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COPYRIGHT

1928 by

MILTON SMITH Editor-ill-Chief

SHELBY WILLIS BlIsiness Jlollogcr

Two


VOLUME VI

PUBLI SHED B Y THE STUDENTS OF

BETHANY- PENIEL COLLEGE BETHANY, OKLA.


In

days to come when you are

no longer on the campus or in the class rooms of this institution, 111ay this volume be a constant reminder of the happy days of yore,

by recalling' the pleasant

associations and the warm friend足 ships enjoyed while here. In order that

a

few

might be resurrected in and

that

A.lul11ni

the and

ties

0

f these

111 el11Q1-y ,

between

the

2Vf ater

be

Alma

strengthened, this book has been prepared.

FOREWORD


The Arrow Staff

--..

Five


To him who is a successful educator, who is intensely inter­ ested in spiritual things. who la­ bors untiringly for God and hu­ manity, who so kindly counsels with us, whose example has in­ :,.pired us to a better and more useful

life.

himself educator,

S. S.

who

to all:

has

endeared

to our

worthy

President and 'friend,

White, we gratefully dedi­

cate this, the sixth volume of the Arrow.


s. S. WHITE


I II

ADl\IINISTRA'rIO�

COLLEGE

III

ACADEl\lY

IV

FI�E

V VI

ARTS

STUDENT Ac'rIVI'rTES ADVERTISEl\IEN TS

CONTENTS


Board of Regen ts WESTERN OKLAHOMA DISTRICT Betha ny , Ok lah o ma Betha ny , Ohlahoma Beth any , Ok lahoma Betha ny , OMaho ma Ok laho ma C ity , Ok lahoma Ryan, Ok laho ma

J. VV.UTtR HALL ( C h ai rman ) BRACK McLAIN (Secretary) A. L. PARROTT (Treasurer) J. A. WHITE H. L. SHOR'f S. W. RYAN

EASTERN OKLAHOMA DISTRICT S. H. OWENS G. H. HARMON F. R. MCCONNELL F. R. MORGAN JOE BISHOP

A da ,Oklahoma Henry etta, 0 k la h o ma Sapu lpa, 0 k la h o ma Tu lsa, Ohlaho 11Ja Sha wnee, Ok lahoma

ARKAKSAS DISTRICT J. W. OLIVER 1. '0/. BLACKLOCK

No rth Little Roc k , A rka nsas Little Roc il, A rka nsas

HAMLIN DISTRICT Hamli n, Texa s Ha mli n, Texas

B. F. N EELY H. C. CAGLE

SAN AN TOKIO DISTIUCT Wa co , Texas Sa n A nto nio , Texa s

O. 'F. HATFIELD JOHN F. ROBER'rs

DALLAS DISTRICT F.

E. WIESE J. W. BaST

A l'li ngto n, Texas )/f/a co , Tex as

LOUISIAN A DISTRICT W. M. NELSON G. M. AKIN

Sh 1'eVep Ol't , Loui siana Sh l'ev epo l't , L 01li s ia na

NEW MEXICO DISTRICT E. E. HALE L. M. MAY

Twelve

El Pas o , Texa s El Pa s o , Texa s


C. H. WIMA:\, Dean

=

Thirteen


s. S. ''''RITE. M.A., B . D . , Ph ilo soph y. Rel igio l/s Edu ca t io n A. L. PARROTT, M.A., B.D. EcollOm,'路cs. Relig ious Edu catio n

Col lege Pastor

I

M. A. WILSO;\, M. A. Reg ist rar, Educatio n, English.

Fourteen

c. H. WIMAN, A.B. High Sch o o l P ri nci pa l Physics


C. A. McCONNELL, A B. Religio 1ls Ed1lca tio n, English .

N . W. SAN FORD, M.S., Education

TAMES R. GARNER, in Ed., M.A. History

A.B., B.S.

MRS. S. S. WHITE, Frenc h

B.D.


MRS. KENDALL S. WHITE Piano

MRS. M. A. WILSON, A.B. Englis h

C. O. MOORE, A.B. Ma t/icmatics

MRS. R. E. GILMORE P ia ll o , 11111sic al, Theo r:.', Di re cto r o f 111 II sic D e part l/le nt

Sixteen


IRA E. BRAY, A.B. English

MISS MYRTLE SHERMA:-\", A.B. Expression, Art

MRS. J. HESTER FISHER PECK Voice

MISS ESSIE MORRIS Dean of Women


B. M. BALL, A.B. Science

,

GERON ROBERTS, A.B. Student Instructor Spanish

R. E. GILMORE, M.A. Re ligio lls Education, Ps ycho logy

,

Eighteen


Senior Class �\lIILTON SMITH, Editor-i n-Chief of Arrow President of Class President o f

U. C . L.

Vice-President of Student Council President of Graduating Classes Delta Rho Gospel Team Choir Athletic

"If I am faithful to the dutie s of the present, Go d will prov ide fo r the f u­ t itre ."

GERON ROBERTS,

Sa n Antonio , Texa s

President of Student Council V i ce-Presi dent of C l ass Young Men ' s Athletic .Association Choir

"Na duty co ul d overta sk him, no need h i s w ill o utrun."

-=

Q


Seniors

);I:VA :\1cDo:,\ALD, Betlinll.\', Oklahollla Class Treasurer G. H. C. President Athletic Association Choir Librarian Gospel Team Lelta Rho, Secretary "'The 1Il0st mall路fest

sign of wisdom

is contil1uollS cheerfulness."

SIBYL HOOPER,

BethaH.", Olduli o llla

Class Secretary Delta Rho

"Thy modesty lIlerit."

Tll!enl!)

IS

a cCindle to thy


Seniors

�AOMI BOST,

TVaco, Texas

Secretary of Student Council Assi stant Editor of Arrow President of Girls' Gospel Team Secretary of G. H. C . Athl etic Association Choir Delta Rho

'''A

cheery word, a hindly slide, a

girl that's friendly all the while."

MRS. ZIMM£R.\lA)I,

"A quiet

Bethany, OHa.

nature lihe a stream snOlC;­

"

hid in J antlOry.

T1JJeniy-nne


Senior Class Prophecy It was a beautiful day in May, when I reached the Sahara desert, a place I h a d longed to v isit i n my travels, having r e a d and heard of t h e m a n y wonders and beauties of the desert. noon.

My friend and I arrived at the l ittle vil lage of Beni-Mora, in the after­

As the train pulled i n, the eager faces of countless Arabs stared in upon us from

the scorched field of manoeuvres where Saphis were exercising in the gathering twi­ light. Having given our luggage tickets to a porter, we passed out o f the station and made our way toward the Hotel du Desert, accompanied by our guide. toward the long gardens of Beni-Mora.

W e walked

White dust was fiying from the road, along

which many o f the Arab aristocracy were indolently strolling.

In their white robes

they looked, we thought, l i ke monks, though the cigarettes many of them were smok­ ing fought against the i l l usion.

Some of them were dressed i n pale colored cloth,

and they held each others hands loosely as they sauntered along, chattering i n soft contralto voices. behind them.

Two or three were attended by servants, who walked a pace or two

They were members of great families, rulers of tribes, men who had

influence over the Sahara people. Vve turned aside from the mad and came into a large tunnel formed by mimosa trees that met above a broad path.

To right and left were other l ittle paths branching

among the trunks o f the fruit trees that grew luxuriantly.

Between the sandy brown

banks, carefully flattened and beaten hard by the spades of Arab gardeners, glided streams of opaque water. green .

I

I n the tunnel the l i ght was very delicate and tinged with

A few Arabs were sitting on benches i n dreamy attitudes, with their heelless

sl ippers hanging from the toes of their bare feet.

B eyond the entrance of the tunnel

we could see two horsemen galloping at a tremendous pace into the desert.

The i r red

oloaks streamed out over the horses, which devoured the earth as if in a frenzy of emula­ tion.

They disappeared into the last glories of the sun, which sti l l lingered on the plain

and blazed among the summits of the red mountains. All the contrasts o f thi s l and were exquisite to us, and, in some mysterious way, suggested eternal thi ngs ; whi spering through color, gleam and shadow, through the pattern of leaf and rock, through the air, now fresh, now tenderly warm and perfumed, through the silence that hung like a filmy cloud in the golden heaven. The quiet o f these gardens was delightful and was only interrupted now and then by the sound o f wheel s upon the road as a carriage rolled by to some house which was h idden in the d i stance of the oasi s . murmured talk.

The seated Arabs scarcely d i sturbed it by their

Many of them indeed said nothing, but re sted l ike the lotl1s-eatel-s in

graceful attitudes with hanging hands, and eyes soft as the eyes of gazel les, that re­ garded the shadowy paths and creeping waters with a grave serenity bo rn o f the i n most spirit of idleness.

(Continued

OJ!

page 66)


Class of '28 President A RL I S M I LT O N S M I T H

Vice-President

Secretary

GERON ROBERTS

SIBYL HOOPER

Treasur('r N INA M cDoNALD

COLORS: Old Rose ancl Camel . Flowe r : Rose. T o The Board Of Regents, B ETHANY-PENIEL C OLLEGE, Bethany, Oklahoma: In behalf of the College Senior Class of '28, we wish to submit the following resolutions as an expression o f our gratitude ancl appreciation to our Alma Mater. RESOL VED: That we sincerely endot·se the p rinciples ancl ideals which are held up to the stuclents of B ethany-Pen iel Col l ege. RES O LVED : That we extend to Ex-President and Mrs. A. K. B racken our love for the i r faithful serv i ce and wholesome influence which have contributed largely 111 l i fting Bethany-Peniel College to its present status. RE S O LVED : That to the B oard of Regents, we express our true gratitude for the i r cooperation in making the school what i t now is, and express our faith and confi­ dence in thei r forward steps for the betterment of our Alma Mater. Respectfully submitted, Senior Class.

Tl»ent!J-three


A Ship Afire at Sea Charles Allen McConnell \\"hat stark terror imagination conj ures with these words! l\lother and the two daughters were taking Professor 'White and the chi ldren over to Santa Catal ina to view the sea gardens through the glass-bottom boat, s o Carl and Wil l i s and I would a fish ing go-deep sea fishing. Off the pier at Santa Monica the day's pleasure boats rode at anchor-big craft and small, some chartered by p r i vate parties; some to carry the publ i c out for a half day's sport; one, the Owl II, ready to make a full day of it. The crowd with reels in hand i s anxious to get away, for word i s out that the barracuda are running. Even I, a n old fisherman, am feeling tremors of excitement, for i f there i s any keener sport than hooking one of these sea-tigers I have not yet found it, The day i s clear, and the sea calm. The Fashion, a trim, well-equi pped gasoline launch, pulled up to the landing sl i p and made fast, The crowd surges ; the boat i s quickly fi l l i ng, Some s i l l y one remarks that if we were to be i n the fashion we would have to go i n the Fashion. But the Rashion is a hal f-day boat. The question we three argued was : Shall we take this first boat to the fishing grounds, even though it returns at noon, or shall we wait an hour more and stay out longer ? \I\fh i le we discussed the matter, the boat received i ts quota of pas­ sengers, and pulled out with Good Luck shouts following. Two hours later, fifteen miles out, from the rail of the Owl II, I hooked the first fish of the catch, a fine mackerel. Carl followed with a five pound h a libut ; then I came again with the first barracuda-the day's sport was on. \I\fithin the radius of a m i l e about us were h a l f a dozen or m o r e boats engaged as w e were. A t a d i stance of two miles rode the Fashion at anchor, laz i ly roll i ng in the swells. As we looked toward her, a slender spiral of smoke shot up from her engine room. What could that mean ? Then, as the smoke reddened and burst into a bil low, came the cry, "The Fashion's afire! The Fashion's afire!"

I have experienced the sicken i ng sense of human helplessness as the sol i d gt'ound weaved and rocked i n earthquake. I am glad to have known that sensation-once. To behold a ship at sea, wrapped i n flames, with its cargo of human l i ves, ranks among one's most thri lling hours-but I pray God I may never behold the l ike again. The whistle of our boat screeched rapid warning blasts. "Al l lines i n , " shouted the captain, and at h i ghest speed we entered the race with death. Q u i ckly we wet'e j oined by other craft, even a lone rowboat, for such i s the law o f the sea. Our rear scuppers were awash ; waves broke over the stern as we rushed to save, i f possible, some l ives. A mile away, \\'e caught sight o f black specks, here and there, in the sea-human heads. " Get the l i fe preservers ready to throw," ordered the captain. Some o f us are praying, "Dear Lord, help them to stay u p until w e can reach them." vV e are close by now. A man's heavy, black sweater floats past ; some l i fe preservers-empty. Here they are, almost within reach, swin �ming desperately away from the fiery i n ferno. They are clinging to l i fe preservers ; there had been no time to put them on. Closer by now. Here i s a man supporting his w i fe with one arm while he holds to a l i fe preserver with the other. They are deep i n the water, and the waves break over them, but he cri es, "Don't stop for us, go for those who didn't get preservers."

(Continued on page 76)

T wcnly-four


Junior Class PERRY C UNNINGHAM

,

BMtlesv ille, 0 k la . Class

President ;

Asst.

B u s . Mgr.

Arrow Staff ; Delta Rho

"No tMng is impossib le to a willing hea rt."

MA, R GUERITE V AN \VEELDEN,

Grandfie ld, O kla . Delta Rho ; O rchestra

"Her vo ic e zms ever soft, ge ntle a lld low -a n excellent th ing in woman."

MARION DOWNS,

D o dso nv illc, Texas

Delta Rho ; Ladies' Quartet; Glee C l ub

"S h e is never alo 1le who is a CC0111pan ie d b y nob le thoug hts."

AYLIFFE GA,RRETT,

Erick , Ok la.

Delta Rho ; G l e e C lub

"She zc.as a plain, h Olles t lass, healthy, ha ppy a nd goo d, a nd w ith tha t sort of b ea u ty tha t c o mes 0/ h a ppiness a nd h e a lth."

IRENE 'FRENCH,

NIu llill, Texas

Delta Rho

"To have f rie nds

IS

to be o ne."

-t

Twen ty-five


Juniors

TORBETT ARMSTRONG,

Wooco, Texas

Delta Rho; Glee Club; Quartet

"By virtue and industr'), comes hap­ piness."

EVA WOODRUFF,

Cloud Chief, Okla.

Delta Rho

"The blessing of her quiet life fell all 1IS like the dew."

ALICE R EED,

Clay Center, Kan.

Delta Rho

"Peace niles the day, ze:here l'eason nIles the mind."

HAZEL

SHULL,

S'ylvia, Kan.

Delta Rho; Glee Club "1

kllow no such thing as genills­ ge n ius is nothing but labor ,and diligence."

LOR£LLE HOOVER,

Bethany, o Ida.

Delta Rho ; Glee Club "Nat

for good deeds bUI for good alolle."

,

i���/�·;:�:r,�-..::-.::7'"="::::==--_-=oco>""",""'''''.

, ••..,! .•

Twenty-six

''''''----


Juniors

lVIILD�ED H I CKS,

Bethany, Okla.

