University of Lincoln - Levelling Up Impact Report

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Levelling Up Impact Report

LEVELLING UP 1


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Foreword Contents

Contents 1

Foreword: Rt Hon Justine Greening Foreword: Professor Neal Juster

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Introduction: Levelling up in the context of COVID

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The journey to the Levelling Up Goals

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The role of universities in levelling up and meeting the Levelling Up Goals

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Impact Assessment Framework

Part 1: Activity Audit - Mapping the University of Lincoln’s existing work against the Levelling Up Goals Part 2: Inputs - Quantifying the resource invested into current activity by Goal Part 3: Output - Identifying the direct results of the University of Lincoln’s current activities Part 4: Outcomes - Measuring the impact of the outputs against specific goals

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Foreword

Foreword

Rt Hon Justine Greening, Founder of the Social Mobility Pledge and Former Secretary of State for Education

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Foreword

For those trying to access opportunity, the UK is not a level playing field. The fact is that problems with social mobility and inequality in this country are often place-based. These issues concentrate in certain areas and communities, turning some of the most deprived areas into social mobility coldspots. Where you are from all too often decides where you can go in life. As the country begins to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that those hit hardest were often in these areas and on low incomes. If Britain is serious about tackling these inequalities, we need a fresh approach to the problem. The solutions we need to deliver should be as place-based as the problems they aim to solve. Rural communities, like those that the University of Lincoln serves, are often most at risk of sparse opportunity. To level them up, the University has engaged in local solutions to support and nurture its local talent. The University’s model of working collaboratively with local partners to provide new, high tech industries in the area with skilled graduates is a powerful example of ensuring talent is not limited by geography. Levelling Up means levelling up everywhere. People in disadvantaged circumstances or growing up in areas of limited opportunity already faced an uphill struggle. COVID-19 has dealt an even harsher blow to their chances of making something of their lives. It has increased existing inequalities, reduced employment, widened the digital divide and exacerbated the mental health crisis. The IFS believes the closure of schools, as one example, is likely to lead to permanently lower incomes for those affected. It estimates that over 50 to 60 years, there will be a £350bn combined loss in earnings. This is bad news for the economy, as well as individuals. There is a real danger that the pandemic could create a ‘lost generation’. The good news is that there is now a national consensus to address the issue head-on but it needs urgent and considered attention. The Purpose Coalition, a group of the UK’s principal purpose-led policymakers, business leaders and university vice-chancellors, has helped to set the agenda. It has had direct discussions with individual MPs and submitted evidence to the Education Select Committee and the House of Lords Committee on Levelling Up. It is also working closely with FTSE 100 companies to develop innovative and integrated solutions, including fresh collaborations with higher education institutions.

In its first piece of work, the Coalition has developed 14 Levelling Up Goals, based on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals which I helped to develop as International Development Secretary. I saw firsthand how well they galvanised government, business and civil society to take action. In the same way, the Levelling Up Goals provide a shared language as well as a way of benchmarking progress. Focusing on key life stages, from early years to adulthood, they enable a common approach for organisations to identify gaps in their social impact and find solutions to bridge them. These solutions will vary by sector and region but a united purpose will help them take more effective action. As a member of the Purpose Coalition, the University of Lincoln has already shown its commitment to levelling up. As one of the organisations which signed up to the Social Mobility Pledge’s original campaign, we produced an Opportunity Action Plan for the University in 2020, Homegrown Aspirations, which looked at the work it was already doing to tackle inequality of opportunity in the local area. More recently, the University is part of a new working group of law firms and universities looking at how to level up the law sector. Under the leadership of its previous Vice Chancellor, Professor Mary Stuart CBE, the University of Lincoln has demonstrated how to be a purpose-led and community-centred organisation. This work looks set to continue at pace with the arrival of the new Vice Chancellor, Professor Neal Juster. By collaborating with local schools and industry, it has shown the potential for universities to transform the social and economic landscape in social mobility coldspots and under-served communities. Its MultiAcademy Trust, the campus in Holbeach and the National Centre for Food Manufacturing provide the local area with infrastructure and resources, helping to create progressive pathways for talent in the area. The University of Lincoln is one of the first universities to create an Impact Report based on the Levelling Up Goals framework. This Impact Report acts as the first audit of its work on social mobility, set against the framework of the 14 Levelling Up Goals.

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Foreword

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Foreword

Professor Neal Juster, Vice Chancellor of the University of Lincoln

The University of Lincoln is a university of opportunity. We are very proud of our heritage, being a true civic institution set up by the leaders of the city and county to directly address the needs of Lincoln and Lincolnshire. These themes of opportunity and civic mission run throughout the many activities and initiatives that we contribute to and lead. Lincolnshire is a large county, with many areas of deprivation particularly in the coastal regions. It is therefore vital that we demonstrate our commitment to the Levelling Up agenda and we were very proud to be one of the first signatories to the Social Mobility Pledge. This report summarises the vast range of activities we undertake which go far beyond our core aims of education and research, and are frequently placebased by nature. We are often the “pivot point” for stakeholders to come together and address the key challenges in our region, and this is certainly the

case as we emerge from the pandemic. We know that the impact of COVID-19 has been worsened in areas where there were already significant economic challenges, and it is important that we lead the way in addressing these challenges working with multiple partners and developing innovative recovery mechanisms. The Levelling Up Goals are proving their value in supporting us to step back and think more strategically about our activities. At a university like ours, there is much enthusiasm for this work and to use our convening power to help join up and add to the range of work ongoing in this space. We are grateful for the opportunity to work with Justine and her team and look forward to increasing our impact on the vital levelling up agenda.

