telephony, film, music, education and imaging will alter the places where we congregate. We will meet, share our stories, and build community in media saturated environments. Who will determine the nature of these environments, and what aesthetic and critical criteria will they use in fashioning the public gathering places of tomorrow? .............What about that recently post-pubescent socially dysfunctional junk food eating cyborg wannabe or the kid next door?

case study 8

case study 5 case study 6

DIGITAL CONVERGENT LOOP Art design Alan Brunettin, Text Paul Guzzardo

Remediation/BIG DAN This psychosexual cerebral adventure by Alan Brunettin took Remediation out of the “rarefied world of media theorist” and put it right on the street where it belongs, when it inserted girlie web images into “Radio Patrol and Big Dan’s Mobsters,” a 1930s detective comic book, a BIG LITTLE BOOK.

Children of D “Children of D” by Paul Guzzardo and Ben Kiel was constructed as a three-minute “contrived promotion” for an upcoming feature film. D stands for Drosophila. Drosophila melanogaster - the fruit fly - research and genome sequencing has revolutionized our knowledge about the connections between DNA and human behavior. “Children of D” was both a spoof on Hollywood blockbuster films and a serious mediation on DNA sequencing and sociobiology.


Intersections An orthogonal city plan met an orthogonal cemetery plan in INTERSECTIONS. Night after night there was all night “shuffle and dissolve” between steady cam mounted video footage from Buenos Aires’s Recoleta Cemetery and a live camera peering out of the media lab onto the street.

case study 11

With their backs to downtown picture windows, digital artist Ben Kiel and Joyce Rudinsky pushed a mix. Their assemblage included: a stew of internet images, video feeds from inside cameras looking out, old flims clips and shotgun text. The Kiel-Rudinsky blend was projected on wrap-around street corner screens. Passersby saw passersby, themselves, all wrapped in a detritus poetic slam...of sorts.

case study 12

case study 9 case study 10

We’re Watching - Do You Care?

Film Festival “Remediation Fractal” was a “performance docudrama.” Media artists shot and edited a film at a kick-off party for the St. Louis International Film Festival. They used the party for a meditation on the nature of film and digital editing. Playing with “process” the artists used montage to map the divergence of new media from traditional media and film. They juxtaposed images from the party with textual commentary about mixing, cutting, image, and time. While assembling it into the “documentary,” they simultaneously projected the editing process on party walls. The remix didn’t stop there. They wove Carl Dreyer’s famous silent film “Joan of Arc” into the mix. It was a fractal stew.

Flood Wall The St. Louis flood wall and its scrub foreground was “the hood” for a multi media installation. A volkswagen was retrofitted as “an extreme projector boom box.” The tailgate set for sound. The luggage rack for the two projectors. Looped and off-sync videos were projected from rack to wall. Site was a long vanishing Mississippi flood wall. Sculptural chimera was the set. The fire dancer was a bonus.

off corner: outlier mixes, and lab scouts: the remix was largely assembled in the street corner media lab but there were off-corner forays. case studies 11+12


regarding the media lab a missive from the Hearst Corporation

>­­­­­ Original Message ­­­­­ From: jcavett@hearstsc.com  > To: zio11@mindspring.com  > Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2001 5:21 AM > Subject: Re: please take care of >I am still searching for the Big Dan Mobsters series I will need to review the >details of the use to seek the proper fees. > >Ita Golzman >09/17/2001 10:54 AM > >To: James R Cavett/ES/Hearst@Hearst >cc: > >Subject: please take care of > >Jim­ > >Please take care of this. > >Audra our attorney wrote a note regarding this e­mail. She wrote: > >Radio Patrol is ours. Big Dan Mobsters, can't find, but it may be part of same >strip. Mark Johnson might know. Please let's do this only if we can get money. > >That is Audra's advice, it is up to you on what you want to do with this >request. Big Dan Mobsters is part of Radio Patrol. > >Thanks, > >Ita >­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Forwarded by Ita Golzman/ES/Hearst on 09/17/2001 10:44 AM >­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ >"paul guzzardo" on 09/03/2001 11:31:26 AM >  > To: Ita Golzman/ES/Hearst@Hearst  >  > cc:  > Subject: copyright  > >Re: Radio Patrol > >Dear Mr. Golzman > >This inquiry is directed to you to determine if the Hearst Corporation currently >holds the copyright on the following: > >Radio Patrol and Big Dan Mobsters ­Based on the Famous Newspaper Strip by Eddie >Sullivan and Charles Schmidt >

>Whitman Publishing Co. Racine Wisconsin > >Copyright 1937, 1940 by King Feature Syndicated, Inc > >I am president of MediaARTS Alliance www.mediaarts.org a not for profit arts >organization located in St. Louis Missouri. MediaARTS, in conjunction with >students from local educational institutions, are examining issues of >remediation in public space. We would like to use images and text from Radio >Patrol and Big Dan Mobsters as part of this exercise. I would be happy to >provide you further details regarding this exercise. I wanted first however to >ascertain whether the copyright is held by the Hearst corporation. I can be >contacted at this e­mail address or at 314­231­8784. > >Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you. >Paul Guzzardo

a fair use study

...do this only if we get the money.

...do this only if we get the money.

script segment

buildbetterbarrel - nine events in new media the opening event: window My father was a sculptor. He was born in Italy and moved to Chicago as a boy. He worked in wood, in stone and in bronze. I worked in a window. The windows wrapped a corner on a street. My medium was digital and I mixed and remixed things. The street where I made remixes was a mile from the Mississippi river. That’s where I scanned a 1930 comic book, BIG DAN MOBSTERS, and then I remixed it with girly pictures, pictures I sliced out of the Internet. I called it Remediation, and other times I just called it Big Dan, after the comic book. I wanted to take Big Dan to other places, other windows but Hearst, The publishing Company that held the “comic copyright” wanted money.  So Big Dan never left that street.   One other thing, before my window was window on a stage on a street, it was window in a lobby. A lobby of a St. Louis Shoe Company, Brown Shoe. They made Buster Brown shoes there for 50 years. They don’t make shoes there any more, or shoes anywhere else, anywhere around there. Buster Brown and all the shoes got out of St. Louis, but Big Dan never did.

...do this only if we get the money.

...do this only if we get the money.

...do this only if we get the money.

...do this only if we get the money.


Memento Mori the lab, and Yamaskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trade towers web and script segments media arts web site The Media Lab in response to the tragic events of September 11, 2001, suspended its regular arts programming. The walls of monitors and screens were dedicated to displaying work created as a memorial to the World Trade Center victims. This commemorative included among the tragic imagery of that day the scrolling names of those lost in the attack and the text of the sad and final phone messages of victims. The lab artists mixed their own edited video shorts with these scrolling names, the transcribed calls, and internet updates. This live collage was projected onto screens facing the street. So within a few days after the Trade Center attack, people walking in downtown St. Louis could watch digital artists wrestling with the medium as they tried to give voice to a memorial. It was a complex and beautiful performative piece. It may have been the only place in the country where something like this was done. buildbetterbarrel script: release 1- window When the trade towers were attacked, I was working in the lab. There were five of us working in the windows. We stopped what we were doing. We started to make our own memorial. We included the searing images, the scrolling names of the victims, messages from the cell phones, those transcripted final unanswered mobile phone calls. Those voices became words on windows. The collage, the remix, was projected on screens facing downtown streets. A few day after September 11th people on the street stood and watched, and sometimes just walked by, as I tried to give voice to a memorial. buildbetterbarrel script: release 2, window epilogue1 The media lab closed at the end of 2001. The funding had stopped. The platform where we told stories was closed, silenced. If the lab had stayed open, I would have told stories about the ever-never-ending war that came after September 11th. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the story that needed to be told, night after night in those windows on that corner in St. Louis. That is the memorial that I wanted to leave behind.


The MediaArts Media Lab closed a few months after September 11, 2001. Players and kit were scattered. Nothing on the corner to challenge the half-backed jingoistic madness on the way. Nothing to grab, wave, shout with. This was more than just a cartographerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dilemma. The corner where the lab mixed it up was vacant for a long while, then a tenant showed up. And again it was a venue for digital medium, albeit a different sort. The tenant was an international telecom. It was walk-in Sprint Store. Mira Digital Publishing was above the media lab. James McKelvey founded Mira. He later went on to add the mobile pay company Square Inc. to his resume. Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey was a Mira intern. He was also upstairs.


24 bad code a genesis tale

McLuhan zoomed in on bad code. He did a bad code primer. It was seminal, Rosette Stone grade. When Douglas Coupland wrote the posse “helped to codify and articulate the genesis of Media Theory that would explode in 1962." Coupland was writing about the Gutenberg Galaxy. The Galaxy is by McLuhan, but it owes much good bones - to Walter Ong’s Ramis hunt. The Galaxy opens with a man clutching a map. Then he starts cutting at it. The man is King Lear. The map is his kingdom. Lear’s foul seed Goneril and Regan watch. Goneril and Regan are the evil brand sisters, breakout creatures from the then new media, visual literacy. Ever saccharin, ever on message Goneril and Regan are the flattest of the flat merchants. They are über bad code. Like the Bard’s script, the Galaxy tracks the sisters and the code. It follows them as they battle Cordelia and Edgar and all the dimensionally amplied. We know how it ends: a hollowed out man on a gory, bloodied stage.


King Lear is a presentation of the new strategy of culture and power as it affects the state, the family, and the individual psyche: Meantime we shall express our darker purpose. Give me the map there. Know we have divided In three our kingdom; In King Lear, as in other plays. Shakespeare shows an utter clairvoyance concerning the social and personal consequences of denudation and stripping of attributes and functions for the sake of speed, precision, and increased power. His insights appear so richly in his lines that it is very difficult to select among them. But with the very opening words of Goneril’s aria we are deep in them: I love you. more than words can wield the matter; Dearer than eyesight, space, and liberty: The stripping of the very human senses themselves will be one of the -themes of this play. The separation of sight from the other senses has already been stressed in Lear’s expression of his “darker purpose” and his resort to the mere visual map. But whereas Goneril is ready to strip off sight as an expression of devotion, Regan rallies to her challenge with: . .. I profess Myself an enemy to an other joys Which the most precious square of sense professes, Regan will strip off all the human senses so long as she possesses Lear’s love.

The stripping of the senses and the interruption of their interplay in tactile synesthesia may well have been one of the effects of the Gutenberg technology. This process of separation and reduction of functions had certainly reached a critical point by the early seventeenth century when King Lear appeared. But to determine how far such a revolution in the human sense life could have proceeded from Gutenberg technology calls for a somewhat different approach from merely sampling the sensibility of a great play of the critical period. King Lear is a kind of medieval sermon-exemplum or inductive reasoning to display the madness and misery of the new Renaissance life of action. Shakespeare explains minutely that the very principle of action is the splitting up of social operations and of the private sense life into specialized segments. The resulting frenzy to discover a new over-all interplay of forces ensures a furious activation of all components and persons affected by the new stress. King Lear is a kind of elaborate case history of people translating themselves out of a world of roles into the new world of jobs. This is a process of stripping and denudation which does not occur instantly except in artistic vision. But Shakespeare saw that it had happened in his time. He was not talking about the future. However, the older world of roles had lingered on as a ghost just as after a century of electricity the West still feels the presence of the older values of literacy and privacy and separateness. Kent, Edgar, and Cordelia are “out of phase” in the language of W. B. Yeats. “Strike flat the thick rotundity of the world” cries Lear as a curse to snap “the most precious square of sense,” And the striking flat, the isolation of the visual is the great achievement of Gutenberg and the Mercator projection.

The allusion to “the most precious square of sense” shows Shakespeare doing an almost scholastic demonstration of the need for a ratio and interplay among the senses as the very constitution of rationality.

* Gutenberg Galaxy - Standard Text King Lear - Itlalized Text

But Mcluhan and Ong thought it might be different this time around. Change the ending. A whole someone might walk out, a thing less flat. They imagined new electronic technologies digital communication mediums - might integrate ear and eye. Dimensional tableaus would usher artists better able to map and peer. Then good things could happen. There could be new platforms and better sighted selves. That’s what the corner media lab and its scrapped progeny the Media Box was after. But players need tools. Need ever changing costumes and props. And a traveling road show needs a base station to launch. NEED SUPPORT. Can’t do it alone. Sometimes it’s there and works. Some times not. In the end it didn’t work out for the media lab.

Lear


the bug code smells There are other maps out there, not just a bard’s storyboard: maps to navigate a bad code terrain, and maps to ride out a face-off with the FLAT. There’s something from a British art critic-historian. Walter Ong had his say. And new kit has cropped up from the digerati. Claire Bishop is the art historian. Her “Artificial Hells” is ace source material on the social turn in the arts as sinkhole. It’s a must have saccharine biopsy textbook. Walter Ong wrote about the bugs that clutch creatives, what holds them back as cartographers. He mapped the map-makers or at least the ones that mattered. And then there are the programmers. But they don’t call it bad code. They call the bugs Code Smell.


common code smells common code smells common code smells common code smells common code smells common code smells common code smells

Claire Bishop: Artificial Hells But since participatory art is not only a social activity but also a symbolic one, both embedded in the world and at one remove from it, the positivist social sciences are ultimately less useful in this regard than the abstract reflections of political philosophy. Without finding a more nuanced language to address the artistic status of this work, we risk discussing these practices solely in positivist terms, that is, by focusing on demonstrable impact. One of the aims of this book, then, is to emphasize the aesthetic in the sense of aisthesis: an autonomous regime of experience that is not reducible to logic, reason or morality. It should be clear by now that I am trying to argue for a more complicated understanding of delegated performance than that offered by a Marxist framework of reification or a contemporary critical discourse rooted in positivist pragmatics and injunctions to social amelioration (as discussed in Chapter 1), all of which reduce these works to standard- issue questions of political correctness.

Walter Ong: Evolution, Myth and Poetic Vision One of the great evolutionary philosophers of our day, Father Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, has been accused of writing often as a poet. But we are hard put to find poets who make creative use of evolutionary insights comparable to Teilhard’s. Teilhard faces forward, into the future, as, in its brighter moments, does the rest of our world, permeated as it is with evolutionary thinking. But the poets and artists tend to exalt the present moment, when they are not facing the past. There is here certainly some kind of crisis concerning the relationship of the poet or artist to time. The poet has always been ill at ease, to some degree, in the world of actuality. The plight of the modern poet and artist is truly extreme. The poet or artist is acutely ill at ease in our present life-world. The earlier lifeworld belonged to the poets in great part because It was so largely constructed out of the archetypal images which poetry and art tend to favor. If to a degree the modern world has rejected the poet because it demands a reorganization of his sensibility which is utterly

terrifying. If the poet speaks for his age, he tends to speak for those who turn away from the characteristic awarenesses of modern man concerned with history and time. With some exceptions, in his sense of time and history and of the succession of events the poet thus has tended to be an aborigine, a primitive. Some maintain that the poet or artist must continue always to be such. I do not believe that he can afford to do so. Of course, no one can prescribe how a poet must speak. If, however, the poet is going to speak for modern man, he is going to have to take into account somehow man’s total consciousness, even though this entails a reorganization of his own psyche and of the entire tradition of poetry so drastic as to fill us with utter terror. Very possibly, the archetypes in the psyche are themselves in process of being reorganized under pressure of present discoveries. How subconsciously archetypal can archetypes be when they are the objects of knowledge as conscious as that which we bring to them today? Let us be honest in facing the future of poetry and art and man. What will poetry be like ten thousand or one hundred thousand years from now? Will man be able still to live with his once fascinating little dreams of recurrence?

Tech Speak a definition, wiki wise In computer programming, code smell is any symptom in the source code of a program that possibly indicates a deeper problem. Code smells are usually not bugs -- they are not technically incorrect and don’t currently prevent the program from functioning. Instead, they indicate weaknesses in design that may be slowing down development or increasing the risk of bugs or failures in the future. Duplicated code: identical or very similar code exists in more than one location. Large class: a class that has grown too large. See God object. Feature envy: a class that uses methods of another class excessively. Inappropriate intimacy: a class that has dependencies on implementation details of another class. Refused bequest: a class that overrides a method of a base class in such a way that the contract of the base class is not honored by the derived class. Lazy class / Freeloader: a class that does too little. Contrived complexity: forced usage of overly complicated design patterns where simpler design would suffice.


“A Minister to His Needs” ran nearly 7000 words. It’s about zeal gone sour. It was old world shout-page investigate journalism at its best. “A Minister to His Needs” has a janus-faced jesus minister, a girl friend on the employ, multiple ever morphing legal documents, a hungry international telecom, and a one hundred and seventy five million dollar pot of fools gold. “Minister” is a comedia buffa, a digerati tale as farce. This Tartuffe meets the FCC offers a timeless probe into feral code. The investigative reporter-writer was Eddie Silva, the same Riverfront Times reporter who bemoaned Clarence and Janet’s People Project. Silva’s text, some Hannah Arendt on “a prince of a fellow,” and a crackerjack wireless spectrum map follows.

a piggish parable

The caption read, Plaintiff PAUL GUZZARDO vs. Defendants HUMANITIES INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION EDUCATIONAL CENTER, REV. DICKSON BEALL, JACK ROSS, JOAN FALK & WILLIAM BAKER. The lawsuit ran along side the Media Lab run. Guzzardo v. all of them shadowed the lab and its protocol. The suit involved a battle of the bands: wireless spectrum, acquisition and use. The litigation showcased high wire hypocrites and hollowed out digital divide pieties. At issue was a swatch of wireless spectrum, a band of twenty wireless broadband data channels. The spectrum offered a maybe chance to assemble and fund a space of appearance. But there were serious code problems. Spectrum isn’t “soy.” Networks work don’t work that way. Can’t slice into cubes, bestow, smile, and be done with it. It’s different. Be wary of wireless Sermon of the Mount zealots. They’re ecologically off sync. Technology is an ecology, a media one. Miss that and you might end up in a sinkhole rather than a space of appearance.

25


hannah arednt on good works and a prince of a fellow Goodness, therefore, as a consistent way of life, is not only im- because these were known to be non-political and even antipossible within the confines of the public realm, it is even destruc- political. A public realm had never come into being between the members of a family, and it was therefore not likely to develop tive of it. from Christian community life if this life was ruled by the principle Nobody perhaps has been more sharply aware of this ruinous of charity and nothing else. quality of doing good than Machiavelli, who, in a famous pasChristian hostility toward the public realm, the tendency at least sage, dared to teach men “how not to be good.” of early Christians to lead a life as far removed from the pubNeedless to add, he did not say and did not mean that men lic realm as possible, can also be understood as a self-evident must be taught how to be bad; the criminal act, though for other consequence of devotion to good works independent of all bereasons, must also flee being seen and heard by others. Ma- liefs and expectations. For it is manifest that the moment a good chiavelli’s criterion for political action was glory, the same as in work becomes known and public, it loses its specific character of classical antiquity, and badness can no more shine in glory than goodness, of being done for nothing but goodness’ sake. When goodness. Therefore all methods by which “one may indeed gain goodness appears openly, it is no longer goodness, though it power, but not glory” are bad. Badness that comes out of hiding may still be useful as organized charity or an act of solidarity. is impudent and directly destroys the common world; goodness that comes out of hiding and assumes a public role is no longer This surprising illustration of the Christian political principle is in good, but corrupt in its own terms and will carry its own corrup- fact very well chosen, because the bond of charity between people, while it is incapable of founding a public realm of its own, is tion wherever it goes. quite adequate to the main Christian principle of worldlessness The unpolitical, non-public character of the Christian community and is admirably fit to carry a group of essentially worldless peowas early defined in the demand that it should form a corpus, a ple through the world, a group of saints or a group of criminals, “body,” whose members were to be related to each other like provided only it is understood that the world itself is doomed and brothers of the same family.The structure of communal life was that every activity in it is undertaken with the proviso quamdiu modeled on the relationships between the members of a family mundus durat (“as long as the world lasts”).


St. Louis River Front Times February 21-27, 2001 MINISTER TO HIS NEEDS Eddie Silva The Rev. Dickson Beall became a local champion of the First Amendment after he opened the St. Marcus Church basement to progressive theater groups in the 1990s. Few people knew what Beall was up to offstage. By Eddie Silva It’s so easy to think of sex as sin,” the Rev. Dickson Beall informed the Riverfront Times back in the fall of 1999. “That isn’t sin. Sin is rebelliousness, pride and self-interest.” Beall was responding to yet another controversy at the St. Marcus Theatre, the performance space he founded in 1990 in the basement of St. Marcus Church, where he served as minister for 13 years. The theater was known for taking on subjects that raised local passions -- sexuality, religion, politics (the usual topics to be avoided in polite society) -with occasional nudity and graphic language that elicited knee-jerk conservative attacks. Beall persevered through these furors, often portrayed in the press (especially in this paper) as a champion of the First Amendment and a friend to the disenfranchised. In the summer of 1999, however, Beall was called before the United Church of Christ Church and Ministry Committee to discuss some of the recent goings-on in the basement. The UCC can in no way be regarded as a fundamentalist organization, but the governing body for the St. Marcus Church, concerned with the relationship between the theater and the congregation, asked who was screening the scripts. Beall certainly wasn’t. With Terrence McNally’s Corpus Christi slated for Christmas at the theater, Beall first heard a synopsis of the plot during an interview with the RFT. When he was told that the play is the story of a gay Christ figure and his 12 gay disciples, Beall responded, “Who cares?” His congregation did. Corpus Christi was the last production at the St. Marcus Theatre. In February 2000, the congregation voted to close the church basement to the groups that had been performing there for 10 years, including such popular companies as Joan Lipkin and That Uppity Theatre Company, New Line Theatre and the AC/DC Series, which featured gay and lesbian performance artists. In addition, the late Al Ura, longtime church president, called for Beall’s resignation. Ura told the RFT that the issue was more about Beall’s commitment to the congregation than the programming of the theater. “He didn’t have no time for the church,” Ura explained. “I asked him to come down to the church two or three days a week, and he said, ‘I can do more work at my apartment.’ So that was it.” Attendance at Sunday service had decreased during Beall’s tenure, according to Ura: “We only have 16 or 18 people on a Sunday morning. We used to have 180 people in the congregation; now we’re down to about 26. [The theater] hasn’t done us any good.” Beall subsequently resigned. Although he remained in town, he disappeared from the public eye, his reputation as a progressive liberal minister diminished by the schism that had opened between him and the South City congregation he had been called to serve. Beall didn’t fade into obscurity, however. He had prospects. Few people were aware that Beall was also pursuing a business venture during his tenure as St. Marcus’ pastor. Beall is co-founder and president of HTV -- originally known as Humanities Instructional Television Educational Center (HITEC) when it incorporated as a

nonprofit organization in Missouri in 1986. If those call letters don’t sound familiar, it’s not because you’re a TV illiterate. HTV can’t be found during a late-night channel surf. Beall’s company is an ITFS, which stands for Instructional Television Fixed Services. In the cryptic lingo of the FCC and invisible airwaves, HTV maintains “four 6 frequency ITFS B channels.” HTV delivers -- or, more accurately, is supposed to be delivering -- educational programs to local schools (in this case, the Discovery and Learning channels) free of charge over its bandwidth. In HTV’s own literature, 12 receiver sites are named, including such private institutions as Eden Theological Seminary and John Burroughs School and public schools in the city, such as Blow and Williams middle schools. HTV’s low visibility is about to change: A lawsuit brought against HTV has made Beall and his unambitious enterprise appear more scandalous than anything that appeared on the St. Marcus stage. Paul Guzzardo, who was recruited to the HTV board in 1999, has brought suit in St. Louis County Circuit Court against his fellow board members, alleging that they have been profiting from a nonprofit corporation. With the lawsuit, Guzzardo hopes to force out Beall and his associates and replace them with a more responsible group of board members. In this way, HTV’s valuable assets and its potential for education would not be lost to the public. His suit states, in part, that Beall and the board have been “engaged in a pattern of breaching their fiduciary duty” and have been involved in “a pattern of fraudulent and dishonest conduct.” Guzzardo may be best known as the owner of the short-lived club Cabool, but he also founded MediaARTS, a nonprofit group formed to develop awareness of the implications of the current technological revolution and to provide artists with a place to join in that revolution. He’s St. Louis’ most knowledgeable technological gadfly. If Guzzardo at times is given to hyperbole, that’s partly because he’s an insistent voice living in a city bent on denying the cultural changes taking place at hyperlink speed. So even his attorney, Ira Berkowitz, at first considered Guzzardo’s charges outlandish. HTV has no staff and has rarely consisted of more than a four-member board. When he first looked at his client’s complaint, Berkowitz admits, “I was still scratching my head a little bit, saying, ‘What’s here? What are we doing?’” But after nearly nine months of investigating HTV’s 15-year history, Berkowitz says, “Now I’m scratching my head and I can’t believe what these people have done.” What have they done? In terms of doing what they’re supposed to be doing -- using their public asset to benefit schools with educational programs -- next to nothing. The RFT called those 12 “receiver sites” and found only one, Sigel Elementary School, that could confirm any relationship with HTV. Even that sign of charity turned out to be meager: The school has grown, so the TV room is now used for other purposes. The Discovery and Learning channels aren’t exactly novel offerings, either. City schools already have cable, so even if HTV did deliver those channels, the schools already get them, thank you very much. In terms of HTV’s charitable function, it’s hard to understand what educational mission was being fulfilled by “offering” a couple of cable channels to the affluent John Burroughs. One thing the HTV board had managed to do was figure out a way to make money from that public asset and distribute it among themselves in a variety of ways. It’s not that a nonprofit can’t make money. In the 1980s, the FCC allowed nonprofit license holders to lease a portion of their bandwidth to for-profit corporations, with the intention of generating revenues to better achieve the educational purpose of the public trust. Over the years,

HTV has leased to Specchio, a cable company, and to PCTV (People’s Choice Television) and is currently leasing to Sprint, which acquired PCTV in 1999 for some $140 million. How much did HTV make from Specchio, and what did it do with the money? It’s hard to estimate, because HTV has no financial records before 1992 and the records for 1993 and half of 1994 are missing. From the accounts that are available, Berkowitz has come up with a minimum figure of $13,250. What did HTV do with that money? How did it use those resources to fulfill its educational mission? Beall pocketed the money. The minister explained, during his pretrial deposition, that he was merely covering his own HTV-related expenses -- although no record of those expenses exists in the company’s files, either. The records that do exist show money was coming into the HTV coffers throughout the 1990s, with the four-member HTV board spending it on themselves for dinners, trips and toys. The cast of characters that was the HTV board through these years included Beall, president of the organization, and a variety of his pals: Jack Ross, HTV’s co-founder and a longtime St. Louis attorney; Joan Falk, a close friend of Beall’s; and retired minister William Baker, who at 80 is the nonprofit’s senior member. Because the company had no office space, the board would often meet at Beall’s Clayton high-rise apartment and then continue their discussions over dinner. Very nice dinners -- Café Napoli ($185), Dominic’s ($222), Frank Papa’s ($196), Remy’s Kitchen & Wine Bar ($190), Dominic’s ($185), Remy’s again ($136), Zinnia ($200), Cardwell’s ($231.52), Dominic’s ($194), the Ritz ($446.27), Café Mira ($246.11), Harvest ($280.25), Café de France ($377.25), Crazy Fish and Grenache ($435.65) -- all enjoyed at HTV’s expense. Beall’s explanation for these lavish nights on the town? “We couldn’t attempt to get all of the business done in the time allotted, and people were hungry and we would go to dinner to finish our business,” Beall said during his deposition. When the HTV board found the St. Louis atmosphere inconducive to productive brainstorming, they went on retreats to Naples, Fla., in 1996 and 1999. In her deposition, Falk testified that this was done for convenience: Because Ross owned a condominium there, she said, “we could have a place to meet that wouldn’t cost us anything.” The board did manage to incur some expenses for those nonprofit getaways, with plane fare and walking-around money for the foursome coming to $6,328.46. Even Ross, who was living in Naples at the time, had his travel paid for by HTV. The company also bought themselves some hands-on experience with the new technologies: A Palm Pilot for each board member ($2,212), an iMac for Ross ($1,694.01) and a laptop ($2,508.95) and a special state-of-the-art desktop computer for Beall ($6,137.02). In 1997 and 1998, the HTV board also paid themselves directors’ fees at the end of each year, distributing among themselves $30,000, with the highest percentage going to Beall. “In a short number of years,” Berkowitz estimates, the HTV board “spent about $70,000 on themselves.” Beall fared better than the others in these transactions, being president and co-founder and all. In light of his company’s activities, perhaps the expense Beall incurred that contains within it the most irony is the $3,300 spent on the series of nonprofit-management courses he took at Washington University. Despite Beall’s apparent failings as a manager or a minister, he’s been a shrewd investor. When Sprint swallowed up PCTV in 1999, he held PCTV stock, which netted him some $70,000.

