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ROBERTA POSEY, EDITOR

PHIL DUFF, ASSOCIATE EDITOR

ERNIE FARMER, BUSINESS MANAGER

CAROL LUNDY, &�NSOR

c H A R A c T E R * c u L T

u R E

Published by

* c H R I s T

The Student Body of BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE Bethany, Oklahoma

1


1

We pattern our lives ...

College life in any school always presents new, fascinating and unforeseen experiences, yet experiences which are eagerly anticipated. In the year 1955-56 BNC reached new planes of success for students and faculty alike in both the hoped-for and the long-sought-after when it stepped through the door of vision into the reality of national

accreditation by North Central

Association and actual construction of a

$300,000

boys'

dormitory. Even a new name was adopted, and many of the dreams that belonged to the former Bethany足 Peniel College became realities in the new Bethany Nazarene Co11ege. Not left behind this door of dreams but carried through with progress was the motto of the co11ege around

which countless students have

patterned their lives. It has never been just a dream on the campus of BNC but has always been a reality. It is for this reason that the 1956 ARROW carefully en足 velopes the old dreams and the new actualities in the real and vital principle-a principle which has again this year guided students' lives in mental, cultural and spiritual growth. This motto has long been our officially and now we hope it wi11 be personally, to be known and re足 membered, not only as something on a seal or in the front of this yearbook, but as the best expression of our college life at BNC. Therefore, to give new empha足 sis and significance to our record of the year's activities, we have chosen as our theme this year: CHARACTER -CULTURE-CHRIST.

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T a b l e o i C on.t e nt s

CHARACTER . . .

. . . .

.

16

Ad m i nistration Facu lty a n d C urricula C lasses Who's Who

CULTURE

.

135

Features Cam pus life Org a n izations Athletics

CHRIST

.

226

C h u rch Chapel Lectures Rel ig ious Organ izations

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To One Whose Life Stands Equal to This Theme ...

With ease exalted to this honored seat, By having held himself in low esteem Unmeanly, is one whose contribution meet, For now eight years, does equal well the theme These covers guard, like hard-mined stones unpriced TI1at stud his crest with Character, Culture, Christ. Triply set within his life, but lustering All as one, each shaft-found star its splendor Tells in rapid-blushing fires lit deeply At the strike of pure light on inner worth. By labor of his office in BreseeAnd duties everywhere-is the trio Marked with many a facet fine and fitting To this honor; such tasks oftimes weigh down His desk 'til it is cluttered with a heap Of forms for dorms or sidewalks or estate. From bank to chapel with monitary tone, Researching for progressive height, must he Oft turn to learn the outcome of income And outgo e'er knowing how to go in To a newly-balanced ledger again. In earnest, such a cycle he pursues; So is his work an upward spiraling Course stamped often with his autograph Which signifies the circles he must run in. But all the pressing duties of his post Do not forbid a constant smiling mien Nor fail his simple understanding of Each poor man's problem lined before his door; Nor yet by such is he prevented from A firm devotement to his house and church, And such close and selfless contact with each Classman that he knows for him a nickname All his own; and students in return such Titles as these to his figure may join: Prophet of Pennies and Count of the Coin. In all these rays reflected from his crest There are disclosed those traits of insight, aim, And constancy which light-and end-our quest For one whose life this theme fits to his name; Him thus found, we dedicate this yearbook To our Business Manager, Harry Craddock.

4


NORTH CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS I. 1..

COMMISSION ON COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES BALDWIN, CHAIRMAN

NORMAN BURNS, SECRETARY

!ISS!! KIMBARK AVENUE

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN

BLAIR STEWART, VICE CHAIRMAN

CHICAGO 37, ILLINOIS

MADISON, WISCONSIN

OBERLIN COLLEGE

April 18, 1956

President Roy H. Cantrell Bethany Nazarene College Bethany, Oklahoma Dear President Cantrell: I am indeed happy to inform you officially that the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, at its Annual Meeting, held April 9-13, voted to accredit Bethany Nazarene College. This action was effective as of April 13. The" name of the College will be added to the published list of member institutions which will appear in the July, 1956, issue of the North Central Association Quarterly. We know you will wish to continue your efforts to build an ever stronger College and we hope that the examiners' report, a copy of which was sent to you before the Annual Meeting, will be of help to you in this connection.

As a new member of the North Central Association you will doubtless be interested in the enclosed booklet describing the organization and policies of the Association. I am also enclosing a copy of the by-laws of the Commission on Colleges and Universities which were adopted at the Annual Meeting one year ago. Your name will be placed on the mailing list for the receipt of materials from time to time dealing with the activities of the Commission. I hope you will feel completely free to turn to us for assistance or for information on problems with which you may be concerned. With best wishes,

I

am,

' llďż˝ Sincerely,

NB:bc Encs.

6

Norman Burns

OBERLIN, OHIO


McCONNEL L HALLHistory, speech, education and Greek Congregate here every day of the week. Napoleon to Bryan, to Methods and back足 These are presented in forms of bare fact; And junior, senior, frosh and sophomore Eagerly seek knowledge througl1 this open door.

FINE ARTSInspiration of chapel day after day As hundreds of students gather to pray足 The melodious efforts of tenors and basses To attain their goals on lines and spaces足 Memories are numerous 'round about here Which all college students hold very dear.

8


SCIENCE HALLExperiments, analysis, lectures and such Are but few of the things students may clutch; Biology, psychology, and sociology hath Found place with chemistry, physics and math. Here glorious success looms very near For doctor, technician, or engineer.

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Basketball, badminton, and volleyball too Our college athletes here do pursue. With a dribble, a serve, and a smashing backhand Team competition on a scale that is grand. Participants many­ Apprecitants ali Assemble together in this great hall.

..,.

9


FANNING HALLThe pitter-patter of size twelves on the stairs, The aU night discussions of problems and cares; Homesickness mocked by the rest of the guys Soon did away with the heart rending sighs; The vividness, profuseness, stateliness, and poise, The temporary home for hundreds of boys.

COMMERCIALFrom rooms at the bottom of tile long tligllt of stairs Tllere floats smells of cooking on the day's balmy air; Wllile typewriters clattering on floor number two Are coupled witll artists' red, yellow, and blue. The secrets of llome ec., business, or arts, To all searching students, tllis building imparts.

10


BUD ROBINSONHen parties, boy friends, formals, and dates, Study sessions, prayer chapel, impromptu debates, The sharing of letters from friends left behind, The quiet meditation that gives peace of mind. Blue eyes, brown eyes, straight hair and curls Mean only one thing, 'tis home for the girls.

)ERN! CANSophomores, juniors, and seniors all, From bottom floor to top足 most hall足 College veterans of years gone by, These hallowed halls do occupy. Away have flown their freshmen fears These girls look forward to future years.

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POST OFFICEA letter, a package, a buiietin briefA ch�ck whioh may bring financial relief­ Greetings from horne, though far away, May seiVe to enlighten the darkest day. So one of the frequented college spots is The place where one hears from hers or from his.

STUDENT UNIONFor relaxation and feiiowship it does exist And very few students its portals. have missed An imposing structure-modernistic in style

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THE DRAGMilkshakes, coffee, limeades or cokes Serve to refresh most college folks. So morning or noontide, after足 noon or night The atmosphere 'round here is constantly bright . A s at tables o r booths o r at the snack bar People indulge from near and from far.

STUDENT UNIONSteel casement windows-tloor covered with tile. Fond of it very the college has grown; Its place on the campus by everyone is known .

13


Charles Allen McConnell 1860-1955

The man who suggested the motto:

"Character-Culture-Christ".

An able writer and editor. A layman who shared in the founding of the Church of the Nazarene. A teacher whose influence will continue through the years to come. A champion of the cause of missions. One whose memory cannot be dissociated from his Irish wit. A man of strong convictions. A man with a compassionate heart. A man with an intense love for God and the Church. A Christian gentleman whose achievements and traits of character so endeared him to the Church of the Nazarene, the community, and the students and faculty of Bethany Nazarene College that he became to all of us just " Uncle Charlie". In this 1956 ARRO\,Y we honor the memory of one loved, admired, and appreciated by all-" Uncle Charlie" McConnell.


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ROW 1 : Dr. Donald R. Danskin, Carol S. Lundy, Dr. Anne C. Greve, Dr. Fred Floyd.

ROW 2: Harry

L.

Craddock, Dr. E. Boyd Shannon,

Dr. Roy H. Cantrell, Dr. C. Harold Ripper, Dr. Vernon A. Snowberger.

A d iD i .. i s t r a t i v e C o •• n e i l DR. ROY H. CANTRELL, Chairman President of the College

18

DR. C. HAROLD RIPPER

DR. ANNE C. GREVE

Dean of the College

Chairman of the Division of Social Science

HARRY L. CRADDOCK

CAROL S. LUNDY

Business Manager

Associate Professor of English

DR. E. BOYD SHANNON

DR. FRED FLOYD

Dean of Students

Professor of History

DR. DONALD R. DANSKIN

DR. VERNON A. SNOWBARGER

Registrar

Professor of Sociology


P:re 8 i d e n t Physicists tell us that the central part of an atom is the nucleus, around which the other com­ ponents revolve. The president of Bethany Naza­ rene College, Dr. Roy H. Cantrell, and his office, could well be the nucleus around which the atom of BNC revolves. A symbol of the dynamic energy required by a forward-striding institution, Dr. Cantrell strives constantly for the continued ad­ vancement of the college-whether on campus or off, locally or over the educational zone. Known by every student through his inspiring chapel messages, Dr. Cantrell always presents an air of personal interest both in the individual and in the college as a whole. Far from being a "desk­ flying" figurehead, Dr. .Cantrell exemplifies the active, zealous personality concerned with the col­ lege as an institution and with the stu9,ents which compose the institution. Radiating with an air of assistance, the office of the president is always open to those who desire his attention to any problem they may have. This year, as in past years, students of BNC have enjoyed both the honor and privilege of attending a Christian college, functioning as a Christ-centered institution through the efforts of Christian individuals such as the President, Dr. Roy H. Cantrell.

An i mportant telephone call is just another event in a typical busy day of BNC President, Dr. Roy H. Cantrel l .

Henry King finds a willing listener a n d a b l e counselor i n t h e personage of Dr. Contrell.

The engaging smile af Miss Lois Merriam, capable presidential secretary, is but one of the merits of the chief administrator's office.

21


It has often been said that "money makes the world go round". It is also very true that money makes a college go 'round, and the person respon足 sible for the dollars and cents end of Bethany Nazarene College is Business Manager Harry L. Craddock. Not only is he a.capable financial ad足 ministrator, Mr. Craddock also has that spirit of understanding which contributes to successful business through able assistance in various student monetary problems. Certainly not the "fierce, new-student-eating ogre" one less informed might expect, Mr. Craddock is constantly available for the advice or assistance so often needed by new and old students alike. Coming in contact with virtually the entirety of the student body, Mr. Craddock holds the respect and honor of all those he has dealt with. A Christian life, apparent not only in his official capacity but, more important, also in his personal actions, he serves as Sunday School superintendent of the College Church-the man known as Busi足 ness Manager of Bethany Nazarene College, Mr. Harry L. Craddock. Pictures are anly another source of interruptions for Mr. Craddock, BNC Business Manager.

First of the month debits and credits rate only a smile fram Mrs. I rene lawrence, assistant secretary to the Business Manager.

While depicting a study in "photographer ignoring", Ruth Newberry, secretary to the Business Manager dispenses with general correspondence.

22


Oii i e e

In figuring various financial matters, college accountant Miss Florence Lundy carefully avoids the use of red ink.

Prompt service by Mrs. I rene Lawrence proves to Wanda Williams that the Business Office is happy to receive school bill payments any day 路of the month.

Thick ledgers, fi lled with rows of figures, apparently have no effect on Mrs. Jane Elkins, office assistant.

Another capable translator of totals and sub路totals, Mrs. Mildred Harris, acknowledges all payment by issuance of individual receipts.

23


D e an Oi T h e Col l ege Among the many other comp9nents of a col足 lege, there stands the curricula, an unexpendable part of any institution of learning. At BNC the selection and organization of this curricula into a feasible, working program is but one of the many duties of the Dean of the College, Dr. C. Harold Ripper. Also one of the chief objectives of the college has of late been the recognition by North Central Accrediting Association of the college, and in this program Dr. Ripper has played a very prominent role. Holding a Ph.D. in psychology, Dr. Ripper serves ably as the head of that department, dis足 playing a talent for instruction as well as adminis足 tration. Despite an overflowing schedule, Dr. Ripper is always available for counseling and advice on any problem a student may wish to discuss with him. Dr. Ripper, Dean of the College, orders another change in the schedule.

Before entering the field of education, Dr. Ripper served several years as a pastor in the Church of the Nazarene and has that spirit which makes him a wonderful personage as well as an outstanding educator and capable administrator.

Office assistant Wanda Williams types out a memorandum from the Dean's office.

Secretary to the Dean, Betty Martin, displays the charm that makes a visit to the office a pleasure.

Mimeograph operator, James Sanders, fond les his pride and joy, the source of schedules, special announcements, etc.

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Dean oi St .. d e n ts In the dark recesses of the African jungle, the lion is king of beasts and with one mighty laryngi­ tic roar he is capable of frightening into submis­ sion his obedient though slightly robotistic sub­ jects. BNC is far removed from an African jungle and the person who is erroneously regarded with awe and fright is even further removed from any "kingship". The Dean of Students, Dr. E. Boyd Shannon, bears absolutely no resemblance to the fierce, fire-breathing monster he is supposed to personify in his position as administrator of stu­ dent discipline. A responsible and understanding counselor, he can always be relied upon fm fair and unbiased consideration. Dr. Shannon promotes and presents the inter­ ests of the college on the civic level by holding the office of Mayor of Bethany. He also capably serves as instructor for certain specialized chem­ istry courses, displaying those traits characteristic of a person of unusual, outstanding administra­

A smiling Dean of Students, Dr. E. Soyd Shannon, is but another symbol of the friendly atmosphere of BNC.

tive and instructive ability.

Whenever classes are cut, it's Janice Willey who records them in the "doomsday" book.

Secretary June Newman checks requests for excused absences before submitting them to the Dean of Students for final approval.

Having "gone through the proper channels" Loreto Broyles receives a "late"

permit from the Dean's

secretary, June Newman.

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F i e l d Re p :r e 8 e ntativ e Nations send ambassadors to other nations for reasons of varied degree but of primary import­ ance. As a school, BNC alsp has the need for representation in "foteign" areas, the educational zone. The person responsible for this task of importance is "Mr. Ambassador," Rev. Curtis Smith, the Field Representative of BNC. Almost constantly on the "go", visiting churches of every district, Rev. Smith can always be found present­ ing the needs of the college and promoting col­ legiate interest. Though his active program off-campus would seem to obscure his reputation locally, he is known to virtually every student on the campus through his forceful and enlightening chapel messages. A graduate of B-P.C., his sense of humor and magnetic personality, coupled with a genuine concern for the college and its young people, make him well liked and appreciated by everyone. Certainly the boys who have lived in the "bar­ racks" owe Rev. Smith a very special vote of gratitude, for it has been one of his greatest desires and the object of much expended effort to see the construction of Chapman Hall begun. This beautiful new boys' dormitory is the result of people over the educational zone responding in such a wonderful way to the needs of the college presented by Rev. Smith. He has shown great enthusiasm for his task and capably serves the college in this responsible position. It's quite surprising that Field Representative Curtis Smith, the roving member of the BNC faculty, could be kept still long enough to photo­ graph.

Meeting the need of a n active Field Representative who is away from his office much of the time is secretary, Mrs. Phyllis Jennings.

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Wo iD e n. College women, contrary to their own opinion, do not know everything. Occasionally th.ey are forced to turn to someone more qualified or experienced for advice and counseling. Of course being the weaker sex, they often feel the need for a motherly shoulder on which to cry. Recog­ nizing these peculiar female quirks, there was created at BNC an office of the Counselor of Women. For this important position, with all its responsibilities, there was one logical selectee­ the First Lady of the college, Mrs. Roy H. Can­ trell. \Vith a contagious smile and an air of sympathetic understanding coupled with campus­ wide respect for her, it is only natural that Mrs. Cantrell is the listener to stories of many feminine troubles. \Vhile concentrating on the ladies' side of the issue, Mrs. Cantrell, an exponent of co-education, has also been a great service to the male clan of the college. these barbaric men were considerably enlightened both as to certain cultural responsi­ bility they held and its discharge. A virtual "second cousin" to Emily Post, Mrs. Cantrell is con­ sidered an authority on any issue of etiquette or social grace and is frequently consulted by fellows as well as girls as to expected behavior. Constantly alert for opportunities to assist college students in their problems is this Lady, Mrs. Roy H. Can­ trell-Counselor of Women. The charming First lady of the college, Mrs. Roy H. Cantrell, capably serves as counselor of women.

Mrs. Cantrell and Verla Oke could be discussing a point of etiquette, but again they could be looking at the latest fashions.

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R e g i str a r In this past year, some nine hundred and thirty­ five students have registered for attendance at Bethany Nazarene College. The filing of their high school records, thei'r college registration, the issuing of their grade. reportsâ&#x20AC;˘and the assembling of their pertinent statistics all come under the jurisdiction of the office of the registrar over which Dr. Donald R. Danskin, as College Registrar, presides. Dr. Danskin as a capable business administrator is also the head of the department of business where he is an outstanding instructor in an area of rising importance. With a great number of students majoring or minoring in the field of business, the business club has progressed rapidly as a campus club, and much of this advance has been due to the efficient guidance of its sponsor, Dr. Danskin. Always willing to assist a student in problems both academic and personal, while being a capable supervisor, versatile instructor and a wonderful Christian, Dr. Danskin is appreciated for his sin­ cere interest in student well-being. Registrar, and head af the business department, Dr. Donald Danskin, is i nterrupted while checking a paper from one of his classes.

Gene Galbraith and Clem Jarvis receive registration forms from Wynona Burkha rt.

Dr. Oanskin's secretary, Mrs. Wynona Burkhart, is one reason for the efficiency of the registrar's office.

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Re c o r d e r 'Vhen a person enrolls in college, his primary desire is for education, and to mark a student's progress toward this goal a unique system of checking is employed-grades. These grades, some­ times over- or under-estin'lated, mark the degrees of student concentration and are a fair illustration of his ability. At Bethany Nazarene College, Mrs. C. A. McConnell, the college recorder, while working in co-ordination with the registrar's office, is the person who carefully records those grades, formulates transcripts, distributes grade reports, and maintains student files. Since college admin­ istrators often call for varied types of information concerning students, Mrs. McConnell's talents and workmanship are in constant demands. A wonderful lady with a charming personality depicted in her friendly smile and genuine interest in each student, Mrs. McConnell has served the Church of the Nazarene as a missionary to Africa, doing a praiseworthy job for God and the church. She radiates with that gracious, sparkling air that makes her honored and respected by the students and faculty of BNC.