We are very proud of our heritage, being a true civic institution set up by the leaders of the city and county to directly address the needs of Lincoln and Lincolnshire. 6


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Foreword

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Introduction

Introduction Levelling up in the context of COVID In the UK, a lack of social mobility has been a persistent problem and, even before COVID, it was often the case that how well a person did in life depended on where they started. The Social Mobility Pledge’s own research had indicated that young people in the UK were finding it harder to progress in the workplace than their parents or grandparents had. It also asked workers aged 18 to 64 how easy it was to get on in life in the UK, regardless of background, and a quarter rated it ‘hard’ or ‘very hard’. Justine Greening first used the phrase “levelled up Britain” in 2015 to set out her view that equality of opportunity should be achieved not by taking opportunity away from those who already have it, but by giving the same access to opportunities to people and communities without them. Elected on a manifesto which vowed to ‘level up every part of the UK’, in his first speech as Prime Minister in 2019 Boris Johnson identified the need to ‘unleash the potential of the whole country’ and close the opportunity gap as one of the biggest challenges for his government. He included not only education and increased productivity as solutions, but improved infrastructure and giving people the chance to own their own home. That ambition is now being more widely reflected across government, industry and civil society as the profound impact of the pandemic across locations, ages and education levels has become clear. COVID has shone a spotlight on many of the inequalities that already existed but its effects have undoubtedly made the task of levelling up the country much more difficult. A report by the think tank, Centre for Cities, estimates that the government’s plan for levelling up the country has become four times harder because of the damage the pandemic has inflicted on the employment market. In his 2020 Spending Review, the Chancellor of the Exchequer confirmed that unemployment rose by 300,000 in 2020 and that the fall in output would be the largest for over 300 years. While it is not expected

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to recover to pre-COVID levels until late 2022, the economic damage is likely to be lasting. The Office for Budget Responsibility provided a reference scenario in which the UK economy would contract by 35%, with unemployment peaking at 10 per cent as a result of COVID. Some sectors such as finance will emerge relatively unscathed with a contraction of just 5%, while others like retail and hospitality will contract by 50% and 85% respectively . That difference in impact across sectors has already resulted in a difference in impact on people. Fifteen per cent of workers in shut-down sectors are from a BAME background compared to 12% of all workers, 57% are women compared to a workforce that is 48% female and those who are low paid are more likely to work in shut-down sectors, as well as less likely to be able to work from home. Young people are particularly impacted with one in three young people under 25 employed in the three sectors most affected by the pandemic - travel, hospitality and retail. While employment levels for those aged 25-64 have fallen by 0.5%, employment levels amongst 16-24 year olds have fallen by 7% . ONS figures reviewing the labour market in February 2021 showed that three fifths of the fall in number of employees came from the under-25s . Across every level of education, the impact of the pandemic has been severe, with the digital divide emerging as a key barrier from primary school through to university. An Institute for Fiscal Studies report assessed that the cost of lost learning could translate to as much as £350bn in lost earnings, with an estimation that pupils stand to lose an average of £40,000 in lifetime earnings, with children from disadvantaged backgrounds most affected. The impact on the health and wellbeing of our children is immense and the threat of a lost generation is very real. Against this challenging background, there is now wide recognition that an organisation’s social impact


Introduction 2

is a crucial part of its governance. The Government has introduced a social mobility agenda into each of its departments and has included the Social Mobility Commission at the centre of government, acknowledging the need for levelling up to be at the heart of its plans. It recognises that does not just extend to jobs and education but also, for example, to sustainable homes, health and infrastructure. Businesses, universities and other organisations are also moving towards delivering a more authentic socially responsible agenda, away from purely corporate governance. Polling carried out by the Social Mobility Pledge reflects what has become much clearer as a result of the pandemic: that the public now expect higher standards of social impact from the organisations that they work for or do business with. The majority also believe that their performance on improving social mobility should form part of how their success is measured. That requires a clear and wide-ranging set of objectives which can form the basis of an organisation’s environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria and shape their focus. For businesses but also for universities, the shift in consumer expectations towards making a positive impact has also increased and so too should the need to build a business strategy and plans around meaningful purpose. In research carried out by the

US Trust as part of the Bank of America Private Bank, 93% of millennials believed that social or environmental impact is important in investment decisions. There is growing pressure from the public and investors for corporate Britain to play its part in solving global challenges, including climate change. That means encouraging as many companies as possible to make a public commitment to reaching net zero emissions. That is the right thing for the country but it is also the smart approach for businesses. There is increasing evidence across markets and sectors of the intrinsic role that having a clear purpose has in underpinning long-term commercial success. Deutsche Bank evaluated 56 academic studies on environmental, social and governance (ESG). Organisations with the highest ESG ratings were found to have a lower cost of debt and equity. 89% of the studies analysed showed that companies with the highest ESG ratings outperformed the market in the medium (3-5 years) and long (5-10 years) term. The Levelling Up Goals have been designed to provide the framework by which purpose-led organisations can address the long-standing issue of poor social mobility more effectively and help communities across the country to recover from the impact of the pandemic.

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Levelling Up Goals

The journey to the Levelling Up Goals In 2015, as Secretary of State for International Development, Justine Greening MP led the UK delegation to the United Nations (UN). Along with 184 international partners, she helped to establish the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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In 2017, the SDGs were made more ‘actionable’ by a UN resolution adopted by the General Assembly which identified specific targets for each goal, along with indicators used to measure progress towards each target. These 17 interlinked, global goals were designed to be ‘a blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all’ . They marked a shift from the previously established Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), following the Millennium Summit of the United Nations in 2000. In contrast to the MDGs, the SDGs were nationallyowned, country-led and targeted wealthy, developed nations as well as developing countries. The SDGs emphasised the interdependent environmental, social and economic aspects of development by centralising the role of sustainability. As Secretary for State, Justine recognised how useful a common set of accessible but ambitious objectives could be in galvanising action to effect change. Since then the COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated many of the problems relating to social inequality in the UK. The recovery is a chance for the United Kingdom to address these issues and level up but that requires updated and specific goals in order to outline, inspire and measure progress. The Purpose


Levelling Up Goals 3

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Strong foundations in Early Years