Delta Rho ; Arrow'staff "1

th in ll and think, and 1l0W 1 simply say, 'She's winsome'."

EDNA \VALLACE,

Bethany, Okla.

"When you see her yon know she a perfect lady ."

CONSTANCE SPRUCE..

ts

Floresville, T ex.a s

Delta Rho ; Choir

"The [;irl wOI,th while 1 S the one who will smile when everything goes dead u rong."

PEARL DAGGETT,

WI'ay, Colo.

not accomplish all, but with consistent effort 1 will accomplish sOlnething."

"1 11W3'


Junior Class Another year o f o u r school life h a s come t o a close; and when we say this, there comes over us a commingled feeling of j oy and sadness; j oy, because we have reached another l andmark o n our great j ourney; sadness, because we shall have to separate from our dear teachers and old school friends. It we have done our best and have made good use o f our time, happy are we; but i f we have not taken advantage of our opportunities from day to day, sad are we. Paul said, "Study to show thysel f approved unto God, workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly d i viding the word of truth," and we today are trying to follow his exhortation. The Junior Class ha3 real ized that success i s not found as a matter o f chance, and therefore has worked diligently through these yeal路s. The way has not been altogether smooth, but l ike most other roads it has been rough and narrow in places. Our attitude has ever been one of determination to go through in spite of obstacles, o r we, l ike many of our former fel l ow c l ass men, might have fal l e n by the wayside. The Junior Class this yeal- i s the l a rgest it has ever been in the history o f the school. We have had the privilege and great honor of having Professor S. S. v'ihite, president o f our col lege, as our sponsor. Professor vVhite has been one of us, but he has lived such a noble l i fe and has upheld such high i deal s that we feel we have been greatly benefited by this year's work with him. The Junior Class gave a Junior-Senior banquet. This was the first o f such ever given at Bethany-Peniel College. Some of the most efficient and most useful students in school al-e members of our class. Two of our number hold prominent positions on the staff; eight are in the glee clubs; one boy i s in two of the college quartets; four o f oUl" gi rls compose the Coll ege Ladies' quartet; and almost without exception, all o f our class are enrolled i n the Fine Arts Department; i n fact, three o f the Fine Arts graduates come from the Junior C l ass. Bethany-Peniel College, w e feel, i s one o f God's chosen centers of education. It is one of the largest schools in our Nazarene movement and it affords not only the highest type of mental devel opment, but also the highest type of spi ritual and social development. Our teachers are a constant source of inspi ration to us to l i ve nobler, purer, and truer Christian l i ves. Vife intend by God's hel p and grace to be more useful after leaving school than we would have been had we not received a ful l , well-rounded education. Of all the school s, o'er all the lands, Some may go down; but this one stands. Her earthly form may fade away ; Her buildings molder and decay; B ut by our class, her praise shal l be Heralded through all eternity ! F. D. S

Tlll eni)l-eight


...........

The Lost Trail Carol G. Spruce It had been a long, hard cl imb for lVli lam Evans and his little daughter, Jewel l . EYer since noon they had followed t h e trail down t h e mountain side, that l e d t o the camp far below, where the brave w i fe and mother was awaiting their return.

M i lam

had remarked several times to his daughter that they must hurry if they woul d reach home J::e fore darkness settled down upon the mountain and h i d the trail from their sight. B riskly they picked their way over the dim path, the l ittle girl engrossed in the wonders whic h nature had spread about them, confident that her father was able to answer the many questions with which she pressed h i m .

A s he replied t o her queries,

Milam thought of the many times he had come with his questions and problems to his Father-the One who knows and understands all .

And his heart rej oi ced as he realized

that his every question had been answered, his every problem solved. Milam grew more and more thoughtful as they went on down the tra i l , though thrilled with the grandeur and beauty of lofty crag, darkening forest, and distant valleys beneath .

A huge rock loomed up before them, and he coul d not see the trail out beyond.

But the track wound around the shoulder o f the mountain, and they paused to gaze at the glory of a di stant range, bathed in the purple haze o f the October evening. Starting on, they were suddenly aware that the trail had come to an abrupt end. TIle father, puzzled, searched this way and that, but not a sign of the trai l could he see.

It seemed as though every l iving being who had come over that path had vanished

at that poi nt.

Aware of the danger of attempting the descent with no path to guide,

where a false step in the growing darkness might mean a swift drop i nto the depths below, M ilam's face became gray with fear.

His heart almost fail ed h i m as he looked

at his little daughter and then at the l engthening shadows of the trees.

I f they failed

to d i scover the trail, what m i ght it mean to spend the night upon the mountain s i de­ what danger from the w i l d J::e asts known to be l urking in those fastnesses !

Again he

looked i nto the face o f the l i ttle girl, but there was no fear there; she was confident that her father would protect hel¡ from all danger.

Aga i n M i l am was reminded of the

watchfulness and care of his Heavenly Father, and he prayed that His protection m i ght be given them now. Turning to his daughter, Mr. Evans said, "Jewell, you sit here upon thi s rock while I go to look for the tra i l . but his voice faltered. obeyed.

It must be somewhere near."

He tried to speak brav�ly,

The l ittle girl returned to h i m a smile o f confidence, as she

The father clambered down over the rocks several feet below, and then searched

above, but there was no trace on either side-the trail ended abruptly at the j utting point of rock.

Finally he caught a glimpse, at some d i stance ahead, of someth ing that

l ooked l ike a trai l .

Yes, there was the l ittle bush from which Jewell had broken a l i mb,

(Continued on Page 87)


Sophomore Class

SHELBY WILLIS,

AmG1'illo, Te xas

Class Presi dent ; B u s . Mgr. Arrow Staff Glee Club; Delta Rho

ELIZABETH ALEXAN.D:2R, Beth an y, Ohla. A rrow Staff, Glee Club ; Delta Rho

JOHN PETERS,

Alt us , Ohla.

OPAL GILBBRT,

I

Delta Rho; Debating

H. \V. BLACKSHEAR\ Morr ilt on, Ar 1? Arrow Staff ; Delta Rho

LAlLA KESLER, Delta Rho

Thirty

Ohlah oma Cit y, 01?la.


Sophomores

BERT LUNDY,

Bla ckwe ll, Ok la.

Delta Rho; Glee Club

MILDRED VVALTON,

Beth a ny , Ok la .

Delta Rho

REV. J. E. BURKE'rT, Oklah oma City, Ok la.

ANNA MAE SMI'I'I-I,

Ha mlin, Texas

VESTAL LANGFORD,

Hen ryetta , Ok la.

LORA TAYLER,

A nadark o, OHa .

Thirty-one


Sophomores

PAUL EVERSOLE,

Elk City, /(all.

Delta Rho

Tipton, Okla.

MERLE NEWSOM,

Delta Rho

J AfiIES W' ALTON,

Bethany, Okla.

Delta Rho; Glee Club

BER'f H A WRIGHT,

Cushing,

Okla.

Delta Rho

ORVILLE HOAG,

Guthrie, Okla.

Delta Rho

EFFIE YOUNG,

ThirlJi-lwo

Bethany, Okla.


Sophomores

GEORGE VY. BRANNON,

Britton, O k la .

Delta Rho

ADA MCWILLIAMS,

D a llas , T exa s

Delta Rho

FLORENCE LUNDY,

Bkrckwell, OHa .

Delta Rho; Financial Secretary

MARY LEAR REED,

Be th a ny, O k la.

Delta Rho

RAMA CAMP,

Betha ny, 0 k la.

Delta Rho

MRS. IRENE NEUENSCHWANDER, Be thany , 01?la.

Thirty-three


The College Sophomore Class of '27-'28 'vVe are not the work of chance. Our destiny was not wrought in some mysterious, unknown real m of uncertainty. We believe our presence, our ideals, our struggles our triumphs had a beginning, shal l we say, in the early pl annings of God. On the sea of col l ege l i fe we started almost two years ago, with sai l s set for a definite goal. Our goal was, and is, and ever shall be, to breathe into the l ives o f others the great and worthwhile principles which were breathed into us in B. P. C. \!\ie have not been in several small boats, merely d r i fting o'er the solemn main o f college l ife ; but we have a ship all our own, manned b y a sturdy crew, piloted with a keen eye, anel kept in trim with sails furled wide and full-speed ahead, sailing ever onward, grandly onward in the course which lies ahead. The sun shines, the ripples 011 the water are tipped with diamonds. Under the proud waving flag of B. P . C . our Sophomore ship sails on. The sun as i t creeps over the rim of the hori zon touches and teams on our ship, a swiftly moving swan-like figure of white upon the water, whi le l ittle waves caress her sides with silken gentleness. As \\'e ol1wal'd sai l with the prow of our ship toward the East, we look back West足 ward, the wondedul \i\f est into which the sun has sli pped each evening like the coin dropped from the widow's fingers into the treasury box of the temple. We behold the fading glory o f its golden rays, banking themselves against the deep blue sky while the fleecy clouds floating above fold over its crimson face like a curtain and with it, closing our second coll ege year. Watching the dancing waves which only a few months past gently pressed themselves against our ship's side, noting too, the dangerous rocks and floating icebergs of trials and perplexities, of making creditable grades, of paying class bills, and safely evading that impulsive l ittle Freshman ship so gay and hopeful, we smoothly gl ide on in the direction of the rising Eastern sun o f hope for the third year of our col l ege course. For truly its ri sing appears to hasten our erstwhile fading dreams to one of resplendent Reality. We al'e glad we have built well our shi p, for now in the place of a j ourney of only two years, we are to enjoy a continued voyage of two more years in our own B. P. C . waters. \i\f e al'e ful ly aware that we are only half way toward our j ourney's end; but when we contemplate these two wonderful years on the congenial bosom of the waters of Bethany-Peniel College, we are thrilled when the Flag-ship Captain cries out fr0111 the towering mast pole, "Sail on in your course, full two more leagues are yom's!" The words have gone forth, and now with queenly magnificence, with silvery sails full -flown, she moves w i th the balmy breezes of hope. Our dear old Sophomore ship proudly plows on toward the next lap o f her j ourney. with every loyal member o f her crew shouting cheer on cheer, for the land of opportunity i s lying j ust ahead.

Some ships sail East, And some sail West By the self-same winds that blow. It's not the gale, B ut the set of the sail, That determines which way they go.

Thirty-four


God's Call of a Man The w o r k o f t h e ministry is a great work, a n d f o r o n e to succeed h e must h a v e the Divine approval, yea, the call of God to that work. Jesus told His disciples that they had not chosen Him but that H e had chosen them. If God calls a man, he cannot satisfy the Holy Spirit o r his own conscience unless he assumes the responsibility, fights the foe of a l l souls, and l eads lost men to God. God must have men to carry on His work, and H e chooses His men as carefully as a gigantic corporation or a bank would choose its chief executive. Outstanding among the Apostles is Pau l . Vie see him first at the stoning o f Stephen, and then o n the road t o Damascus. His purpose i s to exterminate Christianity, thinking himse l f to be performing a service for Goel. God saw in th is Pharisee that which He could use for His glory. The Jews had rej ected Jesus, and, since the Gospel as a world message must be carried to the Gentiles, there must be a message bearer who was not only acquainted with God and knew God, but one who also knew auout Goel. One who was a Jew coul d best qualify, since his people had the law of God and had had personal touch and com足 munication wi th God for several generations. A Gentile would not have the advantage of this progressive revelation of God, and would be in danger of falling back into his old heathen way under the persecution which was sure to come. Paul was a Jew. Second, God needed a man who could meet the people everywhere as one o f them, man who was not a captive slave, a free man. Rome controlled nearly all the civi l ized world at that time. God needed a man who was a Roman citizen. H e found this 111 Paul , who asserts a number of times, in the B i ble, the fact of h is Roman citi zenshi p . a

Then. God not only needed a man w h o knew H i m a n d was one o f the people him足 self, but H e also needed a man who was qualified to carry the message to them. Paul had sat at the feet of one of the greatest educators of his day, Gamaliel. H e knew, probably, seven different languages and was thus enabled to help those whom h e served intelligently. Thi rd, God must have a man who has courage, who w i l l stand for right anywhere and under any ci rcumstances, who will be true to God i n spite o f dungeon, fire, or steel. And yet this man must be wise, a man o f good judgment, and one who w i l l not needlessly risk his l i fe, recklessly endanger the cause o f God, or thwart God's message and purpose to mankind by a foolish move. Paul rebuked the devil in the Philli pian girl, yet h e d i d n o t r e v i l e t h e authorities w h e n they scourged h i m a n d cast him i n t h e i n n e r prison. He heard the sentence, took the punishment, went to jai l , started a revival, got God on the scene, converted the j ailer and his family, and established a church there. Last, but not least, God needed and found in Paul a man who was pliable under the leadership o f the H o ly Ghost. vVhen once he came in contact with Jesus and recog足 nized him as the Son o f God, his one question was, " vVhat w i l t thou have me to do ?" H e continued to ask th is question. a l l through l i fe, and when al l of l i fe was over h e said, "I have fought a good fight."


Freshman Class

Tr oup e, Texas

MILES SIMMONS,

C l ass Pres.; Glee Club Delta Rho

Bet han y, Ok la .

MILDRED STIPES,

Delta Rho; Gl ee Club

BEULAH LeE \VILKS,

A ltus, Oilla.

Delta Rho

HARRELL GARRISON,

Bet han y, Ok la.

Glee C l ub; Delta Rho ; D ebating

CHARLES ROBERTS,

Fli7lt ,lYIi ch.

A r row Staff

VERNAL BLACK,

Betha ny, Ok la.

Arrow Staff

IVA WRIGHT,

Ben t onville, A r il.

Arrow Staff ; Glee Club ; Delta Rho

KENNETH RICE,

KENDALL S . WHITE,

Britt on, Ok la.

Bet ha n y, Ok la.

Delta Rho ; Glee Club; Quartet

CLARA HOUNSHELL, Delta Rho

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Thirl}!-six

Altu s, Oilla.


Freshmen

ALVIN MARKWELL, Ok la . City, Ok la .

'ADOLEEN BROWN, Delta Rho

VERDI MAE FAIN,

Br ow nsville, Texas

Bet ha ny , Ok ra .

REGINALD VlrLLIAM S . Bet ha ny , Ok la. Vice-Presi clent of Class ; Delta Rho ; . An-ow Staff ; Orchestra ; Glee Club

EARL VVELLER, Delta Rho EDI'l'H BAIRETT, Delta Rho

Bet ha ny , OHa .

Erath , Texa s

A M ANDA SPURLIN, Bu ffal o Delta Rho; Glee Club

Gap, Tex.

FLOYD 'I\TILLIAMS, Sa n A nt oni o, T exa s

HANFORD WHITE, Bonha m , T exas Delta Rho ; Glee Club; Quartet

RUBY LEE DEES,

Bet ha wJI, O!?la.

Thirt!i-se1Jen


Freshmen

BYRON ROBERTS,

Fl int, Mich .

Arrow Staft

VIOLETTA HOSTU'rLER, Bethan y, Okla.