Beall and his associates saw even greater booty to plunder with Sprint as their new lessee, especially with that precious bandwidth becoming more valuable than California beachfront property. In a 1999 HTV business plan, Beall estimated those “Four 6 frequency ITFS B channels” to be worth $175 million (an eye-popping number, to be sure, but not out of line with what has been paid for that bandwidth real estate at auction in Europe and the United States). Beall also figured that the tireless HTV board deserved back-salary compensation for all those years in the nonprofit wilderness: $1,240,000. He also figured he and Ross deserved $150,000 each, just for being there for 15 years. What work has the HTV board members performed that entitles them to such generous compensation? Nothing to speak of: HTV’s educational mission remains an abstract concept, with the company delivering no educational programming to any school anywhere at this time -- not even the Learning Channel. Meanwhile, in the midst of a lawsuit, Beall has moved to be near the snowy shores of Bar Harbor, Maine. Repeated calls to his number there have gone unanswered. Beall was right: “Sin is rebelliousness, pride and self-interest.” Beall had a history in television long before he founded HTV. When he lived in New York City in the 1960s, Beall worked as a production assistant for the landmark children’s program Captain Kangaroo and as “sequence director-actor” (as described in a personal résumé from the mid-’80s) for Candid Camera. He also attained some “I-knew-him-when status,” performing off-Broadway with an unknown actor named Dustin Hoffman. By 1968, Beall had moved to St. Louis and was again involved in television, working behind the camera as a director of commercials and in front of it as a drama critic for KDNL-TV (Channel 30). Ten years later, he evidently experienced a significant life change, and he was ordained as a United Church of Christ minister in 1978. His résumé of media experience shifts to less secular entertainment after this, with mention of his hosting “six television programs on the subjects of peace and justice” included on his vita. Beall and Jack Ross became acquainted sometime in the late 1970s, when Ross was president of the board of the Educational Center, a nonprofit corporation offering curricula in religion and psychology to churches, analysts, psychologists, pastors and counselors. Beall was then working as a minister with the United Christian Foundation (or UCF, now United Campus Ministries) at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. He was also studying at Eden Theological Seminary, where he became friends with one of his professors, Gerald Slusser. The idea for HTV was generated by these three men. In 1983, they filed for an FCC license under the name HITEC (Humanities Instructional Television Educational Consortium), listing themselves as officers. Beall had managed to enlist the support of the UCF in paying legal fees and engineering studies for the company’s ITFS licensing. In his deposition, Beall stated that in the early ‘80s he saw “an opportunity for an organization such as Humanities to preserve airtime from being eroded away from educational and charitable and religious use towards commercial entities.” Plans for a HITEC board included representatives from various religious organizations from the bi-state region, with the goal, presumably, of offering programming of a religious nature. HITEC was unable to obtain the FCC license in 1983, but Beall didn’t give up, and in 1986 the company was officially incorporated as a nonprofit organization. The effort to make HITEC a reality strained relations between Beall and the United Christian Foundation, however. Beall resigned from his position as campus minister shortly after HITEC was


incorporated. In his deposition, Beall said he proffered his resignation because the UCF was losing funding and he “saw the handwriting on the wall,” fearing a diminution of his position in lean financial times. A number of letters between the board of HITEC and the campus ministry suggest other reasons for Beall’s departure. The UCF spent more than $3,000 on the creation of HITEC, and its members were looking for reimbursement in 1987. Myra Parrish, who served as both treasurer and president of the UCF, contacted at her home in Granite City, Ill., remembers: “We paid lawyer fees, which people were questioning. I was treasurer, and paying $300 for just talking to a lawyer seemed a bit much.” She says Beall resigned because “he knew he needed to leave.” And after he left, despite UCF’s entreaties, the religious organization never saw its three grand again. Beall moved on to begin his ministry at St. Marcus. Meanwhile, the FCC licensing for his nonprofit corporation stalled in 1986 and 1987, but Beall, even then, was in the midst of planning a way to generate money from his nonprofit enterprise: He was going to lease his asset to himself. As documented in a memo handwritten by Beall, he conceived of forming a for-profit corporation called Premium Plus. The plan involved issuing 100,000 shares of Premium Plus stock at a rate of $15 per share. Twenty percent of the stock would be divided among four investors, with each paying $75,000 -- “Thereby providing $300,000 start-up capital,” Beall wrote in 1986. The remaining 80 percent of Premium Plus stock would be divided equally among Slusser, Ross, Beall and the corporation, HITEC. They would own a for-profit corporation, operate it with other people’s money and pay fees to themselves by way of their own nonprofit company. Although most nonprofits are heavily involved with fundraising and grant-writing activities, HITEC/HTV appears never to have troubled itself with such drudgery. Instead, from the very beginning, Beall and his associates were looking for ways to turn a profit with their nonprofit asset. There wasn’t anything illegal about the Premium Plus plan, at least according to FCC spokeswoman Joyce Bernstein. But then again, she says she’s never heard of such an idea. One of the reasons the plan was so novel was HTV’s unique status within the ITFS world: Most ITFS holders are public institutions. Local organizations such as the Cooperating School Districts, KETC-TV (Channel 9), the Archdiocese of St. Louis and St. Louis Community College also acquired ITFS capability in the 1980s. They make use of their bandwidth in a variety of ways, providing educational programming to schools around the region free of charge. They all have staffs to help deliver and develop that programming. By contrast, HTV seems to have been little more than Beall and Ross and a couple of other board members looking for ways to make money. In 1988, the FCC license was finally awarded to HTV, and Beall and company entered their first agreement to lease bandwidth to a for-profit company -- they went into business with Specchio. How much business, no one can be certain, because they didn’t keep any records. Original board member Slusser retired from Eden Seminary and moved to San Diego in the late 1980s, so he had little involvement with HTV business. In 1994, he received a letter from Ross asserting that -- despite current claims to the contrary -- HTV was essentially inactive:

“I am sure that by this time you are convinced that our wireless cable television effort is dead; and you may be correct,” Ross wrote to his old friend and colleague. “I have heard nothing about activity of any kind for years...” [italics ours]. “However, Dickson, out of the blue,” Ross continued, “came by my office the other day to tell me that he still has some hopes.” Beall wanted to renew the FCC license, which was due to expire. “He also introduced me to a new friend, a young lady who seems interested in participating. “Since he was quite serious about it, I suggested that possibly, if you have no objections, she could simply take your place as one of the three participants. Obviously there is very little hope of ever achieving any financial remuneration for this endeavor, and if we do it would have to be on the basis of work performed.” The “young lady” was Joan Falk. Falk had no experience in television or wireless technology. In addition to doing freelance design work for a company called Parties and Props, which created festive backdrops and scenery for corporate functions, she was executive secretary for the English Speaking Union, a nonprofit organization. Her professional résumé may not have been strong in matters regarding HTV business, but she did seem to have a close relationship with Beall, as a Clintonesque exchange during her deposition suggests. Berkowitz asked Falk, “And did you eventually end up having a romantic involvement with Mr. Beall?” Falk: “I don’t understand that question.” Berkowitz: “Did you at any time have any romantic involvement with Mr. Beall?” Falk: “Well, he’s a good friend. I don’t know what you are asking.” Berkowitz: “You are not familiar with the term ‘romantic involvement’?” Falk: “Well, I’m fond of all the people on the board.” Berkowitz: “I understand. I don’t believe you would consider yourself romantically involved with all the directors on the board. Right?” Falk: “No. But I don’t understand what this has to do with -- I mean, what does ‘romantic’ mean?” Maurice Graham, HTV’s attorney, at this point interjected, “Are you asking have they dated?” Berkowitz: “Have you dated?” Falk: “We’ve gone out socially. It was first of all a social friendship. That’s how we started talking. It wasn’t a business networking involvement. That wasn’t how we met. It was social.” Berkowitz: “And is your relationship at this time that you are simply friends?” Graham: “Are you asking if they are dating now?” Berkowitz: “Are you a couple?” Falk: “We go out socially. We have not promised each other that we won’t go out with somebody else or something like that, if that’s what you are asking.” Berkowitz: “But you consider yourself going out with each other at this point?” Falk: “Yes. Yes, we go places together.” Just as Falk appears uncertain what romance is, her deposition indicates that she also doesn’t know much about the ITFS she’s been working for -- or even what’s on the Learning Channel. (Berkowitz: “Can you give me an example of what is on the Learning Channel?” Falk: “No, I don’t think so.”) Another current board member joined HTV in the mid-1990s -- retired minister William Baker. Beall, Ross and Baker all share an affiliation with the Educational Center, where

Ross was president of the board for many years. (Beall, after leaving the St. Marcus, managed to land a job as director of the Educational Center but lasted only eight months, from March-November 2000. An employee there says she’s now working on the organization’s Web site because “Dickson started but he never completed it and left us with the mess.”) Baker, like Falk, seems to lack knowledge of or interest in HTV’s business. “For a long time I didn’t even know what an ITFS is,” he said in his deposition. He also admitted to taking little interest in meetings when the discussions turned to technical matters. When he received those end-of-the-year directors’ fees in 1997 and 1998, he testified, “It was just all of the sudden you have got a check. Thank you very much.” Baker also testified that the Palm Pilot he received had come in handy for keeping “dates, addresses, phone numbers, that kind of thing.” When Berkowitz asked whether he used it for any HTV business, Baker responded, “Nothing that I know of particularly, no.” With HTV beginning a lease agreement with PCTV in 1996 -- bringing with it $1,500$5,000 per month into the company’s bank account -- and with two old cronies and his girlfriend on the board, Beall’s nonprofit venture had turned very sweet indeed. Trips to Florida, dinners in the best restaurants, the latest computer equipment -- all coming in from the public trust with a minimum of effort. But the situation was about to become sweeter still. In 1998, the ITFS landscape changed radically. For the first time, the FCC would allow the ITFS bandwidth to be adapted for two-way transmission -- meaning not only that the new world of interactive education could become a reality but that the license would increase exponentially in value. When Sprint acquired PCTV in 1999, Beall became involved with one of the major players in the wireless world, and that $175 million figure began to flicker before him. But with that potential, there was also a push to actually fulfill HTV’s educational mission, especially with final approval for renewal of its FCC license pending. Beall sure wasn’t going to create any innovative programming with the crew he’d assembled around him. He needed expertise in both technology and education. He found that in Paul Guzzardo and Laura Friedman. But with them came HTV’s unraveling. Guzzardo had given a number of talks around St. Louis on what he calls the topic of “media and urbanism.” He was fully informed about the new “two-way terrain,” and he tried to let others in on the implications. Phrases such as “data streams” and “Webcam operating system” come easily to him. His club, Cabool, was downtown’s first exploration into a public meeting place shaped by technological culture. One day in December 1998, Guzzardo got a call from Dickson Beall. Beall had heard about him and wondered whether they might be able to talk. They met in Guzzardo’s downtown loft, and Guzzardo says they engaged in a “detailed discussion of new technologies and the possibilities they provide.” Guzzardo showed Beall his plans for superimposing video images on the façades of old buildings, images of factory workers from the 1930s, the very sorts of workers who once occupied those buildings. He talked about the potential of technology to build communities rather than detach them. Beall “was fascinated,” Guzzardo recalls. Soon Guzzardo was asked to give a presentation to the HTV board. Not long after, he was invited to become a member. Guzzardo recalls wryly, “When I was elected to the board of Humanities [HTV], Dickson Beall asked me to stand and said to the other board members: ‘The Buddha says, When the student is ready, the teacher will appear. Students, I present to you our teacher.’ Who would have

thought I’d have to go to court to dismiss class?” Laura Friedman, at Beall’s insistence, was brought onto the board in 1999 as well. (HTV was supposedly managed by consensus, but in reality, if Beall wanted something, it happened.) Friedman has been a passionate advocate for charter schools and has served as director of the Charter Schools Information Center. (She has chosen not to be interviewed for this article.) The board began meeting with consultants for the ITFS industry. Nobody wanted Sprint to get away cheap with the two-way spectrum. HTV, as with other ITFS companies, was looking for Sprint to develop the two-way capacity and to help the nonprofit to move beyond the confines of schools and institutions, allowing it to provide educational content to anyone anywhere at any time. HTV began developing its venture into what has become a buzzword in education: distance learning. LearningChoice was to become the interactive component of the company. A business plan was formed, a Web site brought online and brochures printed -- all telling how HTV was going to “use this increased technological access to provide real time, interactive, multiple format educational communications to those requiring or desiring location dependent access, including home schoolers, the disabled, the imprisoned and distance learners.” That’s what the LearningChoice business plan offered its potential consumers. The four-page document also included a list of HTV assets ($175 million) and debt ($1,240,000 back salaries owed). This was the first time Guzzardo and Friedman had seen or heard of these figures. In December 1999, Guzzardo and Friedman began asking questions and raising concerns. Friedman asked to see the HTV checkbook, but Falk never obliged her. The four veteran board members didn’t award themselves directors’ fees at the end of that year as they had in the previous two. In Falk’s deposition, she explained the reasoning: “We needed to conserve any resources we had for engineering and fees and other professional fees that we might need, plus equipment. And we decided that we didn’t feel like it would be wise to take payment, even though I think we certainly deserved it and we certainly were working for it, but we wanted to conserve our resources and sort of go back to the plan we were on before to build up some revenue, because it appeared we might have some significant expenses.” If this is true, the idea to use their cash rather than distribute it among themselves came rather late in HTV’s history. It seems more likely they didn’t give themselves Christmas presents that year because Guzzardo and Friedman had become the resident Grinches. Beall must have been growing distressed by these inquisitive new colleagues, because in an e-mail written in January 2000, he described Guzzardo and Friedman as members of an “advisory board” -- essentially changing their board status, unbeknownst to them. In the meantime, negotiations with Sprint were imminent. Guzzardo and Falk worked together in finding an attorney to represent HTV and selected Todd Gray, who works for a Washington, D.C., firm that specializes in the communications field. Guzzardo thought it appropriate to send Gray documentation about the company and asked Falk to supply him with a copy of HTV’s bylaws to submit to their attorney. He met with unusual reluctance from Falk, considering the nature of the request, but she finally agreed to leave a copy of the bylaws in her mailbox for Guzzardo to pick up. What he found there the next day, says Guzzardo, was “the most shocking thing I ever read.”


One of the central issues of contention in Guzzardo’s lawsuit involves the HTV bylaws because of what they reveal about Beall and Ross’ plans for profiting from their nonprofit. Three sets of bylaws have now been discovered: a set of standard bylaws from when the company was incorporated in 1986, a completely rewritten set of bylaws from 1995 and the document Guzzardo received from Falk in 2000. The attorney for Beall and his associates, Maurice Graham, claims the standard nonprofit bylaws of 1986 are the only legitimate bylaws for HTV. Those other documents, each with the heading “Humanities Instructional Television Educational Center Inc. By-Laws,” were “never submitted, never signed,” says Graham. But when HTV renewed its nonprofit status with the IRS in 1995, the document that accompanied the application was a copy of those 1995 bylaws. To complicate the matter further, during his sworn deposition, Jack Ross -- an attorney himself -- said repeatedly that HTV had no bylaws whatsoever, contradicting Graham’s claim. The litigious heat is generated by the two more recent documents, which are utterly unique in nonprofit management. Beall certainly didn’t draw these up from anything he learned in those Wash. U. courses he took. Whatever Beall’s idea of consensus is, his company’s bylaws gave him and Ross “ultimate right and control in all matters” relating to HTV. In both documents, he and Ross proclaimed the right to designate successors; the 2000 version even named those heirs -- Beall’s son and Ross’ daughter. Both documents also contained sections titled “Compensation.” In the 1995 version, Beall and Ross are acknowledged “for services performed in the foregoing 10 years.” For that service, they were to receive $50,000 each. In the 2000 version, that sum was increased to $150,000 each. The 1995 bylaws also called for compensation for officers in terms of salaries: Beall was to receive $40,000 per year, Falk $15,000, Ross $35,000 and Baker $5,000. The officers were to put in a minimum number of hours per week: 20 hours for Beall, 10 for Falk and Ross, three for Baker. In the 2000 bylaws, Falk’s salary was adjusted to $20,000 per year, and Baker was to receive no salary. In none of the disputed bylaws is there any mention of directors’ fees, which the board awarded itself in 1997 and 1998 for a total of $30,000. These provisions contradict the very nature of nonprofit enterprises. Peter Ruger, a lawyer teaching at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, also acts as a consultant to nonprofit boards. “I’ve worked with dozens of nonprofits, very active people in the community,” he says. “I’ve never seen a one where anybody asked for anything but out-of-the-pocket expense.” Ruger notices several red flags as the HTV bylaws are read to him over the phone. Nonprofits need to avoid even the perception of “private inurement,” Ruger says. “What that means in English is, you can’t use your position as a board member or an officer to benefit yourself in any unreasonable way. The minute you start paying compensation to directors of a not-for-profit organization, you raise a red flag, particularly if you don’t have a circumstance where there are members in the legal sense -- that is, people who can vote, people who can hold you accountable for your conduct. In Missouri, all you need is three people for a board of directors, but you and I and a good friend could sit here and say, ‘Hey, it’s Jan. 4 -- let’s give ourselves pay increases as directors.’”

Or, in the case of HTV, let’s eat at Grenache tonight, or let’s go to Florida, or let’s buy ourselves Palm Pilots, or let’s give ourselves directors’ fees. By April 2000, Friedman had seen enough. She sent her letter of resignation to the HTV board: “The current bylaws are unworkable for a serious not-for-profit with a serious mission,” she wrote. “Parts of them violate Missouri law with regards to the operation of nonprofit entities; other parts detail an organization structure and compensation schedule that I feel would hamper future growth of the organization. In addition, I have not been given access to financial and budget information (which I have requested) and I have been disturbed by a pattern of spending by board members that I feel to be inconsistent with the operation of a successful and ongoing business. “In the months I have been associated with HITV, I have observed no consistent decision-making procedure. Though the board discusses issues and reaches consensus, I have observed that those consensus decisions tend to be overturned or ignored in subsequent actions (such as decision to retain counsel to assist in negotiations). In addition, my exclusion, and that of other board members, from important meetings with Sprint this week confirms that critical decisions about the future of the organization will be made without input of all members.” Friedman’s tone is clear, her concerns specific and direct. However, during their depositions, when Beall and Falk were asked about Friedman’s resignation, they talked about time concerns. Beall said: “She I think felt that, as Joan indicated [in her deposition], her time restraints were such that she could not be on the board, but I also feel she felt that we were not yet developed enough, that she was unable to put the kind of energy into what we needed to do to make it all happen.” The contrast between Friedman’s actual letter of resignation and Beall’s spin could not be more acute. In May, a month after Friedman’s resignation, Guzzardo attended his final HTV board meeting. His notes from that gathering describe Beall conducting “a bizarre disjointed meeting stating he received another proposal from Sprint but does not know where it is.” Wherever he’d put it, Beall was willing to accept the offer. According to Guzzardo’s record, Beall told the board he didn’t believe HTV was going to get any more money out of Sprint. Guzzardo and Ross vehemently opposed Beall’s idea that the company should accept this new proposal -- which they hadn’t even seen, because Beall had mislaid it. Guzzardo left the meeting in disgust. He contacted Berkowitz and began planning a suit that would force out Beall and his friends. Baker and Ross were both notified of Guzzardo’s complaint on June 14, 2000. Beall was not served until two days later but likely heard about the action from Ross, with whom he’d been so closely involved in all matters relating to HTV since the early 1980s. The very next day, June 15, Beall moved quickly -- without board consensus -- and signed a letter of intent with Sprint. Included in the deal (which is nonbinding and remains in negotiation) was a $40,000 signing fee, a $50,000 equipment grant and $100,080 toward a “technology fund” for distance-learning development. Ross apparently still isn’t happy with the unilateral action taken by his longtime partner. During depositions, when Beall testified that he had consensus with all the board members to sign the letter of intent with Sprint, Ross interrupted the proceeding: “I did not consent to that letter of intent,” he exclaimed. “I don’t know what your recollection is and I hate to butt in, but I didn’t.”

Because his clients are not commenting in public about a case that is now in litigation, Maurice Graham, of Gray, Ritter & Graham, gives his perspective on the case: “These are committed, good people who find themselves in a dispute, and it’s just another example when good people disagree,” he says. “Hopefully the matter will be resolved and the corporation will continue to do the good things that it does.” But what are those good things? If nobody’s even getting the Discovery Channel from HTV, what does the company have to show for 15 years of charitable work? “I don’t know exactly how to answer that in 25 words or less,” Graham says. “You’ve seen hundreds of pages of deposition, and surely you’ve learned some of that. I don’t know how to answer that.” Can Graham name any other organization HTV has contracted with to provide educational programming? “You’ve caught me without the file,” he says. “I assume you’re planning on writing an objective news story that is balanced and fair and responsible -- certainly nothing wrong with that.” Graham chooses not to discuss the issue of back salaries, specifically the contrast between a 1995 business plan that claimed a debt of $100,000 owed to the officers and the 1999 plan, in which the debt had escalated to $1,240,000. “Anything that has to do with the litigation itself, it would be really inappropriate for me to comment, and you certainly understand that,” he says. “From a factual background or historical background, I’d be glad to try to answer anything, but anything that’s been raised in litigation, it would be inappropriate for me to comment.” (Ross’ testimony during his deposition was more illuminating. He explained the remarkable inflation rate as an adjustment made because of “a greater monetary potential.”) Retreats to Florida, lavish dinners, computer equipment -- was this the best use of HTV resources? “The expenditures you’ve just mentioned,” Graham responds, “pale in comparison to the personal commitment and the out-of-pocket expenditures made over the years by these people. I don’t know how to address that, either. Obviously it can be characterized by you and others just about any way you want to put a spin to it, but it’s not the full story, certainly.” Guzzardo’s attorney, Ira Berkowitz, may have been scratching his head about this case last summer, but he isn’t any longer. “HTV is being used as their own personal boondoggle,” he says. “What programming have they done? None. What infrastructure do they have? None. “The company is their toy. This is what they’re playing with. They’ve got this bandwidth. ‘Let’s see if we can get away with doing as little as possible, collect our money and pocket whatever we got.’ Verbally they don’t tell you that. It’s like this pretend world that they’re living in, and they go around in circles about things that they could be doing. And then they don’t do anything, and they make like they’ve done something, then, at the end of the year, pocket whatever monies they have.” Berkowitz talks about this case with a mixture of outrage and awe. “Jack Ross is sitting for 20 years on the board of another nonprofit corporation [the Educational Center]. He knows what bylaws are. He knows what they’re supposed to have. He can’t play ‘I never looked at the statutes. Gee, I just never looked at them. I was president on a board for 20 years and I’ve been sitting on this one for 18, but I never looked at not-for-profit law.’ That’s totally irresponsible.” For 15 years, the board members of HTV have claimed they have not been able to provide the type of services to the community they wish they could because they haven’t had

the resources. Yet Berkowitz notes that in Ross’ deposition, he admits that PCTV offered equipment to the nonprofit that was refused. “It was going to make life too complicated for them,” Berkowitz charges, “so they didn’t do it. I am desperately looking for where has this company done the things they were intended to do. “’Because we have no money,’” Berkowitz recites the HTV lament. “How are you going to have money to do anything if you keep taking it?


26 bad code case study


sontag

Susan Sontag was speaking. The venue was Graham Chapel at Washington University, St. Louis. It was Wednesday, March 24, 2004. She died later that year.1 Sontag was discussing her book “Regarding the Pain of Others.” It was a collection of essays. Francisco de Goya’s Tampoco Plate 36 was the cover page. Plate 36 is from Goya’s “The Disasters of War” cycle.

a sons endnote: “Nothing could have been further from my mind. I thought that I was returning to myhome in New York at the end of a long trip abroad. Instead, I was at the beginning of the journey that would end with my mother’s death. To be specific, it was the afternoon of March 28, 2004, a Sunday, and I was in Heathrow Airport in London on my way back from the Middle East. …. I began making phone calls — reconnecting with home as has always been my habit once I am through reporting a story. That was when my mother, Susan Sontag, told me that there was a chance that she was ill again. My mother was clearly doing her best to be cheerful. “There may be something wrong,” she finally told me after I had gone on at far too great length about what the West Bank had been like. While I had been away, she said, she had gone in for her twice-yearly scans and blood tests — the regular routine that she had been following since her surgery and subsequent chemotherapy for the uterine sarcoma she had been diagnosed with six years earlier.“One of the blood tests they’ve just run doesn’t seem so good,” she said, adding that she had already had some further tests done, and asking me if I would come with her the following day to see a specialist who had been recommended to her and who had done some follow-up tests a couple of days earlier. He would have the conclusive results then.” 1

That afternoon Sontag talked about the history of showing somebody else’s pain and how we read images of atrocities. She claimed that in this media ecology - maelstrom - our perception is eroded, and we are more and more inured from other’s suffering. Somewhere near the end of her talk, she paused. It seemed a long while. Then she said, “I will be remembered for one thing. It will be for extending an essay. The essay was by a German man. His name was Walter Benjamin. His essay is “Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” Benjamin’s essay has been grist for two generations of cultural critics and art historians. Most commentary involves image, replication, aura: all those “copy things.” But that day it seemed the essay’s epilogue mattered most to Sontag. It’s where Benjamin says this. The destructiveness of war furnishes proof that society has not been mature enough to incorporate technology as its organ, that technology has not been sufficiently developed to cope with the elemental forces of society.

The following excerpt, a son’s endnote, opens “Swimming in a Sea of Death: A Son’s Memoir.” The author David Rieff was the son of Susan Sontag. Rieff’s book starts with a phone call of March 28, 2004. Four days later in St. Louis Sontag spoke about how she might be remembered.


Benjamin’s “elemental forces” was “Cartographer’s Dilemma” exhibition copy. The copy was three plus meters and propped up on a line of easels. It set next to the AQ Khan’s Facebook paintings. This elemental force was a “GPS Angel.” The Angel was a preclude to AQ Khan’s Facebook Fans. What the angel looked like, and what Benjamin had to say. “A Klee painting named Angelus Novus shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating. His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. The storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.”

what the angel looked like, and what Benjamin had to say.


Since her death on December 30, 2004, there have been countless sum-ups of the Sontag legacy. Her son David Rief when asked his mother’s great achievement said, “…her 1992 novel “The Volcano Lover” is the best thing she ever did.” “The Volcano Lover” is set in Naples. It is a time of rupture, shortly after the French revolution. The novel is many things. It’s about a cuckold in a playhouse of atrocity, degradation and humiliation. And it is also a story of a collector, or collectors. One of them is Sir William Hamilton. The other is Jack. Sir Hamilton is an ambassador. He is husband to Emma and cuckold to Lord Nelson. Sir Hamilton collects Greco-Roman antiquities. Jack is a monkey. He collects nuts. Sontag’s book is traced to a passage in Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s “Italian Journey.” Goethe is visiting Lord Hamilton and Emma. The thread from Goethe to Sontag follows.

jack is amonkey Sir William Hamilton and his Fair One continue to be very friendly. I dinned at their house, and in the evening, Miss Hart gave a demonstration of her musical and melic talents. At the suggestion of Hackert who is kinder to me than ever and doesn’t want me to miss anything worth seeing. Sir William showed us his secret treasure vault, which was crammed with works of aft and junk, all in the greatest confusion. Oddments from every period, busts, torsos, vases, bronzes, decorative implements of all kinds made of Sicilian agate, carvings, paintings and chance bargains of every sort, lay about all higgledy piggledy; there was even a small chapel. Out of curiosity

I lifted the lid of a long case which lay on the floor and in it were two magnificent candelabra. I nudged Hackert and asked him in a whisper if they were not very like the candelabra in the Portici museum. He silenced me with a look. No doubt they somehow strayed here from the cellars of Pompeii. Perhaps these and other such lucky acquisitions are the reason why. Sir William shows his hidden treasures only to his most intimate friends. “Italian Journey 1786 -1788 “ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


he collects

nuts


Pullitzer modern art collector emily rauh pulitzer during her deposition on marshal mcluhan and other matters.