Making the fresh man feel at home or keeping the senior on his toes is a¡ specialty of Recorder, Mrs. C. A. McConnell.

With Ready to lend a helping hand to any schedule bewitched student, is office assistant, Mrs. Carol Boomer.

the

assistance

of Mrs.

McConnell,

Vernon Swim checks his "Junior Standing" report.

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Board oi Tru ste e s V. H. LEWIS, Chairman Vice-Chairman Janette Aycock

30

Secretary R. T. Williams, Jr.

ABILENE DISTRICT 0. W. Jenkins, Lubbock Dulan Clegg, Cisco Lyman Wood, Petersburg

LOUISIANA DISTRICT Elbert Dodd, Pineville G. M. Akin, Minden L. H. King, Shreveport

DALLAS DISTRICT Paul H. Garrett, Dallas Fletcher Spruce, Texarkana Clyde Ammons, Dallas

NEBRASKA DISTRICT Whitcomb Harding, Hastings George B. Ronnekamp, York Blaine D. Proffitt, Lincoln

HOUSTON DISTRICT V. H. Lewis, Houston L. P. Durham, Houston

ORTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT J. W. Hendrickson, Conway Boyd Hancock, Jonesboro Paul Watson, Springdale

KANSAS DISTRICT Ray Hance, Wichita Eugene Verbeck, Hays E. W. Snowbarger, Sylvia

SOUTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT W. L. French, Little Rock W. Raymond McClung, Little Rock Ponder Gilliland, Little Rock

KANSAS CITY DITRICT Janette Aycock, Kansas City Dean Baldwin, Springfield A. Milton Smith, Kansas City

NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA I. C. Mathis, Tulsa H. D. Morrisett, Muskogee Sam W. Nesmith, Cushing

Alumni Representative Paul Macrory SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA Glen Jones, Ada B. F. Neely, Bethany W. H. Deitz, Henryetta NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA J. T. Gassett, Bethany E. S. Phillips, Bethany A. LeRoy Taylor, Bethany Paul Hoag, Bethany SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA W. T. Johnson, Duncan Carl A. Dillard, Ardmore Earl Darden, Duncan R. T. Williams, Jr., Bethany SAN ANTONIO DISTRICT William Davis, San Antonio Hearne W. Spruce, San Antonio Gene Houghtling, San Benito


H n.ID a n i t i e s Recognizing the garrulous nature of our world, the Humanities Department endeavors to serve as an adequate reservoir from which the rivers of English, Modern Languages and Speech are free to flow. With the streams of English, German, Span­ ish, dramatics, debate, and other depletions con­ stantly demanding an increased supply, the Hu­ manities department is ever growing in both range and scope. From the natural, native Eng­ lish to the forceful, gutteral sounding harshness of German and the fluid, musical, tones of ro­ mantic Spanish, the language divisions are able to institute a general understanding of the basic principles of the respective languages. Working hand in hand with the languages, the speech de­ partment with its innumerable subdivisions, pro­ vides instruction as to proper utilization of the accomplished language and also is able to guide in any number of specialized fields. In order to maintain a perpetual flow of knowl­ edge, an able core of engineers with a capable leader is required and in the department of Hu­ manities this qualified leadership is supplied by Doctor Willis B. Dobson.

32

W ILLIS B. DOBSON Holds an M.A. in English from Texas University where he is also doing work on his Ph.D.-is a member of the Phi Delta Lambda honor society-was the recip­ ient of the Alumni Association "B" award in 1954- 5 5.

MAURINE DICKERSON

NAOM I EMMEL

J. R. EMMEL

A graduate of B-PC-obtained her M.A. in English from Okla. A&M-plans g r a d u a t e work at Colorado University-works with ECHO-enjoys bicycling.

A native "Okie" who received her M.A. from Escuela Inter­ americana in Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico-at one time she taught at NNC-cooking and music are her favorite hobbies.

Received his M.A. in speech from NWU and OU, where he is now doing work on his Ph.D.-has an unusual collection of 12- 1 5,000 world-wide recipes-is very prom­ inent in youth work during the summer.


GERALDINE HUHNKE

.

Received her A.B. in E n g l i s h from NNC - t u r n e d bi-lingual and received M.A. in German and Spanish from U. of Iowa­ dislikes "O'.s" in gradebook from delinquent assignments.

ANNA BELLE LAUGHBAUM

CAROL LUNDY

Holds a Ph.D. from Illinois D.­ member of the English honorary society of literature-enjoys the hobbies of writing and tennis, of which she is an expert.

Holds an M.A. from Texas U.­ was secretary of the Stucco while attending B-PC, where she re­ ceived her A.B. degree in Eng­ lish-has been ARROW spon­ sor for five years.

Fac ulty BESSIE OLSON

KENNETH ROBINSON

DORIS SCHUMANN

Holds an M.A. from OU in speech-won lst in women's state oratorical contest-likes associa­ tion with the people of BNC­ hobbies include writing and trav­ eling.

Received his A.B. from ENC­ his B.D. from the N a z a r e n e Theological Seminary, and his M.S. from Kansas State College -is now working on his Ph.D. at Michigan State.

A native "Okie", she received her A.B. in speech from B-PC-her M.A. from OU. Listed in Who's Who in '49-50-is one of the few ladies who enjoys fishing.

33


Professor Carol Lundy cocks an interested ear as Freshman English class panel members Joanne Fenno, Zola Lankford, and Dot C lark give forth with the Fresh viewpoint on contemporary issues.

Oblivious to leon Wyss and Professor Dickerson with their h u morous approach to English, Jerry Hull dreams of his approaching wedding.

Although the majority of the students enrolled in B.N.C. supposedly use the English language for

communication,

it

is

astounding

at

the

amount of polish and refinement the average col­ lege student needs for the superlative utilization of the skill. The job of English instruction falls into the capable hands of the English department whose scope circumscribes not only writing and speaking but also the instigation of the appreCia­ tion of literature. In agreement with the quota­ tion from the Oxford English Dictionary: "The circle of the English Language has a well defined centre, but no discernible circumference."-it is obvious that the English department recognizes the unlimited field in which it functions. Realiz­ ing this gigantic task, the department strives both through required courses and electives, to de­ velop usage competence and appreciation for the language. Led by Professor W. B. Dobson, the department is a poignant factor in social and cul­ tural development on the B.N.C. campus.

34


M o d e rn La n.g u a g e s It is well known that an ill designed construc­ tion project caused the declaration of Genesis 11 : 7 -"Go to, let u s g o down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one an­ other's speech." . . . And confusion reigned. To­ day at B .N.C., though no tower of Babel is be­ ing attempted, bi-lingualism is of recognized im­ portance. In the study of Spanish, students who plan missionary work in various Latin American countries become acquainted with the language they wi11 speak. Ministerial students, through Greek studies, are able to derive a somewhat more complete meaning from the Biblical writings, while students of German eagerly glean the con­ tents of original Luther manuscripts. Under the competent supervision of Professor Emmel in "Espanol", Professor Huhnke in "der Deutch", and Professor Sawyer and Dr. Laughbaum in "He11enis", the students realize their attainable goal of dual c o m p r e h e n s i on in the fieid of modern languages.

In German lab., married man Tom Boyd poi nts out to "engagee" Phil Washburn and "steady" Dick Osborn the technique of a typical German date.

Spanish student Bertha Gill utilizes the opportunities afforded through tape recordings as Professor Emmel and members of Spanish lab follow her efforts.

35


Play Directing class members Ruth Pierce, Wayne Mu rraw, Wilma Snowberger, and Wallace White learn about stage make-up as Professor Schumann demonstrates on "Peter Paleface11 •

In his desire for improved public speaking a bility, Bob Crawford utilizes the studio, the tape recorder, and the talents of Professor Emmel.

Speech Through infancy, childhood, adolescence, ma­ turity, and oid age, the importance of audible com­ munication, or speech, is in some way understood. From the hungry cry of the new born babe to the farewell testimony of a dying saint, speech is util­ ized in one or many of its divers forms. In our nation's history, various forms of speech have played dominant or important roles. Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty or give me death" and Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" are but two of the memorable examples. In the speech department of B .N.C., the importance of this field is recognized and stressed in the extensive program of instruction which the department maintains. Both in classroom instruction and the various speech activities, the head of the de­ partment, Professor J. Robert Emmel provides the leadership necessary for a successful speech program.

36


Social S e i en.e e According to Mr. Webster, social science is that science that deals with human society or its ele­ ments, as a family, state or race, and with the relations and institutions involved in man's exist­ ence and well-being as a member of an organized community. In recognizing the scope of such a field, Bethany Nazarene College provides in the social sciences, courses all the way from physical education to various phases of psychology, treating each one in the manner desired for ample cover­ age of the subject. With an objective approach serving as the lad­ der on which it ascends to the level of attainment, the Social Science Department utilizes those ele­ ments instrumental in student success-promoting personal initiative and individual insight in the development of the sociological viewpoint. Exist­ ing as an advisory preparatory body, the division is able to instigate in its coherents not only an understanding of the social processes by which cultural changes have occurred, but a better com­ prehension of the modern social world and its problems. As an organization realizing the import of contemporary cultural progress, the Social Sci­ ence Division stands as an unyielding bulwark against the sociological maladjustment of a mod­ ern world. JESSE ANDERSON Possesses a B.S. in Bus. Ed. from B-PC-Ed. M. from OU. One of his outstanding accomplishments of the year was his marriage-ap­ preciates the C h ri s t i a n atmos­ phere of BNC.

ANNE GREVE Received her Ph.D. in education and psychology from U . of Minnesota-dislikes people who seek credit with­ out expending effort-feels definite call to Christian education.

DONALD R. DANSKIN Holds -;m A.B. from Nebraska State Teachers College, an M.A. from the U. of Neb.-and an Ed.D. from OU-likes to play volleyball - enjoys Christian as­ sociation at BNC.

FRED FLOYD Obtained his A.B. at Pasadena, where he was "Veep" of the Stu­ dent Council-received his Ph.D. in history from OU - collects newspaper clippings - likes gar­ dening.

37


JAMES GARNER Holds a Ph.D. in political science from Iowa State-taught at Oli­ vet-dean of students at NNC­ in earlier years e x c el l e d a s a cornet player.

Everyone expects the worst at the Frosh.faculty party as Dr. Floyd expends a noble effort in the balloon·blowing contest.

F a c u lty FORREST LADD An ex-B-PC s t u d e n t-has his M.S. in psychology from OU­ works on Ph.D. dissertation in spare time-dislikes people who postpone tests for trivial excuses.

38

WESLEY MOON Holds Ed.D. from the U. of Buf­ falo-taught at Houghton Col­ lege, N.Y., where he received his A.B.-concentrates on the field of education at BNC.

JACK RAIRDON A true "Bethany-ite" - received both his A.B. and his Th.B. from B-PC before obtaining his M.A. in history from OU-sponsor of the '56 seniors in their successful career.


C. H. RIPPER Dr. Ripper holds a Ph.D. from U . of Iowa in psychology-was in the pastorate for 14 years­ would like to have some spare time - dislikes action based on blind prejudice.

DOROTHY SHELDON With a major in education, Miss Sheldon received her M.A. from the U . of Michigan-has taught in Owosso Bible College-likes painting, nature study and read­ mg .

LAWRENCE SNELL Professor Snell received his B.S. from B-PC and his M.A. from OU, concentrating on the field of business . .. member of the Delta Pi Epsilon Business Frater­ nity-photography is his hobby.

F a e iiit y VERNON SNOWBARGER Received his Ph.D. from USC in sociology - holds A.B. from B-PC- is prominent in youth work-dislikes people being moti­ vated by financial standing.

CONSTANCE SPRUCE She obtained her M.A. from St. Mary's of Texas-has .done grad­ uate work both at OU and Texas U.-likes to travel-a true "Tex­ an" at heart.

DON WILSON Graduated Summa Cum Laude from B-PC, where he obtained his A.B. in history-received Ed. M. from OU in counseling and physical education-pet-peeve is violin students practicing on gym stage.

39


While other business class members are involved in various distortions, Jim Snyder casts a dubious eye at the reference book Dr. Danskin has suggested.

E c o n. o iD i c s Patsy Teas becomes a study in concentration as a problem in intermediate typewriting disappears beneath fleet fingers and flashing keys.

an d BII s i:n e s s Economics is more than the favorite pastime of a handful of college professors and government officials. It is the sum total of the plants and facili­ ties which help make the goods we buy and use. Economics is the basis of that system which is commonly known as business. At B.N.C. the two departments are combined, linking together closely related subjects in the desire for better compre­ hension. The department of business strives to present those essential facts about this economy of ours-what it consists of and how its compon­ ents work together to turn out the highest stand­ ard of living in the world. A department of in­ terest to every student, since our personal for­ tunes are inextricably tied to what happens in the economic area. The business department, headed by Dr. Donald Danskin, not only deals with type­ writers and adding machines but with the basic reasons for their existence.

40


Today in the United States, total school enroll足 ment ranges well over sixty million students. This is over one-third of the entire population; all seek足 ing the same thing-education. In B.N.C. the field of education is very well represented in a depart足 ment all its own, complete with a training system whereby the student actually serves as instructor in public schools in Bethany and the surrounding areas. It presents the latest in teaching methods and stresses to develop techniques suitable for the present age. Progress is calling for expansion in public schools as well as in industry and other institutions. The need for suitable teachers has become acute and the education department, headed by Dr. Wesley Moon, strives in every phase of its program to prepare the instructor for the task that lies before him.

This possible primary classroom scene is really future teachers Wilma Snowberger and Doris Bumpus in a presentation to a methods class.

"City engi neers" Eileen Bryan, Diane Neely, and Delma Montgomery work diligently under the supervision of "boss" Professor Spruce on a model project for Crafts class.

41


In Professor Roirdon's night class of English H istory, a presentation of the sordid lif!' of Henry VIII and the misfortunes of his many wives draws varied class response.

A "Yankee', Earl Skinner from Wisconsin and a "Reb", Cliffie McCurly from Arkansas, are enlightened by Dr. Floyd as to various Civil War campaigns.

Hi sto r y In 1 492 Columbus discovered America; in 1 908 the Nazarene Church was formally organized; in 1 955 the name of Bethany-Peniel College was changed to Bethany Nazarene College and in 1 956 another ARROW was published-this is history and the ARROW is a history book. It is history only on a small scale, perhaps poorly pre足 sented, but still history. We are living in the ever lengthening shadows of history and everything we have done, are doing, or hope to do, is or will be history-it is everywhere. The department of his足 tory strives to present this as a factor in contem足 porary society's political, economic, cultural, and social problems and it offers a possible solution. History at B.N.C. is not presented as a list of dates to be memorized only to be forgotten or as a group of names to be mispronounced and also forgotten, but as a living, vibrant, necessary part of successful intellectual development. As a guide through the maze of discoveries, wars, and de足 pressions, Dr. Fred Floyd serves as departmental head.

42


Hoiii e - E e Over half of the population of this "man's world" consists of women. A personification of progressiveness, the ladies are rapidly making in­ roads in not only their own sphere of influer{ce, but also in certain professional circles. The department of home economics at B .N.C., in its divers courses, offers to those interested an extensive program of study both m the field proper and in related areas. Realizing that now more than ever the contem­ porary woman has a greater responsibility in the home, there is a variety of courses centered direct­ ly around that un-expendable institution-nutri­ tion, hygiene, budgets, clothing, home nursing, etc. Of dual nature, the department also serves as the basis of preparation for professional oppor­ tunities in teaching in non-vocational home mak­ ing departments in secondary schools. This de­ partment, important not only to the ladies but also to their cohorts of earthly habitation-men, functions actively under the capable leadership of its head, Dr. Anne Greve.

Toke a dash of this and mix well wilh tho!, as Dr. Greve supervises Robbie Diffie's birth of on angel food coke, a pan of brown ies, or some other calorie concentration.

Home Economics students Robbie Diffee, Jo Cook, Marlene Ziebarth, and Lauro McNa mes whip up a hot breakfast for the photographer who mode sure he selected the right time for shooting the pictu re.

43


On the badminton cou rt, Bob Norton's backhand d raws an appraising g lance from Ernie Farmer as Gerald Holley and James lewis steel themselves for the onslaught.

I n individual exercises class, while lenore Sloan and Barb Goodson prepare to act as judges, 11Coach" Wilson i nforms Glenna Yarbrough she is to be graded on jamp rope action.

Phy sical E d .-.c ati o n "When the day is done and the players creep One by one to the League of Sleep, Deep in the night they may not know The way of the fight, the fate of the foe. The cheer that passed, and applauding hands, Are sti11ed at last-but the Record stands." So wrote Granclland Rice, dean of American sports writers . Recognizing the importance of fair play and sportsmanship, the department of physical edu足 cation strives to correlate the program of physical training with the development of ethical stand足 ards. Coupled very closely with the sound of toe meeting pigskin, rubber soles squeaking on hard足 wood floors, and ash hitting horsehide, the de足 partment maintains an active intra-mural sports calendar which is the centrum of athletic events on the campus . Directed by Assistant Professor Don ( Coach ) Wilson, the department endeavors to instill a program of physical fitness without detracting from intellectual competence.

44


P o l iti c a l S e i e r� e e 1 956 is a unique year, unique in the way that 1 952, 1 948, and others are unique; not only are they leap years but also they are presidential election years. This year around three million Americans will make their way to the polls and cast their ballots, voting for the candidate they believe in. The reason these people vote and the reason for candidate3 existing for whom they are able to vote, involves a strange, intricate system known as political science or the science of poli­ tics. At B.N.C. an extensive program of instruc­ tion is maintained in the area of politics and the science involved, by the department of politi­ cal science headed by Dr. James Garner. Through the presentation of this program, students, whe­ ther Yankee or Rebel, Democrat or Republican, are brought into contact with the informative "weights" that bear so heavily on the practical "scales" of daily living.

The reverse angle of lectu res, as seen by Dr. Garner, is presented in this view of an Americari Government class.

While Ramona Johnston raises an awe-fil led eye and the American Government class looks an, Mary Staneroad and Dan

Hamiter follow

Dr. Garner's explanation of Governmental departments.

1 ( {)

)

3L( J

45


In abnormal psychology, Dr. Ripper points out to Haro!d Moore the p rocess involved in various psychological adjustments.

