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FALL 2011 WHERESD.COM

San Diego

®

Celebrating 75 years of Where

ARTS

AZ TO

THE SEASON’S 26 HOTTEST CULTURAL HAPPS DESTINATION DINING BEER AND WINE TASTING FASHION ICON RACHEL ZOE RETAIL DETAILS

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where San Diego Fall 2011 the guide 48 DINING Restaurants by cuisine and neighborhood

63 ENTERTAINMENT Festivals, performing arts and sports

69 ATTRACTIONS + MUSEUMS Landmarks, theme parks and exhibitions

71 SHOPPING The best retail destinations

72 NIGHTLIFE Hot clubs, lounges and cocktail bars

74 TOURS + TRANSPORT Getting out, getting around

76 MAPS Navigate the county

city tours 26 28 30 32 34 36 38

18

Stone Brewing World Bistro and Gardens

where now

features

4 Gourmet From potato chips to cigar leaf, local confectioners get creative with the ingredients they pair with chocolate.

12 Arts & Culture A to Z The season’s 26 most unmissable cultural happenings, in alphabetical order.

6 After Dark Meet tequila’s feisty cousin, mezcal.

18 Drink at the Source S.D.’s local breweries and wineries are getting national attention; find out where you can sip and see how it’s done.

7 Style Rachel Zoe on fall’s top trends, plus why you won’t find any scissors at Del Mar’s newest hair salon. 8 Shopping: Where to find it Get to know fall’s must-have trends; plus: up-and-coming SoCal jewelry designers worth watching.

BY MAYA KROTH

BY ANNE MACLACHLAN

22 Destination: Delicious From sleek Tijuana kitchens to dining rooms kissed by ocean waves, these six out-of-the-way restaurants are worth the drive. BY NEAL ALEXANDER

Downtown la Jolla beach Cities uptown North Coast Old Town balboa park

ALSO INSIDE 3 42 44 80

HOT DATES GOLF GUIDE NIGHT CRAWLER 30 THINGS WE LOVE

ON THE COVER Noh Kyung-Hwa, The Pain Mask Series #6, is just one of hundreds of works featured at the Art San Diego contemporary art fair, Sept. 1-4. Read more about fall’s top cultural happenings on p. 12. Photo courtesy Art San Diego and Arts Management International Corporation, Osaka, Japan. CONNECT WITH US ONLINE

wheretraveler.com Get the city buzz from WHERE editors worldwide online and on your smartphone. FALL 2011 WHERE SAN DIEGO 1

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Art. Conservation. Community.

where

san diego

magazine

On the Web: WhereSD.com publisher Jeff Levy EDITOR Maya Kroth ART DIRECTOR Bree Berri

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Nicole Bordges MARKETING DIRECTOR Audrey Nimura ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR PRODUCTION ARTIST

Heidi Schwindt

Ryan Furuya

CONTRIBUTING ART DIRECTOR

Carol Wakano

contributing WRITERS

Neal Alexander, Nina Garin, Ashley Morrow Hermsmeier, Anne Maclachlan contributing photographers

Rich Cook, Amy K. Fellows, Bjarne G. Jensen, Rebecca Morquecho, Edwin Santiago, Brett Shoaf, Ashok Sinha, Ian White ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Joanna McLean, Laura Renner, Heather Howard, Sara Kemp, Mali Mochow, Laura Napolitano, Scott O’Hanlon CIRCULATION MANAGER Jordan Fraser PRoduction manager Dawn Kiko Cheng web manager Christina Xenos administration

Leah Bigelow, Leanne Killian, Beth Moline, Christine Noriega COPY EDITOR

Claire Caraska

Vice President of National Sales Rick Mollineaux 202.463.4550

MEET THE ARTIST live gallery show appearance

November 13, 2011 | 12-4 PM

HONORARY president

Ted Levy

where San Diego

3990 Old Town Ave., Suite B200 San Diego, CA 92110 Phone: 619.260.5599 Fax: 619.260.5598 EMAIL Advertising Nicole.Bordges@WhereSD.com Business JLevy@WhereSD.com Editorial Maya.Kroth@WhereSD.com Art Art@WhereSD.com Production Ads@WhereSD.com Website Christina.Xenos@WhereSD.com Circulation Jordan.Fraser@WhereSD.com Plan ahead for your next visit to San Diego— subscribe to where: Single copy $4, 4 issues $16. Contact: Jordan Fraser, phone: 619.260.5599, E-mail: Jordan.Fraser@WhereSD.com

Wyland Galleries | 855 W. Harbor Drive, #52 | San Diego, CA 92101 Gallery Hours: Open Daily, 10 AM – 9 PM | 800-WYLAND-5 www.wyland.com “Visit Wyland Galleries San Diego and mention this ad for a free Wyland print.”

© 2011 Southern California Media Group. All Rights reserved Published by Southern California Media Group. where makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly prohibited. where is a ­registered trademark of Morris Visitor Publications.

Printed in the United States. Circulation audited by Audit Bureau of Circulations

In San Diego, where magazine is pleased to be a member of San Diego Concierge Association, Gaslamp Quarter Association, San Diego Convention & Visitors Bureau, San Diego Historical Society.

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WHAT’S SIZZLING IN SECONDS FLAT

Hot Dates Fall 2011

SEPTEMBER ARTS MONTH It’s no secret fall is the season for culture in San Diego, but now the mayor’s gone and made it official, dubbing September the city’s definitive Arts Month. The culturepalooza kicks off with an international contemporary art fair, Art San Diego, on Sept. 1. p. 12 SEPT. 18-23 SAN DIEGO RESTAURANT WEEK More than 160 restaurants citywide offer three-course tasting menus for $20, $30 or $40 per person. p. 64 SEPT. 24-25 ADAMS AVENUE STREET FAIR SoCal’s largest free two-day music festival puts 70 musical acts on six stages in Normal Heights. p. 63 SEPT. 28-OCT. 2 SAN DIEGO FILM FESTIVAL Five-day bonanza in the Gaslamp showcases independent feature films, documentaries and shorts between glitzy, starstudded parties. p. 63 SEPT. 23-OCT. 31 HALLOWEEN Yes, Halloween lasts all month in San Diego. Can’t-miss events include Scream Zone in Del Mar, downtown’s Haunted Hotel and Balboa Park’s Haunted Trail, plus the adults-only Monster Bash and costume contest in the Gaslamp. p. 65

Classic cars race at the Coronado Speed Festival

SEPT. 16-OCT. 2

A salute to the soldiers Even as the city has diversified its economy and become a leader in fields like clean energy and biotech, San Diego is still a military town at heart. That spirit is never more clearly on display than during the annual Fleet Week, which is actually a two-week celebration of our men and women in uniform. The event kicks off Sept. 16 with a night on the town called Operation Liberty Call, followed by the Fleet Week Big Bay Family Festival on the weekend. Nostalgia seekers should check out the Coronado Speed Festival (Sept. 24-25), a race of classic autos from the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s. The world’s best civilian and military pilots are the stars at this year’s headline event, the Miramar Air Show. See the Blue Angels in action, along with the Air Force F-22 Raptor and F-16 Falcon, a jet truck, vintage warbird fly-bys and more (Sept. 30-Oct. 2). p. 64 INFO The Miramar Air Show is held at the Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar. Admission is free and open to the public. Gates open at 8 am daily; the Saturday twilight show begins at 5:30 pm. Preferred seating is available at additional cost. For tickets and information call 858.577.1000 or visit miramarairshow.com.

Y

SEPT. 30-OCT. 2 AND OCT. 8 OKTOBERFESTS Oom-pah your way through one of S.D.’s favorite annual traditions, complete with beer, brats and polka. The La Mesa Oktoberfest is one of the nation’s largest (Sept. 30-Oct. 2), while the one in Ocean Beach features a popular sausage toss (Oct. 8). p. 63 OCT. 9 LITTLE ITALY FESTA Held near downtown, the Little Italy Festa attracts some 120,000 attendees with Italian food and a street chalk painting display. p. 63 NOV. 4-13 SAN DIEGO BEER WEEK Hundreds of events throughout the city—including beer dinners, festivals, rare bottle tastings, cheese pairings, brewery tours, classes and more—celebrate S.D.’s vibrant craft beer culture. p. 64 NOV. 12-20 AMERICA’S CUP WORLD SERIES Get within feet of the 45-foot boats will sail along the waterfront in this high-stakes race. Find beer gardens, music and more at the event village on Broadway Pier. NOV. 16-20 SAN DIEGO BAY WINE + FOOD FESTIVAL SoCal’s largest wine and food fest features cooking classes, wine-tasting seminars, exhibits, wine dinners and celebrity chefs. p. 63 ONGOING SAN DIEGO CHARGERS NFL team takes on opponents including the Green Bay Packers, Oakland Raiders and more at Qualcomm Stadium. p. 68

S.D. has no basketball team of its own, but NBA fans find solace this fall, when the Lakers and the Clippers play a friendly at the Valley View Center Oct. 25. p. 68

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where now San Diego

the best in entertainment, shopping and dining.

Âť Dining

Gourmet There are some things in life that need no improvement—rich, artisanal chocolate being one of them. But local chocolatiers aren’t content resting on their laurels and have been busy concocting ever more wild, and wildly satisfying, combinations, from exotic herbs to potato chips.

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News Bites DOWNTOWN The Gaslamp Quarter’s beloved Café Sevilla has reopened after a move to a new location on Fifth Avenue in the heart of the city’s nightlife district. Even one day after reopening the place was already bustling with regulars who had missed the Spanish restaurant’s signature tapas, sangria, flamenco shows and dancing during the extensive renovation (353 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.233.5979). A stone’s throw from the ballpark, the Knotty Barrel aims to take game-day food up a notch with betterquality ingredients in dishes like Parmesan truffle fries and a bison burger with Stilton and heirloom tomatoes, plus a vast selection of craft beers replacing the watered-down national-brand stuff. But it’s not all so highbrow at this low-key neighborhood spot: For dessert, try a deep-fried Twinkie—with housemade whipped cream and raspberry purée, natch (844 Market St., East Village, 619.269.7156).

Artisan truffles from Eclipse

CHUAO CHOCOLATE It may sound like an Elvis-caliber combo to some, but to others the union of salty, crispy potato chips and creamy milk chocolate (pictured at left) is inspired. Find these bars while supplies last at one of Chuao Chocolatier’s three chocolate cafés, including the one in the Lumberyard shopping center. 937 S. Coast Highway 101 #C-109, Encinitas, 760.635.1444 ECLIPSE CHOCOLAT Handmade using sustainably sourced cocoa beans and many organic ingredients, these small-batch truffles are infused with a seasonally changing array of unusual flavors. This fall, look for a sweet potato spice truffle with grains of paradise, an African botanical, and another that pairs the musky scent of cigar leaf with banana compote and rum. 2121 El Cajon Blvd., University Heights, 619.578.2984

NORTH COUNTY Two of central San Diego’s most popular chefs make their move on North County this fall. Brian Malarkey—known locally as the toque behind Searsucker in the Gaslamp and nationally as a finalist on Bravo’s Top Chef—debuts Burlap as part of the Del Mar Highlands shopping center’s recent $20 million renovation. Malarkey describes the theme as “Asian Cowboy,” with an east-meets-west menu complete with raw bar, and bold décor from celebrity designer Thomas Schoos (12995 El Camino Real #21, Del Mar, 858.369.5700). Meanwhile, Chef Matt Gordon of North Park’s Urban Solace brings his sophisticated comfort food to Encinitas with Solace and the Moonlight Lounge. Expect seafood-heavy fare at this coastal spot, including oyster stew, sumac-rubbed Alaskan sockeye salmon and a California spot prawn boil (25 East E St., Encinitas, 619.295.6464). Café Sevilla

CHI CHOCOLATE Adventurous tastes will love the artisan truffle spiked with lemongrass and ginger, while the cardamom bonbon is a seasonal favorite. 2690 Historic Decatur Road, Liberty Station, Point Loma, 619.546.0650 FALL 2011 WHERE SAN DIEGO 5

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where now San

Diego

» nightlife

Introducing: Mezcal Mezcal, tequila’s feisty Oaxacan cousin, is having a moment. Made from the roasted hearts of the maguey plant, mezcal boasts a distinctive smokiness, which makes it fantastic for mixing into cocktails. Check out how local barkeeps are using this newly trendy spirit, because, as they say in Mexico, para todo mal, mezcal; para todo bien, también (for everything bad, mezcal; for everything good as well).

El Take It Easy The cocktail list at this North Park gastrocantina makes copious use of mezcal in drinks like the Aguacaliente; named after Tijuana’s fabled racetrack, the drink pairs mezcal with Damiana, sweet vermouth and lime. There’s also The Long Goodbye, a mezcal-flavored twist on Raymond Chandler’s drink of choice, the gimlet. 3926 30th St., North Park, 619.291.1859 El Vitral Though most famous for its tequila selection (250-plus bottles), this spot also carries eight single-village Oaxacan mezcals. Sip it on its own or splurge on a Chilango Margarita. Made with a host of high-end spirits including Clase Azul Ultra, Grand Marnier 150, Del Maguey tobola mezcal, the rare Palo Cortado aged sherry and fresh lime juice, the drink sells for a whopping $300 apiece. 815 J St., East Village, 619.236.9420 Craft + Commerce Try the Tequila Gumption at this Little Italy hotspot, a stirred drink made with tequila, mezcal, maraschino liqueur and two kinds of bitters (orange and Angostura). 675 W. Beech St., Little Italy, 619.269.2202

The Long Goodbye at El Take It Easy

La Mezcalera Located on Tijuana’s hip Sixth Street, this was the first bar in the region to spotlight the spirit, pouring 20 different types, both flavored and non. If the straight stuff is too much, try a creamy mocha mezcal slushy served over crushed ice in a copper mug. Calle Sexta #8267 (between Av. Revolución and Madero), downtown Tijuana

THE ART OF BEER When you’re the new kid on the block in a swanky arts district, it’s wise to fit in. That’s why Bottlecraft, a new craft beer store and tasting room, designed itself to look like an edgy urban art gallery, with minimalist décor and industrial accents. The place feels like a retail store by day, bar by night; with more than 500 local and international bottles in stock, including several hardto-find cult brews, it’s become the goto spot among local beer snobs. Any bottle in the store can be chilled and

imbibed right on-site at the communal benches or around the small mellow bar, or test your taste buds with a blind flight, offered every Tuesday, while noshing on a “pubcake” (that’s right, cupcakes made with beer). Beer education’s on the menu as well: guests can sniff four different types of hops, sample varieties of barley and wheat and compare tasting notes. Who says beer can’t be high-brow? Daily noon to 10 pm at 2161 India St., Little Italy, 619.487.9493.

Bottlecraft

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Rachel Zoe: Empress of Style Stylist, editor, designer, author, wife and—new to the list— mom, Rachel Zoe hits a runway-worthy stride this fall. In addition to a flourishing career dressing starlets, the fashion expert recently launched her first full retail line, a glamorous collection of autumn looks deserving of her signature catchphrase “I die!” This month, look for the season four premiere of Bravo’s The Rachel Zoe Project, an addictive reality series documenting the drama of Zoe’s fashion-filled life. Here, the “a-mah-zing” Zoe reports to WHERE on the season’s top trends, globetrotting necessities and hopes for her son Skyler’s first fashion show. —Kristina Jenkins and Rosie Leonetti

secret to looking fabulous on the road? Is there a particular piece that everyone should have in their travel wardrobes? Sunnies and a great scarf are essential! And a jumpsuit is always great for travel—comfortable yet super-chic and versatile. Try and pack fabrics that don’t wrinkle and always carry on your valuables.

» BEAUTY

What do you never leave home without when you’re going on a trip? A Birkin. Do you have a favorite vacation spot? St. Barths.

“Team Zoe“ on season three of The Rachel Zoe Project

What is on your radar for fall 2011? Definitely the tuxedo look—suits, dresses and jumpsuits. Sequined tops and cardigans; pantsuits— anything brocade, tweed or military-inspired. Metallics from Oscar de la Renta, Stella McCartney and Balmain; polka dots from Lanvin and Marc Jacobs; bright colored coats from the Row, YSL, Burberry and Celine.

From styling and designing to writing a best-selling book and starring in your own TV show, you have built an empire. You’re also a new mom. How do you balance it all? I love what I do—I have the best job so it never feels like work. And the constant support of the greatest husband and an incredible team makes the balance totally doable.

There is often a fine line between being fashion forward and becoming a fashion victim. What are your tips for navigating trends? Never wear too many trends at once—don’t be a fashion victim. Know your body and have everything tailored, whenever possible. It’s the easiest and most crucial component to achieving both comfort and confidence with every look.

Has your son been to a fashion show yet? If not, whose show will you take him to first? No, he hasn’t yet—but I am so excited to share the experience of fashion week with him! He will obvi[ously] have to see Oscar, Donna, Marc, Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci and Versace—to name a few. You and your clients have traversed the globe. What is the

Where in the world do you most love to shop (cities, specific boutiques, etc.)? Paris! I am obsessed with the Parisian culture, it’s so timeless and chic. Every time I am there I spend an entire afternoon shopping for vintage at Didier Ludot and Scarlett—I die! Is there a favorite find you’ve brought home from a trip? Too many to choose from— probably all of my vintage furs. What/where is the best museum you’ve ever visited? Coco Chanel’s apartment in Paris—it’s the closest I can get to her. Seriously major! What is your most memorable fashion moment? When I went as Marc Jacobs’ date to the 2010 Met ball in the most amazing yellow velvet gown from his collection. Who would you love to dress that you haven’t already? I love all my clients. I am so lucky! They are all so beautiful inside and out. But I think Michelle Obama would be fun—her style is so classic yet modern and chic. Love her!

Trendy tresses Del Mar’s newest salon has no scissors, no color and most definitely no perm solution. Drybar, located at the Del Mar Highlands Center, is a blow-dry-only establishment. Pick from a menu of looks that include the sleek “Manhattan” and the beachy “Mai Tai” for a flat-rate of $35, regardless of hair length. Already a popular destination in L.A. and Orange County, Drybar features crisp décor, a rotation of girlie movies on flat screens, complimentary beverages, iPhone docks and light bites and treats. 12857 El Camino Real, Del Mar, 858.771.0820 FALL 2011  WHERE SAN DIEGO  7

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Where to find it You heard it from style icon Rachel Zoe (p. 7): Metallics are hot for fall. Sassy silver, bold gold, brazen bronze: You name it, you’ll find it all over men’s and women’s clothing and accessories this season—even nail polish and makeup. Pair these metallic accents with rich jewel tones, specifically bordeaux, burgundy and other variations on the red-wine theme (autumn is harvest season, after all). Here, we’ve rounded up a few of our favorite fall finds to help keep you on-trend. tiffany & CO. This open bottle pendant by designer Elsa Peretti also comes in silver, but the 18-carat gold version pictured here looks dynamite with fall’s red-wine color palette ($3,850). Available at: Tiffany & Co., Fashion Valley Mall, 7007 Friars Road, 619.297.7200

Christian Louboutin These glittery “Ziggy” open-toe stiletto booties pop with metallic accents and a six-inch heel ($1,395). Available at: Neiman Marcus, Fashion Valley Mall, 7027 Friars Road, 619.692.9100

Sauvage This plum-colored Morocco bikini from La Jolla designer Elizabeth Southwood was recently featured in Sports Illustrated. With its hand-sewn beads and stones, it hits the right note for the season ($196). Available at: Sauvage, 1025 Prospect St., La Jolla, 858.729.0015 tumi This expandable carry-on from Tumi’s Alpha International collection in blackberry can coordinate with your fall wardrobe and still look classic next season ($595). Available at: Tumi, Westfield UTC, 4505 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla/Golden Triangle, 858.453.1079

Tiffany by Josh Haskin

guess Named Sparkling Pink in honor of breast cancer awareness, this watch not only looks good, it does good, too: 20 percent of proceeds go to Susan G. Komen for the Cure ($105). Available at: Guess, Westfield Horton Plaza, downtown, 619.544.1844

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Where to find it Locals only Thread started in a San Diego backyard and has since grown into one of the most important indie-fashion trunk shows on the West Coast, showcasing hundreds of under-theradar SoCal creatives. Here, Thread organizers round up a few up-and-coming local jewelry designers worth watching. See their creations Oct. 9 at Thread (threadshow.com) or at the boutiques listed below.

jeweliany Made by SDSU metalsmithing grad Julie Simpson, these 18-carat vermeil hoop “prism charm” earrings feature lemon quartz, black onyx, feather charm and black Swarovski ($110). Available at: Dolcetti, 635 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619. 237.4413

MARISSA DEL ROSARIO These edgy Gen X cuffs come in 14 different colors with silver, gold, bronze or antique brass hardware ($60). Available at: Thread, Oct. 9 at Horton Event Space, Fourth and Broadway, downtown, threadshow.com

CONFECTION jewels This retro-modern Voltron cocktail ring is eye-catching with its vintage-glass cabochon mounted in natural polished brass ($65). Available at: Noon, 4993 Niagara Ave., Suite 105, Ocean Beach, 619.523.1744

Mimi&lu Designer Michelle Watson created this enchanted bangle accented with gold-filled wire and Czech fire-polished glass beads ($46). Available at: Nicole Miller, 1923 Calle Barcelona, Suite 141, Carlsbad, 760.632.7000

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Forget Something? Find whatever you've left behind and more at Westfield Horton Plaza's 120 specialty shops including: Brookstone CVS Pharmacy Ritz Camera San Diego Luggage Sunglass Hut Travelex Currency Services GET CONNECTED Like Us on Facebook

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Propuesta pa’ billete de 34 dlls (Proposal for 34 Dolar Bill), by featured Art San Diego artist Daniel Ruanova.

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San Diego’s no mere sleepy beach town: from cutting-edge dance to indie film to top-class touring stage productions, S.D.’s got it. Here, in alphabetical order, are the 26 most unmissable cultural happenings of the season. By maya kroth FALL 2011  WHERE SAN DIEGO  13

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arts & culture A to Z

group Geronimo Jackson on the show. The band’s latest, Born with Stripes, boasts a straight-from-the-‘70s sound, complete with shambling melodies, mellow organic grooves, lyrical references to Sirhan Sirhan and Susan Atkins, two sitar ragas and the psychedelically titled song “Kaleidoscope.” “We’re older souls,” says bassist Tim DeNardo, who lists Talking Heads, Elvis Costello and David Bowie among his influences. “We’re craving for that golden era.”

ENTIJUANARTE

Steeped in so much geopolitical complexity, it’s no wonder the south-of-the-border art scene is sizzling. There’s no better way to survey the breadth of Tijuana talent than at enTijuanarte. One of the most important cultural events in northwestern Mexico, enTijuanarte showcases nearly 200 established and emerging artists working in all media in a weekend-long expo at Centro Cultural de Tijuana, as well as off-site events throughout the week. Legendary muralist José Clemente Orozco is the featured guest at this year’s fest, Oct. 3-9.

The Donkeys

ART SAN DIEGO

Who says beach towns can’t also be art meccas? Hoping to do for San Diego what Art Basel did for Miami, the Art San Diego contemporary art fair (Sept. 1-4) attracts 60 galleries from four continents to show work by more than 500 artists in convention center-style booths; specialized programming includes a spotlight on the art of Argentina, a showcase of local artists and an exhibition of contemporary furniture design along the San Diego/Tijuana border. There will also be performances, conversations with artists and designers and Powering San Diego’s Creative Economy, a oneday conference produced by The Urban Land Institute that may just upend the city’s reputation as nothing but a sleepy beach town.

BEER WEEK Craft is king in San Diego, named the No. 1 beer town in the country by Men’s Journal. Though its signature beer style is a hops-heavy, giant-flavored brew called Double I.P.A., S.D.’s 40-odd breweries also brew up an array of lighter styles. Taste the

rainbow during November’s Beer Week— actually 10 days—comprising more than 400 beer dinners, homebrew demonstrations and other events throughout the city.

CLASSICAL GETS COOL Who needs tuxedos, conductors or even a traditional concert hall? Not Luscious Noise and the Art of Élan. These alternative chambermusic groups stage concerts featuring innovative work by young, up-and-coming composers in unusual locations like museums and nightclubs; they incorporate film clips, dancers and rising musical stars from other cities. Through it all, they’re succeeding at doing what so many traditional arts groups still haven’t mastered: attracting the coveted younger demographic. DONKEYS, THE

Local band The Donkeys makes summer music for the land of the endless summer. If you were a rabid fan of TV’s Lost, you may already know these guys, who portrayed the fictional hippie

FASHION AS ART The Timken Museum in Balboa Park has a slew of fall events that explore the intersection between fashion and fine art. Chaired by British fashion designer Zandra Rhodes—“the Princess of Punk” who once dressed Lady Di—The Art of Fashion includes a fashion show of garments inspired by 15 artworks from the museum’s collection (Sept. 22 and 24), as well as an ongoing exhibition of those creations displayed on mannequins, plus a gallery talk with designers (Oct. 5) and related events throughout the month of October. GILBERT CASTELLANOS

San Diego’s top trumpeter has also been recognized by the likes of Downbeat magazine as one of the best in the nation, having shared stages with Dizzy Gillespie, Wynton Marsalis, Diana Krall, Willie Nelson, Michael Bublé and Natalie Cole. The son of a Mexican cumbia singer who happened to love bigband jazz, Castellanos’ own music combines two longtime influences: modern hardbop and Latin rhythms. Hear it on his latest release, Underground, or live every Wednesday night at El Camino in Little Italy, where

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Anthology Lounge, home to alt-classical group Luscious Noise

he hosts a free weekly jam session with his New Latin Jazz Quintet.

HARVEST SEASON Fall in San Diego means one thing: Julian apples. Each September when the weather cools, locals drive to Julian, a one-time gold-mining town now famous for its apples—and the delicious pies, turnovers, tarts and cider made from those apples. There’s no better time to visit than during the two-month-long Julian Apple Days celebration, when the leaves are turning and events include an Oktoberfest, wine tours and apple picking. INDIE FLICKS Just call us Sundanceby-the-Sea: We’ve got a fall film festival for every taste. The San Diego Film Festival (Sept. 28-Oct. 2) is known for its glitzy, starAnna Kendrick and Joseph GordonLevitt in 50/50 at San Diego Film Festival

studded parties, while the critically acclaimed Asian Film Festival (Oct. 20-28) brings in flicks from Pakistan to the Philippines. With special parties and panel discussions, the Italian Film Festivale (Oct. 29-Nov. 12) celebrates not just the cinema of Italia but also its social and culinary traditions, while the BestFest Student Film Festival spotlights work by the Scorseses and Spielbergs of tomorrow (Sept. 10).

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR Tony-winning director Des McAnuff brings his much-buzzed-about revival of the Tim Rice/Andrew Lloyd Webber rock opera from Canada’s Stratford Shakespeare Festival to the La Jolla Playhouse, where he spent 17 years as artistic director. Telling the story of the last week of Christ’s life, McAnuff’s all-new version has been praised by critics and even Webber himself, who called it “the best acted performance of the show I have ever seen.” Rumor has it that Broadway might be next.

KAESHAMMER

Classically trained in piano in his native Germany, Michael Kaeshammer discovered American boogiewoogie at age 13 and was soon playing concerts and festivals all over Germany. With wicked-fast fingers and rhythm in his soul, just seeing Kaeshammer play piano is en-

tertainment enough for one evening, but the multitalented musician takes it up a notch by singing along to his own songs. Now based in Canada, Kaeshammer’s latest self-titled album was released earlier this year. He plays at Anthology Sept. 28.

LORD OF THE RINGS IN CONCERT This nine-city West Coast tour celebrates the 10th anniversary of one of the top-grossing films of all time. More than 250 musicians from the Munich Symphony Orchestra, Pacific Chorale and Phoenix Boys Choir will perform Howard Shore’s entire Oscar- and Grammy-winning Fellowship of the Ring score, live on-stage, while Peter Jackson’s epic is projected digitally on an immense 60-foot screen. When this tour premiered in New York in 2009, some 10,000 fans came out to hear how Shore recreated Middle Earth in music, crafting leitmotifs for Frodo, Bilbo and the rest. This is just the start of a three-year rolling celebration: Look for The Two Towers tour next year and The Return of the King in 2013. LOTR In Concert hits San Diego Oct. 13.

MEXICAN MODERNISTS The San Diego Museum of Art’s new executive director has helmed some of Mexico City’s most important museums, and now she brings that expertise Stateside. In November, FALL 2011  WHERE SAN DIEGO  15

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arts & culture A to Z

NORTH PARK Near the northeast edge of Balboa Park is one of San Diego’s edgiest arts districts. Street art is everywhere, and the galleries on and around tiny Ray Street come alive during the monthly Ray at Night artwalk, showcasing anything from paintings and prints to sculptural jewelry— even skateboards. Anchoring the district is the restored historic Birch Theatre, where Lyric Opera San Diego presents off-beat musicals, like this fall’s Mame (Sept. 23-Oct. 2). ORCHESTRA NOVA

Performing for 25 years as the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, this group of more than three dozen seasoned players recently changed its name and updated its mission: to take the stuffiness out of chamber music. Led by artistic director Jung-Ho Pak, the orchestra now presents cheekily named programs like “Mozart ❤ Prague” (Oct. 22-24), which features guest pianist Ines Irawati on a program that includes La Clemenza di Tito Overture, a piano concerto and Mozart’s Symphony No. 38; and the cross-genre “Bach, Baroque

and All That Jazz,” with local jazz star Richard Thompson (Nov. 19-21).

PACIFIC STANDARD TIME

New York has always been the center of the American art world—or has it? Initiated by the Getty in L.A., this massive region-wide collaboration of more than 60 SoCal cultural institutions celebrates the birth of the West Coast art scene, tracking genres from Pop art to performance art between 1945 and 1980. Two San Diego museums are participating: the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, whose Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface explores the perceptual work of artists like Robert Irwin and Bruce Nauman; and the Mingei International Museum in Balboa Park, which spotlights San Diego-based craft artists who gained national notoriety for their innovations in furniture, jewelry and ceramics.