...what the world as it is today stands in the greatest need of may be well a new example if the next 1000 years are not to become an era of super civilized monkeys. Hannah Arendt - Bard College December 1968

in the ring with charlie


27 map perfect


Shortly after the downtown Media Lab closed arrangements were made to install the lab protocol in the nearby Grand Center Arts District. It is where McLuhanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s posse set off. The move did not happen, and that lead to a lawsuit. Pleadings and exhibits follow.


The Mediated City Conference: Los Angeles 01 – 04 October, 2014 Title: Posses | Protocol | Perp°Walks Name: Paul Guzzardo

abstract

Abstract: The pretesenter is a Plaintiff. The Defendant is a mixed arts/real estate development district in St. Louis, Missouri. The lawsuit involves platform design. The platforms are viewing stations, mirrors of a sort. The big idea behind these mirrors were to use them to glimpse ourselves sloshing about and around in Big Data. The Plaintiff began working on a brief to build them in the mid-1990s. In 2003, the Plaintiff pitched the brief to an arts district by linking brief and platforms to Marshall McLuhan. McLuhan taught at Saint Louis University from 1937-1944. Since the art district includes the University, the district developers had acquired a new media heritage site whether they wanted one or not. There is dialectic (in) play here. In 2003, the person who effectively ran the district was Emily Pulitzer, widow of Pulitzer Media Company chairman Joseph Pulitzer Jr. Pulitzer Jr. was also known for his collection of contemporary art, regarded as one of the largest and finest in the world. At the time of his death in 1993 he was a director in the arts district. His widow stepped in after he died, bringing the modernist Tadao Ando with her. Together they built a private museum in the district. This background information is a frame for three overlapping stories. Each story will be outlined via excerpted documents: emails, legal pleadings, blog posts, and press releases. The stories: 1. How a big data platform brief is traced to Understanding Media, specifically the role of artist as cartographer; 2. How a code smell contagion in the form of a sycophantic sinkhole blocked platform construction; 3. How traditional media and prosecutors have failed to respond to a vandalized American heritage site. The hoped-for endgame is viral agitprop, and what more appropriate way to celebrate Understanding Media’s 50th anniversary than that. Biography: I am a lawyer/media activist/artist, and a current fellow at the Geddes Institute for UrbanResearch -University of Dundee, Scotland. I was a former legal counsel for District 34 of theUnited Steelworkers of America. My design praxis includes nightclubs, outdoor projections, street-front media labs, street theater, remix concerts, gallery installations, documentary film and litigation. St. Louis, Missouri is a stage for my praxis. Three other players were prelude tableau. Marshall McLuhan was there from 1937-1944. According to his biographer Douglas Coupland, McLuhan put together a “proto-Warhol factory” in St. Louis. It’s where it all began. Player number two is Monsanto. Monsanto was founded in St. Louis. First there was the father, John Queeny, then the son Edgar Monsanto Queeny. Extensions were the family business, and what McLuhan predicted was on the way, but some things you can’t see because of all the dust. And the dust leads to number three, Pruitt-Igoe. March 3, 1972 marks a tumble into a postmodern looking glass. Minoru Yamasaki’s first fall down was a few blocks from where McLuhan once taught. I use this mythic stew for my praxis. I am currently completing a book that blends praxis and myth: “Hackerspace for Myth Making -The Manual."


PETITION COMES NOW, Plaintiff, PAUL GUZZARDO, by and through his attorneys MENEES, WHITNEY, BURNET & TROG and states his Petition as follows: PRELIMINARY STATEMENT The dispute described in this Petition was the subject of an earlier lawsuit. It was cause No. 0922-CCOI036, filed in 2009 in the Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis against three Grand Center corporations: Grand Center, Inc., City Center Redevelopment Corporation, and Vandeventer Spring Redevelopment Corporation. The lawsuit was voluntarily dismissed. It is now being refiled. In addition to the original Grand Center defendants, three additional parties are now being named as defendants in this Petition. They are Emily Pulitzer, Washington University St. Louis, and the law office of Callis Papa Hale & Szewczyk, PC. Callis Papa Hale & Szewczyk, PC represented the Plaintiff in the original action. Five discovery depositions were taken in the first lawsuit. In addition to the Plaintiff, Vincent Schoemehl, Eric Friedman, Sung Ho Kim and Emily Pulitzer were deposed. Testimony from those depositions will be referenced in the allegations that follow. PARTIES 1. Plaintiff, PAUL GUZZARDO, is an individual and a resident of Illinois. He was a resident of Missouri at the time of entering into the contract and during many of the events described in these pleadings. 2. Defendant, GRAND CENTER, INC. (“GRAND CENTER”), is a Missouri not for-profit corporation, with its principal place of business located at 3526 Washington Avenue, 2 Floor in the City of St. Louis, State of Missouri. 3. Defendant, VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP. (“VSRC”), is a Missouri corporation, with its principal place of business located at 3526 Washington Avenue, 2 Floor in the City of St. Louis, State of Missouri. 4. Defendant, CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP. (“CCRC”), is a Missouri corporation with its principal place of business located at 3526 Washington Avenue, 2 Floor in the City of St. Louis, State of Missouri. 5. CCRC is a Missouri Corporation and was established pursuant to the Missouri Urban Redevelopment Law, RSMo. Sec. 353.010 et seq. 6. VSRC is a Missouri Corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of GRAND CENTER. 7. GRAND CENTER owns all of the issued and outstanding stock of CCRC. 8. WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. LOUIS is a Missouri corporation operating under the fictitious name of Washington University in St. Louis 9. EMILY PULITZER is an Individual and a resident of the City of St. Louis, Missouri. 10. The LAW OFFICE OF CALLIS, PAPA, HALE, & SZEWCZ’YK, PC is a professional corporation, duly organized and existing under the laws of the State of Illinois. 11. At all times herein mentioned, John Papa was a partner and agent of The LAW OFFICE OF CALLIS, PAPA, HALE, & SZEWCZ’YK, PC and was acting within the scope of such employment and agency in doing the things herein alleged. JURISDICTION 12. Jurisdiction is proper in the Circuit Court for the City of St. Louis, because the events in this matter occurred in the City of St. Louis and the Defendants have their principal place of business and residences in the City of St. Louis. ALLEGATIONS COMMON TO ALL COUNTS THE GRAND CENTER DISTRICT 13. An area of midtown St. Louis located due north of the campus of St. Louis University, in which various entertainment and cultural venues have existed from time to time, has been commonly known as the Grand Center District. 14. In 1974, the City of St. Louis declared the Grand Center District blighted. In 1981 the City of St. Louis approved CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION’s plan to redevelop the district. The CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (CCRC) was established pursuant to the Missouri Urban Redevelopment Law, RSMo.Sec. 353.010 et seq. The City of St. Louis further granted CCRC the power of eminent domain over property that could not be acquired through good faith negotiations. 15. GRAND CENTER Corporation was organized as an RSMo.Sec. 355 not-for profit corporation in 1987. GRAND CENTER’s mission was to promote and foster the performing arts in the St. Louis area; and to finance, develop, build, own, operate and endow a performing arts center, GRAND CENTER, in the City of St. Louis. GRAND CENTER acquired CCRC’s stock. 16. In 1998 VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (VSRC) was established, pursuant to the Missouri Urban Redevelopment Law, RSMo.Sec. 353.010 et seq. 17. All three entities have a stated goal to “revitalize this neighborhood with the performing arts as the organizing theme of the redevelopment and really to establish it as a national tourist destination, cultural tourist destination.” 18. Despite this target, decay continued, and midtown development stalled. Given this chronic slump, in 2002 the City of St. Louis initiated study of a “GRAND CENTER Tax Increment Financing Plan.” Referred to herein as the GRAND CENTER TIF, the TIF envisioned a resurgent GRAND CENTER that would be a vibrant, economically self sufficient theater and cultural district encompassing historic and contemporary artistic works. The proposed TIF would provide up to $80 million to support some $150 million in development projects. 19. Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. was appointed executive director of GRAND CENTER in 2002. He is a three-term former mayor of the City of St. Louis. In a March 15, 2002 interview with the St. Louis Business Journal, Schoemehl said that GRAND CENTER would need to update its master plan prior to launching a proposal for a District TIF, and he stated that “a land use board committee co-chaired by Donald Suggs and Emily Pulitzer has been formed to do that.” 20. On February 7, 2003 the City of St. Louis enacted the Tax Increment Blighting Analysis and Redevelopment Plan for the GRAND CENTER Redevelopment Area in St. Louis, Missouri. The enabling legislation granted the developer, VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, the power of eminent domain to acquire properties within the Redevelopment Area. It authorized the Industrial Development Authority of the City of St. Louis to issue Tax Increment Improvement Revenue bonds. Bryan Cave LLP, St. Louis, Missouri is listed as “Bond Counsel.” The legislation further states that 1) the GRAND CENTER TIF would be administered by VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION; 2) there shall be eight (8) members of the Board of Directors. Cardinal Ritter College Prep shall appoint four (4) members of the Board and Grand Center, Inc., or its affiliate, shall appoint four (4) members of the Board. 21. Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. in his deposition succinctly laid out the Defendants’ corporate structure and mission. “So, Grand Center, Inc., as a not-for-profit is-is an urban redevelopment corporation and its subsidiaries, CCRC and VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, both 353 corporations, and in our capacity, as the TIF developer for about a 300-acre TIF district that was established in I think 2003, so our mission is to revitalize this neighborhood with the performing arts as the organizing theme of the redevelopment and really to establish it as a national tourist destination, cultural tourist destination.” 6 THE PLAINTIFF AND THE HERITAGE SITE 22. In July 2003, Grand Center President Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. and Grand Center director Emily Pulitzer approached the Plaintiff about becoming a sub developer in the redevelopment district. Emily Pulitzer was on the Defendant’s master planning committee. She was also the founder and board chairman of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts (PFA) a Missouri not-for-profit corporation. The PFA operates a private museum in GRAND CENTER that opened in 2001. The museum displays Emily Pulitzer’s private collection of contemporary art and curated exhibitions of other work. The PFA owns other property in the Grand Center Art District in addition to the museum. 23. The Plaintiff was contacted because of 1) his research in public space design and emerging information technology, 2) his operation of a downtown St. Louis media arts lab, 3) his leadership of MediaArts Alliance, the premier media arts organization in St. Louis, 4) his partnerships and collaborations in new media and community with the City of St. Louis and the Missouri Attorney General, 5) his international reputation as a designer of lofts and public accommodation projects on Washington Avenue in St. Louis. 24. In an initial August 15, 2003 meeting with Schoemehl and Pulitzer, the Plaintiff described his protocol and provided them with a “work- praxis portfolio” detailing work that the Plaintiff had done with three St. Louis mayors. The portfolio chronicled protocol development and included images from a series of the Plaintiffs projects. The Plaintiff testified that at this introductory meeting, Schoemehl said “now with this TIF; this is the type of project which would be welcomed and could be done at GRAND CENTER.” 25. In that first meeting, the Plaintiff discussed how his protocol and creative practice extended the work of communication scholars Marshall McLuhan and Fr. Walter Ong. Marshall McLuhan and Fr. Ong were faculty members at Saint Louis University, which is a part of the GRAND CENTER TIP District. McLuhan, who has been called the “Oracle of the Electronic Age” and the “Patron Saint of Wired Magazine," taught at the school from 1937 until 1944. The Plaintiff explained there was a growing recognition that much of McLuhan’s foundational media scholarship is rooted in St. Louis, and that GRAND CENTER’s recognition and celebration of McLuhan and Ong could anchor the development as a new media destination. 26. Schoemehl said that he wanted something more than a traditional arts and entertainment district - more than super sized outdoor video. He understood that a McLuhan - Ong link might mark the district “as that something more." A heritage brand would be a significant District asset, a step in transforming GRAND CENTER into a “midwest silicone alley.” Schoemehl requested that the plaintiff provide him with a “Marshall McLuhan-Walter Ong reading list.” As Schoemehl stated in his earlier deposition: “What Paul explained to me that I had never realized was that Marshall McLuhan had done all of his work at St. Louis University. I had never heard of Father Walter Hong (Ong) before meeting with Paul. I went out and bought all their books. And I thought the Media Box would be a great connector between GRAND CENTER and ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, and that was really in my mind a very key component of ... this idea that, you know, there are lots of lighting technologies and sound technologies, but the idea that he was going to organize it around the teachings and the-philosophies of Walter Ong and Marshall McLuhan, I found that very intriguing and compelling.” Schoemehl latter arranged for Craig Kaminer of Kaminer & Co. Brand & Reputation Management to meet with the Plaintiff. Schoemehl wanted Kaminer to draft a “Marshall McLuhan Branding Campaign” for the district. Kaminer had recently completed an earlier campaign for the Defendant. The tag line was “GRAND CENTER I the Intersection of Art + Life.” THE PROPERTY - THE TIRE SHOP 27. In their first meeting with the Plaintiff, Vincent C. Schoemehl and Emily Pulitzer proposed 3699 Olive Boulevard as the site for the Plaintiff to develop a project. 3699 Olive Boulevard is at the intersection of Spring and Olive, one of the most visible intersections in the district. It is diagonal to the Contemporary Museum of Art, and directly across the street from a landscaped park owned by the PFA and designed by Emily Pulitzer. The following exchange is from the Plaintiffs depositions. It is about the introductory call the Plaintiff received from Schoemehl setting up the initial meeting. Q. Sure. That first contact from Vince Schoemehl in 2003, what did he communicate to you? A. He said he was aware of my work and he thought I would be a good fit for GRAND CENTER. And there was a specific piece of property that he wished to discuss with me, and he indicated that he would like to set up a meeting with me which would include Emily Pulitzer. 28. The Vandeventer-Spring Redevelopment Plan includes Seven Project Areas. Each Project Area list multiple sites and properties, followed by a recommendation of whether the existing structures should be removed or kept. 3699 Olive Boulevard is listed for Project Area 3. It is the only property listed for that project area. 3699 Olive Boulevard is a brownfield site. A gas station--circa 1960--used to be there, but the building now was being used as a tire shop, and the land around the building for parking. The Redevelopment Plan recommended that the building be removed. Gentle Day owned 3699 Olive Boulevard, and he operated the tire shop. The Defendant, before meeting with the Plaintiff, contacted Gentle Day, and they told him that they wanted to purchase the property. But nothing came out of it. Vincent Schoemehl, in his deposition, explained why they wanted to buy the Day property: “you know, having an automotive repair shop in the middle of an arts district was not deemed to be ideal and it’s, basically, a parking lot and a-and an auto repair shop and our hope was to find a higher and better use for that.” 29. Shortly after the introductory meeting, the Defendant GRAND CENTER formally requested that the Plaintiff submit a proposal to become a sub-developer at 3699 Olive Boulevard. The GRAND CENTER in-house counsel, Alan Pratzel, represented the GRAND CENTER in drafting the contract. Eric Friedman, a specialist in owner-business real-estate relocation matters, assisted the Plaintiff. In his deposition, Friedman was asked about his qualifications. Q. Okay. Through your work-aside from the Media Box, do you have any experience through your work with condemnation actions? A. Yeah. We sold property under the threat of condemnation for clients, and on a regular basis we have worked on projects with Bob Denlow, who is a lawyer specializing in condemnation.” 30. Prior to the Plaintiff and the Defendant GRAND CENTER entering into a contract, Attorney Pratzel filed a Petition for Condemnation against Gentle Day, the owner of 3699 Olive Boulevard, in the Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis. It was Cause No. 042-00630, and it was the first and only instance that the Defendant Vandeventer - Spring Redevelopment filed a Petition for Condemnation exercising the power of eminent domain in furtherance of the Development Plan. 31. Vincent Schoemehl represented to the Plaintiff that the Defendant would exercise the utmost caution and attentiveness in exercising its the power of eminent domain. Vincent Schoemehl testified in his deposition: 10”I think -- Well, first of all, under state law you have an obligation to have good faith negotiations. And, you know, so I think there is that you have to -- you know, you have to satisfy. If condemnation becomes required, then, you know, we demonstrated we were quite ready to do that. But, you know, it is something that has to be done with, you know, with some degree of caution. Most recently and just prior to this, maybe simultaneous with this, St. Louis University was in the press quite a bit about some condemnation -- some acquisitions under condemnation that they had done, so there was some growing sensitivity about the use of eminent domain in the city at the time. Yes, I mean, my Board is pretty informed board and, you know, there had been some press, as I said, about St. Louis University. At the time, I think Father Biondi was on the Board. I mean, people were pretty generally aware of the fact that this can be controversial.” THE OPTION CONTRACT 32. On or about March 25, 2004, GRAND CENTER’s Board of Directors approved the Option Contract. The Contract is attached hereto and incorporated herein, marked as Exhibit A. 33. The Option Contract provided that the Plaintiff would improve the lot and construct his “Media Box” project on the property. The Plaintiff defined the Media Box as a prototype information age structure. Media Box programming and content would emphasize the scholarly media and communications heritage of St. Louis University’s theorists Marshall McLuhan and Father Walter Ong. 34. The Option Contract further stated that “The parties hereto acknowledge and agree that the Project will enhance and benefit the GRAND CENTER District and the region by serving as a center for the study of media art and communications systems. To 11 that end, Buyer and Seller agree to cooperate with each other to carry out each party’s respective obligations hereunder.” 35. A Memorandum describing the Media Box accompanied the Option Contract. The Media Box is described as follows. Digital imaging technology systems will be incorporated and configured into the facade of the building. These technologies will allow information and images to be viewed on multiple sectors of the building, and will allow large outdoor displays with long viewing distances. The imaging technologies to be used may include the following: - rear projection systems - flat display panel systems, including modular systems designed and configured to suit specific applications - alternative imaging technologies, such as electronic paper technologies (The Media Box is a “prototype information age structure.”) - As a public stage for the interplay of complex communication systems, the Media Box has the potential to become another signature piece for GRAND CENTER, by: - Offering multimedia artists a venue to display work - Expanding the audience and constituency for multimedia art - Engaging the public with a provocative and intriguing presentation of visuals that focus on the arts and community - Creating a new social space by injecting information networks and their virtual communities into a rich dimensional public realm - Creating an interactive context to forge group experience and engage the public - Encouraging partnerships between the


Encouraging partnerships between the arts community, entertainment communities, and the telecommunications/information technology industry - Encouraging people to critically investigate the role of technology in our culture - Serving as an ever-changing “bulletin board” for the array of arts and cultural organizations that serve our community - The design also envisions a public plaza fronting the Media Box, linking the building to the surrounding museums and to the GRAND CENTER community. 36. The Option Contract required the Plaintiff to deliver to the Defendant “architectural concepts, a financial feasibility study, and a prospective program and content summary” for the Media Box project during the Option Period. The Plaintiff 12 submitted program and content summaries, architectural development plans, and architectural concepts to GRAND CENTER for approval. The Option Contract required that the Defendant treat all referenced documents as proprietary and confidential, and all such documents and plans were to remain the property of the Plaintiff. Eric Friedman, who participated in drafting the contract, testified that the proprietary and confidential provision was there because “we thought that it (the Media Box) was something unusual, different, propriety and we didn’t want anyone else doing it, stealing the idea, replicating it.” 37. In deposition, the Plaintiff was asked to state the purpose of the Option Contract. Q. What, in your words, was the purpose of the Option Contract? A. Obviously this is highly complex, but the purpose of the Option Contract was to allow the process to begin; to develop a Media Box in GRAND CENTER and for GRAND CENTER to be able to claim St. Louis’s heritage as a site for the development of critical media study.” OPTION CONTRACT EXECUTION 38. Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. represented to the Plaintiff that all reasonable, good faith efforts would be made by Schoemehl, GRAND CENTER, VSCR, and their representatives to acquire the property at 3699 Olive Boulevard; and Plaintiff relied upon these representations and performed services, as hereinafter alleged, which satisfied the terms and conditions of the Option Contract. 39. Throughout said Option Period, and with the knowledge and consent of Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr., Director Pulitzer, and other representatives of GRAND CENTER and VSCR, the Plaintiff developed content models and architectural concepts for the Media Box. 13 40. During said Option Period, the Plaintiff delivered the required documents, which describe the Media Box and detail its main features. Excerpts follow: The building - Digital imaging technology systems will be incorporated and configured into the building’s facade. This will permit information and images to be viewed and heard from multiple sectors of the building, and will allow large outdoor displays with long viewing distances. Visual imaging and audio systems will display and amplify the building’s content and programming on the Media Box’s facade. A public plaza fronting the building will link the building to the surrounding museums and to the GRAND CENTER community. The building will include residential units and spaces for content generation. [The building]-re-imagines civic spaces in a time of information networks and data banks. It has the potential of serving as a prototype, and as it is promotes creative interactions among citizens, artists, communication scholars, and the entertainment industry [will be] a platform to examine and display the communication scholarship of St. Louis University media theorists Father Walter Ong and Marshall McLuhan [will] incorporate state-of-the-art projection technology and serve as a public stage for the interplay of complex communication systems [will] serve as a public venue to view media art, with large outdoor projections of video displays [will be] a public stage for the interplay of complex communication systems [and] must generate content as well as showcase content As a content-driven building, it will provide national and international attention to GRAND CENTER and the St. Louis Metropolitan area. It will promote collaborations and partnerships with other institutions whose mission is also to critically investigate the role of technology in our culture. ...the objective of critically investigating the role of technology in our culture and exploring creative approaches to the interaction of digital networks in our community a “light box” designed to activate the sidewalk in a revitalizing neighborhood, and further establish GRAND CENTER as an innovative, technology and arts-friendly environment. a mixed use digital media project, bridges arts, media and technology. It introduces digital media art to GRAND CENTER’s already rich mix of contemporary art, music, and theater exploring connections between information networks and urban spaces try to bridge the gap between information and communication a public stage for the interplay of complex communication systems 14 a digital arts atelier in generating and showcasing content a new social space in GRAND CENTER by injecting information networks and their virtual communities into a rich dimensional public realm provoke a dialogue between critical thinking artists and all that digital razzmatazz a dynamic interactive configuration to a building, to a street and to the community an extraordinary and unique opportunity for collaboration Foundational media research was done at St. Louis University, first by a young Marshall McLuhan and later by Father Walter Ong. This scholarship is largely unknown by many in St. Louis. It is this intellectual heritage, however, which provides the context for locating the Media Box in GRAND CENTER as well as an opportunity for partnering with other nationally- and internationally-recognized academic institutions. a tradition of communication scholarship at Saint Louis University which informs both the design and the programmatic content of the Media Box a public stage for reflective citizens to examine digital communication systems 41. Wraparound image-projection screens were incorporated into the Media Box designs. Asked in his deposition if these projection surfaces would serve as a source for advertising revenues, Eric Friedman testified as follows: “A. Well, I was hopeful that would definitely be one of the sources of money that would come in, and it would be done in a very kind of public radio, public television kind of way, was my vision, as a business model as opposed to a very commercial kind of way; that it would advertise the arts, it would advertise, you know, things that are really kind of developing the community and the economy of the community as opposed to being-selling something else. That was my vision, you know.” 42. At the request of GRAND CENTER the Plaintiff met with GRAND CENTER stake holders, described his protocol, presented samples of earlier work, and explained how the District, “with a McLuhan and Ong connection," could make the case to be the nation’s new media heritage site. 15 43. The Plaintiff promoted the Media Box, not only in St. Louis, but nationally and internationally. The Plaintiffs promotional activity included lectures and interviews in Australia, and a joint paper with Media Box consultant Sung Ho Kim. This paper was presented at the Media Ecology Association convention at the Rochester Institute of Technology. The Plaintiff and Kim traced how the Media Box grew out of a downtown St. Louis Media Arts lab, which had served as a research and development tool. 44. The GRAND CENTER brand manager Craig Kaminer prepared a Preliminary Public Media Relations Strategy for the GRAND CENTER Media Box Project. The strategy’s intent was to establish the Media Box as a prototype information-age structure, and St. Louis as the nation’s new media heritage site. 45. A Media Box quarterly update was given on September 15, 2004 at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts. Present were Vincent Schoemehl, Jr., Emily Pulitzer, PFA executive director Matthias Waschek, Eric Friedman, Sung Ho Kim, and other GRAND CENTER district sub-developers. Asked about the meeting in his deposition, Plaintiff testified: “A. Well, at that meeting -- the meeting was set up for me to, you know, fill in some of the issues regarding the design of the project, the international connections that the project could open up and discuss the local players in St. Louis who were interested in participating in the project. ---Multimedia reviewed first ---- reviewed my praxis involving Media Arts and urban design ---projects which could then be extrapolated and further developed and explored at GRAND CENTER. So that was part of it. We then discussed at length the history of the GRAND CENTER as it relates to the broader picture of digital cultural and digital design throughout the world. -- would have discussed my presentations elsewhere which would have included my presentations in New York at Rochester in June, my various presentations at St. Louis University regarding these issues. I think I also included presentations regarding my meetings at the law school at St. Louis U and then in detail the presentations in Australia. --- you had my attempt to bring in a national and international audience in design and then the third part would have been Sung Ho reviewing the model which was present at the meeting. And we would have shown some of these development drawings as part of the Power Point.” 16 46. The Plaintiff produced a Media Box demonstration: “a preview installation” intended to explain the Media Box to the St. Louis community, and to demonstrate its potential for activating GRAND CENTER as a nighttime public arts venue. The installation, Marshall McLuhan meets Josephine Baker, was presented on December 31, 2004, New Year’s Eve at the Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts. Its content was selected to support St. Louis’s claim to a Marshall McLuhan legacy, and to demonstrate how and why the city could mark itself as a new media heritage site. The installation drew upon images and text from Marshall McLuhan’s groundbreaking work The Mechanical Bride. The Mechanical Bride, partially assembled and drafted in St. Louis in the early 1940s, is now recognized as a seminal work that prefigured the cultural and social dislocation of the information age. The installation combined McLuhan’s content with visual animations constructed from the FBI files of Josephine Baker, J. Edgar Hoover and Walter Winchell. 47. Marshall McLuhan meets Josephine Baker was produced in collaboration with The Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts. PFA executive director Matthias Waschek worked closely with the Plaintiff on the installation. The concrete exterior walls of the museum were used for the projections. This required approval from the building’s architect, Tado Ando, since the museum’s exterior had never been used as a surface for a multimedia projection and because of certain contract design restrictions. The Plaintiff’s installation, because of certain contract design-alteration restrictions. Marshall McLuhan meets Josephine Baker was well attended and received. 48. Communications between the Defendant and Gentle Day were at a standstill during this period of contract execution. The Plaintiff had retained Eric Friedman to 17 manage property relocation issues relating to the Media Box development, but the Defendant would not allow Friedman to participate in property relocation. In his deposition Friedman was asked what discussions he had with Mr. Schoemehl about relocating Day: “A. We talked about this on a number of occasions because I came up with a location to relocate him that was for sale. It was six blocks north. And Vince said “I’ve got It covered” or something to that effect. And, you know, I said do you want me to pursue it. He said no, and then I think he called me back and said do you think that’s still available, I said yeah, do you want me to pursue it. He said, let me think about it or I’ll get back to you, and nothing ever happened.” THE POLITICAL FIRESTORM 49. One January 31, 2005, the St. Louis Post Dispatch published an article by Jake Wagman headlined Eminent Domain Takes Aim at Life’s Work. It highlighted the situation between GRAND CENTER and Gentle Day, the proprietor of Royal Auto Repair, Inc. The article mentioned the Plaintiff and the Media Box as “the project-building” that would be located at 3699 Olive Boulevard following the exercise of eminent domain. The article casts the Plaintiff and the Media Box as predatory entities, and anoints Gentle Day. Excerpts follow. “Every month for 20 years, Gentle “Jim” Day mailed his $1,222.22 mortgage payment on his business, Royal Auto Repair. He finally paid if off last year. But now Day, the son of Arkansas sharecroppers, faces losing his land and business. An agency backed by the city is preparing to take Day’s business by eminent domain to make way for something called a “Media Box.” “Day developed a knack for engine repair while working on farms in Crawfordsville, Ark., where he grew up. He came to St. Louis as a young man for formal training as a mechanic. Before he bought Royal Auto Repair, Day worked jobs including on an assembly line at an envelope factory and in the kitchen of Uncle Bill’s diner.” “GRAND CENTER can approve or reject building designs, dispense up to $80 million in tax incentives and acquire land by eminent domain. GRAND CENTER’s vision has the area becoming the “cultural soul” of the city, a residential and commercial district that will rival the Delmar Loop and Central West End. The vision does not include an auto repair shop.” 18 “The ‘Media Box’ is really the working title for the design studio piece of it,” Cohen said. Friedman is working with the city’s postmodem standard-bearer, an asbestos lawyer turned multimedia artist named Paul Guzzardo.” “After Day rejected the second offer, an arm of GRAND CENTER filed a lawsuit to have the property condemned. It is pending in St. Louis Circuit Court. Other property owners have sued Schoemehl and GRAND CENTER over tactics they consider heavy-handed and bullying.” “Day is waiting for his day in court. A hearing set for Jan. 18 was postponed to March 7. If Day and GRAND CENTER don’t settle, the court could condemn the land and set compensation for Day. “I sleep at night so I can defend myself from it,” Day says. “I try to have a nice sleep and a clear mind because every day I have to defend myself from this.." 50. Before publication of Wagman’s article, Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. and other representatives of Grand Center and VSRC had directed media representatives to the Plaintiff for information about the Media Box project itself and about the legal actions being used to secure the property at 3699 Olive Boulevard. This created a false public impression that the Plaintiff was responsible for attempts to secure the property. 51. Schoemehl testified that he referred the press to Eric Friedman ." ..because I had talked to him (Jake Wagman) about relocation benefits and Eric is a -- an accomplished professional realtor and I was you know, I was hoping he could explain the process to Jake in -- in more precise terms than maybe I could.” This testimony was inconsistent with events that preceded. Schoemehl had excluded the Plaintiff and Friedman in negotiations with Gentle Day, and he rejected Friedman’s offer to provide relocation services for Day’s auto tire business. Eric Friedman testified in his deposition that he was completely shut out of the process. “Q. Earlier you mentioned some discussions with Vince Schoemehl about relocating Day’s business. What do you recall about relocating Day’s business? A. I suggested he allow me to help him In relocating Day because I grew up working at my father’s salvage yard on Cass and Jefferson which was, oh, I don’t know, maybe 12 blocks away. And I knew that area very well and I had some ideas about where he might be able to be 19 relocated to. And even more important than the location was the idea of how to structure the deal with Mr. Day to get him some additional business to make this a very attractive deal for Mr. Day, And I suggested that the first contact with Mr. Day, that I go to my father and we find somebody who is in the community who knows Mr. Day well who is an African American and we use that team to pursue this property in a way that will hopefully get the results we want and we’ll have somebody who can talk to him who comes from his community. Q. Okay. And what was the response you received from Mr. Schoemehl? A. “I’ve got somebody who does that work for us, a contractor who is hired to do this work, and he’ll take care of it.” Q. Okay. Do you know the name of the contractor? A. I don’t. I think it was some initials. Q. Do you recall any other details of discussions you had with Mr. Schoemehl about relocating Day? A. We talked about this on a number of occasions because I came up with a location to relocate him that was for sale. It was six blocks north. And Vince said “I’ve got It covered” or something to that effect. And, you know, I said do you want me to pursue it. He said no, And then I think he called me back and said do you think that’s still available, I said yeah, do you want me to pursue it. He said, let me think about it or I’ll get back to you, And nothing ever happened.” 52. Following publication of the Wagman article, Gentle Day became a local and national symbol for an alleged abuse of eminent domain by VSRC, its contractors and consultants, including Plaintiff. Mr. Day