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Successful school years

3 Positive destinations Post 16+

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recruitment 5 Open

career progression 6 Fair

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Widening access to savings & credit

enterprise 9 Extending

Right advice and experiences

health and well-being 8 Good

the digital divide 10 Closing

for opportunity 12 11 Infrastructure

Building homes & sustainable communities

the energy 13 Harness 14 transition

Achieve equality, through diversity & inclusion

Coalition, of which the University of Lincoln has been a key member, aims to improve social mobility in the UK and has responded to this challenge with the launch of their own Levelling Up Goals in February 2021. These new Goals build on the foundations laid by the UN’s SDGs by outlining 14 clear goals, and draw on expertise provided by academia and businesses which has been applied to the unique challenges facing the UK in levelling up. They focus on key life stages and highlight the main issues that need to be resolved in order to create a level playing field for all in this country. The Levelling Up Goals are intended to guide how the urgent ambition to level up the UK can actually be achieved. The impact of the work carried out to do this can, and should, be measurable. Sub-goals with quantifiable targets and measurements against which progress can be charted within the 14 goals are being developed by the Purpose Coalition in partnership with universities across the UK. This will create a more transparent and mensurable framework with which to monitor and subsequently address problems of social mobility and inequality. The Levelling Up Goals are designed to look at the outcomes of CSR strategies and measures that organisations operate. Many organisations are doing outstanding work and making important contributions to society but are still measuring this via inputs – a measure that focuses on pounds, pennies and numbers rather than real impact on human lives. Crucially, these Goals are a shared framework. Justine and the wider Purpose Coalition believe that with a common understanding and objectives, there can be action that drives change on the ground. Distinct entities, including universities, businesses, policy-makers, communities and NGOs, can work together, with the shared Goals being a uniting and motivating foundation for progress. As the problems which cause social inequality in the UK are interlinked, it seems that the response to these problems must also be collaborative. The Purpose Coalition has encouraged businesses and universities to share their own best practice with other organisations so they are not only demonstrating their own commitment, but creating a shift towards purpose-led organisations. The Goals can encourage an extension of this co-operative exchange of information which can be used to help level up Britain.

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The role of universities

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The university of Lincoln and the role of universities in levelling up and meeting the levelling up goals It has been reported that with current levels of inequality and intergenerational earnings mobility, it could take at least five generations – or 150 years – for the child of a poor family to reach the average income across OECD countries. There are different rates in different countries – for example it can take just two to three generations to reach that average income in the Nordic countries but nine or more in some emerging economies. In the UK, levels of social mobility have been stagnant for some time and there has been a failure to keep up with other developed countries in addressing the issue. The Levelling Up Goals provide an ambitious and strategic approach to address that challenge, setting out for the first time the gaps that need to be removed to successfully facilitate levelling up across the country. They will offer a common framework within which organisations can collate information on what they are doing and how that is making a difference across all key life stages, using a common language. That ambition should also apply to the higher education sector where universities often serve as anchor institutions in their region. Many already have a principle focus on widening access and participation. Reaching into communities that are often furthest away from a level playing field, they

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can be the gateway to opportunity – the chance for an individual to make something of their life, no matter where they were born or what their background is. If that option is not available, it is likely that much of the talent pool that undoubtedly exists in those communities would be wasted, making poor social and economic sense.


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The role of universities

However, a focus on the widening access and participation agenda offers only one perspective of higher education as a driver of levelling up, when the influence of universities actually extends to many other areas. It is often accompanied by innovative thinking on how they might have a wider impact on communities, for example on employability and connections to employers and industry or, with £11bn spent by the sector annually, improved procurement practices to deliver better social value. It should also be recognised that the task of some higher education institutions to connect graduates up with higher paid jobs is harder than for others, though it is often those institutions that have been the most innovative and developed the best practice. Some institutions are allowed to coast when in fact better outcomes should be demanded of them, whilst others are seen as less successful when in fact they are the universities that hugely change life outcomes for the better, and at scale, for disadvantaged people and communities. There needs to be a new approach to higher education and levelling up which strategically assesses how universities are delivering across each of the 14 Levelling Up Goals, the best practice that already exists and the expectations they need to meet. The Goals framework will make it much easier to evaluate that and, as a result, compare it in a consistent way across organisations. This will also help meet society’s expectations, particularly following the pandemic, that they should be working towards the public good. Students reflect that sentiment and expect their institutions to pursue policies of procurement and sustainability, for example, that deliver positive social value. The University of Lincoln has acknowledged the important part that it can play as a higher education institution in the levelling up agenda. It has demonstrated best practice on building on the strengths of a disconnected community and leveraging the private sector, capitalising on existing local agricultural industries to upskill local roles.

This work would meet Goal 3 Positive destinations post-16, Goal 4 Right advice and experience, Goal 5 Open recruitment and Goal 9 Extending enterprise. Its approach is all the more effective because it is part of a bigger effort on levelling up by the University which is embedding it into its wider strategy for the long term. This audit examines how it is doing that in more detail and identifies more clearly where it is focusing its efforts and how effectively it achieves its strategic aims. There is a real opportunity for universities to be part of the solution to the levelling up agenda in this country. The University of Lincoln has already embarked on that journey and, as part of the Purpose Coalition, will be working towards more transparent and measurable outcomes.

The University of Lincoln has acknowledged the important part that it can play as a higher education institution in the levelling up agenda. 13


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Assessment

Assessment of the university of Lincoln in the context of Levelling Up Goals Many organisations have strong commitments to traditional Corporate Social Responsibility and the ESG agenda. We have already seen through the University of Lincoln’s previous work with the Social Mobility Pledge that the University has a strong social conscience and that it is committed to working toward levelling up Britain through social mobility. This section of this report will map several of the University of Lincoln’s specific initiatives against the Levelling Up Goals, to track where progress is being made and where efforts could be redirected or better targeted.

But universities could be the exception to this trend. Because their activity is inherently place-based, rather than sector specific, the higher education sector is uniquely positioned to make tangible differences across many of the goals.