QUINT GALLERY

With a new address in the heart of chic La Jolla, the area’s hottest gallery rose to prominence on the keen eye of its owner, Mark Quint, who’s got a knack for spotting rising talent like local Kelsey Brookes, a biochemist turned creator of raw, color-splashed animalistic canvases. The gallery, which also represents international art stars like Ryan McGinness, presents a blockbuster group show this fall showcasing Light & Space artists Larry Bell, Peter Alexander, Mary Corse and Robert Irwin—an ideal complement to MCASD’s Phenomenal exhibition (see above).

ROCKY HORROR SHOW

One of the 20th century’s most enduring cult films is coming back to its roots as a stage musical at The Old Globe in Balboa Park. Meant for mature audiences, the wicked-and-weird show follows clean-cut suburban couple Brad and Janet as their car breaks down in the middle of nowhere, leading them to the home of creepy Dr. Frank-N-Furter. Featuring the nowiconic music and lyrics of playwright Richard O’Brien (who appeared in the 1975 film as the character Riff Raff), the show promises to be just as campy, titillating and interactive as its filmic counterpart (Sept. 15-Nov. 6).

SINATRA

The music of Ol’ Blue Eyes is smoldering as ever, even a half-century after the release of his first chart-topping hits. Sinatra is the latest musical heavyweight to get the Broadway treatment at the hands of famed choreographer Twyla Tharp (Billy Joel’s Movin’ Out, Bob Dylan’s The Times They Are A Changin’). The touring production of Come Fly Away (Nov. 8-13) pairs Sinatra’s original masters with a live 14-piece big band and 15 world-class dancers, which together tell the story of four couples falling in and out of love (note to parents: some content is a bit suggestive). The same weekend, Vegas-based Sinatra interpreter Rick Michel sings Sinatra Forever at the Birch Theatre, backed by a dozen musicians, veterans of the Chairman’s own bands.

TROLLEY DANCES

You’d be hardpressed to find stranger bedfellows than modern dance and public transportation, yet Trolley Dances is a union that works. Over the course of two weekends (Sept. 24-25 and Oct. 1-2), viewers spend the day traveling on the San Diego trolley, stopping periodically to view six dance performances, each designed in response to its setting—a freeway underpass, say, or a public fountain. Renowned choreographers Paz Tanjuaquio (NYC), Minerva Tapia (Tijuana) and Jean Isaacs (San Diego) are a few of the featured talents behind this year’s 13th annual event.

URBAN ART TRAIL Look around the Orchestra Nova

city and you’ll see art in unexpected places: the side of a building, a bus bench, a simple

(opposite) Philipp Scholz Rittermann

SDMA shows 80 paintings from the Andrés Blaisten Collection of 20th-century Mexican art, borrowed from its permanent home at Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco in the Mexican capital. The collection includes pieces by heavyweights like Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Rufino Tamayo, as well as lesser-known talents like Alfonso Michel, Federico Cantú and Angel Zárraga. It opens Nov. 5.

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DETAILS

James Turrell, Stuck Red and Stuck Blue, 1970, at MCASD’s Phenomenal, part of Pacific Standard Time

utility box, each decorated with a oneof-a-kind work of art. It’s all part of the Urban Art Trail, a project that began as an effort to beautify downtown’s gentrifying-yet-grafitti-covered East Village neighborhood. With the city’s blessing, a local graphic design professor enlisted her students to decorate unsightly utility boxes, and the project has expanded to include murals, sidewalk poetry, mosaics, birdhouses and benches, replacing urban blight with visual delight.

X STORE AT MCASD One of the coolest museum gift shops in town, the X Store is a perfect place to pick up a little something for the folks back home— even the ones who have everything. With design-minded home décor pieces, art-inspired jewelry and an array of quirky books, the selection goes way beyond mere exhibition catalogs—though you’ll find those, too. With lavish illustrations, the one for this fall’s Phenomenal exhibition promises to be a keeper.

VERTIGO DANCE COMPANY Founded by co-artistic directors and real-life couple Noa Wertheim and Adi Sha’al, this Israeli dance company splits its time between a Jerusalem studio and an eco-art village on a kibbutz, which lends its work a socially conscious slant. On Oct. 19, the company debuts its latest work, Mana, as part of UCSD’s ArtPower! performance series. The sparse, engaging piece features fluid yet unexpected choreography; stay after the show for a conversation with the artists.

YACHT ROCK Ever since it was skewered in a series of cult web videos, the “smooth music” of acts like Don Henley, Steely Dan and Journey has found an unlikely new fanbase in Generation Y. Identified with ‘70s- and ‘80sera yacht-owning yuppies, the genre’s newfound popularity has prompted all three of these acts to dust off their guitars and deck shoes and set sail once again. You can catch them all on San Diego stages this fall; see sidebar for dates and details.

WINE + FOOD FESTIVAL

ZUKERMAN, PINCHAS

More than 70 of San Diego’s top toques plus an all-star cast of celebrity chefs get together for this four-day festival of epicurean delights at San Diego Bay. From Nov. 16-20, guests can enjoy gourmet eats, sample libations from dozens of spirits purveyors, take cooking and wine tasting classes, participate in a bottle auction and taste more than 800 different wines (hopefully not all in one sitting).

One of the world’s most acclaimed violinists, Pinchas Zukerman makes a cameo as a guest of the San Diego Symphony for a concert featuring the most iconic Austrian-German composers: Strauss, Schumann, Bach and Mozart. Zukerman plays and conducts the Bach Violin Concerto in E, while Juno Award-winning cellist Amanda Forsyth is the featured performer on Schumann’s famous Cello Concerto. 

Art San Diego Sept. 1-4 at Hilton San Diego Bayfront, 1 Park Blvd., downtown, artsandiegofair.com Beer Week Nov. 4-13, various venues, sdbw.org Luscious Noise tinyurl.com/noise2011 Art of Elan Oct. 11 and Nov. 29 at San Diego Museum of Art’s Hibben Gallery, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.232.7931, artofelan.org The Donkeys Born with Stripes available at M-Theory Music, 915 W. Washington St., Mission Hills, 619.220.0485 enTijuanarte Oct. 3-9; weekend expo Oct. 7-9 at CECUT, Paseo de los Heroes #9350, Tijuana, entijuanarte.com The Art of Fashion Oct. 1-30 at the Timken Museum, 1500 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.239.5548 Gilbert Castellanos performs Wednesdays at El Camino, 2400 India St., Little Italy, 619.685.3881 Julian Apple Days Sept.-Oct., julianappledays. com San Diego Film Festival Sept. 28-Oct. 2 at the Gaslamp 15, 701 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, sdff.org San Diego Asian Film Festival Oct. 20-28 at UltraStar Cinemas, 7510 Hazard Center Drive, Mission Valley, sdaff.org San Diego Italian Film Festivale Oct. 29-Nov. 12, various venues, sandiegoitalianfilmfestival.org Best Fest Student Film Festival Sept. 10 at UltraStar Cinemas, 7510 Hazard Center Drive, Mission Valley, bestfestamerica.com Jesus Christ Superstar Nov. 18-Dec. 31 at La Jolla Playhouse, 2910 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, 858.550.1010 Michael Kaeshammer Sept. 28 at Anthology, 1337 India St., Little Italy, 619.595.0300 Lord of the Rings Oct. 13 at Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., Midway, 619.224.4171 Mexican Modern Painting Nov. 5-Feb. 19 at SDMA, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.232.7931 North Park 30th St. at University Ave., 619.294.2501 Orchestra Nova various locations, orchestranova.org Phenomenal Sept. 25–Jan. 22 at MCASD, 1100 Kettner Blvd., downtown, 858.454.3541 Craft Revolution Oct. 16–April 15 at Mingei International Museum, 1439 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.239.0003 Quint Gallery New Work, Sept. 23–Nov. 12, 7547 Girard Ave., La Jolla, 858.454.3409 Rocky Horror Show Sept. 15-Nov. 6 at the Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23. GLOBE Come Fly Away Nov. 8-13 at San Diego Civic Theatre, Third Ave. at B St., downtown, 619. 564.3000 Sinatra Forever Nov. 11-13 at Birch Theatre, 2891 University Ave., North Park, 619.239.8836 Trolley Dances Sept. 24-25 and Oct. 1-2, Grantville station, Mission Valley, 619.225.1803 Urban Art Trail urbanarttrail.com Vertigo Dance Company Oct. 19 at Mandeville Auditorium, UCSD, 858.534.TIXS Wine + Food Festival Nov. 16-20 at Embarcadero Marina Park North, 500 Kettner Blvd., Embarcadero, 619.312.1212 X Store at MCASD, 700 Prospect St., La Jolla, 858.454.3541 Don Henley (Sept. 25) and Steely Dan (Oct. 14) at Harrah’s Rincon Open Sky Theatre, 777 Harrah’s Rincon Way, Valley Center, 800.745.3000 Journey Oct. 7 at Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre, 2050 Entertainment Circle, Chula Vista, 619.671.3500 Zukerman Plays and Conducts the San Diego Symphony Oct. 14-16 at Copley Symphony Hall, 750 B St., downtown, 619.235.0804

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DRINK AT THE SOURCE Whether you’re a Cabernet snob or a hop-head, you’ll find something worth toasting in San Diego, whose ingenious brewers and vintners have earned national praise. From cool brick urban brewhouses to North County vineyards with the warmth of the Tuscan countryside, find out where to taste these award-winning made-in-S.D. libations. BY aNNE MaClaCHlaN

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(opposite) istockphoto.com/mustafa deliormanli, (This page) istockphoto.com/Cameron Whitman

BREWERY TOURS We dare you to step up to the bar at Escondido’s Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens and shout “Arrogant Bastard” at the ‘tender. Go on; we’ll watch. But you’ll like the outcome. Stone Brewing Co. has sired a line of “Bastard” Ales: Arrogant, Oaked Arrogant, Lucky and Double. Of course, if you’re feeling Sublimely Self-Righteous, there’s an ale for that, or you can always chase down a Dumb Blonde. Public walk-in tours, which are free and include tastings, operate several times per day in groups of no more than 25. Because these tours fill so quickly, visitors must be on the premises to check in; no phone or email reservations are taken. Pick up a pass at the Stone Company Store after 11 am to snag a place. Larger groups of 10 to 35 can make reservations for private tours as well. Pizza Port’s Solana Beach brewery, established in 1987 directly across from the Amtrak and Coaster station, is the lynchpin of the company’s several locations. The casual beach theme is played up here, and at any given time business execs will be bending elbows next to sandy surfers fresh from the nearby waves. All Pizza Port locations serve pizzas, salads and “portzels”— giant, beer-crust pretzels loaded with anything from feta cheese to sundried tomatoes—but the brews on tap vary daily depending on each brewer’s whim. Check the online Tap Cam to see which of the company’s 100 beers are pouring today. In Solana Beach, four large fermenters are set into a sunken brew room, beneath which are the sub-floor coolers. If you want to branch out from Pizza Port’s signature Swami’s IPA, tastings are $4.25 for four three-ounce pours (cost is higher for brews over eight percent alcohol). On the wall next to the fermenters is the “Geek Board,” which tracks the progress of each brew in the roughly 11-day process— not to mention the growing number of pushups a certain employee owes the boss for being late. It’s all in good fun, though—a reflection of Pizza Port’s welcoming, family-friendly atmosphere. An old name under new ownership and location, Mission Brewery opened its doors earlier this year in the old Wonder Bread factory in the East Village. This is a place for fans of the art of brewing, as questions and wandering are encouraged. Plans are being made to “make it a show,” as tasting manager Mike Peterson puts it, to allow public viewing of all phases of the process. As Mike points out, Mission Brewery is a tasting room: no bar bites or food menu here. Dogs are welcome, and patrons can be found strolling through the huge establishment, trying out the ancient 23-foot shuffleboard, or bellied up to one of two long wooden bars. Nearby are six enormous 2,000-gallon fermenters (16 more are planned). The added beauty here is the 1894 architecture, along with the way the brewery has adapted the Wonder Bread factory to its cur-

details

Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens 1999 Citracado Parkway, Escondido, 760.471.4999 Pizza Port 135 N. Highway 101, Solana Beach, 858.481.7332; 1956 Bacon St., Ocean Beach, 619.224.4700 and 571 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, 760.720.7007 Mission Brewery 1441 L St., East Village, 619.544.0555 Bernardo Winery 13330 Paseo Del Verano Norte, Rancho Bernardo, 858.487.1866 Cordiano Winery 15732 Highland Valley Road, Escondido, 760.469.9463 Carruth Cellars 320 S. Cedros Ave. #400, Solana Beach, 858.847.9463

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rent use. The grain silo is used as originally intended, the gently sloping factory floors are perfect for drainage and the soaring wooden arches overhead have been maintained to add to the atmosphere. Currently, Mission Brewery offers five brews, among which are their award-winning Mission Blonde and Hefeweizen (gold medalists in the 2011 Los Angeles International Commercial Beer Competition) and their specialty, the “Shipwrecked” Double IPA. Tastings are $5 for a flight of five four-ounce pours, $5 per pint and $7 per “Shipwrecked.”

WINERIES In operation since 1889, Bernardo Winery is the oldest established vineyard in San Diego. So large that it sports four parking lots, the vineyard also features boutiques, artist studios, a Friday morning farmer’s market, occasional live music and its own coffee shop. A visit here is like stepping into the 19th century; everything seems sepia-toned and rustic. It’s dog- and kid-friendly, though the establishment requests that both be kept under close watch

CERVEZA Y VINO EN MEXICO The alcohol alchemy continues south of the border, where an exploding population of homebrewers is putting Northern Mexico’s beer scene on the map, while a growing wine country in the Guadalupe Valley east of Ensenada is the toast of Mexico’s epicurean elite. With its signature red-andsilver logo, Tecate Brewery is named for the charming border

village that houses it. Fans say it’s the local water, tapped from natural springs, that makes the light, effervescent brew taste so good. The drive to Tecate is scenic, winding through the rolling hills of San Diego’s East County; once you’ve crossed at Tecate’s tiny port of entry, continue going straight: the brewery is just a few blocks away at Dr. Arturo Guerra 70. Free tours are offered every hour (M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa 10 am-2 pm). Be sure to leave time for

ice cream and people-watching in the enchanting zócalo, or central square. Closed-toed shoes are required, and tour reservations are recommended; call 665.654.9478 or email juan.vera@cuamoc.com to schedule. From Tecate, you can catch Highway 3 south toward Ensenada to pass through the Guadalupe Valley, Baja California’s wine country. With nearly 50 wineries, the region produces 90 percent

of Mexico’s wine. Operations range from industrial-scale to tiny, with many clustered right around the main road. Tasting hours can be somewhat unpredictable, so the best approach is just to drive along the wine route looking for blue grapeicon signs or wooden “Ruta del Vino” signs and stop wherever strikes your fancy. If you want to make it an overnight trip, check in at one of a handful of upscale B&Bs. Download maps and info at provinoac.org.

(opposite) istockphoto.com/Donald Gruener

The view from above at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens

for safety reasons, as this is a working vineyard. On Saturdays at 1 pm, there are $15-per-person public tours that include a tasting (reservations not required). Tastings without the tour run $8 for five one-ounce pours. The winery produces a wide range of varietals, from sweet muscat to robust reds. Bernardo Winery is proud of their traditional, organic approach to grape growing, and counts 2,500 vines along with 400 olive and 50 avocado trees. About a 45-minute drive from downtown San Diego, the setting at Cordiano Winery feels like the southern Italian countryside. As its heart-shaped logo suggests, the Cordiano family’s winery is based on a labor of love. Even the welcome is heartfelt, whether tasters arrive on a busy weekend or just stop by on a quiet weekday afternoon. The winery and its spacious terrace, snuggled into a hillside high above the valley, overlook the vineyards and surrounding low mountains. There’s an open-air oven, which produces breadsticks and pizzas to go with the vineyard’s signature Cabernet Sauvignon or with one of their six other reds, including Tempranillo and Shiraz. Offered Wednesday through Sunday from 11 am until sunset, tastings (and tours) are relaxed and informal; $10 buys eight one- or two-ounce pours. What’s a winery doing tucked away in an urban warehouse among artist studios and design stores? Nestled into a little plaza just off Solana Beach’s main drag, Carruth Cellars is an easy stroll from the Amtrak/Coaster station. Proprietor Adam Carruth invites tasters into his intimate, casual mini-warehouse wine cellar from noon to 9 pm daily (Sundays noon to 6 pm). It’s a unique opportunity to sample the wines and also get an insider’s look at the entire process, from the delivery and pressing of fresh Northern Coastal California grapes to the opening of the bottles. Tastings are $10 for six to eight one-ounce pours—sometimes a little extra if Carruth is sampling a new barrel. Otherwise, have a glass of your favorite for $10; try one of their signature wines, an Alexander Valley Cabernet or a Russian River Chardonnay. Local farmer’s market baguettes, salami and cheeses are also available to accompany their many varietals.

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Destination: delicious Out-of-the-way restaurants that are worth the drive Destination restaurants share an outlook similar to Hollywood’s Golden Age film star Greta Garbo: they vant to be alone. They are places apart from other restaurants. They set out to become destinations unto themselves, restaurants that diners don’t come upon by chance and casually drop in. They are venues that diners plan for, make reservations at and anticipate having extraordinary experiences in. By Neal Alexander

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A coddled farm egg (left) is just one of myriad daily-changing dishes at Del Mar’s opulent Addison (pictured here).

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San Diego boasts more than a few destination restaurants, and several are distinct, distinguished and worthy of a special trip. Addison at the Grand Del Mar is a world unto itself, a realm where elegance and refinement rule. Arranged as a series of open and linked spaces, Addison is high-ceilinged, seriously upholstered and set with widely-spaced, linen-draped tables. The environment is impressively sumptuous, like a warm and hospitable castle. And yet the setting functions simply as backdrop for the extraordinary food of Chef William Bradley. In the five years since Addison opened, Bradley’s food has gone from clever, complex and evolving to sophisticated, focused and utterly confident. Typical dishes have French roots and California savvy, yet mostly they reflect the creative intelligence of the kitchen. Virtually every item is a surprise. A first course emerges as shards of fresh grilled calamari paired with Prince Edward Island mussels, both of which are delicately arrayed over an intensely-flavored sauce of garlic, basil and olive oil. A soup features tomatoes handled three ways: a lake of glassy and transparent tomato consommé is home to tiny caramelized and confit tomatoes. For a touch of sweetness, minuscule wine grapes float in the liquid. The presentation is ravishing, the taste ethereal. An appetizer combines beef tartare and smoked chorizo into a single crimson disk surrounded by a pool of gouda fondue. Lamb is so mild and buttery it conveys hints of veal. Sweetbreads are crisp and sweet and served with caramelized onions accompanied by transcendent mashed potatoes. Dish after dish, Addison sums to an extraordinary experience. Mille Fleurs is nestled in the small commercial center of Rancho Santa Fe (aka “The Ranch”), a community that traces its roots back more than a century. But these are not ordinary roots. The area is the third-mostexpensive ZIP code for housing in the United States and the most expensive in California. Mille Fleurs enjoyed a long heyday during which it

Left to right: Appetizer “trilogy” at the Marine Room at La Jolla Shores, Cavaillon Chef Michael von Euw, one of Chef Javier Plascencia’s creations at Tijuana’s Misión 19, Misión 19’s striking dining room. Below: A colorful salad at El Bizcocho at the Rancho Bernardo Inn.

collected walls full of wine and dining awards. That was a time when San Diego’s fine dining opportunities were fewer and wunderkind Chef Martin Woesle had high local visibility. In recent years, Mille Fleurs and Woesle have settled into a slower, more discreet rhythm. The main dining room has changed little over time: it’s still cozy and low-ceilinged, feeling very much like a comfy private club. Because the menu changes daily—including a special section with vegetarian options—Mille Fleurs may never be the same dining experience twice. Some of the very best dishes involve fish, which Chef Woesle clearly understands. Whether it’s smoked eel, wild salmon tartare or grilled sea bass, the handling is expert. Of course Mille Fleurs also features the food expected in restaurants of this caliber, so there are oysters and lobster bisque, foie gras and rack of lamb, hangar steak and watercress soup. Presentations are a stripped-down version of European style in that they are classic without fussiness. Service is casual and straightforward. Cavaillon offers California French cuisine from a microscopic office center in Santaluz, an upscale planned community barely 10 years old. En route to the restaurant, all first-time visitors must surely think themselves lost. Persevere though, rewards lie ahead. Cavaillon offers a single, modestly-appointed room holding little more than a dozen tables and a small enclosed courtyard for al fresco dining. The mood is relaxed, suburban and totally unpretentious; it’s clearly where neighborhood folks head for food that is certainly French, but with strong Mediterranean and modern California influences. Under the direction of Chef Michael von Euw, Cavillion’s menu features house-cured salmon, wild mushroom risotto with aged Parmesan cheese, a wonderful parma ham salad, fish that’s caught specifically for the restaurant (usually the day before it’s served), braised lamb shank and duck a l’orange. There’s also a sensational veal chop cooked sous vide, which is then finished on the grill. All food is presented in an easy and highly

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appetizing manner. Service is extremely friendly. The Marine Room is renowned for what’s been called its million-dollar view. Considering inflation and the rising value of La Jolla’s beachfront, in today’s dollars that view is probably worth $50-$75 million. Perched right on the beach, the restaurant is eye-level with the restlessly swaying Pacific Ocean, which is mostly benign, flowing in rhythmic and hypnotic waves that lap against the building. During occasional high tides, however, the Pacific grows assertive and sprays, splashes and sometimes crashes against the restaurant’s windows. Low or high tide, it’s a breathtaking experience to be in this gorgeous dining room, taking in the horizon and deciding on appetizers and entrées. Long the domain of Executive Chef Bernard Guillas and Chef de Cuisine Ron Oliver, the Marine Room serves savory, passionately rendered food that looks like modern art. This is not ethereal, insubstantial, can’t-quite-catch-the-flavor food; this is clean, distinctive and richly rewarding fare. Consider it comfort food raised to its highest and most celebratory stratum. Steamed oysters are wrapped in spinach and scented with myrtle; goat cheese comes as a brûlée; a wild prawn and scallop appetizer is bathed in an exquisite lemongrass foam; venison arrives with a tart cherry glaze; and circles of thinly sliced beef carpaccio are draped over one another and served with tamarind pâté, cumin gouda, watercress and horseradish oil. Most entrées include a main item that remains relatively unadorned and a side composition of vegetables arrayed into a glorious still life. Some portion of every plate will also have swirls, dots or grid patterns of sauce. Also making The Marine Room atypical is Lisa Redwine, a charming, animated and entirely down-to-earth sommelier. Diners should seek her advice even when ordering a single glass of wine. Service is gracious and efficient. Misión 19, while not a world away, is clearly in a different country. Opened in January about 15 minutes south of the border in Tijuana, the restaurant has gener-

details Addison at the Grand Del Mar, 5200 Grand Del Mar Way, Del Mar, 858.314.1900. Three- to 10-course dinners $90-225. Mille Fleurs 6009 Paseo Delicias, Rancho Santa Fe, 858.756.3085 Cavaillon 14701 Via Bettona #200, Santaluz, 858.433.0483 Misión 19 at Via Corporativo, Misión San Javier 10643, Second Floor, Zona Urbana Río, Tijuana, B.C., México, 52.664. 634.2493, mision19.com (Note: Tijuana has several streets named Misión San Javier, so be sure to ask for directions when calling for reservations. Crossing into Mexico is typically fast and easy; driving back into the U.S. will take less time if the crossing occurs after 10 pm. Take your passport.)

The Marine Room 2000 Spindrift Drive, La Jolla Shores, 858.459.7222 El Bizcocho at the Rancho Bernardo Inn, 17550 Bernardo Oaks Drive, Rancho Bernardo. 858.675.8550

ated constant national media attention. Most of the praise and approval for Misión 19 comes as a result of Chef Javier Plascencia. He’s merging fresh and sustainable regional foods, Mexican/Mediterranean/Pacific Rim cuisines and modern California-style techniques and presentations. Among his notable attributes, Plascencia wraps many dishes with distinctively Mexican elements. There are salads of tomatillos and cactus, oysters dusted with crushed pork rinds and grilled octopus layered with salsa. As well, some dishes are simply international in style: duck with kumquat, short ribs in a fig sauce, lamb with fresh garbanzos and chicken with black truffles. Reminiscent of urbane dining almost anywhere on the planet, Misión 19 is small in scale, softly lit and maintains a very mellow vibe. The waitstaff-to-diner ratio is very high. Patrons are fashionably though informally dressed, speak in low tones and could be from the Americas, Europe or Asia. El Bizcocho began life as a fine dining destination decades ago, well before there was even a freeway connection to Rancho Bernardo. Over the years, the venerable restaurant developed a strong reputation for fine, formal and increasingly adventurous dining. There was a culmination of sorts in 2007 when then-Chef Gavin Kaysen represented the United States in the Bocuse d’Or competition in Lyon, France. Shortly thereafter, Kaysen left El Biz for New York City and Café Boulud. With Executive Chef Nicolas Bour now at the helm, the menu has been pared down to familiar fine-dining dishes. There’s a Dungeness crab cake composed almost entirely of fresh crab, as well as lobster bisque, wild salmon and a bone-in 16-ounce rib eye steak. Unexpectedly, there’s asparagus risotto, a very meaty pork belly and thick hunks of quickly seared yellowfin ahi. Flavors are robust, sauces are emphatic and presentations are simple and bold. Décor at El Bizcocho, once stately and orthodox, seems rather world-weary. It is turning involuntarily to shabby chic. Service remains courtly, and Sunday brunch is famous.

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exploring

Downtown

Left to right: the historic Balboa Theater; the harbor and skyline at sunset; browsing the Gaslamp Quarter’s many boutiques and galleries.

The past and present come together in San Diego’s lively, historic downtown neighborhoods.

Gaslamp Quarter

Businessman Alonzo Erastus Horton envisioned San Diego as a bustling port city, and in 1867 he spent $264 for 800 acres he called “New Town.” Today, New Town is known as the historic Gaslamp Quarter, or simply “The Gaslamp.” Comprising more than 16 blocks, the Gaslamp stretches from Broadway to Har­bor Drive (just north of the Convention Center), with Fourth, Fifth and Sixth ave­nues as its main thoroughfares. Anchoring the area’s northwest end is Horton Plaza, a small square with a bubbling fountain on the corner of Broadway and Fourth. The Gaslamp’s immaculately preserved Victorian-style buildings are home to dozens of restaurants, clubs, ­theaters and retailers. Several tour guides offer an insider’s look at the Gaslamp (see p. 74), or create your own: The area can be easily covered on foot, or via bicycle, which can be rented at Bike Revolution (522 Sixth Ave.), located at the southeast corner of the district—right next door to Heavenly Cupcake (518 Sixth Ave.). C’mon, you deserve it. From there you can explore retail finds on the southern side of the zone, like Chuck Jones Gallery (232 Fifth Ave.), one of only three in the nation showcasing the work of the Oscarwinning animator responsible for the Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote and Marvin the Martian. Shop for designer resale at Carolyn’s (310 K St.) or retro dresses at the Bettie Page store (430 Fifth Ave.). We also love GOGA (401 Market St.), the signature shop of one-time Project Runway contestant Gordana Gehlhausen, who designs her own line of feminine, ethereal tops and gowns and also carries items from up-and-coming Southern California labels. For national retailers, venture farther up Fifth, where you’ll find well-known stores like footwear boutique Sketchers (480 Fifth Ave.), Urban Outfitters (665 Fifth Ave.) and Dutch brand G-Star Raw (470 Fifth Ave.), with trendy styles for men and women. Or make your way over to Westfield Horton Plaza (see p. 72), a multilevel outdoor mall with a kaleidoscopic design that kicked off the revitalization of downtown when it was constructed in 1985. It’s now home to some 100 restaurants and shops including White House Black Market, Macy’s, BCBG and more. There’s also culture to be had at the mall: San Diego Repertory Theatre performs on the Lyceum theater stage, and the historic Balboa Theatre anchors the shopping center’s eastern edge, at Fourth Avenue and E Street (see p. 66). After a long day of shopping and sightseeing, sate your hunger at one of the Gaslamp’s 100-plus restaurants and cafés, ranging from American to Chinese to Indian to Thai to steak

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and seafood (see dining guide, p. 48). Parking can be dicey in the Gaslamp; a garage is your best bet. Horton Plaza, with entrances on Fourth Avenue and G Street, offers up to three hours of free parking if you self-validate at machines on levels 1, 3 and 5. Be sure to note your “vegetable” or “fruit” level; it can be a confusing garage (619.239.8180). Park It On Market is a 500-space garage at Market Street with entrances on Sixth and Seventh avenues (619.232.1271); while 6th & K Parkade offers 1,230 spots, with entrances on Sixth and Seventh avenues (619.233.6624). For more information, call the ­Gas­lamp Quarter Association (619.233.5227).

(opposite, from left) NELS AKERLUND, BRETT SHoaF/ARTISTIC VISUALS, ASHOK SINHA

Downtown’s Core

Just beyond the Gaslamp are several sites worth exploring, including the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (see p. 70) and the New Children’s Museum (see p. 71), an interactive art/play place for kids of all ages. The San Diego Chinese ­Historical Museum (404 Third Ave.) also features a beautiful garden with a koi pond. Arts and culture abound downtown. San Diego Symphony celebrates its centennial season at Copley Symphony Hall (see p. 67), while Broadway/San Diego brings touring shows from New York to the Civic Theatre (1100 Third Ave.). Spreckels Theatre (121 Broadway) hosts many performing arts events throughout the year. See page 64 for additional theater listings.

East Village

The construction of Petco Park (100 Park Blvd.), home of the San Diego Padres, helped gentrify this once-gritty neighborhood east of the Gaslamp. Seven years on, it’s now rife

with entertainment options. Pick up a creamy burratta or a smoky Gouda at Venissimo Cheese (871 G St.), or a Tony Gwynn jersey at the Padres Team Store (J St. at Seventh Ave.). The neighborhood’s burgeoning art scene includes a few notable galleries: the edgy Periscope Project, built from stacked shipping cargo containers near the corner of 15th and K, and Alexander Salazar Fine Art, featuring mixed-media work from emerging and mid-career contemporary artists (640 Broadway).