appeared at a St. Louis City Hall rally, and met with local and regional government officials, including state legislators in Jefferson City, and Congressman Lacy Clay’s Chief of Staff. Yard signs reading “no to eminent domain” appeared throughout the St. Louis metropolitan region. The outcry was further provoked by a national campaign centered on an eminent domain case before the United States Supreme Court. This case, Kelo v. City of New London, 545 U.S. 469 (2005), was the first major eminent domain case heard by the Supreme Court since 1984. It involved the use of eminent domain to transfer land from one private owner to another private owner for furtherance of economic development. 53. Alderman Michael Milkman, who sponsored the Tax Increment Blighting Analysis and Redevelopment Plan for the GRAND CENTER Redevelopment Area, was quoted in the newspaper as saying he was surprised to learn about Day’s situation. “Had I 20 been aware of it,” McMillan said, “I would not have supported the way it was done.” In addition to the Alderman, Eric Friedman testified that Congressman Clay’s office was also “very unhappy” about what was happening. 54. A series of emails between Vincent Schoemehl and Eric Friedman addressed the racial and the political fallout that was resulting from Mr. Day’s and the press’s condemnation of the Defendant Grand Center. The Plaintiff and Director Pulitzer were copied on some of these emails. 55. Plaintiff was labeled a “racist” and an “elitist” on multiple online blogs and articles following publication of the Wagman article. 56. The State of Missouri revised its eminent domain laws following a wave of public outcry over Kelo v. New London, the Defendant’s mismanagement of the Gentle Day condemnation, and the imprudent use of eminent domain in the city of Sunset Hills. As part of this revision the state legislature created “The Office of the Ombudsman for Property Rights." This Office is officially charged with documenting the use of eminent domain within in Missouri and any issues associated with its abuse. CONTRACT TERMINATION AND THE BURNT CHURCH 57. On May 17, 2005 the Executive Board of GRAND CENTER met and voted to withdraw the Petition for Condemnation. When asked about this meeting in his earlier deposition Vincent Schoemehl testified: A. There was a national organization that came to town over the over the Day case that wanted to have demonstrations in GRAND CENTER. I mean, there was -- there was a lot of-- there was a lot of concern about this from a public relations standpoint. A...we made the decision to drop it. Q. Who was involved in that decision and when did that decision - I don’t know the exact - 21 Q. take place? A. ....date. I don’t know the exact date, but it went ---1 did take that to the full Grand Center Board. Q. And was that after the publication of this -A.Yes. Q. Wagman article? A. It was after the publication of the Wagman article. We weren’t making any progress. And just we decided, you know, this is just --we’re just --you know, we’re taking too much of a public beating and we need to --you know, we need to just dismiss this case with prejudice. Q. Was a primary concern on behalf of the Vandeventer Redevelopment Board and the Grand Center Board adverse reputation, bad-will being caused by the action? A. There was certainly that., And he added about his board of directors, A ...all of whom were donors, and they were concerned about the negative publicity. 58. Fifteen minutes after the May 17, 2005 meeting in which the Grand Center Executive Board voted to withdraw the Petition for Condemnation Schoemehl received a call from the St. Louis Post Dispatch wanting to confirm the vote. Schoemehl then called the Plaintiff and left a voice message notifying the Plaintiff of the vote to withdraw the petition. In this message, Schoemehl also indicated that an alternative site for the Media Box needed to be found. Shortly after leaving the phone message Schoemehl sent the Plaintiff two emails regarding alternative -replacement Media Box properties. 59. After the Defendant GRAND CENTER ceased its efforts to acquire 3699 Olive Boulevard, a lot in the GRAND CENTER District containing the shell of a burned out church was suggested by Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. to Plaintiff, as an alternative location for the Media Box. The Defendant owned this property. The property is listed in Municipal Bond prospective as “The Spring Church." It is described in Exhibit IV of the TIF ordinance: “This small, white rock church, originally built in the late 19th century, was home to a 100 member congregation until a late night fire in April 2001, reduced the wooden interior and roof to ash. ----This ruin and the vacant plot sit directly across Spring Avenue from the new Cardinal 22 Ritter College Prep High School. In their current conditions, these properties serve as a blighting influence on the entire District. However, as envisioned, this space will preserve an important historic St. Louis artifact, add value to all surrounding properties and provide an important greenspace in the District. It is anticipated that Grand Center, Inc. will retain ownership of the property and be responsible for its maintenance. It is anticipated that TIF funds will be used only for the acquisition, clean up and stabilization of the church property and site preparation and development of the north parcel.” The Ordinance further states that the allowable amount of TIF Obligations: Urban Garden was $ 280,000. Elsewhere in the enabling Ordinance the property is listed as a Series C Notes. Later ordinances show it as a Series D Note and state that the Allowable Amount of TIF Obligations was $ 380,000. 60. A few days after the Defendant GRAND CENTER ceased its efforts to acquire 3699 Olive Boulevard Schoemehl provided Plaintiff with site plans and architectural drawings of the burnt Church, and the adjoining lot. He asked his assistant, JoAnne LaSala, to work with Plaintiff to relocate the Media Box into this church. LaSala is the former president of St. Louis 2004, which had provided funding for the Plaintiffs Media Arts lab - forerunner of the Media Box. In his meetings with LaSala the Plaintiff proposed inserting features of the Media Box into the derelict church structure, and described how the church could be transformed into a glowing new media “information lamp," lighting up GRAND CENTER and marking a heritage site. 61. LaSala asked the Plaintiff to provide for updated documents regarding his presentations, publications and research and development protocol. Plaintiff testified that he was “willing to try to be cooperative with them to try to sustain the development of these ideas which I had been working on which I consider part of our national patrimony and put them in Grand Center.” Shortly thereafter LaSala informed the Plaintiff that GRAND CENTER had decided that the burnt church was not appropriate for 23 development, and that the energy of a Media Box would would need to be moved elsewhere in the district. APPROPRIATION OF THE PLAINTIFF’S PROPRIETARY DESIGNS 62. Immediately after dismissing the condemnation action the Defendant GRAND CENTER corporations engaged Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter of Axi: Ome llc as the “de facto in-house designers” for the district. They were charged with exploring how digital media might be applied to different locations in GRAND CENTER. Both individuals had worked as consultants for the Plaintiff on the Media Box. “The Urban Media Complex GRAND CENTER” was the first project they did for the District. The Urban Media Complex GRAND CENTER” was based on the Media Box and the Plaintiff’s protocol. There was nothing new here, except the name. 63. Neither the GRAND CENTER Defendants nor their agents contacted the Plaintiff again until late December 2006, when Vincent Schoemehl sent the Plaintiff an email. Schoemehl sought the Plaintiff’s assistance in designing a media-projection infrastructure for the GRAND CENTER district. Vince Schoemehl <vince@grandcenter.org> wrote: Paul: I would like to speak with you about a lighting/projection project in Grand Center. We’ve been given a fairly nice gift for new arts projects and this is one of the projects we’d like to propose to our committee. I’m looking for some help with technology specifications and some ideas on how to program this. We’re looking at starting with projections onto several walls/surfaces in Grand Center and then as a second phase placing “art walls” on the superstructures on top of the Club Riviera Building and possibly the Fox and other buildings in the district. My office number is (314) 289-1502 and my cell is (314) 369-6630. Give me a call if you get a chance. Thanks and happy New Year!!! Vincent C. Schoemehl 64. The Plaintiff was asked about this email from Schoemehl in his deposition. Q. And was he contacting you about the Media Box in December 2006? 24A. He was contacting me about the media installations in Grand Center. He indicated that they were going to be moving in a two-stage process, all series of district projections, which would then lead to, you know, inserting projection infrastructures at multiple locations in the district. Q. In December of 2006 was there any discussion of potential locations for the original Media Box concept? A. No. No. It dealt with, in some respect, blowing up the Media Box into a series of fragments and forms which would then be, you know, snapped into place in Grand Center. 65. In response to Schoemehl’s request the Plaintiff prepared an updated resume and a memorandum for the Defendants GRAND CENTER. In the resume he attached exhibits of additional projects and recent work. In his memorandum, the Plaintiff again detailed how digital media could be used and incorporated into the GRAND CENTER district. In a reply email VincentC.SchoemehlJr.wrote ..Paul:Thanks.this is perfect.” After “this email message, the Defendant terminated all communication with the Plaintiff. 66. Subsequently and without the Plaintiffs authorization, the Defendant took the proprietary and confidential Media Box architectural concepts, program and content summaries from the planned Media Box project, and used these to design and program a series of GRAND CENTER projects - one temporary, the others permanent. The temporary project was installed in the brunt church. The permanent, built projects are located half a block from the original Media Box site, at 3651 - 3655 Olive Street. All of these projects have made use of the Plaintiffs proprietary and confidential designs. The Plaintiff received no compensation or acknowledgment for the plans he proposed to the Defendants in confidence. The projects with estimated budgets follow: 1) The Burnt Church Lamp Project: $750,000 + dollars 2) The Nine Network for Public Media: 1 million dollars 3) The UMSL at GRAND CENTER: 14 million dollars 254) The Public Media Commons: 5 million dollars 5) The Art Walk : unknown 67. The GRAND CENTER Defendants have actively supported and encouraged its agents and stakeholders to incorporate proprietary Media Box protocols in these temporary and permanent projects. The GRAND CENTER Defendants have promoted, and continues to promote these projects as the frontline - the vanguard - of new media and public design. In none of the projects do the GRAND CENTER Defendant’s acknowledge the Plaintiff, the use of his original Media Box protocol, or St. Louis’s new media heritage. Descriptions of the hijacked projects follow, beginning with the burnt church. 68. The Community Light Project was sponsored by Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts, in collaboration with the GRAND CENTER Defendants. It was organized and presented in conjunction with the Pulitzer Foundation’s exhibition Dan Flavin: Constructed Light, which ran from February 1, 2008 through October 4, 2008 inside the museum. Outside the building four GRAND CENTER installations comprised the Community Light Project. One of these, a multimedia projection titled Crystal World, was installed directly across the street from the original site planned for the Media Box. “The Lamp Project at Spring Church” involved the installation of lamps into a shell roof attached to the burnt church - the alternative site that the GRAND CENTER Defendants had offered the Plaintiff. 69. “The Lamp Project at Spring Church” ran from September 4, 2008 through October 17 of 2008. Two German light artists, Rainer Kehres and Sebastian Hungerer, installed several hundred donated lamps in a temporary shell ceiling to create a light 26”roof’ for the church. Earlier in 2005 Kehres and Hungerer had exhibited a somewhat similar lamp installation at ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art in Karlsruhe, Germany - considered one of the foremost media arts exhibition venues in the world. The 2005 installation, Space Invaders drew international attention. It was exhibited in the same venue for a second time, from December 12, 2007 to February 24, 2008. ZKM announced the second Karlsruhe lamp installation on its website, and included hyperlinks to The Community Light Project. The success of previous installation during the ZKM special exhibition “Light Art from Artificial Light” in 2005/06 reached up abroad: the record number of visitors and especially the internationally publicized for light art exhibition catalog effected for the Karlsruhe artist an invitation to the “Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts “to St. Louis [U.S.] to a light art exhibition in September 2008, along with artists such as Dan Flavin, Spencer Finch and Kim Sooja. The Light Project, the participation of the artists in the exhibition Dan Flavin. Constructed Light, 01.02.04.10.2008, Pulitzer Museum, St. Louis [USA] Rainer Kehres, Sebastian Hungerer: 70. The Community Light Project was also heavily promoted in the United States. PFA Director Matthias Waschek wrote the forward to the Light Project’s promotional brochure, which did not mention either the Plaintiff or St. Louis’s new media heritage mentioned. This following excerpt is from the brochure: With The Light Project the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts spills beyond it’s walls for the first time. Grand Center is literally illuminated by four artworks, each of which is conceived by an artist (or artist team) with international visibility, curated under the auspices of an institution based in St. Louis and invested in this neighborhood. Conceptually, the Pulitzer’s exhibition Dan Flavin: Constructed Light pointed the way. After sunset surreal beans of florescent color emanate from the Pulitzer’s window and bounce off the water-court toward the south, creating between the Pulitzer and its neighborhood an immaterial but palpable bond. In a given setting one may perceive in light anything from basic safety to sublime spirituality. Its meaning lies very much in the context. Some of the artists invited to participate in The Light Project take light’s site specific meanings as ancillary effects, others engage them directly, even playfully. The total effect of The Light Project is, like light itself, difficult to pin down. Though the project is ostensibly on view for only six weeks. If it is successful, it will be outlived by memories that generate a new sense of what Grand Center can be. For this reason it is my pleasure to thank a great many people: the artists Spencer Finch, Sebastian Hungerer, Rainer Kehres, Ann Lislegaard, and Jason Peters, for their willingness to set our neighborhood aglow; the curators Robin Clark, Laura Fried, and Matthew Strauss, for their efforts and expertise; our 27 partnering institutions the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Saint Louis Art Museum, and White Flag Projects,for their involvement, and individuals and enterprises too numerous to be named here, for their generous support. 71. “The Lamp Project at Spring Church” required that extensive structural repairs be made to the church before any lamps could be installed. The Executive Committee of GRAND CENTER met on March 15, 2007, ‘’to take care of the problem." The minutes state that Director Pulitzer made a motion to approve a resolution authorizing a loan from the Illinois Facilities Fund in the amount of $750,000 to fund the stabilization and development of the burnt church property located at 620 North Spring. The burnt church was pledged as security for the loan. The motion passed unanimously. The chairman of the meeting was Don Lents, the chairman of Bryan Cave LLP. , the Defendants’ Bond Counsel. 72. Upon the best of our knowledge information and belief, the GRAND CENTER directors at the March 15, 2007 discussed the Plaintiff, the Media Box, and the lighting/projection project which Schoemehl had recently sought the Plaintiffs design and programming assistance. This discussion, however, was not put into the minutes. The minutes of this meeting are attached hereto and incorporated herein, marked as Exhibit B. 73. The loan documents indicate that the church was to be used as the Phoenix Art Forum. In a May 31,2007 correspondence to GRAND CENTER, the lender, the Illinois Facilities Fund wrote, “Congratulations on the completion of your project, funded with a loan from IFF. It is a pleasure partnering with you as you seek to meet the needs of those less fortunate.” The Church, however, has only been used once since the loan’s disbursement and church stabilization, and that was for the PFA-sponsored ‘’The Lamp Project at Spring Church." “ 74. Construction began on the permanent infrastructure projects shortly after the completion of “The Lamp Project at Spring Church." Former


Media Box consultants Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter - principals in the architecture and design firm Axi:Ome - designed The Nine Network for Public Media and UMSL (University of Missouri St. Louis) at GRAND CENTER. They also did preliminary conceptual design studies for Public Media Commons. Axi:Ome is currently working on The Art Walk, a fourth project. Descriptions of the four permanent projects follow. Two are completed, one is in construction, and one is in the design phrase. These descriptions and projects summaries are taken from press releases and promotional video created by the GRAND CENTER Defendants’ and their agents. They demonstrate how far the Defendants have gone to appropriate not only Media Box content, but - in some instances - the actual language used by the Plaintiff to describe and promote the Media Box. BUILT: THE NINE NETWORK FOR PUBLIC MEDIA Excerpts from a transcript: Public Broadcasting System ceremony announcing the Nine Network for Public Media Paula Kurger. the President and CEO of National PBS: “It is very exciting to be here. I think what defines public broadcasting is their commitment to localism and engaging in local communities. As I travel around the country there are a handful of stations, the really do sit at the leading edge of what public broadcasting should be, and that is KETC. So it is exciting to see this new initiative move forward to create a physical space where the community can come together can embrace new technology and look at ways to serve St. Louis. And I will be looking at this as a model as we roll out our work across the country.” Jack Galmiche President and CEO of the local St. Louis PBS - KETC TV: ." ..with us is Heather Woofter who is the architect and designer along with Sung Ho- they are a team of architects out of Washington University. And it was our hope that this space would appeal to the youth of our community. And because you works so closely with youth- it was partly your vision that allowed us to create a space will be welcoming to the youth of our community.” Heather Woofer of Axi:Ome : “And I think that is what really motivated us in the work. We started to think about network and communication being one of the critical issues in the project. And we tried to carry that out spatially within the environment.” “So I think we’ve tried to maintain some of the inspiring words that we heard from Jack regarding communication and network. And work that into an idea of how to build a community in a particular space.” BUILT: UMSL at GRAND CENTER 29 A selection of press releases, and excerpts from a transcript of a St. Louis on the Air interview of June 18, 2012. Program Guests were Tim Eby, director and general manager at St. Louis Public Radio I 90.7 KWMU - NPR in St. Louis, Vince Schoemehl executive director of GRAND CENTER, and Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofer of Aix:Ome PRESS RELEASES On display will be the newly-equipped, high-tech studios and offices of St. Louis Public Radio with its monochromatic white walls and furnishings. UMSL’s classrooms with the latest computers, projectors, editing rooms and offices focus on the study of new and digital media. The ground floor contains the Monsanto Community Education Center. It will feature the studios and offices of St. Louis Public Radio 90.7 KWMU and classrooms for the rapidly expanding field of new media: Design architects are Heather Woofter and Sung Ho Kim of Axi: Ome LLC. St. Louis Public Radio and the University of Missouri St. Louis broke ground on a three-story building will feature more studios, more space for additional staff. Heather Woofter is a partner at Axi: Ome, the company that designed the structure. She said one of the guiding design principals was to create an inviting structure which is open to the public. “The building is meant to be open and transparent,” Woofter said. “Grand Center was typically ‘closed’ if you will. One of the directives was that the media component be open to the community and the environment,” she said Digital Media Studies-The Creative Spark for Tomorrow’s World- 1.1 billion Internet users. 2.5 billion cell phone users. 200 million social network users. Tomorrow’s communication professionals will need to explain, interpret, and inspire their world using digital media with proficiency and flair. UMSL’s nationally recognized Communication Department will offer courses designed to prepare students to identify, evaluate, select and design effective strategies and technologies for communicating in various contexts. The digital media program will take advantage of its proximity to public radio; television and digital news outlets to provide students with practical hands-on experience in their chosen major with media professional. June 18.2012 St. Louis on the Air Eby 3:25 UMSL at GRAND CENTER - The University of Missouri St. Louis at GRAND CENTER- that is one of the exciting features of this building is how it really does integrate the region’s public radio station with the region’s major public university. And we have thee classrooms in this building, we have a meeting space for the university to hold meetings and seminars and it is very closely intertwined with our space as well and I think that is going to create a true synergy. Eby 5:35 I think that Sung Ho and Heather described that so well when they came up with the vision of what this vision looks like. To take advantage of where we are located right here in the heart of GRAND CENTER. Woofer 8:00 We were also thinking about the building as a threshold into GRAND CENTER and connecting with Lindell and Saint Louis University, Channel Nine and also all the art institutions that are in this area. Woofer 12:50 (the newsroom) have wonderful views of the Media Commons so when there are events that start to happen adjacent to building that the newsroom will be front and center and be able to witness all the activities. Eby 15:20 The primary academic unit at USML that is involved is the College of Fine Arts and Communications. They are actually going to have a faculty person staying that is going to be teaching digital media and new media. Woofer 17:25 30...thinking about the events that would happen in the media plaza and how the dark skin of the building and the quality of glass could let the interior move out into the plaza area so that if feels like the public space is coming into the building. Woofer 20: 30 One of the beginnings of this project was working with an architect and friend of ours Aaron Novak. He asked us a question what lot do you think has the most potential in the city. That initiated a series of conversations with the leaders of GRAND CENTER. That was a few years before UMSL committed to coming to this site. So there are really phenomenal people in GRAND CENTER that lead the conversation on how this project might evolve. Eby 22:40 It is creating this hub of public media. And with the public university part of USML down here. There is now where else in the country. There is nothing like this anywhere in America. Schoemehl 29:00 Pound for pound we have a greater cultural offer than any community in this country, and I mean any community, including New York. Schoemehl 31:25 We think the opportunity to introduce a collaboration among the public media in this community with all of these arts organizations is really going to accelerate the success of not only the organizations themselves but of the community as a whole. Eby One of the things that we have been talking about is projected videos. They are going to re-skin the wall of the 9 Network Building so we can have project video that actually comes from our rooftop down on to the side of the Nine Network. and to commission films that could actually be played there, along with having an LED screen on the back of the Sheldon. 39:31 Schoemehl I cannot overstate the impact that this public media commons is going to have wait till you see that. 48:53 UNDER CONSTRICTION: PUBLIC MEDIA COMMONS Excerpts from transcripts: Transcription 10-30-2012 Ground Breaking Ceremony Jack Galmiche President and CEO of St. Louis PBS - KETC TV : The public media commons that we break ground today will be a Grand Center destination. a St. Louis destination and a powerful expression of how we envision the future of public media. It will in fact be the only place in the country where the arts education and public media come together in an interactive outdoor space specifically designed to engage people in the cultural life of our community. We envision and energetic space that attracts and engages people of all ages and in this space will be performances stages, multiple seating areas, green spaces, interactive technology. large screen projections on the east wall of the Nine Network building and behind us on the south wall of the Sheldon. The possibilities of this space are boundless. We envision this space to the public media commons will entertain you. And will be entirely different each time that you come. Promotional Video - St. Louis PBS - KETC TV: What if in the very heart of St. Louis there were a world class urban space comparable to Chicago’s Millennium Park. Rockefeller Center and Lincoln Center. What if it were possible to assemble a team of the world’s greatest designers to create that space. It is possible. Today plans are underway to create a public space in the heart of Midtown St. Louis. Unlike any other in our region or the nation. A media commons bringing our community together through the power of public media. The commons design and construction is lead by an internationally acclaimed team of urban planners, architects, landscape specialist, designers and media consultants. 31 The Commons will serve as the focus of the districts creative energy as well as a showcase and incubator for artistic expression. For the past century Mid Town St. Louis has been the center of culture in St. Louis. The new age of digital technology offers pathways and platforms that enable us to connect with each other and our environment in ways we never dreamed of possible. The Commons will take the experience of community to new heights drawing us together and encouraging us to share our thoughts and experiences. Giant screens will cover the east wall of the Nine Network and the south wall of the Sheldon Concert Hall. Providing and ever changing array of immersive visual and aural experiences. Visitors will interact with each other by creating their own media content, as well as what is created by public media and arts organizations. The possibilities are infinite. IN DESIGN STAGE - THE ART WALK Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofer were interviewed by Liam Otten, Art News Director of the Washington University in St. Louis News Room. Q&A: Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter: Architects discuss technology, building a practice and designing new facilities for St. Louis Public Radio, September 9,2013 Liam Otten - Art Walk, your current GRAND CENTER project. Heather Woofer - Well, it encapsulates ideas we’ve been talking about for years. We were asked to do the conceptual design, as part of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, but a lot of big logistical questions are still being worked out. Right now, it feels like the early stages of the UMSL building. You need something visionary to gather support and pull people together. Liam Otten - So what is the vision for Art Walk? What’s the problem it solves? Sung Ho Kim - Connectivity. Right now, it’s hard for pedestrians to move through the area - it has all these barriers. So, how do you cue people? How do you slow down traffic? It’s not just about putting up signs that say “arts district.” It’s about using light and sound and making beautiful things. Heather Woofer - The path would start at Saint Louis University, cross Lindell Boulevard to the SLU Museum of Art, then come along the Scottish Rite Cathedral and into the media plaza between the UMSL and Channel Nine buildings. From there, it passes the Sheldon and takes a left turn down Washington Avenue to the Pulitzer, the Contemporary and the PXSTL site, and then along Spring to Enright. Along the way, we’re proposing a series of interventions. Each would have a design distinction that would recognize the unique identity and perspective of each institution, but there’d also be some continuity between them. The Art Walk as described by Sung Ho Kim in his deposition A. ...And we just won a competition for the Art Walk in GRAND CENTER. Q. And tell me what that is going to be; what’s the Art Walk? A. Art Walk is GRAND CENTER is developing an Art Walk and we are designing the streetscapes. Q. With which agency are you working with from the Art Walk project? A. GRAND CENTER, Pulitzer Foundation, The Contemporary, The Sheldon, KETC, St. Louis University, Scottish Rite. They were all kind of institutions in GRAND CENTER. Q. What’s the scope of the Art Walk project? A. Design the public spaces. Q. And about how much money is that going to entail? A. Nobody knows. Q. In terms of fees? A. Oh, fees? It was a fixed fee of $75,000. 32 Q. Has that been paid already? A. No. Just won it a week ago. Q. Who do you expect to be paid by? A. I think GRAND CENTER. THE HERITAGE SITE - THE DIRECTOR RESIGNATIONS 75. The temporary and permanent projects described above do not acknowledge St. Louis as a new media heritage site. The press releases, interviews, video promotions, and the radio segments are silent. They never mention the heritage site. In response to this erasure _ a deletion which very much appears to be related to the erasure of the Media Box_the Plaintiff, a licensed attorney in the State of Missouri, filed a Complaint with the Office of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel on March 2, 2011. The Complaint was filed against Alan Pratzel, The Chief Disciplinary Counsel of the State of Missouri. Prior to assuming his position as The Chief Disciplinary Counsel, Pratzel was the in-house counsel for the GRAND CENTER Defendants. Pratzel filed the eminent domain action against Gentle Day, drafted the Media Box contract, and attended the March 15, 2007 meeting of the GRAND CENTER Executive Committee. On receipt of the Plaintiff’s Complaint, the Office of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel referred the Complaint to the Advisory Committee of the Supreme Court of Missouri. The Advisory Committee concluded that the matter that should not be opened as a disciplinary investigation. 76. The TIF enabling ordinance required that VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION have eight directors, and the State of Missouri, in 2011 required that Missouri corporations file an annual list of officers and directors. When the Plaintiff filed the Complaint with the Office of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel on March 2, 2011 there were eight directors listed for VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION. The same eight individuals were also listed as 33 directors for CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION. On June 1,2011, three month after the filling of the Complaint with the Office of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel, the Secretary of State sent Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. in his capacity as a registered agent a notice advising that the officer and director list of VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION and CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION had not been filed. The notice advised Schoemehl that the two corporations would be administratively dissolved if these documents were not filed by July 1, 2011. The officer and director lists were subsequently filed, and filed on the last possible day. The overdue 2011 filings list three directors for CCRC, and three for VSRC. With the exception of Vincent Schoemehl, all the CCRC and VSRC directors who served between 2005 and 2010 stepped down shortly after the filling of the Complaint with the Office of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel. At present, and in violation of the TIP enabling ordinance, five VSRC directorships remain vacant. COUNT 1 BREACH OF CONTRACT NOW COMES Plaintiff and for Count 1 of his Petition against Defendants’ GRAND CENTER, INC., a Missouri corporation; VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP., a Missouri corporation; CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP., a Missouri corporation; states as follows: 77. Plaintiff incorporates and re-alleges Paragraphs 1 through 76 of his Petition, as if fully set forth herein. 34 78. A valid Option Contract, marked Exhibit A, and attached hereto existed between Plaintiff and Defendant VSRC, signed by both the Plaintiff and Defendant VSRC’s president, Vincent Schoemehl, Jr. 79. The Option Contract required Defendant VSRC to deliver marketable title to the Plaintiff. 80. The Option Contract granted the Plaintiff the right to purchase the said property and develop the Media Box, with plans subject to Defendant GRAND CENTER’s approval. 81. VSRC and its representatives had a duty to exercise reasonable, good faith efforts to acquire 3699 Olive Boulevard, and to exercise good faith in using eminent domain to do so. 82. The Option Contract required both parties to cooperate with each other to carry out their respective obligations under the Option Contract. 83. Defendant failed to conduct good faith negotiations to acquire 3699 Olive Boulevard. 84. Defendant failed to exercise good faith in the use of its eminent domain powers by failing to offer Gentle Day a fair price for his land or a suitable alternative location, in violation of the provisions of the GRAND CENTER Tax Increment Blighting Analysis and Redevelopment Plan. 85. As a direct result of Defendant VSRC’s failure to conduct competent and