ELIZABETH RICE,

Br itt on, Okla.

PAUL GARRETT,

Erick, Okla.

Delta Rho; Glee Cl u b ;

Debating

LOWELL HOOPER,

Betha ny, Ok la.

CASSIE SEVERNS,

Av a, Mo.

Delta Rho

CAROL SPRUCE,

San Ant onio. Texas

Delta Rho

JOI-IN \,yUIAN,

Ros coe , Texa s

Delta Rho

Foy

TATE,

Blevin s , Ark.

Delta Rho; Glee Club

THELMA Hn;SLEY, Str ong C it y, Ok la.

. .

ThirlJl-eighl


Freshmen

Mangltm, Okla.

LLOYD BARNETT, Delta Rho LILLIAN BRAD.BERRY, Delta Rho

Z ELLA WEBBER, Delta Rho EVA MAE HA M M OND,

Bethany, Okla.

Delta Rho

VELTA S M IT H , Delta Rho

J EWELL

Bethall}l, Okla.

McANINCH,

Blackwell, Okla.

Delta Rho

BEULAH SPELL, Delta Rho

Kendrick, Okla.

CLOVIS MELVIN,

Canute, Okla.

Delta Rho

NAOMI S H ELDON,

Gllthrie, OHa.

Delta Rho HeRMAN BURTO!\',

Erick, Okla.

Debating

)

" ==�-------..

� .. - � Thirty-nine


Freshmen

GUY TATE"

B levins , A rk.

Delta Rho E M M A R OBERT S ,

Pilot P o int, Texas

Delta Rho

AUDREY GA'fES, El Ren o, Delta Rho; Faculty Steno. HOR>RACE S H ERRILL, Delta Rho

Beth a ny, Ok la.

HEARNE SPRUCE, San Antonio, Delta Rho ; Glee Club

RUTH TROUB, Delta Rho

RUTI-l COLLINS, Delta Rho \VEK DELL VVEBB, Delta Rho

O ll lo .

Tex as

Carnegie, O kl a.

Des Moin e s , N. 111 .

Bethany, O k la .

PAUL T H O M PSON,

C offy, 11;[0.

Delta Rho; Orchestra C H LOE JARVIS,

G O lll d, Okla.

Delta Rho

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Freshmen

ALVIS JOH N SO)l,

Betha11Y, O kla. vVaco, Texas

MARY SCARBOROUGH, Delta Rho ; Orchestra

MRS. BeSSIE WOOD,

LOTTIE TAYLOR,

STELLA ARMSTRONG,

Betha ny, O kla.

Cleveland, 0 kl a .

vVaco, Texas

MAR,Y SOM ERS,

Medfo1'd, 0 kla .

LOUISA SOMERS,

Medford, 0 1�la.

BEN WEDEL,

Bulher, Kallsas.


The Freshman Class 111 Bethany-Peniel College, under t h e southern skies of Oklahoma, of truc> b lue Freshmen gathered from many different states.

IS

a loyal class

Such a c lass is of course a constant source o f annoyance to the Upperclassmen. S everal times i n thei r plottings against the humble ones they were c hagrined by th" d i scovery of the presence o f Fresh lT.en . And again discovering w i res leading from their sec r et place of meeting,. they o f course found Fl-eshmen at the end o f the wi res re­ ceiving their secrets. This riva l ry i s a ll good-natu red, l ending zest and spirit to the Freshman's first days i n school. The first i mportant action of the class was the election of officers. These worthy office holders are proving themselves to be real l eaders, not only of the class, but also of the school. Their sponsor i s a real asset to the c l ass. Patient i n a crisis, helpful and obl i ging in a ll ac�ivities, and always at her post o f duty. She wilI l i v e long in the hearts of her protegee,s,. In none of the activities of the school is th i s class lagging. The position o f advertising manager of T h e A l: row i s held b y a Freshman. In basket b a l l h e r team takes first place. It is hard to say what the debating team would be without her Freshman members, I n the contest over the sale of t i ckets for the Jean Valj ean lecture the ever faithful Freshmen were victorious. Still another field o f activity, by far the most important, i s that o f Christian servi ce. A number of the students are preparing to be ministers, miss ionaries, teachers, or song evangel i sts. The work they wilI do w i l l forever be a monument o f achi evement t o t h e class.

I

The social functions have not been numerous, but they may b e remembered for their quahty rather than their quantity. The get-acquainted social w i l l b e remembered as the basis of many b eauti ful and lasting friendships and acquai ntances. The leap year party was a wholesome good time for everyone. The b lushing maidens making dates with the none the less blushing boys w i ll be a lasting memory in many m i nds. This noble class selected for its colors green and p i nk and for its flower the snap dragon of corresponding colors. Their motto is "Originators, not I mitators ." T h e c l ass h a s successfull y made itself a cl ass of l o y a l Freshmen, one hundred per cen t for B. P . C . and has lai d a good foundation for the best class of the school in succeeding years. Z. M. W,

s�� " _ .

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Her Mother's Picture I t w a s a beauti ful June morning on t h e western plains of Texas. I sabel l Osborn pulled a broad-brimmed hat over her brown wavy hair, and long canvas gloves over her slender hands. "vVhat a wonderful morning to be out in the air," she exclaimed. every breath of it."

"I shall enj o}

A s this orphan gi r l crossed the pasture, she remembered the times she had watched her mother paint. Always there was a message in her pictures, for her mother loved Christ and art, and Isabell was grateful for this heritage. Thinking of the past week, she said : "I do appreciate M r . and Mrs. Bingham for hel p i ng me finish this last year of high school and I 'm glad to prove it. But-I never could have won the scholarship had i t not b e e n fo r mother's picture." Having the first year o f college to look forward to, made the summer pass rapidly for I sabell. Before she hardly real ized it, she was i n Oklahoma, registering in Bethany足 Peniel College. The matron of the gi rls' dormitory assigned her a room on the second floor with B onnie Mae Summers, and she was beginning to feel at home until there came one of those rainy Saturdays. "\;\That a gloomy day," she said. looking u p f r o m her book. " Yes, it i s, but we'll feel hetter if we write friend.

a

cheerful letter home," answered her

" I believe you are right, B onnie," concluded Isabell. She filled her pen and began a letter to the B i nghams, when she heard a nOise. Looking out o f the window the girls saw people running and yelling something about a fire. " Oh , let's go see where it i s, " exclaimed I sabel l . T h e y r a n o u t into t h e y a r d to find i t w a s t h e dormitory itself on fire. "Oh what shall w e do ?" cried one girl. " My books and clothes are in my room ! " sobbed another. I sabell stared at the angry flames as if measuring them, then dashed u p the steps and di sappeared in a cloud of black smoke. " I s abell, come back ! " wailed Bonnie. "Come out of that burning b u ilding," screamed another. The firemen were i n a terrible battle. The roof was ready to fall when one o f the men came running, carrying a n unconscious gi rl. As quickly as the flames on her clothing were smothered, she was rushed to the hospital. The nurse was cutting the charred rags from her body, and in so doing, discovered a marvelous work of art which the girl had clasped i n her bosom. I t was a picture of a group of young people studying art, music, and literature. In their midst was a man with a kind face who seemed so glad to be with them. H e was the Man with the seamless garment. "Did-it-get-burned ?" she asked faintly. "N 0, it's all right," answered the nurse. And I sabel l closed her eyes i n satisfaction. for she was now going to be with the kind face i n her mother's picture. A. C . R.


Bible Conference Among the many rich blessings w h i c h Bethany-Peniel College has enj oyed this year was the Preachers' Convention. It was a j oint convention o f the Eastern and Wester n Okla足 hon1a Districts. One o f the contributions which made i t a success was the large delegation o f preachers from these two districts. The prime obj ect o f the convention was to create a better spirit of brotherhood and bring about greater unity between these two closely connected di stricts.

DR. R. T. W I LLI A M S

Then, too, the educational phase o f the conference would be hard to overesti mate. Dr. R. T. vV i ll iams ( who i s a resident of our coll ege tow n ) gave each morning to the preachers some o f the most practical and i nspi ring lectUl'es that one could possibly wish for; also, he preached each even足 ing i n a very profitable manner.

Professor McConnell, our Dean of Theology, also gave lectures each morning on Theological subj ects which were very instructive to every hearer. Professor G ilmore, one of our splendid young preachers, also a teacher on our college faculty, gave many lectures on sermon preparation. H i s talks were practical and helpful, especially to the preachers. Professor W i lson, who is our college Registrar, gave some talks on Psychology, which were enlightening and profitable. Professor S. S . White, who is now the full-fledged president o f Bethany-Peniel Coll ege, also spoke on the subj ect o f Psychology. All who have heard his l ectures on this phase o f education are \vel l aware of h i s high type of thought and presentation. Each morning at chapel we had some visiting preacher to speak to us, which proved unusually profitable, especi ally to the student body. The Board of Regents met in conjunction with the convention ; their presence and fellowship were welcomed by al l . The comi ng o f our brethren t o u s w i l l b e long remembered for their encouragement. There was much inspiration from having th i s goodly company i n our midst. We do Eot know exactly how the brethren felt, but we feel that they went away with a greater interest i n the school work than they had had before. The conference was a success from every standpoint. May th i s treat be repeated to each of the succeeding student bodies in the years that are to come.


College Functions It w a s a beautiful afternoon in January when t h e Coll ege students gathered in front o f the new classroom buil ding, soon to be off for supper in the wood s .

All was

in a stir, for the place must be reached in time to prepare wieners and marshmallows, have supper, and get back by seven o'clock. vVe soon reached the river.

Fire was kindled and the boys were out searching

for a forked stick i n order to roast two wieners at a time. The time was fast passing and we must soon be studying.

After a song and

prayer the couples coul d be seen returning to their old stomping ground. APACHE AND C O M A N C H E In looking through t h i s volume, no doubt b u t that y o u have observed t h e I ndian theme all along. The names Comanche and Apache, you recognized, are also the names o f two of the leading I ndian Tri bes o f Oklahoma. I n carrying out the Indian theme we decided to call the two contesting sides by these names. The student body was equally divi ded into two contestant parties.

Then a boy

and a girl were selected as leade�s of each side. The l i st o f names was given to the leaders which was prepared in order to have the si des well balanced.

After having all previous arrangements made, a chapel service

was given in which the contest was launched.

There were several enthusiastic speeches

given to create the proper atmosphere for annual selli ng.

I mmediately the leaders came

to the front and began to read the names appearing on their l i sts ; having each student to come forward as his name was reacl.

This was continued until the student body was

standing in two l i nes in the building. The distinguishing feature of the opposite sides was the color o f tag they wore. The Apaches wore a red tag, while that of the Comanches was green. These tags were given out while standing in l ine in order to identify each fellow with his own side. The next proposition p resented was that o f getting the students to buy an annual themselves whi l e i n the notion.

The leaders had contracts and these were given to and

si gned by all the students who would purchase an annual, and returned to the leader then and there.

It was interesting how each respective side got busy to get every

member to buy a book .

They did not stop with their own immediate members, how­

ever, but worked the town as wel l . A half holiday was given at the close of the contest, and the losing side served the winners on this occasion. the lead.

Finally the last moment came with the Comanches in

The Apaches were good losers, however the Comanches did not win by

extremely l arge margin.

ďż˝ ...


Freshman's Soliloquy

I

To pass, or not to pass ? T h a t is t h e question. Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The pangs and errors of outrageous grammar, Or to take arms against a sea of errors And by opposing, end them. To pas s-to flunk, To flunk once more ? But i f w e pass W e say we end the headache and the thousand Nervous shocks that flesh i s heir to. 'Tis a consolation hopeless to be wished. To flunk, to pass-to flunk ? Perchance to Be an "Upperclassman ! " Aye there's my chanc e ! For if we flunk what hopes may come vVhen w e have lain aside our books. We must give paus e ! There's the respect That makes so long a Freshman's l i fe. Why must we bear the slights and scorns of "Upperclassmen ?" The oppressor's wrong ? They are contumely. Why must we grunt and sweat under such a weary l i f e ? vVhy must we fear the undiscovered realms before us, From whose bourne few Freshmen have survived ? v\Thy not let us bear the i l l s we have, Than fl y to others w e know not o f ? Thus, Conscience does make cowards of us al l ; And our native hue of resolution Vanishes with the pale cast o f such tiloaghts, The enterprises o f great pith and mom ent. With this regard th eir currents turn aw;J.Y, And thus we lose the name of actioI'. B . L.


Twelfth Grade

IS Raymond

Ryan

LIKES

D I S LIKES

'Y ILL

BE

Handsome

Lank-fords

Rules

Ona Kern

Quiet

English

Housekeeping

::Vlarried

T . E . Verner

Married

Music

'Vashing

Useful

Faye Bartlett

In Loye

Chewing g u m

M o n i to r s

Time w i l l tell

Lee S m i th

Fat

Fords

Girls

Bald

C h r i s t i n e Spurling

Studious

Typing

::11 en

Lonely

Henry Hughes

A Puzzle

A. change

O l d mai d.,

S u ccessful

O r a Mae vV o o d s

Blonde

Dormitory l i fe

Teasing

Happy

Tal!

Leonard Goodwin

Red headed

" Hoopg"

Debating

Great

Bernice Sears

Little

History

Toys

Dign i fi e d

Roy Peck

Good look i n g

Popularity

T o be alone

A preacher


Twelfth Grade

IS

LIKES

DISLIKES

"W I L L

BE

Harold S m i t h

Industrious

Everyone

Company

A salesman

L a u ra i n e O l i v e r

Lively

Singing

D i sc i p l i n e

Dressmaker

Joseph E . Lege

A

"Rights"

Short dresses

An old Bachelor

A n n i s G i l n1ol'e

Cute

B a s k e t ball

Exams

Educated

Willie :vIae Lo,"e

Lovable

Preachers

Physics

.:\" o b l e

R a y m o n d Irick

Ind e p e n d e n t

Cal' r i d i n g

School

A druggis t

Flora :lIae Smith

Contented

Spit-curls

Spanish

A vaJnp

S a d i e Heit

'I' h ough tful

D i s h wash i n g

Laziness

Housekeeper

B e s s i e Barton

Satis-fied

Ath l e t i c s

Mathematics

A woman

Ida Reed

Importa n t

Dates

Faculty

Lecturess

Bessie Thompson

Pretty

F el l o w s

T h e me s

S c h o o l - rnaI'm

Forty-eight

preacher


Twelfth Grade

IS

LIKES

DISLIKES

WILL B E

A m u s i cian

Glee club

Cats

A teacher

Zelia Lee Barrett

A recluse

To i5 m i l e

Fussing

A charmer

Ruth

Solemn

To read

Boys

A stenographer

Mary Ridings

Smart

Company

Foolishness

Saleslady

Lois Uerkvitz

Likeable

Comedians

Beans

An actress

R u b y Hicks

Clever

Expre s s i on

Noise

Storekeeper

Lula Stephens

Brilliant

To be moving

Q u ietness

A s i n ger

S i byl

Camp

Sears


Eleventh Grade

CAN Y O U IMAGI N E Paul Ridings-Growing a mustache Ruby \Vallace-In a hurry Walter H i ll-Havi ng a date Beatrice M i ller-An old maid Delbert iVlarkwelI-Assistant clean Ruth Rucly--A twin Fletcher McLain-Qt1iet

111

study hall

\Vilma Lankford-Being dumb Henry Smith-Crawling

Fift))


Eleventh Gra d e

CAďż˝ Y O U I MA G I N E Alice Riggs-B eing serious Paul I rick-Si lent Nettie Traub-Flirting Harold Stiverson-Being on time Ruby Rudy-Being tall Esther Oliver-A school teacher Harold Volk-A song leader vVrennie King-A married lady Frank Rice- -A j elly bean


A Lesson I Fain Would Learn Little bird, sitting h igh On the b rall c h o f a tree, Singing in s :c eetf'st notes Pretty songs unto me. T ell me how do you h ide In your red-feathered breast, Sorrow and memories Of a long crum bled nest ? Can you look bach upon What was Ollce .a sweet spot, vVhere ymw mate sat 'with you A nd u here now he is not; A nd yet keep your song fnll Of the joy and the cheer, That floating comes to m e A s alone I sit here ? Can you think of the babes, As from you they were torn By the cruel h and of Death, On the night of the stor111, A nd yet keep such a brave, Thrilling note in your song, To inspire the discouraged, Perchance he comes alone? Can you think of winter And the hard fligh t at hand, Ere you find for yourself A nother summer land, A nd still keep melody Vibrating in your tone, That gladdens 1ny sad heart As I sit here alon e ? If you can, little bird, vVon't you please teach to me, T he lesson you've learned ? And perhaps I can be Useful in the l1taking Of a lone, saddened heart To cheer up once again, And to make a new start. B. C.