With Johnny Westmoreland assisting and Professor ladd observing,

Psych o logy

Jack l mel becomes the "guinea pig" for a psychological experiment.

Far from being a maze of complexes, motiva­ tions, and inhibitions, the study of psychology divulges the secrets of human behavior from per­ sonality to conduct. In the department of psychol­ ogy at BNC, there is offered an extensive study into both the primary and specialized areas of the science. Offering studies all the way from an intro­ ductory course, concerning basic human adjust­ ment and experience, to the seminar dealing with the specialized and intensive study of thinking, learning, emotions, etc., the department serves to integrate into the student a thorough under­ standing of his field. As a professional interest, the department also provides for undergraduate psychological instruction in education, the Chris­ tian ministry, research, vocational counseling, industrial psychology, clinical psychology, and psychiatry. Serving as head of the department, Dr. C. Harold Ripper functions as a capable instructor, counselor, and psychoanalyst for any of his confused proteges.

46


F i ii e A rts Shakespeare said, "The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, s trategems and spoils: The motions of his spirit are dull as night And his affections dark as Erebus : Let no such man be trusted." An _exageration? Perhaps. However, one cannot live without realizing it as a partial truth, for the world of music is the world in which we live­ the world that we enjoy. Yet this "earthly ball" could not be complete with the mere existence of lines and spaces occupied by whole and half notes, for its environment would certainly be inadequate without its cultural cohort-art. The Fine Arts Division strives both for the ap­ preciation of various artistic expression and also the propagation of individual creative expression. By linking together these two mediums of music and art, the department is able to further advance the "finer things of life" not only in individual students but also on a diversified area level. Lend­ ing an air of dignified temperament to the college and the student body, the division of fine arts is an example of all that is asthetic and cultural in Bethany Nazarene College.

RAY BOWMAN By birth a "wheatshocker"-re­ ceived B.S. and M.S. in architec­ ture from KU-served on staff of KU-has done much to im­ prove the esthetic sense of BNC.

LESTER DUNN Received his M .Mus. in voice from OU-has studied in Europe and taken graduate work from Cincinnati Conservatory-proclaims "mechanics" as his hobby.

GENE CHAMBERS Holds a M.Mus. in voice perform­ ance from Wichita U .-received a B .Mus. from B-PC-graduated Cum Laude-like all musicians, he dislikes a lack of concentra­ tion toward good music.

NAOMI DOBSON Holds a certificate in voice from Trevecca and a diploma from Oli­ vet-has taught voice both at Pasadena and Olivet-detests out­ of-tune pianos.

47


KEITH PAGAN A graduate of B-PC where he ob­ tained his B.Mus.-received his M .Mus. from OU-is now the music director at Eastside Naza­ rene Church-dislikes people who are late-is an excellent cook.

CARROLL HARVILLE Virtuoso of the keyboard - re­ ceived his B.Mus. from B-PC­ detests 7 : 30 eartraining class-has an i n te n s e affection for carrot juice.

F a c o. lty ESTHER SAXON Received her B.Mus. from George Peapody College in piano per· formance - experiencing her first year at BNC-likes the friendly attitude of the students-enjoys symphonies.

48

RUTH TAYLOR A member of the Natl. Guild of Organists - has a B. Mus. from OCU-member of Sigma Alpha Iota professional sorority-enjoys the Christian atmosphere at BNC.

DORIS VAUGHAN Received her B .Mus. from B-PC where she served as assistant in piano during her senior year-an outstanding instructor as well as a brilliant pianist.


Mu sic Perhaps one of the ideal portrayals of B.N.C.'s motto of Character, Culture, and Christ is the Music Department. To borrow a few words from recognized authorities-Aristotle said of music in connection with Character-"Since Music has so much to do with the moulding of character, it is necessary that we teach it to our children." . . . Concerning the Cultural aspects of music, Plato stated, "Music is a tonic which accomplishes for the mind what gymnasium does for the body." . . . As for Christ being exemplified in music, Longfellow declared : "Yea, Music is the Prophet's art, Among the gifts that God hath sent, One ot the most magnificent." With such high recommendations, it is little wonder that the department of Music, under the guiding baton of Professor Lester Dunn, is the picture of accomplishment in all fields of music at B.N.C.

With a n observant class for a n audience, maestros of the morrow, Gerald H u man and Harold Brown, display the techniques they ore developing in "Di recti ng�� class.

Although drums are made to beat on, Howard Oliver and Keith Pagan reap the results of some student's over-exubera nce.

49


Art class offers divers mediums of expression as Roy Simpson goes arch itectural, Jo Howard a bstract, and Rosalie Rose scenic.

Professor Bowman supervises the squinting observation that goes into each a rtistic project before it goes on the drawing board.

A rt Bringing into fruition the applied talents of would be Michaelangelos and Reynards, the art department represents a major center of aesthetic interest on the collegiate level. Though no depart足 mental major is offered in the field, the courses presented serve to benefit those interested in the various aspects of education or certain areas of church work. Existing as a member of the Fine Arts Division, the department of art functions as a beam radiating from the core of general education, serving as a major implement in the hands of future teachers. Emphasizing a thorough under足 standing of the fundamental points of art, the College offers, through the department, that basis so necessary for the successful realization of any goal. Guiding the brush wielding, palette swing足 ing aggregation is Assistant Professor Ray Bow足 man, providing adequate leadership as head of the department of art.

50


Ph ilosoph y an d R e l i g i o n. "Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding" ( Proverbs 3 : 1 3 ) -the linking of religion and logic in the realization that in religion lies the only true philosophy. In joining the greatest teacher, the immortal Jesus Christ, with those great mortal teachers, Plato, Aristotle, and Socrates, the Department of Philosophy and Religion secures its objectives of ultimate and Christian meaning to human exist­ ence. In this turmoil-filled world of confusion, with prejudice and illogical thinking gaining pre­ dominance, the need for accurate and consistent thinking is appalling and only through the com­ bined efforts of philosophy and religion is the best possible solution offered. With the major emphasis of the college being religiously centered, subordination of philosophy might be expected. However, in the linking to­ gether of these two major fields a strong union instead of disorganized antagonism is attained. Through this union, mutual benefits are enjoyed by both philosophy and religion.

J. P. JOHNSON A native of Oregon, Prof. John­ son received MA from Kansas State Teachers College in Phi­ losophy-sponsors BNC philoso­ phy club - now doing graduate work at NWU towards Ph.D.

L. C. PHILO The holder of two MA degrees, one in Theology from Chicago Evangelical Institute, and the other from the University of Michigan in Philosophy, Dr. Philo has an honorary doctorate from God's Bible School. Dr. Philo's hobby is collecting heathen gods.

W. N. KING A native of Canada, Dr. . King received his A.B. from Pasadena College in Calif.-obtained his M .A. from USC and his S.T.D. from Metropolitan University of Los Angeles.

51


ORVILLE McDANIEL Holds an A.B. in religion from ENC and a M.A. in history from the U. of Maryland-ex-editor of college newspaper and yearbook -likes good books and golf. Jerry lambert wonders at the p resence of footwear, as F rosh sponsor, Prof. Sawyer, waxes eloquent at the "shoeless" freshman party.

F a e iii t y DON METZ A "Yankee" who holds his D.R.E. from the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - edited both the newspaper and annual of ENC where he received his A.B.-likes an occasional game of golf.

52

ROBERT SAWYER Received his Th.M. from Central Baptist Seminary where he is also doing work on his Th.D.-an ex足 faculty member of the Nazarene Seminary - is sponsor of the freshman class.


Ph ilosoph y Philosophy-the science which investigates the facts and principles of reality and of human nature and conduct. Composed of logic, ethics, esthetics, metaphysics, and the theory of knowledge, the study involves the intricacies of personal existence evident in life. At B.N.C. a well-rounded depart­ ment of philosophy furnishes the student with courses both generalized and specialized-from an introductory course designed to orientate the stu­ dent with the fundamental problems and methods of philosophy to the seminar, offering intensive study in the areas of the history of philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, and axiology. Work­ ing in close harmony with the department of religion, the department of philosophy adds an invaluable note to the symphony of successful life. Led by the departmental head, Professor J. Pres­ cott Johnson, the department of philosophy flour­ ishes as a dynamic spark on the B.N.C. campus.

11Aristotle'' Gardner, 11Socrates11 Edmonds, and "Piato11 Ha rtpence ore led by "Chief Phi losopher" Johnson to a weekly session of deep thought in philosophy class.

Professor Johnson elaborates on Kierkegaard, the lather of existentialism, while members of the night session of Philosophy Seminar exp ress varied degrees of i nterest.

53


While Dr. Philo gives an explanation, his heothenistic god collection is examined by Althea Kohnk, lowell Bell, Korlos Morgan, and Glenn Anderson.

Dr. Metz presents a lecture on the study of Nazarene Doctrine in an

R e l i g i o il

interest-holding manner.

Religion has often been defined as the service and adoration of God as expressed in forms of wor­ ship. It is that awareness or conviction of the exist­ ence of a supreme being, arousing reverence, love, gratitude and the will to obey and serve. At B.N.C. the department of religion is the largest department of the college and it emphasizes almost every aspect of the subject. The depart­ ment offers a knowledge and understanding of the Bible with comprehension of those basic truths which are essential to Christian experience and living. The department also places proper em­ phasis upon the doctrine and experience of holi­ ness while presenting inspiration and guidance toward a better life of Christian service. In the study of religion, assistance is provided by the head of the department, Dr. L. C. Philo.

54


Natural S e i e n. e e In the last sixty years, we have witnessed as a nation and a world, the most phenomenal scien足 tific advance in history. This has been due to several factors-one of them, the scientific ap足 proach to existing problems. Utilizing the medium of realization, coupled with experimentation, and notation, this process involves divers mediums of approach. The propagation of this program warrants the special attention of the Natural Science Divisions of B.N.C. and, together with an objective train of thought, generally results in the successful solution of designated problems. Together with the instilling of understanding and appreciation toward the role chemistry has charac足 terized in the development of civilization and the realization of the cultural and relative aspects of mathematics, the Department of Natural Sciences presents one of the examples of the training of Christian education over the evils of ignorance, misconception, and superstition.

ROBERT LAWRENCE A biological science enthusiast-graduated from ENC -received M.A. from Boston U .-has done graduate work at both Boston U. and Okla. A&M-likes hunting and fishing.

DON BEAVER Junior Class pres., Who's Who, Student Council pres. at B-PC where he obtained his A.B. in chemistry-M.S. and Ph.D. were received from Okla. A&M-likes concern of faculty for students at B C.

Prof. Lawrence's preparation for a lecture to his I nvertebrate Zoology class is well-supervised by 11Mortimer Muscle1 1, the rubber cadaver.

55


EARL V. GREER Graduated from Olivet-.received Ph.D. in math from OU-is now engaged in writing his thesis for publication-regrets there are not 36 hours in a day.

As another college year gets under way, fal l registration finds Dr. Shannon serving as counselor for fresh man enrollee, Billy Boles.

F a c u lty EMMETT HAMMER A.B. degree from John Fletcher College of Kansas-M.A. from KU - dislikes immature college students�has a green thumb and enjoys a fast game of golf.

56

E . BOYD SHANNON Received his Ed.D. from OU­ an ex-industrial chemist-dislikes Nazarenes who have to be begged to attend SS-enjoys woodwork­ ing as a hobby.


C h e iii i st:r y From the double doors leading into the spacious, well-equipped room located in the ultra-modern red brick building commonly known as the Science Hall, there is often detected suspicious odors- phosphorus, sulphur, and the like. This is the Chemistry Department in action. From the neat rows of shining test tubes and separators to the well-stocked shelves of the chemical room, the desire and ability to radiate knowledge to waiting and willing hands is evident. Presenting to those who are interested, an adequate, well-rounded basis for education, engineering, and medicine, the department is the focal point of application for students with these professional objectives in mind. As head of the department, Associate Pro足 fessor Don Beaver is successful in preventing over足 exuberant students from blowing up the laboratory while he lends needed assistance in particularly difficult assignments.

A view from "down under" finds Gayle Clements and J o h n Kelly enthralled by the possi bilities of the latest chemistry formula.

An unobse;ved photographer catches Dr. Shannon, Clifton McNabb, Phillip Washburn, and Earl Skinner musing over the latest problem i n Organic Chemistry.

57


With D r . Greer a n d h i s class interestedly observing, John Norrell and Pa u l A n g l i n assist B o b Hendricks i n a slide r u l e check o f his computations.

M at h e iD a ti e s Dr. Greer explains a model for a problem in Ana lytic Geometry which warrants special attention from Phil Wash b urn, Bob Hendricks and other class members.

58

From figuring the percentage of interest on the unpaid school bill to finding the unknown factor involved in date night finances, the typical college student utilizes an applied knowledge of mathe足 matics. Though these are rather elementary, the department of mathematics offers both a series of primary courses and also an advanced study of "math" in several specialized areas. A must for the pre-engineering student and also those inter足 ested in the educational aspects of the science are the various courses in algebra, geometry, trig足 onometry, etc. From the beginner's course ( affec足 tionately termed "Bonehead Math" ) to the most difficult calculus assignments, the department strives for complete student comprehension of the presented material. To ascertain the difference between a "quotient" and a "remainder", the head of the department, Dr. Earl V. Greer, is always available to lend the proverbial helping hand.


Biological S e i e n_ e e From the Greek word "bios", meaning life, and the Latin word "logia" meaning science, comes the word "biology", defined as life-science or the science of life. Presenting to the student this study of the science of living, the department pro­ vides instruction both for those with vocational interests in the educational aspects of science and those interested in medicine, medical technology, dentistry, and nursing. The Biological Science Department instills in the student mind the importance of observation coupled with notation to attain the desired general end of information. In this world of slimy appearing specimens and gruesome dissections, the student is able to survey his field in a very realistic setting. As depart¡ mental head, Professor Robert Lawrence serve� as a guide for those future leaders in the areas of scientific education and the field of medicine.

Daisy Hoilman and Viola DeVore utilize the dual eyepiece microscope attachment while lab assistant Ken Herrick di rects their efforts.

As the Biology class gets microscope eyestrain from intense observation, apparently a minute organism successfu l ly eludes the inquiring eyes of some class member.

59


This compl icated appearing agg regation is only Pa ul Anglin and Robert Herrick engaged in determining the resistance of a resistor by employing a Wheatsone Bridge.

The next phrase could be on the next physics test; so Jeanie Steinbach, Vernon and Gordon Beckett pay careful attenti on to the words of Pro路

Phy sics

fessor H a mmer.

This is the age of the atom-the twentieth cen颅 tury and the development and utilization of this peculiar source of energy falls into the field of physics or other physical sciences. Though B.N.C. is certainly not Oak Ridge and the experiments hardly involve such a force as the atomic bomb, the department of physics endeavors to give those who are interested a thorough knowledge of the basic principles involved in the physical process of an advancement. Recognizing the progressive nature of the contemporary scientific world, the College, through the department of physics, is able to present to the student that information that will prove useful to him in future years. Professor Emmett Hammer acts as an able guide through the maze of scalars, vectors, and webers, and in doing so also serves as the head of the physical science department.

60


Li bra ry Located in the archaic recesses of Bresee Hall, the Bethany Nazarene College library rests in quite solitude, disturbed only by those who seek her favors in erstwhile research. With the jacketed residents covering almost any feasible subject, the shelved interior serves as the court of first resort to the English theme condemned Frosh or to the fourth year man sentenced to a Senior Paper. Occupying a central location on the campus and containing over 30,000 volumes, the B.N.C. library reverberates with a personality all its own. Present­ ing an air of warm hospitality, the collection of white-paged, black-lettered stacks receive those of studious nature from the four corners of the educational zone. From the crispness of contem­ porary publications to the mustiness of writings of past years-from the ultra-modern audio-visual center with facilities for the playing of records or the showing of film to the drama filled section of ancient words of wisdom from sages of old, the invitation into the world of books is written in the flourishing hand of a qualified host-The Bethany azarene College Library.

CHARLES JONES A graduate of B-PC-received his A.B. in history-holds M.A. in library science from Univ. of Iich.-enjoys the challenge of his field at B TC-loves philoso­ phy.

ELIZABETH WILLIS In the field of library science, she obtained her B .A. from OU and her M.A. from the Univ. of Michigan­ served in the Public Library both at Amarillo, Texas and Ada, Okla.-is very enthusiastic in her work.

KATHRYN PASCHALL With an A.B. in math from Tre­ vecca, Miss Paschall also holds an M.A. from Peabody College­ enjoys working with Christian young people-likes bicycling.

·= ··· · 5,1 If

'

l I

61


To meet the demands of the ever present research paper, Molly Copeland divulges the material needed by Gary H a rtpence, Doris Bumpus a nd Shirley Towns.

Libra ry For sources of outside reading, John Spire consults the always helpful card catalog.

Regardless of how thorough an instructor may endeavor to be or how extensive the presentation of his material, there is always some minute detail or further research a student may wish to do. With this idea in mind, B.N:c. maintains, in its library, the facilities for any such activity a student may desire. Offering widely diversified sources of infor足 mation, the library contains books related to almost every feasible subject. So situated as to provide both convenient access, and an atmo足 sphere conducive to study, the library is one of the most frequented institutions on the campus. Here in this symbol of learning, the lowly Frosh and the high-and-mighty U p p e r c l a s s m a n a r e transformed into a common individual, the stu足 dent, turning to a recognized authority for assist足 ance-the library.

62


Re siden ce C o •• n. s e l o r s Bethany Nazarene College is a "home away from home" for several hundred young men and women. The college is a very large family, functioning on an enlarged scale like the individual home. In the various dormitories, an attempt is made to provide an atmo­ sphere conducive to a well rounded college life. Disci­ pline is necessary in the dormitory as well as in the home; certain rules must be obeyed and various regu­ lations must be enforced, but they all exist for the wel­ fare of the student. Since situations frequently arise that need supervision, and for this reason, persons who are trained in the field of guidance and counseling serve as dormitory counselors. When doubts and fears assail the student, the latchstring is always out on the door of these people's apartments. Whether it's calming the feats of a homesick freshman or keeping the upperclass­ man on the road to graduation, the people who are affectionately known as "Uncle", "Aunt", or "Mom", play a vital and pleasant part of college life.

Mrs. Alice Ray, Jernigan Hall counselor, is "on the beam" as for as her g i rls ore concerned.

Mrs. Olive Wright is "Mom" to over 1 00 Freshman girls.

Men's Halls counselors, Gene and Sobbie Moore agree that this year has set some records.

Fanning Hall counselors, "Aunt" Ida a nd " U ncle" Fred Burch pull a raid on the icebox.