good faith negotiations under the Option Contract, or effectively acquire 3699 Olive Boulevard, by eminent domain, Defendant was not able to deliver marketable title thereto 35 and breached the Option Contract. As a result of these failures, the Plaintiff was unable to build the Media Box as provided in said Option Contract. 86. The Plaintiff was damaged by the loss of fees, payments, and earnings to which he was entitled pursuant to the Option Contract. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff, Paul Guzzardo, prays that this Honorable Court enter judgment in his favor and against Defendants, GRAND CENTER, INC., VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP., and CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP. for compensatory damages in the amount in excess of $25,000.00 plus costs of suit, and for such other and further relief as may be just and proper. COUNT 2 BREACH OF CONTRACT NOW COMES Plaintiff and for Count 2 of his Petition against Defendants’ GRAND CENTER, INC., a Missouri corporation; VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP., a Missouri corporation; CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP., a Missouri corporation; states as follows: 87. The Plaintiff incorporates and re-alleges Paragraphs 1 through _---’8:::..;:6~_ of his Petition, as if fully set forth herein. 88. The Option Contract required Plaintiff to deliver to Defendant “architectural concepts, financial feasibility study, and prospective program and content summary” for the Media Box project during the Option Period. 89. The Plaintiff delivered the required documents during said Option Period. Documents delivered included a series of memoranda describing the Media Box and the Media Box protocol. At the Defendants’ instruction and request, some of this content was 36 presented to the GRAND CENTER agent-stakeholders: Saint Louis University, the Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts, and the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. 90. The Option Contract required that Defendant treat all referenced documents as proprietary and confidential, and that the Plaintiffs Media Box protocol would be proprietary and confidential. 91. The Light Project installations in the burnt church, the Nine Network for Public Media, UMSL at GRAND CENTER, the Public Media Commons in GRAND CENTER, and the Art Walk have all made use of the Media Box protocol. This unauthorized use is in violation of the proprietary and confidential provisions of the Option Contract. 92. The Plaintiff received neither compensation nor acknowledgment for the plans he proposed to Defendants in confidence for use in the burned out church, The Nine Network for Public, UMSL at GRAND CENTER, the Public Media Commons in GRAND CENTER, and the Art Walk. 93. Appropriation of Plaintiffs proprietary and confidential designs, by Defendant GRAND CENTER and Defendant’s agent’s is a clear violation of the Plaintiffs proprietary and confidential interests and a willful breach of the Option Contract. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff, Paul Guzzardo, prays that this Honorable Court enter judgment in his favor and against Defendants, GRAND CENTER, INC., VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP., and CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP. for compensatory damages in the amount in excess of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00) plus costs of suit, and for such other and further relief as may be just and proper. 37 COUNT 3 NEGLIGENCE NOW COMES Plaintiff and for Count 3 of his Petition against Defendants’ GRAND CENTER, INC., a Missouri corporation; VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP., a Missouri corporation; CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP., a Missouri corporation; states as follows: 94. The Plaintiff incorporates and re-alleges Paragraphs 1 through _..,,::9~3__ of his Petition, as if fully set forth herein. 95. The Option Contract and Defendants’ initiation of eminent domain proceedings as aforesaid on Plaintiffs behalf, created a duty that Defendants exercise reasonable care in their actions dealing with the Days. 96. Prior to the publication of Jake Wagman’s article on January 31,2005, in the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Mr. Wagman contacted Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. to inquire about the eminent domain proceedings on the 3699 Olive Boulevard property. Vincent C. Schoemehl disclosed and provided the Plaintiff’s name to Mr. Wagman and to the public at large. Schoemehl directed Wagman to contact Plaintiff about the Media Box and the methods being used to obtain the property, thereby creating a false impression that the Plaintiff was responsible for the attempts to secure the property from Gentle Day and Royal Auto Repair, Inc. 97. Schoemehl’s actions in this regard violated his duty to exercise reasonable care in the performance of his obligations under the Option Contract. 98. Jake Wagman’s “hit and run” article heavily criticized the Plaintiff and falsely identified him the party responsible for the eminent domain actions against Gentle Day. 38 99. After Vincent C. Schoemehl and representatives of GRAND CENTER and VSRC publicly disclosed the Plaintiff’s identity and association with the Media Box project, no attempt was made to publicly clarify or correct misinformation that falsely identified the Plaintiff as a person who was responsible for the attempts to secure the property of Gentle Day and Royal Auto Repair, Inc. 100. Neither Schoemehl nor any other representative of the Defendants informed Mr. Wagman that the Plaintiff had no involvement with the actual eminent domain action against 3699 Olive Boulevard, was not involved with any negotiations to purchase the property from the Days and Royal Auto Repair, Inc., and that the Gentle Day - GRAND CENTER negotiations preceded the Plaintiff’s option contract. 101. As a direct and proximate result of Defendants’ failure to exercise reasonable care, Plaintiff was labeled a “racist” and an “elitist” in multiple online blogs and articles. 102. As a direct and proximate result of the GRAND CENTER Defendants’ failure to exercise reasonable care which caused racial accusations and adverse publicity against the Plaintiff and the Media Box, Plaintiff was removed from the Board of Directors of the Humanities Instructional Television Educational Center. 103. As a direct and proximate result of the GRAND CENTER Defendants’ failure to exercise reasonable care, which caused racial accusations and adverse publicity against the Plaintiff and the Media Box, the Plaintiff was excluded from participating in two downtown St. Louis public media projects: the St. Louis Old Post Office Plaza and the Gateway Mall Expansion. 104. As a result of Defendants failure to exercise reasonable, good faith efforts to acquire the property and failure to exercise good faith in its use of eminent domain, the 39 Plaintiff’s reputation was damaged. He was the subjected to accusations of racism and adverse publicity. He was excluded from projects outside the GRAND CENTER district, and he missed creative, commercial and business opportunities. 105. As a direct and proximate result of the GRAND CENTER Defendants’ failure to exercise reasonable care the Plaintiffs professional reputation has been irreparably damaged. The Plaintiff has suffered emotional distress and has missed commercial and business opportunities to advance his research in the fields of public media and urban design, all to his damage in an amount in excess of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00). WHEREFORE, Plaintiff, Paul Guzzardo, prays that this Honorable Court enter judgment in his favor and against Defendants, GRAND CENTER, INC., VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORP., and CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORP. for compensatory damages in the amount in excess of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00) plus costs of suit, and for such other and further relief as may be just and proper. COUNT 4 Tortious Inference with Contract and Business Relations NOW COMES Plaintiff and for Count 4 of his Petition against Defendant EMILY PULITZER states as follows: 106. Plaintiff incorporates and re-alleges Paragraphs 1 through _--:1:..::0:.:,5__ of his Petition, as if fully set forth herein. 107. Defendant Emily Pulitzer is the widow of Joseph Pulitzer Jr. Joseph Pulitzer Jr. was chairman of the Pulitzer Media Company, and chairman of the board responsible for awarding the Pulitzer Prize. He was also known for his contemporary art collection, 40 regarded as one of the largest and finest in the world. At the time of his death in 1993, Joseph Pulitzer Jr. was on the GRAND CENTER Inc. board of directors. 108. Defendant Emily Pulitzer became a director of GRAND CENTER Inc. in 1994. She has continued to serve as director up to the present. She became a director of CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION and VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION in 2005. She served continuously as a director for those two GRAND CENTER Corporations until she stepped down in 2011. Since 1994 has served on various Defendant committees: these include nominating, land use master plan, and executive committees. 109. Plaintiff is an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Missouri. On April 29, 2013, after repeatedly requesting his attorney to depose Emily Pulitzer in Cause No. 0922-CCOI036, the Plaintiff filed a notice to depose her. The Plaintiff took her deposition on June 21, 2013. She was represented in her deposition by the office of Bryan Cave LLP. 110. Defendant Emily Pulitzer was asked about the following in her deposition: the 3699 Olive Boulevard condemnation action, the installation that the Plaintiff projected onto her museum, her newspaper’s publication of Eminent Domain Takes Aim at Life’S Work, the political and racial upheaval that this article provoked, the termination of the Media Box contract, the $750,000 church stabilization loan, the Lamp Project at Spring Church, her relationship with the Axi:Ome principals Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter, the GRAND CENTER district as a new media heritage site, her directorships on the boards of the Defendant GRAND CENTER corporations, the dates of her 41 resignations from these boards and the reason for her resignations. Her responses, which follow, are evasive, indifferent, riddled with memory gaps, and almost disdainful. 111. Defendant Emily Pulitzer was asked about her newspaper’s publication of Eminent Domain Takes Aim at Life’s Work. Q. After the publication were there any meetings at GRAND CENTER dealing with this Post Dispatch story regarding the Gentle Jim Day property? A. There may have been.” 112. Pulitzer was asked about an email exchange between Vincent Schoemehl and Eric Friedman, which discussed the racial and political fallout that the Post Dispatch story on the Day condemnation provoked. Pulitzer was copied in this email thread. The emails mention that Gentle Day had been invited to the meet with members of the Missouri Legislature in Jefferson City. The email exchange reports that Day met with the Chief of Staff for Congressman Lacy Clay, the Congressman for the GRAND CENTER District. The emails note the Congressman expressed his concern, and asked to be kept informed of all developments. Q. “Were you aware of any contact that Michael McMillan or Lacy Clay had with GRAND CENTER regarding this matter?” A. “no." ” 113. Defendant Emily Pulitzer was asked about the May 17, 2005 GRAND CENTER Executive Board of meeting decision to terminate the Gentle Day condemnation suit, and about the recommendation to find an alternative site for the Media Box. Q. Let me direct your attention to two paragraphs, the paragraph where it states “A St. Louis auto mechanic whose repair shop was targeted for acquisition to make way for a “Media Box” will get to keep his land after all. The board of directors for Grand Center Development Agency that presides over the cultural district of the same name voted to drop its eminent domain suit against Gentle Jim Day, owner of Royal Auto Repair.” Were you --did you participate in the meeting and the vote to drop the condemnation action? A. I don’t remember. Again, it would be a matter of record. Q. SO you have no specific recollection of attending that meeting? 42 A No. Q. Further in the article it says, “But on Thursday Schoemehl said the Grand Center board unanimously followed his recommendation to drop the eminent domain suit against Day. Other Grand Center sites will be scouted for the proposed building, he said.” Did you participate in any discussions with Vince Schoemehl or other board members regarding the alternative sites? A I don’t remember. 114. Defendant Emily Pulitzer was asked to describe her relationship with Aix:Ome partners Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter, GRAND CENTER’s “de facto in-house design firm." Q. How would you describe your relationship with Sing Ho Kim and Heather Woofter? A. When? Q. Currently. A. They’re friends. Q. How long have they been friends? A Maybe three, four years. Vincent Schoemehl in his deposition, and without being asked, offered this about Pulitzer, Kim and Woofter. ." .. and either prior to or subsequent to that, Emily Pulitzer and -- and Sung Ho Kim and his wife, Heather Woofter (sic), have become -- Woofter have become pretty good friends.” Sung Ho Kim in his deposition was questioned about the friendship. Q. What about with Ms. Pulitzer, do you still have communications or contacts with her? A. Yes, Q. In what context? A Personal, She’s a friend of the family Later Kim was asked, “Have you received any types of remuneration or grants founded by Ms. Pulitzer or her foundations?” He testified that Emily Pulitzer gave him $8,000 for his last book, Spatial Practice. 115. In her deposition, Defendant Emily Pulitzer was asked if she was familiar with the Plaintiff’s installation Marshall McLuhan meets Josephine Baker, which the Plaintiff had projected onto the exterior walls of the Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts museum building. She was presented with Group Exhibit 7: emails between the PFA executive director 43 Matthias Waschek and the Plaintiff detailing their collaboration on the installation. Pulitzer testified that she had no recollection of the project. Her testimony follows: Q. Do you recall an installation that was done at First Night of 2000 --I guess we would call it 2004 or ‘05, projection installation on the Pulitzer Foundation? A I wasn’t there. Q. Were you aware that there was a projection done on the Pulitzer Foundation at that time? A I don’t remember. Q. At that time your executive director was Matthias Waschek; is that correct? A Correct. Q. Before I forget, is there -can you tell me where Matthias Waschek might be contacted? A He’s the director of the Worcester Art Museum in Worcester, Massachusetts. Q. Thank you. (plaintiff’s Exhibit 7 was marked for identification.) (Guzzardo) Let me present you what is a thread of e-mails, if you might take a look at the exhibit. Q. Do you recall seeing any of these e-mails at the time? A No. Q. Do you recall whether or not Matthias provided you with either orally or written summaries regarding the nature of this projection project? A No. Q. Do you recall any discussions with Matthias or Vince Schoemehl regarding this installation? A I don’t recall the installation. Q. Had the exterior Pulitzer museum been used for projection projects prior to First Night 2004? A I don’t remember. I don’t remember. Q. It has been used subsequently, of course? A Oh, it’s been used frequently. In an email to the Plaintiff dated November 09, 2004, Waschek wrote, “I will give Emmy the complete dossier on your project. So will have to wait until 1 get the information you will send me later on this week. Thanks and talk to you soon Matthias." The email is attached hereto and incorporated herein, marked as Exhibit C. 116. In her deposition, Defendant Emily Pulitzer was asked about Marshall McLuhan and Father Walter Ong. She feigned disinterest in these men, and the new media heritage site where she built her museum. A. I’m specifically referring to that section regarding the language that says that the parties will prepare a prospective program and content summary for the Media Box with an emphasis on the scholarly media and communications heritage of St. Louis University’s theorists Marshall McLuhan and Father Walter Ong. At the time of the contract were you familiar with Marshall McLuhan and Walter Ong? A. I never met either of them. 44 Q. Were you aware of their writings? A. I was aware that they had written. I have not read their writings. Q. Were you aware of the role of Marshall McLuhan and Walter Ong in the study of media art and communications? A. Yes. Q. Okay. Did you have any occasion to discuss the role of these individuals with Vincent Schoemehl and the impact they would have on Grand Center? A. I don’t remember. Q. Did you have any conversations with Vincent Schoemehl about Marshall McLuhan and about the writings of Marshall McLuhan? A. I doubt it. Q. Did you have any conversations with your former, 1 believe it would have been executive director of PFA, Matthias Waschek --is that how you pronounce his last name? A. Yes, yes. Q. --regarding Marshall McLuhan or Father Walter Ong? A. I doubt it. 117. In her deposition, Pulitzer was presented with three exhibits that referenced the post condemnation! Media Box events. Deposition Exhibit 11 was the January 2007 email thread between the Plaintiff and Vincent Schoemehl, in which, at Schoemehl’s request, Plaintiff updated his resume and provided a summary proposal for the all-district lighting program. Deposition Exhibit 12 consisted of the minutes of the March 15, 2007 GRAND CENTER


executive committee meeting. Deposition Exhibit 13 was an architectural proposal for stabilizing the brunt church from architects Skibbe Uhlig, Inc. When asked about Exhibit 11, Ms. Pulitzer said she had not seen it. When shown the March 15, 2007 executive committee meeting minutes, and asked who had made the motion to enter into the loan with lender to stabilize the church, she answered that she had. When asked if that meeting had included any discussion about the Plaintiff, the Media Box, and the burnt church as a potential and alternative site for the Media Box, she testified “I don’t think so.” When asked if the loan had been repaid in full, she said she did not know. She was then presented with Exhibit 13, which addressed the church 45 repair. It is captioned, “re: proposed transformation for: Phoenix Art Forum 620 Spring Avenue St. Louis Mo.” She was asked if she was “familiar with the term the Phoenix Art Forum?” She answered no. 118. Defendant EMILY PULITZER was asked in her deposition to describe the mechanics of installing the “Burnt Church Lamp Project” and the other Community Light Projects that the PFA sponsored. She testified: “We went to three curators in St. Louis; Robin Clark who was the contemporary curator at the St. Louis Art Museum, Matt Strauss who heads White Flag, and the curator at the Contemporary Museum. Our feeling was that we were not familiar with young artists’ work and they were, and we asked them each to nominate artists for this project. And Robin Clark of the St. Louis Art Museum suggested Ann Lislegaard who had a projection on our back wall of a video she had made and Sebastian Hungerer and Rainer Kehres from Germany who did the Bumt Church project.”Asked when she decided to install the Community Light Projects, she testified that it was after the Dan Flavin Constructed Light exhibition was installed at the PFA. The Flavin exhibition opened February 1, 2008. Only after that did she decide to install the other light projects. A. The Flavin exhibition came first, and the idea for the Constructed Light project came because the natural light, which normally flows into our building, what was occurring at night was the light from the Flavin installation was flowing out. And that provided the idea that we would commission light projects in the Grand Center area from younger artists. Q. Just for clarity, so the Dan Flavin exhibition had been installed A. Correct. Q.--in the PFA? A. Correct.” 119. The final line of deposition questions directed to the Defendant Pulitzer involved GRAND CENTER directorships. She was asked if she had been a director of CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION and VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION on March of 2007. She answered no. When 46 presented with the VSRC and CCRC Annual Registration Reports filed with the Missouri Secretary of State, which list her as a director of both corporations from 2005 through 2010, she acknowledged that she was a director. Asked why she was not listed in the fillings for 2011 and thereafter, she indicated that she did not know. The pertinent transcript passage follows: Q. Were you on the boards of Vandeventer-Spring Redevelopment Corporation at that time? A No. Q. You were not on the board of Vandeventer-Spring Redevelopment Corporation at that time? A No. Q. Were you on the board of City Center Redevelopment Corporation at that time? A No. MR.. GUZZARDO: Let’s do this as a group exhibit. (plaintiff’s Exhibit 15 was marked for identification.) Q. (By Mr. Guzzardo) Mrs. Pulitzer, I want to give you what is marked as Plaintiff’s Group Exhibit Number 15, and it purports to be a series of filings with Secretary of State Robin Carnahan for 2006 and 2007 of Vandeventer-Spring Redevelopment Corporation and City Center Redevelopment Corporation. If you just take a moment and look at that. A Well, I guess this indicates I was a member of the City Center Redevelopment Corporation. Q. Do you recall when you first became a director of City Center? A I didn’t recall I was on it. Q. Do you have any recollection on your current status as it applies to City Center Corporation A I don’t think I’m a member. Q. --or Vandeventer-Spring, okay. Do you have any recollection of resigning from either of those two boards? A No, but this is all a matter of record. 120. Defendant Emily Pulitzer Pulitzer’s deposition demonstrates how she induced GRAND CENTER to breach the contract, rendered the contract performance impossible, and blotted out the Plaintiff and his design protocol from GRAND CENTER, and elsewhere in the City of St. Louis, all to the damage of the Plaintiff. Pulitzer was not 47 acting in the capacity of a private citizen but as an agent for the sovereign when she decided to take Gentle Day’s property. The sovereign has two powers. It can take your body or your property. Day’s tire shop was across the street from her park, a little gem that she designed. But like any “sovereign” this collector needed a public use rationale. She came to the plaintiff for that. When it blew up, and things got too messy to grab the property, she decided to take the Plaintiffs ideas instead. But she didn’t want the Plaintiff: she scrubbed his name off, and blotted out the Marshall McLuhan and Walter Ong heritage marker. It was easier to grab hold of Axial. And it was even easier to get a loan. 121. Defendant Director Pulitzer has violated the Corporation Laws in Missouri. She has breached her fiduciary duty and has conducted the business of the Defendants’ GRAND CENTER Corporations for her own personal benefit. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff, Paul Guzzardo, prays that this Honorable Court enter judgment in his favor and against the Defendant Emily Pulitzer, for compensatory damages in the amount in excess of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00) plus costs of suit, and for such other and further relief as may be just and proper. COUNTS Tortious Inference with Contract and Business Relations NOW COMES Plaintiff and for Count 5 of his Petition against Defendant WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. LOUIS, a corporation, states as follows: 122. Plaintiff incorporates and re-alleges Paragraphs 1 through 121 of his Petition, as if fully set forth herein. 123. WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. Louis is a private research university located in suburban St. Louis, Missouri. It is the recipient of hundreds of millions of 48 dollars in federal research and development funds. The University is made up of seven graduate and undergraduate schools, one of which is the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts. The Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts consists of the College of Art, the College of Architecture and the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum. Carmon Colangelo is the Dean of the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts. 124. As professors in The Sam Fox School College of Architecture Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter are employees of Defendant Washington University St. Louis. Defendant WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. LOUIS through its agents Kim and Woofter intentionally induced GRAND CENTER to breach the Plaintiffs contract, rendered the contract performance impossible, and further tortiously interfered with Plaintiffs business relations elsewhere in GRAND CENTER and the City of St. Louis all to the damages of the Plaintiff. Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter were acting within the scope of their employment when they harmed the Plaintiff. They did this to benefit Defendant WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. LOUIS, and Defendant WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY has benefited materially from Sung Ho Kim’s and Heather Woofter’s conduct. 125. In 2002 Sung Ho Kim was appointed an assistant professor at the Sam Fox College of Architecture, and in 2008 he became a tenured associate professor in that college. Heather Woofter became an assistant professor in Sam Fox The College of Architecture in 2004, and in 2008 she became a tenured associate professor of architecture in 2008. Currently, Woofter is the Chair of the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design at Defendant WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS. Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter are the professional partners of Axi:Ome 49 LLC, a design studio located in St. Louis. Axi:Ome has been in operation since 2000. Kim and Woofter are husband and wife. 126. Defendant Washington University St. Louis actively aided Kim and Woofter in an ongoing campaign to erase any mention of the Media Box, to exclude the Plaintiff from GRAND CENTER development and programming, and to efface and expunge any acknowledgment of St. Louis as an American new media heritage site. Through its media public relations unit Defendant Washington University St. Louis has promoted Kim and Woofter’s completed and ongoing work for GRAND CENTER. The Defendant University Washington University St. Louis has done this to build “the Wash U Brand," and to bolster the Sam Fox School’s reputation as a leading edge, vanguard architectural and urban design institution. The Defendant University has also done this in order to establish PXSTL. PXSTL is a collaborative project with the Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts. 127. PXSTL is a design-build competition collaboratively organized by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. PXSTL’s venue is the GRAND CENTER lot across the street from the Pulitzer Museum, which is owned by the PFA. PXSTL was launched in March 2013, the same month that Sung Ho Kim was deposed in the earlier lawsuit. The Defendant Washington University St. Louis News Room issued the following press release about PXSTL. The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis have launched a new collaborative project. “Our vision for PXSTL is to create a dialogue about urban life and how environment has a profound impact on our day today experience. Architecture, design, and art play an important role in our decisions-how we navigate, where we spend time, and our impressions of the spaces we inhabit,” said Kristina Van Dyke, the Pulitzer’s Director. 50”PXSTL represents the collaborative culture of our School and the arts in St. Louis, bringing together art, architecture, and design in a way that makes a meaningful contribution to the community,” said Carmon Colangelo, Dean of the Sam Fox School and the E. Desmond Lee Professor for Collaboration in the Arts. “Washington University is committed to public art beyond our own Art on Campus program, and Leslie Markle, Curator for Public Art, has been instrumental in executing these efforts.” Opportunities for innovative and interdisciplinary practice, offering Washington University students unique, and practical learning experiences. New and unexpected public access for visitors and stakeholders, increasing Grand Center’s visibility as a destination neighborhood and urban arts hub National and international attention for the Grand Center neighborhood as a design forward example of urban opportunity and growth. The project site is an undeveloped and vacant lot owned by the Pulitzer Foundation located at 3713 and 3719 Washington Boulevard. Situated in the heart of Grand Center, it lies directly across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation’s building, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Tadao Ando. 128. Sung Ho Kim was deposed on March 1,2013. In his deposition Kim engaged in a pattern of serial mendacity. The perjury was done to benefit Defendant Washington University St. Louis, to avoid anything that would discredit PXSTL, to advance the Sam Fox School’s reputation, and to curry favor with Emily Pulitzer. Kim’s deposition testimony demonstrates the great lengths Defendant University was willing to go to in order to tortiously interfere with the Plaintiffs business relations in GRAND CENTER and elsewhere. Selections from Kim’s deposition follow. 129. Sung Ho Kim was asked in his deposition about the Plaintiff’s qualifications and background in digital media. Q. What expertise did Mr. Guzzardo have that made him qualified to work on this Media Box development? A. Financial. And he was just, he had some interesting things to propose. Q. Are you aware of him having any training or work experience in digital media? A. No Kim’s answer “no” was ludicrous. Plaintiff and Kim met in December of 2002. At that time the Plaintiff was under contract with St. Louis Arts and Transit to develop a conceptual model for the use of digital media in a half billion dollar St. Louis light rail extension. The Plaintiff introduced himself to Kim with that public transit portfolio. In his deposition the Plaintiff testified that he was hired “ to come up with some of the new technologies that might be used to 51 create a new arts and transit model for the expansion, extension of that MetroLink." This Metro project is detailed in Displaced: Llonch + Vidalle Architecture, a book that the Plaintiff co-authored with internationally acclaimed architect/urbanist Michael Sorkin, and two other prominent architects. Following is an excerpt from Displaced : Llonch + Vidalle Architecture that describes the MetroLink project concept: The system proposed would be incorporated into an eight-station expansion of St. Louis’s light rail system, which is scheduled to begin construction this fall. This prototype which is based upon a study of the transit experience begins to suggest a scalable, flexible system that can be adapted to various light rail station environments. It is designed to act as an accessory, and insertion, into an already advanced and evolved station design. Its use is not limited to platforms/ enclosures, though it can be installed there; it can also be applied to then surrounding environments. Content from many sources can be programmed on the installation’s screens/panels. Through its scalable skeletal triangular design, it proposes how the visual variety and character of neighborhoods and communities served by the light rail system might be incorporated in to each station. In addition to this light-rail project material the Plaintiff showed Kim a mix of print and multimedia documentation relating to earlier work: his internationally published media night club Cabool, his street media lab, and his mixed-media theatre productions. 130. When he met Kim, the Plaintiff was also the president of MediaArts Alliance, a Missouri not-for-profit foundation that had been in existence for 20 years. MediaArts Alliance was well known throughout St. Louis and Missouri; representatives of the major educational institution in St. Louis served on its board of directors. The mission of MediaArts as stated on the organization’s web site follows: Media ARTS mission is the examination of the spatial implications of Digital Convergence. Digital Convergence, this interchangeability, interactivity, and interconnectedness of data, broadcasting, telephony, film, music, education and imaging will alter the places where we congregate. We will meet, share our stories, and build community in media saturated environments. Who will determine the nature of these environments? What criteria will they use to decide what these places will look and feel like? These are the issues MediaARTS is examining in the Media Lab. 52 Over the years the MediaARTS Alliance provided funds for the Plaintiffs projects and the research and development of his protocol. The MediaArts Alliance was behind the Media Box from the start. The MediaArts Alliance paid Sung Ho Kim to build a model of the Media Box, and it also helped fund Marshall McLuhan Meets Josephine Baker. When asked in his deposition about MediaArts Alliance backing of the Media Box, Kim gave this reply. I told him (plaintiff) there is an empty vial. We don’t know what the program is, And he (guzzardo) said, oh, maybe I could start a foundation for media whatever group and I could fund that part, And that’s how It became this unknown program. It’s for the, you know, media foundation or research. However not only was there “a media foundation," Kim was elected to its board of the foundation. Kim was a director of Media Arts Alliance. His answer was contrived nonsense. 131. Shortly after they met, the Plaintiff suggested to Kim that they submit a joint proposal to the Regional Arts Commission., which was in the process of finishing a new building. RAC had recently issued an open call for submissions for, an east wall public art structure/ installation. Kim and the Plaintiff submitted a joint proposal to RAC on January 23, 2003. The following excerpt is from the Guzzardo - Kim proposal, for an interactive media wall. ...a media wall as an integrated, permanent work specifically designed for the eastern wall of the Regional Arts Commission’s new Cultural Resource Center Building. This media wall installation will act as the direct delivery mechanism for works of digital art, such as interactive sound and video experiences and in other cases, it will deliver cultural/arts information about local arts projects, dance performances, symphony programs, etc.” A line of jointly prepared exhibits accompanied the RAC proposal. The exhibits detailed Kim’s and Plaintiff’s respective work. Kim was asked about the submission in his deposition, and he was presented with the RAC submission documents. He testified that he didn’t remember 53 any of it. It was all wiped out. It did not fit into Kim’s resume, or Defendant Washington University’s “brand management plan." An excerpt from Kim’s deposition follows. Q. Okay. In this email from Paul to you he is referencing a Media Wall proposal that it looks like