Little Italy

A few blocks northwest of ­downtown, Little Italy is home to fabulous restaurants, galleries, boutiques and markets dotting the main drag, India Street. Highlights include Noel-Baza Fine Art (2165 India St.), a wellrespected contemporary art gallery featuring legends and locals alike; trendy women’s boutique Melero (1918 India St.), and Bella Stanza (1501 India St.), with Murano glass, Italian ceramics and more. Take time to explore the streets branching off from India, too: The colorful cottages of the Fir Street Shops include Carol Gardyne Studio (1840 Columbia St.), with hand-painted silk scarves, and Vitreum (619 W. Fir St.), specializing in simple, elegant ceramics. Running parallel to India Street, Kettner Boulevard forms the spine of the art-anddesign district. A gallery cluster near the corner of Kettner and Kalmia includes Scott White Contemporary Art and cool Subtext Gallery, focused on lowbrow and graphic artists. Monthly on the second Friday, many area galleries host evening receptions. You can also shop for modern furniture, art and home accessories at chic Toke (2136 Kettner Blvd.), a design center founded by

interior designers from Tijuana, or Mixture (2210 Kettner Blvd.), identifiable by its large roll-up garage door. Casa Artelexia (2419 Kettner Blvd.) is a charming cottage with colorful crafts imported from Mexico. Foodies shouldn’t miss the Saturday morning Mercato on Date Street, one of the city’s most popular farmer’s markets (619.233.3769).

Embarcadero

Another entertainment destination is Seaport Village (see p. 72), a 14-acre outdoor plaza with shops and a beautiful 19th-century carousel. The bayside boardwalk is ideal for walking to and from the Convention Center. Grab an iced cappuccino from Upstart Crow Trading Company (835-C W. Harbor Drive) and head for the Embarcadero Marina Park, which offers bike and jogging trails, basketball courts and picnicking. Continue north along the harbor to Broadway Pier, where you can embark on sightseeing excursions or catch the Coronado Ferry (1050 N. Harbor Drive), which travels across the bay several times daily. The USS Midway (see p. 71) invites the public to learn about America’s longestserving aircraft carrier. Many of the storytelling docents are veterans who served on the carrier over its 47-year history. The floating Maritime Museum (see p. 70) features several historic ships, including the HMS Surprise from the film Master and Commander. While exploring, keep your eyes open for Urban Trees, a public art project consisting of tree-like sculptures placed all along Harbor Drive For a map of these neighborhoods, see page 78. For information about restaurants in this area, see page 62.

hats off

great find Goorin Brothers Hat Shop concerns itself with lofty things ... like the top of your head. At this newly opened spot, design is a priority from head to toe: myriad hats are neatly displayed in rows on walls painted with imaginative designs that spill onto wood floors embellished with filigree and Persian rugs. “It” hats for fall include the Gatsby fedora for men and a 1920s-style cloche for women. Warm felts, cool straw, trucker, cowboy, even quirky baseball caps can be found here. Or, if you already like the hat you have, try accessorizing with a vintage hatpin—they’re making a comeback. 631 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.450.6303.

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exploring

La Jolla

Left to right: the gateway to the La Jolla cave; Nancy Rubins’ Pleasure Point at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; the view from Salk Institute.

La Jolla is a jewel sparkling with art, theater, fine dining, boutique shopping and the area’s best outdoor recreation.

BOUTIQUES AND GALLERIES

La Jolla’s spectacular streets are lined with high-end boutiques, antique stores and art galleries. Prospect Street and Girard Avenue form the spines of the village shopping district, but don’t be afraid to venture off onto side streets, where hidden gems await. On Girard, amid national brands like White House Black Market (7927 Girard Ave.), Rangoni Firenze shoes (7870 Girard Ave.) and Lucky Jeans (7844 Girard Ave.), we love women’s apparel boutique Kerut (7944 Girard Ave.), a chic, well-appointed spot run by a stylist. It’s not uncommon to find cupcakes and bubbly awaiting your arrival. Farther down Girard is La Maisonette (7631 Girard Ave.), an oasis of Parisian and French country gifts and textiles, as well as independent bookseller D.G. Wills (7461 Girard Ave.), for that rare firstedition. Read a few chapters at one of many nearby sidewalk cafés. Back on Prospect Street, you’ll find We Olive (1158 Prospect St.), a new wine bar and gourmet olive oil tasting room, as well as a slew of female-friendly stores like Victoria’s Secret (1111 Prospect St.), locally designed swimwear shop Sauvage (1025 Prospect St.) and Robina (1261 Prospect St.), with chic women’s apparel and accessories. Prospect is also home to many art galleries, whose collections range from landscape photography to Picasso canvases. Madison Gallery (1020 Prospect St.) traffics in art from a select pool of noted local artists as well as big names from Lichtenstein to Damien Hirst, while Martin Lawrence Gallery (1111 Prospect St.) specializes in original prints of masters like Chagall, Miró, Dalí, Warhol and Erte. La Jolla Boulevard heads south out of the village toward the charming neighborhood of Bird Rock, but don’t leave without stopping in at Sweet Paper, a boutique stationery shop run by design-savvy sisters (7527 La Jolla Blvd. just north of Pearl St.). The cottage that houses the store was once the home of painter—and one-time Picasso muse—Françoise Gilot. Continue southward for about two miles to reach Bird Rock, where worthwhile shops include Shabby Chic (5651 La Jolla Blvd.), with trendy, easy-breezy clothes fit for the coastal lifestyle. Break for coffee at Bird Rock Coffee Roasters (5627 La Jolla Blvd.), whose soughtafter beans are served at cafés throughout the city, or pick up a loaf of low-carb, gluten-free bread at Julian Bakery (5621 La Jolla Blvd.). La Jolla Shores, just a short drive up Torrey Pines Road, is also worth a visit. The wide, flat beach is perfect for swimming and sunning, while the tiny main drag, Avenida de la Playa, is lined with eateries and rental shops with all the surf and kayak gear you need.

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(opposite, from left) IAN WHITE, edwin santiago, courtesy symphony at salk

arts & Science

The University of Cali­fornia, San Diego (9500 Gilman Drive) is home to one of the best theaters in the country: La Jolla Playhouse (see p. 64 for additional theater listings). The theater was founded in 1947 by actors Mel Ferrer, Dorothy McGuire and La Jolla native Gregory Peck. Each season is a mix of classic and daring productions; many have gone straight to Broadway. The Stuart Collection, a group of site-specific outdoor sculptures, adds to the artistic setting at UCSD (p. 71). A 24-foot giant teddy bear made of boulders and a 560-foot-long Snake Path are among the artworks placed throughout the 1,200-acre campus. Just north of campus is the Salk Institute for Biological Studies (10010 N. Torrey Pines Road), an architectural masterpiece designed by Louis Kahn. The scientific research complex was named in honor of Dr. Jonas Salk, who discovered a vaccine for polio and later lived in La Jolla. Tours of campus architecture are available to the public (858.453.4100 x1262). Southwest of campus sits Scripps Institu­ tion of Oceanography (8622 Kennel Way) and neighboring Birch Aquarium (see p. 69), both among the best ocean life learning centers in the world. In La Jolla village, the Museum of Con­ temp­orary Art San Diego (see p. 70) examines the boundaries of art created since 1950. Housed in the former home of Ellen Browning Scripps, the museum’s galleries boast an unparalleled ocean view, while Nancy Rubins’ stunning large-scale, nautical-inspired artwork adorns the museum’s west side. Definitely schedule a stop at the gift shop. The Athenaeum Music and Arts Library (1008 Wall St.) features year-round art exhibitions, plus jazz and chamber music concerts,

and a treasure trove of books and records. Many well-known names have called La Jolla home, including Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, actress Raquel Welch, motivational speaker Tony Robbins and author Anne Rice.

Recreation

La Jolla is paradise for outdoorsy types. The Cove (1100 Coast Blvd.) is a haven for swimmers and snorkelers; La Jolla Shores (8200 Camino del Oro) has easy access for scuba divers; and Windansea (6800 Neptune Place), immortalized in Tom Wolfe’s The Pump House Gang, is the ultimate surfing break. Children’s Pool, a small cove next to Ellen Browning Scripps Park, is a place to observe wildlife, particularly the harbor seals that have taken over the area. The seals’ encampment has caused an ongoing community debate: Some residents want to reclaim the cove for a children’s pool; others advocate for the seals. For a quick bite, try one of the many oceanview restaurants along Prospect Street or Coast Boulevard.

Torrey Pines

Torrey Pines is just north of La Jolla village. There, you’ll find the 2,000-acre Torrey Pines State Reserve, which offers eight miles of hiking trails winding through wind-sculpted pines and wildflowers. Located off Coast Highway 101 between La Jolla and Del Mar, the reserve was established to protect the nation’s rarest pine tree, the Pinus torreyana. The visitors center, a pueblo-style structure at the top of Park Road, is available to help with guided tours. One of the reserve’s trails leads directly to Torrey Pines State Beach, located on North Torrey Pines Road. The beach, which spans 4.5 miles from Del Mar to the cliffs at Torrey Pines Mesa, is a great place for swimming,

boating and fishing. You can also catch these amazing ocean views from up high, via a hang glider or paraglider. The Torrey Pines Glider Port and Flight Park (2800 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive) offers flights (tandem, too) for novices and extreme adventure seekers. Adjacent Blacks Beach is a two-mile sandy strip known for great surfing—and nude sunbathing (“not officially sanctioned”). Getting to Blacks isn’t easy. If you can, park near the Glider Port and hike to the bottom of the bluffs, paying close attention to warning signs about unstable cliffs. You can walk a mile from Torrey Pines State Beach, but access may be blocked by high tides. The Torrey Pines Golf Course gives golfers the ultimate indulgence: two courses with stunning ocean views. In 2008, the landmark became one of the only public courses to host a U.S. Open; it’s also the site of the PGA Tour’s Farmers Insurance Open (see p. 42).

Golden Triangle

The area east of La Jolla village is known as the Golden Triangle, bordered by Interstate 5 on the west, Interstate 805 on the east and State Route 52 on the south. This triangular area includes upscale hotels, fine dining and great shopping. The shopping district revolves around Westfield University Towne Centre (see p. 72), which locals shorten to “UTC.” This outdoor mall, anchored by Macy’s and Nordstrom, features dozens of eateries and retail storefronts, including Anthropologie, Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Apple, Tumi and Williams-Sonoma. From the village, go north on Torrey Pines Road and turn right on La Jolla Village Drive. For a map of these neighborhoods, see page 79. For a list of restaurants in this area, see page 62.

KIDDIE cool

great find Hillside Artisans is already a familiar name in San Diego, thanks to a small yet quality selection of toys and children’s apparel found at its Mission Hills and Del Mar locations. A third store recently opened in the heart of La Jolla and features its trademark collection of soft newborn blankets, whimsical lunch boxes and one-of-a-kind outfits, plus a large selection of Ergo carriers and See Kai Run shoes. You’ll also find a small play space for kids to explore while the grownups shop. Owner Karen Dole, who has a degree in fine art, takes special care to make sure the store is filled with “fruity, gem” colors that foster children’s imaginations. 7874 Girard Ave., La Jolla, 858.456.0134.

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exploring

Beach Cities

Left to right: heading out for a surf in Coronado; boards and beach cruisers at the Mission Beach Boardwalk; the lighthouse at Point Loma.

From Coronado to Pacific Beach: Welcome to Southern California’s most scenic oceanside neighborhoods.

Coronado

Coronado is an island of small-town quaintness amid San Diego’s big-city bustle. Well, it’s not really an island, though many locals call it that. Coro­nado is actually an ­isthmus, attached to the mainland at the southern end of Silver Strand State Beach. Though driving there via the iconic Coro­nado Bridge is always a thrill, it’s also great fun to travel by sea. The Coronado/San Diego Ferry leaves on the hour from downtown’s Broadway Pier between 9 am and 9 pm (619.234.4111), while San Diego Water Taxi offers on-call transportation around the bay from 9 am to 10 pm (619.235.8294). Upon arrival, you can browse the shops and restaurants at Coronado Ferry Landing Marketplace (1201 First St.), then rent a cruiser at Bikes and Beyond to explore Coronado’s flat, tree-lined side streets. Head south on the main drag of Orange Avenue to find an inviting entertainment district, with shops like women’s apparel boutique La Mer (1122 Orange Ave.) and La Provençale (1122 Orange Ave.), with French-inspired linens, bath-and-body items and gifts. Don’t miss two new side-by-side shops, Be Styled, with chic tops, dresses and accessories, and Blue Jeans & Bikinis, which makes it easy to shop for those two items women notoriously hate having to try on (1113 Adella Ave.). Continuing on Orange toward the beach brings you to the storybook Hotel del Coronado (1500 Orange Ave.), opened in 1888 and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1977. For more on the town’s history, stop by the Coronado Museum of History and Art (1100 Orange Ave.), whose current exhibition celebrates the 100th anniversary of naval aviation. Spreckels Park (Orange Ave. between Sixth and Seventh sts.) sits between these two retail zones and is an ideal place to take a break from all that strenuous shopping.

Shelter Island and Harbor Island

Shelter Island and Harbor Island aren’t really “islands” either; they’re connected to the mainland and were created more than 35 years ago with tons of sand dredged from the floor of the bay. Shelter Island, with its many bars, restaurants and nautically themed stores, is the departure point for various sportfishing charters. The area is also home to Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay, a 1,400-seat outdoor theater that hosts jazz, blues and pop headliners in warmer months. Nearby Harbor Island has its own, smaller outdoor festival site, Spanish Landing Park, and several bayview restaurants. Both islands offer postcard vistas of the downtown skyline, plus flat paths for walks and bike rides.

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(opposite, left to right) ASHOK SINHA, IAN WHITE, edwin santiago

Ocean Beach and Point Loma

“O.B.” for short, this neighborhood is truly one of San Diego’s most unique. It’s an endless summer of love in O.B., an aggregation of aging hippies, surfers, ­bikers, artists, ­musicians and other free spirits. OBceans possess a strong sense of community and territorial pride best summed up by a oncepopular bumper sticker: “U.S. out of O.B.” The main drag, Newport Avenue, smells of incense and has many shops catering to the O.B. lifestyle, but also plenty of antiques dealers at places like Ocean Beach Antique Mall (4926 Newport Ave.). Music junkies will love the vintage vinyl at Cow Records (5029 ­Newport Ave.), while Belle Maison (4896 Newport Ave.) has coastal-inspired furniture and accessories. Pine Tree Road (4885 Newport Ave.) specializes in soaps, scrubs and lotions, and nearby Azucar is a Cuban-style patisserie with fresh-baked scones, honey buns and more (4820 Newport Ave.). Off Newport, don’t miss Noon (4993 Niagara Ave.), with handmade letterpress cards and jewelry. Wind down the day with a leisurely stroll down the Ocean Beach Pier, which, at 1,971 feet, is one of the longest concrete piers in the ­country. Nearby Point Loma is home to a small but charming array of restaurants and cafés, as well as the Cabrillo National Monument, Fort ­Rosecrans ­National Cemetery and military installations. The Cabrillo National Monument (see p. 69) offers panoramic vistas stretching from San Diego to Mexico. There are also hiking trails, tidepools, a historic ­lighthouse, a bookstore and museum exhibits about conquistador Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, the founder of San Diego.

Mission Beach and Pacific Beach

Two of San Diego’s most popular beaches, Mission Beach and Pacific Beach (“P.B.” to locals) form an ­unbroken band of sand that ­stretches for three miles, from the mouth of Mission Bay to the rocky points of La Jolla. Both are overflowing with restaurants, bars and boutiques. South Mission Beach is home to serious beach volleyball and bayside basketball games. Farther north, check out the star attraction at the Belmont Park amusement park: the Giant Dipper, a restored 1925 wooden roller coaster (see p. 69). Another landmark dating back to 1925 is Crystal Pier, at the foot of Garnet Avenue in P.B. This 400-foot-long wooden pier is gated and lined with rental cottages. However, the pier is open to the public during the day and is always popular with fishermen. The best way to experience this area is to walk along the boardwalk, where peoplewatching is not just encouraged, it’s a must. If the nonstop parade of skateboarders, inliners, bikers, ­joggers and walkers gets to be too much, walk across Mission Boulevard to the bayside boardwalk, where there’s much less of a scene. Garnet Avenue and Mission Boulevard form the backbone of this funky, retro retail district, which boasts dozens of small shops filled with surfing gear, swimsuits and casual wear. Begin the 10-block shopping stroll where the two main streets intersect, then head east. (Note: These are long blocks.) First order of business: find that perfect bikini. SunSplash (979 Garnet Ave.) can help, with stylish swimwear and casual beachwear in a wide array of sizes. For the rest of the outfit, try Chillers Showroom (4667 Cass

great find

St.), a spacious shop just off the main drag selling men’s and women’s clothing in a relaxed, lounge-like atmosphere. Farther up Garnet Avenue is Rusty Spokes Vintage Bicycles (1344 Garnet Ave.), which specializes in antique and classic cycles. Venturing north on Mission Boulevard from Garnet leads you to Urban Outfitters (4516 Mission Blvd.), various bike-rental shops and Surfindian (4658 Mission Blvd.), a gallery with art inspired by San Diego’s most sacred sport. Heading south brings you to Mission Beach, home to bikini emporium Pilar’s (3745 Mission Blvd.) and The Basement (3790 Mission Blvd.), with clothing and jewelry by local designers.

Mission Bay Park

Mission Bay Park is a 4,000-acre gathering spot for locals and visitors to enjoy outdoor activities including running, biking, skating, kite-flying, sailing and boating. The park is made up of various coves, points and islands with excellent ­picnicking spots and fire pits. ­Several sportfishing charters depart daily from Mission Bay, and a variety of ­watercraft can be rented from nearby shops. If you’re feeling adventurous, try your hand at stand-up paddleboarding. The west side of the bay is also home to several resort hotels and SeaWorld (see p. 69), the internationally known park sheltering more than 12,000 aquatic animals. Don’t miss Shark Encounter, a 57-foot underwater walkway offering a peek into the world of sand tiger, bonnethead and whitetip sharks. For a map of these neighborhoods, see page 77. For information about restaurants in this area, see page 62.

PAGE TURNERS

In a post-Borders world, things have been looking grim for the bookworm. iPads, e-readers and online stores have all but wiped out the brick-and-mortar book business. But one local bookstore is thriving. Located in an converted Navy barracks at Liberty Station in Point Loma, Yellow Book Road is the largest children’s bookstore in the county, its name an homage to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, which was written on nearby Coronado. They’ve got that title in stock, naturally, along with the rest of the classics, plus new books, education materials, plushy toys and plenty of young-adult novels for your Twilight-starved ‘tween. 2690 Historic Decatur Road #102, Liberty Station, Point Loma, 619.463.4900.

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exploring

Uptown

Left to right: In the heart of artsy North Park; the historic Birch North Park Theatre; Hillcrest by night. Opposite page: fresh produce at the Hillcrest farmer’s market, held every Sunday.

Hillcrest, Mission Hills, North Park: Neighborhoods full of culture, character and charm.

Uptown encompasses some of S.D.’s most diverse and eclectic neighborhoods. Hillcrest, which borders Balboa Park’s northwest corner, is one of the county’s most vibrant areas. Adjacent University Heights and Mission Hills are filled with Craftsman-style homes and quaint boutiques. Just east of Hillcrest, a renovated theater, galleries and cafés have helped North Park become San Diego’s newest arts district, while its residential neighbor to the south is the area’s best-kept secret for unique gift shopping.

Hillcrest

The hub of Hillcrest, at the intersection of University and Fifth avenues, is a buzzing, heavily trafficked scene throughout the day, with cars lined up in both directions and joggers, dogwalkers and coffee-sippers crowding the sidewalks. Fabulous shopping begins at University and First avenues and runs 12 blocks to Park Boulevard. Score specialty stationery at Ink by Kymberli Parker (127 W. University Ave.), with a fun array of cards and pens. Other special finds include candle emporium Cathedral (435 ­University Ave.); Mint (525 University Ave.), which sells retro urban footwear; and home design shops like Cohabitat (1433 ­University Ave.). Just off the main drag you’ll find all manner of headgear at the Village Hat Shop (3821 Fourth Ave.) and trendy dresses and accessories at Twirl (3840 Fifth Ave.). Leave time to peruse 5th Avenue Books (3838 Fifth Ave.) ­and ­Bluestocking Books (3817 Fifth Ave.), whose shelves are lined with out-of-print and rare tomes.

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS & MISSION HILLS

Northeast of Hillcrest on Park Boulevard lies quaint University Heights, home to ethnic eateries and good shopping at places like Frock You (4121 Park Blvd.), a clothing store whose helpful staff knows its stuff when it comes to vintage fashion. University Heights also has an astonishing number of cafés for such a small neighborhood, each catering to a different clientele. We love the back patio at quiet, well-designed Monica’s at the Park (1735 Adams Ave.) for a cappuccino break. The streets of gorgeous Mission Hills, northwest of Hillcrest, are lined with stately homes, quaint cafés and boutiques. Cali­fornia Fleurish (4011 Goldfinch St.) offers a plethora of fragrances and scented candles; Maison en Provence (820 Fort Stockton Drive) carries French country home accessories.

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Presidio Park, at the western edge of ­this neighborhood, is historically significant as the site of the first European settlement in California (619.692.4918). Scenic trails lead to the neighboring Junípero Serra Museum. The museum, built in 1929, is a ­replica of the mission erected there in 1769.

North Park

Centered at University Avenue and 30th Street, North Park is San Diego’s newest arts district, thanks in part to the restoration of the historic 1928 Birch North Park Theatre (2891 University Ave.). Ray Street, two blocks east of the theater, is an artistic hub featured during gallery-hopping events held select Saturday nights from 6 to 9 pm. The area is also home to dozens of independent clothing and décor boutiques. We love the organic cotton baby clothes and stylish art books sold at Pigment (3827 30th St.), while the shopkeepers at Mimi & Red (3032 University Ave.) curate a trendy selection of up-to-date women’s fashions and costume jewelry. After dark, North Park comes alive with dozens of bars, clubs and restaurants.

(opposite, center) amy k. fellows, (others) bjarne g. jensen, (this page, top) rich cook

SOUTH PARK

About a mile south of University on 30th Street lies the quiet neighborhood known as South Park. Though largely residential, South Park does have a few good neighborhood eateries and bars, and it’s a great place to shop for gifts while supporting the local independent merchants. Favorite retailers in this area include The Grove bookstore (3010 Juniper St.), eco-boutique Mythology (2365 30th St.) and sweet shop Daily Scoop (3004 Juniper St.). For a map of these neighborhoods, see page 78. For a list of restaurants in this area, see page 62.

great find

making progress

Owned by a design-minded husband-and-wife team, Progress brings a cool, modern vibe to the trendy South Park neighborhood. Most items in the store, from the sculptural cardboard pendant lamps to the benches made from folded-up magazine pages, have an eco twist, and the fun, smart furniture is all sourced from small companies. You’ll find few mass-produced goods here: instead, most of the creative, colorful pieces come from individual designers, lending each an almost one-of-a-kind feel (perfect for hard-to-buyfor friends back home). The shop also stocks candles, jewelry, handbags, cards, kids’ stuff and more. 2225 30th St., South Park 619.280.5501

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exploring

North Coast

Left to right: the Self-Realization Fellowship in Encinitas; the Del Mar Fairgrounds; the surfer sculpture locals call the Cardiff “kook.”

Del Mar, Solana Beach, Encinitas, Carlsbad ... These cities exemplify the good life.

Del Mar

Del Mar’s celebrity status began more than 70 years ago, when the oceanside paradise became home of the Del Mar Racetrack (2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd.). Actors Bing Crosby and Pat O’Brien helped establish the track—and its track record for hosting the Hollywood elite at the Thoroughbred Club. Ava Gardner, W.C. Fields, Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Jimmy Durante and Mickey Rooney were among the regulars in the late 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s. Today, the racing season runs from mid-July to early September, but exciting events are held at the Del Mar Fairgrounds year-round. Jimmy Durante Boulevard—named for the famous entertainer who lived in Del Mar— paves the way from the track to the heart of the village. The intersection of Camino del Mar and 15th Street forms Del Mar’s bustling center. The three-story Del Mar Plaza (see p. 72) has scenic fountains and sweeping ocean views, plus upscale shops like clothing boutiques Gerhard and Peaches en Regalia; Loghman Jewelers, with Italian jewelry and watches; and chains like Banana Republic and Sunglass Hut. There’s more retail along Del Mar’s main street, Camino del Mar, and the area can easily be covered on foot. The shopping district is lined with gift stores like Sun­dancer (1418 Camino del Mar), plus several casual cafés and eateries. More great shopping is a short drive away. East of the Fair­grounds, off I-5 on Via de la Valle, is Flower Hill Promenade (2720 Via de la Valle), where shops include women’s boutique Coconut Lime, men’s clothier Patrick James and Dallman Chocolate Boutique. At the end of the day, walk to Seagrove Park (Coast Blvd. at 15th St.) to enjoy a brilliant sunset. From the hush of the surf you can almost hear the echo of Bing Crosby, singing the jingle he wrote in honor of the track: Where the turf meets the surf, down at old Del Mar...

Solana Beach

Solana Beach is home to some of the most chic stores in San Diego County. The Cedros Design District begins at South Cedros Avenue and Lomas Santa Fe Drive, easily accessible by The Coaster, the train that runs from downtown San Diego to Oceanside. More than 50 shops spanning a quarter-mile feature fashion, home furnishings and antiques. Most of the boutiques on South Cedros are housed in renovated Quonset huts (iron warehouses shaped like a half-cylinder), giving this neighborhood an artistic feel. Fuel up for your walking tour of the neighborhood at Claire’s (246 N. Cedros Ave.), across from

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the train station. It’s the kind of eco-conscious place that provides preferred parking for electric and hybrid cars. Then pop in to Tobi Blatt (152 N. Cedros Ave.), with trendy threads for women from labels like True Religion. Cross Lomas Santa Fe to explore South Cedros: We love Tucci (130 S. Cedros Ave.) for women’s apparel and designer denim, and HIS (111 S. Cedros Ave. #200), a store geared towards the style-minded guy. The sweet smells springing from Mistral (146 S. Cedros Ave.), a small bungalow with soaps and lotions imported from France, are intoxicating. Farther down the street you’ll find hip home décor and art books at Solo (309 S. Cedros Ave.) and a few worthwhile galleries. Aaron Chang Ocean Art Gallery has stunning photos from the legendary surf photographer, while Susan Street Fine Art is a must for lovers of contemporary art (both at 415 S. Cedros Ave.). Break for a coffee at hidden Lockwood Table Café (346-B S. Cedros Ave.), a casual spot that uses fresh, locally sourced ingredients. Nestled among the retail shops is one of the county’s top live music venues: The Belly Up Tavern (see p. 74), a Solana Beach landmark for more than 35 years.

(opposite, left) IAN WHITE, (OTHERS) REBECCA Morquecho

Encinitas and cardiff-by-the-sea

Heading north on 101 from Solana Beach, you’ll pass through the small surf community of Cardiff-by-the-Sea. Be sure to get a picture with the Cardiff “kook,” the sculpture of a surfer that locals have fondly ridiculed for years. Officially named The Magic Carpet Ride, the statue is often dressed up in outrageous outfits (military fatigues, a toga, a bikini) by anonymous midnight marauders. As you continue north approaching downtown Encinitas, you’ll see a unique silhouette

among the palm trees. The Self-Realization Fellowship Retreat and Hermitage (215 K St.), with its lotus blossom–shaped towers, dates back to 1937. A portion of the grounds is open free to the public. A stroll through the lush, cliffside gardens offers views of surfers at nearby Swami’s Beach (1298 S. Coast Hwy. 101), a popular break for longboarders. Up the road, The Lumberyard’s 27 shops include stylish clothier Mog & Rue and modern home-and-garden store Grounded. There’s also an array of wine bars, eateries and cafés, many with outdoor seating (937 S. Coast Hwy. 101). In the center of downtown, the historic La Paloma Theatre (471 S. Coast Hwy. 101) has anchored the district since the 1920s and still hosts films and concerts. Boutiques and restaurants also line the strip: ­gar’den•ol•ogy (587 S. Coast Hwy. 101) is a must-stop for green thumbs, while Book Tales (603 S. Coast Hwy. 101) caters to literary types with its stacks of vintage hardcovers. North Coast Highway 101 runs through sleepy Leucadia, where it’s easy to speed right by gems like Lou’s Records (434 N. Coast Hwy. 101), with its selection of hip LPs and CDs, and Ducky Waddles ­Emporium (414 N. Coast Hwy. 101) with its ­excellent collection of books on all things arty or bawdy. A great cluster of shops is found at The Gold Coast (466 N. Coast Hwy. 101), whose tenants include deepFling, with silver jewelry from Scandinavian designers, and chic children’s boutique Daisy Bee. A short drive inland leads to San Diego Botanic Garden, a 35-acre treasure showcasing more than 3,000 rare and exotic plants (see p. 69). This fall, look for blooms including Bird of Paradise, the delicate Angel’s Trumpet and Dragon Fruit.

Carlsbad

Downtown Carlsbad is a picturesque seaside village with tree-lined roads, restaurants and boutique shopping. Along Carlsbad Village Drive, the main drag, you’ll find two local landmarks: Ocean House (300 Carlsbad Village Drive), a restaurant and nighttime hot spot that boasts beautiful Victorian architecture, and nearby Frazier’s Well (2802 Carlsbad Blvd.), where sea captain John Frazier discovered mineral water in 1882. Next to Ocean House is Carlsbad Village Faire, a shopping center home to several casual eateries and shops. Retail on nearby State Street includes antique stores and shops like Fairen Del (2940 State St.), with an assortment of fine leather goods, shoes, handbags and jewelry. A short drive east of the freeway on Palomar Airport Road leads to great outlet shopping at Carlsbad ­Premium Outlets (see p. 71), with brand-name stores like BCBG, Kenneth Cole and Michael Kors. Continuing on Palomar Airport Road from the outlets will lead you to another cluster of attractions. LegoLand (see p. 69) is 128 acres of kid-­friendly entertainment that includes a new Sea Life Aquarium. Nearby, the Museum of Making Music (see p. 70) is filled with musical memorabilia. La Costa Resort and Spa (2100 Costa del Mar Road) is home to the Chopra Center for Well Being, with spa therapies and wellness ­programs created by holistic specialist Deepak Chopra. Two miles south of La Costa is The Forum (see p. 72), an outdoor, Spanish-style mall whose shops include Tilly’s surf shop, Anthropologie and organic skincare shop NuboNau. For a map of these neighborhoods, see page 79. For information about restaurants in this area, see page 62.