63


C a iD p n s P e r s o n. n e l As the beautiful veneer of paneling is dep�ndent for strength upon its rugged core, to a certain extent so do�s BNC depend upon that often unseen but vital group of supporting pillars. A guardian of collegiate health, an expert in the preparation of good food, and a capable technician are all found in the campus personnel of the college. The greatest blessing of life has often been, and perhaps correctly so, defined as good health. The health of college students is amply safeguarded by Dr. Paul Macrory, school physician, who aside from conducting physical examinations of enrollees, is also constantly on call in case of any serious disease or emergency. Napoleon said, "An army marches on its stomach," and this could aptly be applied to a college also, for everyone respects the virtues of good food with students certainly being no exception. As dietitian, Mrs. Katie Drewry is responsible for stilling the growls of several hundred collegiate stomachs and the success of her program is evident in the extra inches found around student midriffs. On a college campus, maintenance is a full time job and Mr. Marvin Simpson with his crew of plumbers, carpenters, yard men and janitors deserve considerable praise for the job they have done. A mute, though striking, testimony of this department's activities, is the fine appearance of the over-all campus. These are the people behind the scenes, those who work with not enough praise for their successes and too much criticism in any shortcoming-the campus personnel.

MRS. KATIE DREWRY Dietitian

MR. MARVIN SIMPSON Superintendent of Grounds

DR. PAUL MACRORY School Physician

64


In firm a ry Recognizing that even college students get sick, NBC maintains an ultra-modern, well足 equipped infirmary to handle any ailing scholars. Under the supervision of Mrs. Julia Wyatt, college nurse, the small hos足 pital receives those unfortunate individuals who fall victim to virus, fevers, or other aches and pains. From the sterile recesses of this organization comes mysterious pow足 ders, tablets, pills, and syrups which are calculated to cure anything from the bite of the lovebug to pangs of homesickness.

Peculiar looking instruments and bottles with unpronounceable labels are "home" to Mrs. Julia "Nurse" Wyatt, college nurse.

Viewing the results of the dining

holl,

Ann

Pace gets a routine weight-height check by "Nurse".

A charming "nurse'' like Shirley Veach convinces Bob Hendricks that his cold

That virus won't stand a chance with Jim

Motsinger after Mrs. Wyatt finishes "shoal足 ing" him.

isn't too bad.

65


Cl ass Offic ers Dale Tuttle

_________________

Janelle Phillips

_________

Wilma Snowbarger Melba Lynn Case Jack Rairdon

President

Vice-President

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________

Secretary

Treasurer

_________________

Sponsor

At the Senior Greek dinner, closs prexy Dole Tuttle sets the stage for "The Clouds", a play written by Aristophanes in 500 B.C.

Sen iors Cl a s s o f 1 9 5 6 They returned to Bethany for the last time as stu­ dents and there was an air of melancholy sentimentality in their every action. A breath of finality seemed to escape from deed and word; the way they fondly looked at the campus, the touch of familiarity in voices as they spoke to faculty as well as students, the attentive way in which they listened to conversations and lectures, as if to capture and hold every word, and finally the dreamy, far away look that came often to their eyes­ remembrance. The Oklahoma sands of time swirl backward in a gust of seemingly ever-present wind, and we see in the college crystal-ball the entire Frosh class of ' 5 3 engaged in hard labor. Their initiation consisted of class con­ struction of the sidewalk between Bresee Hall and the Science Building. Many hours of shovel swinging and trowel slinging transformed the barren stretch of cam­ pus into a much used walkway with class sponsor, Professor Jack Rairdon, doing the ribbon cutting honors. As second year students, the sophomores of ' 54 aired their study-filled lungs by the customary outing at Price's Falls. An extraordinary amount of leadership po­ tential came to light as the results of spring elections found four of the six elected Student Council officers springing from their class.

As upperclassmen, the juniors of ' 5 5 broke the ice of tradition by having the Junior-Senior Banquet with its theme of "In Elysian Gardens" on campus. For their spring lyceum, they sponsored three one-act plays, which were presented by the speech department. Also, with the coming of spring, many class members paid a visit to the marriage altar, thus further "unifying" the class. Coming down to the wire of this year, the seniors distinguished themselves by claiming their fourth con­ secutive Echo Tournament championship. The social event of the year was portrayed in a dinner party based on a theme of Ancient Greece. The class, which had dwindled to approximately one-hundred ten members, sponsored for a fall lyceum a speech department pres­ entation of three one-act plays, coupled with a spring program featuring R. H. Isaacs, lyric tenor, in a lyceum of fine music. For relaxation, a three day trip to Camp Classen provided a good time for everyone. Back in the concrete business for their gift to the school, they made possible the construction of the super-sidewalk between Bresee Hall and the Student Union Building. With this brief resume' it is easily seen why the moist-eyed fourth year men have a few misgivings, as the final curtain falls on this, the senior year of ' 56. 69


DORIS AMMONS Dallas, Texas; B. S. Elementary Education; :;ospel Team, Secretary; )orm President; �lead Hostess.

NILLIAM BATES 3artlesville, Oklahoma; \.B., Religion.

GAYLAND AUBREY Dover, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

FREDA ARCHER Sayre, Oklahoma; B .S., Elementary Education; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting; Treble Choir.

DWAYNE BAILEY Augusta, Kansas; A.B., Religion.

Sen iors

GEORGE B IGGS Wayside, Kansas; B.S., Business Education; F.T.A. Business Club.

SHELDA BEALS Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Biology Club; Treble Choir; Queen Attendant.

70

TOM BOYD Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Philosophy; Class President; President, Student Body; Director of Religious Activities; Who's Who.


'ERNON BROCKMAN ethany, Oklahoma; ,.B., Religion.

'ARK BURKHART �ethany, Oklahoma; <.B., Religion; Ministerial •ssociation, President; :heerleader; Faculty tudies Committee.

LORETA BROYLES Alma, Arkansas; A.B., Speech; F.T.A.; Biology Club; Gospel Team.

EILEEN BRYAN Guymon, Oklahoma; B .S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; ARROW Staff; Treble Choir.

NORMA JANE BUMPUS Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education.

Sen iors

MELBA LYNN CASE Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Psychology and Education; F.T.A.; ECHO Staff; Gospel Team.

CHARLES CASE Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Social Science.

71

PAULINE CLASSEN Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Honor Society; Gospel Team; Beth Ann.


LOUISE CLINE Gage, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Prayer and Fasting; Girls' Athletic Director.

KENNETH COKER Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

ALICE CLOUD Higgins, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Prayer and Fasting; Mission Band.

DON CONWAY Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Philosophy.

Sen iors

f. D. COOK Bethany, Oklahoma; '\.B., Religion; Class =haplain; Gospel Team, ?resident; Prayer and ?asting, Vice President.

PAT COURTNEY Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

GRACE CRAIG Meade, Kansas; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Gospel Team; Vice President, Bud Robinson Hall.

72

HAROLD DAILY Alma, Arkansas; B .S., Business.


BARBARA DAVIS Bethany, Oklahoma; A. B., Religion; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting; Ministerial Association.

ROBBIE DIFFEE Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; B.S., Home Economics; Home Ec. Club; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

GERALD DRYDEN Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Business Education; Business Club; Basketba11; Outstanding Player Award.

RUTH DRYDEN Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Business Education; F.T.A.; Business Club.

Sen iors

SAM EDMONDS Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Philosophy.

ERNEST FARMER Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Social 路 Studies; Junior Class President; Who's Who; ARROW Staff, Business Manager.

ROBERT EMRICH Miltonvale, Kansas; A.B., Religion; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

73

JIM GARDNER Meade, Kansas; A.B., Philosophy; Student Council, Vice President; A Cappe11a; Honor Society, Vice President.


DON GASSETT Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S.,Business; A Cappella; Business Club.

CANTLEY GEORGE Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Spanish; F.T.A., President; Gospel Team; Mission Band.

BARBARA GOODSON Texarkana, Texas; B.S., Business Education; Business Club; Dorm Cotfncil; ARROW Staff.

MARJORIE GREVE Newton, Iowa; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Prayer and Fasting; Meek Missionary Society.

Sen iors

BILL HADDO\V Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Social Science.

DICK HALTOM Coffeyville, Kansas; A.B., Philosophy; A Cappella; Philosophy Club, Vice President; Ministerial Association,

DON HALE Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

74

VIRGI IIA HALTOM Coffeyville, Kansas; B.S., Elementary Education; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting; Dorm Chaplain. Vice President


AMOS HANN Winfield, Kansas; A.B., Religion; Gospel Team, Vice President.

KENNETH HERRICK Farmington, New Mexico; B.S., Biology; ECHO Staff; Biology Club, President; Assistantship in Biology.

LEON HESS Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; ECHO Staff; Ministerial Association.

PHILLIP HILL Helena, Arkansas. A.B., Religion

Sen iors

GERALD HOGAN Pine Bluff, Arkansas; A.B., Psychology; Psychology Club.

ERNEST HOWLAND Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

JUNE HOLLAND Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.

75

DOLORES JANTZ Newton, Kansas; Honor Society; Freshman Scholarship; Student Piano instructor; Music Dept. Assistant.


LAWRENCE JANTZ Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Honor Society; Class Scholarship; Honor Society Scholarship; A Capella Choir.

DICK JARRELL Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Prayer and Fasting; Basketball; Texas Athletic Director.

DEJUANA JARRELL Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Prayer and Fasting; Messiah.

JOHN KELLY Sturgis, South Dakota; B.S., Chemistry; Honor Society; Biology Club; Chemistry Associates Scholarship.

Sen iors

ALLYN KENNEDY Bethany, Oklahoma; B.A., History; ECHO Tournament King; Most Valuable Player Award; Basketball.

VICKY KLINNER Bethany, Oklahoma; B .S., Home Economics.

DORSEY KIRBY Kansas City, Missouri; B .S., Business; Business Club.

76

LAVERNE KNIERIM Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., English; Gospel Team; F.T.A.; Prayer and Fasting.


ALTHEA KOHNK Grand Island, Nebraska; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Mission Band; Dorm Council.

JOHN LEPPER Bethany, Oklahoma

AULEEN LAMB Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Senior Lyceum.

GRAHAM LUKENS Atchison, Kansas; A.B., Psychology; Honor Society; Psychology Club.

Sen iors

BEVERLY LUNDY Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., English; ARROW Staff; Honor Society; Literary Society.

WILLIAM McNABB Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Biology Club; Gospel Team.

GENE MAY Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Chemistry; Chemistry Club; Chemistry Department Lab Assistant.

'77

NORMAN MEAZELL Bethany, Oklahoma; B .S., Business; Music Club.


MIKKELSON, VERNA Minneapolis, Minnesota; B.S., Elementary Education; ECHO Staff; F.T.A.

WAYNE MURROW Alva, Oklahoma A.B., Religion.

KARLOS MORGAN Lake Charles, Louisiana; A.B., Religion; Mission Band; Ministerial Association; Mixed Chorus.

DIANE NEELY Bethany, Oklahoma; B .S., Elementary ' Education; A Cappella; ARROW Staff, Assistant Editor; College Queen.

Sen iors

DWIGHT NEWEN足 SCHWANDER Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

DICK NEWTON Chetopa, Kansas; A.B., Religion; Class Chaplain; Director of Religious Activities; Class Vice President.

ARK NOEL Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting; Basketball.

78

DICK OSBORN Dallas, Texas; A.B., History; A Cappella; Plainsman Quartet; Ministerial Association, President.


PATSY PAGAN Stroud, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Honor Society; Senior Faculty Representative; Dorm Council.

JANELLE PHILLIPS Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Home Economics; Class Vice President; ECHO Staff; Literary Society, President.

MYRLENE PITTS Bethany, Oklahoma; B .S ., Elementary Education; Mission Band, Secretary; A Cappella; F.T.A.

ROBERTA POSEY Wellington, Texas; B.S., Psychology and Education; Honor Society; ARROW, Editor; Student Council; Who's Who.

Sen iors

LENA LOU PULLIAM Duncan, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting.

JOHN REESE Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Student Pastor.

BONNIE RITTER Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., History.

79

PATSY ROBINSON Waco, Texas; B .S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Honor Society; Prayer and Fasting.


JOHN ROGERS Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

DOROTHY SCHAUER Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Home Economics; F.T.A.; Home Ec. Club.

EVELYN ROUSSELLE McCook, Nebraska; A.B., English; ARROW, Associate Editor; Literary Society; F.T.A.

ARDEN SICKENBERG Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B.,Religion.

Sen iors

EARL SKINNER Kenosha, Wisconsin; B.S., Chemistry.

LUCILLE SLOAN Aline, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; ECHO Staff; F.T.A., Treasurer; Dorm Council.

LENORE SLOAN Blackwell, Oklahoma; B .S., Elementary Education; ECHO Staff; F.T.A.; Dorm Council.

80

CARSON SNOW Bethany, Oklahoma; A. B., Religion; Honor Society.


\VILMA SNOWBARGER Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; \Vho's Who; Jamboree Queen; Class Secretary.

SHIRLEY STANGELAND Ponca City, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Honor Society; Class Secretary; Student Council, Secretary; Jamboree Queen.

REBA SPOON Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education.

EVANGELINE STEELE Coffeyville, Kansas; B.S., Elementary Education; Heart Pal Queen; \Vho's \Vho; A Cappella.

Sen iors

KENNETH SUTTON Dallas, Texas; A.B., Psychology.

CAROL SWIM Kansas City, Missouri; A.B., English; ARROW Staff; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

HELE TURNER Eastland, Texas; B.S., Business; Prayer and Fasting; Mission Band; Business Club, Treasurer.

81

DALE TUTTLE Kalvesta, Kansas; A.B., Biology; ECHO, Editor; Sr. Class President; Who's Who; Class Vice President; Chaplain Mission Band.


ARLESS WILSON Marshall, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; A Cappella; Music Club; Jamboree.

EMMALEE WITTLER Jansen, Nebraska; B.S., Elementary Education.

DOROTHEA WIRE Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Business Education; F.T.A.; Business Club.

CLARA WOMACK Telephone, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting.

Sen iors

MADOLY WRIGHT Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; B.S., Music Education; Honor Society; Freshman Award; Chapel Organist; Prayer and Fasting.

ELLIS ZIEBARTH St. James, Minnesota; B.S., Business; Business Club, President.

LEON WYSS Bethany, Oklahoma.

82

ROBERT ZIMMERMEN Bertha, Minnesota; A.B., Religion.


Cl a ss Offic ers Paul Edmonds Charles Strawn Irma Garnand

________ _____________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

Dr. Floyd

Vice-President

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ ______

Clifton McNabb Lester Knight

President

___

___________________

Secretary

Treasurer

Student Council Representative

____________________ _ _ _____

Sponsor At the J u nior-Senior

banquet,

a

somewhat

"fishy" g reeting

from

junior class prexy Poul Edmonds gains varied respons � from Emcee Bob Visor; guest speaker Dr. Hamlin; and the college's Fi rst Lady, Mrs. Cantrell.

J un. i o r s Cl a s s oi 1 9 5 7 Like a seasoned veteran going into battle, the junior class returned to BNC. They were "old hands" at this business of going to college, and confidence radiated from their every movement. They could only faintly recall the fear and trembling which had controlled them but two short years ago. The pangs of home­ sickness that they had fought to conceal during those first few months were only shadows in an illustrious past and the difficulty of research papers was all but forgotten in this, their new role as upperclassmen. They held the respect of those "foolish" freshmen who almost trembled at their approach, as well as the homage of those self-styled "sophisticated" sophomores who were beginning to "feel their oats"; only the "senile" seniors still exercised any control over these Junior Juggernauts. Under the capable leadership of their loved and appreciated sponsor, Dr. Fred Floyd, . the first semester clicked steadily by, with each day holding the formu­ lation of future activities or present realities. Seeking escape from any possible m o n o t o n y , these juniors organized a class hayride to Lake Overholser, where they soon became "stuffed" with hot dogs and all the trimmings.

The irresistible temptation of the marriage altar and the ruggedness of mid-term examinations reduced the number of junior scholars by ten, leaving one hundred forty-two faithful ones to begin the second semester of this, their third year. A Man Called Peter, the story of the famed Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall, which was presented by the speech department for the Junior Lycenm, was a near sellout in a two night pres­ entation. Following this "solid" smash, the class turned to things of a more "liquid" nature and in true junior style presented one of the most uniquely different junior-senior banquets in h i s t o r y . For innumerable "breathless" moments, members of both classes mar­ velled at the beauty and charm of a banquet held "Under the Sea". The book of memories was becoming filled-ban­ quets, initiation, picnics, parties, outings, and on the more serious side, assignments, revivals, recitals, chapel, research papers-all the ingredients that make college what it is. However, almost as quickly as it began, the year came to an abrupt halt, with all of its victories and its few defeats. Crystal gazers began peering into the future, into that vastness that holds the unknown, but they were seeing as next year's seniors, the Junior class of ' 56. 85


J u n i o :r s

Raymond Adams Harold Allen

Robert Allen orma Atkinson Robert Atkinson Bessie Babcock Charles Baldwin

Patricia Barham Shirley Bauder Gordon Beckett Sam Bell Donna Bond

Marion Bond Ruth Bond Billie Bonner \V. 0. Boomer Beverly Boyd

Harold Brown

Dnris Bumpus

Some do and some don't. Apparently John Hendricks does as the jun足

86

\

ior picnic finds him a central attraction.


Boast of being the richest class in school

Jerry Burns Robert Campbell

Charlene Carrick Lucretia Carter Elmer Chandler Horace Classen Terry Connally

Jo Cook Tommy Cooksey Maxine Coons Molly Copeland Rex Crumpley

Claud Cypert !Vlitchell Daugherty Lee Davis Jerry Demetre Jack Driscoll

Paul Edmonds

Roger Egerton

Before the homecoming festivities, there occurred many such scenes as this-the Honor Society working on their float for the parade.

87


J u n i o :r s

Imogene Elliott Darlene Farmer

Ruth Fika Phyllis Fisher Larry Flood Rachel Floyd Lou Ann Fox

Harold Franklin Irma Lee Garnand Earnest Garrett Helen Goetz Vonciel Gordon

Darrell Goulden Jo Ann Hale Chuck Harper Billy Joe Harris Harry Harris

Robert Hendricks

John Hendricks

Via the use of a flashlight "The Three Flats and a Sharp": Jack lmel,

88

Dean Horton, Larry Flood, and Howard Oliver, add a bit of barber-

-..h nn hnrmnnv tn th,:::��. i11ninr r'\nr+v


And of h aving the school's most ex perienced sponsor

Robert Herrick Kendall Hight

Bobby Hoover Dean Horton Delma Howland Jerry Hull Jack Imel

Virginia Irvine Reba Keys Norwood King Shirley King Kenneth Klemme

Lester Knight Billy Lambert Kenneth Luther Cliffie McCurley Clifton McNabb

Bob Madison

Don Martin

Bob Madison, Tom Boyd, Ronald Snowberger, and Dwight Southworth provide someth ing unusual for dress-up night as they go Lil' Abner style_

89


J u n i o :r s Sue Merrill Orville lVIobley

Gene Moore I Iarold Moore

Dwight Neal Dean

eff

I !award Oliver

Bobbie Owens Esther Ozias Monte Page Bill Penquite \Vilma Peters

Harrv Pierce Ruth Pierce Rodney Pitts Carolyn Puckett Dean Purtee

Roger Riggs

Franklin Roberts

Candle light and soft music linked with the beautiful program MC'd

90

by Ruth Pierce transformed the SUB into a winter wonderland.