Below is a list of the Levelling Up Goals, their definitions, and our team’s assessment of how the University of Lincoln is currently meeting them. These have been assessed through a document It is important to note that it would be difficult for review process that takes account of previous any one organisation to work effectively toward commitments, future strategies, implementation of every single one of the Levelling Up Goals. As more statutory requirements, and the University’s research; organisations adopt the goals, it could be more efficient we then map the amount of activity done by the for individual organisations to focus on particular areas University of Lincoln across each of the Levelling Up where they can make a real impact, rather than making Goals. We can then progress to measuring specific a superficial impact across many goals. impact across these activities.

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1 Strong foundations in Early Years

Close the early years development gap by delivering the best possible start for every child

school years 2 Successful

3 Positive destinations Post 16+

Right advice and experiences

recruitment 5 Open

Every child successfully achieving their potential in attainment and development

Every young person and adult to have the choice of a high quality route in education, employment, or training

Access to the right advice and experiences at the right time to unlock opportunity through a person’s life

Careers and professions open to people of all backgrounds through transparent, accessible, and open recruitment practices

Establishment of University of Lincoln Academy Trust

Establishment of National Centre for Food Manufacturing and Institute of Technology creates an ecosystem of opportunity

Students able to engage with local employers through National Centre for Food Manufacturing

Recruitment transparency

World-leading research in field of education Schools Champion programme Science and Computing Hubs Lincolnshire Learning Lab

Creation of University Campus North North Lincolnshire Skills Transformation Degree Apprenticeship programmes WOW Summer School

career progression 6 Fair

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Widening access to savings & credit

health and well-being 8 Good

Career Transition Partnership

Work with local UTC College and other schools Strong local links and education providers Specific criteria in recruitment panels Lincoln Connect Opportunity Fund SteepHill Careers Podcast Central Careers Activity Education Liaison Team Engagement with a range of local employers to ensure students have access to the right advice and experiences. enterprise 9 Extending

the digital divide 10 Closing

Opportunities for career advancement for all based on ability and potential, not connections

Widening access to responsible credit and closing the savings gap

Improving mental and physical health at all ages to boost overall well-being to allow people to fulfil their potential

Extending private enterprise and entrepreneurship to all people and communities

Closing the digital divide in technology access, skills, opportunities, and infrastructure

Training and Development programmes

Student Funding Team

Wellbeing Services adapted to support remote-learning students

National Centre for Food Manufacturing’s location specifically chosen to bring enterprise to left behind community

World-leading research in the field of computer science and informatics.

Number of initiatives to support employees

World-leading research in health aligned fields

Sparkhouse Incubation Centre Student Enterprise Team

Laptop loan programme

Productivity Hubs Programme

Open access digital skills courses

Greater Lincolnshire Innovation Council

Digital Student Life initiative

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Assessment

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Creating affordable quality homes so people can live in safe and sustainable communities

Ensure that the energy transition is fair and creates opportunities across the UK

Create a level playing field on opportunity for all, to fully unleash Britain’s potential for the first time

World leading research into architecture, built environment, and planning.

Promotion of net zero schools

Online Orientation Week has explicit focus on students with protected characteristics.

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Developing the physical infrastructure that connects people and places to opportunity

Participation on Towns Boards Support for Humber Freeport Representation on Investors in Lincoln Board and Greater Lincolnshire LEP

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the energy 13 Harness transition

for opportunity 11 Infrastructure

Building homes & sustainable communities

Encouraging of outdoor study and leisure Sustainable medical school

Key partner in regional projects to reduce carbon emissions including Agrifood, Humber Freeport, Logistics and supply chain.

Achieve equality, through diversity & inclusion

Work with Bright Networks Community of Practice for widening participation Eleanor Glanville Centre Access and Participation Plan


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Assessment

Key Strengths:

Goal 3:

Goal 8:

Positive Destination Post 16+

Good health and well-being

Through its seamless offering of apprenticeships from Level 2 to Level 7, the University of Lincoln supports a range of apprenticeships and spreads opportunity throughout the region. The University’s outreach programme ensures that higher education is accessible to a diverse range of people, evidenced by its high proportion of students coming from low participation backgrounds.

The Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health plays a crucial role in local health and wellbeing and focuses specifically on the health needs of communities in left-behind rural and coastal areas. The University of Lincoln is also involved with a transitional mental health project which delivers sessions on managing change and emotional fitness to support students in Years 11-13.

Key Activity Strengths

Goal 9:

Extending enterprise The National Centre for Food Manufacturing was built in the town of Holbeach as it would disproportionately benefit from the initial investment into the site as well as future opportunities created by other employers. The University of Lincoln is also involved in many other initiatives and partnerships to extend enterprise within the region, such as the Greater Lincolnshire Innovation Council and Barclays Eagle Labs.

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Assessment

Through its seamless offering of apprenticeships from Level 2 to Level 7, the University of Lincoln supports a range of apprenticeships and spreads opportunity throughout the region. 18


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Assessment

school years 2 Successful

Has the organisation helped to allow every child to successfully achieve their potential in attainment and development? The University of Lincoln has submitted research in the field of education, with 42% of submitted research being classed as world-leading or internationally excellent. In 2011, the University of Lincoln began sponsoring a secondary academy in Holbeach. This has since evolved into a multi-academy trust, responsible for the education of over 2,500 young people across five schools. STEM university departments are closely aligned to the local Science Hub (the Science Learning Partnership) and Computing Hub. University staff provide CPD to serving teachers, using their expertise to support subject knowledge enhancement. Lincoln has a clear focus on improving outcomes for students, offering subject-specific as well as aspirational talks to schools for their young people. The University provides a Lincoln-based contribution to the National Saturday Club, giving 13-16 year olds a chance to study art and design. Lincoln has a wide range of extra-curricular activities that support young people including: the Christmas lecture programme; the National Science Week programme of talks; subject-specific competitions; the Sixth Form Geography Conference; Python programming courses; the School Scientist of the Year Awards and a growing programme of masterclasses delivered by academics in schools. The aim is to make higher education visible to young people and to build connections with them, reducing barriers to participation in university. To support the schools and colleges across their region, each school/department at the university has an academic nominated as Schools Champion. This programme brings outreach across the university together and ensures good practice is shared. Established by the School of Education at the University of Lincoln in February 2021, Lincolnshire Learning Lab is a group set up to help improve the learning of all children and the working environments for teachers within Lincolnshire. The purpose is to bring academic rigour and evidence-based research into the classroom by engaging the three key stakeholders – teachers, academics, and anyone involved or interested in the education system, such as parents and educational consultants.