TRE CHIC

great find TRE, short for The Rare Earth, is a two-story, tres chic boutique that’s host to nearly 100 high-end boutique brands. Owners of TRE know San Diego well and keep a sharp eye out for cardigans and jackets that transition easily with our weather. This fall, a colorful, classy dress by Alberto Makali or Black Halo works for a night out on the town, or peruse Michael Stars and Bella Doll brands for something cute and comfy for the beach. For fall, staffers advise mixing grays, browns and blacks with nude and pops of bright color like brick red, teal green, berry and amethyst. Don’t forget to check out the vintage-inspired silver jewelry by local Catherine Max. 2710 Via De La Valle, Del Mar, 858.755.7227

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exploring

Old Town

Left to right: The Cosmopolitan Hotel; colorful souvenirs; Colorado House, home of the Wells Fargo Museum. Opposite page: Palms shadowed on adobe.

San Diego celebrates Mexican and Spanish Colonial history.

On the hilltop overlooking Old Town is the site where, in 1769, Padre Junípero Serra established Mission Basilica San Diego de Alcalá. In 1774, Serra’s mission was moved to a location six miles east, but a colony of residents remained and the area became known as California’s first permanent European settlement. Today, the Junípero Serra Museum (2727 Presidio Drive) stands on that same hill, overlooking the festive neighborhood now called Old Town San Diego.

Living History and culture

Old Town State Historic Park, a pedestrian-only area spanning six blocks, is home to more than a dozen of San Diego’s earliest buildings—some original, others reproductions—including a general store, Wells Fargo Bank, adobe homes and the first office of the San Diego Union, the city’s oldest newspaper. You’ll also find the Casa de Estudillo, the 1825 home of Spanish aristocrat Don Jose Antonio de Estudillo, the newly renovated Cosmopolitan Hotel and Seeley Stable Museum, a reconstruction of the 1850s-era stagecoach stop that now houses a collection of vintage carriages. Park aides lead tours of the sites, leaving from the Old Town Visitor’s Center in the Robinson Rose building, located on the plaza. No reservations are necessary and tours are free (619.220.5422). Adjacent to the plaza, Fiesta de Reyes (2754 Calhoun St.) is filled with restaurants and shops that celebrate Mexican and American history; check out Hacienda de las Rosas, a winery and tasting room whose wines are made from locally grown grapes, and The Urban Seed, which not only has a huge selection of heritage vegetable seeds but also French antiques and elegant home décor pieces. Costumed storytellers and artisans throughout the plaza add to the ambiance. Up the hill at Harney and Juan streets you’ll find the Mormon Battalion as well as Heritage Park, the site of seven restored Victorian buildings that were moved to this site from downtown San Diego after World War II to escape demolition due to modern development. The park also houses Southern California’s first synagogue, Temple Beth Israel, built in 1889. More historical sites line San Diego Avenue, which leads out of Old Town State Park to the south. Construction on the gorgeous Church of the Immaculate Conception, still an active Catholic church, began in 1868 in an effort to replace the existing adobe church with a brick structure, but was not completed for more than 50 years. The bell tower houses one

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of the San Diego mission’s original bells. Farther up San Diego Avenue, behind an adobe wall, is El Campo Santo, the city’s first cemetery, established in 1850, and the San Diego Sheriff’s Museum and Educational Center (2384 San Diego Ave.), built 100 feet from where San Diego’s original ­cobblestone jail once stood. It features exhibits displaying weapons and equipment used by the county’s 28 ­sheriffs over the past 150 years. The Casa del Rey Moro Museum (2471 Congress St.) is a small house transformed into a ­scholarly treasure of African world ­history, with a focus on the Afro-Spanish, Afro-Mexican and African-American heritage in Old Town and California. Hungry for more? Take in a show at the Old Town Theatre (4040 Twiggs St.), operated by the critically acclaimed Cygnet Theatre Company. Cygnet’s main fall show is Shakespeare’s Richard III, which runs from Oct. 19 through Nov. 13.

shopping

Old Town’s many shops offer everything from authentic goods to touristy tchotchkes. Check out Miranda’s Court­yard (2548 Congress St.) for a large collection of Mexican folk art, or browse women and children’s fashions made from eco-friendly cotton and alpaca at Wandering Sage (2415 San Diego Ave.). On the back side of the park, Taylor Street is home to Bazaar del Mundo (4133 Taylor St.), a two-story emporium of ­international folk arts, fashion, jewelry and home décor. Wind down your shopping day with a glass of pinot at Wine Cabana (2539 Congress St.). For a map of this neighborhood, see page 78. For a list of restaurants in this area, see page 62.

ashok sinha

SWEET TASTE OF HISTORY

great find Everything about Old Town is set up to transport visitors back to its 1850s heyday, from the costumed actors milling about the plaza down to the old-timey candies being sold at the new Rust General Store. Meant to reflect the transatlantic trading taking place at the time, the shop is well-stocked with imported European candies, French caramels and several varieties of licorice, including a mango flavor from Australia. The cashiers even dress the historical part, with women in modest lace-trimmed dresses and men in suspenders. You’ll also find gourmet mustards, preserves and other specialty food items from modern times, plus lotions, soaps, housewares and more. 2720 Calhoun St., 619.295.RUST

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exploring

Balboa Park

Left to right: the graceful architecture of the House of Hospitality; a bonobo at play at the San Diego Zoo (located inside the park); the Old Globe Theatre.

Art, music and performance bloom year-round.

Spanning 1,200 acres of lush, beautifully landscaped terrain, Balboa Park is known as San Diego’s “crown jewel,” offering a variety of outdoor recreation options for kids and adults alike, not to mention a verdant respite from the bustle of the city’s increasingly metropolitan pace. The park is also the seat of San Diego’s thriving cultural scene. Nestled between palm trees and botanical gardens, ornate Spanish Colonial buildings house many of the park’s museums and art exhibits. Several of the buildings were constructed as part of two world fairs: the Panama-California Exposition in 1915–16, and the California-Pacific International Exposition in 1935–36. ­ It can take more than one day to see and enjoy each museum, garden and attraction. The Visitors Center (619.239.0512) in the House of Hospitality offers a Passport to Balboa Park, allowing admission to any of the park’s museums for one week. (Keep in mind some museums are closed on Mondays.) Deluxe ­packages include passes to the neighboring San Diego Zoo. Or go high-tech and let the park’s new iPhone app be your guide.

ARTS & CULTURE

Performing arts abound in the park. The Old Globe Theatre routinely presents top talent in world-renowned productions; fall features include Richard O’Brien’s The Rocky Horror Show (Sept. 15-Nov. 6), a revival of the musical that inspired the cult-classic film, and Somewhere (Sept. 24-Oct. 30), a world premiere play from playwright-in-residence Matthew Lopez. See p. 64 for more theater listings. Elsewhere in the park, the Marie Hitchcock Puppet Theatre presents whimsical puppet shows, while Spreckels Organ Pavilion houses the world’s largest ­outdoor pipe organ, with some 4,500 pipes. Free concerts are offered Sundays at 2 pm. The park is also home to groups celebrating culture. The House of Pacific Relations International Cottages promotes the heritage of countries around the world by hosting open houses and weekend festivals. Neighboring WorldBeat Center uses art, music, dance and education to celebrate African and indigenous cultures, while Centro Cultural de la Raza is a multidisciplinary center dedicated to the preservation of Chicano/Latino culture. The park has a vast array of institutions celebrating the visual arts, past and present. Known for its presentation of eclectic traveling exhibitions, the San Diego Museum of Art also has a trove of Renaissance and Baroque works, plus a vast Asian collection; a survey of Mexican Modernist painting arrives this fall. The world-class Museum of Photographic

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(OPPOSITE) BJARNE G. JENSEN EXCEPT BONOBO COURTESY SAN DIEGO ZOO; (THIS PAGE, TOP) EDWIN SANTIAGO; RUBEN ORTIZ-TORRES, NO HAY PASO (DO NOT ENTER), 1983

Arts showcases compelling photography and also presents films in its state-of-the-art theater. The Mingei International Museum is dedicated to folk art, craft and design from around the world, while the Timken Museum of Art is home to the Putnam Foundation’s renowned collection of European and Byzantine art, including Russian religious paintings. The San Diego Art Institute’s Museum of the Living Artist presents exhibitions by contemporary local artists every four to six weeks, and the historic Spanish Village Art Center is a collection of 37 studios representing more than 200 artists working in media ranging from sculpture to blown glass; the charming courtyard setting is meant to evoke an Old World town square.

SCienCe & HiSTorY

Balboa Park’s many non-visual-art museums are a huge draw for children, but most distinguish themselves by crafting exhibitions that also appeal to adult sensibilities. The San Diego Air and Space Museum salutes aviation with 68 original, reproduction and model airplanes and spacecraft. The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center has interactive science exhibitions and an IMAX Dome theater. The country’s largest multisports museum, the San Diego Hall of Champions has interactive displays inviting sports fans to test their athletic and broadcasting skills. From antiques to hot rods, the San Diego Automotive Museum’s collection illustrates the evolution of the automobile. The San Diego Natural History Museum’s life-sized T-Rex skeleton, fossil exhibits and 3-D theater let visitors explore the natural world. Dedicated to the study of anthropol-

The iconic Museum of Man

greAT Find

PUNKADEMICS

The Mexico City punk scene of the 1980s and ‘90s inspired many, its long tentacles even reaching the hallowed halls of the San Diego Museum of Art. SDMA’s latest show, Rubén Ortiz-Torres: Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, features photos, paintings, drawings and videos created by the internationally-renowned postmodern artist, author and UCSD professor, who documented the subculture with an intimacy only an insider can deliver. The show offers a rare chance to see earlier examples of Ortiz-Torres’ work, which today is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, among many others. Through Nov. 6 at SDMA, 1450 El Prado, 619.232.7931

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ogy, the San Diego Museum of Man explores cultures of the world, especially the Americas. The largest of its kind, the Model Railroad Museum boasts scale models and interactive features for children. The Museum of San Diego History features traveling shows and exhibitions culled from the Historical Society’s vast collection. At the Veteran’s Museum & Memorial Center visitors will find military uniforms from World War I, Vietnam and the Korean War, as well as maritime paintings by local artists and other displays. The Marston House, an Arts & Crafts mansion designed in 1905 by noted architect Irving Gill, is a must for history and architecture buffs; the grounds also feature a carriage house and gardens.

attractions & gardens

NO WONDER IT’S WORLD FAMOUS sandiegozoo.org

The park’s major attraction is, of course, the San Diego Zoo (see p. 69), with some 4,000 rare and endangered species. Among the animal residents you’ll find the much-beloved meerkats, Asian and African elephants, monkeys, birds and more. Be sure to stop by Panda Canyon to say hello to the newest member of the clan, Yun Zi. After visiting the zoo, try your hand at the brass ring game from your perch atop a hand-carved pony on the Balboa Park Carousel. Both kids and grown-ups are welcome on the Balboa Park Miniature Railroad, which takes a 3-minute, half-mile trip through four acres of the park. The park also features several gardens, a legacy left by its founding “mother,” botanist Kate Sessions. Complete with ornate fountains and colorful tiling, the Spanishstyle Alcazar Garden, which abuts the Art Institute and Mingei Museum, blooms with 7,000 brilliantly colored annuals. The Japanese Friendship Garden features a Zen meditation garden and bonsai exhibit, while the sunken Zoro Garden has an interesting history: It was designed as a nudist colony during the 1935 California-Pacific International Exposition but is now a habitat for monarch, sulfur and swallowtail butterflies. Also built for the Expo, the Old Cactus Garden has succulents and other exotic plants. With some 2,100 orchids, ferns, poinsettias and other plants, the Botanical Building is among the world’s largest lath structures; along with its gorgeous Lily Pond, it’s one of the park’s most photographed sites.

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RECREATION

From hiking and jogging to tennis and bocce ball, you’ll find it in the park. The Balboa Park Activity Center has facilities for badminton, table tennis, volleyball and more, while the Balboa Park Municipal Golf Course offers striking views of downtown and Coronado. At Texas and Upas streets, on the park’s northeast end, the Morley Field Sports Complex is a haven for disc golf fans and other sports nuts, boasting a pool, velodrome, archery range and bocce court. Check in here for information on the many hike and bike trails through Florida Canyon, a popular workout spot for joggers. The nearby Balboa Tennis Club is open to the public, with 25 courts and a full-service pro shop, plus lessons and clinics. The dapper, white-clad members of the San Diego Lawn Bowling Club, which has been around for more than 75 years, play six days a week near the corner of Sixth Ave. and Laurel St. Visitors are welcome to join the fun and receive a free lesson. There are also a few leash-free dog parks here, including one at Balboa Drive and El Prado, south of the Cabrillo Bridge, and another at Morley Field, northwest of the tennis courts.

for the

WHOLE San Diego’s only IMAX® Dome Theater plus 100+ Hands-On Science Exhibits

Open every day with free parking. Located in beautiful Balboa Park.

(619) 238-1233 • www.rhfleet.org

DINING

Several casual snack bars and coffee carts can be found throughout the park and inside certain museums. For a sit-down experience, try The Prado, whose lively, colorful interior and charming garden patio—not to mention hearty American cuisine, refreshing salads and exotic South American cocktails—have made it a longtime local favorite. The Tea Pavilion at the Japanese Friendship Garden serves tea, noodles and sushi in a casual setting, while the Sculpture Court Café at the San Diego Museum of Art is a good bet for salads and sandwiches. For the at-home gourmand, the Balboa Park Food & Wine School has classes in everything from fondue-making to sushi rolling taught by celebrated local chefs, plus wine education. Make sure to make reservations in advance, though, as classes tend to fill up quickly. A map of Balboa Park is on page 78. Museums and attractions are listed in the where guide.

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Maderas Golf Club

A GUIDE TO

THE GREENS From the desert to the sea, San Diego’s got game

STEELE CANYON GOLF CLUB

Talk about sand traps and water hazards. San Diego has two of the biggest: the Anza-Borrego desert and the Pacific Ocean. Coastal cliffs and desert mountains set the scene for some of the best golf in the world. More than 90 courses are open to the public, and players of all levels can take a swing at links near the city center or at par-3 courses for that quick fix. One day on the greens will be all it takes to understand why San Diego County is truly a golfer’s paradise.

A perfect combination of scenery and challenge, this 27-hole course in the East County community of Jamul is the only one in San Diego designed by Gary Player. It features three distinct courses, each with four sets of tees that invite all levels of play. Canyon Nine provides breathtaking elevations; Ranch Nine winds through fields surrounding a working ranch; and Meadow Nine stretches along the pastoral valley floor where wildlife often plays through. Steele Canyon was named one of the top 10 courses in California by Golf for Women and received Golf Digest’s four-star award. 3199 Stonefield Drive, Jamul, 619.441.6900

TORREY PINES GOLF COURSE

MADERAS GOLF CLUB

Site of the 2008 U.S. Open and the annual PGA tournament known as the Farmer’s Insurance Open, this is one of the bestknown courses in America. (Tiger Woods and local Phil Mickelson are among the greats who have played here.) The two courses have stunning ocean views from the bluffs above the Pacific, wide fairways and sloping greens. The South Course (par 72; 7,628 yards) is a bit more difficult than the North (par 72; 6,874 yards), with the seventh and 12th holes being two of the town’s toughest. 11480 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, 800.985.4653

This Johnny Miller- and Robert Muir Graves–designed course is set in secluded canyons and ravines 20 minutes northeast of downtown, complemented by oaks, sycamores, creeks, lakes, waterfalls and 40 acres of native wildflowers. This 18-hole course plays to 7,115 yards from the back tees—and with five sets of tees, it can be enjoyed by golfers of all skill levels. The renowned maintenance practices of Troon Golf assure championship conditions every day of the week. 17750 Old Coach Road, Poway, 858.451.8100

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riverwalk golf club Location, location, location. This is San Diego’s most convenient and centrally ­located golf club. The 27-hole course was redesigned by Ted Robinson Sr. and Jr., and ­features nearly 100 bunkers, splashy waterfalls and well-protected bentgrass greens. A night-lit driving range is open every day; call for times. 1150 Fashion Valley Road, San Diego, 619.296.4653

la costa resort and spa Measure your game against golfing’s elite at La Costa, the site of numerous PGA Tour events. Amid 400 acres in the coastal foothills of Carlsbad, La Costa features two 18-hole courses, a driving range, equipment rental, a prestigious Jim McLean Golf School and unique programs offered on-site by the U.S. Golf Fitness Association and the Chopra Center. The last four holes of the South Course are known as “the longest mile in golf.” 2100 Costa del Mar Road, Carlsbad, 800.854.5000

carmel mountain ranch country club Although not particularly scenic (some holes front Rancho Bernardo housing developments), it’s one of the county’s more demanding courses. Almost every hole is either uphill or down, with ravines, natural boulder formations and streams adding to the test. 14050 Carmel Ridge Road, San Diego, 858.487.9224

PARK HYATT aviara The only Arnold Palmer signature golf course in San Diego, Aviara winds through rolling valleys with ocean views. Named by Golf Digest and Golf magazines as one of the best resort courses in America, and by Condé Nast Traveler as one of the best in the world, the resort also welcomes non-guests to play. 7447 Batiquitos Drive, Carlsbad, 760.603.6900

sail ho golf club Built by A.G. Spalding, Sail Ho is one of the oldest courses in the country, dating back to the ‘20s. Originally known as the San Diego Country Club, the 1,023-yard, nine-hole course recently received a $3.3 million face-lift. 2960 Truxton Road, Liberty Station, Point Loma, 619.222.4653

18-hole executive course spread over some 425 acres. Also onsite is a golf school designed exclusively for women of all ages and skill levels, taught by LPGA professionals. 3007 Dehesa Road, El Cajon, 619.442.3425

SALT CREEK GOLF CLUB Carved through the foothills of Mount Miguel, this 280-acre layout is a links design by John Cook. It features three lakes, 78 bunkers and plenty of lush wetlands. The scenic course is surrounded by a wildlife refuge—not housing developments. Five sets of tees make it playable for all levels. 525 Hunte Parkway, Chula Vista, 619.482.4666

rancho bernardo inn & country club A Ted Robinson Sr.–designed championship layout with an amazing 18th hole, the course was enhanced some years ago by the design team of Schmidt & Curley. Also on site is a 27-hole executive course with mature trees and natural water ­features. Non-guests are welcome, but reservations must be made a minimum of seven days in advance. 17550 Bernardo Oaks Drive, Rancho Bernardo, 858.675.8470

THE CROSSINGS AT CARLSBAD Located about a mile from the ocean and 30 minutes from downtown San Diego, this 18-hole championship course is the city’s newest facility. As envisioned by architect Greg Nash, the course’s design is inspired by the protected wetlands and rugged canyons surrounding it. Five bridges (or crossings) link the course, which plays par 72 over 6,835 yards. The Crossings also features a lighted practice center, golf shop, walking trails and restaurants. 5800 The Crossings Drive, Carlsbad, 760.444.1800

golf baja Can’t get a tee time, or just craving some post-links mariscos? Head to Baja California, where the crowds are scarce, the scenery is unbeatable and the price is right. These three courses are all within an hour’s drive of the border.

BARONA CREEK GOLF club This par-72 course over 7,088 yards has received numerous accolades since its opening in 2001. Created by Gary Roger Baird Design, the course includes more than 100 bunkers and a series of lakes and ponds. It was also the host site for the 2007 Nationwide Tour Championships. 1932 Wildcat Canyon Road, Barona Valley Ranch Resort & Casino, Lakeside, 619.387.7018

coronado municipal golf course If you’re able to get on this 18-hole ­championship course, you may have difficulty ­keeping your eye on the ball: From the back nine, the ­views of the Coronado Bridge and the San Diego skyline across the bay can be beautifully ­distracting. 2000 Visalia Row, Coronado, 619.435.3121

Club Campestre de tijuana The 18-hole urban course at the Tijuana Country Club has an impressive pedigree: It was designed by world-class course architect Alister MacKenzie. Agua Caliente 11311, Tijuana, B.C., 888.217.1165 real del mar This coastal resort 15 minutes south of the border features a par-72, 18-hole course set among canyons; navigating the narrow fairways can be challenging—in a good way. KM 19.5 Tijuana-Ensenada Toll Road, Rosarito, B.C., 800.662.6180 bajamar They call this 27-hole, links-style championship course “the Pebble Beach of Baja” for its multiple cliffside holes; don’t miss Oceano No. 5, 185-yard par-3 that carries over a roiling cove. KM 77.5 Tijuana-Ensenada Toll Road, Ensenada, B.C, 888.311.6076.

sycuan resort Set amid rugged mountains and natural rock outcroppings, Sycuan Resort is a 25-min­ute drive east from downtown San Diego. There are two 18-hole championship courses and an

Y F or tee times at these and other local courses, call San Diego Golf Reservations, 866.717.6552, or Showtime Golf, 888.806.7667.

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Night crawler

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San Diego nightlife ranges from beach-bar lunacy to martini-足sipping sophisti足cation. Find your place in the moonlight.

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207/float

THE IVY

Channel your inner rock star at these two nightspots at the Hard Rock Hotel. The street-level 207 bar features sumptuous interior detailing and a lively, often celebrity-studded scene, while the rooftop Float bar is a rollicking pool party to rival Las Vegas. 207 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 866.751.7625. Map Q16

Find a trio of different atmospheres and experiences at the Andaz Hotel. The basement nightclub is founded on a principle of titillating voyeurism, which extends from the décor (leathercorseted columns) to the scanty cocktail waitress uniforms. The rooftop bar features outdoor fire pits and poolside cabanas, while the street-level wine bar offers by-the-ounce tasters in a sophisticated setting. 600 F St., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.814.2055. Map Q16

Altitude sky lounge The views from this popular open-air lounge are unmatched. Pull up a seat around the perimeter to see the downtown skyline and inside Petco Park from 22 floors up. The bar itself is illuminated with a colorful waterfall, while the lounge area—filled with comfy couches—is covered by a trellis. A DJ spins anything from rock to hip-hop. Located atop the Marriott Gaslamp Quarter. 660 K St., downtown, 619.696.0234. Map R16

beach There’s just one letter you need to know: W. As in the W Hotel, which hosts several different nightspot settings. The rooftop Beach has heated-sand floors, a fire pit and private, tented cabanas, while downstairs houses the loungey, ­sophisticated lobby bar. A third bar is located on the mezzanine, poolside. 421 W. B St., downtown, 619.231.8220. Map P15

belly up tavern This well-respected institution has been rocking for more than 35 years in what was once a sleepy neighborhood in Solana Beach. The area is now the swank Cedros Design District, but the BUT (as it’s affectionately called) is still in the same beautiful space, keeping music fans happy with a steady diet of blues, reggae, rock, country, world music, folk and hip-hop from international and local acts. 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach, 858.481.8140. Map W22

croce’s jazz bar Run by Ingrid Croce, widow of singer–songwriter Jim Croce, this restaurant and adjacent bar is a downtown staple. The small but lively bar features a regular cast of local talent playing jazz, blues, jumpin‘ jive and R&B. A real (and rare) treat is to catch Ingrid and Jim‘s son, A.J. Croce, performing his piano-based folk jams. 802 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.233.4355. Map Q16

FLUXX ­

LOUNGESIX Tropical LoungeSix is located on the fourth floor rooftop deck of Hotel Solamar, offering beautiful views of downtown and the bay, not to mention a happening bar scene. The spacious patio is illuminated by flickering lanterns, fire pits and electrified palm trees. A row of cabanas lines the pool—the perfect spot to indulge in signature cocktails and fresh, fruity sangria. 616 J St., downtown, 619.531.8744. Map Q16

OCEAN HOUSE This restaurant/club (formerly known as Neimans) is housed in a ­spectacular Victorian mansion, but the grande dame rocks to the rhythms of reggae, rock, hip-hop, salsa and jazz. The beautiful 1922 pavilion has a large dance floor and a great sound system. A smaller space accommodates comedy acts and DJs. 300 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, 760.729.4131. Map T22

on broadway On Broadway boasts one of the largest and loudest dance floors in town, as well as a sushi bar that serves until 1 am. Originally a bank built in 1926, On Broadway has a sprawling floor plan with two levels, multiple rooms (including quieter lounge areas) and a lounge in what was once the vault. Friday/Saturday only. 615 Broadway, downtown, 619.231.0011. Map P16

onyx­ This bi-level nightspot hosts a hip, fashionable crowd sipping old-school cocktails in a striking, contemporary setting on one floor; dancing on the other. Music, both live and DJ-spun, ranges from rare grooves and hip-hop to soul, house and acid jazz. 852 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.231.7529. Map Q16

This ambiance-changing dance club comes courtesy of the design team behind Sidebar and Stingaree. S.D.’s nubile children of the night gather on the sunken circular dance floor to shake what their mama gave them while big-name DJs rock the club’s state-of-the-art sound system. 500 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.232.8100. Map Q16

Sidebar

house of blues

STINGAREE

Housed in a former Woolworth’s department store (the original sign is mounted in the concert hall), House of Blues serves up an eclectic bill of rock, blues, Latin and reggae on its basement main stage and small, street-level restaurant stage. The club also serves Southern-inspired cuisine, and don’t miss the extensive collection of folk art, with some 300 pieces on display. 1055 Fifth Ave., downtown, 619.299.2583. Map Q16

This swanky, tri-level club includes multiple bars and dance floors inside, plus private cabanas and a fire pit on the roof. Stingaree’s name pays homage to the bawdy history of its location: Back in the 1880s, this part of the Gaslamp Quarter was known as the red-light district, where patrons could get “stung” with mischief. 454 Sixth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.544.9500. Map R16

Birdcages hang from the ceiling and even encase the DJ booth at this newly renovated see-and-be-seen spot, whose titillating décor includes tasteful nude paintings and risqué videos playing on a loop near the bumpin’ dance floor. 536 Market St., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.696.0946. Map Q16

Clockwise from top: The scene from 22 floors up at Altitude Sky Lounge; posh downtown lounge Sidebar; 207, the lobby bar at the Hard Rock Hotel in the Gaslamp.

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where

the guide FALL 2011

NIGHTLIFE

Naughty & Nice Once home to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the gorgeous 1882 building at the corner of Sixth and Market has been reincarnated as Airr Supperclub. With soaring ceilings and monochromatic theme rooms, Airr is the Jekyll and Hyde of downtown nightlife. Guests who are feeling angelic can dine on porcini mushroom risotto, bay scallops and flat iron steak in the pristine, all-white communal dining room, or cross to the other side, where every surface—from the oversized lounge-beds to the chandeliers and floors—is toned in devilish red. Don’t be shy to let loose: Like the secret society that once met here, what happens at Airr stays hush-hush. 526 Market St., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.546.8306.

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Dining SPOTLIGHT

American The 3RD CORNER WINE SHOP & BISTRO  Combining a casual French-American bistro with a retail wine shop, these popular spots give foodies a wealth of pairing options at any budget. L, D (daily till 1 am; closed M in O.B.).  2265 Bacon St., Ocean Beach, 619.223.2700.  Map J8; 897 S. Coast Hwy. 101,   Encinitas, 760.942.2104. $$ Map W22 analog  Inspired by a wood-clad 1970s recording studio, this spot features comfort food like prosciutto mac ‘n’ cheese and “totchos” (tater tot nachos). D (T-Su), Br (Su).  801 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.233.1183. $$  Map Q16 anthology  Swank Little Italy three-story supper club with Todd Allison’s New American menu and live jazz, blues or rock music nightly. D (M-Sa).  1337 India St., Little Italy, 619.595.0300. $$  Map P15 Avenue 5  Stylish, comfortable neighborhood eatery serves seasonal French-American cuisine within walking distance of Balboa Park museums and theaters. L (T-F), D (T-Su), Br (Su).  2760 Fifth Ave. #100, Bankers Hill, 619.542.0394. $$$  Map O16

Coronado cool

Local, organic, sustainable— these foodie buzzwords are everywhere these days, including on the menu at Coronado’s spacious new Leroy’s Kitchen and Lounge. Sure, this isn’t the first or only place in town to spotlight natural meats and produce from small San Diego farmers; still, we can think of worse bandwagons on which to jump. Behind its streetside roll-up garage door lies a bar and dining room outfitted in reclaimed wood; the menu’s loaded with fresh seasonal salads, blue-cheese potato chips and entrées like scallop sliders, Duroc pork and Jidori chicken, which you can wash down with a craft cocktail or local brew. Trendy, yes— but who’s complaining? 1015 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.437.6087

bankers hill bar and restaurant  Take a seat in one of the mismatched antique chairs decorating this casual spot with an urban-industrial vibe. Chef Carl Schroeder’s top-notch seasonal menu includes his signature pork tacos and a great burger. D (nightly).  2202 Fourth Ave., Bankers Hill, 619.231.0222. $$  Map O16 Bertrand at MISTER A’s  Incredible 12th-floor views complemented by fresh, seasonal ingredients. Appetizers range from mac ‘n’ cheese to pan-seared scallops, augmented by an outstanding wine list. L (M–F), D (nightly).  2550 Fifth Ave., Bankers Hill, 619.239.1377. $$$  Map O16 Brockton Villa  An 1894 cottage with spectacular ocean view. Try the Coast Toast, a French toast soufflé from the award-wining breakfast menu. B, L (daily); D (T-Su).  1235 Coast Blvd., La Jolla, 858.454.7393. $$  Map W19 Bub’s at the ballpark  Steps from Petco Park, this good-time sports bar, famous for its peanut-shellcovered floor, features a menu of pub favorites (salads, sammies, wings, etc.) plus an on-site mini-basketball court, shuffleboard and more. L, D (daily).  715 J St., East Village, 619.546.0815. $$  Map R16 CardifF chart house  Seafood and steakhouse has picturesque coastline location with floor-to-ceiling windows. Indulge in hot chocolate lava cake for dessert. L (W–Sa), D (nightly), Br (Su).  2588 S. Coast Hwy. 101, Cardiff-by-the-Sea, 760.436.4044. $$$  Map W22 Craft + commerce  Gastropub-inspired food like roasted bone marrow, fried pickles and bacon cracker jacks, plus handcrafted cocktails, local beers and a lively, social bar atmosphere. L, D (daily).  675 W. Beech St., Little Italy, 619.269.2202. $$  Map W22 CROCE’S RESTAURANT & jazz BAR  Awardwinning cuisine includes seafood, p­asta, poultry, lamb and beef. Run by musician Jim Croce’s widow, Ingrid, the centrally located downtown venue pays tribute to its namesake with live music nightly. B, L (Sa-Su); D (nightly).  802 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.233.4355. $$$  Map Q16 Currant  Brasserie-style menu in an elegant, comfortable yet upscale setting with 17-foot ceilings and charming sidewalk patio. Located on the ground floor of the Sofia Hotel. Br (Sa-Su), L (M-F), D (nightly).  140 W. Broadway, downtown, 619.702.6309. $$$  Map Q16

Guidelines

Restaurants are listed by city on page 54. Map locators at the end of each listing (Map A3; Map H10, etc.) refer to maps on pages 76–79. Compendium includes editors’ recommendations and advertisers.