" W h a t w e a 1路 e s p e a li s s o loudl y that p e o p l e cannot hear what we say"

Kenneth Rogers !\ !artha Rogers

Rosalie Rose Harry Schoenhals John Schubert Ardith Schuler Mary Lou Sells

Roy Sim pson Bill Sipes Frank Skillern Dorothy Sloan Dixie Smith

LaDonna Sparks Charles Strawn Richard Stump Fuad Safadi Floyd Sumner

lola Sumner

Vernon Swim

Robert Herrick depicts the typical scientist, as he indu lges in close scrutiny of a histologist's slide.

9


J u n i o :r s

Alice

ell Taylor

'orman Tibbetts

Jim Tracy [arian Truax Forrest Tyler Bob Viser Grace Wallace

Levoy Wallace Doris West Eva Wheeler Julia White Floe Williams

Virginia Williams Wanda Williams Shirley Willison Glenna Yarbrough Roy Young

Henry Zaleta

.'A

.-.ďż˝

)

SCUL PTUR E r;z at

As Professor Bowman raises an eye at the photographer during the a l l-school banquet, lenore Sloan expresses her dislike for olives or

mavbe it's the table decoration<.


Cl a ss Offic er s Richard Leffel Richy Lewis

_

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

Katherine Snowbarger Vera Ruth Winter Gary Hartpence

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

President

Vice-President

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Dr. Vernon Snowbarger

Secretary

Treasurer

Student Council Representative

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Sponsor

At the All School Banq uet, a moment to remember for sophomores Oletho ludwig and Gory H o rtpence, is Dr. E. Boyd Shannon's presen· lotion to them of the All-round Freshman Awards.

S o p h o iD o :r e s Cla ss oi 1 9 5S It was like a giant magnet dra�·ing them back to

results of a day's team competition. A terrific time was

BNC as vows of not returning were tossed out the

had by all, and the end of the clay ' s activity found

nearest window. The desire to see the "gang" was

the frosh ''bare of beanies" - victorious by a very

overwhelming, and the wish to hear the sound of the

narrow margin.

chimes ring through the evening became foremost in the minds of sophomores from Texas to Timbuktu. Suddenly, like the surge of floodwaters after spring rains, the mass influx upon the college began.

The "experienced" sophs had learned to cope with the evils of

7 : 30

classes, pop quizzes, and term papers;

so the routine of college life Rowed smoothly, though far from uneventfully, along its designated channel.

Undoubtedly seismograph operators surveyed their

The barrier of Sophomore Tests, an intensive program

machines with skepticism as that instrument probably

of examination, was successfully hurdled, with few if

recorded the meeting of room-mate with room-mate.

any casualties, thus needlessly inflating the non-suffering

It would not have been unexpected if radio stations

ego of the Second Year Men.

had closed clown as a result o ( the tremendous amount

of static thrown into the atmosphere from revived "bull

sessions" and "hen parties". Barrels of mid-night oil were consumed for light by which to relate summer experiences. Friends who had not returned were eulo­ gized almost to the point of perfection, and the for­ boding appearance of new professors was discussed and re-discussecl. Another college year had begun.

The magic month of April, coupled with the glories of spring, turned the fancy of the sophomores to the great outdoors -the Sophomore Outing. For the en­ tirety of a clay, beginning at

1 0 :00

5 :00

A.M. and ending at

P.M., the sophomores romped rambunctiously

amidst the scenic beauties of Price's Falls. \,Yonclerfully

weary, and with heads full of memories, they made their way back to the sheltering arms of B

C and the year's

Immediately there appeared a cloud on the un­

end festivities. It had been a wonderful year, decisions

blemished horizon of these "omnipotent" �ophomores

had been made, possibilities had become probabilities,

-those upstart freshmen. Sanctioned by Professor

and dreams approached reality, but almost unexpectedly

Snowbarger, who was serving his second stint as class

the end of May heralded the c l o s i n g of a n o t h e r

sponsor, there was promulgated a program of frosh

college year - the second successful year for the

"beanie-wearing", the length of time to depend on the

Sophomore Class.

95


Yvonne Adams

Soph o m ores

C. L. Armstrong

Charles Ballard LaVeta Bee! LaVeda Bernstorf Buddy Biggs Eleanor Bond

Glen Bond Helen Brindle Daniel Brown Bob Burch Mary Burdine

Glenn Burnett Wesley Burpo Lynn Burr Bill Campbell Don Carleton

Don Carney Lois Carter

Martha Carter Juan Casey

96

The a ll-school mixer, one highly nervous pig, a large quantity of lard, and a determined Don Carleton, provide entertainment for the interested group of observers.


Of t h e yea r ' s t w e l v e queen candidates, nine were sop h s .

Kirby Choate Beverly Clark

The Senate doesn't have a monopoly on investigations, for at the Christmas banquet Santa C laus checks up on the year's behavior of Wendel Craighead.

Wendel Craighead Cenell Crawford Forrest Cunningham Charles Danner Asenath Davenport

Beatrice Davis Ramona Davis Doris DeVore Phil Duff Buddy Emmert

\Vinona Ensminger Norman Enterline Jack Eyestone Bill Fika Don Firestone

Don Fitzgerald Ellen Fitzgerald Wilda Foote Mary Foster James Fox 97


Doyle Frazier

Sophomores

Carl Gaede

Gene Galbraith Dale Gardner Marjorie Gentz J. C. Cilley Bertha Gill

Betty Gorham Dorothy Gray Ann Hamiter Dan Hamiter i\ lary Anna Harrison

Cary Hartpence Bonnie Haynes l\ lary Jene Henderson Vera Herron Donald Hess

Janett Higdon Frankie Holland

Sheilia I lopkins Betty Howard

At the a ll-school mixer, a mechanized stagecoach driven by Gene

98

Galbraith is hi-jacked by hard riding Ronnie Orr and Jim Alexander.


Introduced a new and better system for initiation

Eldridge Hudgins Jerry Hutchings

Talmadge Johnson, Gary Hartpence, Harry Pierce and other enrol lees discover a sure way to contact writer's cramp-register for college.

Mac Jantz Orlando Jantz Clarence Jennings Talmadge Johnson Wendell Jones

John Jonte Marilyn Kauth Henry King Glenn Knutson Paul Lana

LaVerta Lane Martha Langley Richard Leffel Glenn Lenz Greta Lewis

Richy Lewis Shelda Limbocker Kenneth Long Oletha Ludwig Lee Roy McCleery 99


Myrna McClung

Sophom ores

Eugene McElyea

Jean l\ !cElyea Martha McMinn Iva McNabb Laura McNames Tex Maney

l\ l ary Etta Mavo Bobbie Meador Charlotte Miley DeLane Miller Sharon Miller

Lloyd Millikin Kathryn Millsap Florene Mitchell Delma Montgomery Deletta Moseley

Francis Muttoo Delores Nagel

Gypsy Nehrbass Charlene Ogden

100

Kathy Millsap receives unexpected payment for cookies and punch, while small fry looks disgustedly at the Capita listic Collegians.


Selected " Pioneers" f o r a c l a ss n a m e

Jack Packwood Jerry Parrish

While various interested parties observe, Evie Mikke lson learns from Dene Simpson that "initiation into the house of poo" can be quite a filling experience.

John Peard Beverly Price Charles Pugh Joyce Ripper Sue Robinson

Chuck Rodgers Delta Rogers Bill Rohlmeier Hiram Sanders Joyce Schurman

Jack Sheeks Dale Shotts Dene Simpson Shirley Simpson Roy Sloan

Alma Smith Katherine Snowbarger John Spire Charlotte Stanley Eugenia Steinbach 101


James Stewart Vera Stone Doyle Strother Calvin Sutterfield

Pat Swigart Allan Taylor Janet Taylor Glenda Teague Shirley Towns

Clair Uitts Shirley Veach Elvin Vermillion Donna Viser Rebecca Wachtel

Gwen Walker Phillip Washburn Dolores Wellman John Westmoreland Johnny vVestmoreland

Char! etta Weston Wesley Weston W. F. White Elizabeth Williams Lois Wimberley

Vera Ruth Winter Bob Womack Eugene Wright Albert Zabel Crystal Zentz 102


C l a ss Offic e r s Dwight Southworth Ronnie Orr

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

Ruth Knutson

President

Vice-President

_ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _ _ _ __ _ ___

Secretary

Verla Oke ------------------------Treasurer Paul Johnson Prof. Sawyer

_

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Student Council Representative

_______ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______

Sponsor As time for the "Deep South" Freshman Banq uet draws nigh, ra mbling roses and Virginia creepers erupt from flying fingers of willi ng-working Fresh committee members.

F r e s h iD e n Cl ass oi 1 9 5 9 Like a tender green shoot appearing m the midst of mature vegetation, the Freshman class of 1956 ap­ peared on the campus of BNC. From every section of the map, these tyros descended upon the college­ enthusiastic, eager, and optimistic. Many strange and awe-inspiring sights were to loom terrifyingly large before their unknowing eyes, but with craniums bulg­ ing with names, faces, and places, the Freshman Frigate boldly embarked on the sea of college life. With the capable direction of "navigator" Professor Sawyer, spon­ sor, they successfully sailed the stormy waters of Col­ lege Ocean and docked at the port of School's End­ both happier and wiser. The diary of the Frosh class of '56 would undoubtedly make use of the term "outstanding" in describing the entirety of their infant year. The All School Mixer launched them successfully, if head-long, into the rapid flowing stream of life at college. Initiation found the hordes of green beanie bedecked frosh in triumphant team competition with the sophomores for the right to remove those symbols of underclasshood. Of course, a well remembered occasion for all who attended was the extraordinary Freshman Sock Party, which featured not only a "shoeless" parade of the latest in sockwear, but also an enjoyable time for everyone. "TWIRP"

week found the ladies of the "beginner" class on the prowl and the boys trying not so very hard to elude them. "Silent Night," "Jingle Bells" and the Christmas Banquet discovered frosh lovelies in formals and cor­ sages while dinner jacketed escorts charmed their dates with deeds of unprecedented gallantry. The end of a successful first semester and the begin­ ning of a promising second gave "the greenies" any needed incentive for a "hearty" participation in the fes­ tivities of the Heart Pal Banquet. Later, the "Fighting Frosh" distinguished themselves by t r o u n c i n g the sophomore five in the consolation game of the Echo Basketball Tournament. As a crowning achievement, the social highlight of the year came in the Freshman Banquet, with a theme of Deep South, featuring class talent in decorating, programming, and entertaining. Suddenly, the final chapel service of the year was history, 7 : 30 classes were in the past, and term papers were forgotten; suitcases were packed, strange people arrived on the campus--parents; moisty eyed farewells were blurted out, and with a last long look at the almost deserted campus, the exodus began. This was the end of an era; the end of the freshman year but the begin­ ning of a class to "increase in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man".

105


F r e 8 h iD e n

John Akkerman Jimmy Alexander

Lue Anna Allen Paul Anglin Ronald Arnold ivlary Barker Ronald Barlow

Rosemary Barnett Barbara Barrett Wyvetta Beard Vernon Beckett Esther Bergen

Gerald Bergen Betty Blystone Charles Bohannan Derald Boldt Vadean Bonner

Carole Boomer

Janette Bostick

With an audience sporting the latest in hosiery, Frosh Prexy Dwight

106

Southworth comp lete with argyles, is assisted by Jeanette Ware also "a Ia sox", as he waxes eloquent at the fresh man party.


Jim Motsin ge r - K i n g of the E c h o Tournament

Donivan Bounds Leon Box

Milton Boydston Leon Bradshaw Nita Brewer Elaine Broce David Brown

Sylvia Buffington Jimmy Burgner Margaret Burns Sue Burton Lavona Butler

Neva Campbell Wally Cantrell Lynn Carr Roy Case Jo Casey

Henry Cheatwood Glen Chesnut Bobby Childress Jim Christy Nola Cinnamon

Dot Clark Joanne Claxton Gayle Clements Francis Collier William Conger '

'

IC


Fre8hmen

W. L. Crawford Sidney Cribbs

Lee Roy Cristy Stephen Cullison Waynetta Cummins James Daniel Donna Danskin

Carolyn Daugherty Lawrence Dean Kenneth Dedman Jack Dempsey Glen DeVore

Viola DeVore Victor Diffee Marvin Dodgen Larry Doskocil Stewart Downey

Ronald Durr

Patricia Easley

There goes a perfectly good excuse for a possible low grade point as

1 08

the sound-proof studio, the audiometer, and Prof. Emmel's technical knowledge prove Jim Bergner's hearing perfectly good.


Sharon Mann - Echo Tournament " Most Valuable Player" Award

Steve Eatmon Jimmy Ellis

Joanne Fenno Carmaleta Fink Alex Fitzgerald Charlene Flood

\

Nancy Foley

Marlene Forshee David Galbraith Robbie Gardner Ann Garner Martha Gibson

J. M. Gleason Marsha Gorman Ken Granger Winogene Green Vincent Greer

Billy Grimes Daisy Hailman Duane Harder Barbara Harris Mary Ruth Harris

Clarence Hawkins Doyle Hawthorn Wesley Henry Robert Hensley Marcia Higgins

1 09


F r e 8 h iD e n

Mary H ines Sherrill Hodgson

James Holcomb Joe Holladay Joyce Holland Gerald Holley Charles Hoover

Jo Howard Kenneth Hughes Robert James Jimmie Jennings Glenda Jernigan

Linda Johnson Norma Johnson Paul Johnson Ramona Johnston Karen Jones

LeRoy Jones

Barbara Kane

There's b lood in the eyes of loyal frosh, Sammye Nesmith, Verla Oak,

1 10

Jo Casey, and Joyce Holland as they prepare pom-poms for the ECHO

tnurnAV


Victors over Sophs in initia tion con tests

Bing Kelly Janice Kennedy

Peter Kim Wilma Kirk Ruth Knutson Naomi Kornelsen G. W. Kotwitz

Jerry Lambert Zola Lankford James Ray Lewis Robert Lewis Jo Lindsey

Eunice Linton Mary Loganbill Donna Lolmaugh Benny Luinstra William McBee

Margaret McCoy Preston McDuff Louis McNabb Billie McNair Wanda Mace

Don Maddox Sharon Mahin Charlie Mahoney Eleanor Manbeck Elaine Marines Ill


Fre�h men

Paul Marshall Betty Martin

Gene Martin Hazel Martin Jimmy Matlock Stanley Meek Dale Meesey

Evelyn Mikkelson Rosalia Miley Albert Miller Barbara Miller Mary Miller

Maurine Miller Walter Miller James Miranda Elizabeth Mishler Ernest Moore

Charles Moreland

Janice Morgan

At the frosh party, Derald Boldt, James Lewis, and Dwight South­

llZ

worth observe that Mary Loganbill and Steve Eatmon have discov­ ered a new use for a toothoick and a lifP.<ovAr


Year was highlighted b y " So u th e rn Plantation" Banquet

Jean Morgan Pat Morgan

Bill Morris Jim Motsinger Richard Mountford John Needels Patricia Nehrbass

Sammye Nesmith Dean Newsom James Noggles John Norell Bobby Norton

Verla Oke Ronnie Orr Lorrene Owens Ann Pace Jane Parker

Maureen Pearce Mabel Pearson T. J. Pearson Julia Penny Merle Pershall

Delores Peterson Julia Phillips David Philo Virginia Potter George Powell

113


Fresh men

Connie Price Flora Pywell

Carmen Qualls Dorothy Ramsey Joyce Ransom John Rawls Carolyn Rea

Eunice Reep Mary Lou Reeves Aubrey Ridley Ed Rowley James Sanders

Delbert Sargent Rodney Sayers Dean Schmidt Marjorie Schmidt M. G. Scroggs

Sally Seachord

Carolyn Shackelford

At the dorm party, Virginia Potter supplies mood music as PGiu l Ed足

1 14

monds gives warning against the g hosts and goblins.


Excelled in all phases of college life

Marilynn Shipley John Shocklee

Betty Smith Clark Smith Kenneth Smith Mae Belle Smith Rachel Smith

Robert Smith Roger Smith Sharon Smith Ronald Snowbarger Dwight Southworth

Wayne Stallings Shirley Statzer Naomi Stewart Raymond Stiverson Mary Stoneroad

Byron Strange Kay Strawn Joanne Stroud Paul Stroud Carl Summer

Jack Sumpter Gary Taylor Patsy Teas William Tennyson James Terrell 115


Fresh men

Dale Tiry Donald Vail Violita Verness

Thelma Walcher Kenneth Walden Gaylen Wallace Isa Wallace Carolyn Ward

Jeannette Ware Clifton Watson Nadine Watson 0bed Watters Shirlene Webb

Dale Webster Lona Wheatley Bob Wheeler Floyd White Robert White

Pat Wicker Janice Willey Calvin Williamson Robert Wood Doris Woods

Vivian Woods Johnny Wright Carol Yarbrough Dwain Young Marlene Ziebarth

1 16


Post G r a d u_ a t e s

Darrel Spoon Th-B

Carl Prentice Th-B With a background of coffee urns and toasters, the "Armour" bedecked Mary Ann is proudly displayed by poppa Koichi Yamamoto.

Koichi Yamamoto Th-B

117


Wynona Burkhart Fine Arts

Robert Gilpin Adult Special

Wilma Ingram Adult Special

Joe Lyons Second Semester

Special s

Darrel Varbell Second Semester

118

Wilber Wade Second Semester

Henry Wagoner Adult Special

Wilma Wood Graduate


.lllr,u ,. llrJ,, \*'""''

'lq ,,.,,. ,,<!

�1Ut�rut� ,.1/uu,.,r., ul, ,. .,.,, , tl.',!ll,.

,.,...