Tenth Grade

WHO

HOW

WHAT

HARRIS CREECH C H ARLSIE B URDITT EARL ALLER H EL E N R ICE How ARD LEEPER RUTH O'BRIEN LLOYD LAN KFORD S, H, BUN.DY NAOMI McADA M S

Executive Reserve Musician Quaker Joker Reliable Efficient Comedian Uke player

JOE C O NALLY CATHERINE SIDLES PAUL R EED MARY RUTH DEES JEWELL NEAL CARLIS HAUGHT PEARL JACKSON PELLUM HAUN VELMA BARTON C H A,RLES DAVIS VIVIAN ROACH

Opti mist Adventurer Tailor Dignitarian Elocutionist Conqueror Balance Psychologist Perseverance A lert Son gstl'ess

Ever growing u p and out, Up and at it when 'tis needed. Fingers made for the piano. " S i lence ! Sh ! " T h e spice o f the class i s he. I love everybody. A man's a man for all 0' that. He must have his fun . From morn til l night her uke worked right. Happy am I , from care I'm free. Heights and depths are hers to know. .smal l of stature, big o f heart. "That's not the way to d o it." She sways them as she wills. They can conquel' who believe they can. Free, l i ght, yet stern was she. Lost i n the fog. "Who persevel'es will be crowned," A ready hand and a w i l l ing mind, Kind and "merry."

-=

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Fifl!J-lhree


Ninth Grade

AMBITION MERLE ZYIEFEL

Flute pia yer

B ON N I E MOORE

G ove rnor of Oklah oma

C ARL PEARCE

Fa rmer

RUTH McDoN ALD

a p eru

HOWARD CUNNINGHAM

Fi[I);-four

singer

T o get married

VERA PIOR

Vi olinist

MARY DELL AYCOCK

To be m a tr on of girls' d ormit ory

MARIE KOONS

T o b e sl end er

LOIS HAUN

T o b e freck led

NAOMI COOK

A c oo"


Special Students

OPAL NEWSON, College Sophomore

Tipton, Okla .

"A g ood laugh is sunshine in th e h ou se ." RAYMOND BOYD,

Webb City, Mo.

Voice ; Theological Student

"Disc reti on of speech is m ore than eloquen ce ." BURL C H RISTIAN,

.

Watonga , Okla.

Music

"M usic i s w ell said to be the speech of angels." H. L. LOGANBILL, Theological Student

Bethan y, O k la .

"The sure st zt a y not to fail is to dete rmine t o su cceed." E. E . LYKINS,

Shawnee, O k la .

"A w orkman tha t needeth n ot to be a shamed." MRS. J . P . KOONS, Theological Student

Bethany, O kla .

"Live to explain th y d octrine by th y life." FRANK D . B URNETT, Theological Student

Pueblo, C ol o.

"M. a ste r, go on, and I w ill f ol low thee t o the la st gra sp , with t'�lIth and l03'alty."

Fiftl]-five



Out Where the West Begins O ll t where the h a ndclasp's a little stronger, O u t where the smile da ells a little longer, That's where the H/cst begills. O u t zc here the sun is a little brighter, Where the snows that faU are a trifle zc h iter, Where the bonas of h 01l1e are a wee bit' tighter, That's where the West begills. O u t where the skies are a trifle bIller, Out whel'e friendship's a little trller, That's a here the West b egins. O u t where a fresher brce::;e is blowing, Where there's laughter in every st-reamlet floďż˝, illg, Where there's more of reaping a nd less of sowing, That's where the West begills. Out where the world is in the making, fiT/hen? fewer hearts with despair are (lchillg, That's z( h ere the West begins. Where t here's more of giving and less of b ll"j'illg. A1ld a m an makes friends withollt half trying. That's where the H/est begi11s. -ARTHUR C H APMAN.

" ,"

F if/y¡S/l


Expression Department

sion.

Elocution is mere ski l l in exhibition. Exhibition is the greatest enemy of expres颅 The best art i s alway s expressive rather than decorative.

True expression i s the fu l l and glorious mani festation of the thinking and feeling sou l . I t i mplies the alNakening i n another of the faculties that are active in the speaker h i mself. The expression art bears as its motto, " From within, outward." goal ; and simplici ty its keynote.

To share i s its

The study of expression should develop and d i l路ect the physical, mental and vocal responses and elimi nate eccentricities which may exist. Expression success i s not so much a matter o f ability as abandonment. sympathetically li ves the truth h e portrays. Expression is universal in its scope and deman ds a proper study i f it

The artist

IS

practical

to a l l . "/'I.. word fitly spoken i s l ike apples o f gold

111

pictures o f silver." M I SS S H SR M A N .


E xpression Grad u a tes

LAlLA KESLER

"Her voi ce is p lea sing and well u sed."

HAZEL S H ULL "Thought s well exp ressed are well clothed.路'

MARION DOWNS

"Strength of a discourse lies in the de livery ."

ALICE REED ".,-1

w el l expre ssed m essage i s m o re forceful than 'when oth erwise expl'essed or freighted."

RUBY HICKS "Beginning

111

time

1S

a wise a ct ."

VERNAL BLACK

"Frankne ss i s characterist i c of her:"

Fitly-eight


Piano and Voice Grad u a tes

NAOMI B OST,

Voice

"Her optimism is always inspiring."

RUTH HALTON,

Piano

"Being considerate is more 1loble than t o be considered."

THREADGILL ROBINSON,

Voice

"There is nothing like being prepared."

IVA VVRIGHT,

Piano

"Her playing tou ched the deepest emotions."

Fifty-nine


Piano

I f o n e must choose f o r study o n l y o n e o f t h e fi n e arts-let that choice b e a study of piano. No other in strument has as many possi bilities, such a variety of uses nor more beautiful tone qualities than does the piano. Public opinion has deneed that it i s the most popular solo instrument in existence. At the present time we find a piano in almost every home and good piano-players will soon b e as common a s High School graduates. B esides being a popular solo instrument we find it being used almost entirely as an accompaniment to other instruments, vocal numbers, choirs, orchestras, etc. N o instrument seems more perfect a s an accompaniment. The training one receives i n learning to play the piano i s worthwhile itself. Thro this training one I'eceives the stri ctest di scipl ine as wel l as the greatest inspi ration. Such a combination can but pl'oduce a beautiful character. Then the refining i n fluence of a course o f music study must not b e omitted. One cannot live in a real m of beautiful music and love chaos, brusqueness or coarseness in any of its forms. Also the ability to play wel l the average classics is a great pleasure to onesel f aside from the musical education one receives i n acqui ring this degree o f efficiency. A fter mastering a classic one feels the composition belongs to himself as well as the composer. Such wealth ! Aside from the training, pleasure and refining influence that a study of the piano gives to the individual, thel'e i s also to be considered its influence i n the home. Here the entire family can become familiar with and appreciate the world's best music. Excepting christianity. no other force can bring as much j oy, happiness, refinement and contentment to the home. Longfellow said. " Show me the home wherein music dwel l s a n d I will s h o w you a happy. peaceful a n d contented home."


Voice

N o branch of musical education i s o f greater importance t h a n the proper develop­ ment and training o f the voice. There i s n o instrument so perfect i n construction or so great in its capacity to influence and move the world as the human voice.

"I sho t an a rrow into the a i r, It fe ll to ea rth, I knew not whe re; Fo r so swiftly it flew, the sight Cou ld not fo llow it in its f light. I b reathed a song into the air, It fe ll to ea rth, I know not where; Fo r what ha s sight so lleen and strong, That it can fo llow the flight of a songY' Long, long aftenw rd, i n an oak I found the a rrow, sti ll unb roke; A nd the song, from beginning to end, I fou nd again in the hea rt of a friend." -LONGFELLOW.

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Male Quartet

Men's Glee Club

Sixty-two


Mixed Quartet

Ladies' Glee Club

I

Sixty-three


The Orchestra

K othing can inspire t h e young people of a school or community as much as a musical organization such as an orchestra. To such an organization they can bring their mediocre musical talents and by combining them with the talents o f others, produce a musical interpretation that i s really quite pleasing to themselves and others, while they are doing this they are increasing their own musical efficiency, widening their knowl edge o f good music, learning to cooperate with others and receiving that aesthetic o r spi ritual training that a l iterary education alone does not gi ve. Parents and teachers are awakening to the fact that the boy or girl with only a literary education i s only parti a l ly educated i n that there is an aesthetic trai n i ng that i s absolutely essential. The study of music i n any o f its forms i s a part of this training. Musical training l i fts the morals o f the individual, awakens gl-eater ambitions, and puri fies the ideals. It is also a character builde r because of its constant suggestion o f harmony, ordel­ and beauty. Men do not commit c r i mes to the strains of beautiful music. Expressing this same thought the di rector of the largest Boy S c out Band i n America said, "Teach a boy to blow a horn and he w i l l never blow a safe." Shakespeare had somewhat the same idea when he said, "The man that hath no music i n h i mself-Let no such man be trusted."

Bethany-Peniel Col lege has a thirty piece orchestra under the di rection o f M rs . Gilmore. T h i s organization has added m u c h to t h e programs o f t h e school w i t h t h e i r beauti ful numbers. May the orchestra increase in number and efficiency i s our wish.

_____

Sixt)}-four

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I t must b e admitted that sacred music i s a s d i vinely inspired a s sermons and writ颅 ings. Hayden, when composing his oratot路io, "The Creation", said "I fell on my knees daily and prayed earnestly to God that H e would grant me strength to carry the work and praise Him worth i ly." When the composition was finished and produced, and the audience broke into tumultuous applause, the feeble old musician was no l onger able to withstand h i s emotion. H e burst into tears, and stretching his hands upward exclaimed : "It all came from Heaven." Many other composers have given similar testimonies. This being true, we should feel a great revet路ence and appreciation for music in our worship. Were it not for the hymns w e sing, our services would be void o f that something which i nspires and encourages the heart, and with its harmony li fts one away from the perplexing cares of l i fe into the very presence of Him who created music. As one writer has said. "\Vhen words fail, music speaks."

Sixty-five


(C ontinued from page 22 ) By this time we had reached our hotel, which passed description. glad for the comfort it afforded us.

\il/e were indeed

But after a good night's s leep we were ready to

make our first pilgri mage out on the desert.

But we had not gone far until we were

stopped by Indians and superior Arabs that had bazaars along the way.

One of the

latter came out from the shadow of his hanging rugs and embroideries as we passed, and spoke to us in strange mixture of French and Engl ish, begged us to come in, but our time was l imited and we started to move on, but he planted himself right before us in the road.

H e held a smal l bag i n his hands.

for us to look into it.

He untied the mouth o f the bag

We expected to see something precious-j ewels perhaps.

we saw only a quantity o f sand.

But

We thought the Arab an impudent fel low trying to

make fun of us and we started on, but again he stopped our progress.

After much

chatter we were able to understand that he wanted to read the future for us, in his bag of sand.

As he made progress impossible we decided to l i sten.

struck me, why not find out about our dear old senior class of

Then, the happy thought

'28.

It had been sometime

since I had heard from any of them. O f course Naomi Bost was the first one I thought of and I asked the Arab to tell me what he could of her.

I was not surprised when he told me she was a nationally

known evangeli st's wife, traveling with hinl and blessing thousands with her wonder­ ful s i nging.

I remember how she often sang for our class and how we enj oyed it.

I was still thinking of Naomi, when the man called the name of Sibyl Hooper. vVhat was that he was saying ? " She i s head o f the English department in one o f your colleges where she i s making a good record for herself." The next I asked about was our class president, Milton .smith.

The Arab told

us that Milton was one of our general superintendents of the Nazarene Church, and was doing great things fo r the advancement o f the C�lurch. Then there was M rs . Zimmerman, what could I find out about her ?

She was

touring the United States in interest o f foreign missions and aiding hel- husband in his work. And then we asked him about our Vice-presi dent, Geron Roberts.

He tol d us that

Geron was in New York, where he was pastor o f the l a rgest N azarene Church i n the movement.

He was on leave of absence at this time in Europe. where he was studying

and traveling. After hearing all of these interesting facts we made our way back to the hotel to rest until evening, when we would continue our j ourney.

Sixty-six


Student Council

Among the student actIvItIes i s a n organization known as the Student Council. The members o f this organization are selected and elected by the student body as their representatives. There a I路e five members of this Council, three from College and two from the Academy. Its work i s a sort o f mediating posItIOn, standing between students and Faculty. S i nce having the honor of being chosen by the students as the i r mediators it would b e only natural and normal for all possibl e favors to be given. I t l i stens to the pro颅 posal o f any student o r Faculty member, then if deemed proper and wise, submits the proposal to the student body for the i r consideration. B esides the foregoing, it i s its place t o work f o r the general interest o f t h e school, such a s upholding the principles and ideals, also helping to keep unity and cooperation i n the school and to bring about a mutual fellows hi p among all. This Council does not try to show its authority, for the on l y authority that it possesses i s granted by the Faculty. I t is pleased, therefore, to work in full harmony and coopeI路ation with the Faculty. If you were to visit the school for one week, there i s one outstanding feature this organization that you would appreciate, that i s the splen did program rendered Thursday in chapel. Some o f the very best chapel services are those sponsored this organization. I t has proved to b e a wide-awake body which believes in doing that i s possible f01路 a better Bethany-Peniel College.

of on by all

Sixty-sellen


Young Men's Gospel Team

I n t h e midst of t h e hurry o f school l i fe t h e Young Men's Gospel Team gives oppor­ tunities such as are o f greatest importance to young men preparing fOI' Christian service. There are two privileges thus afforded that can be noted-the pl'ivil ege to . gather inspiration and the privi lege o f good associations. After a week of toil and grind the young men gather at the Gospel Team service and ask God for His blessings. The Lord comes and inspires every heart. In testimony each young man i s helped by another's v i ctory ; in preaching each i s helped b y another's vi sion ; in prayer each is inspired by another's burden. I n fact, the meeting for the young men i s o f such a necessary and inspi rational nature that i t can truly b e likened to an oasis in a burning desert. Thus the Gospel Team affords the student a splendid opportunity of getting God's blessings down upon his soul. Great i s the value of associations with Spirit-fi l l ed lives.