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Assessment

3 Positive destinations Post 16+

Does the organisation support young people and adults to have the choice of a highquality route in education, employment, or training? The University of Lincoln established the University Campus North Lincolnshire, which offers courses aligned to local and national industry needs, serving young people unable to access education and training at other locations. The University of Lincoln Academy Trust provides strong offerings on both academic and vocational courses, looking at the needs of local employers as well as the widening participation agenda the university has. The University and its schools have a pathway to the National Centre for Food Manufacturing, a satellite campus located next to one of their schools, allowing pupils to have easy access to high quality equipment as well as work opportunities. The University of Lincoln is unique in its seamless offering of apprenticeships from Level 2 to Level 7 for key roles, including degree apprenticeships in Food Engineering and the Level 7 Research Scientist Apprenticeship. The National Centre for Food Manufacturing supports over 350 apprentices in 70 businesses. Establishment of the Lincolnshire Institute of Technology as the higher education anchor working with two further education anchors, four other FE colleges, Lincoln UTC and two employer anchors. The Institute of Technology specialises in meeting the higher technical skills needs of the Agri-tech, Food Manufacturing, Energy, Digital and Engineering sectors across Greater Lincolnshire. The IoT has ambitious targets to increase the numbers of under-represented groups and females in these fields and levels of education. The IoT offers technical education and industry placements for both school leavers and mature students (as they up- or re-skill) to meet the evolving regional job market and emerging new opportunities, e.g. decarbonisation and sustainable energy development. The University of Lincoln is a founding partner with North Lindsey College and North Lincolnshire Council of the University Campus North Lincolnshire based in Scunthorpe. The creation of coherent education pathways from Level 3 to Level 6 and beyond is driving greater engagement and aspiration for tertiary education and with the subsequent award of High Street and Town Fund grants reinforcing the development of a more dynamic town centre. The University has developed a range of Degree Apprenticeships, with a particular emphasis on those areas that support local economic priorities and key sectors. These programmes have enabled access to HE for those re-entering education, whilst supporting the recruitment and development needs of local employers, with particular emphasis on health, business leadership, engineering and the food sector. The WOW Summer School gives potential students with mental health conditions and/or autistic spectrum disorders the opportunity to develop coping strategies to deal with challenges in advance of enrolling on a course. A specific programme of events has been created by the Student Wellbeing team in a 3-day programme and 2-night stay on campus during the summer before they enrol. This gives them the opportunity to engage socially with their peers and to build strong relationships which could potentially last for the duration of their study. In 2019/20 - 19.4% of students at the University of Lincoln came from Low Participation Neighbourhoods. This is compared to a UK average of 11.8%.

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Assessment

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Right advice and experiences

Does the organisation provide access to the right advice and experiences at the right time to unlock opportunity through a person’s life? The University and its schools have a pathway to the National Centre for Food Manufacturing, a satellite campus located next to one of their schools, allowing pupils to have easy access to high quality equipment as well as work opportunities. The University of Lincoln is planning to develop a range of activities to engage young people with the businesses that will eventually operate within the Enterprize Zone at Holbeach. 2,100 of the 2,500 students in the University of Lincoln Academy Trust are in close vicinity to the National Centre, and the University of Lincoln has connected the talent pipeline to the opportunities at the employer facing campus of the Centre. The University has worked with the Education Business Partnership (EBP) to model a scholarship scheme that provides work experience with an employer during their programme and the guarantee of a graduate level position on completion. The scheme is designed to work with local employers, supporting the GLLEP economic priorities and to support the ambition to retain graduates in the county. The University has worked closely with the local UTC college to support levelling up and improved aspirations. Current academics sit on the board of governors in a supportive role, and a number of initiatives have been delivered. For example, in 2018 MSc students delivered inspirational lectures at the UTC, which supported work to increase the number of university applications. The following year, a mentorship scheme was set up where Lincoln students provided weekly mentorship for UTC students.

Lincoln Connect is the University of Lincoln’s online mentoring platform. In the past two years it has secured over 1,000 registered users. The platform supports students from under-represented groups to gain information, advice and guidance through a mentoring network of industry experts. The Careers & Employability team have worked with employer partners and Alumni to create 15 industry groups throughout this academic year, with 544 current users generating 1,577 private messages between themselves. The Opportunity Fund was created to support students from under-represented groups to access experiential learning opportunities. Last academic year the fund supported 38 under-represented students resulting in 11 graduate jobs, 7 placements/internships, and 6 work experience opportunities. The SteepHill Careers Podcast embraces Lincoln’s innovative approaches to engaging students and has been created as a direct result of student feedback for audio content. The creation of the student-led podcast interviews students and graduates from widening participation groups empowering them to share their own stories of resilience in adversity, offering tips and advice to colleagues listening in. Along with established Arts and Social Science provision, since 2011 the University has founded seven new STEM schools (engineering, mathematics & physics, chemistry, pharmacy, geography, computer science and life sciences) developing regional industrial collaboration around skills and innovation needs.