W h o's W h o Scholastic standing, personality, extra-curricular activities-all these are factors to be carefully considered in the selection of Who's Who candidates. This year, by joint action of the Administrative Council and the Student Council of Bethany Nazarene College, thirteen students were elected to the honor of membership in this organization. Signal, outstanding, and salient are but partial description of these personages and their achievements. Prominent in character, collegiate service, and future potential, the following students are those who have received this enviable honor of being the college representatives in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges o f 1 956Dale Tuttle"I never knew so young a body with so old a head."

Madalyn Wright"There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip."

Paul Edmonds"He reads much; he is a great observer."

Evangeline Steele"She that was ever fair and never proud, had tongue a t will and yet was never loud."

Howard Oliver-

"He is as fuii of valour as of kindness; princely in both."

Wilma Snowbarger"From her shall read the perfect ways of honour."

Chuck Harper"Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal."

Shirley Stangeland.....;.

"A peace above all eartl1ly dignities, consc1ence ."

a

still and quiet

Tom Boyd-

"A man in all the world's new fashion pla n te d , That hath a mint of phrases in his brain."

Sue Merrill-

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low, an excellent thing in woman."

Lester Knight-

"He was ever precise in promise-keeping."

Roberta Posey"As merry as Ernest Farmer-

"He hath

1 20

a

the day is l o n g " .

heart as sound as a bell."


DALE TUTTLE Kalvesta, Kansas


MADOLYN WRIGHT Oklahoma City, Oklahoma


PAUL EDMONDS Bethany, Oklahoma


EVANGE LINE STE ELE Coffeyville, Kansas


HO\VARD OLIVER Newton, Kansas


WILMA SNOWBARGER Oklahoma City, Oklahoma


CHUCK HARPER Kansas City, Missouri


TOM BOYD Lufkin, Texas


t

SUE MERRILL Marshall, Texas


LESTER KNIGHT Mineral Wells, Texas


ROBERTA POSEY Wellington, Texas


ERNEST FARMER Bethany, Oklahoma


H o iD e c o iD i .. g C o :r o ii a t i o n.

Some "Ki n g ly" assistance is given by Jim Gardner to "Her Majesty" Shirley Stange足 land.

And followed this much scrutinized route.

The royal procession, led by "King" Gard足 ner and "Queen" Shirley, began here . . .

No medieval court was ever more charming than this majestic assemblage at the Homecoming coronation.

1 38


9fo '.n ecomin g Qu e e n


H e a r t Pa l C o r o Ji a t i o n.

With a background of soft candlelight and framed by the valentine decorated archway, Heart Pal Queen Dixie Smith and King Dean Horton view their domain.

Members of the royal court, Princes Chuck Harper and Dale Tuttle and Princesses Vera Winter and Kathy Snowberger witness the coronation.

"King" Dean first places the crown on "Queen11 Dixie

140

Amusedly assists her in some difficu lty .

And sits with her, making a regal couple.


Echo C o r o u_ a t i o :n

At the ECHO coronation, "King" Jim Motsinger apparently longs for the pace of the game as "Queen" Kathy 路Snowberger beams at her subjects.

"Queen" Kathy with her "Ladies i n Waiting" Pat Swigart and Vera Winter surveys the realm of her "queen" dom.

" H er Majesty" Kathy receives the queenly bouquet from " H is Majesty" Jim as other members of the royal fgmily, Kendall H ight, Pat Swigart, Vera Winter, and Vernon Swim, await her command.

142


{)Catherine @!nowbar g er 6 c h o 9'o u rn a m e n l {Sf}ueen


Accompanied

by Jeanie Steinbach as

Barbara,

Peter Marshall (Ed Rowley), leads a g roup from New York Presbyterian Church in a Scotch ballad songfest.

••

A M a .. C a l l e d _ ... - ·

Hectic days and tuberculosis take their toll, as Catherine Marshall (Ruth Pierce) collapses at the feet of Peter Marshall (Ed Rowley).

' The con flicting optntons of Peter Marsha l l (Ed Rowley) and Senator Polk (Wallace White) concerning juvenile delinquency, give rise to a heated discussion, wherein Marshall suffers a heart attack.

144

P e t e :r ��


A reconciled couple, Marian (Geneva Chand ler) and Steven

Grant

(Wayne

Murrow)

a re

warmly wel足

comed by their daug hter Susan (Reba Keys) who, because of their morital problems and attitudes, left home and came to the Marshalls'.

J esse and Judith Bickle, typical spinsters, portrayed by Crystal Zentz and Wilma Snowberger, become prop足 erly astounded at the proper time.

A dejected teen-ager, Joe Keating, (Bob Norton) real足 izes the folly of his delinquent actions.

While

the

tuberculosis

stricken

Catherine Marshall

(Ruth Pierce) looks on, her son Peter John

(Mike

Weed) gets a scolding from H ulda (lou Ann Fox) the cook.

145


Senior

Fall

L y c e •• ID

Asylum escapee Dale Tuttle, in the role of Wilson, violently accuses Dick H a ltom as Dr. Stephens for the death of his wife and threatens, at g un-point, to find vengeance by killing Mrs. Stephens.

" The Bar r ier "

As the lights go down in the Fine Arts auditorium, a sense of anticipation falls over the audience. With the cry of "Curtain Time", the assemblage readies itself for one of the rare drarhatic treats of the year-two one-act plays and one two-act play featured as the Senior Fall Lyceum. "The Barrier", a drama which portrayed a young over-burdened doctor, whose wife tried to make herself a "barrier" between her husband and overwork, inter­ ruptions and annoyances. "The Bond Between", another drama, depicted the story of the mother of a boy condemned to death, and her ii1cessant plea with the governor's sick wife for her son's pardon. "Home for Christmas", a light, two-act comedy cen­ tering around the return of a family, which had scat­ tered to every part of the country, to their home for Christmas. Suspense, tragedy, and comedy all combined for audience enjoyment; minute upon minute of laughter, tears, hopes, and fears as the players trooped across, up and down-stage in their various roles. Heroes were never so heroic, heroines so charming, villains so villain­ ous, or comedians so amusing. When the final curtain fell on the last scene of the evening, a thunderous ovation demanded encore after encore as the audience expressed their satisfaction with the Senior Fall Lyceum.

U nderstand ing and sympathy shown by lois Carter, the doctor's wife, calm the emotions of the escapee,

Overcome with the care given him by the Stephens, Wilson

who allows his injured hand to be bandaged by the

relents in his revengeful

woman he had determined to kill.

146

menace and sees new hope for his wrecked life.


" Home for C hr istmas "

"Mother'', Grace Craig, recalls some of their chi ldhood antics to her eldest "son", Gaylord Elam, and young est '1daughter11, Norma Bumpus. It's "old home week" as the plot of ''Home for Ch ristmas" unfolds in a series of renewed acquai ntances.

1 1 Secretary" LeDonne Sparks and ''dau3hter" Reba Keys hear "governor's wife" Lou Ann Fox's relating a supernatural dream.

" T he Bond Betw een " In the 11dream", lou Ann, at the insistence of ''mother" Floe Williams who seeks clemency for her son, makes a call to 路i he governor's office.

1 47


H a iD i e t

Fear and amazement ore mirrored on the faces of Horatio (Cha rles Harrison) and the castle guards as the Ghost (Gory Ha rtpence) stalks the platform at midnight.

The ghostly vision onca more walks the night-this time to tell the tole of his death at his brother's hands to young H a mlet (Dole Tuttle).

Hamlet reads descriptively from the pen of a "satirical

"The play is the thing" wherein H a mlet catches the conscience of King

rogue" to the apprehensive Polonius (Paul Edmonds).

Claudius (Gaylord Elom) and Queen Gertrude (Floe Williams) as Luci足 onus (Jock Sheeks) re-inocts the poisoning of Ha mlet's father (portrayed by Dene Simpson).

148


P r i ii c e oi

D e it i.. a r k

"

The revengeful H a mlet frightens his evil mother for her part in the death of his father.

The fair Ophelia (Oietha Ludwig) loses h e r m i n d as a result o f h e r father's death and Hamlet's refusal of her love. The Queen and Laertes, h e r brother (lawrence Dean), stand shocked at her lack of coherence.

Horatio bids his companion farewell as the bodies of the King, Queen, Hamlet accomplishes his !ask and revenges his father

Laertes, and H a mlet litter the court i n the dreadful closing scene.

as he murders the King with the envenomed foil.

1 49


S t u d e il t C o .-. n c i l L y c e n iD R. H. ISAACS The Fine Arts Auditorium was filled to capacity when on the evening of April 6, the Senior class pre­ sented R. H. Isaacs, popular lyric tenor and former BNC student, in a lyceum· of fine music. \Vith a pro­ gram ranging from light classical to operatic, from Puccini to Firestone, Mr. Isaacs satisfied the musical diet of everyone concerned . Soloist for a year on a weekly religious television program from WBKB, Chicago, Mr. Isaacs has also made sacred recordings for several of the leading record­ ing companies. He was guest soloist on Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the Town" and has also appeared on the "Chicago Theater of the Air", a nationwide radio broadcast. During the lyceum, thunderous applause, register­ ing audience enthusiasm and appreciation, greeted Mr. Isaacs and each of his numbers, while his finale, "If I Could Tell You" by Firestone, demanded encore after encore. One of the most favorably received Lyceums of its type, arousing ci.vic as well as student interest, this program, to everyone's satisfaction, drew a near record turnout. Extending to the audience an opportunity to hear and enjoy good music in a high level perform­ ance was the Senior Lyceum-R . H. Isaacs.

S e n i o r L y e e n iD MRS. G. B. \VILLIAMSON On the evening of March 3, 1956, there came to the Fine Arts auditorium of BNC a rare treat, seldom found outside the realm of professional circles : Mrs. G. B . Williamson i n a program of interpretive reading. De­ scribed by all who attended as superb, the program was of the highest level, intellectually as well as spiritually, and it depicted perfectly the caliber of the lady who presented it. Certainly an artist in her own right, Mrs. \Villiam­ son has been called upon for her talents by both Eastern Nazarene College of \Vollaston, Massachusetts, and Olivet Nazarene College of Kankakee, Illinois. The quality of the program she presented to the audience of BNC is sufficient justification for these constant demands, since the superlative nature of those selec­ tions and their presentation can not be denied. The recital consisted of selections from the book of Esther coupled with the classical works : "The Soul of the Bell", "Go Down Death", and "Three Arshins of Land" with the nature of the presentation being a com­ parative one, pointing out the Biblical backgrounds for classical writings.

1 50


By using this "Surrey With

the

Fringe

It was the afternoon of Friday, November 1 8, 1 9 5 5 . The few remaining residents o f the almost barren trees were stirred by a balmy autumn breeze, while in the sky above, a flock of pessimistic ducks winged their way southward. The streets of Bethany were relatively quiet, disturbed only by everyday traffic, but over the entire setting there lay an air of expectation soon to give vent to realization. Suddenly the kaleidoscope of color which had been building up in "Windy Stadium" erupted! Flowing out onto the city streets, the organism begap to take definite form. Here one could discern the shape of floats-there, the beauty of Queen and Princess bedecked convertibles. With the exciting blare of trumpets and the stirring roll of drums, the parade began to move. Everybody from six to sixty loves a parade and the townspeople of Bethany are certainly no e x ce p t i o n _ Housewives and garage mechanics eagerly craned their necks to catch a glimpse of the animated splendor and vivacity. Within a few minutes the sidewalks were crowded with spectators seeking to witness the exhibition of collegiate frivolity. Winding through the thoroughfares of the city, the Homecoming Parade, and its theme of song titles, spread a symphony of carefree gaiety and lightheartedness. From the laughing faces of the participating students as well as the proclamations of the floats one could almost detect the feeling of optimism_ In the sparkling eyes of the Queen and Princesses one could see the "pomp and circumstance" of the coming coronation_ In the eyes of the male clan one could see the crowd-packed gymnasium, hear the squeak of rubber on hardwood, and the swishing sound of the ball passing through the net Everywhere, and everyone radiated with the thrill of-Homecoming.

On

Top", the prize winning a l umni creation por路 !rayed best the sang title theme of the Home颅 coming Parade.

H o iD e c o iD i it g

A display of Bud Robinson Hall's beauty, coupled with

Henry

Cheatwood's

warbling

of

a

romantic

ballad, created a bit of the giving spirit.

The home-ec masterpiece displays the Redskin intention of baking four and twenty a l u mni on the basketba l l court.

1 52


Aided by two lusty "basso profundos", Jernigan Hall g i rls label the Alumni "Too Pooped to Pop".

Two bashful Redmen, "Rain-in-the-face" Edmonds and "Sitting

Bull"

Harper, catch up on some

interesting reading.

Para d e

The addition of F.T.A.'s "School Days" finds Redskins plus Redskins equal Alumni defeat.

victory over the Alumni.

153


F r e s h iD a n B a ii q n e t "Deep

S o u t h ''

With a "Carolina Moon" a nd 11Stars fa lling on Alabama" combined with a delicious menu, it is no wonder the Fresh banquet was heralded a success.

Bing Kelly, lawrence Dean, Bob Smith, and Ronnie Barlow (the Four Freshmen) blend voices for a fine southern ballad.

'Neath the magnolia tree there stood Wesley Hen ry, a south路 ern gentleman and emcee of the " 'Iii 'ole gel together".

As honorary southerners, freshmen discover that 'possum jaw and corn pone was never like fried chicken with all the fixin's.

1 54


After arrival at Price's Fal ls, their base of operations, the sophomores re-embarked lor horseback riding, hiking, etc.

Joyce Ripper and Bobbie Meador discover that though the sun may be warm, the spring-led mountain stream is sti ll a bit icy.

S o p h o iii o r e o .. t i n g

A hot l u nch is followed by ice cream bars lor dessert as the sophs pause lor refueling.

Filled p lates and soo n-to-be-fi lled stomachs are the general order as Genell Crawford and Tal Johnson hit the "end of the line".

To the dismay of both him and his teammates Clair Uitts discovers that a low inside pitch has nicked a corner lor a ca lied strike.

155


Apparently equipped with Dr.

his personal aqua-lung,

Hamlin as guest speaker, charmed the entire audience.

Undersea pressure has no effect an the appetites of these hungry juniors and seniors.

J u n. i o :r - S e :n i o r

B a n q .. e t

Bob Childress, as King Neptune, su rveys h is realm and the festivities therein.

1 56

Oblivious

to

Freddy-the-fish,

Emcee

Bob

Viser

waxes eloquent to the satisfaciion of Dr. Hamlin.


" Under The Sea"

J uniors a nd seniors alike "waded in" to enjoy the delicacy of fish with a l l the "swimmings".

U nder scrutiny of senior class president, Dale Tuttle, are head table occupants Prof. and Mrs. Rairdon and Dr. and Mrs. Ripper.

The splendors of the ocean floor provide majestic background for Dale Tuttle's response to the j u n ior prexy's welcome.

"La Mer" and other flowing melodies played by Myra Luginbyhl provide the proper atmosphere.

1 57


Senior

As the head table so vividly i l lustrates, the Hellenic gods and goddesses with their nectar and ambrosia "never had it so good11 as the seniors at thei r Greek Dinner.

With the stately pillars of Athens for a background, Don Conway gives Dale Tuttle a melodramatic ear-scorching in a satirical treatment of ancient civilization.

These senior girls are truly "heovenly11 in appearance as they portray the clouds with whom Dick Osborn as Socrates and Don Conway, the aspiring scholar, philosophize.

Seniors and thei r g uests are of one accord in their praise, "Olympus was never like this."

1 58


H eart Pal B a :n q u. e t

At the head table of the Heart Pal Banquet, Dick Osborn is rather conspicuous as he dines with Mrs. Taylcrr, Mrs. Cantrell, Vera Winter, and Doris Ammons.

Clever conversation, a cumu lus of cooking, and a connavmg Cupid are combined to make the Heart Pa l Banq uet a wonderful success.

Rounding out a seeming ''national" move足 ment is "Okie'' Louise Cline and "Missour足

At the Heart Pal Banquet, California

ian" Dene Simpson, as their engagement is

and Min nesota are united in the en足 gagement

announcement

of

olso approved by "Cupid" lynne.

Bonnie

Haynes ond Ellis Ziebarth

of a "Texan" and a 11Wheatshocker", Bonnie Gray and Jim Gardner also receive the blessing of consolidator, lynne Robinson.

1 59


W o iD e n � s D o :r iD i t o :r i e s

A degree in shoe shining is not offered at BNC, but Vera Stone, Martha lang ley, Pat Barham, Rachel Smith, and Gwen Walker are first in line for a n honorary sheepskin.

B ud Sharon Mahin, laura McNames, Maurine Miller, Marilyn Kauth, and

Charlotte

pop

corn

while

a·nd

C rosby's

Stanley sample D r.

Peppers,

"White

R ob inson

I

1

Christ­

mas" lends atmosphere to the Yuletide season.

'Tis envy i n the eyes of Myrna McClung, Bobbie Meador,

Delta

Rogers,

Betty

Howard, Jeanette Higdon, as they view the wedding borger.

This is the steadying influence of Bud Robinson Hal l-the Dorm Council composed of Ju lia Penny, Ruth Knutson, Kathy Snow­ borger, "Mom1 1 Wright, Grace Craig, Lenore Sloan, Lucille Sloan, and Mary Sells.

1 60

gown of

Wilma

Snow­


Like two mother hens hovering over her brood are Jernigan and Bud Robinson Halls, girls' dormitories at BNC. These buildings are more than just collections of brick, mortar, and steel; they are, for nine months, "home" to the ladies of the college. Here, to a large extent, will be the development of the collegiate person­ ality, an increased number of friendships and acquaint­ ances will be added to the girl's repertoire, and here in that odd arrangement known as "dorm life", social, cultural, and spiritual development will be presented on the highest of levels. Undoubtedly every girl who walks into a strange building, inhabited by even stranger people, has some feeling of misgiving as she turns the key to what will be home for the insuing nine months, yet a few short hours bring quite a transformation. The "strange in­ habitants", who were every bit as bewildered as she, take on new meaning as friends; they acquire names and memorable traits. The building, which was dark and forboding, begins to shine in the afterglow of dozens of occupied rooms. Days are never dull at BNC, a peculiar system known as classes guarantees that, but for that matter, neither are the evenings. As the shades of dusk settle into the shadows of night, the day-sleeping dorm seems to awaken and rouse herself. In the parlor, group study is lightened by pop corn and / or Dr. Peppers. In indivi­ dual rooms, studies vanish on concentration, letters home stream from free flowing pens, and quiet medi­ tation, prayer, or serious reading is done under the watchful supervision of the motherly old building. To banish any possible monotony, coffee breaks, date reports, or just plain "hen parties" are always just below the placidness of routine, to be surfaced at the slightest suggestion. The inner peace derived from prayer chapel, assistance from "room-mate" on that assignment, a shared "package from home" or some needed advice from the residence counselor, is but a part of the womanly comradeship found in "Bud" and "Jernigan".