submitted to the Regional Arts Commission? A. Um-hum. Q. Did you work with him on that proposal? A. To tell you the truth, I don’t remember this one. If he has an image of it I will remember it, but at the time I was doing several projects. And this was like one of few, you know what I mean, so I don’t really remember what it was. I could have given him something I was working on to say he could use it. This is what most designers do, they propose something. So they have a lot of projects, it’s like in our archives and we send it out to people to, you know, try to get interest. Q. Okay. A. So I could have just done it, you know/not really knowing what I was doing. I could have just given anything that was in my file. Q. Sure, okay. (Defendant Exhibit C, 1/24/2003 Document, was then marked for identification.) Q. I’m handing you what I’ve marked Exhibit C. It looks like a letter dated January 24th, 2003. It says to East Wall Public Art, Regional Arts Commission. It says it’s from Ax:Ome (sic) and it probably should be Axi:Ome? A. Urn-hum. Q. And Paul Guzzardo. I guess I want to know did you provide any of this information to Paul? A. No, I didn’t provide any of the Q. Do you remember anything along those lines? A. Actually, I don’t. To tell you the truth, I don’t remember. I don’t remember this. Q. Okay. In the second paragraph it says, “Axi:Ome and Paul Guzzardo have in the past examined ways in which digital media elements can be integrated with infrastructure and adapted to meet various physical and operational constraints.” A. I didn’t write that, so I don’t know. 54 132. Shortly after meeting Kim, the Plaintiff introduced him to Sonya Pelli. Pelli was the manager of Internet Services and the Community Information Network for St. Louis. Pelli and the Plaintiff had worked together on public media installations in the Washington Avenue Loft District, and Pelli had assisted the Plaintiff in an effort to develop a media plaza at the intersection of Washington Avenue and Tucker Street. Together Pelli and Plaintiff created “stlvirtualpark," a new media installation with accompanying website, which received a Millennium Communities designation from the White House designated. Pelli in an introductory meeting, reviewed these projects with Kim. When asked in his deposition, however, if he had ever met the city administrator Sonya Pelli, Kim answered ‘’No’’. 133. In the spring of 2003 the Plaintiff was invited to give a paper at an urban design and network technology conference, held at the University of Nottingham in the UK. In the paper, which was titled New Media Literacy in the Smart City, the Plaintiff described his media lab and protocol development, providing the following as context: All of this took place at a street comer. The comer is only a brisk walk from where Marshall McLuhan served as professor of Rhetoric and Interpretation at St. Louis University and where McLuhan’s colleague Father Walter Ong wrote Orality and Literacy. Just a few blocks from where Minoru Yamasaki built his once highly acclaimed public housing project Pruitt-Igoe, and where Yamasaki’s first building fell down. Before leaving for the conference, the Plaintiff sent this paper to Sung Ho Kim for comments, Kim’s 3/26/2003 email response follows: “the paper was good......i liked it alot it had english humor like the archigram group......i didn’t know Marshall McLuhan lived and taught at stl amazing best, sbk However, when asked about the McLuhan - St. Louis connection in his deposition, Kim claimed that he had been aware of McLuhan’s work in St. Louis. 55 Q. Was that a revelation to you that Marshall McLuhan had been a professor at St. Louis University? A. No. Q. You knew that? A. Yeah. Kim chose not to identify the Plaintiff as the source of his knowledge about McLuhan’s work in St. Louis, because that would complicate things. The Washington University press office, the GRAND CENTER promotional material, and the PFA never, ever mention the McLuhan - St. Louis connection because it’s too dangerous. To mention this connection would risk others connecting dots, dots that lead to the Plaintiff and the Media Box contract. It is better to forfeit an American heritage site than to risk this. 134. Kim’s memory failed again, when he was asked if he had ever seen the Media Box contract. The Media Box contract negotiations involved a lengthy email exchange. The Media Box contract, with its various revisions, was attached to a number of individual messages in this email exchange. Most of the emails were between the Plaintiff and Eric Friedman, but Kim was copied on some of them. One such message follows. To: Sung Ho Kim (sungho@architecture.wust1. edu); Subject:-FW: 3699 Olive Option Contract-the tread Date: Thursday, March 11,2004 1:53:00 PM Attachments: 3699 Olive Opt Contract clean 03-04-04.doc Sungho Been out But have been dealing with the Contract Here’s the tread of emails - note at Eric’s suggestion the following language has been added important..... When asked if he had ever seen the contract, however, Kim answered as follows: Q. Are you aware that in March 2004 Paul entered an Option Contract with some of the Defendants in this case? A. I heard about it, but I didn’t - 56 Q. Did you ever see a copy of the Option Contract? A. Never seen it. 135. The surreal character of Kim’s deposition testimony continued. When asked, “Did you attend any presentations or lectures where Paul discussed the Media Box?” Kim answers “No." When asked “Did Paul ever talk to you about something called the Media Lab, sort of a precursor to the Media Box.," Kim answered ‘’No’’. In fact, Kim was in attendance at multiple presentations in which the Plaintiff discussed the Media Lab as a working prototype for the Media Box. Presentations were not only in GRAND CENTER, and at St. Louis University, but in Axi:Ome’s office. Presentations were given to Kim’s own staff, and his staff participated in post-presentation Q & A. All of the individuals deposed in the earlier action testified that Sung Ho Kim was present when the Plaintiff discussed the Media Box and the Media Lab. Further, Kim and the Plaintiff authored a joint paper about the Media Box and the Lab. The paper, Thickening the Word and The Return of the Trickster, was presented at the Media Ecology Association Convention at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York. The following extended excerpt is from the Guzzardo-Kim paper: The Media Box is a prototype information age structure. It is to be located in St. Louis’s arts and entertainment district - Grand Center, situated across from two modern architectural landmarks: The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. It is also sited two blocks from St. Louis University where Walter Ong lived and wrote, and where Ong’s teacher Marshall McLuhan taught from 1937 through 1944. The Grand Center Media Box is currently in the design phase. Multiple projection screens and audio systems will be integrated into the building’s interior and exterior surfaces. Digital imaging technology systems will be incorporated and configured into the building’s facades. These technologies will allow information and images to be viewed and heard from multiple sectors of the building. The site allows large outdoor displays with long viewing distances. Visual imaging and audio systems will display and amplify the building content and program on the Media Box’s facades. 57 The Media Box will inject information networks and their virtual communities into a rich dimensional public realm. Mingling on line operators and communities with a streetscape audience will create a new urban social space. One of the co-presenters ran a St. Louis media arts lab from 1999 through 2001. The lab occupied a windowed first floor comer in a downtown building, where various applications and delivery systems were showcased 24/7. Housed in the lab was a changing inventory of fat data pipes, computers, photo imaging and editing equipment, projectors, screens and monitor walls. The artists who manned the lab, or virtual ambient jockeys as they were called, offered passers-by a chance to watch digital media types at work. They used digital collage techniques as they sampled the riches of data banks and networks. Their work - the evening’s digital amalgam - was projected on screens and monitor walls facing the street Cameras inside, looking out on the street, added an interactive face. The topical subject matter included meditations on film and digital editing; digital representation of art-science practice; the effect of IT on social organization; 9/11; the millennium, comic books; and Orwellian media culture. The lab was a stage for an ongoing “info age” critique. It played out over and over, night after night. It was also a viewing station into a networked city. It was an ocular device offering a line of sight into tangled virtual information infrastructures and street comers. The goal is to resume and to move the critique and “the watch” to new quarters. 136. The political and racial firestorm provoked by the Post Dispatch article on Gentle Day and the Media Box effectively blew up a project that Kim had been working on for a year and a half. However, when Kim was asked about the article he said he had never bothered to read it. His testimony follows: A...the article about Grand Center and Paul. a. Well, let’s establish this. Is your memory about particular events regarding this particular project somewhat foggy today? A. No. Some details are foggy, but I believe, personally I believe it ended when the article came out between Paul and Eric Friedman. a. So you believe there was some connection between the end of this project and the publication of that article? A. Yes. a. But you don’t particularly remember the information conveyed in that article; right? A. No. I never read the article. a. Never read the article? A. Yeah. a. Even though there was some issue that developed with this project being affected by the publication of that article you didn’t choose to go back and look at it yourself? A. No, because for me it was always a speculative project. it wasn’t a big deal that it would end. 137. It serves Defendant Washington University’s agenda to advance the fiction that the Media Box was a “speculative project,” and Kim repeatedly employs this pretense in 58 his deposition. Kim continued to stick to this fictitious script when he was questioned about project cost estimates for the Media Box. When asked if he had “any knowledge about the costs associated with developing the Media Box project to completion?," Kim answered ‘’No’’, adding that he never calculated square footage, or what construction costs would be. But there are emails and exhibits in the earlier pre-trial depositions detailing Media Box project square-footage calculations. Kim participated in these calculations. Schoemehl testified that Plaintiff provided GRAND CENTER with Media Box square-footage calculations, and that after Schoemehl reviewed these calculation documents /figures: ..we started talking about trying to maybe vacate the street to give it more square footage without any real incremental cost and perhaps add some additional units so that there - you know, so there could be some additional revenue. 138. In 2009 Kim and Woofter published the architectural monograph Axi:Ome- Specular between Practice and Education. Bruce Lindsey, Dean of the School of Architecture at Sam Fox, wrote an introductory essay. Twenty pages of the book - images and text - are devoted to the Media Box-but there’s been a name change: the book refers to the project as the Media Arcade. The Media Box is erased. Kim was asked about this. Q. And did you rename it to Media Arcade? A. Yeah. Q. Is that the same thing A. Exactly. Q. -- as the Media Box? A. Yes. Q. Okay. But Media Arcade is based upon Media Box? A. Yes. Q. Okay. What was Heather’s involvement, if any, in the Media Box project? A. She designed the architecture part. That’s hard to explain. And it was her idea about becoming a Media Arcade. The reason is - should I go into detail? Q. Yeah, go ahead and tell me, 59 A. Okay. Before, Media Box was just projection around. Media Arcade is that when you cantilever a building you get the dark spots on the ground so we Imagined that you could project onto the ground and kids could come and play video games, projections going up to the ceiling and the ground It became an arcade, a public space to play games and other media events. The problem is that the model pictured in Axi:Ome’ book - the model labeled the Media Arcade - is the model that the Media Arts foundation paid Kim to build. It’s the same model that the Plaintiff and Kim presented to a roomful of people in 2004 at the PFA. Defendant Pulitzer was shown a three-page photocopied excerpt from the Axi:Ome monograph. She testified as follows: Q. (By Mr. Guzzardo) If you’d please take a look at Exhibit Number 6 which is a series of images of an architectural project. A. Yes. Q. There’s a model in those images. Is that the model in which you were presented at the meeting we’ve discussed of the PFA? A. I suppose so. 139. Kim attempted every which way to explain the name change. He testified, “Actually, what I did with Paul has never been published. I only published things that was done after Paul.” The problem is the date stamped on the Media Arcade model in his book, which says 2004 - the same year the Media Box was designed and the contract was entered into. Kim justified the name change by claiming that Axi:Ome had come up with “a new idea." Kim says the new idea was about, ." .a public space to play games and other media events." This, however, was an “old idea”: the gaming arcade component was explicitly proposed by the Plaintiff in a number of 2004 and 2005 memorandums and meetings. This excerpt from the July 2004 Media Box Quarterly Report was submitted by the Plaintiff to Defendant GRAND CENTER Corporations, pursuant to Paragraph 5 of the Option Contract: INTERNET MULTI - USER GAMING MODEL The Media Box needs to mingle on line ‘’video game” operators and on line communities with streetscape audiences and players. This mix will permit the Media Box to become both a destination and a jumping off point for legions of garners and their virtual counterparts. By injecting information networks and their 60 virtual communities into a rich dimensional public realm, we believe the Media Box can begin to create a new social space in Grand Center. People want to be with their friends in public spaces. Video gaming is a social experience. It is also becoming the primary economic engine for entertainment and interactive technologies. Housing a media arts lab and a multi-user gaming facility in the same building permits a dynamic and creative conversation. It is a conversation that is particularly appropriate to a public art and entertainment district and its constituency. Combining both digital artists and gaming communities in the Media Box will provoke a dialogue between critical thinking artists and all that digital razzmatazz. It will offer a dynamic interactive configuration to a building, to a street and to the community. 140. Axi:Ome-Specular Between Practice and Education continues with a “Stalinesque flair” by altering the original graphic content displayed in the Media Box’s presentation drawings. The initial presentation drawings included graphics from SECRET: The Josephine Baker FBI Files. SECRET was one of the Plaintiffs protocol research and development projects: a multimedia project cycle that critiqued big data and the national security state. Eric Friedman testified that the Plaintiffs Secret Multimedia cycle and the Media Box and were “intertwined." Kim and Woofter ditched all that in their Media Box-Media Arcade shell game. They scrubbed the SECRET presentation facades from their book, replacing theses with anodyne corporate cutouts and paste-ons. Particularly galling is the chapter on SECRET in Axi:Ome-Specular Between Practice and Education. The chapter, called “secret stage, bastian center_st. louis_mo_usa," is in the book because Kim and Woofter worked on SECRET, along with a couple dozen others. They were hired by the St. Louis Community College District to design the stage sets for the Plaintiff’s multimedia play. That play was a part - one piece of the SECRET cycle - a cycle that ran for more than two years. Kim and Woofter included SECRET set designs and photographs in their book, but they erected a wall between their SECRET chapter, and their Media Arcade fantasy chapter. To acknowledge the relationship would complicate things, and mess up the Defendant Washington University’s branding plan. Some SECRET web-copy follows. It offers a glimpse into an essence of the Media Box, 61 and just what got gutted in the book, and sacked by Defendant Washington University of St. Louis. SECRET is a cycle of multimedia productions. Cycle of productions are culled from the FBI files of Josephine Baker, Walter Winchell, and J. Edgar Hoover. Fashioned out of “net accessible” documents, this multimedia mosaic makes theater and public art out of a 1950’s surveillance data bank. The faded and scratched up documents with their numbing bureaucratic entries and crudely blotted out paragraphs are the residue of government surveillance files. Each iteration tells a little-known story of art, politics, race, and media power that reverberates with some of the most important themes of 20th-century America. These files contain haunting microfiche memos,


telegrams, newspaper clippings and photos, that tell how Josephine Baker, the famous expatriate African American performer was pursued by the FBI. DataBank - Agit Prop is a storytelling strategy. It propels this cycle of SECRET multimedia productions. As a visual and narrative grammar it does not ignore the incomprehensibility of exploding data systems. Fifty years ago surveillance meant “Big Brother," and a “Dramatist/Artist” might well have used these surveillance files to fashion the “Script” and be done with it. But fifty years ago when Baker, Hoover and Winchell tangoed, the ceaseless accretion of digital information and imagery were not part of the scene. Now they are. 141. To better track the web of lies, understand how Defendant Washington University of St. Louis made use of those lies, and pinpoint what the University knew, and when they knew it, it’s necessary to reference two other individuals. One is Angela Miller, the other is Jasmin Aber. Angela Miller introduced the Plaintiff and Sung Ho Kim in 2002. Miller is an art historian and a professor in the Defendant’s Department of Art History & Archaeology. Professor Miller was familiar with the Plaintiffs work, and his collaborations, over the years with a number of Washington University students and faculty. Miller thought Kim and the Plaintiff shared a common sensibility, and were a good fit. 142. The Plaintiff met Jasmin Aber shortly after GRAND CENTER dismissed the Gentle Day condemnation action. Jasmin Aber, a licensed architect, was associated with The Shrinking Cities International Research Network, out of UC Berkeley’s Center for Global Metropolitan Studies. She was in St. Louis working on “creative communities and 62 urban design strategies." From June of 2005 through June of 2006, the Plaintiff and Aber engaged in on an going and lively conversation. Plaintiff reviewed his new media urban design projects, shared copies of his papers with Aber, and kept her abreast of his activities at the Geddes Institute for Urban Research, at the University of Dundee Scotland. In response to this continuing exchange, Ms. Aber indicated that she wanted to work with the Plaintiff to organize an interactive media urban design competition in St. Louis, which would allow Aber and the Plaintiff to further developed their research. The competition would be set downtown St. Louis, near where the Plaintiff’s media lab had operated. The competition would be arranged around the architectural conceit “The Folly." “The Folly” is a very old architectural tool, a visual trick of sorts. 143. Out of nowhere, Jasmin Aber suddenly told the Plaintiff that he could not participate, or be associated with the Folly competition. She said the decision was not hers, and that she had no choice in the matter. She told him that if the competition was going to happen, it could not in any way be linked or identified with the Plaintiff in anyway. Leslie Laskey, professor emeritus in Defendant Washington University’s architectural school, helped raise money for the Folly competition. To the best knowledge, information and belief Leslie Laskey vetoed the Plaintiff’s involvement in the St. Louis Follies Idea Competition. 144. The St. Louis Follies Idea Competition took place in December 2006. The Director of Planning & Urban Design Agency for St. Louis, Rollin Stanley, said this about the competition. “The Follies Competition would be part of the information supplied to the Master Plan team from the Gateway Arch and that once the Plan is complete, we hope to then start attracting sponsors to fund 63 designs.” Jasmin Aber ran the Competition in partnership with Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter. Defendant Washington University St. Louis was a sponsor, and promoted the competition. The competition brief was widely distributed, and included language almost word for word used earlier to describe the Media Box and the Plaintiffs downtown media lab. Excerpted text follows: The St. Louis Follies sought to generate ideas for the Gateway Mall, a large open space located downtown along Market Street, immediately west of the Gateway Arch. Projects would serve as “visual anchors” for the area, highlighting the interplay between the physical and the virtual, while also facilitating public movement between the Arch and the downtown business district promote St. Louis as a cutting-edge place, inviting the creative multimedia industries to the area and region -an interplay between the physical and the virtual -incorporate emerging technologies -encompass the role that innovation and technology play in shaping our living spaces and working lives; 145. Prior to the commencement of the Follies competition the Defendant Washington University was advised that the Plaintiff had initiated the competition, and that he was forced out against his will. On December of 5, 2006 Professor Angela Miller delivered a package to Carmon Colangelo, Dean of the Sam Fox School. The package contained documents referencing the Follies competition, the Plaintiffs role in setting up the competition, and the Plaintiff’s praxis. A cover letter from Professor Miller to Dean Colangelo accompanied the package. It follows in its entirety: December 5,2006 Carmon Colangelo Dean, Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts Dear Carmon: I’m writing to you, informally, on behalf of a friend of mine, someone I have known for twenty years. 64 Paul Guzzardo is a retired lawyer who has been very active internationally and nationally in the design field, both as a theorist and as a designer, in collaboration with a number of architects. Over the past decade he has been actively theorizing new ways of using interactive digital media as a form of critical engagement with urban space. I write because an event that is cosponsored by the Sam Fox School-the Saint Louis Follies competition, organized by Jasmin Aber-involves issues of intellectual property pertaining to Paul’s published ideas and collaborations with other institutions. Paul has been cut out of the jury for this event, which includes two School of Architecture faculty (Eric Mumford and Sungho Kim). I am not privy to the politics behind this decision, but I do think you should be aware of the possible infringements of his intellectual property that this exclusion involves. Paul moved to Buenos Aires recently, a move in part inspired by his sense of discouragement with the collaborative environment in St. Louis. I’m not at all sure of the appropriate response on the part of the School. I’m doing this for an old friend who feels, justifiably, that his theoretical engagements and formative ideas have not been properly acknowledged by those who are currently building upon them, most notably his Grand Center Media Box project. Though unrealized, this project is well known to the various parties involved with Grand Center, from Emily Pulitzer to Vincent Schoemehl and others. Intellectual property rights is a notoriously difficult thing to establish; it would be nice if the final event would in some way acknowledge Paul’s efforts to push St. Louis in new directions urbanistically over the past decade. I am also forwarding the following from Professor Lorens Holm, who taught at the School in the 1980s, and who now lives and works in Dundee, Scotland, after receiving a Ph.D. in Architectural theory from the Architectural Association in London. Lorens and Paul are longtime collaborators: It appears to me that Paul’s name has been removed from association with a competition that has been based to a large extent upon his creative works in St. Louis and abroad. These concern the exploration, in words, images, and multi-media installations, of new possible forms of engagement with the city based on the construction of agit prop-like digital media platforms. I quote, for example, from the competition poster, ‘to energize Market Street using flexible multimedia open space exhibition infrastructures’ (sic). He has been involved with Grand Centre for a number of years now in studying possible ways to implement these media platforms in downtown St. Louis. I am concerned both for Paul, for the fair use and acknowledgement of his intellectual property; and because Paul has been involved in a number of collaborative projects with the Geddes Institute for Urban Research at the University of Dundee, of which I am director. These projects are original interactions with, or are original developments from, his ideas; and their integrity as creative practice led research, depends to a certain extent, upon the originality of his ideas. I know you will be meeting with (or have already met with) the jury members of the Architectural Follies competition. Because of the personal politics, I would appreciate not becoming directly involved; also because I am admittedly only an observer in this situation. But I am fairly certain that an injustice has been done here, and would like to do my small part to make sure that the School, as a cosponsor of this event, knows the longer history of these ideas. Thank you Carmon. All the best, Angela 65 Angela Miller Art History and Archaeology Department 146. Dean Carmon Colangelo did no responded to Professor Miller’s letter. Nor did any representative of Defendant contact Lorens Holm, or any representative of the University of Dundee, Scotland. The much publicized competition took place. The winners received cash stipends. The Defendant Washington University issued a press announcement on Jan. 26, 2007. It was headlined: Three teams from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts took top honors in the recent St. Louis Gateway Mall Follies Ideas Competition. The press announcement was written by Liam Otten, Art News Director for the University News Room. An excerpt follows: Three teams from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts took top honors in the recent St. Louis Gateway Mall Follies Ideas Competition. The St. Louis Follies Competition was conceived by Jasmin Aber, an architect and visiting scholar at the University of California Berkeley, as an outgrowth of the Market Street Charrette, an intensive, weekend long design session sponsored last October by the St. Louis Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AlA). Aber organized the follies competition with Heather Woofter and Sung Ho Kim - both assistant professors of architecture as well as principals of the firm Axi:Ome llc. All three served on the competition jury, which Aber chaired. 147. On September 9, 2013 Liam Otten, Art News Director of the Washington University News Room, wrote Q&A: Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter Architects discuss technology, building a practice and designing new facilities for St. Louis Public Radio. The article was distributed by the Defendant’s multiple media outlets. There’s a picture of the Media Box in Otten’s article, and just like Kim and Woofter’s book it is labeled the Media Arcade, Grand Center, St. Louis, and is dated 2004. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff, PAUL GUZZARDO, prays that this Honorable Court enter judgment in his favor and against the Defendant WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. LOUIS, 66 for compensatory damages in the amount in excess of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00) plus costs of suit, and for such other and further relief as may be just and proper. COUNT 6 Failure to Exercise Reasonable Professional Care NOW COMES Plaintiff and for Count 6 of his Petition against Defendant CALLIS PAPA HALE & SZEWCZYK & , PC, a corporation, and states as follows: 148. The Plaintiff incorporates and re-alleges Paragraphs 1 through 147 of his Petition, as if fully set forth herein. 149. In 2007 Defendant CALLIS PAPA HALE & SZEWCZYK & , PC, hereafter referred to as Defendant CALLIS, undertook to provide legal services for the Plaintiff in connection with an option contract that the Plaintiff earlier entered into with the GRAND CENTER Corporations. At all time Defendant CALLIS held itself out as competent in the area of law dealing with the legal matter for which the Plaintiff retained the services of Defendant. 150. The Plaintiff and Defendant CALLIS acted under an attorney client relationship in which Defendant undertook to represent the Plaintiff. 151. Defendant CALLIS was required to exercise the same legal skill as a reasonably competent attorney, and to use reasonable care in determining and implementing a strategy to be followed to achieve the Plaintiffs legal goals. 152. As a fiduciary of the Plaintiff, Defendant CALLIS was obligated to treat all information relating to a the Plaintiffs representation as confidential and to zealously 67 represent the Plaintiffs interests, including disclosure of any conflicts of interest that might impair the Defendant CALLIS’s ability to represent the Plaintiff. 153. In the course of handling the legal matter for the Plaintiff, Defendant negligently failed to act with the degree of competence generally possessed by Attorneys in the State who handle legal matters similar to Plaintiffs. During the course of Defendants’ representation of the Plaintiff, there were several instances wherein the conduct of the Defendants fell below the applicable standard of care, as set forth herein. The chronology of events that follow details the Defendant’s negligence, malpractice, and breached fiduciary duties to Plaintiff . 154. In March 2009 Defendant CALLIS filed a lawsuit against GRAND CENTER Corporation, CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, and VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION in the Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis, Cause No. 0922-CC01036. The Simon Law Firm P.C. entered its appearance as co-counsel. The complaint contained three counts, two for breach of contract and one for negligence. 155. William Zorn the Defendant’s house counsel filed an Answer on April 10,2009. In June 2010 Defendant CALLIS sent Interrogatories and Requests for Production to Defendant GRAND CENTER Corporations. On August 27,2010 the Plaintiff and John Papa of the CALLIS office met with attorney Zorn at the GRAND CENTER’s Washington Avenue office. At that meeting Attorney Zorn pointed to a pile of documents on a table and said, “Here’s what you asked for. Give me a week and I’ll copy, scan and get it all to off to you.” 68 156. At the time of the August 27,2010 meeting the Plaintiff was scheduled to leave the country, and be away for a few months. John Papa told the Plaintiff that “he would email scanned pdf discovery to him just as soon as they were received." The Plaintiff told John Papa he would review the material, and prepare a summary memo. Papa asked Plaintiff to return for Vincent Schoemehl and Emily Pulitzer’ depositions, should their depositions be set before Plaintiff’s planned return. Plaintiff agreed. 157. On October 4, 2010 the Defendant CALLIS emailed the Plaintiff additional production. It consisted of six hundred ninety eight pages of scanned documents. The Plaintiff returned to the country later that month, and met with John Papa at his office on October 25, 2010. While the Plaintiff was still away he and Papa exchanged a series of emails. The emails and the events surrounding their transmission follow: From: Paul Guzzardo [mailto:paulguzzardol@yahoo.com] Sent: Tuesday, September 07,201010:22 AM To: John Papa Subject: any discovery show? From: John Papa <john@callislaw.com> To: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardol@yahoo.com> Sent: Tue, September 7, 2010 5:14:07 PM Subject: RE: any discovery show? Paul: No show on the discovery to date. No surprise either I suppose. I’ll keep you posted. John Re: any discovery show? From:Paul Guzzardo ·:;.paulguzzardol@yahoo.com> To: John Papa -::john@callislaw.com> Wed, September 8, 2010 12:03:53 PM john who knows as you said i think you’ll have to go into your dentist mode. but I’m almost certain that there’s a smoking E. Pulitzer gun out there in response to that memo of mine and VS PG exchanges. and all of this would have to have moved electronically through emails a thought maybe while we sit waiting there should be one supplementary production request sent something 69 to this effect Copies of any and all emails from July 2003 to (the date of service) from the Defendants staff, officers and board member that refer to The Media Box, Plaintiff, Eric Friedman, Sung Ho Kim and Heather Woofter. what do you think? paul Attorney Zorn sent additional discovery to John Papa on September 10, 2010, but the material is not emai1ed to the Plaintiff. On October 4,2010 the Plaintiff sends this email to John Papa. checking From: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardol@yahoo.com> To:John Papa <John@callislaw.com> Mon, October 4,20107:49:22 AM john que pasa? it’s been about 5 weeks since our visit with Zorn nothing showed up? John Papa’s secretary Veronica Pyatt later that day emailed scanned additional production to Plaintiff. The Plaintiff responded the next day. the discovery Tue, October 5,20104:02:34 PM From: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardol@yahoo.com> To:John Papa <John@callislaw.com> Mon, October 4,20107:49:22 AM john I checked it out the material sheds some light on the church and the auto garage but all the guzzardo docs must be under Vince Schoemhl’s bed or behind one Pulitzer’s Water Lilies let me put together a memo tomorrow, and get it off to you. paul Plaintiff sends John Papa two emails in the days that follow, each one with an accompanying memo. He tells Papa that while there’s little here that we asked for, there are documents indicating director self dealing. 158. The Plaintiff and John Papa meet at the Defendant’s law office on October 25, 2010. The plaintiff tells John Papa that it’s time to schedule Schoemehl’s and Pulitzer’s 70 depositions. Papa tells the Plaintiff he will not be taking their depositions. No explanation is offered. The Plaintiff hears nothing more from Papa, then on November 26 he sends an email to John Papa advising that he is scheduled to present a series of lectures titled, The Cartographer’s Guide to Bad Code. Papa does respond to this email. 159. The next email from the