An opportunity o f making

j ust these kinds of associations comes to the student in the Gospel Team meetings. He

is a better young man after he attends, because of the influence o f the friends he meets there. H e never forgets the holy influence o f the meetings once he comes under that influence. Friends are found that are real friends. All are standing for a common cause ; all are fighting the same enemy. One is encouraged to bear the toil when he remembers how his friend i s fighting bravely on. A l l rely on God. Thus with a united band and with D i vine assistance, an earnest Christian student is inspired to spend and b e spent for humanity.

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Sixty-eight

.


Young Ladies' Gospel T earn

T h e Young Ladies' Gospel Team i s a religious organization which consists o f the girls o f the school . I t has been an organization for several years, but it seems ',hat this has been the most successful year of its history. Many times cluring the school months the religious life is neglected but this year the gi rls seem to real i z e the import­ ance o f a closer walk with Jesus. From the very first service the gi rls have shown interest and enthusiasm.

T here has been an average attendance o f about forty.

Each Thursclay they meet for an hour o f prayer and testimony. The Spirit of the Lord has been felt in every service. Many have been blessed, those that were d i s­ couraged were encouraged and made to have a greater determination to l i ve for Jesus, and some found the Lord in h i s saving and sanctifying power-for which we are thankful. The organization not only gives spi ritual help but also trains i n leadership.

After

taking part i n the gospel team, the girls will be better trained for Chri stian work.

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Lone Star Club

Oklahoma Club

I

Seventy


Arkansas Club

1

Miscellaneous States Club

Seventy-one


Young Men's Athletic Association

Young Ladies' Athletic Association

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A t the second el ection held i n t h e Delta Rho Literary Soci ety the college gi rls reali zed the need of fair representation. The political parties o f the organization were fai l i ng to meet the needs, and as the time drew near fOI' election the girls reali zed thei r responsibi lity and formed what was known as the W omen's I ndependent Party. Campaign speeches and cries could be heard over the campus i n the evening before the election . B y seven o'clock, when the election was to take place, the gi r l s were one hundred per cent behind the I. W. P. As the members gathered, an air o f mystery seemed t o prevai l . The Whigs presented the i r platform and nominees. I t seemed as though the audience was greatly moved in favor of the \,yhigs and that there would be a l andslide i n their favor. But the speakel' for the I. W. P. was given the floor, and their platform was pre­ sented and nominess introduced, causing consternation among the other parties. The election was cal l ed for and the vote taken. Due to the fact that the majority o f the society was girls the I. \,y. P. received the highest number o f votes cast, but not a l a rge enough maj ority. so the election was postponed until the following Saturday. But l ong before the next meeting the girls had organized a permanent cI ub, �nd work had begun in earnest. The organization was to be an honor club with member­

( Contin ll!'d

071

page 74 )

Seventy-three


( Cont-inucci from page 73 ) ship based upon conduct and scholarship, more than that, they wanted to be a real blessing to younger girls and to the coll ege i n genera\. Many meetings were held and work outlined for the club. The path o f the G. H. C . was not al l sunshine and roses, however. On one occa­ s i on when they were having an important meeting, the door was locked from the outside and they were forced to remain i n session for sometime. Another time they were very much surprised to learn that a di scussion o f some i mportance had been overheard by some of the col lege boys, and of course was broadcast. But even this did not discourage the girls, and by gri m determination and hal'd work they were able to put it over. One of the times most enjoyed by the members was a slumber ( 1 ess ) party at the Girls' dormitory. At about six-thi rty o'clock in the evening one could see girls comiI1g from every di rection, and by seven-thirty there were about twenty-five girls pI'esent, ready to initiate all those who were late. By nine o'clock there were about forty present. After playing many l ively games and stunts-,fol 1owed by a man less wedding -sandwiches, hot coffee and chocolate were served, and the time had arri ved to find a place to sleep. B eds were made on the floor in the parlor and halls. AfteI' telling bedtime stories for an hour or two the gi rls were ready for bed. Then the scrambl e began ; but l o ! when several of the girls turned back the covers, the bed was ful l o f pop-corn : then began t h e search f o r a new bed : p i l l o w s began to fl y , a n d covers t o disappear. The repeated groans from those who w e r e beginning to f e e l t h e need of sleep, the laughter and chatter o f those who were m i nus covers, room or pillows, could be heard. At one o'clock the l i ghts fli ckered and then went off, and they were in total darkness. Some got quiet for awhile, then began the grand chorus by Ru' Constance and lVliss Sherman snoring. This was broken into by B rownie crawling up over the transom i n an adjoining room, cal ling for help. Final ly after much per­ suasion from Miss Morris every one was quiet except for Naomi's and Vernal ' s con­ tinual calls to each other which fi nally wore out ; as the cl ock struck four not a sound could t e heard, except the soft whisper o t Eli zabeth, as she sai d, "Let's turn," and then the call of Emma, "\Vhere i s all of our cover ?" At five o'clock the crowd was brought to l i fe by an alarm and the lceating of tin pans, and then the scramble to dress began. But alas, every one was minus some article of apparel. " \Vho was the gui lty culprit ? " \:Vho would be mean eno ugh to hide the i r things ? vVel l . b y n i n e o'clock a l l w e r e c lothed a n d in thei r right m inds ( except I v a ) declaring it a \\'onderful night. a n d t h e G. H. C . organization t h e best in t h e world.

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_ _ _ _


Arrow Con test 'vVe a r e pleased to announce t h e following prize w i nners : Literary : Bernice Gates Snapshot : Fi rst prize, Marguerite Van \Veelden Second prize, Alvin Markwel l .

Complaints Milton Smith compl ains o f being rushed for dates. Shelby \Villis complains of too many rules. Reginald Wil liams has a grudge against the faculty for refusing dates to those under seventeen. Naomi Bost complains of l i ving too close to campus. Mr. B l ackshear holds a grievance against the Arrow Staff for having to furnish a l l the brains. Professor M. A . \Vil son complains of not having anything to do. Elizabeth Alexander complains o f too many dates. I va Wright holds it against the AlTOW Staff for not having a "\Vhite A rtist." Perry Cunningham holds it against the faculty for not gl'anting him the honorary degree o f D . Mus. Vernal B l ack will always hold a grievance against the faculty for insisting on o l d fashion form of dress. Mildred Hicks complains o f over work. Raymond Ryan complains of growing pains. Byron Roberts complains of too much noise in boys' dormitory.

Want Ads of the Arrow Staff WANT ED-An extra pai r of trousers. Milton Smith . W A N TED-A b e d moved to staff room t o complete m y home. Shelby Will is. 'vV A N T E D-A good chaperon to accompany M i lton and me home from staff meeting. Naomi B ost. L O S T-One stick of gum between confectionery and College building. Eli zabeth Alexander. L O S T-Three hours in 'Freshman rhetoric. I va Wright. W A N TED-Hair-raising remedy. H. W. B lackshear. W A N TED-A pair of l onger trousers. Prof. \Vi lson. \V A N T E D-Quiet room to practice my cornet. Byron Roberts. F O R SALE-My ability as stump speaker. Reginald Williams. L O S T-Ten pounds of weight due to overwork on Arrow. Raymond Ryan. L O S T-A permanent wave. Finder please return to Vernal Bl ack. FOUK D-Di fficulty in finding my way home at 2 :00 A . M . from staff meeting. Mi ldred H i cks.

Contribu tors B E RT L U N DY GEORGE B RA N N O N B E R N I C E GATES MRS. R. E . G I L M O R E M R S . O . D. P E C K FLORENCE S N OW B AR G E R O. J. HOAG A. J . J O H N S O N

N I N A M c D O NALD ALMA R O GE R S ZELLA W E B B E R A D A McWILLIAMS C A R O L SPRUCE J EWEL McAN I N C H M I S S S HERMAN AL VIN MARKWELL


( Continued from page 24) 'vVe pick the swimmers up as we come to them. Carl catches one fellow floating by ; Willis another. I reach for a wet hand thrown up-it slips. I make a second frantic grab, and the shirt sleeve holds. U p to the side o f the boat I pull him, but the exhausted man has no strength to clamber in. I get my arm down under a l eg in the water, and the poor fellow i s saved. Our boat picked u p seven, two women and five men. The other boats were likewise busy, and it was thought that no l i fe was l ost. Our captain had hot coffee served to the chilled, dripping rescued ones, and those o f us who possessed dry coats or sweaters shared our fOl·tune with thei r misfortune. There were two incidents worthy o f note. My particular rescued man said, through chattering teeth, "I was pull ing my heavy, black sweater over my head, when I was knocked overboard. I got the thing off, and my arms loose, before I came to the surface, and luckily there was a l i fe preserver close at hand. But I had all my money and valuables in a pocket of that sweater." I then remembered the black thing we had seen floating by, and spoke to the captain, who cruised about and picked u p the missing garment. The second noteworthy incident was the pleasure I had i n finding a man after my own heart. H e came swimming toward us with his fish pole hel d high 1I1 one hand. Sadly we watched the flames complete their destructi on-the feared explosion, as the gasoline tank was reached-the convul sion , as of some live thing mortally stricken, then the plunge, the cloud o f smoky steam for a few moments, and the sea resumed its calm. Transferring our rescued ones to a boat starting for the harbor, we retllrned to the fishing grounds, where w e had good success. My seat neighbor, as we were approaching the harbor in the evening, remarked. after a long silence, "Well, w e ha' lost two fu' hours 0' gude feshin'."

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Seventy-sIx

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The ' ;College Picnic Frida;,', t h e thirteenth, daze ned clear a n d b right, February skies were blue-no clouds in sight. The college students of B. P. C. f;Vent on a picnic-happy and free. We met at the libmry at half past nine; Everyone ' (ws feeling fine As we started for Lincoln Park; Everyone singing like a lark. We arrived a t the Park at half past ten, A nd 'ÂŤ(;ere taking pictures, when Nina called for so'meone to go With her to the monkey's den. S a we all went up the hill to see A lion, ,a bear, and ,a monkey. Then we played three-deep Until we were ready to eat. We climbed the hill to go to lunch; f;Ve 'll ere hungry as could be-the whole bunch. We had sand'u icltes, salads, cookies, Bananas, oranges, a nd apples. After lunch, there were about twenty-one That got in the truck and had some fun. They got some water in buckets and cans, A nd we had a water fight on hands. A bout four o'clock the first truck left, A nd the thirteen that were left Strolled once to the lake shore To talk, and laugh, amd talk some more. At six 0'clock the second truck came A nd we thirteen from the lake shore came, Over to the b ridge and started for home, Glad that to Lincoln Park we had roamed. C. G. S. J. I. M.

Sel1ent]l-sel1en


The Mid - Winter Revival The wel l known evangelist J arrette a n d Dell Aycock w e r e engaged f o r our m i d ­ winter meeting. R e v . Aycock w a s converted at t h e a g e o f twenty, and s o o n afterward felt a cal l to preach. H i s ministry has been increased a great deal by his beloved wife who has stood by him so loyally. B rother A.ycock's messages are so profound, and yet, s o simple that all classes enj oy them. Then, besides thIs simpli city, the messenger possesses an excellent spi rit o f sin cerity which grips people. S i ster Aycock's unique method of presentation in the children's services is of the very highest type. She i s an adept i n the art of presenting to children the ideal s :;1 Christianity through pictures and other object lessons which have a lasting effect upon the i r minds. These workers w e r e very successful i n o u r midst. The altar was lined from end to end. extra chairs were placed, and the front benches were used repeatedly for the seekers. N o count was kept of the number who bowed at the altar, but a rough estimate i s about five hundred. The day services were full of grace, helpful to those who were established i n God, and instructive REV. J A.RRETT E AYCOCK to those who had newly found Him. There was much i n these services to impress Christians with the need of more personal work for Jesus Christ.

I

One o f the unusual features o f the revival was the selling of good l iterature among our people and their friends. Good books by Brother and S i ster Aycock, J . B . Chap­ man and C. A. McConnell were sold. Then, to climax all, Bethany holds the record for the l argest number of sub­ scriptions to the "Herald of Holiness" obtained in a single meeting. We had four reasons for putting over our sub­ scription list. First, we b el i eve in the "Herald o f Holiness" and those behind it. Second, l ike all other people and institu­ tions, we naturally like to head the l i st ; we l ike to be leaders. Third, we desire to help our fel low man. When we place the paper i n his hands we believe we are giving him some­ thing that will encourage h i m to seek and find God, ac­ quaint him with some o f the leaders i n God's work, and with one of the greatest institutions of God and the Church, MRS. DELL AYCOCK and especially the Church of the N azarene. Last, we wanted to help our school. The proposition was put in such a way by B rother Aycock as to be a direct blessing to the school. When the final count was made we had five hundred and seventy-one subscriptions. We do not desire to boast when we say that the students, faculty, and citizens of Bethany are a most loyal people.

Seventy-eight


The Inspi ration of the Bible S u c h i s t h e intrinsic excellence of Christianity that i t i s adapted to t h e wants of all, and it provides fO!' a l l , not only by its precepts and by its doctrines, but also by its evidence. The poor man may know nothing o f history, o r science, o r phi losophy ; h e may have read scarcely any book but the B i bl e ; he may be totally unable to vanquish the skeptic i n the arena o f public debate ; but he is, nevertheless, surrounded by a panoply which the shafts of infidel ity can never pierce. You may go to the home of the poor cottager, whose heart is deeply imbued with the spirit o f vital Christianity ; you may see him gather h i s l ittle family around h i m. He expounds to them the wholesome doctrines and princi ples of the B i ble, and, i f they want t o know the evidence upon which h e rests h i s faith of the divine origin o f h i s religion, he c a n tell them u pon reading t h e book which teaches Christianity h e fi n d s n o t o n l y a perfectly t r u e description o f h i s o w n natural character, b u t i n the provisions of this rel igion a perfect adaptation to all his needs. It is a religion by which to l ive, a religion by which to die ; a religion which cheers in darkness, rel ieves in perplexity, supports in adversity, keeps steadfast in prosperity, and guides the inquirer to that blessed land where "the wi d::erl cease from troubling, and the weary are at rest."