Under the leadership of chaplain, Virginia H a ltom, weekly prayer meetings in Jernigan Hall offer the ultimate in spiritual inspiration.

J e r nig an

By the time Loreto Broyles, Verna Mikkelson, and Patsy Robinson add their artistic touch, Wanda Wil· Iiams' d iary should be far from - "normal".

Toke four girls, Vera Winter, Pat Swigart, Sissy Mill· sap, and Oletha Ludwig, add a pot of coffee, some eatables, plus reading material-study hour memories are made of this.

1 61


M en �s D o r i-n i t o :r i e s

After the attentions of "barbers" Dene Newsom, Jim Hokum,

and

James

Lewis, whose juvenile antics

Chuck Ha rper's 7:30 classes sometimes call for roommate Gary H a rtpence to do a bit of 11timell' convincing.

Be it ever so humble, there's no place like the boys' dorm. These aggregations of brick, mortar, and other building materials, have a story all their own . . . the sounds of ioud male laughter, run­ ning feet, prayer, and discussion-the sounds of college life at BNC. Here, students fight the battles of homesickness, term papers, and innum­ merable assignments. On the campus of BNC, the boys meet these foes in the stately recesses of Fanning Hall and the "Barracks" ( Soon to be replaced by Chapman Hall ) . At first observation, these buildings hardly seem different from the

It all began very quietly with Phil Duff doing some outside reading . . .

other red brick structures of the college, yet on closer scrutiny the · difference is evident-per­ sonality. These buildings actually have a dynamic, almost living personality. The word "dorm" lends itself readily to inter­ esting dissection, and we find : "D" is for delight­ fulness and all the delightful aspects of group living-whether cultural, social or religious. 0 could stand for organization; for the success of the program as a whole lies in competent organization. "R" obviously stands for romance; either the relat­ ing of a Friday night date to the rest of the gang "

His reverie was broken by James lewis, Roger Smith, Steve Eatmon and Bob C h i ld ress; so

1 62

"

are


Girls! Keep this scene in mind for Jack Eye揃 stone, Jerry Parrish, Buddy Emmert, Wes Bu rpo, and Tal Johnson may be looking at your picture tomorrow night.

ig nored by Dave Galbraith and Byron Strange, counselor Carl Gaede will awaken 11Whiskerless but wiser".

or the literary romance of life on such an en足 larged scale. "M"-Yes, that's right, mischief, for it is only too natural that fellows should indulge in a bit of harmless fun. Boys have been boys since time began and they will continue to be so until time ends. Inside Fanning, as well as the "Barracks", a variety of scenes is in the offering : A studious fellow laboring over the morrow's assignment, a boisterous group engaged in a lively "bull session", the quiet solitude of the prayer chapel or a shower dunking party for an engagee. Inside these walls

A hard concrete shower room floor, with a crowd of anticipating spectators provide the scene as .

.

there is enacted the tragedies, the victories, and the humor of hundreds of boys' lives. Here in the confines of these buildings is the universe of college life-that different little world composed of fellows from the "four winds and the seven seas" -Rebels, Yankees, Americans, Koreans, Brit足 ishers, but college students all. These "Shangri La" bases of operation for dating expeditions, scholastic endeavors and private devotions; the "humble abode", periodic resting place, and "Home Sweet Home" for the men of BNC足 Fanning Hall, the Barracks, the new Chapman Hall. These are the boys' dorms.

Phil discovers what happens when Monitors "go steady".

.

163


The ,..

In the east section of the Student Union Build足 ing, there now exists a shadow of BNC's illustrious past-the "Drag". Before construction of the modern SUB, the basement of Fanning Hall housed a unique institution; a combination cafe and soda fountain, it was labeled by some versatile individual the "Drag-on-Inn". When the SUB was completed, facilities were provided to expand and modernize the Inn and by the time those plans were realized, the modernistic, shining result resembled very little its predecessor. However, the convenient snack bar, the cozy booths, and the comfortable tables and chairs failed to erase from the minds of the students the memory of the original, and the name "Drag", shortened from the complete term, carried over to the present and will probably continue to be used in the future. The "Drag" provides the superlative in food and drink while it also functions as a relaxation center. Another "drawing card" is its four ping足 pong tables which are in almost constant use, giving release for pent-up emotions and the foster足 ing of intense rivalries which finally gave rise to a table tennis tournament, held in the "Drag" during March and April. From opening to closing, except for chapel period, the "Drag" is the rendezvous for a cup of coffee, a game of chess, or a coke date. Within these portals one may find discussions ranging from politics to Puccini and from social problems to Socrates. A center of social and recreational life on the campus and yielding an immeasurable amount of fellowship through association, is the "Drag", a symbol of the past, present, and future of BNC.

While Charlotte Miley serves up a nother Wing Ding, something d raws the attention of Neva Campbell while she draws the attention of Buddy Biggs.

The team of Burch and Campbell gives Schoenhals and Morgan a run for their money i n a fast g a me of mixed doubles.

1 0:00 P.M., healthy appetites, aboundant conversation, and the "Drag" are combined for varied examples of student attitudes.

1 64


NlfMIIUilGERS CNEESEStlllG£il$ HOTDOG$ IIIIM SIINOW/CN£$ EGG S.-NPwlt:NES CIIUSE SIINDWICN£$ 8AR. · 6 · � S()UP CHII./ eo,,u rt•

8�a.�t ��

ll tki,l Ot SJ'..t£ tf U'I 62 EtMS, TOAST, t!lt.I.YCQ,T(£ I EG6, BACON, lfMST 6 t:O�TEE TEE 2 l6G$, UeoN, ftJA.ST£&(;Of: C4FFU

Three charm ing "soda jerks" , Louise Cline, Cha rlotte Mi ley, and Linda Joh nson, parta ke of some of their own creati ons as a lax period in the 11Dra g" gives them a break .

.

.

-

spins anoth er ta l l Texas tale which amply holds the atten tion of his audience.

Ripper , Eyesto ne, Biggs, Hight, and H a rtpenc e, discov er that those forgo tten wallet conten ts are often a m using.

1 65


T � i rp We e k

As Robert Herrick nonchalantly enjoys the services afford­ ed him by the virtues of Twirp Week, Billie Ruth McNair "lifts that note-pad and totes that textbaak."

Jim Motsinger samples his superduper banana split while his _escort, Carolyn Rae, with her nickel coke, views the proceed ings with mixed emotions.

The ladies seat the gentlemen to their own right as the topsy-turveyness of Twirp Week seeps i nto the dining hall.

1 66

For one week, the campus of BNC resembles Dog­ patch on Sadie Hawkins Day. For a period of five days and four nights the female bal}k account is subjected to the fickle whimsies of -the fellows, with "The Wom­ an Is Required to Pay", a phrase to strike terror into the heart of any lady, being the general order of the day and night Payment consists not only of merely reaching for the customary check, but also the paying of those common courtesies generally accorded the fairer sex by the gentlemen. All dates are asked for by the girls, who must also call for the boys at the Fanning parlor. Plans for the evening are arranged by the ladies; this includes selection of entertainment, dining place, and the procurement of transportation for the "com­ ing out". During daylight hours, the girls must stand back and permit the boys to enter the dining hall first, they must help seat the gentlemen, walk on the out­ side when on the street, and carry all books. Sponsored by the Student Council, which as a special concession to the ladies makes a special effort to provide ample festivities for the week, these one hundred twelve hours are thoroughly enjoyed by guys and gals alike. Aside from many dinner dates and im­ promptu parties, the "crazy-mixed-up" couples were also able to attend one of the college basketball games and the Senior lyceum, consisting of three one-act plays. By l l : 30 Friday night, closing time for Twirp week, girls who sported sadly depleted pocket books, and fellows who carried extra grey hairs from worrying over the prospect of no date, were both ready to de­ clare a truce and return to the "ways of their fathers" with another unusual college experience tucked away in their memory-Twirp week.


Sun ..

/

Mo n �

E R S E P T E M B Tu o .

Wo d .

Thu .

Fr i .

Sot-

·· � �

•· .

\. �

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1 9 5 6 I Mon.

Sun. 7 19

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8

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29 5 . 17

S oi' ·


S e p t e in b e r

like sheep led to the slaughter they came for fall registration and from that day

hence they were never

again "caught up".

Students and faculty seem occupied with their appetites at the al l-school banquet though Einstein would have been amazed at the use of his " E -M C.2 11 formula for decorative pu rposes.

As Prof. Ladd and Dr. Ripper finish in a messy second

The barrel! rolling techniques of "twinkle-toes" lenore

place, Dick Osborn proclaims Prof. "Pieface" Emmel

Sloan won her first prize at the All-school party.

the champion pie-eater of the A l l-School party.

1 68


October

The

aftermath

of

the

"shoeless"

freshman party could be described in one word-CONFUSION.

At the junior picnic a brisk autumn evening and the smell of hickory smoke are calculated

to

activate

any squeamish appetites.

At the frosh sock party, Doris Woods steals the scene

A midnight snack revives the spirit of nightwatchmen

from Billie Bonner and a realistic appearing ghoul.

on g uard against H a lloween pranksters and vandals.

1 69


N o v e iD b e r

"Romeo! Wherefore art thou?" Portrayed by George Adkins and Floe Williams the splendid old Shakespearean Tragedy lives again.

Many hours of "behind-the-scenes" work such as this, done by Honor Society members Pa ul Edmonds, Doris Bumpus, and Lee Davis went to make the Homecoming parade a success.

l-;: -- -- -

A '55 Pontiac convertible, a capable cha uffer portrayed by Gary H a rtpence, and a beautiful g i rl personified by Pat Swigart, are combined to create a successful Homecoming parade.

170


D e c e in. b e .-

Crosby could dream a l l night of his "White C h ristmas", but attendants at the Yule banquet were mainly concerned with food and fellowship.

Social customs are turned topsy-turvy as Twirp Week finds Marilyn Kauth doing the honors for Henry King.

A shimmering Yule tree, candlelight, and choral reading of the Nativity story contributed to the success of the C h ristmas banq uet.

171


J a n -u a r y

For an entire hour, a college a udience was ca ptivated by the charm and talent of Mrs. Madelyn Wright i n her senior organ recital.

In the cold gray dawn of a J a n u a ry morning, Bethany Nazarene Cemetery, the a m using result of a practical joke, was born.

1 72

An example of the girls' ball-handling abi lity is

like a Sherman tank with plenty of supporting

Jerry Hutchings as she ignores the defense with

infantry, AI Kennedy rebounds and goes charging

a beautiful off-the-floor hook shot.

down-court.


F e b r .. a r y

Several engagements were a nnounced at the Heart Pa l Banquet with 11Cupid Jr." Lynne Robinson, supplying love arrows for "C upid Sr.IJ, Prof. Doris Schumann. Coupled with flying fingers and concentration, Bach, Beethoven, and Haydn found release in the faculty recita l of Miss Esther Saxon.

"Dashing Through the Snow" on a sleigh complete with a caboose provided a chilling pastime for adventurous Eskimoic students.

173


March

In re/, eo

rsoJ ďż˝ or t h e Ju D PE nio r . TER"' L ce u 'tnp lo Peter m, " Y res A M M orsh Co th eri AN oft (1: ne M r L O sh a/1 d Ro 1e na ve w y) (Rut/, P . faith . i er e '" c )

CAL L E

Go d.

to

One of the outstanding events of the college year was Loreto Broyles and her senior recital of SPRING CAME ON FOREVER.

All work and no play makes even the Dean of In rehearsal for HAMLET, '"en garde" and the sound

of rapier

meeting

rapier signal the

beginning of the tragic duel between Hamlet (Dale Tuttle) and Laertes (Lawrence Dean).

1 74

Students a stuffed shirt; so Dr. Shannon en­ gages i n a relaxing bit of table tennis.


April

The well attended semi-finals of the table tennis tourney finds Glen B u rnett victorious over George Prentice.

The sophomore recital of pianist Kathy Snow足

BNC accreditation by North Central is a joyous

borger and soprano Vera Winter was eagerly

occasion for Dr. Cantrell and the entire college.

received by the student body.

175


May

With Phil Duff on deck, Gary H a rtpence swings for the fence, while catcher Kenny long and umpire John Jonte give the ball their undivided attention.

Gaylord Elam preaches a negro sermon on a text from the Book of Revolutions, with the freshman and their g uests as congregation.

Track day and the final kick of the quarter mile run finds David Philo sprinting for the finish line.

Ah yes, the month of May had many things to offer-among them, golden fried chicken at the "Deep South" frosh banquet.

1 76


ROW 1 : Chuck Harper, Roberta Posey, Shirley Stra ngeland, Sue Merrill, Professor Dunn.

ROW 2 : J i m Gardner, Gary Hartpence, Howard

Oliver, Paul Johnson, lester Knight. (Not shown: Tom Boyd.)

They plan our days and weeks for us

/

CHUCK HARPER President

178

On the BNC campus there is a constant parade of events and buzz of activity. One reason for this "per­ petual motion" is the student government organization -the Student Council . Composed of a president, vice president, secretary, ARROW editor, ECHO editor, director of religious activities, and representatives from the respective classes, this year the Council, with their sponsor, Professor Lester Dunn, has been the picture of animation. Successfully beginning the year with the All School Party, the Council proceeded to promulgate such events as Saturday night programs, Homecoming, Twirp Week, the Christmas Banquet, the Heart Pal Banquet, the Heart Fund Drive, chapel programs. the Table Tennis Tournament, and two Lyceums. Plan­ ning for the futme, the Council is explo�ing the possi­ bility of a Student Court, to have jurisdiction in various rule and regulation infractions. An important function of the Stuco is its service as a coordinating factor between the student body and the administration, existing as a communicative medium for suggestions, "gripes", and expressions of gratitude. An example of the national democratic principles, this Council, elected by the popular vote of the student body, is one of the most outstanding organizations of the campus, for its program involves the welfare of the individual as well as the institution.


S t .. d e .. t C o -.. II c i l.

HOWARD OLIVER Vice-President

SHIRLEY STANGELAND Secretary

TOM BOYD Director Religious Activities

PROFESSOR LESTER DUNN Sponsor

1 79


ROW 1 ' Verna Mikkelson, Janelle Phillips, Wanda Williams, Patsy Robinson, Rachel Smith. ROW 2, Dale Shotts, Bill Rohlmeier, G. W. Kotwitz, lowell Bell, Bob Smith, Professor McDaniel.

E ventful voices echo through its columns

SUE MERRILL Editor

1 80

Extra! Extra ! Read all about it. We have a paper and we're proud of it. With cries of "Stop the presses" and "Meet that deadline" the REVE ILLE ECHO came into fruition. Harboring a group of individuals with over developed proboscises, referred to among newshound circles as noses for news, the college news­ paper flourished amid the stacks of galleyproof and the smell of printer's ink. By the calendar, every other week there appeared a group of harried looking personages dashing madly about the campus, wildly waving products of their creative skill. Somehow, behind the massive door guard­ ing the office, all these bits of information, statistics and photographs were diligently compiled and carefully edited. A waiting period then occurred until 'galley' was returned, then the smell of rubber cement was everywhere as the crossword puzzle, destined to be a newspaper, was successfully fitted together. As the s taff endeavored to recuperate for the next period of lunacy, members of the student body exited from the dining hall to find deposited in strategic places, numer­ ous copies of the latest collegiate news. Printed in red for Valentine's Day, green for St. Patrick's and always eagerly awaited were the pertinent facts, student opin­ ions, contemporary activities, BNC sports and select­ ed humor found in the college newspaper - THE REVEILLE ECHO.


LESTER K NIGHT Business Manager

MAURINE DICKERSON

ORVAL McDANIEL

Sponsor

Sponsor

DALE TUTTLE Associate Editor

GARY HARTPENCE Associate Editor

1 81


Barbara Goodson, Doris West, Bob Smith, Eileen Bryan, Kathryn Millsap, James Ray lewis, Don Fitzgerald, Joyce Ransom.

It records our activities for posterity

ROBERTA POSEY Editor 1 82

This is the ARROW-the yearbook, or if you prefer, the annual of Bethany Nazarene College. It is the only yearbook the college publishes, and for this reason, if for none other, it maintains a prominent position in collegiate literature. As proof of the fine calibre of the publication, it should be noted that the 1 9 5 5 ARROW was judged as a first class annual by the Associated Collegiate揃 Publications falling short of an All-American rating by only forty points. With this as incentive, coupled with sources of information gleaned from attendance at the ACP Convention in Detroit, the staff began the great undertaking-the publication of a college yearbook. Guided by their capable sponsor, Mrs. Carol Lundy, the project was attacked with vim and vigor. In the search for a suitable theme, CHARACTER, CUL足 TURE, CHRIST, the college motto, presented itself as an ideal medium of p r e s e n t a t i o n . Green leaves turned brown and fell from trees, warm autumn breezes turned to chilling winter winds and in the mystic recesses of the ARROW office strange things were happening. From piles of stock came layouts, moun足 tains of copy erupted . from typewriters, and an ever足 occupied darkroom spouted innumerable photographs. Back outside, robins sang, flowers bloomed, young men's fancies turned to baseball, and in the "Merry Month of May" to the students of Bethany Nazarene College was presented the 1 956 ARROW.


CAROL LUNDY Sponsor

DIANE NEELY Assistant Editor

PHIL DUFF Associate Editor

Yv

f(t

DENE SIMPSON Photographer

ERNEST FARMER Business Manager

1 83


ROW 1 : Rogers, Bumpus, Winter, Ammons, Ripper, Stanley, Millsap, Neely, Casey, Ware. ROW 2: Snowberger, Craw­ ford, Meador, Allen, ludwig, Burdine, Swigart, Steele, Mont· gomery, Fox, Professor Dunn. ROW 3: Smith, Harder, Neff, Horton, Kelly, Oliver, Harper, Cheatwood, Johnson, Knight. ROW 4: Allen, Doskocil, l mel, · lui nstra, Osborn, Sanders, Gardner, Carleton, Smith, Sta llings.

Representing some of the finest musical talent on the campus is the A Cappella Choir. Serving not only as an excellent vocal assemblage, this choir also functions as a representative group in its many wanderings over the educational zone. The choir pro­ motes and presents the superlative in sacred music and in doing so characterizes the spirit in which they sing. In religious aggregations on the campus, such as chapel, revivals, and conventions, the choir is invaluable in its contribution to the temperament of the service. Also, on the social scene, such as music week programs, recitals, and wed­ dings, the choir is constantly in the fore­ ground as a dynamic example of achieve­ ment. Taking to the "field" on an annual tour, the choir offers to the educational zone an example of its accomplishment. This year it will serve as an ambassadorial body to the General Assembly.