Index American...............................48 Breakfast................................ 49 Brewpubs............................... 50 California Cuisine.................51 Chinese....................................52 Desserts..................................53 Eclectic/Fusion.....................53 French......................................53

International......................... 54 Italian........................................55 Japanese.................................57 Mexican/Southwestern... 57 Seafood................................58 Steak......................................59 Thai.........................................61 Wine Bars.............................61

dick’s last resort  Buckets of ribs, catfish and crab legs served by a purposefully irreverent waitstaff, plus 66 beers and live music nightly (T-Sa). L, D (daily).  345 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.231.9100. $$  Map Q16 THE FLEETWOOD  Steak, seafood and comfort classics like tater tots and mac ‘n’ cheese at this ballpark-area bar/lounge. All you can eat crab legs on Tuesdays. D (nightly), Br (Sa-Su).  639 J St., Gaslamp, 619.702.7700. $$$  Map Q16 house of blues  Dan Aykroyd’s nightclub and restaurant features live music nightly in the basement venue and Southern cuisine (voodoo shrimp, rosemary cornbread, baby-back ribs) in the upstairs restaurant. Sidewalk café dining. L (M-F), D (nightly).  1055 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.299.2583. $$  Map Q16 Jimmy’s Famous American Tavern  Spicy California cheeseburgers and specialty cocktails served in a fun, casual bayside venue; outdoor patio offers great marina views. L, D (daily); Br (Su).  4990 N. Harbor Drive, Point Loma, 619.226.2103. $$  Map K9 KENSINGTON GRILL  Hip, upscale neighborhood dining spot features comfort classics like pork ribs, gourmet tater tots and shrimp waffles. Don’t miss the “hog bar,” a selection of bacony delights. D (nightly).  4055 Adams Ave., Kensington, 619.281.4014. $$$  Map I12 knotty barrel  Local craft beers and some organic ingredients elevate this new spot a step above your average beer bar. On the menu find fried pickles, bison burgers, fish ‘n’ chips and the house specialty: deep-fried Twinkies. L, D (daily).  844 Market St., East Village, 619.269.7156. $$-$$$  Map Q17 La Playa A modern and cozy wine pub featuring seasonal hearty plates (grilled meats, pasta) plus shareable apps like bacon-wrapped dates. D (daily), Br (SaSu).  1005 Rosecrans St., Point Loma, 619.546.9500. $$ Map K8 THE Lincoln Room Honest Abe inspires this downtown social club, down to the log cabin décor and old-fashioned whisky cocktails. But Chef Chris Walsh’s modern cuisine is a far cry from frontier food. L, D (daily).  901 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.696.8888. $$ Map Q16 NEIGHBORHOOD  Gastropub-inspired eatery is a bit snobbish about its condiments (you’ll find no ketchup here), but makes up for it with tasty gourmet burgers, hand-cut sweet potato fries and 27 craft brews. L, D (daily).  777 G St., East Village, 619.446.0002. $  Map Q16 OCEAN HOUSE OF CARLSBAD VILLAGE  Lovely spot in a Victorian mansion comes alive nightly with live entertain­ment and outside dining. Serving seafood, steak

San Diego Restaurant Week offers a chance to sample more than 160 local restaurants as they offer three-course meals for $20, $30 or $40, Sept. 18-23. p. 64

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Dining and pasta. L, D (daily); Br (Su). 300 Carlsbad Blvd.,  Carlsbad, 760.729.4131. $$  Map T22 qualITy SOCIal Billed as “a bar, with food,” this dive-bar-gone-upscale features booze-friendly eats like pork belly BLT and beet-and-burrata salad. D (nightly), Br (Sa-Su). 789 Sixth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter,  619.501.7675. $$  Map Q16 The ReD DOOR Cozy, modern bistro with cottagelike interior features a new farm-to-table menu using ingredients grown in the owner’s garden. L (M-F), D (nightly), Br (Su). 741 W. Washington St., Mission  Hills, 619.295.6000. $$$  Map N16 R gaNg eaTeRy Top Chef alum Rich Sweeney runs this colorful, clubhouse-like comfort-food spot with a lively open-air patio. Favorites include smoked gouda mac ‘n’ cheese, Portobello fries and tater tots. L (T-Th), D (T-Su), Br (F-Su). 3683 Fifth Ave., Hillcrest,  619.677.2845. $$  Map N16 SeaRSuCkeR At this always-hopping Gaslamp hotspot, Top Chef finalist Brian Malarkey crafts a bold, flavorful menu that ranges from a mammoth 32-oz. rib eye to mini appetizer bites. L (M-F), D (nightly), Br (Su). 611 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp Quarter, 619.233.7327.  $$$  Map Q16  SOlaCe aND The MOONlIghT lOuNge Chef Matt Gordon of North Park’s Urban Solace expands his upscale-comfort-food empire to North County, this time with an emphasis on seafood. L (M-Sa), D (nightly), Br (Sa).  24 East E St., Encinitas, 619.295.6464. $$$ Map  W22 TRaCTOR ROOM This dimly lit spot is decked out in hunting lodge chic, with a game-heavy menu that includes crispy elk ravioli and venison meatloaf, plus killer craft cocktails. D (nightly), Br (Sa-Su). 3687 Fifth  Ave., Hillcrest, 619.543.1007. $$  Map N16 uRBaN SOlaCe Neighborhood joint in up-and-coming North Park features updated New American comfort cuisine and an intriguing wine, craft beer and cocktail list. Locals love the warm cheese biscuits and Sunday bluegrass brunch. L, D (daily); Br (Su). 3823 30th St.,  North Park, 619.295.6464. $$  Map N17

Breakfast BeaCh gRaSS Cafe A breezy and casually chic eatery by the beach serves up a health-conscious menu of granola, flapjacks, salads and more. B, L (daily). 159 S.  Highway 101, Solana Beach, 858.748.7770. $$  Map X22 BRIaN’S 24 Old-school clubby spot features a mahogany bar, crystal chandelier and 24-hour dining (midnight brunch, anyone?). Burgers, steaks, pasta and chicken and waffles, too. B, L, D (daily). 828 Sixth Ave.,  Gaslamp Quarter, 619.702.8410. $$  Map Q16 Café 222 Locals line up in droves for Cafe 222’s quirky American cuisine and whimsical décor. Popular menu items include the peanut butter waffle with bananas at breakfast; tuna melts, salads and more at lunch. B, L (daily). 222 Island Ave., downtown,  619.236.9902. $  Map R15 Café ON PaRk From pancakes and cereal to sandwiches and pasta, this personality-filled familyfriendly space serves up huge portions and eclectic combinations. B, L (daily). 3831 Park Blvd., Hillcrest,  619.293.7275. $  Map N18 The COTTage Housed in a charming turn-of-thecentury home complete with garden patio, the Cottage is hugely popular for breakfast (don’t miss the coffee cake). Sammies and burgers at lunch; fish tacos, pasta and grilled meats at dinner. B, L (daily); D (nightly until Oct. 1). 7702 Fay Ave., La Jolla, 858.454.8409.  $$  Map W19

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Dining The crown room  Often voted best Sunday brunch in town, this lavish buffet is set in an architecturally stunning dining room at the Hotel del Coronado. Reservations are required. Br (Su).  1500 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.522.8490. $$$$  Map L10 HASH HOUSE A GO GO  Huge portions of “twisted farm food” that will make your eyes bulge: egg scrambles and more arrive on massive platters, speared with a giant rosemary branch. Expect a long wait at weekend brunch. B, L (daily); D (T-Su).  3628 Fifth Ave., Hillcrest, 619.298.4646. $$  Map N16 IsABEL’S CANTINA  A cool, casual spot near the beach serves health-conscious, bold-flavored Latin and Asian-influenced fare, from tamales to udon noodles. B, L, D (daily).  966 Felspar St., Pacific Beach, 858.272.8400. $$  Map H7 maryJANE’S COFFEE SHOP  All-day breakfast spot offers sticky buns, burgers and chicken pot pie in a classic diner setting, with a dash of rock-star style. B, L, D (daily; F-Sa until 3 am); Br (Sa-Su).  207 Fifth Ave., Hard Rock Hotel, Gaslamp, 619.764.6950. $$  Map Q16 The Mission  This super-popular mini-chain of vegetarian-friendly spots is known for pancakes, French toast, smoothies, breakfast burritos, baked goods and eclectic food. B, L (daily).  3795 Mission Blvd., Mission Beach, 858.488.9060, Map I7; 2801 University Ave., North Park, 619.220.8992, Map N17; 1250 J St., East Village, 619.232.7662. $  Map Q17 richard walker’s pancake house  Popular downtown spot with a huge selection of mouth-watering flapjacks and other breakfast and lunch fare. Favorites include the baked apple pancake. B, L (daily).  520 Front St., downtown, 619.231.7777. $  Map Q15 

Brewpubs Blind Lady Ale House  This bicyclist-friendly uptown spot is a local favorite thanks to its gourmet pizzas, handcrafted organic salads and vast beer selection. There’s even a mini-brewery in the back. L (F-Su), D (T-Su).  3416 Adams Ave., Normal Heights, 619.255.2491. $$  Map I12 CORONADO BREWING COMPANY  Fresh from the local microbrewery, the diverse beer selection complements the steaks, seafood, pizza and pastas in this casual family environment. L, D (daily).  170 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.437.4452. $$  Map L11 Pizza Port  A huge hit with locals, Pizza Port’s three locations deliver quirkily-named pies, award-winning private-label beers and a fun, family-friendly environment just blocks from the beach. L, D (daily).  135 N. Highway 101, Solana Beach, 858.481.7332, Map X22; 571 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, 760.720.7007, Map T22; 1956 Bacon St., Ocean Beach, 619.224.4700. $$ Map W22 San diego Beer Company Downtown’s newest brewery and sports bar also has eats like seared ahi, woodfired pizzas and numerous finger appetizers to share. L,D (daily).  603 Broadway, Gaslamp, 619.398.0707. $$ Map Q16 Stone Brewing Company  Home of Arrogant Bastard Ale, Stone’s massive brewery comes complete with scenic gardens and a restaurant serving eclectic, beer-friendly food inspired by cuisines of the world, like wild boar ribs and duck tacos. L, D (daily).  1999 Citricado Parkway, Escondido, 760.471.4999. $$$  Map C3 yard house  World’s largest selection of draft beer with American fusion cuisine including orange-peel chicken and pan-seared ahi. Extensive ­children’s menu, late-night dining, 152 beers on tap. L, D (daily).  1023 Fourth Ave., downtown, 619.233.9273. $$  Map P16 

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A MENU SO FRESH, WE PRINT IT TWICE A DAY.

Dining California Cuisine 1500 OCeaN Housemade pastas and adventurous starters with bold, inventive flavors define this special-occasion spot on Coronado, complete with intimate ocean-view terrace, beach cabanas and a wine cellar. D (T-Sa). Hotel del Coronado, 1500 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.522.8490.  $$$$  Map L10 a.R. valeNTIeN Named for an Impressionist painter whose canvases adorn the walls of this Craftsman-style structure, this celebrated spot features seasonal ingredients fresh from the farm, with Chef Jeff Jackson at the helm. B (Sa-Su); L, D (daily). 11480 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla,  858.777.6635. $$$  Map S19

Premium Seafood. Aged Steaks. Fine Wines.

AT THE OMNI HOTEL

675 L Street | San Diego (619) 645-6545 www.McCormickandSchmicks.com/San Diego MSSR_SanDiego_SepOctNov2011.indd 1

WHERE | San Diego Sep/Oct/Nov 2011 1/3 p 4c

aRTeRRa A favorite power-lunch spot, Arterra’s seasonal menu makes good use of locally sourced ingredients in dishes like braised beef short ribs. Sushi bar and outdoor lounge with fire pits and cabanas, too. B (daily), L (M–F), D (M–Sa). 11966 El Camino Real, Del Mar,  858.369.6032. $$$  Map X22  BlaNCa Chef Gavin Schmidt’s artistic, ingredientdriven cuisine features local produce, house-baked breads, house-cured meats and more. D (M-Sa). 437  S. Coast Hwy. 101, Solana Beach, 858.792.0072.  $$$$  Map W22 BluefIRe gRIll La Costa Resort’s stylish destination dining spot serves coastal delicacies and seasonal vegetables. Elegant setting with indoor waterfall and outdoor fire pits. D (daily). 2100 Costa del Mar Road,   Carlsbad, 760.929.6346. $$$  Map T22

DOBSON’S Power-lunch spot has great California cuisine with a touch of Italian, French, Spanish and Asian, plus seafood specialties, including to-die-for mussel bisque with puffed pastry. L (M–F), D (M– 7/26/11 10:42 AM Sa). 956 Broadway Circle, downtown, 619.231.6771.  $$$   Map Q15  flavOR Del MaR Coastal cuisine like sous vide local bass and snap peas and grilled spring onion ravioli from noted Chef Jason Maitland in an airy, ocean-view space. L, D (daily). 1555 Camino Del Mar, Del Mar,  858.755.3663. $$$  Map X22 geORge’S aT The COve La Jolla institution comprises three levels (from elegant to casual), all with picture-perfect views. Award-winning Chef Trey Foshee creates fresh seafood, steak and regional cuisine. L, D (daily). 1250 Prospect St., La Jolla, 858.454.4244.  $$$$  Map W19  gRaNT gRIll Chef Mark Kropczynski creates dishes with ingredients native to the region—jumbo diver scallops are a signature dish—while Jeff Josenhans crafts mixology magic behind the bar, all inside the historic U.S. Grant Hotel. B, L, D (daily). 326 Broadway, downtown, 619.744.2077. $$$$  Map Q16   jSIX Modern restaurant in Hotel Solamar features seasonal foods inspired by the coastline and area farms, lots of handcrafted elements and wines from Washington to Baja. B, L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 616 J St.,  Gaslamp, 619.531.8744. $$$  Map Q16 jRDN Hip restaurant at Tower 23 Hotel has steak and seafood dishes, as well as a full raw bar. Patio offers boardwalk and ocean views and great people-watching. B, L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 723 Felspar St., Pacific  Beach, 858.270.5736. $$$  Map H7 kITCheN 1540 Farm-to-table is the concept at this eatery at L’Auberge Del Mar hotel. James Beard “Rising Star” Chef Paul McCabe crafts dishes like whole roasted Tai snapper and pan-seared black cod. B, L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 1540 Camino del Mar, Del Mar,  858.793.6460. $$$  Map X22 

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Dining The lINkeRy Named one of the best farm-to-table restaurants in the U.S. for its near-exclusive use of local, seasonal ingredients, the Linkery makes nearly everything in-house, including its gourmet sausages. L (F-Su), D (nightly), Br (Sa-Su). 3794 30th St., North  Park, 619.255.8778. $$  Map J12 MaRkeT ReSTauRaNT + BaR Chef Carl Schroeder crafts modern cuisine using local produce, handmade cheeses and locally raised meat. Highlights include the blue cheese souffle, market veggie tasting and desserts like Meyer lemon-cream crepes. D (nightly). 3702 Via  de la Valle, Del Mar, 858.523.0007. $$$  Map X22 MISTRal Acclaimed Chef Patrick Ponsaty makes unique French/Italian dishes using farm-fresh ingredients and herbs grown in the hotel’s on-site garden. D (T-Sa). 4000 Coronado Bay Road, Loews Coronado  Bay Resort, Coronado, 619.424.4000. $$$  Map L11  NINe-TeN At this intimate and sophisticated restaurant, award-winning Chef Jason Knibb creates evolving California cuisine made with local and organic ingredients. The Jamaican jerk pork belly appetizer and the braised short rib entree are highlights. B, L, D (daily). 910 Prospect St., Grande Colonial Hotel, La  Jolla, 858.964.5400. $$  Map V19 RaNChO valeNCIa Exceptional ambience with Spanish tile and gorgeous scenery. Superb cuisine with Pacific Rim flair and an award-winning wine list. B, L, D (daily); Br (Su). 5921 Valencia Circle, Rancho Santa Fe,  858.759.6216. $$$   Map X23  Sky ROOM Elegant dining room features contemporary California cuisine atop a classic hotel with fantastic scenic views. More than 1,000 wines to choose from. D (W-Su). 1132 Prospect St., La Valencia Hotel, La Jolla,  858.454.0771. $$$$  Map W19 STaRlITe Dazzling design complements fresh, sustainably farmed food and boutique cocktails at this ultra-hip restaurant/bar. Open for dinner late night; don’t miss the burger on brioche washed down with the signature Starlite Mule. D (nightly), Br (Su). 21+. 3175 India St., Midtown/Little Italy, 619.358.9766.  $$$  Map O15  WhISkNlaDle Chef Ryan Johnson uses local organic ingredients in back-to-basics dishes like roasted bone marrow and chorizo-date fritters. Outdoor patio provides ideal opportunity for people-watching. L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 1044 Wall St., La Jolla, 858.551.7575.  $$   Map W19

Retail Wine Shop • Late Night Dining • Reservations Accepted The 3rd Corner Wine Shop and Bistro is a paradise for food and wine lovers alike. This unique and affordable concept that reflects a new generation of restaurants features a living wine list, wonderful food and late night dining. Visit us at www.the3rdcorner.com

Palm Desert

HOURS

73101 Highway 111 • Palm Desert, CA 92260 Phone: 760.837.9600 • Fax: 760.837.9608

Retail Wine Shop Tues–Sun, 10:00am–1:30am Bistro Tues–Sun, 11:30am–1:00am

Encinitas 897 S. Coast Hwy, Ste F-104 • Encinitas, CA 92024 Phone: 760.942.2104 • Fax: 760.942.2147

Ocean Beach

Closed Mondays

2265 Bacon Street • San Diego, CA 92107 Phone: 619.223.2700 • Fax: 619.223.3640

Photography by TLS Images

H ot F ood, C old B eer . . . G et in H ere !

Chinese Del MaR ReNDezvOuS Upscale Chinese bistro featuring entrées like Mongolian rack of lamb and steak Shangri-La, plus handmade dumplings and sauces made in-house. L (M-Sa), D (nightly). 1555 Camino del  Mar #102, Del Mar, 858.755.2669. $$  Map X22 jaSMINe SeafOOD ReSTauRaNT Popular for dim sum, this casual spot also serves authentic Hong Kong-style seafood, duck and barbecue entrées at dinner. L, D (daily). 4609 Convoy St., Kearny Mesa,  858.268.0888. $$  Map G1 PaNDa INN A rare sit-down dining experience at Horton Plaza mall, Panda Inn serves Mandarin-style dishes like tea-smoked duck and Phoenix chicken, with white-chocolate-covered fortune cookies at the end of the meal. L (M-F), D (daily). 506 Horton Plaza, downtown, 619.233.7800. $$  Map Q16  ReD PeaRl kITCheN Pan-Asian cuisine served in a hip, contemporary bar setting decked out with dark lacquered tones contrasted with vibrant colors and textures. Favorite dishes include hearts of palm salad, spicy tuna tartare, crispy tofu and Alaskan halibut. D (nightly). 440 J St., Gaslamp, 619.231.1100. $$  Map R16

Lunch / dinner / sunday brunch Spicy Deviled Eggs Chili Cheese Fries, Onion Rings – Proprietary 10 oz. Burgers – • Jimmy Burger • The Cowboy Fish & Chips, Fried Chicken Cajun Shellfish Boil Braised Short Ribs

619.226.2103

happy hour 3 for 3

Monday - Friday, 3pm-6 pm $3

- draft beers - well drinks $3 - select wines Plus $3 off appetizers $3

www. J - F a t . com

A M E R i C A ’ S C u P H A R B O R - 4990 N. HARBOR DRivE next to point loma sportfishing

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Dining Desserts CUPS  Retro-styled organic cupcake lounge features vegan and gluten-free options plus cheekily-named standards like the Elvis (chocolate cake with banana cream filling and peanut buttercream). Open daily.  7857 Girard Ave., La Jolla, 858.459.2877. $  Map W19 EXTRAORDINARY DES­SERTS  Topped with edible flowers and gold flakes, Karen Krasne’s stunning tarts, cakes and other treats are truly extraordinary. A must-try. Open daily.  1430 Union St., Little Italy, 619.294.7001, Map P16; 2929 Fifth Ave., Hillcrest, 619.294.2132. $$  Map O16 GHIRARDELLI SODA FOUNTAIN  A staple in the Gaslamp, this old-timey soda shop serves up rich sundaes, shakes and malts that will take you back to childhood. Open daily.  643 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.234.2449. $  Map Q16 heaven sent desserts  Anchoring the corner of 30th and University in the heart of lively North Park, this spot’s daily-changing menu features treats like tropical fruit tarts and specialty cakes. Open daily.  3001 University Ave., North Park, 619.793.4758. $  Map J12 MICHELE COULON DESSERTIER  A longtime favorite among La Jolla locals, Coulon whips up tortes, homemade jams, breads and quiches using local organic products. (M-Sa).  7556-D Fay Ave., La Jolla, 858.456.5098. $  Map W19

Eclectic/Fusion Bali hai  Newly remodeled tiki oasis has a new Polynesian menu by Chef Chris Powell, featuring Hawaiian-style blackened ahi tuna and wok-fried whole striped bass, plus fabulous bay views. L (M-Sa), D (nightly), Br (Su).  2230 Shelter Island Drive, Shelter Island, 619.222.1181. $$$  Map K9 BISTRO D’ASIA  Innovative blending of flavors and ingredients from Beijing, Bangkok and Saigon in dishes like whole Peking duck and “dancing” scallops. Sushi, too: the citrus spicy scallop roll is a happy-hour staple. L, D (daily).  1301 Orange Ave., ­Coronado, 619.437.6677. $$  Map L10

San Diego’s Premier Ethiopian Restaurant

Open 7 Days Lunch Dinner Daily Happy Hour

INDIGO GRILL  Award-winning Chef Deborah Scott explores her love of the spicy and sweet in her twist on Southwestern cuisine. Try her famous Indian corn pudding; Jiffy cornbread mix never tasted so decadent. D (nightly), Br (Sa-Su).  1536 India St., Little Italy, 619.234.6802. $$  Map P15 Roppongi  Cutting-edge eatery with spectacular décor, including a wall-sized aquarium and outdoor fireplace. Chef Stephen Window’s list of Pacific Rim–style tapas is as extensive as it is excellent. L, D (daily).  875 Prospect St., La Jolla, 858.551.5252. $$$  Map W19

11am - 3pm 5pm - 10pm 4pm - 7pm

French

Lunch Buffet Mon - Fri $9.99 Hillcrest 530 University Avenue San Diego, CA 92103 619.269.6142 www.bayusethiopiancuisine.com Mention WHERE and receive a free appetizer. Not valid with any other offer.

ADDISON  Chef William Bradley creates deliriously tasty, elegant dishes from local ingredients with French influences at this ultra-fine restaurant at the Grand Del Mar. D (T-Sa).  5200 Grand Del Mar Way, Del Mar, 858.314.1900. $$$$  Map X22 Bo Beau Chef Katherine Humphus’ classic French dishes (boeuf bourguignon, chicken fricasse) are served in a cozy and inviting atmosphere in bohemian Ocean Beach. D (nightly).  4996 W. Point Loma Blvd., Ocean Beach, 619.224.2884 $$ Map J8 El Bizcocho  Chef Nicolas Bour creates updated elegant classics with a molecular twist, accompanied by a 1,600-label wine list. It’s a fine-dining atmosphere, so be

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Dining sure to dress the part. D (T–Sa), Br (Su).  17550 Bernardo Oaks Drive, Rancho Bernardo Inn, Rancho Bernardo, 858.675.8550. $$$$  Map C3 CAFé CHLOE  This locals’ favorite offers an afternoon “urban tea” (booking required) and bistro cuisine, such as smoked trout salad, cheese plates and moules frites in a casually elegant downtown setting, complete with small sidewalk patio. B, L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su).  721 Ninth Ave., East Village, 619.232.3242. $$  Map Q17

Straight from the market to the grill!

Chez Loma  Classic romantic dining in a historic Victorian house. Continental/Nouvelle French cuisine with seafood specialties like roasted salmon fillet with a horseradish crust. D (T-Su).  1132 Loma Ave., Coronado, 619.435.0661. $$$  Map L10 FARM HOUSE CAFÉ  At this popular neighborhood spot, Chef Olivier Bioteau serves up rustic French cuisine (like pain perdu with lavender honey) in a cozy and casual setting; tiny patio available, too. D (T-Su); Br (Su).  2121 Adams Ave., University Heights, 619.269.9662. $$$  Map I12 Marine Room  Outstanding nouveau French ­food like macadamia-pesto-crusted salmon and artisan cheeses by Chef Bernard Guillas in an unparalleled oceanfront location (at high tide, waves can reach the windows!). D (nightly).  2000 Spindrift Drive, La Jolla, 858.459.7222. $$$$  Map W20 Mille Fleurs  This über-romantic restaurant is a classic date spot in remote, exclusive Rancho Santa Fe. The cuisine is creative, updated French/California (think: escargot and whole dover sole meunière). L (T–F), D (nightly). 6009 Paseo ­Delicias, Rancho Santa Fe, 858.756.3085. $$$$  Map W23

1040 University Ave., San Diego In the Uptown District Shopping Center

(619) 574-2800

CASUAL AND AFFORDABLE. FRESH FISH PREPARED TO ORDER. Local beers on tap Local Seafood Beer-bat tered f ish and chips

Baja f ish tacos San Diego’s bes t clam chowder Grilled f ish sandwiches

bosseafoodmarketandgrill.com

Pamplemousse Grille  Former New York Chef ­Jeffrey Strauss brings an imaginative flair to his ­country French–influenced American menu in a quirky, casually elegant setting near the racetrack. L (F), D (nightly).  514 Via de la Valle, Solana Beach, 858.792.9090. $$$  Map W22 LE PASSAGE  French comfort food prepared with California-style touches and fine wines in a quaint and intimate bistro setting. L (T–Sa), D (T-Su).  2961 State St., Carlsbad, 760.729.7097. $$  Map T22 Tapenade  Chef Jean-Michel Diot’s traditional preparations incorporate Mediterranean ­flavors from regions beyond France. Decadent and savory desserts as well as vegetarian options. L (T–F), D (nightly).  7612 Fay Ave., La Jolla, 858.551.7500. $$$  Map W19 Vincent’s  Locals’ favorite is a great start to an evening of entertainment at nearby California Center for the Arts. Creative update of classic French cuisine. L (T–F), D (T–Sa).  113 W. Grand Ave., Escondido, 760.745.3835. $$  Map C3 

International alchemy  American comfort food with an international twist, utilizing regional ingredients and served in a low-key (but sometimes noisy) neighborhood spot. Bacon-infused vodka in the Hail Mary is a highlight at brunch. D (nightly), Br (Sa-Su). 1503 30th St., South Park, 619.255.0616. $$  Map K12 bayu’s authentic ethiopian cuisine  Find spiced meats, hearty vegetable dishes, injera bread and a popular lunch buffet at this vegetarian-friendly spot in Hillcrest. L, D (daily). 530 University Ave., Hillcrest, 619.269.6142. $$  Map N16 Berta’s Latin American  Latin American specialties can be sampled via generously apportioned tapas in this little cottage in Old Town. Entrées such as Brazilian vatapá should not be missed. L, D (T–Su). 3928 Twiggs St., Old Town, 619.295.2343. $$  Map N13

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Dining Cafe Sevilla Recently reopened in a new Gaslamp location, Sevilla still serves up the same Spanish tapas, seafood specialties, flamenco and salsa lessons that have made it a longtime local favorite. D (nightly).  353 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.233.5979 $$ Map R16 ChopaHn Enjoy authentic Afghan cuisine including Aushak (steamed dumpling filled with leek and onion) and an array of California wines in a serene setting just off the Gaslamp’s crowded main drag. D (nightly).  750 Sixth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.236.9236. $$$ Map R16 COSTA BRAVA  Coastal eatery serves Spain’s greatest hits, from jamón iberico to paella to tapas—and don’t forget the sangria. Live music offered throughout the week. L, D (daily).  1653 Garnet Ave., Pacific Beach, 858.273.1218. $$  Map H8 mediterranean room  Chef Lance Repp’s menu features flavors from across the Mediterranean, including North Africa and Turkey, in dishes like lemon roasted chicken and confit of Moroccan-spiced duck. B, L, D (daily); Br (Su).  La Valencia Hotel, 1132 Prospect Ave., La Jolla, 858.551.3765. $$$  Map W19 monsoon  Authentic Northern Indian cuisine in sophisticated environment. Bounteous lunch buffet; entrées include Bangalore masala and lamb curry. Signature cocktails and wines by the glass L, D (daily).  729 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.234.5555. $$  Map Q16 The Prado  The Prado’s dramatic garden patio is the perfect setting for a drink or a bite after a long day of sightseeing in Balboa Park. The eclectic American menu is spiked with Latin/Italian flair. L (daily), D (T-Su).  1549 El Prado, House of Hospitality, Balboa Park, 619.557.9441. $$  Map O17 Proper gastropub Chef Sean Magee serves a mix of British and American dishes in a festive pub atmosphere just an errant fly ball’s distance from Petco Park. L (Th-Fr), D (T-Su), Br (Sa-Su).  795 J St., East Village, 619.255.7520. $$ Map R16 el q’ero  A rare Peruvian restaurant in North County, featuring regional classics such as lomo saltado and the signature beverage, chicha morada, made from purple corn. L (T-Sa), D (M-Sa).  564 S. Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas, 760.753.9050. $$  Map V22 REI DO GADO  Meat-lovers, rejoice. This Brazilian-style steakhouse serves succulent beef and pork cooked over a mesquite fire, brought tableside on skewers until you tell them to stop. L, D (daily).  939 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.702.8464. $$  Map Q16 royal india  Palatial Gaslamp spot features Northern Indian specialties, bountiful vegetarian options and 30+ different curries. Buffet L (daily), D (nightly).  329 Market St., Gaslamp, 619.269.9999. $$  Map R16 