We entreat you, therefore, to give the B ible a welcome, a cordial reception ; obey its precepts, trust its promises, and rely implicitly upon that D i vine Redeemer whose rel igion brings glory to God in the h i ghest, and on Earth peace and good-wi l l to men. Thus w i l l you fulfill the noble end of your- existence, and the great God of the Universe w i l l be your- father and your friend ; and, when the l ast mighty convulsion shall shake the earth and the sea and the sky, and the fragments of a thousand barks, richly freighted with intellect and learning, are scattered on the shores of error and delusion, you r vessel shal l i n safety outride the storm, and enter i n triumph the haven of eternal rest.

I


Crossing the Bar Sllnset alld evelling star, And one cleO?' call for 11I C ! A lid lIlay there be no moaning of the bar, TVhen I put Ollt to sea, B ill sitch a (de as lIl oving seellls asleep, Too full for sound and foam, Wizen that

1:(

hich drew from out the boundless deep

Turns again home, Twiligh t and evening b ell. And after that the dark ! And lIIay there be no sad'lless of farewell, TVhen I embark; For tho' frolll alit 0111' b 0 1l rne of Time and Place The flood m ay bear 11Ie far, I h ope to sec my Pilot face to face VV hen I

have CI'OSt the bar, -Selected.

-.� :.. .... .

.

.�t��:·:J:�( ;i·.:�:���}ii::��==---�===".. Eighty


Eight}i-one


Editorial GREETIN GS : The sixth volume o f the Arrow is now before you. It is a reminder that another year of our school life is quickly coming to a close, and soon the curtain of time will have dropped on the scenes of its activities. A s a staff, we have earnestly striven to prepare this volume in such a way as to reflect the activities of the year in what is truly representative. The purpose herein is that the contents will be the means of keeping alive in our memories the pleasant happenings of this school year. And while endeavoring to make this truly

representative, we have also hoped to add to its attractiveness by carrying the I ndian theme throughout its pages. vVe wish to thank the student body for their cooperation, encouragement, and loyal support. 'liVe have also been stimulated a great deal by the kindness which the faculty has extended to us. vVe are not unmindful o f those, who, though not of our immediate number, have so kindly assisted us. \Vhatever degree of Sllccess we may have attained in this publication has largely been due to the efficient labor of the contributors. Desiring that this w ill fulfill the purpose for which it is prepared, we submit this volume for your perusal.

Eighty-two


Managerial Before you i s the f ruit o f one year's tireless endeavors of one o f the most loyal staffs with which any editor and manager could have the pleasure of associat足 ing. It is with pleasure and j oy that we have served the college as active workers of the 1 928 Arrow. We appreciate, sincerely, the earnest cooperative spirit of the entire student body toward this publication. The success of the Annual contest i s due t o the loyal support and interest o f the student body. Their different contri足 butions were greatly appreciated. It would be impossible however, to publish a book of this sort with only the support of the" student body. In order, therefore, to finance the publication we had to solicit a great deal of advertisement. We acknowledge thanks to the bu.,i足 ness men of Bethany, Yukon and Oklahoma City for their help in making this book possible. We owe a debt of gratitude which must be paid to our loyal churchmen who also helped us a great deal. Finally, we would not fail to express our \\"hole-hearted appreciati on to the faculty of Bethany-Peniel College fIJr their kind consideration. To the Arrow staffs of the future, we extend felicitations.


Advice to the '29 Staff I f you desire e l ection carry on a hearty campaign. B e sure to shave and dress up before electi on.

Votes are difficult to get.

Editor-Be sure that you have the office. See to i t that you have a congenial staff and that you have YOUl' best girl on it. During your summer vacat i on we would suggest that you rest and sleep, ror hard work an d sleepl ess n i ghts are sure to come to you. :t\ever get i rritated if some o f the members o f the staff decide to work. Business Manager-Practice your speech-making i n the summer, as you w i l l have no time to do i t after school has started. Coll ect all b i l l s promptl y ; never stand for procrastination on the part of your debtors. Develop a good nature and a stationary smi le, so that after receiving a good bawling-out you can invite i r r itated students to call again to pay thei r bills. I n formation i n Genera l : Explain ful ly all necessary procedures to Freshmen to avoid useless questions. Never promise a good picture to anyone ; demand payment for all pi ctures. A l a rge dictionary is a n ecessity, no knowledge i s needed. Post all notices upside down ; curiosity will prompt the students to read them. Always try to do your work backwards, so you wi 11 be sure to get it right. Get a supply o f smelling salts before all owing the gi rl s to see their proofs. Use the floor for a waste basket ; it doesn't fil l so easily. Always have a savi ngs account so you can entertain v i sitors. Keep dummy l ocked up ; some people are fond o f them. :\ ever tell anything outside the staff room.

Never work l ater than 2 :00 A. M . to help keep u p your studies.

I f possible, get on the good side o f a friend

Don't wony the advertisers by asking th em for their ad copy, wait unti l the day before the book i s to go to press, for they al ways have thei r copy ready and do not need a reminder. Having labored under the handicap o f ignorance ourselves, the staff of freely these short cuts on publ ishing an annual.

EightJi-four

1928 'give


Half-Holiday T h e sun shined s o brightly, and the breezes blew s o gently upon that day, that the student body could almost hear the call to the wi lds. School was goi n g as usual, the morning sli pped away and chapel was next i n order. It had been some time since the promise o f a half-holi day was given, which was to celebrate the Annual Contest. Perhaps this promise had sli pped from the minds o f many o f the students ; while the others were occupied with ordinary cares o f school l i fe . Chapel went as usual unti l at the l ast the announcements were being made, when the house was fi lled with noise resulting from the clapping of hands and the stamping of feet, reacting to the an足 nouncement that in fon11ed us the afternoon would be used for the hal f-holi day so long l ooked for.

I

I mmediately after dinner the students gathered around on the campus for an en 足 j oyable afternoon. The outstanding game of the afternoon was basket ball. The Uppel'classmen and Academy were the fi rst ones to play. The Freshies coul d b e seen on the side l i ne watching the team work of the Upperclassmen, for they must soon clash w i th them. They had chal lenged the winning team for a game and i t was not long unti l they saw that the Upperclassmen would be the i r rivals. The first game ended with a score decidedly in favor of the Upperclassmen. There were only a few mi nutes i ntervention until the game between the Upper足 classmen and the Freshmen was call ed. The battle was hard fought by both teams. But when the whi stle blew and the scol-e was counted i t was found to stand 18 to 16 in favor of the Upperclassmen. vVhile the last was going, the refreshmC'nts were being prepared. It was in front o f the Admini stration Building about five o'clock, that the refreshments were served. Sandwiches, cookies, and punch were the main constituents of the refreshments. These surely served the purpose for which they were intended this time. After being served so bountifully the gi rls decided that the day should not pass without their partici pating in something ; so the hal f-holiday was ended by a rousing game of basket ball played by the girls.

Eighty-six


( Continued from Page 29 ) on thei r way up.

vVith a j oyful shout the father called h i s daughter, and she hastened

to h i m. It was almost dark, and they realized that they had not a moment ' to l ose.

Getting

the d i rection, they hurried toward the place where the bush marked the lost trai l .

But

even as they hurried, breaking into a run, they felt the ground upon the steep mountain side begin to slip beneath their feet. happened.

In a moment M i lam Evans real i zed what had

The fall rains had saturated the thin earth above the smooth granite, and a

s l owly-moving landsl ide had obliterated their trail at that place-even now thei r steps were hastening its speed. He caught Jewel l up in his arms, and desperately raced across the now swiftly-moving mass.

Just as he grasped the solid rock upon the other side,

the ground over which he had been running sli pped completely o ff the rock, down, down the mountain s ide, with a thundering roar into the chasm hundreds of feet below. Mr. Evans drew his daughter close to his heart, and raising his eyes toward heaven, he thanked God for sparing their l ives.

Then he prayed that He would guide their

footsteps as they went on down the tra i l t o the brave l i ttle woman who awaited their return.

Eighty-seven


Boys Entertai ned the Girls T h e boys of this year gave t h e fi r s t entertainment for t h e gi rls ever given i n the h i story of the school.

Oftentimes the boys have been i nvi ted to the girls' Dormitory

to spend a social evening, but this was the fi rst time for the girls ever t o be invited to a social by the boys. The program of the evening consi sted of many interesting things w h i ch varied wi dely in style and type. ridiculous. B rannon.

It ranged from the ridiculous to sublime, from sublime to

The first number was a welcome address by the Preceptor, Mr. George M i ss Morris, the Dean of Women, responded to the welcome addl'ess in a

brief way. Then the fo llowing hour or two were fi l l e d with rousing good games. It was nearing ten when the refreshments were served. 'Followi llg this were the closing numbers, "Home, Sweet Home" ; Piano ,Solo, played by Paul Thompson, and "Show me the way to go home", sung by the Dormitory quartet.

Debating I n the fall of

1927

several of the j un i o r coll eges of Oklahoma formed a league for

debating and other forensic activities.

O w ing to the fact that earlier provi s i on had

not been made for this work, it was handicapped by l ack of time and proper financial support.

In spite of this several debates were I�e] d with othel' schools.

our teams put up won o r not.

a

In all of these

stiff fight and made i t interesting for every opponent whether they

Two traits stood out prominently in all our debaters.

high type of debating.

The first was their

Their speeches \I" ere not j ust memorized recitations.

showed flexi b i l i ty in meeting the argun:ents of their opponents.

at the main issues and used no tri ckery i n dodging difficult points. was their sportsmanship.

They

They drove straight The second trait

In the face o f defeats they kept their enthusiasm, their

cheerfulness, and their courteousness.

TI: e i r opponent as well as thei r friends were i m ­

pressed with these facts. Those who debated \"ere Paul Garrett, Herman

B u rton, O pa l Gilbert, Ha rreld

Garrison, and Gran v i l l e Rogers. W ith th i s year's valuable experien ce behind them, we bel ieve that from this group will come teams that w i l l be invincible in the years to come.

, ...�

:: --::::::::a<_, .:;��;j�·:; �J:'�:::':-::.:-:---

EightJi-eight

===----�""-� s=" ""'-----"'" ------= """" = -=: o ...=


Eighl];-nin2


Calendar SEPTEMBER

1 2. 13. 15.

16. 1 8. 20.

23.

26. 30.

Registration. Everyone read directions before asking questions. Convocation Address. Welcome, first school day we greet thee in song. Get acquainted socia l . F i rst norther arrives. D r . Wil liams talks in chapel. Ouch ! Don 't touch my sore arm. Uncle Buddie visits us. Upperclassmen have their first meeting. Freshmen spies found in desk. OCTOBER

1. 2. S. �.

1 4. 15. 19. 20. 21. 22.

Freshmen sympathizing w i t h some of thei r members. M il es a n d Hanford go through the belt row. Freshmen get upperclassmen's goat. Assembly starts. $55,000.00 raised on endowment fund for B. P. C. Freshmen have a party. Marguerite resigns as editor of "The AlTow." M i lton S mith elected. Upperclassmen colors flying everywhere. Freshmen put up thei r colors, but are astonished on the fol lowing morning to find that they have turned to red and black. U . C . L . seen in large l etters o n the water tower. They are erased soon after sunrise by Freshmen. 1. Vi. P. introduced as thi rd party at Delta Rho, to the amazement o f the other party leaders.

23.

It won't be l ong now.-Bro. McConne l l is expecting his new 'Ford.

26.

1. W. P . have an outing and decide to make the organization permanent. dead things permanent ? Mi lton & Shelby. )

27. 28.

Miss Sherman gives an art demonstration in chapel.

( Are

Hall owe'en party at Luna's.

29.

Meet on the corner and the ghost w i l l lead you to a Hall owe'en party.

31.

Dormitory papa gets wet as he goes out the door. N OV E M B E R

3.

Freshmen to gi v e program i n chapel , but wait i n vain for an aud ience.

4.

Freshmen in high spi rits-u pperclassmen have condescended to come to their program.

S.

Mrs. S . S. \iVhite announces i n chapel, "I have lost a green pencil-it's j ust l ike the one that Miss Sherman has i n her hand."

6.

Boys try to listen-in on 1. \V. P . meeting, but install m i crophone in the wrons' room.

1 1.

Mrs. Dr. 'Wi lli ams entertains Coll ege Gi rl s' Sunday School C lass.

1 4.

Freshmen victorious over Twelfth grade in basket bal l .

16.

Faculty vs. eleventh grade i n basket bal l.

T h e faculty puts up a b r a v e fight.

,,

::: -=c= :::::::o.o_..,, ,,::,·::,::-=--= ..l!'''.:.:.�i:,:�;L;·:>:,� '

'M.'�'''

Ninety

� _ _ _ _ _ ==-_ ...

"--_ � _ ::"' _ _ :::: = .= ._

_ _ _ _ _


DECEMBER 2.

College boys g o opposum hunt.

8.

The mid-winter revival begins.

College gi rls h a v e a slumiJer party.

12.

Dr. Riley from Minnesota v i sits us.

20.

Publ i c Speaking C l ass presents "The Gift of Time."

22.

S chool closes for Christmas hol i days.

22.

Publi c school gives C h r i stmas program.

30.

W i ener roast.

JANUARY

1.

Mrs. Peck resolves t o like Otis' dogs.

2.

Students return to school after holidays.

3.

School opens after h o lidays.

4.

Look out for the collectors.

7.

Girls take advantage of leap year.

8.

Girls' dormitory burns.

9.

G i rl s search i n ruins for lost treasures.

1 0.

Girls parade before the dress committee.

15.

New bui lding started.

Prof. W i l son : "And what would you l ike most to be when you grow ul' ?" N i n a : Very promptly, " S i x feet." Milton Smith : "Up in Arkansas w e b ave l ilac bushes fifty feet h i gh . " Browni e : " I w i sh I could l i lac that." Vernal : " \;Y b at's that bump on your head ?" Laila : " Oh that's where a thought struck me." Perry : " S ay, did you take a bath ?" Geron : "No, i s there one missing ?" M i s s Sherman : "James, what i s the height o f your ambiti on ?" James Garner : "Oh, she comes about to my waist." Naomi : "Why did you quit playing the pipe organ ?" I va : "I felt too childish playing with my feet." M i les : " S ay, Opal I sure put one over the rail road company." Opal : "How was that ?" M i les : "1 bought a round trip ticket and walked back home." Beulah Spel l : "You al ways do all the talking, Emma, and never l isten." Emma : "How ridiculous, I do. too. I 've heard every word I 've said."

Ninet))-one


17.

New papa for dormitory boys.

1 8.

Preacher's convention.

19.

Naomi announces publ icly that she expects to be a preacher's wi fe.

20.

Exams ! ! ! ? ? ?

21.

Registration for second semester.

22.

Prof. and M rs. B racken return from the University of Cal i fo rn i a .

23.

P r o f . B racken talks i n chapel.

23.

U. C . L. buried.

24.

Fresh ies surpri sed to find U. C . L.'s spirits around.

25.

E s s i e gives announcement party i n honor of Lyster 2 n J Lacy.

27.

Upperclassmen have overal l and apron party.

29.

Kaomi Sheldon gets het- first date with Carlis Haught.