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Assessment

recruitment 5 Open

Are careers and professions open to people of all backgrounds through transparent, accessible, and open recruitment practices? Career Transition Partnership – as part of being a Gold level holder of the Armed Forces Employer Recognition Scheme Lincoln utilises the Armed Forces Career Transition Partnership which seeks to promote vacancies to individuals leaving the Armed Forces where skills crossover. Internal training is undertaken by all recruitment panel members along with unconscious bias training. Activities to ensure best practice is adhered to include gender language reviews of job descriptions and adverts, pilot blind recruitment, monitoring of application, short listing and candidate offer data. Recruitment panels – University of Lincoln has set criteria in respect of the makeup of recruitment panels and also includes student panel members for academic appointments and external panel members for benchmarking standards.

career progression 6 Fair

Does the company offer opportunities for career advancement for all based on ability and potential, not connections? Career Pathways and Management and Leadership development programmes are in place and work alongside University staff Online Learning platforms offering both professional and personal skills development. Lincoln recognises its importance locally as a major employer and has a number of initiatives to ensure colleagues are supported in the right way. Internal programmes to support progression in underrepresented areas include the Aurora Programme, Inspire Leadership Programme, Executive Coaching, Local School Mentoring Scheme, and Pipeline Mentoring Scheme. Career Pathways was created in response to the University of Lincoln’s staff survey, where it became clear that clarity and transparency were required to support professional service career development between the grades 2 – 10. The aim is to highlight the generic transferable skills at each grade, giving greater awareness of career opportunities not just within your current department, but across the wider organisation. ILM Level 3 and 5 – these awards in management and leadership explore leadership roles and theories, self-leadership, emotional intelligence, winning and maintaining commitment, setting and communicating direction. It is particularly valuable for managers in leadership roles who are keen to underpin and demonstrate clearer knowledge of the principles and practice of effective leadership. The Pipeline Inclusive Mentoring Scheme (PIMS) - adopts an inclusive mentoring approach and is open to all staff (academic and professional services/support) and postgraduate students (PGR/PhD) at the University who wish to develop their careers, improve their working environment, expand their understanding, and take advantage of the mentoring opportunities offered. Technician Commitment - The Technician Commitment is a national university and research institution initiative, led with support from the Science Council. The technicians commitment aims to improve the visibility, recognition, career development and sustainability for technicians working in higher education. The University of Lincoln is a signatory to this scheme.

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5

Assessment

7

Widening access to savings & credit

Does the organisation help widen access to responsible credit and close the savings gap? The University’s Student Funding Team administers a range of hardship funds which are available to students to access. This includes specific funds for estranged students and those coming from care.

health and well-being 8 Good

Does the organisation improve mental and physical health at all ages to boost overall well-being to allow people to fulfil their potential? The University of Lincoln has submitted research in the field of the allied health professions, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy, and 86% of this is recognised as being either world-leading or internationally excellent. The Lincoln International Institute for Rural Health has been established to build on this expertise and to focus specifically on the health needs of communities in left-behind rural and coastal areas. The University’s Wellbeing Centre has retained a core physical presence on campus for vulnerable students and to respond to concern for welfare cases during COVID, and their delivery has been adapted to support students who are remote learning. Outreach work in schools as part of the Office for Students funded transitional mental health project delivers sessions on managing change and emotional fitness to support students in Years 11-13 as they transition out of secondary education, preparing them for their post-16 destinations whether this be FE/HE, work or apprenticeships. To date 26 separate transitional outreach visits were made to 14 schools, both face to face and during the pandemic by virtual means. 2,061 students, ranging in age from Year 11 to Year 13, took part in sessions with the project team. An additional 10,713 pre-entry and transitional students, parents, carers and teachers accessed virtual sessions. The University’s pharmacy school helps a county that has struggled to recruit pharmacists.

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5

Assessment

9

Extending enterprise

Does the organisation work to extend private enterprise and entrepreneurship to all people and communities? Research and innovation activities and strengths have been developed that deliberately link to the assets and needs of the surrounding area along with key industries. These are driving global collaboration with regions, their universities and sectors around the world with shared research challenges. The University of Lincoln has submitted research toward business and management studies, and 54% of this research is recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent. The National Centre for Food Manufacturing’s location in the town of Holbeach was specifically chosen by the University of Lincoln as it would disproportionately benefit from the initial investment into the site as well as future opportunities created by other employers. Creation of an engineering school acted as an anchor for large local employer Siemens, safeguarding an existing industry and offering fast-track training to Lincoln graduates. Sparkhouse Incubation Centre supports start-ups in their first two years of trading through offering physical or virtual space with dedicated business support, access to an Enterprise Manager, business events, workshops, mentoring, peer to peer support. The ideas HUB is a dedicated space available for any student entrepreneurs to work on their business. The Student Enterprise Service offers 1-1 advice and guidance to those with an idea to startup and/or those in early stages. Informative bootcamps and workshops on practical business advice are organised regularly and this year 250 new students/graduates have engaged in these services. The Student Enterprise Team has developed a 12-week module for practical support for students, which is now embedded in the Business School’s curriculum for Business Management students. In the face of COVID-19, Lincoln has had an impact on 170 start-ups in the past year, all of which have been supported through the Business Incubation & Growth team through one or more of these mechanisms. The Productivity Programme supports Greater Lincolnshire businesses to innovate and grow through a range of support including grant funding, specialist business support, academic expertise, graduate internships and start-up funding. The University established and leads the Greater Lincolnshire Innovation Council, which steers regional innovation strategy and reports into the Greater Lincolnshire LEP Board. Barclays Eagle Labs has partnered with the University of Lincoln to open an AgriTech hub focusing on the future of farming located at the Riseholme campus.

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5

Assessment

the digital divide 10 Closing

Is the organisation working to close the digital divide in technology access, skills, opportunities, and infrastructure? The University utilised funding from the Office for Students to enhance its loan laptop scheme to buy laptops for students requiring support. The Digital Student Life initiative, launched in 2016, involves working in partnership with students to develop digital resources offering peer to peer advice and guidance to other students. This includes a range of resources specifically focused on digital tools and the skills needed by students to make best use of them. The University of Lincoln has submitted research in the field of computer science and informatics, and 42% of this is either world-leading or internationally excellent. The University provides delivery of open-access digital skills courses, developed by students and released to the community on YouTube. The “programming fundamentals” videos have been shared with local schools networks, and students from non-computing subject areas. The University offers a weekly introduction to programming live-stream delivered through YouTube, accessible to anyone. The first stream focused on teaching individuals how to write code in python, one of the most employable languages in the world. The second series (to be released later in 2021) will focus on games development.