Plainti to John Papa is sent on February 18,2011. It begins with, “John where are you? What’s going on? I’m concerned. But anyway, here’s an update.” The Plainti tells Papa he’s leaving for the United Kingdom to lecture. The Plainti sends two attachments in the email: one is a press release on the GRAND CENTER Public Media Commons, the second is a “draft complaint” against Alan Pratzel, the former in-house counsel for the Defendant GRAND CENTER corporations. In his email the Plainti asks Papa to contact him, Papa does not respond. On March 9, 2011 Plainti emails John Papa a copy of the Complaint led with the Oce of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel against Alan Pratzel. John Papa does not reply to this email. 160. On June 27, 2012 Plainti advises John Papa that with the exception Vincent Schoemehl, all the CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION and VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION directors who served between 2005 and 2010 stepped down shortly after the Complaint was led with the Oce of The Chief Disciplinary Counsel against Alan Pratzel. 161. In preparation for the lawsuit the Plainti provided the John Papa with over 500 pages of digital les, detailing the Plainti’s protocol and contract negotiations with Defendants. The work production material was organized in four pdf le groups: MB 2003-4, MB 2005 +, pre MB 1, pre MB 2. The le groups include emails, memos, 71 professional papers, photographs, video grabs, and news articles. The Plainti used Adobe Acrobat professional software to insert supplementary comments on nearly a hundred pdfs. The comments were intended to provide the Callis Oce with additional document background, as well as review litigation strategy. In response to the GRAND CENTER Defendants’ “Motion to Compel and for Sanctions and for Failure to Comply with the Court’s Prior Order Related to Discovery," the Callis Oce sent the Defendants all four bulk pdf les. The Callis Oce did not delete any of the Plaintis comments. It was all shipped o to the Defendants, every single page, every line highlighted remained, all of it, and in utter disregard of the Plainti’s privilege and work product. 162. Three depositions were taken in the earlier led case: Vincent Schoemehl on September 18, 2012, Eric Friedman on January 10, 2013, Sung Ho Kim on March 7, 2013. The Plainti was not advised of any of the depositions, and was not present for any of them. 163. During the Schoemehl deposition John Papa does not ask the former mayor about the executive committee meeting of March 7, 2010, the $750,000 loan for the stabilization of the Burnt Church, or the departure of the seven directors from CITY CENTER REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION and VANDEVENTER SPRING REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION. 164. A few weeks after the deposition of Eric Friedman, the Plainti through a chance conversation with a third party became aware that Friedman was deposed. The Plainti directs an email-inquiry to John Papa. Papa’s secretary Veronica Pyatt replies. She tells the Plainti that the law oce has not been able to contact him to let him know about the deposition, or anything else for awhile. She said that the law oce was sending all the 72 emails to a “zio11” email address. There’s a problem here. The “sign” email address had been closed, inoperative, for over six years. The Plainti and Defendant CALLIS LAW OFFICE during the last six years have used paulguzzardol@yahoo.com as his email address of record. Pyatt does not indicate that any of “the recent email sent to zio11” were returned to sender as undeliverable. The email exchange between Plainti and Veronica Pyatt follows: From: Paul Guzzardo [mailto:paulguzzardol@yahoo Sent: Tuesday, March 12,2013 8: 26 AM To: Veronica Pyatt Subject: back Hi John I’m back in macomb been here two weeks now mom is ill send update thanks paul From: Veronica Pyatt <veronica@callislaw.com> To: Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardol@yahoo.com> Sent: Tue, March 12,2013 8:51:14 AM Subject:BUE:back Paul: Sorry to hear your mother is ill. I have been sending emails to the zio11 email. Is that not a good e-mail for you anymore. If not please let me know so that I can resend the e-mails and materials. One of the emails John had me inform you that we have until March 22 to disclose our experts. John wanted you to give him a call to discuss this and I forwarded transcripts of Friedman and Schemel to you and he wanted to discuss those depositions with you. If you are unable to get those from the zio11 e-mail let me know and I will forward them to this address. Thank you and have a great day! Veronica L Pyatt Re: back From Paul Guzzardo <paulguzzardol@ yahoo.com> To. Veronica Pyatt <veronica@callislaw.com> Sent Tue. March 12,2013 veronica this is the email i have not had that zio11 email for six years?? send back emails, depositions and all material to this yahoo address paul 165. On March 12, 2013 Plainti is advised that there’s a March 22,2013 deadline to disclose expert witnesses in the case. Plainti hurriedly contacts potential expert 73 witnesses. He sends a line of emails with expert names and resumes to John Papa. Papa does not respond to any of these emails. 166. On April 9, 2013 co-counsel Stephanie H. To of The Simon Law Firm sends the the following letter to John Papa. It also sent as an email. Dear John: We were served with Defendant’s Motion for Summary Judgment on April 5th. This letter conrms that your oce will be handling all deadlines associated with this Motion. If you need our assistance in any way, please let us know as soon as possible. According to the above-referenced matter’s docket sheet, trial in this matter is scheduled to begin on August 26, 2013. It is my understanding that your oce will be handling the trial of this matter, including all deadlines in the March 2013 Amended Scheduling Order. If you would like someone from our oce to appear at trial, assist with pre-trial preparation, or assist in any other way, please let us know as soon as possible. Sincerely, Stephanie H. To Stephanie H. To John Papa responds to Attorney Stephanie H. To on April 25, 2013. Dear Stephanie: This acknowledges your April 9, 2013 letter concerning the above referenced matter. Your letter accurately sets forth that my oce will be responsible for responding to the Motion for Summary Judgment and conducting the trial scheduled to begin on August 26,2013. 167. John Papa does not le a response to the Defendants’ Motion for Summary Judgment. 168. On May 14, 2013 the Plainti notied Defendant CALLIS LAW OFFICE and The Simon Law Firm that he was terminating their services and the rms as counsel of record eective that day. 169. The events surrounding the Media Box and Defendant CALLIS Oce representation of the Plainti have been the subject of press and investigative web-blogs. Paul Guzzardo And The Lost Heritage of St. Louis was posted on the “PeoriaStory” on September 18, 2013. The St. Louis blogger Steve Patterson published Dirty Laundry: GRAND CENTER, EMILY PULITZER, Etc on January 6,2014 on Urban Review STL. 74”PeoriaStory” also published Democrats in the 13th Congressional District of Illinois: one has “issues on January 20, 2014. In Paul Guzzardo And The Lost Heritage of St. Louis, Elaine Hopkins, a former investigative journalist with the Peoria Journal Star, blogged that there was a conict of interest involving the Defendant CALLIS and Bryan Cave LLP. Bryan Cave is the GRAND CENTER bond counsel, and the law rm that represented Defendant PULITZER at her deposition. Blogger Elaine Hopkins writes: The chair of Bryan Cave is Don Lents, a specialist in securities law. He ran the Grand Center executive meeting of March 15, 2007, the church loan meeting. And he was one the directors who resigned or “stepped down.” One of the nation’s largest law rms, Bryan Cave LLP is a Monsanto outside counsel. Lents replaced Walter Metcalfe as rm chair. Metcalfe is on Pulitzer’s board. Metcalfe is also the chairman of the hottest new project in St. Louis, Arch - 2015, the organization in charge of a billion dollar Arch expansion development. But it was dependent on voter approval of a sales tax referendum. The other Arch player was the Metro East Parks and Recreation District, across the river in Illinois. Their attorney was John Papa. After favorable stories and an endorsement by the St. Louis Post Dispatch, the former Pulitzer newspaper, the referendum passed in April 2013, but just barely. 170. The conict of interest is glaring. If Plainti had been present during Vincent Schoemehl’s deposition Attorney Papa would have had to have asked Schoemehl about the executive committee meeting of March 15, 2010, the $750,000 loan for the stabilization of the Burnt Church, and the departure of the seven directors. This line of inquiry could have led to a political re storm. It would have made voter approval of the St. Louis Arch sale tax almost impossible, and the timing could not have been worse. The three depositions, the ones where the Plainti was a “no show," took place during an all-out campaign to pass the Gateway Arch sales tax referendum. Simply stated, asking these question under oath, to a former three term mayor of St. Louis, would likely have derailed the sales tax. Voter approval of that tax was of critical importance to the Callis Law Oce’s other client, the Metro East Parks and Recreation District. So it was no accident that Plainti was not told about the depositions, that Papa refused to schedule PULITZER’s Deposition, or that Papa failed to le a response to the Defendants’ Motion 75 for Summary Judgment. A calculated decision was made to sell out the Plainti and forfeit the case. It was done for a reason, done to make sure that nothing, and no one, would get in the way of getting the voters to approve a sales tax for the renovation of the St. Louis Gateway Arch. WHEREFORE, Plainti, PAUL GUZZARDO, prays that this Honorable Court enter judgment in his favor and against the Defendant CALLIS PAPA HALE & SZEWCZYK &, PC, for actual and punitive damages in the amount in excess of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00)plus costs of suit, and for such other and further relief as may be just and proper.


28 dial is stuck


what an artist looks

From the Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deposition: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also a Geddesian, and I give talks on Hannah Arendt, and all of that is based on what is called the agon, the agonistic model of creativity. My reputation has been affected by the fact that I use multiple tools and litigation as a tool for creative discourse, which is fundamental to the agon, (it) is not traditionally part of an agenda for individuals in the school of fine arts and architecture at Washington University. (d-pp. 80-82) From the Defendant Washington Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Motion For Protective Order on Depositions: Mr. Guzzardo testified at his recent deposition that he believes Jasmin Aber excluded him from the jury for the Follies because retired professor Lesley Laskey, who purportedly arranged some of the funding for the Follies, did not like Mr. Guzzardo because he is a lawyer who (as Mr. Guzzardo readily agreed in his deposition) likes to use litigation as a tool of his creative process. (d-p.4)


The installation details an ongoing lawsuit between the plaintiff Paul Guzzardo and two defendants: Grand Center - a private corporation with statutory development powers in St. Louis, and Washington University, a BioScience research institution. Unlike Charles Dickens’ Bleak House the transactional is secondary here. This is about the role of digital media in collective consciousness and how media shapes the relation of people to places. It’s also about Marshall McLuhan’s role in the intellectual formation of St. Louis, and how Geddes’ synoptic vision got muscled out by a sycophantic one. Project journals and looping multimedia tell the story. The journals contain press, legal pleadings and testimony. Guzzardo’s documentaries and video depositions comprise the multimedia. The documentaries are “buildbetterbarrel,” “the cartographer’s dilemma,” and “posses | protocol | perp walks.” The deposition witnesses are: Emily Pulitzer, collector and founder of the Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts; Heather Woofter, teacher and chair of graduate studies at the Washington University School of Architecture; and Paul Guzzardo, lawyer and media activist/artist. Installation Text Panel - U of Dundee pleadings

depositions

press

a septic turn a septic turn a septic turn


McLuhan videos-transcription bits Marsahll McLuhan: One of the effects of switching over to circuitry from mechanical moving parts and wheels is an enormous increase in the amount of information that is moving. You can not cope with vast amounts of information in the old classified patterns. You tend to go looking for mythic forms in order to manage such complex data that’s moving at very high speeds. So the electrical engineers often speak of pattern recognition as a normal need of people processing data electrically and by computers. The need for pattern recognition. It is a need for which the poets foresaw a century ago in their drive back to mythic forms of organizing experience. Frank Kermode: In your other book the more recent one Understanding Media where you you go into all of this. You use a kind of slogan I guess. “The Medium is the Message." Would you like to illuminate that? Marsahll McLuhan: Well I think it is more satisfactory to say that any medium be it radio or be it the wheel tends to create a completely new human environment. The human environment as such tends to have an invisible character about it. The unawareness of the environmental is compensated for by some attention to the content of the environment. The environments merely as a set of ground rules as a kind of overall enveloping force gets very little recognition as a form except from the artist. I think our arts if you look at them in this connection do throw quite a lot of light on environments. The artists is usually engaged in somewhat excitedly explaining to people the character of new environments, and new strategies of culture necessary to cope with them. Marshall McLuhan Interview with Frank Kermode BBC - 1964 Marsahll McLuhan: The artist would seem to have been given to us as a providential means of bridging the gap between evolution and technology. The artist is able to program the sensory life or reprogram the sensory life in a way which gives you a navigational chart to get out of the maelstrom created by your own ingenuity. The role of the artist in that regard to man and the medium is simply survival. “To get in touch” strange phrase. When a wheel and an axle are playing along together, as long as there is a nice interval between the wheel and the axle they are in touch. When the interval gets too small or too big they lose touch. The wheel is either on the hotbox - uptight, or else seized up or else falls apart. This situation of keeping in touch requires this interplay, this interface which is a kind of interval of resonance. Touch is actually not connection but interval. It is when you touch something you have a little space between yourself and that thing which resonates. And that is play. And without play there cannot be any creative work, creative activity in any field at all. Man and Media Lecture - Centre for Culture and Technology - University of Toronto 1979 Robert Fulford : What kind of world would you rather live in? Is there a period in the past or a possible period in the future you’d rather be in? Marsahll McLuhan: No, I’d rather be in any period at all as long as people are going to leave it alone for a while. Robert Fulford : But they’re not going to, are they? Marsahll McLuhan: No, and so the only alternative is to understand everything that’s going on, and then neutralize it as much as possible, turn off as many buttons as you can, and frustrate them as much as you can. I am resolutely opposed to all innovation, all change, but I am determined to understand what’s happening because I don’t choose just to sit and let the juggernaut roll over me. Marsahll McLuhan: TV interview with the journalist Robert Fulford 1966 * Marshall Mcluhan did not turn up out of a clam or god-head. Patrick Geddes and Lewis Mumford (among others) helped lead the way.


UNDERSTANDING MEDIA - The Extensions of Man, Marshall McLuhan The serious artist is the only person able to encounter technology In their artistic play, they discover what is actually happening, and with impunity, just because he is an expert aware of the changes thus they appear to be “ahead of their time.” Non - artists always look at the present through the spectacles of the preceding age. in sense perception. General staffs are alway magnificently prepared to fight the preOnly the dedicated artist seems to have the power for encounter- vious war. ing the present actuality. It is the artist’s job to try to dislocate older media into postures In the history of human culture there is no example of a conscious that permit attention to the new. To this end, even though the adjustment of the various factors of personal and social life to majority of his audience may prefer to remain fixed in their old new extensions except in the puny and peripheral efforts of art- perceptual attitudes. ists. The artist picks up the message of cultural and technological challenge decades before its transforming impact occurs. He, Artistic rule-of-thumb usually anticipates the science and techthen builds models or Noah’s arks for facing the change that is nology in these matters by a full generation or more. at hand. As our proliferating technologies have credited a whole series of For in the electric age there is no longer any sense in talking new environments, men have become aware of the arts as “antiabout the artist’s being ahead of his time. Our technology is also, environment “ or “counter-environments” that provide us with the ahead of its time, if we reckon by the ability to recognize it for means of perceiving the environments itself. what it is. To prevent undue wreckage in society the artist tends now to move from the ivory tower to the control tower of society. The power of the arts to anticipate future social and technological developments, by a generation and more, has long been recogBut in the past century it has come to be generally acknowledged nized. that, in the words of Wyndham Lewis, “The artist is always engaged in writing a detailed history of the future because he is the In this century Ezra Pound called the arts “the antennae of the race.” This concept of the arts as prophetic, contrasts with the only person aware of the nature of the present.” popular idea of them as mere self-expression. If art is an “early Artists in various fields are always the first to discover how to en- warning system” to use the phrase from World War II, when radar was new, art has the utmost relevance not only to media study able one medium to use or to release the power of another. but to the development of media controls. ....for the artist makes models of problems and situations that have not yet emerged in the larger matrix of society.

“The artist is always engaged in writing a detailed history of the future because he is the only person aware of the nature of the present.”


dispatch from a [zombie] front Marshall McLuhan died on December 31, 1980. At the time of his death McLuhan was being left behind, forgotten, a hacker storyteller blotted out. A professor at New York University helped turn it around. Neal Postman organized a new field of storytelling scholarship. It is called media ecology. He traced it back to “Geddes's Drop," that petri dish, and he credited McLuhan with much. Postman was after myth. This is how Neal Postman ends his1988 essay “Social Science as Media Theology." The quote is taken out of Lance Strate's "Amazing Ourselves to Death Neal Postman's Brave New World Revisited." The purpose of social research is to reconsider the truths of social life; to comment and criticize the moral behavior of people, and finally to put forward metaphors, images, and ideas that can help people live with some measure of understanding and dignity. Specifically, the purpose of media ecology is to tell stories about the consequences of technology; to tell how media environments create contexts that may change the way we think or organize our social life, or make us better or worse, or smarter to dumber, or free or more enslaved. I feel sure the reader will pardon a touch of bias when I say that the stories media ecologist have to tell are rather more important than those of other academic storytellers because — the power of communications technologies to give shape to people’s lives is not a matter that comes equally to the forefront of people’s consciousness, though we live in an age when our lives - whether we like it or not - have been submitted to the demanding sovereignty of the new media. And so we are obliged, in the interest of humane survival to tell tales of what sort of paradise might be gained, and what sort lost. We will not have been the first to tell such tales. But unless are stories ring true, we may be that last.


a remix trickster and a wallkabout The SecretBaker Cycle was a pattern recognition walkabout in search of myth. The cycle played out over three years. Venues included theaters, cinemas, concerts halls, nightclubs, galleries and the street. All that time a community was being assembled to slip through gates and plot a space of appearance. Cycle productions were culled from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) files of Josephine Baker, Walter Winchell, and J. Edgar Hoover. The SecretBaker story-line gave deference and berth to issues of the day: racism, surveillance, feminism. But Secret wanted more. It was greedy. It wanted something to stand up to deadbeat code, the bugs. It wanted myth as a shield against the column of super civilized monkeys Arendt saw approaching. A Cycle Archive Follows: It is composed of newsprint, lectures, publications, website, emails, promotion, and a legion of photos. Excerpts from the stage play and documentaries also are included.

___club ___exhibition ___truck ___stage ___screen ___press


By singing the world into existence, he said, the Ancestors had been poets in the original sense poesis, meaning ‘creation’. No Aboriginal could conceive that the created world was in any way imperfect. His religious life had a single aim: to keep the land the way it was and should be. The man who went ‘Walkabout’ was making a ritual journey. He trod in the footprints of his Ancestor. He sang the Ancestor’s stanzas without changing a word or note — and so recreated the Creation. The Hero Cycle, wherever found, is a story of ‘fitness’ in the Darwinian sense: a blueprint for genetic ‘success’. Beowulf leaves . . . Ivan leaves . . . Jack leaves . . . the young Aboriginal on Walkabout leaves . . . even the antique Don Quixote leaves. And these Wanderjabre, and combats with the Beast, are the story-teller’s version of the incest taboo; whereby a man must first prove ‘fitness’ and then must ‘marry far’. Bruce Chatwin “The Songlines”


pattern recognition walk about in search of myth Each iteration tells a little-known story of art, politics, race, and media power that reverberates with some of the most important themes of 20th-century America. Fashioned out of “net accessible” documents, this multimedia mosaic makes theater and public art out of a 1950’s surveillance data bank. The faded and scratched up documents with their numbing bureaucratic entries and crudely blotted out paragraphs are the residue of government surveillance files. These files contain haunting microfiche memos, telegrams, newspaper clippings and photos, that tell how Josephine Baker, the famous expatriate African-American performer, was pursued by the FBI. An integral part of the story is the role of the highly-influential radio personality Walter Winchell and his association to Hoover. This surveillance tale is an information-age morality play from a simpler time. FBI chieftain Hoover represents a force that encircles and paralyzes. Gossip master Walter Winchell is the “voice” that destroys by slashing out on the airways and in print.

Baker, the artist, embodies a creative disruptive force that struggles to soar. She is the trickster who leaves traces of her intentions as she crosses international borders and moves from theatrical stage to political stage, from the personal level to public level. The Baker FBI file opens in Paris in 1949. The file records Josephine Baker being followed and harassed all over the world by a host of federal agencies – the FBI, the State Department, and the INS [Immigration and Naturalization Service]. Baker is beleaguered, not only because, she’s an international spokesperson for racial equality nor because of her ongoing invectives against the USA. She is “the traitoress, the undesirable” because she gravely wounds J. Edgar Hoover’s closest friend and accomplice, Walter Winchell. Winchell is Old Media’s MEGA SUPERSTAR. Buried in the 400-page Baker file, a dossier prefaced again and again with the words “that she was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1906, daughter of a St. Louis washer woman” are a wealth of memos, telegrams, newspaper clippings and photos from the 1950’s.