Italian acqua al 2  Sister restaurant to a like-named ­establishment in Florence, Italy, this spot (a Padres player favorite) serves fresh Tuscan fare in a ­stylish setting. Pastas, steaks and sandwiches for lunch. L (M–F), D (nightly).  322 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.230.0382. $$  Map Q16 ARRIVEDERCI  Charming restaurant with sidewalk seating draws loads of locals for its gnocchi with pesto cream and sun-dried tomato sauce. Sandwiches, pizzas and wines also available. L, D (daily).  3845 Fourth Ave., Hillcrest, 619.299.6282. $$  Map N16 ASTI  Northern Italian with a bistro feel, fresh seafood and steak specialties. Bustling patio dining area makes for great people-watching. L, D (daily).  728 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.232.8844. $$  Map Q16 BeNCOTTO  Italian for “well-cooked,” this slick, airy new spot in the modern Q Building earns raves for

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CafeCoyote_FA11v4.pdf

1

7/25/11

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Dining simple but well-executed create-your-own pasta dishes and other Italian specialities. L, D (T-Su).  750 W. Fir St., Little Italy, 619.450.4786. $$  Map P15 Bice  Milanese authenticity from Chef Mario Cassineri in the heart of downtown; don’t miss the cheese and salumi bar. Great cocktails, too. D (nightly).  425 Island Ave., Gaslamp, 619.239.BICE. $$$  Map Q16

GOLD MEDALLION AWARD 2011

VOTED BEST MEXICAN

California Restaurant Association, San Diego

Buca di Beppo  Family-style platters of ravioli al pomodoro or spaghetti and meatballs served up in a kitschy and friendly atmosphere. L, D (daily).  705 Sixth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.233.7272. $$  Map Q16 Cucina urbana  A hit since the day it opened, this chic neighborhood hotspot features housemade pastas, oven-baked pizzas and more Italian farm-to-table cuisine. Wash it down with a sophisticated cocktail or a selection from the on-site retail wine shop. L (T-F), D (nightly).  505 Laurel St., Bankers Hill, 619.239.2222. $$  Map O16 Il Fornaio  Authentic Italian recipes including excellent pasta, pizza and regional specialties paired with handmade breads. Coronado location has great bay views. L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su).  1555 Camino del Mar, Del Mar, 858.755.8876, Map X22; 1333 First St., Coronado, 619.437.4911. $$  Map L10 il postino  Spacious Italian spot comes complete with a pizza oven and full bar. The rack of lamb with rosemary and margherita pizza are among menu favorites. L, D (daily).  3955 30th St., North Park, 619.325.0809. $$  Map N17

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily Traditional Mexican Food Serving in the Heart of Historic Old Town

jACK & GIULIO’S  Known for its scampi and its spaghetti and meatballs, this Old Town Italian spot is a local favorite. Excellent wines for pairing. D (nightly).  2391 San Diego Ave., Old Town, 619.294.2074. $$  Map N14

2461 San Diego Avenue • 619.291.4695 • www.cafecoyoteoldtown.com

THE OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY  Italian comfort food served in a historic building with upstairs billiard room and loft bar. Family-friendly with large portions. L, D (daily).  275 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.233.4323. $$  Map R16 Old Venice  Local favorite boasts easy-going, candlelit atmosphere and Italian cuisine with Mediterranean flavors. Enjoy dishes like the spicy Roma shrimp and veal picatta. L (M–Sa), D (nightly).  2910 Cañon St., Point Loma, 619.222.5888. $$  Map K8 Osteria Panevino  Colorful ceramics and marble set the Italian feel for authentic Tuscan cuisine in a classic sidewalk café style; pair your pasta with a domestic or Italian wine. L, D (daily).  722 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.595.7959. $$  Map Q16 Piatti  Delicious pastas (ravioli al limone) and other Italian faves near the ocean in La Jolla Shores. The setting is elegant yet family-friendly, with a quaint outdoor patio. L, D (daily); Br (Sa–Su).  2182 Avenida de la Playa, La Jolla, 858.454.1589. $$  Map V20 Po pazzo  Italian for “a little crazy,” the menu at this Little Italy spot goes way beyond pasta, to steaks, seafood, veal and more. L, D (daily).  1917 India St., Little Italy, 619.238.1917. $$$  Map P15 Trattoria Fantastica  Popular eatery serving Sicilian fare in a casual setting, with a charming patio in the back. Specialties include wood-fired pizza and red wine osso bucco. B, L, D (daily).  1735 India St., Little Italy, 619.234.1735. $$  Map P15 TRATTORIA I TRULLI  Superb pasta and sauces in a rustic setting with more than 100 wines to choose from. The créme brûlée shouldn’t be missed. L, D (daily).  830 #100 S. Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas, 760.943.6800. $$  Map V22

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Dining

SPECTACULAR WATERFRONT DINING Enjoy breathtaking breathtaking views views Enjoy of the the coastline coastline while while you you of dine on on fresh fresh fish fish specialties, specialties, dine award-winning prime prime rib rib and and award-winning decadent desserts. desserts. decadent Chart House House is is your your place place Chart for outstanding outstanding cuisine cuisine and and for impeccable service. service. impeccable

vIvaCe Marvelous Northern Italian cuisine with a California twist made fresh using only organic ingredients at this gorgeous restaurant at the Park Hyatt Aviara Resort. D (M-Sa). 7100 Four  Seasons Point, Carlsbad,  760.603.6999. $$$  Map U22  vIgIluCCI’S RISTORaNTe Italian favorites plus Prime steaks, fresh seafood and savory veal, coupled with elegant décor, cozy piano bar and ocean views. L, D (daily). 1300  Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.522.0946, Map L10; 2943  State St., Carlsbad, 760.434.2500, Map T22; 505 S.  Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas, 760.942.7332. $$$   Map V22

Japanese Cafe jaPeNgO Bustling atmosphere attracts a hip after-work crowd to this upscale spot specializing in artistic sushi and cocktails. L (M–F), D (nightly).  8960  University Center Lane, La Jolla/Golden Triangle,  858.450.3355. $$  Map T21  2588 S. S. COAST COAST HWY HWY.. 101 101 2588 CARDIFF CARDIFF 760.436.4044 760.436.4044 ONLINE RESERVATIONS RESERVATIONS AT AT ONLINE

CHART-HOUSE.COM -HOUSE.COM CHART

Oasis on Coronado Island

Peohe’s offers offers guests guests an an Peohe’s island-inspired menu menu featuring featuring island-inspired an eclectic eclectic mix mix of of fresh fresh seafood, seafood, an mouthwatering steaks, steaks, new new wave wave mouthwatering sushi and and more. more. Enjoy Enjoy Peohe’s Peohe’s sushi all new new modern modern decor decor and and all stunning waterfront waterfront view view of of stunning the San San Diego Diego skyline. skyline. the

haRNey SuShI Find award-winning sushi with a molecular gastronomy twist at this groovy local mini-chain, where live DJs spin nightly. L (M-F), D (nightly). 3964  Harney St., Old Town, 619.295.3272, Map J10; 301 Mission Ave., Oceanside, 760.967.1820. $$  Map S22 NOBu After conquering L.A., New York, Miami, London and Vegas, celeb Chef Nobu Matsuhisa brings his brand to the Hard Rock Hotel. The miso black cod is a house specialty. D (nightly). 207 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.814.4124.  $$$  Map Q16 Ra SuShI A hip sushi bar that also features a creative menu of Japanese fusion dishes. Lively bar has Asianthemed cocktails and flat-screen TVs. L, D (daily). 474  Broadway,  downtown, 619.321.0021. $$   Map Q16 SuShI ON The ROCk This raucous sushi bar is ideal for the fun-seeker who appreciates rock music and a high energy atmosphere with creative rolls and fresh catch. L, D (daily). 1025 Prospect St., La Jolla, 858.459.3208.  $$  Map W19 Taka Hip, upscale sushi bar with inventive Asian fusion dishes like miso black cod and oysters dynamite on and off the menu. D (nightly). 555 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp,  619.338.0555. $$  Map Q16 

1201 FIRST FIRST STREET STREET 1201 CORONADO FERRY FERRY CORONADO LANDING LANDING 619.437.4474 619.437.4474 ONLINE RESERVATIONS RESERVATIONS AT AT ONLINE

PEOHES.COM PEOHES.COM

zeNBu Innovative sushi rolls and sashimi crafted from line-caught fish brought in by the owner’s personal fleet of fishing boats. Ask the staff about special off-the-menu rolls. D (nightly). 7660 Fay Ave., La Jolla, 858.454.4540,  Map W19; 2003 San Elijo Ave., Cardiff, 760.633.2223.  $$$  Map W22

Mexican/Southwestern el agave No mere burrito factory here: this is upscale, authentic Mexico City-style cuisine in exotic dishes like cuitlacoche tlacoyo on blue corn tortilla. There are also some 2,000 tequilas available to sample. L, D (daily). 2304 San Diego Ave., Old Town, 619.220.0692.  $$  Map M14 alfONSO’S A La Jolla institution since 1971, Alfonso’s prime location offers great people-watching from the sidewalk terrace. Family recipes include carne asada Alfonso. L, D (daily). 1251 Prospect St., La Jolla,  858.454.2232. $$  Map V19 BaRRIO STaR Decked out in colorful, Día-de-losMuertos-inspired décor, Isabel Cruz’s latest restaurant serves Mexican soul food with local, sustainable ingredients in dishes like diablo chicken and handmade tamales. B, L, D (daily). 2706 Fifth Ave., Bankers Hill,  619.501.7827. $$  Map O16 Cafe COyOTe South-of-the-border classics in a lively setting right in the center of Old Town. Choose from more than 100 tequilas in your margarita to wash down an order

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Dining of enchiladas suizas. B, L, D (daily). 2461 San Diego Ave., Old Town, 619.291.4695. $$  Map M14 Candelas  Find tequila prawns flambé over ahi tuna (but no burritos) at this romantic nouvelle ­Mexican spot with breathtaking views of San Diego’s skyline. D (nightly) at both locations; additional Br (Su), L (M-F) in Coronado only. 416 Third Ave., downtown, 619.702.4455, Map R16; 1201 First St. #115, Coronado, 619.435.4900. $$$  Map L10 CASA GUADALAJARA  Talavera tiles, folk art, a garden patio and a 200-year-old pepper tree define the setting; cuisine includes regional dishes like chicken and mango quesadilla and tequila-lime shrimp. L, D (daily).  4105 Taylor St., Old Town, 619.295.5111. $$  Map N13 La Fiesta  Nice blend of authentic and ­California-style Mexican dishes like lobster quesadilla and Mazatlan shrimp in a casual, colorful setting centrally located in the heart of downtown. L, D daily; Br (Sa-Su). 628 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.232.4242. $$  Map Q16 En Fuego  A Mexican restaurant with a lively bar scene, En Fuego specializes in traditional Mexican food like empanadas, tamales and seafood ­specialties such as mango salsa tilapia. Sip on specialty mojitos and margaritas of all flavors. L, D (daily).  1342 Camino del Mar, Del Mar, 858.792.6551. $$  Map X22 Miguel’s Cocina  This family-owned restaurant chain dates back to 1982. Each location has its own breezy vibe, but all serve Miguel’s seriously addictive queso dip. L, D (daily); Br (Su, also Sa on Coronado).  2912 Shelter Island Drive, 619.224.2401, Map K9; 1351 Orange Ave., Coro­ nado, 619.437.4237,  Map L10; 2444 San Diego Ave., Old Town, 619.298.9840, $$  Map N13 Old Town Mexican Cafe  This Old Town staple is famous for its handmade tortillas, which you can see being made fresh daily through the restaurant’s front window. A festive atmosphere awaits inside. B, L, D (daily).  2489 San Diego Ave., Old Town, 619.297.4330. $  Map N13 el take it easy  No burritos at this cool, urban Tijuana-inspired “gastrocantina.” Instead try the house-cured country ham or rabbit cazuela. World-class craft beers and boutique wines, too. D (nightly), L (F-Su).  3926 30th St., North Park. 619.291.1859. $$  Map J12 EL VITRAL  Serving creative, authentic Mexican fare, signature margaritas (try the Cuco-Yaya) and more than 250 tequilas in an airy converted warehouse space near the ballpark. Br (Sa-Su); D (nightly).  815 J St., East Village, 619.236.9420. $$$  Map R16 

Seafood anthony’s fish grotto  Bayside restaurant has served up fresh catches, fish ‘n’ chips and Mama’s famous clam chowders for 60 years running. And you can’t argue with those bay views. L, D (daily); Br (Su).  1360 N. Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.232.5103. $$$  Map Q15 BALEEN  Paradise Point Resort’s signature restaurant serves upscale seafood and “land-food” with stellar bay views in an island-inspired and family-friendly environment. D (T-Su).  1404 W. Vacation Road, Mission Bay, 858.490.6363. $$$  Map I8 Blue Point Coastal Cuisine  Executive Chef Daniel Baron presents California-style seafood and fresh oysters as well as modern molecular cuisine and hearty dishes like the blue crab and white truffle mac ‘n’ cheese. Hip martini bar and decadent desserts, too. D (nightly).  565 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.233.6623. $$$$  Map Q16 bo’s seafood market & grill  The local catch is featured on Bo’s dine-in menu in dishes like fish ceviche,

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Dining shrimp tacos and beer-battered fish ‘n’ chips. Local brews on draft, too. L, D (daily).  1040 University Ave., Hillcrest, 619.574.2800. $$  Map N16 the brigantine  Popular chain with a rollicking happy hour, steaks and chops is known for its fish tacos, swordfish and oyster bars. L (daily except Del Mar), D (nightly), Br (Su at Del Mar).  2725 Shelter Island Drive, Shelter Island, 619.224.2871, Map K8; 3263 Camino del Mar, Del Mar, 858.481.1166, Map X22; 1333 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.435.4166. $$  Map L10 CORONADO BOATHOUSE 1887  Prime rib and fish specialties like macadamia-crusted halibut in a beautiful, historic structure on the waterfront in Coronado. D (nightly).  1701 Strand Way, Coronado, 619.435.0155. $$  Map L10 Donovan’s prime seafood Popular steakhouse makes a splash with this seafood venture with prime Gaslamp location. D (nightly).  333 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.906.4850. $$$  Map R16 The Fish Market/Top of the Market  Casual dining includes seafood and sushi, plus oyster bar and bay view. Upstairs: Top of the Market features fine seafood and an expanded wine list. L, D (daily).  750 N. Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.232.3474, Map Q15; 640 Via de la Valle, Solana Beach, 858.755.2277. $$  Map X22 humphrey’s RESTAURANT  Yacht-club views with bayside seafood like sauteed Georges bank scallops and pepper-crusted king salmon. B, L, D (daily); Br (Su).   2241 Shelter Island Drive, Shelter Island, 619.224.3577. $$$  Map K8 island prime  Seafood, steak and cocktails complemented by one of the city’s best views. Adjacent C Level Lounge on the spacious deck is popular with the afterwork crowd. L, D (daily).  880 Harbor Island Drive, Harbor Island, 619.298.6802. $$$  Map J10 Mccormick & schmick’s  Stylish seafood chain is located in the Omni Hotel, adjacent to Petco Park. Fresh catch includes some local selections like swordfish and albacore from nearby Catalina Island. B, L, D (daily).  675 L St., downtown, 619.645.6545. $$$  Map Q16 The oceanaire seafood room  Retro oceanliner design features a bustling cocktail scene with oyster bar. Market-fresh seafood and regionally inspired dishes star on the daily-changing menu. D (nightly).  400 J St., Gaslamp, 619.858.2277. $$$  Map Q16 osetra WATERGRILL  Indulge in caviar, vodka and oysters at this progressive eatery, whose interior is defined by a three-story wine tower. Prime-aged meats are also on the menu. D (nightly).  904 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.239.1800. $$$  Map Q16 Pacifica Del Mar  Upscale ocean-view Asian fusion spot attracts a power crowd with mustard catfish and sugar-spiced salmon. Visit the vodka bar with more than 75 selections. L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su).  1555 Camino del Mar, Del Mar, 858.792.0476. $$$  Map X22 peohe’s  Tropical décor with spectacular water views and Pacific Rim plates like crispy wok-fried whole bass and fire shrimp courtesy. L, D (daily); Br (Su).  1201 First St., Coronado, 619.437.4474. $$$  Map K10 TRULUCK’S  Fresh crab, miso-glazed seabass, blue mac ‘n’ cheese, Niman Ranch steaks and more at this seafood, steak and crabhouse. D (nightly).  8990 University Center Lane, La Jolla, 858.453.2583. $$$  Map R16

Steak Cowboy star  With barstools upholstered in cowhide, this downtown steakhouse is decked out in Old West style. Great cocktails. L (T-F), D (T-Su).  640 10th Ave., East Village, 619.450.5880. $$$  Map Q17

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Dining Donovan’s Steak & Chop House  The power crowd noshes on huge portions of Prime steaks, chops and seafood paired with award-winning wines in a lively atmosphere. D (nightly; M-Sa at La Jolla).  4340 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, 858.450.6666, Map T21; 570 K St., Gaslamp, 619.237.9700. $$$  Map R16 edgewater grill  Casual bayside dining in Seaport Village features menu items like ahi, pasta and steak salad on a relaxed outdoor patio. B, L, D (daily).  861 W. ­Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.232.7581. $$  Map R15 Fleming’s Prime steakhouse & Wine Bar  Upscale steakhouse with Prime steaks, seafood, hearty side dishes and an excellent wine list (100+ choices by the glass). D (nightly).   8970 University Center Lane, La Jolla, 858.535.0078, Map T21; 380 K St., Gaslamp, 619.237.1155. $$$  Map Q16 GASLAMP STRIP CLUB  Vintage Vargas Girl prints adorn this grill-it-yourself steakhouse and martini bar with selfserve wine cellar. Central location and social vibe makes this a friendly alternative to a traditional steakhouse. D (nightly). 21+.  340 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.231.3140. ­$$  Map Q16 GEORGES ON FIFTH  Wins over diners with its centercut certified Angus Prime beef, American Kobe, fresh seafood, pasta and award-winning wine list. Live music F-Sa. D (nightly).  835 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.702.0444. $$$$  Map Q16 Greystone, The SteakHouse  Prime steaks, seafood (try the Dover sole prepared tableside) and pastas in a great downtown location. Beefy menu includes filet mignon potstickers, Kobe carpaccio and more. D (nightly).  658 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.232.0225. $$$  Map Q16 lou & mickey’s  Chop house with a mid-century feel features Prime steaks, chops and seafood, plus martinis shaken tableside and 350+-item wine list. L (M-F), D (nightly).  224 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.237.4900. $$$  Map Q16 Morton’s, THE steakhouse  USDA Prime-aged beef, seafood, fine wine, chilled cocktails, decadent desserts, crisp white linens and great service at the edge of the historic Gaslamp Quarter. D (nightly).  285 J St., downtown, 619.696.3369. $$$  Map Q16 THE PALM RESTAURANT  Steak, lobster and pastas served in a saloon-like atmosphere with classic caricatures drawn with charcoals and pastels right on the walls. D (nightly).  615 J St., Gaslamp, 619.702.6500. $$$  Map P16 Ruth’s Chris SteakHouse  Steakhouse chain renowned for “like ­buttah” steaks, barbeque shrimp and Ruth’s bread pudding for dessert with spectacular views of San Diego bay. L (F) in Carmel Valley, D (nightly).  1355 N. Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.233.1422, Map Q15; 11582 El Camino Real, Carmel Valley, 858.755.1454. $$$  Map X22 The Steakhouse at Azul La Jolla  Chef Carmine Lopez has a menu featuring Waygu beef and fresh seafood. A garden patio is defined by a contemporary glass-encircled fire ring. L (Sa), D (nightly), Br (Su).  1250 Prospect St. #C10, La Jolla, 858.454.9616. $$$  Map W19 UrbAN BAr AND GRILL  Contemporary American cuisine runs the gamut from steak, seafood and pasta dishes to creative burgers to standbys like Buffalo wings and pizza. D (nightly).  827 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.235.8700. $$  Map Q16 VIGILUCCI’S SEAFOOD, STEAK & CHOP HOUSE  Italian-influenced chophouse features steaks, oysters baked and on the half shell and pastas like the classic capellini checca along with breathtaking beach views. L, D (daily); Br (Su).  909 Prospect St., La Jolla, 858.454.9664, Map W19; 3878 Carlsbad Blvd., Carlsbad, 760.434.2580. $$$  Map T22 

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downtown’s only

24

THE

Dining hour restaurant bar & grill

rESTAUrANT

Lotus thai  Elegant bamboo décor and modern Thai cuisine with specialties including Choo Chee pork chops and roasted half-duck curry. L, D (daily).  3761 Sixth Ave., Hillcrest, 619.299.8272, Map N16; 906 Market St., downtown, 619.595.0115. $$  Map Q17 rama  Traditional Thai in a stylish, exotic setting (check out the waterfall in the back room). Specialties include Crying Tiger, with thinly sliced filet mignon. L (M-F), D (nightly).   327 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.501.8424. $$  Map Q16 Royal Thai Cuisine  Extensive menu of traditional Thai cuisine and specialties like quick-fried cornish game hen prepared as hot (or not) as you like. L (daily; M-F at La Jolla), D (nightly).  467 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.230.8424, Map R16; 737 Pearl St., La Jolla, 858.551.8424. $$  Map W19

THAT NEvEr

SLEEPS

Thai

Spice & Rice Thai Kitchen  Local favorite offers creative twist on Thai in specialties like Panang curry duck and spicy chili halibut. L (M–Sa), D (nightly).  7734 Girard Ave., La Jolla, 858.456.0466. $$  Map W19

BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER & LATE NIGHT MENU SERVED ROUND the CLOCK FULL BAR BEER ON TAP

Swadee Restaurant of Coronado  Quaint eatery on Coronado known for its tasty curries and friendly service. L, D (M-Sa). 1001 C Ave., Coronado, 619.435.8110. $$  Map L10 

Wine Bars counterpoint  Ultra-friendly neighborhood wine bar serves salads, panini, craft beer, international wines and a wide array of gourmet cheeses. L (Sa-Su), D (T-Su).  830 25th St., Golden Hill, 619.564.6722. $$  Map Q18 FIREFLY GRILL AND WINE BAR  Rare wines plus international cuisine in a cozy setting. Hearty fare includes Duroc pork schnitzel and balsamic-braised lamb osso bucco. D (nightly).  251-B N. El Camino Real, Encinitas, 760.635.1066. $$  Map V22 THE GRAPE  S.D.’s original wine bar features excellent wine list plus artisanal cheeses, breads and antipasti. Open nightly at 5 pm.  823 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.238.8010. $$  Map Q15 the wine lover  This Parisian-inspired wine shop features California and international wines paired with an array of cheese and imported olives. Open daily at 4:30 pm.  3968 Fifth Ave., Hillcrest, 619.294.9200. $$$  Map V23 wine steals  Lively atmosphere and wine-friendly eats including tasty cheeses, pizzas and charcuterie at good prices. Open daily (closed M in East Village).  1953 San Elijo Ave., Cardiff, 760.230.2657, Map W22; 1243 University Ave., Hillcrest, 619.295.1188, Map N17; 793 and 795 J St., East Village, 619.255.7452, Map Q16; 2970 Truxton Road, Point Loma, 619.221.1959. $$  Map J9

Extraordinary Portions complete menu available at www.brians24.com

828 6th Ave • Gaslamp 619.702.8410

THE BEST HOTCAKES YOU’vE EvEr TASTEd

WINE VAULT & BISTRO  A truly special find in Mission Hills, this place serves five-course set-menu wine dinners every Saturday, with wine flights and special events during the week. Food ranges from Italian to French to California, depending on the evening.  3731-A India St., S. Mission Hills, 619.295.3939. $$  Map P15

where?

Log on anywhere. WhereSD.com FALL 2011  WHERE SAN DIEGO  61

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Restaurants

Area Index

Our superguide by area, with cross reference to listings by cuisine.

GASLAMP QUARTER AREA aCqua al 2  (Italian)..........................................................55 analog  (American)............................................................48 asti  (Italian)............................................................................55 bice  (Italian)............................................................................56 blue point  (Seafood).......................................................58 brian’s 24  (Breakfast)......................................................49 buca di beppo (Italian).......................................... 56 cAFE SEVILLA  (International).........................................55 cHOPAHN  (International)...................................................55 croce’s  (American)............................................................48 dick’s last resort  (American)...............................48 donovan’s  (Steak)........................................................... 60

MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S  (Seafood).......................59

the mission  (Breakfast)................................................. 50

solace and the moonlight 

the mission  (Breakfast)................................................. 50

pizza port  (Brewpubs)................................................... 50

lounge  (American)........................................................49

morton’s, THE STEAKHOUSE  (Steak)................. 60

panda inn  (Chinese).........................................................52 proper gastropub  (International).........................55

bali hai  (Eclectic/Fusion).................................................53

STEAK & CHOP HOUSE  (Steak)............................... 60

ra sushi  (Japanese)...........................................................57

the brigantine  (Seafood)............................................59

vigilucci’s ristorante  (Italian)...........................57

richard walker’s  

humphrey’s  (Seafood) . ..................................................59

Wine steals  (Wine bars)................................................61

pancake HOUSE  (Breakfast)................................... 50

island Prime  (Seafood)..................................................59

zenbu  (Japanese).................................................................57

ruth’s chris  (Steak)....................................................... 60

jimmy’s famous  

top of the market  (Seafood)..................................59

American tavern (American)..........................48

El Vitral (Mexican/Southwestern)......................... 58

miguel’s cocina  (Mexican/Southwestern)............58

wine steals  (Wine bars)................................................61

OLD venice  (Italian)..........................................................56 

YARD HOUSE  (Brewpubs)................................................ 50

la playa  (American).......................................... 48

donovan’s prime seafood  (Seafood)..............59 LA FIESTA  (Mexican)...........................................................58 THE fleETWOOD  (American).......................................48 fleming’s  (Steak).............................................................. 60 gaslamp strip club  (Steak).................................... 60 Georges on fifth  (Steak)......................................... 60 GHIRARDELLI SODA FOUNTAIN  (Desserts).........53 the grape  (Wine bars)......................................................61 greystone  (Steak).......................................................... 60 House of Blues  (American)........................................48

Little italy ANTHOLOGY  (American)..................................................48 bencotto  (Italian).............................................................55 CRAFT + COMMERCE  (American)................................48 extraordinary desserts  (Desserts)...............53 indigo grill  (Eclectic/Fusion).....................................53 Po Pazzo  (Italian)...............................................................56 trattoria fantastica  (Italian).............................56 wine vault & bistro  (Wine bars)............................61

JSIX  (California Cuisine).........................................................51 the lincoln room  (American).................................48 lou & mickey’s  (Steak)................................................. 60 mAryjane’s coffee shop  (Breakfast)............... 50 monsoon  (International) ................................................55 nOBU  (Japanese)....................................................................57 The oceanaire  (Seafood).............................................59 tHE OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY  (Italian)...............56 osetrA watergrill  (Seafood)................................59 osteria panevino  (Italian)........................................56 THE PALM RESTAURANT  (Steak)............................... 60 quality social  (American).........................................49 rama  (Thai).............................................................................61 rED PEARL KITCHEN  (Chinese)...................................52 rei do gado  (International)...........................................55 royal INDIA  (International)............................................55 royal thai  (Thai)...............................................................61 san diego beer company  (Brewpubs).............. 50 searsucker  (American).................................................49 taka  (Japanese)....................................................................57 Urban Bar and Grill  (Steak)................................ 60

downtown/EAST  VILLAGE/EMBARCADERO

TRATTORIA I TRULLI  (Italian).......................................56

Harbor & shelter islandS point loma

neighborhood  (American).........................................48

La jolla/  torrey pines/  go­lden triangle alfonso’s  (Mexican/Southwestern)...........................57

CORONADO 1500 OCEAN  (California Cuisine).....................................51 bistro d’Asia  (Eclectic/Fusion)...................................53 the brigantine  (Seafood)............................................59 candelas  (Mexican/Southwestern)............................58 chez loma  (French)..........................................................54 coronado boathouse 1887  (Seafood).............59 coronado brewing co.  (Brewpubs)................. 50 Crown room  (Breakfast)............................................. 50 il fornaio  (Italian)...........................................................56 miguel’s cocina  (Mexican/Southwestern)............58 Mistral  (California Cuisine).............................................52 Peohe’s  (Seafood)...............................................................59