for opportunity 11 Infrastructure

Is the organisation developing the physical infrastructure that connects people and places to opportunity? The University is on all six of the Greater Lincolnshire Towns Boards (Scunthorpe, Grimsby, Lincoln, Boston and the combined Mablethorpe and Skegness Connected Coast Board) and the Newark Board. The University of Lincoln has partnered with the University of Hull to support Humber Freeport development. In 2015 the University, supporting its local and regional creative ecology, established the Centre for Culture and Creativity and brought into the University regional arts programmes to support culture in the region, now all supported by the Arts Council. The University is represented at senior level on the Investors in Lincoln Board as well as the Business Improvement District, supporting physical developments across the city. Since its foundation the University has worked closely with the City Council to integrate the development of the campus with the wider regeneration of the city. The University has supported specific infrastructure and transport service developments, including the integrated Transport Hub and working with partners to bring enhanced train services, connecting Lincoln directly to London. Two Deputy Vice-Chancellors and other staff members serve on the GLLEP Board and are actively involved in writing local economic growth plans such as the Local Industrial Strategy.

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5

Assessment

12

Building homes & sustainable communities

Is the organisation helping people live in quality, affordable homes so people can live in safe and sustainable communities? The new Medical School building is the most sustainable building on campus, having achieved an Energy Performance Rating of ‘A’ and the BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating. It features solar panels, a solar wall and a green wall to enhance biodiversity and support pollinators. The University is improving its outdoor spaces at Brayford by installing over 50 benches to encourage outdoor study and leisure, replanting flower beds and borders to support pollinators, and continuing to provide volunteering opportunities at the ‘kitchen garden’, an open access allotment area for staff and students. The University of Lincoln has submitted research into architecture, built environment, and planning, and 21% of this research is world-leading or internationally excellent.

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Harness the energy transition

Is the organisation ensuring that the energy transition is fair and creates opportunities across the UK? Lincoln is working to reduce carbon emissions arising as a result of the operation of its estate. A 34% reduction was achieved between 2009/10 and 2019/20. Energy and Clean Growth research at the University of Lincoln is shaped by local assets and industrial needs from across our rural coastal geography. These include: a diverse mix of energy and heat generation methods (including the offshore wind industry and innovative Anaerobic Digestor plants); local industrial processes which have already incorporated hydrogen as an alternative fuel; industries that have significant opportunities to decarbonise, such as agrifood and logistics; and local capacity constraints that are particular to rural areas. The Lincoln Climate Commission is working with Lincolnshire Teaching Schools Together on the Ambition Lincoln project to promote the Let’s Go Zero schools campaign to 38 schools in Lincoln. The University is a founding member of the North Lincolnshire Skills Transformation Group, which is setting the strategic agenda to deliver skills transformation across the region as the requirement and commitment to decarbonise the Humber and develop sustainable energy solutions accelerates.

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Assessment

14

Achieve equality, through diversity & inclusion

Is the organisation working to create a level playing field on opportunity for all, to fully unleash Britain’s potential for the first time? The University contributed to the development of an Online Orientation Week prior to the start of teaching aimed at new students (and particular groups of students, such as those who are care leavers, disabled, or Black, Asian and minority ethnic). The Community of Practice (CoP) for widening participation staff at the university was conceived and created by the APPEP team with ongoing support from the Head of Student Services in 2019. It includes professional staff based in marketing, student support, wellbeing, the library, careers; Human Resources based Equality and Diversity practitioners, Students’ Union officers and academic members of staff including lecturers and researchers. Members share their expertise and are bound by a common purpose and passion - supporting potential entrants from under-represented groups to access HE, do well and have the best experience possible and realise the benefits of HE in their future lives. The Access and Participation Plan Evaluation Project team evaluate APP interventions across the student lifecycle in support of the APP targets. Their recent and ongoing evaluations and capacity building work has included: • The impact of the University of Lincoln’s financial support on students who are traditionally under-represented in HE (in 2017/18; 2019/20 and 2020/21) as well as the financial assistance funds (see section on post-16 destinations). The Scholarship represents a significant financial investment on the part of the university and a sizeable proportion of its Access and Participation budget. Their evaluations have found that providing a scholarship for students from households with an annual income of less than £45,875 per year helps to give the “Scholarship group… equivalent outcomes to the comparator group suggesting financial support continues to ‘level the playing field’ between Scholarship recipients and their peers”. • A systematic literature review to support colleagues involved in access and outreach focussed on APP access targets- to increase enrolment of students from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds and students from lower Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) quintiles. • A report on the ways in which APP staff can engage care experienced students with interventions to access, success and progress whilst at the University to be shared with the CoP and APOG. • Ongoing student consultation – the APPEP team regularly consult with students from under-represented groups to inform APP activity and have undertaken a longitudinal COVID-19 study over three phases to identify the ways in which the pandemic has impacted on under-represented groups and how, with university support, they can be mitigated. The Careers and Employability Service has built relationships with Bright Networks, 1hourproject.org and more recently EmployAbility. In 2021, Lincoln partnered with EmployAbility so disabled students could access the service for 1:1 support, helping them to understand their rights, adjustments in the workplace and to access advocacy.

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Assessment

Output and Outcomes This section will consider how the aforementioned activities and their inputs, both financial and in terms of manpower, result in associated outputs and subsequent outcomes. The listed outputs have been noted from available data; while given the absence of current universal measurement for social impact in the company, outcomes have been implied. As the availability of data increases, with increased adoption of impact tracking and measurement, both outcomes will be more readily reported against. This will be highly effective for benchmarking the impact of any social impact project the University of Lincoln progresses with.

school years 2 Successful

Has the organisation helped to allow every child to successfully achieve their potential in attainment and development? Activity

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

Establishment of University of Lincoln Academy Trust

Educate 2,500 young people across 5 schools.

Thousands of young people in Lincolnshire are able to enter the ecosystem of opportunity.

World-leading research in field of education

42% of research in the education field is worldleading or internationally excellent.

Schools Champion programme Science and Computing Hubs

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Best practice in education further developed.