30.

Freshmen announce that they want some competition in the snap shot contest.

Freshmen have leap year party.

F E B RUARY

I

1.

They get it.

The upperclassmen win i n the contest.

2.

Upperclassmen win b a ll game over Freshies.

A rchie 'W i l son was i n vited out to dinner. He was asked to give thanks. Not knowing what he was supposed to d o he was told to say what his father usually said at the beginning of the meal . " O h, yes," said the boy. "Go l i ght on the butter, kids, i t i s fifty cents a pound." Prof. McConnell : John, make u p a sentence with the words, deta i l , defense and defeat i n them. J 011\1 : Yes, ma' sar. De-feet of de-cat went over de-fense before de-ta i l . Marguerite : I want a p a i r o f stockings. Clerk : S i lk or cotton hose, madam ? Marguerite : You misunderstood me, I said a pair of stock ings. Prof. Wil son had asked time and again for the students to put some personal touch into thei r themes, so the paper he received from Alvin ended thus : "VV e1J , professor. how are the wife and k i ddies, and could you l end me $:; J"

Ninety-tn,c


BETHANY - PENIEL COLLEGE Accredited Full Four Yea rs for 1 928

Offers for your consideration, the following eight points : 1.

Ample Buildings and Equipment

2.

University Trai ned Teachers

3.

A. Hi story Unexcelled by other Holiness Schools

4.

,Expenses :Much L ovver than other Schools of its Class

5.

Self-help Secured f o r many o f t h e Students

6.

A Clean, Religious Atmosphere

7.

A Progressive Building Program

8.

Permanency-Growing Endowment of $275 ,000 B ethany-Peniel builds character.

Character h a s etern al v alues.

Address : Rev. S . S. White,

M.A.,

B . D . , President

B ethany, Oklahoma

Ninety-three


Nazarene Youn g Peop le's Society Western Oklahoma District "Lift Up Now Thine Eyes and Look" Gen. 1 3 : 1 4- 1 j D ISTRICT OFFICERS JAM E S GARNER, Pres. Bethany, Okla. AYJJIFFE GARRE T rr , Sec 'y-Treas. Erick, Okla. GEO. W. BRANNON, Dist. Evangelist Bethany, Okla. CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES Florence Lundy Organization Blackwell , Okla.

Geo. VV. Brannon, Evangelist Bethany, Okla. Ruby Lundy, lVI is5ionary Blackwell, Okla. 1\ orene

Southall, L iterature

Altus, Okia� YI

rs.

Lotti e Ester, Convention Oklahoma City, 5 1 2

W.

"A" St.

JA�\1E S GARN ER, President The success of the Nazarene church of tomorrow is dependent upon her youth of today ! The N . Y . P. S. organization is a distinct department of the Church and for the specific purpose of preparing the young people of our church for the responsiblities of the church of tomorrow. Our aim is to glorify God and to further the cause of H oliness on earth. We solicit your prayers and co-operation.

L

Ninei]}-four


BETHANY CHURCH of the NAZARENE

A . L . PARROTT, M.A., B.D. College Pastor R. E . G ILMORE, M.A.

Assistant Pastor

M OTTO : "GO, GROW, GLOW." We are striving earnestly to meet the spiritual needs o f the people. There are no faction5, on essentials we have unity, on non-essentials charity. A whole足 some spiritual atmosphere prevails and an old time revival i5 on the year around. We are keenly conscious of our responsibility and shal l do our best for the wel fare of your sons and daughters. \1\' e solicit an interest in your prayers.

Ninel'y-five


J . A. WHITE General Merchandise Bethany, Okla.

G ree tings to the Friends of B. P. C. \Ne welcome you to Bethany and to our STORE S . Since the l SSl1 l11g o f the last annual we haye added t o our stock and o p ened u p a ne,"

C ASH GROCERY STORE Our Dry Goods Department is complete in suits, shoes, hosiery, piece goods and :'Ien路" work clothes. Sa tisfa ction can be fo u n d for the m ost daint3' a p p e t it e .

Try some o f our Fresh 1i l ea ts, staple co1l n e d goods, and green vegetables

Your" to please, ] . A. WI-I I T E

]. A . w m T E

Ninety-six

W H IT E' S CA S H GROCERY


Henryetta, Oklahoma First Church of the Nazarene Our church is located i n the heart o f this beaut i ful little city o f ten thousand. vVe have a Sunday School of an average of more than 350 and also four strong societies, Y. P. S., Intermediates, Junior, and W. 1\1 . S. Our aim is to offer a helping hand to all who are in need, and to keep within our walls the old time spiritual fervency for which our great church stands. GEO.

H.

HARM O N , Pastor

MRS. G. H. HARMON

N inet!)-selJen


We boost for you-Do you boost for us ?

A growing Bank in a School town

FARMERS STATE BANK S. H. B U N DY, Pres.

J O H N STO C KTON, Cashi er

H. E. Leonhart

C. H. Norris,

General l\'Ianager

Local Manager

KIOWA LUMBER CO. "Every Stick A Dry One " Owning Your Own Home Spells Happiness and Contentment. May we be of Service to You ?

·KIOWA LUMBER CO. Yard� at Bethany Oklahoma City

Enid Morris

Ninet)!-eight

Shawnee

Okmulgee


Ninety-nine


BETHANY -PENIEL COLLEGE ' '';u

H a s made o u r town what it i s today.

Theref �re we believe our town should be 1 00 per cent boosters for our school and church. Our aim is to accomplish this by locating families who wish to enroll their\ children in the Bethany-Peniel College . ;'$"

.•

IF YOU WANT TO BUY e have a large listing, including tracts, houses and farms.

IF YOU WISH TO RENT We can rent you a home a t a reasonable price

OUR MOTTO

S ;;

INSURANCE

AFETY

RENTALS

ERVICE ATISFACTION

REAL ESTATE

"

BETHAN� REALTY CO. w.

H . CREECH

Office : Interurban R. R. Station.

One Hundred

>1'

J . N . BALES

I SA� C REE D Phone No. 3


We want you as one o f our 5atisfied customers

Sanitary Grocery and Market F. V. CAIN, Proprietor Phone 5

School Supplies

Hardware

BOND'S PHARMACY Drugs, Candies and Cold Drinks vYhere the Patrons and Students of

Bethany-Peniel College Trade

We Appreciate Your Patronage

JOKES Pro f . Garner : Emma, gIve what you consider the most important date In all history. Emma : The one Anthony had with Cleopatra. Iva : I'll take a banana split. ]vL r. Sherrill : Oh go ahead and take a "vhole one I 've got the money to pay for it. Pro f. G ilmore : \iVho can name one important thing we have now that we did not have a hundred years ago. M ilton : Me !

M APLE 2060

WALNUT 2060

THE HOME UNDERTAKERS WATTS

& McATEE

Ambulance Se rvice

" O UR SERVICE A SACRED TRUS T"

1 1 07 North Robinson

Oklahoma

City

One Hundred one


OUR STATION CANNOT PRAISE TOO HIGHLY BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE

There is noth ing reasonable we will not do for its students. Paul and Joyce are 1 00 per cent Boosters for the schoo1.

HIGHWAY MOTOR CO. Gasoline, Oils, Accessories, Mechanical work.

PAUL

HOAG

PHONE

91

JOYCE

All that many people ask of their bank i s safety for their money, convenience of location, courtesy and accuracy of servIce. Others desire the bene fit of wide busi ness experience and a contact with progressive business men. I f you belong to either group, your account belongs in this

bank.

Everybody's

One Hundred lwo

Bank

M e mber F e d e ral Reserve System

JOHNSON


BETHANY -PENIEL COLLEGE

Combi n es the B est Thorough Scholarship w i th Genu ine Spirituality足 So We S upport H er A n n u al Publication-The Arrow

Compliment

DeLUXE CONFECTIONERY Our Fountain the Mecca for the Thirsty

BETHANY, OKLA.

J. M. DAVIS, Proprietor

One Hundred three


( ( Your Horne Should Come Firs t J J B EAUTIFY I T W I T H

- SPIVEYS FURNITURE Household Furnishings, Stoves, Carpets, Rugs ((

WE D O " TRUST YO U OKLAHOMA CITY

228-230 W. Califo路rnia

{ Phone Phone M-0811 M-0812

PROFESSOR GILMORE TO TRADE :

Fresh Goat Milk for Fresh Honey

"THA T'S THE TOP NO TCH FO R DIET"

Bethany, Okla.

Phone 124

SAPULP A NAZARENE CHURCH REV. F . R. McCO N N E L L, Pastor OUR AIM : Always to lend a helping hand .

" We are in full sympath路y with our Schools."

One Hundred four


ARKANSAS DISTRICT CAMP MEETING July 26 to Aug. 5, 1 928

Workers :

Dr. A. O. H E N DRIX, DR. ANDREW JOHNSON, M I S S RUTH HARRIS.

Location :-

Two M iles North of Little Rock on Fort Smith State Highway

JOHN "y\'. OLIVER, District Superintendent.

PARRISH PLUMBING & ELECTRIC CO. QUALITY AND SERVICE

Pla rrish Plumbing and El ectrical Wiring is satisfaction guaranteed to you. We sell gas hea ters and Roper gas ranges. The best stoves on the m arket. E ureka Vacuum Cleaners, M ay tag Washing M achine, American Beauty, and the Westinghouse A u tomatic I rons, Chande足 li ers of q uality and bea uty, National M azda lamps, and many other Electrical Appli ances.

Call 1 03 for a Plumber, Electrician or Appliances needed We are at your service We make a Specialty of Repair Work

Telephone I 03-34W One Hundred fi1>e


R. ALEX WELLS STUDIOS SPECIALI STS I N SCHOOL PORTRAITS

CA LENDA R-- ( Con tin ued) FEB RUARY 3. 4. 6. 9. 1 0. 12. 14. 1 7. 1 8.

20. 24. 27.

Mrs. 'White entertains T uniors and Seniors. Debaters go to Lawton : Fletcher McLain ha5 to stay in detention. Debating team entertains in chapel. Delta Rho goes on a picnic. Dr. W iley visits. Staff works all night. Pro f. \iVilson warns girls in chapel to get an education, they may have to make their own living-there are not enough boys to go around. Pro f . and Mrs. Wilson entertain Sophomores. Pro f . Sanford talks in chapel. Cameron College comes to debate. Good English week.

CAMPUS STORE The Students Store

ENULA TOOTH PASTE Removes Stains Kills Pyorrhea

Lunch

Eliminates Tartar

Ice Cream Candies and Sodas

Made in Bethany

HARPER BROTHERS

One Hundred

six


Pennolene Lubricating Oils and Greases

PINK-O-RED GASOUNE

" Service with a Smile"

I t will p ay you to make this station a regular stop We deliver free

BETHANY SERVICE STATION Residence Phone 68-R

P h one 97

H. E. PALMER, Prop.

Better Motoring

Full size gum dipped balloons Also

Oldfield, Courier and Airway

BETHANY SERVICE ST ATION Main Street

Phone 97 WE DO VULCANIZING

On the Corner

Res. Phone 68-R

One Hundred sellen


BETHANY BARBER SHOP

HOME FEED & PRODUCE CO. B E THANY, OKLA.

STUDENT HEADQUARTERS

A. H. WALLACE, Prop.

For

We Appre c i a t e S e l l ing You

BARBER WORK

Our

WALTER DAME RON, Proprietor

Feed

We Buy Produce and Cream

MODERN DAIRY COMPLIMENTS

Equipped with Frigidairs

and

Milking

of

Mac;hines

S . L . MAPES Phone 33 - R

J O H N A. D E N N EY

Permanent Waving, Water Waving", Finger Waving, Marcelling, Facials, Sham足 pooing, Hair Dyeing, Scalp Treatment

The Bobette Shop (Over

Hartwells)

Ladies Hair Cutting by

Men

Approved Marinello Phone Maple VIRGIL 132Y:,

W.

GREEN,

Main

Experts

Shop

Pressure Cooker

Burpee Can Sealer Cans and Canning Supplies Phone 122-W

1226 Owner

Oklahoma

NATIONAL

W. T. City

Stockett

B ETHANY, OKLA.

GET YOUR TREES

Buy your Flour, Feed,

From

Seed and Ice

BETHANY NURSERY

At The

Prices are Reasonable

Bethany Mill and Feed Supply

Stocks a" good as can be grown

We do custom grinding

W. T. FAIN, Proprietor

One Hundred eight

'vV. F. Weiszbrod, Prop.

Phone 1 04


UP-TO-DATE CLEANERS

Men's Suits Cleaned and Pressed

Ladies' Suits and Plain Dresses

_ __ _ _ _

50c

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

75c

Phone 1 2

E. E. LYKINS, Prop.

O NCE UPON A TIME足 MANY, MANY MOONS AGO ! A i r c a s tles were b e i n g b u i l t d u r ing t h o s e r a re s ummer n i g h t s of J u n e . h e r the world was y o u r s i f she would say the word

You told

"Yes I " S h e s t a r t e d out on t h e h i g h r o a d o f happiness wi th y o u toward one o f t h o s e air c a s t l e s a n d b e f o r e l o n g y o u were s ki d d i n g from o n e r e n t e d h ou s e ,to another. Son, i t is time you put on chains. Come i n t o t h e Local B ui l d in g a n d Loan A s s o足 ciation a n d l e a r n how e a sy it is to own your home with small monthly payments. Let your l i f e partner h a v e a h o m e of her own. The k i n d s h e dreamed about under -that summer moon-t h e k i n d she still i s dreaming about. O u r rate of $1 1 .'50 p e r month p e r t h o u sand dollars b o r r owed i s easy t o pay. Come i n . Let u s t a l k p l a i n facts. R. O . B REWER, M anager.

The LOCAL B UILDING A ND LOAN A SSO CIA TION Okla homa City

First and Robinson Phone Walnut 1 1 46 E . L. Bozarth, Treasurer W. T. Hales, President J. H. Everest, Counsellor C. F . Colcord, First Vice- Pres. A. Weisman, S ecretary R. O. Brewer, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. J. W. Everest, Assistant Secretary

One Hundred nme


Artists Material, Picture Frames, Wall Papers, Window Glass, Paints, Varnishes" Leads and Oils

WE SELL

CLOTHES

G. P. & w. (Successors to)

Eastland

Wall

Paper

Phone Walnut 0183

& Art Company 1 1 8 N . Broadway

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA.

Across from the College Oklahoma City,

Campus Green

Walter T.

Is the M i d-way B arber Shop White and Clean

Okla.

Vahlberg

Falls,

Texas

L.

Sorey

Thomas

SOREY & VAHLBERG ARCHITECTS 306·7

We appreciate your patronage

Braniff

Building

Telephone Walnut 7080 OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA.

LOYD NELSON, Manager

Phones

Wichita

W·2912-M · I 082

OKLAHOMA CITY

Compliments of

3 0 lA West Main; 1 03 North Harvey

Mistletoe Shoe Rebuilders Sixteen

Work

Called Shine

Years

For

in

Business

and' D elivered

Free

H. E. MUSSON CO. A Booster For A B igger and Better Bethany, also A Successful Bethany-Peniel College

Parlor in Connection Grain E xchange Bldg.