A.R. Valentien  (California Cuisine).............................51

swadee restauranT  (Thai)......................................61 Vigilucci’s Ristorante (Italian)....................... 57

cafe japengo  (Japanese).............................................57

the cottage  (Breakfast)................................................49 donovan’s  (Steak)........................................................... 60 fleming’s  (Steak).............................................................. 60 george’s at the cove  (Cal. Cuisine).....................51 marine room  (French)....................................................54 Mediterranean Room  (International).................55 michele coulon  (Desserts).......................................53 nine-ten  (California Cuisine)...........................................52 piatti  (Italian)........................................................................56 roppongi  (Eclectic/Fusion)............................................53 royal thai  (Thai)...............................................................61 sky room  (California Cuisine)........................................52 spice & rice  (Thai).............................................................61 Steakhouse at azul  (Steak).................................. 60

del mar/  rancho Santa fe

Balboa park/  UPTOWN/hillcrest/  mission hills Alchemy  (International)...................................................54 ARRIVEDERCI  (Italian).......................................................55 avenue 5  (American).........................................................48 barrio star  (Mexican)...................................................57 Bankers hill  (American)..............................................48 bayu’s ethiopian cuisine  (Int’l)..........................54 bertrand at mr. a’s  (American)............................48 blind lady ale house  (Brewpubs)...................... 50 bo’s seafood market & grill  (Seafood).......58 CAFE ON PARK  (Breakfast).............................................49 CUCINA URBANA  (Italian)...............................................56 extraordinary desserts  (Desserts)...............53 Farm House cafe  (French).........................................54 hash house a go go  (Breakfast)........................... 50 heaven sent  (Desserts).................................................53 il postino  (Italian)............................................................56

the brigantine  (Seafood)............................................59

lotus thai  (Thai)...............................................................61

DEL MAR RENDEZVOUS  (Chinese).............................52

the mission  (Breakfast)................................................. 50

Flavor del mar  (California Cuisine).........................51

the prado  (International)...............................................55

en fuego  (Mexican/Southwestern)..............................58

the red door  (American).............................................49

il fornaio  (Italian)...........................................................56

r gang eatery  (American)..........................................49

kitchen 1540  (California Cuisine)..................................51

STARLITE  (California Cuisine) . .........................................52

MARKET  (California Cuisine)..............................................52

el take it easy  (Mexican/Southwestern)...............58

mille fleurs  (French).....................................................54

tractor room  (American)..........................................49

pacifica del mar  (Seafood).......................................59

urban solace  (American)...........................................49

rancho valencia  (California Cuisine)....................52

the wine lover  (Wine bars)........................................61 wine steals  (Wine bars)................................................61

tapEnade  (French).............................................................54

North coastal the 3rd corner  (American).......................................48

cafe 222  (Breakfast)..........................................................49

VIGILUCCI’S SEAFOOD,  

beach grass cafe  (Breakfast).................. 49

cafe CHLOE  (French)........................................................54

STEAK & CHOP HOUSE  (Steak)............................... 60

BLANCA  (California Cuisine)...............................................51

CANDELAS  (Mexican/Southwestern)............................58

Whisknladle  (California Cuisine)...............................52

bluefire grill  (California Cuisine).............................51

Counterpoint (Wine Bars)....................................61

zenbu  (Japanese).................................................................57

cardiff chart house  (American)........................48

the 3rd corner  (American).......................................48

Vincent’s  (French).............................................................54

KENSINGTON GRILL  (American)..................................48

Truluck’s  (Seafood).........................................................59

mission bay/beaches

stone brewing co.  (Brewpubs)............................. 50

The Linkery  (California Cuisine)...................................52

BUb’s at the ballpark  (American)......................48

dobson’s  (California Cuisine)..........................................51

el bizcocho  (French)......................................................53

Arterra  (California Cuisine)............................................51

ANTHONY’S FISH GROTTO  (Seafood)......................58

currant  (American).........................................................48

North inland

ADDISON  (French)................................................................53

sushi on the rock  (Japanese).................................57

Cowboy star (Steak)............................................. 59

VIGILUCCI’S SEAFOOD,  

wine steals  (Wine bars)................................................61

brockton villa  (American)......................................48

cups  (Dessert).......................................................................53

vivace  (Italian)......................................................................57

firefly grill and wine bar  (Wine bars).........61 the fish market  (Seafood).........................................59 Harney Sushi (Japanese)....................................... 57

edgewater grill  (Steak).......................................... 60

baleen  (Seafood)............................................... 58

OCEAN HOUSE  (American)..............................................48

the fish market  (Seafood) ........................................59

BO BEAU  (French).................................................................53

PAMPLEMOUSSE grille  (French).............................54

Old town el agave  (Mexican/Southwestern)...............................57 berta’s  (International).......................................................54 cafe coyote  (Mexican/Southwestern).....................57 casa guadalajara  (Mexican/Southwestern)...58 Harney sushi (Japanese)....................................... 57 jack & giulio’s  (Italian)................................................56 miguel’s cocina  (Mexican).........................................58 old town mexican cafe  (Mexican)...................58

grant grill  (California Cuisine)...................................51

Costa brava  (International).........................................55

le passage  (French).........................................................54

knotty barrel  (American).........................................48

Isabel’s cantina  (Breakfast).................................... 50

pizza port  (Brewpubs)................................................... 50

Mission valley/  kearny mesa

lotus thai  (Thai)...............................................................61

JRDN  (California Cuisine)......................................................51

EL Q’ERO  (International)....................................................55

JASMINE SEAFOOD  (Chinese).......................................52

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Entertainment Guidelines

Map locators at the end of each listing (Map A3; Map H10, etc.) refer to maps on pages 76–79. Compendium includes editors’ recommendations and advertisers.

Index Festivals................................63 Special Events.....................63 Center Stage...................... 64 Music + Dance...................66 Sports....................................68 Casinos.................................68

Attractions...........................69 Wineries...............................69 Museums.............................70 Destination Shopping.......71 Nightlife................................72 Tours.......................................74

Festivals

OLD TOWN ART FESTIVAL  Oct. 1-2. More than 100 hand-picked artists from across the country show and sell their works in Old Town State Historic Park. 4000 Twiggs St., Old Town, 619.233.5008.  Map J10 La Jolla Art & Wine FESTivAl  Oct. 1-2. This twoday event features 300 SoCal and Baja artists plus fine local wines and beer, live entertainment and more. Girard Ave., between Pearl and Genter sts. lajollaartandwinefestival.com.   Map W19 OCEAN BEACH OKTOBERFEST  Oct. 8, 10 am-8:30 pm. Live bands, bratwurst-eating contests, a sausage toss and more on O.B.’s Newport Avenue. Ocean Beach, 619.224.4906. Map J8

SAN DIEGO FESTIVAL OF BEER  Sept. 9. The 17th annual festival features live music and samples from more than 100 different microbreweries. Columbia and B sts., downtown, sdbeerfest.org.  Map Q15

LITTLE ITALY FESTA  Oct. 9. Music, Italian food and specialty crafts are highlighted at this free event, which also features a popular street painting festival. India St. between Ash and Grape sts., Little Italy, 619.615.1092.  Map P15

ARTWALK ON THE BAY  Sept. 10-11. Artists from around the nation and Mexico display their original artworks for exhibition and sale in this open-air gallery with beautiful bay views. The Waterfront Park at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront, downtown, 619.615.1090.  Map R16

SAN DIEGO ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL  Oct. 20-28. The 12th annual event includes feature films, shorts and animation from Asian artists worldwide. UltraStar Cinemas, 7519 Hazard Center Drive, Mission Valley, 858.565.1264.  Map M18

OLD GLOBE shakespeare Festival  Through Sept. 25. The Old Globe presents Much Ado About Nothing, The Tempest and Amadeus, performed in nightly repertory on the outdoor stage.  1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.234.5623.  Map Q17

DEL MAR HARVEST FESTIVAL  Oct. 21-23. This 36th annual festival showcases 300 American artists, plus entertainment, food samples and kids’ crafts. 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Del Mar, 415.447.3205.  Map X22

CORONADO ART WALK  Sept. 17-18. The openair arts festival accompanied by performers and live music. More than 90 artists will display their wares in historic downtown Coronado. 1100 Orange Ave., 619.435.7242.  Map L11

David Maisel, Terminal Mirage 5, 2003 © David Maisel. Courtesy the artist and Haines Gallery.

dred vendors, three beer gardens, five food courts and a kiddie carnival fill six city blocks. Spring St. and La Mesa Blvd., La Mesa, 619.462.3002. Map E3

PACIFIC ISLANDER FESTIVAL  Sept. 24-25. The 17th annual event celebrates the food, art and culture of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Ski Beach, Mission Bay, 619.699.8797.  Map I8 ADAMS AVENUE STREET FAIR  Sept. 24-25. The 30th annual event, SoCal’s largest free two-day music festival, features 70 musical acts on six stages, plus carnival rides, beer gardens, vendors and more. Adams Ave. between 32nd and 35th streets, Normal Heights, 619.282.7329.  Map I12 OCEANSIDE HARBOR DAYS  Sept. 24-25. Sun, sand, surf and activities, from pier fishing to boat-building contests. Oceanside Harbor, 760.722.1534.  Map S22 CABRILLO FESTIVAL  Oct. 1-2. Special events commemorate Juan Cabrillo’s exploration of the West Coast in 1542. Ballast Point and Cabrillo National Monument, 1800 Cabrillo Memorial Drive, Point Loma, 619.557.5450.  Map L8 SAN DIEGO FILM FESTIVAL  Sept. 28-Oct. 2. Five-day bonanza in the Gaslamp showcases independent feature films, documentaries and shorts. Gaslamp 15 Cinemas, 619.582.2368. Map Q16 JULIAN FALL APPLE harvest  Mid-Sept.-Oct. Enjoy autumn foliage, art, entertainment and seasonal foods such as apple cider and pie. Special events on weekends, including the Julian Grape Stomp Festa on Sept. 3. Julian, 760.765.1857.  Map C6 OKTOBERFEST LA MESA  Sept. 30-Oct. 2. About 200,000 revelers attend this 38th annual Oktoberfest, the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi. Three hun-

CARLSBAD VILLAGE FAIRE  Nov. 6. Street fair features more than 900 vendors with international food, art and live entertainment. Grand Avenue near the ocean, Carlsbad, 760.945.9288.  Map T22 SAN DIEGO BAY WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL  Nov. 16-20. SoCal’s largest wine and food fest features cooking classes, wine-tasting seminars, exhibits, wine dinners and celebrity chefs. Embarcadero Marina Park North, downtown, 619.342.7337.  Map R15 SAN DIEGO THANKSGIVING DIXIELAND JAZZ FESTIVAL  Nov. 23-27. The 32nd annual event features 25+ performances by international artists. Town & Country Hotel, 500 Hotel Circle North, Mission Valley, 619.297.5277.  Map M15 SAN DIEGO holiday festival  Dec. 2-4. Watch artists at work, including glassblowing demonstrations and shop from the holiday collections of more than 200 local vendors, artists, and craftsmen. Del Mar Fairgrounds, 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., 858.792.4235.  Map X22

Special Events art san diego  Sept. 1-4. Contemporary art fair features gallery exhibitors, panel discussions, art labs and special events. Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel, 1 Park Blvd., downtown, 619.564.3333.  Map R16 san diego bayfair  Sept. 16-18. Crowds flock to Ski Beach to catch the World Series of Power Boat Racing, featuring intense water competition and the fastest powerboats in the world. Race course runs between Crown Point and Fiesta Island, Mission Bay, 619.434.8260.  Map I9 Disney live!  Sept. 16. Disney princesses are brought to life as Cinderella, Beauty and the Beast and Snow White and the Seven Dwarves come to the stage.  Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., Midway, 619.224.4171.  Map N13

Picture It

The Museum of Photographic Arts’ Infinite Balance exhibition showcases international photographers shortlisted for the three-year-old Prix Pictet, the world’s top prize for photography and sustainability. “These photographs highlight the beauty of the earth we share,” wrote Kofi Annan, Prix Pictet’s honorary president. “But they also expose the damage, deliberately or carelessly, we are inflicting on our own environment. So these images are a celebration and a reminder of the urgent need to change our ways.” The show includes work by Sammy Baloji, Edward Burtynsky, Michael Wolf and others, many of whom have never before had their work on view in the United States. p. 71

UCSD’s ArtPower! performing arts series brings cutting-edge artists to San Diego, including the Creole Choir of Cuba, contemporary string quartet Ethel and more. p. 66

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Entertainment FLEET WEEK SAN DIEGO Sept. 16-Oct. 2. A tribute to military service men and women includes U.S. Navy ship tours (Sept. 17-18), Coronado Speed Festival vintage car races (Sept. 24-25) and the Miramar Air Show (Sept. 30-Oct. 2). 619.858.1545.

T HE O CEAN A WAITS.

SAN DIEGO RESTAURANT WEEK Sept. 18-23. More than 160 of San Diego’s best restaurants offer fixed price, three-course meals in this seventh annual event. Visit website for participating restaurants. sandiegorestaurantweek.com. SCREAM ZONE Sept. 30-Oct. 16 (weekends only); Oct 20-Oct. 31 (nightly). Eerie attractions include the Haunted Hayride, Chamber of Chills and House of Horror. Del Mar Fairgrounds, 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Del Mar, 858.755.1161. Map X22 HAUNTED HOTEL Sept. 23-24, Sept. 30-Oct. 31. (closed M-T but open nightly from Oct. 19-31). Not for the faint of heart, this spooky maze will have everyone screaming. 424 Market Street, Gaslamp Quarter, 619.231.0131. Map Q16

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HAUNTED TRAIL Sept. 23-24, Sept. 30-Oct. 31. (closed M-T but open nightly from Oct. 19-31). No ordinary walk in the park, this mile-long scary trail features a Carnival of Carnage (not suitable for kids under 10). Balboa Park, 619.696.SCARE. Map O17

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LORD OF THE RINGS IN CONCERT Oct. 13: Howard Shore’s Grammy-winning score to the cult fantasy film is performed live to full film on-stage by over 250 musicians. Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., Midway, 619.224.4171. Map N13

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TEqUILA FESTIVAL AND EXpO Oct. 13-17. Unlimited tastings of more than 100 tequilas. Av. Revolución and Seventh St., Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, 664.607.3097. Map F3 GHOST HUNTING TOUR Oct. 21-22, 26. Creepy ghost tours inside the Whaley House prove why it’s dubbed the most haunted house in America. 2476 San Diego Ave., 619.297.7511. Map N14

Experience San Diego

MONSTER BASH Oct. 29. 11th annual festive street party features live bands, DJs and a costume contest. 21 and over. Gaslamp Quarter, 619.233.5008. Map Q16 SAN DIEGO BEER WEEK Nov. 4-13. More than 300 citywide events including beer dinners, rare bottle tastings, cheese pairings and brewery tours celebrate S.D.’s internationally recognized craft beer culture. Various locations. sdbw.org. MOTHER GOOSE pARADE Nov. 20. The 65th annual parade offers free family fun to start the holiday season. Route begins on Main St. and Magnolia Ave., El Cajon, 619.444.8712. Map E4

Center Stage AMADEUS Through Sept. 22. The lone non-Bard production in this year’s Summer Shakespeare Festival, Amadeus chronicles Mozart’s rise against rival Antonio Salieri in the court of the Austrian Emperor Josef; it won the Tony for Best Play and the Oscar for Best Film. Lowell Davies Festival Theatre at the Old Globe, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23.GLOBE. Map Q16 BLUE MAN GROUp Sept. 20-25. Comedy, music, technology, general oddity and a whole lotta blue define this worldwide entertainment phenomenon. Broadway/ San Diego, Civic Theatre, Third Ave. and B St., downtown, 619.570.1100. Map Q16 COME FLY AWAY Nov. 8-13. The music of Frank Sinatra meets the choreography of Twyla Tharp in this musical, which also features 15 world-class dancers and a 14-piece big band. Broadway/San Diego, Civic Theatre, Third Ave. and B St., downtown, 619.570.1100. Map Q16

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Entertainment San Diego Symphony Beyond MUSICAL EXCELLENCE

DR. SEUSS’ HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS! Nov. 19-Dec. 31. The holiday classic, which has gone on to Broadway, returns for the 14th year in a row. Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23.GLOBE. Map Q16

Great Concerts All Year Round!

THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER pARK MUSICAL Nov. 5-Dec. 4. This show is billed as “a comic fable about agoraphobia, adultery, spray cheese, roadkill, hysterical pregnancy, kleptomania and strippers.” Lyceum Theatre, 79 Horton Plaza, downtown, 619.231.3586. Map Q16 HAIR Oct. 18-23. The touring production of Public Theater’s new Tony-winner, this free-love musical, which contains brief nudity, insists it’s time to let the sunshine in. For mature audiences. Broadway/San Diego, Civic Theatre, Third Ave. and B St., downtown, 619.570.1100. Map Q16 JESUS CHRIST SUpERSTAR Nov. 18-Dec. 31. Des McAnuff’s hailed revival of the classic rock musical about the last week of Christ’s life comes to S.D. after a successful turn at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. Mandell Weiss Theatre at the La Jolla Playhouse, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, 858.550.1010. Map T20

CLASSICAL

MILK LIKE SUGAR Through Sept. 25. Kirsten Greenridge’s new play tells the story of 16-year-old Annie and two friends who enter into a pregnancy pact to escape their dead-end town. Potiker Theatre at the La Jolla Playhouse, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, 858.550.1010. Map T20

FAMILY POPS

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Through Sept. 24. Chockablock with the Bard’s clever wordsmithing, this original battle of the sexes comedy finds Beatrice and Benedick bickering while Hero and Claudio race to the altar, only to find the wicked Don John conspiring to break up the wedding. Lowell Davies Festival Theatre at the Old Globe, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23.GLOBE. Map Q16

For Complete Season Information: CALL 619.235.0804 or VISIT sandiegosymphony.com

RICHARD III Oct. 22-Nov. 13. Follow the hunchback’s scheming, bloody path to the English crown in this play, one of Shakespeare’s most-produced. Cygnet Theatre in Old Town, 4040 Twiggs St., Old Town, 619.337.1525. Map E3 Craig Kauffman, Untitled, 1968 (detail). Synthetic polymer vacuum-formed Plexiglas with acrylic lacquer. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of Arthur and Carol Goldberg in honor of Margo Leavin. © Craig Kauffman. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann.

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SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS Oct. 7-Nov. 20. The creator of TV’s Home Improvement presents this worldpremiere musical tale of love and mistaken identity, set in Venice and based on Carlo Goldoni’s Italian comedy classic. Lamb’s Players Theatre, 1142 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.437.0600. Map L10 SOME LOVERS Nov. 26-Dec. 31. This world-premiere musical based on the classic tale “The Gift of the Magi” features music by Burt Bacharach and book and lyrics by Steven Sater. White Theatre at the Old Globe, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23.GLOBE. Map Q16 SOMEWHERE Sept. 24-Oct. 30. Complete with dance numbers, this world-premiere play from Old Globe Playwright-in-Residence Matthew Lopez (The Whipping Man) tells the story of Inez Candelaria and her three children’s dream of a life in show business. White Theatre at the Old Globe, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23. GLOBE. Map Q16 THE TEMpEST Through Sept. 25. Marooned on a deserted island, Prospero uses his magic to raise a storm to exact revenge upon his enemies. The tale of love, vengeance and redemption was Shakespeare’s final work. Lowell Davies Festival Theatre at the Old Globe, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23.GLOBE. Map Q16

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RICHARD O’BRIEN’S THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Sept. 15-Nov. 6. Strange things happen when Brad and Janet get caught with a flat in the middle of nowhere. Based on the cult film (which was based on the stage musical), this show is for mature audiences only. Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23.GLOBE. Map Q16

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Entertainment Till We Have Faces Sept. 9-25. Ensemble theater presents an adaptation of C.S. Lewis’ tale of Psyche and Cupid, with pageantry, sword-play and a gorgeous musical score.  Lamb’s Players Theatre, 1142 Orange Ave., Coronado, 619.437.0600.  Map L10 Twelfth Night  Nov. 6-13. USD MFA acting students put their spin on Shakespeare’s classic genderbending comedy.  White Theatre at the Old Globe Theatre, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, 619.23. GLOBE.  Map Q16 walter cronkite is dead  Sept. 17-Oct. 16. It’s red state vs. blue state as two very different women are forced to share a long evening together in an airport bar. Lyceum Theatre, 79 Horton Plaza, downtown, 619.231.3586.  Map Q16 For day-of-show, half-price tickets, visit the Arts Tix booth in downtown San Diego at Horton Plaza, 619.497.5000, or at California Center for the Arts in Escondido, 360 N. Escondido Blvd., 800.988.4253, or visit www.sandiegoperforms.com.

Music + Dance artpower! Music, dance, art and film series at UCSD. Sept. 22: Garfunkel and Oates; Oct. 19: Vertigo Dance Company; Oct. 21: Hugo Wolf Quartett; Oct. 25: Ethel; Nov. 1: Creole Choir of Cuba; Nov. 5: Pacifica Quartet; Nov. 17: Miguel Zenón Quartet. Film Series at the Loft: Oct. 6: Fleurs du Mal; Oct. 27: Le graine et le Mulet; Nov. 3: Hongse Xue; Nov. 15: The Interrupters. Various locations around UCSD campus. artpwr.com Athenaeum music and arts library  Chamber Concert Series: Oct. 1: Inon Barnatan; Nov. 4: The Lincoln Trio. 1008 Wall St., La Jolla Map W19 Balboa theatre  Sept. 17: The San Diego Chorus of Sweet Adelines International; Sept. 23: Herbie Hancock; Sept. 25: Ethan Bortnick; Oct. 15: Emi Meyer; Oct. 23: An Evening with Howie Mandel; Oct. 24: k.d. lang and The Siss Boom Bang; Oct. 30: Orla Fallon (Celtic Woman); Nov. 6: The Kings of Salsa; Nov. 18: Herb Alpert and Lani Hall.  868 Fourth Ave., downtown, 619.570.1100.  Map Q16 Birch aquarium at scripps  Green Flash Seaside Summer Concert Series. Live music on the plaza with ocean view at sunset. Sept. 21: Brett Dennen.  2300 Expedition Way, La Jolla, 858.534. FISH.  Map R15 Birch north park theatre  Home of Lyric Opera San Diego. Sept. 10: Steamboat Bill, Jr. (film with live accompaniment); Sept. 23-25 and Sept. 29-Oct. 2: Mame; Nov. 4, 6: Good Bye, Good Luck ... and Get Out; Nov. 11-13: Sinatra Forever.  2891 University Ave., North Park, 619.239.8836.  Map N18 california center for the arts  Sept. 8: Luma Dance; Sept. 24: Superstars of Cable Comedy; Sept. 25: Bart Rockett: Defying Reality; Oct. 9: Ravi Shankar; Oct. 23: Frank Sinatra’s Crooners. 340 N. Escondido Blvd., Escondido, 800.988.4253.  Map B3 Cricket wireless AMPHITHEATER  Sept. 2: Identity Festival feat. Kaskade, DJ Shadow, Steve Aoki, etc.; Sept. 4: Kings of Leon; Sept. 10: Luis Miguel; Sept. 18: Rascal Flatts; Sept. 21: Santana; Oct. 7: Journey; Oct. 9: Uproar Festival feat. Avenged Sevenfold, Sevendust, Three Days Grace; Oct. 19: Judas Priest; Oct. 28: Jason Aldean. Call ahead for complete schedule.  2050 Entertainment Circle, Chula Vista, 619.671.3600. Map F4 Harrah’s Rincon Casino—Open Sky Theater  Sept. 9: Gary Allan; Sept. 25: Don Henley; Oct. 14: Steely Dan. Call for complete schedule.  777 Harrah’s Rincon Way, Valley Center, 877.777.2457.  Map B4

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For Brow n Backgro u n d:

Entertainment HUMpHREY’S CONCERTS BY THE BAY Sept. 9: The Ultimate Doo-Wop Show; Sept. 12: Tears For Fears; Sept. 13: Diana Ross; Sept. 16: Three Dog Night; Sept. 17: Chris Botti; Sept. 18: Cecilio & Kapono; Sept. 19: Return to Forever IV w/ Zappa Plays Zappa feat. Dweezil; Sept. 23: Jim Gaffigan (two shows); Sept. 24: Shaquille O’Neal Presents All-Star Comedy Jam (feat. Aries Spears, Corey Holcomb, Tommy Davidson, Capone, Gary Owen and Tony Roberts); Sept. 25: Basia; Sept. 26: Michael McDonald/Boz Scaggs; Oct. 7-8: George Lopez; Oct. 9: OMD (Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark); Oct. 13: Australian Pink Floyd; Oct. 18: Billy Idol; Oct. 19: Julieta Venegas; Oct. 25: Celtic Thunder. 2241 Shelter Island Drive, Shelter Island, 619.224.3577. Map F4

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LA JOLLA SYMpHONY AND CHORUS Oct. 29-30: The French Composer: Steven Schick conducts a program featuring compositions by Igor Stravinsky, Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel w/ appearance by guest artist Charissa Barger, harp. Mandeville Auditorium at UCSD, La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, 858.534.4637. Map T20 LYRIC OpERA SAN DIEGO Sept. 23-25 and Sept. 29-Oct. 2: Mame; Nov. 4, 6: Good Bye, Good Luck ... and Get Out; Nov. 11-13: Sinatra Forever. Birch North Park Theatre, 2891 University Ave., North Park, 619.239.8836. Map N18 OpEN AIR THEATRE AT SDSU Sept. 18: Ke$ha; Sept 24: Arctic Monkeys/TV on the Radio. Call for complete schedule. 5500 Campanile Drive, SDSU, 619.594.0429. Map E3 ORCHESTRA NOVA (formerly S.D. Chamber Orchestra). Oct. 22, 24: Mozart ❤ Prague feat. guest artist Ines Irawati, piano; Nov. 19, 21: Bach, Baroque and All That Jazz feat. Richard Thompson. Various locations. 858.350.0290. RIMAC ARENA AT UCSD Sept. 10: Bassnectar. Call for complete schedule. 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, 858.534.8569. Map T20 SAN DIEGO SYMpHONY SUMMER pOpS Sept. 2-4: Tchaikovsky Spectacular. Embarcadero Marina Park South, Embarcadero, 619.235.0804. Map Q14

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SAN DIEGO SYMpHONY Jacobs Masterworks Series: Sept. 30-Oct. 2: Thibaudet Plays Ravel Concertos; Jahja Ling, conductor; Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano; Oct. 1: Opus 2011 Gala w/ Jean-Yves Thibaudet and Kathleen Battle; Oct. 14-16: Pinchas Zukerman (violin) Plays and Conducts Strauss, Schumann, Bach, Mozart feat. Amanda Forsyth, cello; Nov. 4-6: Liszt’s Piano Concertos feat. Stephen Hough, piano; Nov. 11-13: Mahler’s Ninth. Winter Pops: Oct. 2: National Acrobats of China; Oct. 28-29: Stayin’ Alive: Music of the Bee Gees feat. Marvin Hamlisch, conductor; Oct. 30: Halloween Silent Film Night: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde feat. Russ Peck, organ; Nov. 20: Compaña Flamenco Jose Porcel. Copley Symphony Hall, 750 B St., downtown, 619.235.0804. Map Q14 Chamber Music Series: Nov. 8: The Perlman/Quint/Bailey Trio performs Haydn’s Gypsy Trio and Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2. The Neurosciences Institute, 10640 John Jay Hopkins Drive, La Jolla, 619.235.0804, Map S20 SpRECKELS ORGAN pAVILION Su, 2–3 pm. Free concerts on the world’s largest outdoor pipe organ. Balboa Park, 619.702.8138. Map O17 SpRECKELS THEATRE Sept. 16: Bon Iver; Oct. 8: Jo Koy. Call for complete schedule. 121 Broadway, downtown, 800.745.3000. Map Q16

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TROLLEY DANCES Sept. 24-25 and Oct. 1-2: Modern dance meets public transit on S.D.’s trolley lines. Sitespecific performances by renowned choreographers. Begins at the Grantville trolley station and follows the Green Line into Santee. Tickets include all-day trolley pass: $15-$30; kids 5 and under free. 619.225.1803. Map Q16

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LJK WHERE MAG Spring 2011 V3 press ready.pdf 1 1/28/2011 9:24:44 AM

Entertainment VALLEY VIEW CASINO CENTER (formerly San Diego sports arena)  Sept. 9: Selena Gomez & the Scene; Sept. 16: Disney Live!; Oct. 13: Lord of the Rings in Concert; Oct. 20: Taylor Swift; Oct. 25: L.A. Lakers vs. L.A. Clippers. Call for complete schedule.  3500 Sports Arena Blvd., Midway, 619.224.4171.  Map N13 viejas arena at sdsu  Sept. 22: Marc Anthony; Oct. 17: Foo Fighters. Call for complete schedule.  5500 Canyon Crest Drive, SDSU, 619.594.0429.  Map E3 C M

Sports

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L.A. Lakers vs. l.a. clippers  Oct. 25: ExhibitionCM game between Los Angeles’ two basketball teams.  Valley View Casino Center, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., MY Midway, 619.224.4171.  Map N13 CY

SAN DIEGO PADRES  Major League Baseball. Sept. 2-4: Colorado Rockies; Sept. 5-7: S.F. Giants; Sept. CMY 16-18: Arizona Diamondbacks; Sept. 23-25: L.A. Dodgers; Sept. 26-28: Chicago Cubs. Petco Park, 100 Park K Blvd., East Village, 619.795.5000.  Map Q16 SAN DIEGO CHARGERS  National Football League. Sept. 11: Minnesota Vikings; Sept. 25: Kansas City Chiefs; Oct. 2: Miami Dolphins; Nov. 6: Green Bay Packers; Nov. 10: Oakland Raiders; Nov. 27: Denver Broncos. Qualcomm Stadium, 9449 Friars Road, Mission Valley, 877.242.7437.  Map H12 POWAY RODEO  Sept. 23-24. 39th annual rodeo features bull riding, calf roping and more. 14336 Tierra Bonita Road, Poway, 866.776.7633.  Map D3 