5

Assessment

3 Positive destinations Post 16+ Does the organisation support young people and adults to have the choice of a high-quality route in education, employment, or training? Activity

Establishment of National Centre for Food Manufacturing and Institution of Technology creates an ecosystem of opportunity Creation of University Campus North North Lincolnshire Skills Transformation

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

NCFM supports over 350 apprentices in 70 businesses.

Opportunity is on the doorstep of many people in the area.

19.4% of students at the University of Lincoln are from Low Participation Neighbourhoods (UK average is 11.8%).

People able to earn while studying toward a degreelevel qualification. Extending opportunity to a diverse range of people.

Degree Apprenticeship programmes WOW Summer School Inclusive and targeted outreach programmes

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5

Assessment

4

Right advice and experiences

Does the organisation provide access to the right advice and experiences at the right time to unlock opportunity through a person’s life? Activity

Students able to engage with local employers through National Centre for Food Manufacturing Work with local UTC College and other schools and education providers Lincoln Connect Opportunity Fund

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

2,100/2,500 students are within the National Centre for Food Manufacturing’s area.

People have the ability to access high quality work experiences right on their doorstep.

Lincoln Connect has over 1,000 registered users. Careers & Employability Team has 544 current users generating 1577 messages. Has engaged 5 students from widening participation groups and has 231 graduates registered as both mentors and mentees.

SteepHill Careers Podcast Central Careers Activity Education Liaison Team

Opportunity Fund has supported 38 under-represented students resulting in 11 graduates jobs, 7 placements/internships and 6 work experience opportunities. Central Careers Activity has supported 20 care leavers, 401 diabled students, 120 mature students, 110 BME students and 423 Polar 1&2 students. It has organised and delivered workshops attended by 40 care leavers, 752 disabled students, 301 mature students, 290 BME students, and 951 Polar 1&2 students. The Lincoln Award Active student has had 10 care leaver student participants, 67 BME student participants, 263 disabled student participants, 95 mature student participants, and 305 Polar 1&2 student participants.

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Students usually underrepresented in education are able to access monies to help them access jobs, experiences, and placements they might not usually be able to access.


5

Assessment

recruitment 5 Open

Are careers and professions open to people of all backgrounds through transparent, accessible, and open recruitment practices? Activity

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

Positions at the university and related institutions accessible to all through transparency, wide advertising, and balanced recruitment panels.

Recruitment Transparency Career Transition Partnership Strong local links Specific criteria in recruitment panels

career progression 6 Fair

Does the company offer opportunities for career advancement for all based on ability and potential, not connections? Activity

Output

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

Outcome (Implied)

These are the more intangible benefits

Training and Development programmes

Students are able to train and develop.

Number of initiatives to support employees

Employees are supported to progress.

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5

Assessment

7

Widening access to savings & credit

Does the organisation help widen access to responsible credit and close the savings gap? Activity

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

Students are supported to study with fewer money issues.

Student Funding Team

health and well-being 8 Good

Does the organisation improve mental and physical health at all ages to boost overall well-being to allow people to fulfil their potential? Activity

Wellbeing Services adapted to support remote-learning students World-leading research in health aligned fields.

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Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

86% of research in allied health professions is either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Health professions benefit from more high-quality research.

26 outreach visits have been made to 14 schools with 2,061 students taking part in sessions with an additional 10,713 pre-entry and transitional students.

Students are able to access mental health support remote and in person.


5

Assessment

enterprise 9 Extending

Does the organisation work to extending private enterprise and entrepreneurship to all people and communities? Activity

National Centre for Food Manufacturing’s location specifically chosen to bring enterprise to left behind community Sparkhouse Incubation Centre

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

54% of research in the field of business is world-leading or internationally excellent.

Business expertise is developed and disseminated through research.

Student Enterprise Service has engaged with 250 new students/graduates.

Students and graduates are able to start and grow businesses.

Lincoln has had an impact on 170 start ups in the past year.

Start-up community in Lincoln supported.

Student Enterprise Team Productivity Hubs Programme

the digital divide 10 Closing

Is the organisation working to close the digital divide in technology access, skills, opportunities, and infrastructure? Activity

World-leading research in the field of computer science and informatics. Laptop loan programme

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

42% of research in the field of computer science is either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Students are able to access and correctly use digital technology. Knowledge of computing developed through research.

Open access digital skills courses Digital Student Life initiative

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5

Assessment

for opportunity 11 Infrastructure

Is the organisation developing the physical infrastructure that connects people and places to opportunity? Activity

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits Able to help strategically develop support for towns.

Participation on Towns Boards Support for Humber Freeport Representation on Investors in Lincoln Board and Greater Lincolnshire LEP

12

Building homes & sustainable communities

Is the organisation helping people live in quality, affordable homes so people can live in safe and sustainable communities? Activity

World leading research into architecture, built environment, and planning. Encouraging of outdoor study and leisure Sustainable medical school

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Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

21% of research in the field of architecture, built environment, and planning is world-leading or internationally excellent.

People live and work in a more sustainable area.

Over 50 benches have been installed to encourage outdoor study.

Best practice in planning and architecture developed and disseminated through research.


5

Assessment

the energy 13 Harness transition

Is the organisation ensuring that the energy transition is fair and creates opportunities across the UK? Activity

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

Promotion of net zero schools

Let Go Zero schools programme promoted to 38 schools.

Schools helped to become net zero.

Reducing carbon emissions

A 34% reduction was achieved between 2009/10 and 2019/20.

Contributing towards the journey to net zero.

14

Achieve equality, through diversity & inclusion

Is the organisation working to create a level playing field on opportunity for all, to fully unleash Britain’s potential for the first time? Activity

Online Orientation week has explicit focus on students with protected characteristics. Work with Bright Networks

Output

Outcome (Implied)

These are the measurable things e.g. no of people participating

These are the more intangible benefits

Provided 1:1 support for 19 disabled students.

All students are supported to achieve whatever their background.

Community of Practice for widening participation Eleanor Glanville Centre Access and Participation Plan

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LEVELLING UP

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