Now, however, in the electronic age, data classification yields to pattern recognition, the key phrase at IBM. When data move instantly, classification is too fragmentary. In order to cope with data at electric speed in typical situations of ‘’information overload,” men resort to the study of configurations, like the sailor in Edgar Alan Poe’s Maelstrom. Marshall McLuhan Understanding Media On the terms imposed by technocratic society, there is no hope for mankind except by ‘going with’ its plans for accelerated technological progress, even though man’s vital organs will all be cannibalized in order to prolong the mega-machine’s meaningless existence. But for those of us who have thrown off the myth of the machine, the next move is ours: for the gates of the technocratic prison will open automatically, despite their rusty ancient hinges, as soon as we choose to walk out. Lewis Mumford, The Myth of the Machine 


a story telling code

DataBank - Agit Prop propels this cycle of SECRET multimedia productions. As a visual and narrative grammar it does not ignore the incomprehensibility of exploding data systems. Fifty years ago surveillance meant “Big Brother," and a “Dramatist/Artist ” might well have used these surveillance files to fashion the “Script” and be done with it. But fifty years ago when Baker, Hoover and Winchell tangoed, the ceaseless accretion of digital information and imagery were not part of the scene. Now they are. Today it’s naïve to simply consign a surveillance discussion to some flat normative/value-laden nowhere place. It is equally naïve for anyone who is media literate to approach these 1950 era Freedom of Information files with the simple goal of fashioning a tightly scripted dramatization or “a wall hung” installation. Certainly there’s something satisfying about sitting around the fire/stage and telling a start to finish surveillance morality tale or gazing at the all consuming image. But in times of virtual plenitude, something else is needed to deal with all those “all seeing eyes." SECRET multimedia was first shown in conjunction with a projection of text and images from Marshall McLuhan’s The Mechanical Bride. McLuhan’s ground breaking new media track was actually published in 1951, the same year Baker and Winchell had their run in at the Stork Club’s cub room. McLuhan wrote about the "cub room" and the telegraphic rattle of Walter Winchell in his Mechanical Bride. But it’s not McLuhan’s mention of Winchell that’s important, it’s his mention of Edgar Allan Poe. It’s Poe’s A Descent into the Maelstrom that hangs above and plants itself throughout The Mechanical Bride. It also shadows SECRET. A Descent into the Maelstrom is about two sailors caught in a whirlpool; only one survives. Poe’s story offers a bare survival strategy in the face of chaos - and McLuhan grabs it. DataBank Agit Prop is a survival strategy. It is about wearing, mapping and dancing with the data maelstrom. It was Josephine Baker’s strategy. SECRETBaker Web Site 2005


club


exhibition


truck


“buildbetterbarrel” script; segment - Truck Baker came up from the bottom, the Mississippi Bottom, home to where three rivers meet, the Mississippi, Missouri, and the Illinois. Baker ran away from home, St. Louis, at 16. Joined the circus, got to Paris, became the international star Le’ Baker, and for the next 25 years appeared on big stage after big stage. And all that time she scripted and re-scripted herself and her stories. She told it every which way. She was a remix artist and a genius at it. But this remix-mixer wanted to go home. In 1951 she came home and walked right onto another stage, the Stork Club. The Stork Club was New York’s hottest hot spot. This club wasn’t home just to the 50’s celebrities and the occasional hoi polloi but to the men in suits, the ones who ran well… everything. And the man in the ring, the one with the big hat, was Walter Winchell. Winchell was a vaudeville child star who became the mega, mega media superstar of print and radio. AND he was first out of the gate in television. Noise, News, Chatter, Celebrity Gossip and Trash - trace it all back to Winchell. This media colossus had a BEST FRIEND, a confidant, another Stork Club regular-- the number one G-man, J. Edgar Hoover. Hoover was the first director of the FBI, a job he held till he died 50 years later. Hoover made his name bringing down Dillinger and Capone, and then after Capone he went after Commies. Hoover was the man with all the files, the first one to use fingerprints. This man who never married was our father, the father of our state surveillance, the big eye. And Winchell was Hoover’s voice and ear. The Hoover and Winchell stage was the Stork Club.  It was their media platform. It’s where they fashioned the world that we’ve got now. And this is where that remix artist, Baker, landed.


a review KDHX Theatre Review - SECRET: The Josephine Baker FBI File St. Louis Community College at Forest Park Reviewed by Richard Green There are two real stars of this piece: The first is Paul Guzzardo, who assembled the very flashy and memorable multi-media montages of nightclub entertainer Josephine Baker in the time of the “Red Scare.” The second is actor Joe Engel, who somehow manages to bring red-baiting broadcaster Walter Winchell vividly to life— despite the fact that the play technically has no playwright. But rest easy, it may have something better, which I’ll get to in just six more paragraphs, I promise. There are plenty of clues leading up to that, so let’s play, shall we? Mr. Guzzardo’s incredible multi-media barrage of McCarthyism is terribly impressive (hint #1, at the real significance of the work), while Mr. Engel’s fine, punchy delivery as broadcaster Winchell crushes every one of his wan, good-hearted castmates like a steamroller. Even at intermission, Mr. Guzzardo’s Red Scare propaganda echoes through the lobby and down into the men’s room (this is hint #2), in a chilling recreation of 1950’s anti-communist brainwashing. And in 2005, it’s a timely reminder of government-sponsored hysteria. On stage, Dick Watt is a colorless figure as J. Edgar Hoover, owing mostly to the vaguest presumption of a narrative at work. i>SECRET has no playwright, but it has twenty-one technical crew people operating multi-media equipment, and sound and light (with—hint #3—no lighting gels and not much lighting emphasis for the actors), as well as music and on a bare-bones set (hint #4), under three giant screens. I suppose it’s a miracle there’s even one remotely believable character. Most of the performers are mere sock-puppets on stage for The Message (hint #5). We might extrapolate from this that Mr. Guzzardo and his team of very talented video artisans chose to gain a few additional kinetic properties from live performers, in an almost grudging way. A reasonable person could assume there’s more drama going on out in the booth than up on stage. But if you take it to the next cerebral scaffold, and factor-in some good old theatre history, things may start to look very different. There’s plenty of raw material here to work with, and not just in the official history and the exhaustive research and very elaborate “Power-Point” editing. But there’s still room for improvement: Serroge Watt, as the male chorus member, manages to project the greatest commitment of any member of the supporting cast, even in a shockingly anachronistic “rap” number after a ruckus at New York’s “Stork Club” in 1951 (hint #6)—but the ruckus is described, not shown, which is a problem any way you look at it.

The balance of power wants to shift when Baker files suit, and Winchell gets rattled and drops out of sight for “medical reasons.” His “Jergens Journal” comes back to ABC radio eventually, but his brand of sensationalism has somehow driven a wedge between him and his sources at the FBI, and more dangerously it has apparently alienated his sponsor, Jergens Lotion. We could really use a human face to put on Jergen’s decision (presumably an “oily” face) to break ties with Winchell, for the sake of structure. And from Hoover, we get just the slightest inkling of crocodile tears for Winchell’s fall from glory, which may be another fixable problem. It’s clear that Winchell couldn’t stop raising false alarms in his Sunday night broadcasts, but we need more of a sense of growing disenchantment from within the FBI in the acting. Samantha Rall provides a rare, pleasant respite from the monolithic propaganda campaign as Ms. Baker, but she doesn’t get to sing or dance, as I recall. Wonderful carefree movies of the real Josephine Baker dance on the big screens upstage, in a manner that is hypnotic and dadaistic. Likewise the actors’ disgraced exits, up through the audience (hint #7), are also effective. So is a humorous tango between Winchell and Hoover, though that could be comically broader, still. For that matter, Mr. Watt could do more when a long string of pearls is thrown ‘round his neck (as a friend of mine likes to say, “if you don’t have a character, get a prop!”). However, given the characters’ general lack of internal life (hint #8), and the overwhelming dominance of The Message (sorry, this is just a rehash of hint #5), this might mistakenly be seen as nothing more than a very impressive technical achievement. All right, players, time’s up! The dominant theme here seems to be that a tsunami of disinformation and innuendo drowned-out the fight to end racial injustice ten years before freedom marches and the civil rights act were finally taken seriously. It’s almost stated outright that McCarthyism was a sideshow to distract from the treatment of blacks in America in the 1950’s. This makes it a truly important effort, though not an entertaining one. Ah, the spectre of Berthold Brecht, pounding us over the head in a way that is still quite haunting and somehow fascinating. The alienation of sparsely drawn characters and minimal sets is certainly there. And the placard-type images at hyper-digitized speed are way, way beyond the wildest dreams of Mother Courage or The Good Person of Szechuan. In fact, the real significance of SECRET is that it amounts to a sort of 21st Century “High Brechtology,” where we understand the idealistic computer/multi-media programmers’ intent, but just like Brecht, Mr. Guzzardo steadfastly refuses to comply with our desire to live through the characters. In that new, harsh light, I reluctantly move that the show be allowed stand more or less as it is, with perhaps some rabble-rousing thrown-in at the Stork Club, and maybe another little ditty (about the fall of Winchell?) for style (“Ding-Dong, The Winch Is Dead”?). Mr. Guzzardo can be proud of a truly outstanding job of compiling images of a memorable time in history.

stage


HOOVER 150, 000 murderers are roaming the United States. 300,000 citizens are walking the streets of the towns of America unaware that they are doomed to die in the hands of murderers. One out of every 25 persons in the United States is inclined to CRIMINALITY. If the criminal world were to marshal it forces, they would march ceaselessly past, hour upon hour, in daylight and darkness, and back to daylight again, 10 to 20 abreast. America would fall in a few hours to an army of MURDERERS. WINCHELL New York City - Last Monday night the G-Men captured a tough guy. Taking no chances of having any more of their men killed, the G - Men used machine guns to get what they wanted, a very dangerous criminal. They got him. Now newspapers and writers are attacking the G- Men and their chief. Mr. Hoover is heckled, belittled and condemned for making America a safer place for children to live in. The widows of G- Men who died for your family and mine, whose men died shooting it out with Dillinger, and “Baby Face Nelson," must be appalled. Take this from one who knows how courageous the G- Men are. They are not glory hunters. They are man hunters. HOOVER Thank you, Walter. You made a succinct and pertinent observation. I am grateful. The forces you speak of are trying to belittle, ridicule and smear the G- Men. They are the writers of slime columns. They suffer from mental halitosis. These editorial writers have an aggravated case of mental diarrhea. They regurgitate their own filth. They tear down that which restrains the criminals of the underworld. The criminal morons can only be held in check by fear and respect, and by vigorous apprehension and punishment. I know instances where the actual criminals we’ve apprehended have had in their very possession clippings of newspaper columns written by the above alluded to coyotes. Walter, I sometime wonder whether America really wants clean and effective crime enforcement. WINCHELL And that Mr. and Mrs. 48 winds up another Winchell, next Sunday night at the very same time. Until then I remain your New York correspondent. But before I go, remember that tomorrow marks the 30th year John Edgar Hoover has been head of the FBI, but he actually started thirty–seven years ago on next July 26. He has not amassed any monetary awards to show for three decades of public service; in fact Mr. Hoover is practically poor. Not long ago, he paid off the mortgage on his home, the one his mother gave him. John Edgar Hoover has amassed no loot for his years of public service, but he does have the nation’s admiration and respect and the President’s handshake and salute. So I’m sure I speak for all Americans and say, “Here, John Edgar Hoover, is our affectionate embrace.”

WINCHELL The first week’s winner of a top prize in our CONTEST: “Why I Could Never Be a Communist!." …is Gertrude M. Prescott, Madison, Lake County, Ohio. She will also be in the finals for 1st Prize: A $7,000 Cadillac Eldorado convertible. The “Why I Could Never Be a Communist”! contest closes midnight May 3rd. Winners announced weekly until May 16th... Under 50 words ...please enclose $1 in each letter you enter...Send as many letters as you wish to me, Box 80, NY. Thankxx! ...get your children to enter... Your kiddy may win the Caddy, … The U in Lucky May Be U. WINCHELL Mr. and Mrs. United States- Josephine Baker, a Negro star, complained to authorities this week that she was discriminated against at the Stork Club last Tuesday night and that she had been told that Walter Winchell was in the place at the time. Winchell was not in the Stock Club at the time of the alleged disturbance. I am appalled at the agony and embarrassment caused Josephine Baker and her friends at the Stork Club, but I am equally appalled at their efforts to involve me in an incident in which I had no part. READER Based on an anonymous tip that the Stork Club would be blown up because it had refused to admit Negroes, the police searched all eight stories of the Stork Club. No investigation is being conducted by the Bureau at this time. READER In 1951 Robert White, president of the New York City NAACP,  sent the following telegram to J Edgar Hoover, head of The Federal Bureau of Investigation. FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION - U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE COMMUNICATIONS SECTION OCT 20, 1951 TELEGRAM TO: J EDGAR HOOVER FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION AS A PATRON OF STORK CLUB WE ASK IF YOU WOULD EXPRESS YOUR DISAPPROVAL AND TAKE WHATEVER OTHER ACTION IS WISE AND FEASIBLE REGARDING GRATUITOUS REFUSAL OF SERVICE TO MISS JOSEPHINE BAKER OCTOBER 16 WHEN SHE WAS GUEST THERE OF MR. AND MRS. ROGER RICO AND KNOWN POLICY OF SHERMAN BILLINGSLEY TO BAR PATRONS BECAUSE OF RACE AND COLOR. AT THIS CRITICAL PERIOD OF WORLD HISTORY SUCH DISCRIMINATION IN A METROPOLITAN CITY LIKE NEW YORK OR ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES PLAYS DIRECTLY INTO HANDS OF COMMUNISTS AND OTHER ENEMIES OF DEMOCRACY. DISAPPROVAL OF SUCH POLICY WILL DEMONSTRATE VITALITY AND INTEGRITY OF DEMOCRACY. WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR SENDING US COPY OF WHATEVER PROTEST YOU SEE FIT TO MAKE. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE 20 W 40 NYC HOOVER - I don’t consider this to be any of my business.

From - The Director To: NY Office Subject: Baker Immediately furnish bureau any information concerning her activities coming to your attention through informants, established sources and public sources. Have office determine the status of the Lawsuit and keep bureau advised of all developments. From - The Director To: Internal Security Subject: Baker Reference is made to our memorandum to the Department of State. It would be appreciated if you would furnish the Bureau any information in your possession concerning the subject. From - The Director To: Special Agent Tolson Subject: Baker The McCarran Committee called today and asked if it would be possible to have a summary of any derogatory information in the Bureau’s files on Baker. From- The Director To: Office of Security Department of State Subject: Baker Internal Security – France Reference is made to our earlier memorandum, a copy of which was designated for the Central Intelligence Agency, containing information from our files concerning Baker. From- The Director To: Internal Security Subject: Baker Liaison advised that the Commissioner Swing of the INS has taken a personal interest in captioned case. INS requested that leads be expedited. From- The Director To: Special Agent Nichols Subject: Baker Mr. Mario Noto of the (INS) Immigration and Naturalization Service called. I have been informed that the Justice Department ruled that there was insufficient derogatory subversive information to exclude Baker from the United States. Mr. Noto again advised me that INS Commissioner Swing has taken a personal interest in the Baker case. Commissioner Swing has directed that the INS obtain sufficient information to order Baker’s exclusion from the United States. The INS is conducting an additional inquiry in order to obtain this information. Mr. Noto has requested that Bureau files once again be reviewed to insure that all pertinent derogatory information in possession of the Bureau be furnished to the INS.

script selections North American democracy is a farce. The United States Negroes are the objects of threats and intimidations. Lynchings, condemnations without trial, electrocutions are dealt out coldly to Negroes in order to form the climate of racial violence. In the country where I was born, they speak of “democracy” and of “civilization” while Negroes are sent to die in Korea. There are many, very many people, who, with the greatest naiveté, look upon the United States as a model. It is necessary to open their eyes. Racial and religious discrimination is like an octopus which releases a black liquid to conceal itself. I have heard that steps are being taken to prohibit my return to the United States. I hope they know that none of these threats can prevent my carrying on my trust until all men are equal. Although they can prevent my entry into their country, they will not stop my activities as long as there are those who need me. This would not worry me in the slightest if I knew that Negroes no longer needed me. The reason I had to flee from that country was to put my name and myself at their disposal and to do what I knew they could not do for themselves. If my entry into the United States is forbidden, this for me will be an honor, will show that my work for humanity has been successful. Ladies and gentlemen, I have spoken to you about the horrors existing in a country, which calls itself the guiding democracy of the world. I ask you - should such horrors exist in any country and especially in one, which wishes to govern the world? The United States is not a free country, and believe me, I am not jealous of those who live there. What does the famous Statue of Liberty represent? Where is this Democracy which so many North Americans speak with conviction? The people in the United States who struggle against race prejudice and for justice live in terror. In this horror of discrimination, where is democracy? At this moment in North America I am branded because I have the courage to speak of the atrocities resulting from race and religious discrimination. In the white newspapers of that country, there is hardly ever anything printed about the Negroes. But I am the latest news. I am the traitoress; I am the undesirable, the traitoress. Josephine Baker -Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires Argentina 1951


SECRET: The Josephine Baker FBI Files The documentary is a film adaption of a 2005 multimedia performance art workshop production. The production was SECRET. It was a collaboration of media artists, rap singer/DJs and actors from St. Louis, the birthplace of Josephine Baker. Subsequent media incarnations of SECRET ranged from public art wall projections to interactive media gallery work produced in locations throughout the world through 2006 in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Josephine Baker’s birth. Drawn from over a thousand FBI files and archival material, SECRET tells the story of St. Louis born entertainer, Josephine Baker, and two men who pursued her, media personality Walter Winchell and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. Mixing old and new sound and images to link the present and past, SECRET uncovers Baker’s little known identity as a global human rights activist. Produced and written by Kathy Corley and Paul Guzzardo Director/Editor Kathy Corley adapted from the stage production workshop written and directed by Paul Guzzardo

screen

Secret: The Josephine Baker FBI Files Screenings Big Sky Documentary Film Festival February 2009 Takoma Park Film Festival November 16, 2007 2007 Black Maria Film Festival Director’s Choice Award Newark, New Jersey, U S A February 2007 (Film Festival) Josephine Baker Centennial Celebration:  St. Louis Public Library St. Louis, U S A June 2006 (Theatrical) San Francisco Documentary Festival San Francisco, U S A

May 2006 (Film Festival) Twin Rivers Multimedia Festival 2nd Place Award: Documentary Asheville, NC, U S A April 2006 (Film Festival) Western Illinois University screening; NAACP cosponsored event Macomb, Illinois, U S A February 2006 (Theatrical) Celebrating Josephine Baker jazz concert, with SECRET film St. Louis, U S A February 2006 (Theatrical) 2006 Big Muddy Film Festival John Michaels Award Carbondale, U S A

February 2006 (Film Festival) 2005 St. Louis International Film Festival St. Louis, U S A November 2005 (Film Festival) Webster University Film Series - Alumni Weekend Film Festival St. Louis, U S A October 2005 (Film Festival) 2005 St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase ‘Best Documentary Short’ from St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association St. Louis, U S A July 2005 (Film Festival) Premiere screening


press

press

Snapshots: Shorts Program: The most ambitious offering is an odd portrait of the troubling intersection of race and right-wing politics in America. Secret The Josephine Baker FBI Files flashes back to the 195Os, when Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s color line was enforced by twin culture czars: FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover and tabloid columnist Walter Winchell. Told in a pastiche of black-and-white footage and dramatically recreated recollections from the time, the film is a tribute to the bravery and spunk of a talented black American entertainer who carved out a brilliant career in exile in France.

Snapshots: Shorts Program: The most ambitious offering is an odd portrait of the troubling intersection of race and right-wing politics in America. Secret The Josephine Baker FBI Files flashes back to the 195Os, when America's color line was enforced by twin culture czars: FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover and tabloid columnist Walter Winchell. Told in a pastiche of black-and-white footage and dramatically recreated recollections from the time, the film is a tribute to the bravery and spunk of a talented black American entertainer who carved out a brilliant career in exile in France.


Tue, May 24, 2005 8:32:44 PM Why Baker? From: Paul Guzzardo <zio11@sbcglobal.net> To: Lorens Holm <l.holm@dundee.ac.uk> I think this is important – so let me clarify. The Baker project – and BAKER as BAKER works for me for reasons that I think do dove tail with your research. Let us assume that as designer I want to use new digital technologies / these digital toys to reconfigure public space. I’m interested in creating the commons-agora as a stage set for others to use. The question is who is able to occupy that stage – note the Macomb WIU – Guzzardo page and my SECRET databank agit prop page. “The once secret, now public, FBI files of stage personality Josephine Baker and her relationship with J. Edgar Hoover and radio personality Walter Winchell are activated for visitors to wear, map and dance with. ” “….Poe’s story offers a bare survival strategy in the face of chaos and McLuhan grabs it. DataBank Agit Prop is about a survival strategy. It is about wearing, mapping and dancing with the data maelstrom. It was Josephine Baker’s strategy.” So the political USA surveillance story is really secondary to the international diva who represents the trickster archetype – it is the trickster archetype who is the actor on the stage that we are trying to design. The trickster is psychologically and maybe psychically best able to act on this stage to act on stage that dissolves architectural boundaries the trickster already has dissolved the “container” that makes up the individual agent /player . This is where Davis fits into all of this –link him as artist to Baker as archetype “trickster." Otherwise it is too abstract – he and his types make it comprehensible . Absent “A Baker” I don’t know why I should design and build this stage set – because it will be empty. there will be nobody out there who can occupy it. Thought I’d pass this on. p


Hanging from a ledge, bit by bit they plugged into a myth. Hanging from a ledge, bit by bit they plugged into a myth. Hanging from a ledge, bit by bit they plugged into a myth. Hanging from a ledge, bit by bit they plugged into a myth. Hanging from a ledge, bit by bit they plugged into a myth.


epilogue

a faceoff with a singularity


Patrick Geddes read "Brave New World" shortly before he died. The author Aldous Huxley was the grandson of his teacher, T. H. Huxley. "Brave New World" tells a story of an “auto-mated posthuman” tomorrow. It’s a dark myth. Huxley traces an approaching dystopia to the assembly-line titan, Henry Ford. Huxley was not alone in fearing what Ford wrought. The three brothers who organized Mr. Ford’s workers were alert to what might come. Walter, Victor and Roy Reuther founded the United Auto Workers. Within that union they created the UAW Education and Citizenship Department to hack into what was on the way. It’s what Walter Reuther called “this is our trouble." The Reuthers hired the author’s father to help them, and sent Sam Guzzardo to where McLuhan’s posse set off. Eventually the son followed.


credits

credits and graphic design “hackerspace" graphic design was developed through a series of iterations. there were a number of collaborators. leo malinow and paul guzzardo are responsible for this final version. the credits that follow reference individuals and collaborative sources other than paul guzzardo.

the dervish in the machine leon lamont - dj hand swirl jeff edwards, angela pancela, joyce rudinsky, ben kiel, joe beuckman, sonja pelli, and heuris logic - millennium street lab production, mayor clarence harmon - birthday greeting charles dickens - “bleak house” film strip

front page in the ring with charlie - a strip

costume shop gonzalo pepe and susman mpls - fashion collage NRHP Inventory Nominations - text landmarks association of st. louis - building photos gerardo caballero - street photos lorens holm - street photo city of st. louis - garment district map

prologue buenos aires- graffiti synoptic visions university of dundee - patrick geddes image andrew peckham - university of westminster poster konstantinos avramidis - university of edinburgh, prokolo poster patrick geddes - cities in evolution a new crackerjack world john meyer, primary net - sister city emails harmon for mayor campaign committee - invitation and birthday photos patrick geddes - cities in evolution holm-guzzardo - the cartographer’s dilemma university of dundee - patrick geddes image rose salvato wiley - crackerjack class photo feed lot goes bad edie silva - riverfront times web back machine - text archive mcdonnell genome institute - web page snapshot on a ledge kurt meineckie - graphic design basilica mosaic museum - drawing and photo david davis - photo collage, sheldon designs and drawings lorens holm - photo collage, sheldon design, drawings, text and cursive notes james polshek - audio transcription st. louis AIA - audio transcription st. louis business journal- newspaper collage jesse codling - crackerjack gallery david bonetti, st. louis post dispatch - text mary lou anderson - cartoon plaza photo grave-merry man casper mcelwee - queen of heaven animation ian belton - contagion director kathy dunlop- contagion producer joyce rudinsky - contagion multimedia asenath lakes - performance review luca signorelli - “sermon and deeds of the antichrist” painting william a donohue - catholic league correspondence zlato cosic - secret baker photo maurice mcnamee - “the architecture and mosaics of the saint louis cathedral” text

street kit tom walsh - graphic design joel marion- 1709 photos mario corea - 1709 photo adrian luchini - 1709 architectural drawing lorens holm - 1521 architectural drawing tom margulies - 1521 photos jeffery johnson - 1521 photos st. louis post dispatch - text collage feterabend - text collage desino interior - text collage hannah arendt - “the human condition” the hacker cometh crystal kepple - graphic design jesse codling - graphic design saint louis college seminary - 1934 year book photo missouri historical society - street photo rose salvato wiley - crackerjack class philip marchand - “marshall mcluhan: the medium and the messenger” maurice mcNamee, “refections in tranquility” douglas coupland - marshall mcluhan biography walter j ong - “mcluhan as teacher - the st. louis years” marshall mcluhan - “the gutenberg galaxy” thomas j farrell - “walter ong’s contributions to cultural studies," a text montage adrian jones - forward to “ramus method and the decay of dialogue” david walczyk - “everywhere tableau," a wiu lecture tool chest cameron mcewan - photos conor mccafferty - photo jesse codling - graphics and posters lorens holm - graphic culture lab newcastle - text and graphic sovereign code thomas hobbes - cover page “the leviathan” walter j ong - review “the gutenberg galaxy” amin hinds - video stills

zlato cosic - video stills aaron aubuchon- video stills robert j flaherty -“nanook of the north” director kazue graham - “nanook of the north” voiceover script elena peteva - “nanook of the north” voiceover script calop, city of university city - emails + memos lawrence lessig - free culture keynote, OSCON 2002 united states supreme court - elder v. ashcroft tables, tunnels and debris tom walsh - graphic design hannah arendt - “the human condition” craft alliance - dinner party checklist fabian llonch and gisela vidalle - transit lab drawings affairs magazine - photos st. louis post dispatch - photo montage st. louis aclu - invitation more tables, more debris bruce walters - graphic design bobgeiger.com - senate transcript craft alliance - dinner party checklist the myth that got away “escape from new york” - photo montage bob walsh and joe dickman - fight video still united states geological survey, ISDI, USD-HUD - pruitt-igoe photo thomas edison film - the gordon sisters montage walter j ong - “fighting for life: contest, sexuality, and consciousness” st. ignatius of loyola -anonymous painting, french school hitting a wall tom walsh - graphic design ian caine - architectural wall collage + drawings city of st. louis - plaza option contract cyborg on corners tom walsh- graphic design ILGW union - archival film footage stills marshall mcluhan - “the mechanical bride” - projection text robert j flaherty - director, “nanook of the north” andrea saltzman - couture, gonzalo pepe photos irving penn - photo montage jeff daniels, st. louis post-dispatch - fr. mcnamee and fr. ong 1997 interview eric hobsbawm - “the age of extremes” jesse codling - “in the ring with charlie” graphic edmund carpenter - “oh, what a blow that phantom gave me!” barton beebe - “intellectual property law and the sumptuary code” progeny tom walsh - graphic design jesse codling - dystopic kid text video new york times - text

bits of passage william mccabe - an introduction to jesuit theater amin hinds - video stills steven pinker - “the language instinct,” “the blank slate,” “how the mind works” two cities film - “hamlet” the film maurice mcnamee - “refections in tranquility” maurice mcnamee - “the jesuit influence on baroque architecture” goya smeared steven hall, hedrich blessing - photos pedro marquinez- cabool manager joe beuckman + paul w davis - programer emails interior design, desinointerior, st. louis post dispatch, riverfront times, st. louis business journal, designing entrances for retail and restaurant spaces - print media trunk show jesse codling - graphic design tunel cad 2 gonzalo - pepe - universidad nacional de san martin, st. louis community college at forest park - video still strip la nacion - “el artista como maestro” poster venues - pratt, ulster festival of art and design, place, university of dundee, rosario poster graphic designers - jesse codling, lorens holm, leon lamont, cameron mcewan the cartographer’s dilemma the atlantic monthly - cover robert kaplan - “the coming anarchy” jesse codling - graphics alan brunettin - a q khan tryptic john graham, western illinois university gallery of art - curatorial michael thompson -western illinois university television - video stills urban design group journal - print media tri- state radio NPR - interview spaceport booster tom walsh - graphics robert kaplan - “an empire wilderness: travels into america’s future” alan brunettin - gateway arch graphics a lab jesse codling - graphics lab jockeys - “a lab journal” marshall mcluhan - “understanding media” marshall mcluhan, frank kermode - bbc interview, text hearst publications - i.p. email thread alan brunettin - “my father was a sculptor," a bbb segment bad code a genesis tale henry fuseli - king lear painting gerolamo lo savio - king lear silent film stills william shakespeare - “king lear” marshal mcluhan - “the gutenberg galaxy” rogelio polesello - centro cultural recoleta borges- kafka, tableau claire bishop, “artificial hells” walter j ong, “evolution, myth, and poetic vision”


a piggish parable eddie silva - “a minister to his needs," riverfront times roy tompkins - a minister to his needs” graphics, riverfront times hannah arendt - “the human condition” federal communications commission - wireless spectrum map bad code study jesse codling - angel of history graphic alan brunettin - a q khan tryptic associated press - nawaz sharif collage david rieff - “swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir.” francisco goya -“the disasters of war cycle” johann wolfgang von goethe - “italian journey” jesse codling - urn-bug-nut graphic series karen russo - deposition e.r. pulitzer hannah arendt - 1968 bard college address map perfect 1422-CC08922 - case.net, www.courts.mo.gov axi:ome, st. louis post dispatch, - kaminer & co. - 1422-CC08922 - exhibit collages dial is stuck cameron mcewan - poster geba box buenos aires - photo bbc, university of toronto, robert fulford - mcluhan video transcriptions mcluhan - “understanding media, the extensions of man” lance strate - “amazing ourselves to death” (neal postman quote) piranesi - carceri d’invenzione a trickster and a walkabout fbi archive - j. baker, j.e. hoover, w. winchell bruce chatwin - “the songlines” lewis mumford -“the myth of the machine” evan leaks, zlatko cosic, kathy corley, aaron auBuchon, terry rathje, brett murphy - secret graphics zlatko cosic, bruce walters, paul grant - secret photos ann davis, amin hinds, leon lamont, kathy corley, lorens holm - secret video stills jeff schneider - remix truck production richard green - theatre review, kdhx radio kathy corley - documentary, secret: the josephine baker bfi files cora camille - final veil dancer epilogue illinois labor publication, june 1956 - photo additional production - tracey dixon, ian courter, bruce walters * the idea for a manual was first raised over fish and chips in Belfast with Paul Clarke.

Hackerspace for Myth Making - The Manual  

Paul Guzzardo

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