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BARONA VALLEY RANCH RESORT AND CASINO  More than 2,000 slot machines, 70+ table games, satellite wagering and an all-you-can-eat buffet. Daily, 24 hours. 1932 Wildcat Canyon Road, Lakeside, 619.443.2300.  Map D4 CASINO PAUMA  Tropically themed complex with more than 35,000 square feet of gaming, 850 slots, 24 table games, poker parlor and non-smoking section. Daily, 24 hours. 777 Pauma Reservation Road, Pauma Valley, 760.891.7900.  Map A4 PALA RESORT AND CASINO  Features 2,250 state-ofthe-art slots and video machines, 85 Vegas-style gaming tables, eight restaurants and entertainment in two lounges. 11154 Hwy. 76, Pala, 760.510.5100.  Map A3 PECHANGA RESORT AND CASINO  Video machines, table games, lunch buffet and entertainment center ­featuring live concerts and ­professional boxing. Alcohol served. Daily, 24 hours. 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula, 951.693.1819.  Map A3 HARRAH’S RINCON CASINO  Slots paradise. Daily, 24 hours. 33750 Valley Center Road, Valley Center, 760.751.3100.  Map B4 SYCUAN CASINO  Find high-stakes bingo, pai gow poker, slots and four restaurants at this East County gambling hall, plus a 500-seat theater. Daily, 24 hours. 5469 Dehesa Road, El Cajon, 619.445.6002.  Map D5 VALLEY VIEW CASINO  High-limit blackjack, 1,750 slots, steakhouse and 24-hour café, free valet parking and separate non-smoking gaming and bar area. Daily, 24 hours. 16300 Nyemii Pass Road, Valley Center, 760.291.5500.  Map B4 VIEJAS CASINO  This Alpine casino features more than 2,500 Vegas–style slots, table games, satellite wagering, high-stakes bingo, buffet and six restaurants. Daily, 24 hours. 5000 Willows Road, Alpine, 800.847.6537.  Map D5 

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Attractions + Museums Attractions BELMONT PARK A beachfront landmark with the historic Giant Dipper roller coaster, Wave House, Liberty Carousel, a family playland, SoCal’s largest indoor pool, arcades and more. Open daily; call for hours. 3190 Mission Blvd., Mission Beach, 858.488.1549. Map I8

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BIRCH AQUARIUM AT SCRIPPS Explore one of the U.S.’s largest oceanographic museums, and enjoy a spectacular view from the tidepool plaza. Open daily 9 am–5 pm. $14; seniors $10; kids 3-17 $9.50; children 2 and under free. Three-hour courtesy parking. 2300 Expedition Way, La Jolla, 858.534.3474. Map U20 CABRILLO NATIONAL MONUMENT Exhibits, whale watching, tidepools, trails, the restored Old Point Loma Lighthouse and spectacular views. Daily 9 am–5 pm. $3-5. 1800 Cabrillo Memorial Drive, Point Loma, 619.557.5450. Map L8

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LEGOLAND Find 50+ rides and shows and Sea Life Aquarium’s seven-foot-long Lego submarine. Also check out the recently opened waterpark complete with lazy river. Adults $69; kids 3–12 and seniors 60+ $59 (add $11/ticket for admission to aquarium or water park; add $20/ticket for admission to all three). Aquarium-only: adults $20, seniors 60+ $17, kids 3-12 $13. Parking $12–20. Call for hours. 1 Legoland Drive, Carlsbad, 760.918.5346. Map U22 SAFARI PARK (formerly the Wild Animal Park). Take a safari adventure through the 1,800–acre wildlife preserve, home to herds of exotic animals roaming in vast enclosures resembling African and Asian plains. Safari packages start at $40 for adults; children 3–11 $30; kids 2 and under free; seniors 60+ $36. Cars $10–15. Open daily, 9 am-5 pm (holiday weekends till 6 pm). 15500 San Pasqual Valley Road, Escondido, 760.747.8702. Map C3

8/5/11 6:22SAN PM DIEGO BOTANIC GARDEN One of the world’s

most diverse plant collections. Daily 9 am–5 pm. $12; seniors 60+ $8; kids 3-12 $6; kids 2 and under free. Parking $2. 230 Quail Gardens Drive, Encinitas, 760.436.3036. Map V22

SAN DIEGO ZOO World-famous zoo has more than 4,000 rare and endangered animals in state–of–the–art environment. $40; kids 3–11 $30; kids 2 and under free; seniors 60+ $36. Free parking. Open daily, 9 am-5 pm (till 6 pm through Oct. 2). 2920 Zoo Drive, Balboa Park, 619.231.1515. Map O17

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SEAWORLD The 189-acre adventure park features thousands of marine animals including killer whales plus fish, reptiles and birds. $70; kids 3–9 $62; kids 2 and under free. Parking $14-19. Open daily; call for hours and combo rates. 500 SeaWorld Drive, Mission Bay Park, 800.25.SHAMU. Map I8

Wineries BERNARDO WINERY Founded in 1899 by Sicilian winemakers, this is the oldest continuously operating Winery in SoCal. Also on-site: a restaurant, chocolatier and art galleries, including a glassblowing studio. Tastings daily. 13330 Paseo Del Verano N., Rancho Bernardo, 858.487.1866. Map C4 CARRUTH CELLARS Urban winery and tasting room makes wine from Northern California grapes; tastings W-Su. 320 S. Cedros Ave. #400, Solana Beach, 858.847.9463. Map X22 L.A. CETTO The largest winery in Baja’s scenic wine region, which produces 90% of Mexico’s wine. Open daily for tastings; also features olive oil, chocolates and gifts. KM 73.5 Tecate-Ensenada Highway, Valle de Guadalupe, Baja California, Mexico, lacetto.com.

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Attractions + Museums MENGHINI WINERY Boutique Julian winery produces just 4,000 cases of Syrah, Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling and Cabernet Sauvignon annually. Tastings daily. 1150 Julian Orchards Drive, Julian, 760.765.2072. Map C6 ORFILA VINEYARDS Growing Syrah, Viognier, Muscat Canelli and more, this boutique winery produces about 10,000 cases of Rhone-style wines annually. 13455 San Pasqual Road, Escondido, 760.738.6500. Map C3

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pONTE FAMILY ESTATE WINERY This 300-acre vineyard grows mostly Cabernet, Merlot and Chardonnay, plus other Italian varieties; tasting room open daily. 35053 Rancho California Road, Temecula, 951.694.8855. Map A2 THORNTON WINERY Medal-winning sparkling winery is housed in a vineyard-view chateau in Temecula. Tasting lounge open daily; tours on weekends. 32575 Rancho California Road, Temecula, 951.699.0099. Map A2 WILSON CREEK WINERY AND VINEYARD Known for its almond champagne, this Tuscan-inspired estate also includes a restaurant and tasting room, both open daily. 35960 Rancho California Road, Temecula, 951.699.9463. Map A2 WITCH CREEK WINERY Two tasting rooms, including one in the heart of Carlsbad, offer samplings of Witch Creek’s full-bodied wines daily, each with a feline-inspired name. 2906 Carlsbad Blvd., Carlsbad, 760.765.2023, Map T22; 2100 Main St., Julian, 760.720.7499. Map C6

Museums

1501 India Street, #120 (corner of Beech & India) San Diego

CALIFORNIA SURF MUSEUM Collection of surfing artifacts and memorabilia, plus exhibits about surfing legends. Rare surfing collectibles in museum gift shop. Daily 10 am–4 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Adults $3; seniors/ military/students $1; kids under 12 free. 312 Pier View BellaStanza_FA11v2.indd 1 Way, Oceanside, 760.721.6876. Map S22

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MARITIME MUSEUM Visit the 1863 barque Star of India (world’s oldest active ship), the 1898 steam ferryboat Berkeley, the 1904 steam yacht Medea, a Soviet-era submarine and the HMS Surprise, the Royal Navy frigate featured in the film Master and Commander. Daily 9 am–8 pm. $14; seniors/military $11; kids 6-17 $8; children 5 and under free. The schooner Californian also offers half-day sailing trips ($31-42). 1492 N. Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.234.9153. Map P14 MINGEI INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM Exhibits celebrate folk art. Tu–Su 10 am–4 pm. $5–8; children 5 and under free. 1439 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.239.0003. Map O17 MISSION SAN DIEGO DE ALCALÁ The first of 21 missions stretching north along the California coast, this one was established by Junípero Serra in 1769 on Presidio Hill and moved to this site in 1774. Daily mass in the chapel at 7 am and 5:30 pm and tools and artifacts on display. Visitor’s center open daily 9 am–4:45 pm. Adults $3; kids/seniors $2. 10818 San Diego Mission Road, Mission Valley, 619.281.8449. Map I12 MUSEUM OF CONTEMpORARY ART SAN DIEGO Renowned for its vast collection and thoughtprovoking exhibits, this museum features post-1950s art spanning many genres and media. Both locations open Th–Tu 11 am–5 pm, third Th 11 am–7 pm. Closed W. $5-10 admission valid for 7 days; ages 25 and under free; free third Th 5-7 pm. 700 Prospect St., La Jolla, Map W19; 1001 and 1100 Kettner Blvd., downtown, 858.454.3541. Map Q15 MUSEUM OF MAKING MUSIC Vintage instruments, interactive audio and visual exhibits offer dynamic look into the history of American popular music. Tu–Su 10 am–5 pm. $5–7; kids 5 and under free. 5790 Armada Drive, Carlsbad, 760.438.5996. Map U23

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MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS  Collection includes contemporary photography, social documentary and photojournalism. Film screenings, too. Tu-Su 10 am–5 pm., Th 10 am-9 pm. $5–8; kids 12 and under free.  1649 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.238.7559.  Map O17 NEW CHILDREN’S MUSEUM  Downtown’s newest museum, designed just for kids, encourages visitors to touch and interact with exhibits. M-Sa 10 am–4 pm. (Th until 6 pm; closed W); Su noon-4 pm. $10; seniors $5; children under 1 free. Free second Su.  200 W. Island Ave., downtown, 619.233.8792.  Map Q16 OCEANSIDE MUSEUM OF ART  Regional and international artists showcased in exhibits ranging from landscape painting to studio furniture, neon sculpture, art quilts and architectural glass. Tu–Sa 10 am–4 pm, Su 1-4 pm. $5–8 (students/military free).  704 Pier View Way, Oceanside, 760.435.3720.  Map S22 REUBEN H. FLEET SCIENCE CENTER  Interactive science galleries invite visitors to explore the wonders of astronomy and physics. Giant-screen films run in the IMAX Dome Theater. M-Th 10 am–5 pm (open later during holiday breaks), F till 8 pm, Sa till 7 pm, Su till 6 pm. $9.75-11.75; kids 2 and under free.  1875 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.238.1233.  Map O17 SAN DIEGO AIR & SPACE MUSEUM  Hot-air balloons, jets and historic aircraft from around the world. Daily 10 am–5:30 pm. $12-24, kids 2 and under free.  2001 Pan American Plaza, Balboa Park, 619.234.8291.  Map P17 SAN DIEGO HALL OF CHAMPIONS  Three levels and 68,000 square feet of sports exhibits and interactive displays form the largest multi-sports museum in the U.S. Daily 10 am–4:30 pm. $4–8; kids 6 and under free.  2131 Pan American Plaza, Balboa Park, 619.234.2544.  Map O17

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SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART  Diverse collection includes Italian Renaissance and Spanish Baroque works, 19th–20th century American and ­European paintings and sculptures and a vast Asian collection. Tu–Sa 10 am–5 pm, Su noon-5 pm. $4.50–12; kids 6 and under free.  1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.232.7931.  Map O17 SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF MAN  Go on a journey of the human experience highlighting our physical and cultural development through permanent and changing exhibits. Daily 10 am–4:30 pm; $8–12.50; children 2 and under free.  1350 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.239.2001.  Map O17 SAN DIEGO NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM  Dinosaur displays, giant-screen films, photography exhibitions and more. Daily 10 am-5 pm. $11–17; children 2 and under free; free for active military first Tu.  1788 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.232.3821.  Map O17 STUART COLLECTION OF SCULPTURE  Scattered across the UCSD campus, outdoor art collection includes talking and singing trees, Sun God and more. Free.  Gilman and La Jolla Village drives, La Jolla, 858.534.2230.  Map T20

Ca rol Ga rdy n e b o u t i q u e & s tu d i o LITTLE ITALY 1840 Columbia Street San Diego, CA 92101 619.233.8066

USS MIDWAY  The world’s largest floating navalaviation museum has restored airplanes on the flight deck and interactive exhibits inside. Daily 10 am–5 pm. $10–18; military/kids 5 and under free.  910 N. ­Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.544.9600.  Map Q14

Destination Shopping CARLSBAD PREMIUM OUTLETS  90+ outlet stores (Barneys New York to Polo Ralph Lauren to Banana Republic) in a nice outdoor setting.  5620 Paseo del Norte, Carlsbad, 760.804.9000.  Map U22

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Nightlife DEL MAR pLAZA With more than 20 shops, including Banana Republic and Chico’s, and nine restaurants, this gorgeous tri-level boutique shopping plaza overlooks the Pacific Ocean. 1555 Camino del Mar, Del Mar, 858.792.1555. Map X22 FASHION VALLEY Beautiful bi-level, outdoor mall with 200+ shops like Tiffany & Co., Louis Vuitton and Tory Burch, six department stores, eight restaurants and 18-screen movie theater. 7007 Friars Road, Mission Valley, 619.688.9113. Map J10

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THE FORUM AT CARLSBAD Elegant, tree-lined outdoor center with dozens of shops and restaurants, including Anthropologie and Sur La Table. 1905 Calle Barcelona, Carlsbad, 760.479.0166. Map V23 LAS AMERICAS pREMIUM OUTLETS Spanish Colonial-style outlet mall has 125+ shops. 4211 Camino de la Plaza, San Ysidro, 619.934.8400. Map F3 OTAY RANCH TOWN CENTER Shops at this South County mall include Apple and Sephora; there’s also outdoor fire pits, a dog park and a movie theater. Eastlake Pkwy. at Olympic Pkwy., Chula Vista, 619.656.9100. Map F3 SEApORT VILLAGE Picturesque and charming outdoor plaza on the waterfront features 54 one-of-a-kind shops and galleries. 849 W. Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 619.235.4014. Map R15

VIEJAS OUTLET CENTER Tranquil outdoor mall with 60+ shops (Gap, Tommy Hilfiger, Polo Ralph Lauren) plus restaurants and concert park. 5005 Willows Road, Alpine, 619.659.2071. Map D5

PIANOS

NIGHTS

WESTFIELD HORTON pLAZA Multi-level outdoor mall featuring almost 200 shops, two restaurants and a food court. Anchored by Macy’s and Nordstrom. 324 Horton Plaza, downtown, 619.239.8180. Map Q16

A WEEK!

WESTFIELD UTC Outdoor mall has more than 180 shops, five restaurants and a food court. Located near UCSD, the mall is anchored by Macy’s, Sears and Nordstrom. 4545 La Jolla Village Drive, Golden Triangle, 858.546.8858. Map T21

Nightlife Gaslamp Quarter/Downtown/Little Italy

207/FLOAT Rock ‘n’ roll glamour at the Hard Rock Hotel; two nightspots offer different vibes, from the street-level 207 lounge to the rooftop Float, featuring bottle service in poolside cabanas. Hard Rock Hotel, 207 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.702.3000. Map Q16 4TH & B Local favorite for live music, located downtown adjacent to the Gaslamp Quarter. Call for shows. 345 B St., downtown, 619.231.4343. Map Q16 ANTHOLOGY Chic three-story venue with amazing acoustics has live jazz, Latin, blues and rock. 1337 India St., Little Italy, 619.595.0300. Map Q15 BASIC Urban bar in a cool, renovated warehouse near the ballpark serves brick-oven pizzas. 410 10th Ave., East Village, 619.531.8869. Map Q17 BOOTLEGGER This spacious, light-filled spot features vintage Prohibition-inspired design accents plus pub grub, flat-screen TVs and more. 804 Market St., East Village, 619.794.BOOT. Map Q17

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THE CASBAH Small but legendary rock club has hosted superstars like Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins on their way up. Live music nightly. 2501 Kettner Blvd., Midtown, 619.232.4355. Map P15 DOUBLE DEUCE Country-rock bar features mechanical bull, DJs and dancing downstairs, stripper pole and

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Nightlife

Over 200 artists in 37 working art studios located in Balboa Park open daily from 11am-4pm.

interactive games in upstairs cocktail bar.  528 F St., Gaslamp, 619.450.6522.  Map Q16 East Village Tavern & Bowl  Sports bar and bowling alley near Petco Park also has darts and pool.  930 Market St., East Village, 619.677.BOWL. Map R17

www.spanishvillageart.com Spanish Village Art Center • 1770 Village Place • San Diego, CA 92101

FLUXX  Ambiance-changing dance club from the design team behind Sidebar and Stingaree.  500 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.232.8100.  Map Q16 Henry’s Pub  Nightclub and restaurant serves California cuisine and showcases live entertainment nightly.  618 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.238.2389.  Map Q16 House of blues  Live rock, blues and pop music, plus Sunday gospel brunch. Call for current shows.  1055 Fifth Ave., downtown, 619.299.2583.  Map Q16 THE IVY  Vegas-worthy club in the Andaz Hotel has sexy décor and rooftop bar with downtown views.  600 F St., Gaslamp 619.814.2055.  Map I8 ON BROADWAY  Housed in an old bank, this megaclub still packs in a huge weekend crowd. Where else will you find a dance floor in a bank vault?  615 Broadway, Gaslamp, 619.231.0011.  Map Q16 ONYX  DJs, jazz and cocktails in bi-level Gaslamp nightpot.  852 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.235.6699.  Map Q16 The Shout house  Dueling pianos played by impossible-to-stump musicians. Music ranges from classic rock to contemporary hits.  655 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.231.6700.  Map Q16

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SIDEBAR  DJs, dancing and bottle service at this sexy, modern downtown lounge.  536 Market St., Gaslamp, 619.696.0946.  Map Q16 STINGAREE  Tri-level dance club and restaurant with rooftop cabanas. Ultra hip nightspot with several house specialty drinks. Dress code enforced.  454 Sixth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.544.9500.  Map Q16 the tipsy crow  A neighborhood bar with three levels including pool tables, shuffleboard and trivia.  770 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.338.9300.  Map Q16

VOTED BEST BREAKFAST BY NBC TV OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 6:30 AM – 2:30 PM 520 Front Street, Downtown San Diego (just South of Market) 619-231-7777 www.Richardwalkers.com

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Top of the Hyatt  Panoramic vistas from the West Coast’s tallest waterfront building. Take in the sunset or enjoy the lights of downtown.  1 Market Place, downtown, 619.232.1234.  Map Q15 Vin de syrah  Alice in Wonderland-themed subterranean nightspot has eye-popping design, live music, wine and full bar.  901 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.234.4166.  Map Q16 Voyeur  Punk-inspired Gaslamp bar features DJs, fashion events and on-site boutique.  755 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.756.7678.  Map Q16 whiskEy girl  Live bands, DJs, karaoke, TVs showing the big game and, of course, whiskey (and bourbon and rye) at this raucous Gaslamp club.  600 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.236.1616.  Map Q16

La Jolla

BARFLY  Sports bar by day, DJ/dance club by night in the heart of the village.  900 Prospect St., 858.454.2323.  Map W19 Cafe Japengo  Beautiful people to go along with the artistic sushi and Asian fusion fare.  8960 University Center Lane, UTC, 858.450.3355.  Map T21

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Whaling Bar  Classic old-school haunt at La Valencia Hotel has an Old World seaside feeling and has played host to a who’s who of La Jolla society.  1132 Prospect St., 858.454.0771.  Map W19

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BELLY Up North County’s premier live music venue. Voted best live-music venue and lauded by Rolling Stone magazine. 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach, 858.481.8140. Map X22 COYOTE BAR & GRILL Hot live music and cool fire pits. Indoor/outdoor spot offers casual ambience and a view. 300 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, 760.729.4695. Map T22 EN FUEGO Lively singles vibe and tasty Mexican food served up on this restaurant’s bustling patio. 1342 Camino del Mar, Del Mar, 858.792.6551. Map X22 JIMMY O’S A favorite of sports fans and locals. Choose between the sports bar and the nightclub. 225 W. 15th St., Del Mar, 858.350.3735. Map X22

Beaches

710 BEACH CLUB Steps from the beach, this live music venue has everything from rock to hip-hop. 710 Garnet Ave., Pacific Beach, 858.483.7844. Map H8 BAR WEST This 5,000-foot upscale bar and lounge merges downtown chic with the casual attitude of the beach. 959 Hornblend St., Pacific Beach, 858.273.9378. Map H8 HUMpHREY’S BACKSTAGE LOUNGE Live jazz and blues along with dancing. A longtime favorite located right on the water. 2241 Shelter Island Drive, Shelter Island, 619.224.3577. Map K8

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JRDN “Jordan,” Tower 23’s hip bar, overlooks the ocean and has a variety of signature cocktails and a full raw bar. 4551 Ocean Blvd., Pacific Beach, 858.270.5736. Map K8 SOUTH BEACH BAR & GRILL Just steps away from the ocean, this bar offers light fare and drinks. 5059 Newport Ave., Ocean Beach, 619.226.4577. Map J8 TURqUOISE CAFE BAR EUROpA This Euro-style wine bar has tapas, cask wines and live music nightly. 873 Turquoise St., Pacific Beach, 858.488.4200. Map H8

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Tours + Transport ADVENTURE R.I.B. RIDES Intimate dolphin, whalewatching and sightseeing excursions onboard a Navy SEAL Rigid Inflatable Boat (R.I.B.) with U.S. Coast Guard Captain Ken Manzoni. 619.808.2822.

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BALBOA pARK Free tours about history, architecture, horticulture and botanical gardens. Call for schedule. Visitors Center, House of Hospitality, 1549 El Prado, Balboa Park, 619.239.0512. Map P17 BIpLANE, AIR COMBAT & WARBIRD ADVENTURES Among the airborne tours offered are gentle or thrilling coastal biplane rides for two, you-fly-it air combat, loops and rolls in a WWII warbird. Montgomery Field, 760.930.0903. Map U23 CITYpASS Discount combo packages for the San Diego Zoo, Safari Park, SeaWorld, Universal Studios Hollywood, Disneyland and Disney’s California Adventure. $276 (kids $229). 888.330.5008, citypass.com. COACH AMERICA SAN DIEGO Daily tours of all attractions in San Diego and Mexico. Charter minibuses, fully equipped passenger coaches. 3888 Beech St., downtown, 800.331.5077. Map P16 CORONADO TOURING Walking tour around the historic Hotel del Coronado and neighborhood. Tu, Th and Sa at 11 am. $12; children 3 and under free. Meet at Glorietta Bay Inn, 1630 Glorietta Blvd., Coronado, 619.435.5993. Map L11

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CORpORATE HELICOpTERS Great views of La Jolla and downtown from the comfort of a private helicopter. Montgomery Field, 800.345.6737. Map H11 DESTINATION TEMECULA Door-to-door excursions to Temecula Wine Country, including wine tastings, complimentary wine glass, lunch and free time in Old Town Temecula. 28475 Old Town Front St., Temecula, 800.584.8162. Map A2 FLAGSHIp CRUISES AND EVENTS Daily narrated tours of San Diego Bay plus brunch and dinner cruises, water taxi and more. 1050 N. Harbor Drive, Embarcadero, 800.442.7847. Map Q14 GASLAMp qUARTER HISTORICAL FOUNDATION Two-hour walking tour of the Gaslamp, Sa 11 am. $10. 410 Island Ave., Gaslamp, 619.233.4692. Map R1 GASLAMp SEGWAY Guided segway tours of historic neighborhoods including La Jolla and Coronado. Reservations required. 739 Fourth Ave., Gaslamp, 619.239.2111. Map R16

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HORNBLOWER CRUISES Daily narrated tours of San Diego Bay, plus dinner cruises, yacht charters, weddings and events. 1066 N. Harbor Drive, Broadway Pier, Embarcadero, 619.686.8700. Map Q4 LA JOLLA KAYAK Cave and snorkel tours, bike and kayak rentals, whale-watching excursions and more. 2199 Avenida de la Playa, La Jolla Shores, 858.459.1114. Map V20 MAGICAL ADVENTURES Offering hot air balloon flights over Del Mar & Wine Country. 866.ENJOY.US.

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OLD TOWN TROLLEY TOURS OF SAN DIEGO Narrated sightseeing tour explores San Diego and Coronado via trolley or “SEAL” (sea and land vehicle). On-and-off boarding privileges. Call for nearest pickup point and reservations. 619.298.8687. SAIL SAN DIEGO Enjoy San Diego Bay on afternoon and sunset sails. Snacks, drinks included. Customized accommodations available. 2051 Shelter Island Drive, Shelter Island, 619.297.7426. Map K9 SAN DIEGO CHINESE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Walking tour of the Asian Pacific Historic District. Second Tu-Sa 10 am, Sun 12 pm. Reservations required. $2; children free. Chinese Historical Museum, 404 Third Ave., downtown, 619.338.9888. Map R16

SeaWorld San Diego

SAN DIEGO SCENIC TOURS Daily half-day and fullday tours of attractions in San Diego and Mexico, including the Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana. 858.273.8687. SO DIEGO TOURS Culinary, nightlife and bike/walk sightseeing tours geared toward active visitors. 770 11th Ave., East Village, 619.233.8687. Map Q17

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Maps  san diego county 1

2

3

To Corona

15 215

C a m p Pe n d l e t o n

78

S12

S10

Leucadia Encinitas

S9

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where

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94

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1

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905

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94

Brown Field

San Ysidro

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5

Fo r e s t

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54

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125

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163

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79

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Barona Valley Ranch Resort and Casino

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80

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National

67

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CALIFORNIA

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Pacific Beach Copyright © 2011

78

Julian

Ramona

Alliant International University

Golden Triangle

5

where San Diego

Fo r e s t 78

S4

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Miramar University of California San Diego

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78

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56

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RIV ERS IDE COU NTY SAN DIE GO COU NTY

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6

79 Pechanga Entertainment Center

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94 Tecate

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1

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To Ensenada

4

5

6

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Maps

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Maps  downtown + little italy + uptown

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Maps

la jolla + north coast

CONTINUES AT BOTTOM RIGHT To r r e y P i n e s State Reser ve Copyright © 2011

5

where San Diego

805 76

To r r e y P i n e s State Reser ve

5

78

5

Carlsbad Premium Outlets

5

La Costa Resort & Spa

The Forum CA

LL

EB

AR

CE

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NA

5

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

52 5

5

Copyright © 2011

where San Diego

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things we love San Diego

8

29

12

13

1

  Australian Mango Licorice and more old-timey candies at Old Town’s new Rust General Store. p. 37   Learning to surf on the FlowRider wave simulator at The Wavehouse. p. 31   Taking in a rock show at the Casbah with a cold PBR in hand. p. 72   Teeing off against the backdrop of the Pacific Ocean at Torrey Pines Golf Course. p. 42   Picking up a new chapeau at the Gaslamp Quarter’s Goorin Brothers Hat Shop. p. 27   Covetable modern furniture and home décor stuff at Progress. p. 33   This red radish risotto—or anything Chef Bradley makes at Addison. p. 22

where in the world

  Potato chips and milk chocolate from Chuao Chocolatier: a crazy-sounding combination that tastes divine. p. 4

  Catching an art-house flick at Kensington Cinema (4061 Adams Ave., Kensington, 619.283.3227).

  Elsa Peretti’s delicate gold bottle pendant at Tiffany & Co. p. 8

  Touring the Stuart Collection of Sculpture at UCSD, especially Tim Hawkinson’s giant Bear.   p. 71

  People-watching while noshing on local, organic grub at Leroy’s in Coronado. p. 48

  Getting a blowout before a big night out at Drybar. p. 7

  Browsing the stacks at Warwick’s, the oldest family-run bookstore in the U.S. (7812 Girard Ave., La Jolla, 858.454.0347).

  Finally knowing what to bring to a 3-year-old’s birthday party, thanks to La Jolla’s Hillside Artisans. p. 29

  Getting acquainted with tequila’s smoky cousin, mezcal. p. 6

  Brian Malarkey’s new “Asian Cowboy” eatery, Burlap. p. 5

  Sampling hard-to-find beers from all over the world at Bottlecraft in Little Italy. p. 6

  Going up to Julian for Apple Days and to see the leaves change. p. 63

  The Old Globe Shakespeare Festival. p. 63

  These great fall boots from Temecula-based designer Senita, sold at Nordstrom.

  Gilbert Castellanos’ Wednesday night jazz jam at El Camino. p. 12

  Not having to go all the way to Napa or Bordeaux for great wine. p. 18

  De Wain Valentine’s Slab, and the rest of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego’s new show, Phenomenal, part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative. p. 12

  Picnics in Balboa Park. p. 38

  Getting to be one of the first Americans to see photos shortlisted for the Prix Pictet sustainability prize at the Museum of Photographic Arts’ Infinite Balance exhibition. p. 63

  Dirty martinis and a Cajun ribeye at Morton’s. p. 60

WHERE is an inter­national network of magazines first published in 1936 and distributed in 4,000 leading hotels in more than 50 places around the world. Look for us when you visit any of the following cities, or plan ahead for your next trip by visiting us online at wheretraveler.com United States Alaska & Yukon, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Georgia, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Maui, Minneapolis/St. Paul,

  Finding this beaded Indonesian dowry box at the Mingei International Museum gift shop. p. 70   Becoming a cultural hub, not just a sleepy beach town. p. 12 This year, we expand our list! For the complete list of 75 things we love, go to wheresd.com/75-things

New Orleans, New York, Northern Virginia, Oahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix/Scottsdale, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, South Florida, St. Louis, Washington, D.C. ASIA Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore Canada Calgary, Canadian Rockies, Edmonton, Halifax, Mississauga, Muskoka/Parry Sound, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Winnipeg Europe Budapest, London, Milan, Moscow, Paris, Rome, St. Petersburg

de wain valentine photo © De Wain Valentine. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann

  Cool, minimalist jewelry from local designer Mimi&Lu. p. 9

22

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DISCOVER THE MAGIC! The best brands, the biggest selection, plus 1O% off * for visitors. Macy’s invites you to experience why we are “The World’s Most Famous Store”. With top designer names – and legendary special events – Macy’s is a must-see destination! And, when you’re here, be sure to stop by the Visitor Center on the 3rd Level to pick up your Macy’s Visitor Savings Pass*, good for 10% off* thousands of items throughout the store! For more information or to obtain a Macy’s 10% Visitor Savings Pass, call us at 1-877-797-7227, email us at visitor@macys.com or visit www.VisitMacysUSA.com Macy’s Horton Plaza 160 Horton Plaza San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-3284 Restrictions apply. Valid I.D. required. Details in store.

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Where San Diego Magazine Fall 2011