Felix Lee, Prop.

Mrs. Felix Lee,

Oklahoma City

Sec.

Harris : Wilma, what happened when your father told Raynolds he should put away something � or a rainy day ? W ilma : Why in a few days dad's raincoat disappeared.


The New Spring Styles for College Men are Here ! Scores o f Hart Schaffner & Marx & Knight Beck Suits (two pants) and Top Coats in all of the new Spring shades are now ready for your inspection. Among them you'll find values to de­ light the most exacting. And too, Stetson Hats, Smith's Smart Shoes, as well as all apparel Il�cessary to the College man' s wardrobe in style:, authentic to the last detail.

KNIGHT BECK & CO. 107

Main

BEAVERS PAY AND SAVE STORE Bethany, Okla.

TO OUR FRIENDS A ND CUSTOMERS : We can't arrange words in a suitable way to express our appreciation for your patronage, confidence and loyalty. The supreme confidence with which hundreds of people that trade with us should be an inducement and recommendation for you to trade at Beavers. MONEY CAN NOT BUY BETTER GOODS THAN

"FIRST PICK", "DEL MONTE", "R.B.M." and "QUAIL" BRANDS CANNED FRUITS A N D VEGETABLES B y comparison you will find that we sell these HIGH QUALITY Goods at the price o f ordinary canned good:,. Every week we have a large list of special lines of these higl;1 class goods on sale and we invite you to come in and get our prices. You will find that we can save you mOiley. ARTHUR B EAVER.

One Hundred eiel>en


KU NDERER'S POPULAR P R I C E

CAFE and CAFETERIA . 6 : 3 0 A. M . to 7 : 45 P . M.

1 1 : 00 A. M. t o 2 : 30 P. M . 5 : 00 P . M. to 7 : 45 P . M. CLOS E D

1. 2. 3. J.

7. 5. 6. 6.

S U NDAY

CA LENDA R- ( Continued) MARCH H igh School Seniors have sneak day. Debate-Tonkawa vs. Bethany. M ilton Smith's suit in pressing shop. He "ends Bert to fill his date. Bro. McConnell gets tired waiting for his Ford s o he buys a \i\Thippet. Prof. White's new hat gnawed on by the rats before he gets to wear it. Carol Spruce loses h e r heart o n Physics Class picnic. Pro f. Gilmore prove" in psychology that he knows nothing. Pep service for track meet.

OUR BANK IS YOUR BANK

Everyone here i s a t your service, we are happy t o s e e you. An intelligent, progressive band awaits you here.

YUKON NATIONAL BANK YUKON, OKLAHOMA

FOR S A LE ... THE EARTH I buy, sell and exchange property anywhere in the United States. W rite or Call

DAN BIVINS BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

One Hundred IDlelve

Phone 70


" Maximum Service jar Minimum Cost"

But

MAXIMUM EFFI C I E N C Y

VIe Believe in

I s N e c e s sa r y

and Boost for

is

Assured

only

when

Your

Eyes

BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE

ARE WORKING P E RFECTLY

DR. FARMER, O ptometrist

LOGSDON�S

DAIRY

Exclusive Optical Specialist

Suite

718

First

Nat'l

Bank

Bldg.

F. P. LOGSDON, Prop.

Oklahoma City

Phone M. 7950

T E N N I S & GYM

S HOES

APPRECIATIVE

LAD I E S ' R I D I N G & H I K I N G BOOTS, also

OUTING

OFFICER'S

TOGS BOOTS,

LEAT H E R OUTING

Phone 33 - M

AND

FOR

LAD I E S .

S HOES

AND

P U TT E E S­ WORK

CLO T H E S

FOR M E N AND BOYS

TENTS AND CAMP EQU I P M E N T

Anderson

Brothers,

O f the kindly feeling eXlstmg be­ tween our establishment and the citi­ zens o f Bethany, the faculty and stu­ dents of Betbany-Peniel College, we subscribe our name and ask that they visit us when they a re in need o f Better Printing.

Inc.

ARMY & NAVY STORE

Prompt Publishing Company P hone Walnut 1 403

212 West Grand Avenue

Opposite Colcord Buil ding

OKLAHOMA

CITY,

OKLAHOMA

1007

S. Walker

Oklahoma

City

One Hundred thirteen


Bethany Cafe Try O u r Restaurant for Good EATS

We Serve Well

R. G. JOHNSON, Manager

CALENDAR-- ( Continued)

8. 9. 10. 12. 1 3. 14. 1 6. 23. 30. 6. 6.

MARCH French classes give program in chapel. Music department gives Irish program. Prof. White takes a few students to Shawnee. Girls move into new dormitory. Boys quartet go to S. S . Convention at Guthrie. Annual goes to press. Junior-Senior Banquet. Piano-voice graduation recital. M r:;. Halton and Threadgill Robinson. Expression recital. Vernal Black. A P RIL Track Meet. John':; and Cat's wedding day.

The BETHANY TRIBU NE

Phone M - 4338

DR. L. E. GLASS DENTIST Suite 323 Perrine

One Hundred fourteen

Bldg.

FOR SALE My latest book on how to grow tall. It's a bargain. N I N A McDON ALD


Complim ents of

TIBBS.DORSEY MFG. CO. Oklahoma City, Okla. MANUFACTURERS OFHigh Grade Mill Work Bank and Store Fixtures Interior Marble LOOK AT THE PEW S

IN

BETHAN Y.PENI EL COLLEGE AUDITORIUM

-We Made Them-

RESPECT... for you, respect for ourselves, reverence for bereavement ; these are the high guiding creed i n a rel i able modern, and modera te Service.

STREET & DRAPER Funeral Directors 920 North Robinson Walnut

PHONE

1 1 20

MAPLE

7982

The LUNDBERG ENGRAVING CO. E NGRAVED

STAT I O N E R Y

School Invitations, Wedding Invitations, Announcelnents a n d Reception Cards

128 WEST SECOND STREET

One Hundred six/een

OKLAHOMA CITY


Complimen ts of LUSCO BRICK AND STONE CO. FACE B RICK Com.mon B rick

Hollow B l d g. Tile CARTHALITE STONE

" There is no Substitute tor Quality" 806 Amer:can Bk. Bldg.

13. 20. 27.

1. 4.

11. 1 8. 19. 20. 23.

Ok:ahoma City

CA LENDAR- ( Continued) A PR I L Voice- Piano graduation, M i sses Bost and Wright. Senior Play. Oratorical contest of Junior college Forensic League. MAY � Iove up Day. Expression Recitai-� I isses Shull and Reed . Expression Recital-�1 isses Downs and Fl icks. Expression Recital-Laila Kesler. Glee Club-Program. Baccalaureate. Commencement Address.

JASPER SIPES CO. OKLAHOMA CITY DEALER S

IN

FU RNITU RE

SCHOOL and CHURCH S C HOOL S U P P L I E S

S C H OOL

O P E RA C H A I R S

BOOKS

Since 1889

INVE ST IN BUILDIN G AN D LOA N

We pay 6 % on i n v e s t m e n t s , and have never paid l e s s than 8% on monthly s a v i n g s . VyThy place y o u r funds where the earnings are l e s s and the s a fe t y i s uncertain ? In the past five y e a r s \\ e have paid

$140,000.00 in Dividends to over l(X)O s a t i s fied investors

Ask Them Capital

Full

$3,500,Oao.OO

i n formation

on

application

MUTUAL SA VINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION Oklahoma City 18 North Robinson

Phone M-6346 CREECH

AND

BALES,

RESIDENT

AGENTS

One Hundred selienleen


FIRST MORTGAGE LOAN CO., Inc. CAP ITAL and SURPLUS $105,000.00

Quick Service and Most Reasonable Terms on straight Five Year Loans on Improved Oklahoma City, Bethany, N orman, and Edmond Property ; also Adj acent Improved Acreage Tracts.

v

315 N . H a r ey Street Oklahoma

City,

U. M . BAUGHMAN,

Pres.

F. R. BULL, Vice· Pres. & Sec'y.

Okla.

A. W. KRUEGER, Asst. Sec'y.

JOKES GRIN A1\D BEAR IT.-'·The up-to-date girl does not cry," says a critic. No. Look at the price of face powder !-London Opinion. NEED FOR A POLOGY.-Mr. Rogers-· · The idea of letting Vera tell every­ body she ha5 made a man of you. You don't hear my wife saying that about me." James-" No, but I heard her tell Smith that she had done the best she could. "-Amherst Lord leff. CALL FIDO.-Diner ( fi nally ) - . "Anyhow, waiter, I wont eat such food ! You'd better fetch the manager. " Waiter-"That's no good, sir. H e wouldn't eat it !"-London Opinion. NOSY PERSON .-' · Have you a good landlord ?" "Excellent. His only fault is an overwhelming curiosity ; he is al ways asking when I am going to pay my rent. -B os t o n Transcript. M UST BE A SETTER-Jake : What makes that dog howl 50 ? Jones : J ust laziness. Jake : Does that make a dog howl ? Jones : It does this one. He's sitting on a cactus and is ton lazy to get off. "

L. A. RIDINGS Building Contractor

Home Builder of Bethany

PHONE 7 1 -R

One Hundred eighteen

BETHANY, OKLA.


CLOTHES DO HELP MAKE A MAN

BETHANY CLEANERS

PHONE 1 0

"White Boys"

K E N D A L L & H AN FORD

O FFICIAL M ER CHANTS 路 FOR

International Made-to-Measure Clothes

One Hunderd nine/een


Classified Ads WANTED :

Some good Rat poison.

LOST :

S. S. WHITE.

\,yill buy a French "Pone" that CCin be ridden by a small child.

A perfectly good voice. EMMA ROBERTS.

Would like to have a few special privileges. MARGUERITE VAN WEELDEN.

B ERT LUN DY.

WANTED : Adaline."

A few copies o f "Sweet

PAUL GARRETT.

WANTED : To get in touch w ith a school where 110 studying is required. HAN FORD WHITE.

FOR SALE :

A supply of dignity.

LORENCE SNOWBARGER.

LOST :

One Peck of Oat�.

l\J RS. J. HESTER FISHER OTI S D . PECK.

WAK TED : An easy way to some money.

make

P.-\UL T H O M PSON.

WAN TED :

A date.

CON STANCE S PRUCE.

LOST :

:\1y Algebra Key. C. O. M OORE.

All kinds of hard wood. Just removed from my upper story. AUDRY GATES.

O n e Hundred twenty

WANTED : To know why Jewel N eal is taking Home Economics. HENRY HUGHES.


t w t. e i l e J.. {!. !,

h e.. e.. h ďż˝ t'- l

One Hundred twenty-one


J O KES M rs. Rogers : Do you really think sardines are healthy ? Clerk : Well, madam I never heard one complain. Paul Thompson : I j ust heard the new girl singing in the kitchen. a cuckoo. Pellum H aun : She may be a cuckoo, but she is no cook.

She

1 :;'

Sibyl Hooper : Will you let me ki ss you i f I give you a. penny ? Stanton White : "A penny !" he exclaimed. " \Vhy I get more than that for taking castor oil." Mrs. Riggs : I 'll teach you to make love to my girl, old boy. Paul Thompson : I wish you would, for I am not making much headway. M r. Haag : How is it that I never see you at church any more ? Mr. Balckshear ; M aybe it is because I am not there. Prof. vVhite : ( About M is:;, Morris. ) How modestly she dresses and how sensible. Emma : Yes, that woman will do anything to attract attention. J. E. Lege : M iss Reed doesn't show her age, do you think ? Brannon : No, i f you mean that she points it out in the family Bible. Perry : I saw you at church Sunday. Bert : Well I never noticed you. Perry : I suppose not. You see I took the collection. M isdirected endearments. Mr. Lege : I always kis:;, the stamps on your letters 'cause I know that your lips have touched them. Bertha : Oh dear, and to think that I dampened them on Fido's nose. Granville Rogers : My wi fe and I agree on everything. Mr. Burton : Have you no opinions of your own ? Mrs. Gates : Why don't you bob your hair ? Eva Woodruff ; I can't decide on the style. it look like a whisk broom or a feather duster.

I don't know whether to have

Kendall Wh ite : \Vho told you to put that paper on the wall ? Decorator : Your wife, sir. Kendall : Pretty, isn't it ? Mild Disapproval.-Dr. Henry Coward say!'. that j azz is boisterous, blatant, grotesque, hideous , degrading, demoralizing, a sacrilege and a crime. I gather that there is something about j azz that Dr. Coward doesn't altogether l ike.-The Pass颅 ing Show ( L ondon. ) No Publicity Wanted.-A man attacked by two highwaymen put up a terrific fight. Finally he was overcome and searched. All they found on him was a dime. The bandits were amazed. " Say," exclaimed one, "you don't mean to tell us you put up a battle like that for a measly dime. Why, we almost had to kill you." " Well," answered the victim, "the truth of the matter i!'. I didn't want my financial condition ex po sed."-Bosto n Tra1'lscript.

One Hundred twenty路two


Use the Interurbans

Service of the Oklahoma R ailway Company n ever wlas better. Tracks on i nterurban l i n es have been b allasted, and the m argin of safety, as w el l a s speed has been i n creased. Remember ! There are no parking worries when you get into the heart of the c i ty i f you use the i n terurbans, street cars and busses.

OKLAHOMA RAILWAY COMPANY

S PECIAL PROGRA M S OF THE YEAR Nov. 18. Walter S . M ills. Dec. 1 2. Dr. Riley. Feb . 1 2. Dr. Wiley. Feb. 24. Cameron College Debates home team. Dec. 20. Gift of Time. March 9. Irish Program. Sept. 26. Uncle Buddy. March 23. Mrs. Halton and Threadgill Robinson presented in plano and voice recital. March 30. Expression recital.-Vernal Black. April 1 3. Voice and Piano graduation recital. Naomi Bost and Iva Wright. April 20. Senior play. April 27. Oratori cal contest of Junior College Forensic League. May 4. Expression graduation recital.-Hazel Schull and Alice Reed. May 1 1 . Expres:,ion Recital.-Marion Downs and Ruby H icks . May 18. Expression Recital.-Laila Kesler. May 19. Glee Club Program. M ay. 20. Baccalaureate. May 23. Commencement Address.

One Hundred twenty-three


One Hundred twenty-four


Check Your Requirements and Call Us ForLETTER H EA D S E N V ELOPES I NVOICES STATEMENTS FOLDERS BOOKLETS CATALOGS BLANK OR

BOOKS

A N YTH I N G

THAT'S

P R I NTED

THE WARDEN COMPANY 6 1 8路20 WEST G R A N D OKLAH O M A C I T Y , OKLA. TELEP H O N E WALN U T 0 5 1 2

One Hundred in>eniJl-filJe


P HOTOGRA P H S

O n e Hundred twenty-six


A UTOGRA P H S

O n e Hundred twenty-seven


One Hundred tJlJent:y-eight



1928 Arrow