1 84

O F F I CERS: H. Oliver, pres.; l. Knig ht, v. pres.; E. Steele, sec.; Professor D u n n , sponsor.

A Cappell a Choir


ROW 1 : Kornelsen, Clark, Luginbyhl, Scroggs, Verness, Wil足 liams, Stiverson. ROW 2: Snowberger, Brown. ROW 3: Lewis, Willison, Davy, Box, Henry, Oliver, Fox, Mountford, Lui nstra, Ja ntz, Kotwitz, Norton. ROW 4: Professor Pagan, Rogers, Holcomb, Gibson, Morris, Flood, Pywell, Bohannon.

Illustrating one of the fastest growing personified structures on the campus, the band, in its fifty percent increase in number, exemplifies those results of determination and perseverance. Of course, with this in足 creased numerical quantity, there is also an improved quality in the finished product of the organizational effort. As the Utopia of future Sousas, Leidzens and Bennetts, the band is successful in the provision of fine music both for performers and listeners. In the presentation of their skill, they presented two well received chapel programs and a spring concert during music week. With athletic events suffering from lack of "harmony", a junior size version of the band presented "pep" music at the Homecoming basketball game, adding considerably to the spirit of the proceedings. With the band containing several specialized units, various ensembles have presented performances both on and off the campus.

O F F I C ERS: H. King, pres.; B. Norton, v. pres.; N. Kornelsen, sec.; J. fox, lib. M. Davy, librarian; Professor Pagan, di rector.

B a it d

1 85


I f·

'

,l

l

f

\

7-

l

1' ' .

I

ROW 1 : Barker, Gibson, Yarbrough, Barrett, Verness, Gray, Lang ley. ROW 2: Linton, Seachord, Clark, Stoneroad, C i nna­ mon, Nogg les, Brewer. ROW 3 : Towns, Smith, Sloan, Woods, Mi ley, Miller, Johnson.

The school year of 19 5 5-56 was a revision year at Bethany Nazarene College in more than one way as it heralded the renewed appearance of an all-girl musical assemblage -the Treble Choir. After a "first-night" performance, under the direction of Mrs. Naomi Dobson, the choir received numer­ ous requests for performances in churches in the Oklahoma City-Bethany area. Taking time off from rehearsals and programs, and with 19 56 being "leap-year" the feline aggre­ gation also maintains a bountiful social cal­ endar with a Christmas banquet and two other social functions of special merit. With an abundance of both interest and talent, though schedule conflicts make for complica­ tions, it is obvious that this choir will be one of the future stars of the musical universe.

1 86

OFFICERS: M. Log a nbill, pres.; S. Towns, sec.; Mrs. Dobson, sponsor.

Treble


ROW 1 : Professor Cha mbers, Matlock, Burr, U itts. ROW 2 : James, Bohannon, Rawls, Jonte. ROW 3 : Enterline, Bond, Craighead, Stroud.

With growing male interest in whole and half notes there was revived this year at B.N.C. an exclusive choir-exclusive to the point of "no girls allowed"; the Male Choir is back in existence after a much realized absence. Under the pioneering baton of Professor Gene Chambers, the group is flourishing like Toscanini with the Boston Pops. Endeavoring to encourage the "bash足 ful" men into using their vocal cords tends to concentrate on the religious and semi足 classical type of music. The choir made its debut with participa足 tion in several church services and was so well received that calls for off-campus pro足

O F F I C ERS: C. Bohannon, pres.; l. Burr,

v.

pres.; Professor Cha mbers, sponsor.

Male Choir

grams were soon forthcoming. The choir is an example of applied practice, patience, and participation.

1 87


ROW 1 : Wash burn, May, Kelly. ROW 2: Herrick, Edmonds, Skinner. ROW 3 : Dr. Beaver, Cu nningham, Norell, McNabb.

Existing as a branch of Beta Chi Alpha, National Chemistry Society, the Chemistry Associates of Bethany Nazarene College en足 deavor to institute campus-wide interest both in chemistry and the organization proper. Utilizing the opportunities afforded through field trips and intensified research into specialized areas, the club is able to realize the technical aspects involved in sat足 isfactory realization of their study. Giving its members an opportunity to disentangle themselves from test tubes and Bunsen burn足 ers, though keeping them constantly aware of their "chemical calling", the organization also ventures into the social realm on certain festive occasions. This is evident in the two banquets enjoyed annually by members of the club.

1 88

OFFICERS: C . McNabb, pres.; F. C u n n i ngham,

v.

pres.; J. Norell, sec.; J. Kelly,

rep. at large; Dr. Beaver, sponsor.

C h e iD i s t r y Club


• •

ROW

1:

l

'

Fitzgerald, Westmoreland, I mel, Hull. ROW 2: Farm­

er, Gaede, McNabb, Harris. ROW 3 : Kennedy, Oliver, Boyd, Horton, Swim.

Representing the outstanding members of that peculiar clan of individuals who traverse the yard markers, scorch the nets, pound the cinders, and run the basepaths, the Men's B Club is the ultimate aim of every aspiring athlete on the campus. This

O F F I CERS: B. Harris, pres.; D. fitzgerald, v. pres.; V. Swim, sec.

organization functions as an executive power in the field of physical education. Member­ ship in the club is attained through an elec­ tion held yearly with the new members being chosen from the most outstanding of the participants in each sport. Far from be­ ing a "brawn with no brain" organization, the B Club heads a list of accomplishments

M e ii � s B C l u. b

and activities with sponsorship of the annual B Club Basketball Tournament, one of the campus athletic highlights.

1 89


ROW 1 : Bond, Dr. Floyd, McElyea. ROW 2: Duff, Gill, Schubert. ROW 3 : Farmer, Dr. Garner, Craighead.

With history being made each day, world politics weighing heavily in every destiny, and.social maladjustments becoming a major problem, the Social Science Club has an un­ limited scope in which to function. Perhaps harboring future politicians, historians, and social workers, the club reverberates with the personality of a contemporary being fed by the realized mistakes and successes of the past. Cosmopolitan in action as well as or­ ganization, the club utilizes available Twen­ tieth Century facilities. Audio-visual meth­ ods, documental sources, and associated field trips are well employed in the presentation of their program. Constantly alert to the possibility of the past, present, and fore­ seeable future offering assistance, the Social Science Club functions as a well-rounded organization and contributes much to the sociological interests of the campus.

190

OFFIC ERS: G. Bond, pres.; E. McElyea,

v.

pres.; B. Gill, sec.; P. Duff, ed.

Historian; Dr. Floyd, .sponsor.

Socia l S c i e n. c e


J ROW 1 : Zentz, Flood, Cook. ROW 2: Davy, Sumner, Neh rbass. ROW 3 : McNa mes, H a rris, Dr. Greve.

Recognizing the existing need for an un­ derstanding and efficient h o m e m a k e r as being over that of an individual with merely the ability to sew and cook, the Home Economics Club endeavors to equip the so­ called "weaker sex" with those traits so desired by the picayunish male. The club furnishes specialized instruction in certain

O F F I C ERS: I. Sumner, pres.; B. Davy, v. pres.; J. Cook, sec.; V. Williams, treas.; Dr. Greve, sponsor.

fields, serving to broaden the ladies' per­ spective, while arraying them in the neces­ sary elements of successful homemaking. Beneficial to all members are such progres­ sive precepts as the formulation of befitting hair styles, and ways in which each may learn to successfully meet civic and social ob­ ligations. The Home Ec Club is an ultra­ modern club functioning in an ultra-modern

H o iD e E e Club

institution, better preparing its members for the role they must play in an ultra-modern world.

1 91


ROW 1: Keys, Neely, Pierce. ROW 2 : Laughbaum, Merrill, Phillips. ROW 3: Mrs. Sch umann, West, Rouselle, Mrs. Emmel. ROW 4: Sheeks, Professor Dobson, Elam, Professor Emmel.

Realizing that Twentieth Century "mod­ ernism" issued a challenge to collegiate in­ terest in the fine arts, the Literary Society was organized to perpetuate that same in­ terest in the "old masters". With capable leadership, an abundance of concern, and well-planned programs, the group has served its purpose very well and in celebrating its second anniversary, the society is able to look back over its two infant years of exist­ ence with the highest degree of pride. Cer­ tainly not suffering from a "sophomore year slump", the society progressed both numeri­ cally and interest-wise, maintaining the high­ est degree of efficiency and organization. Since the dub revolves around the divisions of the fine arts, dub activities are likewise centralized around the arts, music, and liter­ ature, with emphasis placed on individual designated divisions. Advantageously using pertinent literary selections, classical records, and instructive films, the dub is able to realize this aim and further promote the organizational purpose.

192

OFFIC ERS: J. Phillips, pres.; J. Sheeks,

v.

pres.; E. Rouselle, sec.;

Professor Dobson, sponsor.

Li t e ra ry Society


ROW 1 : Professor Johnson, Schoenhals, lewis. ROW 2: Boyd, Riggs, Franklin, Phillips. ROW 3: Edmonds, Hartpence, Flood, Gardner.

Socrates, Aristotle, and Plato would feel very much at home in the College Philos­ ophy Club as that temperate group launches headlong into discussions from "Eleatic" to "Heraclitic" schools of thought. In this unique, progressive approach to contempor­ ary events and problems, the organization, of course, merits much campus reflection and comment. 11lustrating the application of their major, the club programs usually feature the con­ sideration of various papers pertaining to aesthetic, logical, and ethical issues. Far from being impractical, especially along the line of food, the club is usually successful in holding its meetings in the proximity of a restaurant or coffee shop and is dogmatic in its demand for at least one social function during the year. Undoubtedly crowned cam­ pus king of rational thinking, reasoning, and valid thought is the Bethany Nazarene Col­ lege Philosophy Club.

OFFI CERS: J . Gardner, pres.; G. H a rtpence,

v.

pres.; S. Edmonds, sec.;

Professor Johnson, sponsor.

Philosophy Club

193


ROW 1 : Cloud, Broyles, Neely, Fox, Cl ine, Brewer, Sloan,

Puckett. ROW 2: Robinson, Phillips, Schauer, Wire, Mikkel· son, Owens, McNames, Ca rter, Henderson, Pulliam, Dr. Moon_ ROW 3: Stangeland, Walker, Pagan, Rouselle, Greve, King, Davis, Snowberger, Steele, Womack, Koh nk. ROW 4: Good­ son,

West,

Campbell,

Farmer,

Oliver,

Craighead,

Bond,

Hendricks, Bryan, Sloan.

Serving as a "study hall" for the teaching minded individual, the Future Teachers of America Club endeavors to inform as well as interest those planning on education as a vocation. As the abode of would-be Floyds, Philos, and Greers, the club is outstanding as a professional organization and is "first grade" for teaching enthusiasts. Character­ izing Emily Post, the club acts as host for the annual career conferences, and in doing so, broadens its perspective through varied vocational contacts. Utilizing instructive films, records, and pertinent published material, the club re­ cruits both education majors and those with an eduootional interest. Realizing the im­ portance of collegiate-civic relations, the club, working in co-operation with various schools of the Oklahoma City area, on re­ quest provides substitute instructors. The F. T. A. has an active program of service, both on and off campus.

194

OFFICERS: W. Snowberger, pres.; I. Garndnd, v. pres.; G. Walker, sec.; Miss Spruce, Dr. Moon, co-sponsors.

F. T. A .


ROW 1 : Oke, Clements, Haynes, Steinbach, DeVore, Broyles. ROW 2 : DeVore, Hines, Banner, Statzer, Ca rter, McNabb, Sloan, Hoilman. ROW 3 : Carr, Simpson, Herrick, Orr, Barlow, Witherspoon, Tuttle, Newsom, Professor Lawrence.

The field of Biological Science is personi­ fied in the collegiate branch of the Beta Sigma Lambda biological society. These in­ dividuals, who feel perfectly normal in the presence of formaldehyde, dissecting kits, and microscopes, seek incessantly to culti­ vate a more profound regard for their science and the scientific program. Though their association with terms like "polymorphonu­ clear granulocytes" would certainly be jus­ tification for an air of aloofness, these future doctors, dentists, laboratory technicians, and instructors display only an air of consider­ ation of others as they endeavor to present programs which are interesting as well as in­ formative to those laymen merely interested in science. Certainly benign on character, the club expresses its aggressive nature in its active calendar schedule which features field trips, lectures, club projects, instructive films, and a social which is held each semester.

OFFIC ERS: K. Herrick, pres.; E. Steinbach, sec.; K. Millsap, trees.; D . Tuttle, p u b. chairman; R. Orr, rep. at large; R. Barlow, fresh. rep.; Professor Lawrence sponsor.

Biology Club

195


ROW 1 : Garnand, Neely, Copeland, Snowbarger, Winter, Sells, Bumpus. ROW 2 : Stangeland, Walker, Teague, Jantz, Ludwig,

Swigart,

Davis,

Posey. ROW 3:

Allen, Gardner,

Cunningham, Swim, Ja ntz, Lukens, Mrs. Schumann.

Certainly classed ·as an intellectual group on the campus is the Honor Society. Since the society is composed of members who have attained a grade point average of 2.4 for two consecutive semesters, the group rep­ resents the peak in scholastic achievement. In bringing to the chapel one of the out­ standing programs of the year, the society proved its f u n c t i o n i n g power. Through monthly luncheons, the club is able to freely discuss those problems that so often per­ plex the individual but are so easily solved by combined effort. Disproving the fallacy of knowledge being associated with stodgi­ ness, the organization highlights such virtues as inspiration, vivacity, and expressed energy through every event in which they partici­ pate. Thus, adding to the prestige of the campus is the college Honor Society.

196

OFFIC ERS: J. Gardner, pres.; P. Swiga rt, v. pres.; D. Neely, sec.; Mrs. Sch umann, sponsor.

H o ii o r Society


ROW 1 : Campbell, Broce, Turner, Ensminger, Wire, Bee I,

Robinson. ROW 2: Barham, Williams, Cummins, Fisher, Mose­

ley, Morgan, Owens. ROW 3: Herron, Adams, Dr. Danskin, Ziebarth, Allen, Biggs, Haynes, McElyea.

To a certain degree, everyone minors in business-other people's, but the business at hand is that weird, complex machinery that governs the column of figures in a ledger, the endorsed checks, and the row of complicated files-"b.usiness" business. The Business Club centers around a general understanding of those fundamentals of "debit", "credit", and "balance", operating on the principle of knowledge breeding fur­ ther interest. To make the field more appealing, the latest methods of presentation are utilized with emphasis on field trips to banks, insur­ ance agencies, and other concerns. Promi­ nent leaders in the world of business are featured as speakers and informative, instruc­ tive films are shown to arouse any possible lagging interest. As is expected, with a "live wire" program such as this, participation is never lacking in the B.N.C. Business Club.

OFFICERS: E. Ziebarth, pres.; W. Williams,

v.

pres.; P. Barham, trees.; P. Fisher,

sec.; Dr. Danskin, sponsor.

n •• 8 i n e 8 8

Club

1 97


ROW 1 : Rogers, Crawford, Brewer, Linton. ROW 2: Winter,

Meador, Potter, Roberts. ROW 3: Al�en, Swigart, Burdine, Snowberger. ROW 4: Allen, Mou ntford, Oliver, Holley, Pro­ fessor Pagan.

On the campus of B. N. C., as sounds of close harmony and intriguing rhythm float across the grand staff of an evening breeze, one of the main purposes of the College Music Club is realized-the creation of beau­ tiful music for the pleasure of others. En­ deavoring to promote further music study and appreciation above and beyond class­ room instruction, the organization strives for a deeper appreciation of music in all phases while giving its members a broader realiza­ tion of what music includes and how the various phases may be incorporated into daily living. With an active schedule of in­ structive films and records, the club has also sponsored various campus musical endeavors, including a program by the Treble Choir and the pioneer "Kampus Sing", keeping alive that spark of originality and vitality that contributes so much to the music inter­ ests of the college.

198

O F F I C ERS: F. Roberts, pres.; H. Allen, v. pres.; D. Rogers, pub. chairman; V. Winter, sec.i Professor Pagan, sponsor.

M II s i c C l -u b


DON WILSON Head of the Athletic Department

The Autumn air is punctuated by the sound of toe meeting pigskin; crowds of spectators gather along the sidelines of Windy Stadium and another football season gets well under way. As chilling winter winds howl across the grounds and retirement of the ellipsoid becomes complete, a new sound is born in the athletic world. The sound of a bouncing, air-filled round cube known as the basket足 ball heralds the start of the predominant sport on the campus. Fairer weather and a parade of sweat-suited figures jogging around the field, illustrate another era of recre足 ational life at the college-track, which reaches its absolute with virtual all-school participation on "Track Day". Birds sing, flowers bloom, and young minds turn to thoughts of softball. The forceful meeting of ash and horsehide coupled with cries of "Play Ball" becomes the trumpet call to the final division of athletics at the college. However, these four major areas of competition are futther supported by tennis, which also enjoys a high degree of popularity. Participation in the program is on the intramural level with division stemming from the students' home ( Border States, Kansas, Off-Zone, O k l a h o m a, and Texas ) and his classification ( freshman, sophomore, junior and senior. ) The school pep song, which illustrates so very well that noteworthy idea of Christian competition, is an able criterion for measuring the collegiate athletic attitudes.

200

ERNIE FARMER All-School Athletic Director

Hail to thee, B.N.C., We will fight, fight, fight to victory; Brave and strong, won't go wrong, to the end we'll sing this victor's song; We will fight for the right as we strive to win the whole year through; We will work, we'll fight all the while for dear old B.N.C.


Ath l etic D irectors

ERNIE FARMER Senior Director

DEAN HORTON Junior Director

BILL ROHLMEIER Sophomore Director

BOB WOOD Freshman Director

201


As Earl Skinner moves in for the tog, George Prentice, Arkonsawyer a nd Border Stater, grabs a ground gaining pass in the Trojan-Hornet duel.

Footba l l An air-filled leathern ellipsoid, an open field approach­ ing smoothness, twelve gentlemen of varied ability, and determination; add an autumn afternoon, close rivalry, and an abundance of spectators; mix well, sprinkling in a liberal number of spiraling punts, bullet passes, charg­ ing offenses, and blocking linemen-there you have foot­ ball at BNC. - The cry of "It's a pass" or "Block that kick" is the reveille to which any and all football enthusiasts react. From all points of the compass they are drawn by the irresistible magnetism of the pigskin, individualists who become welded into compact offensive and defensive units. The strong Kansas Jayhawkers dropped their opener to the Off-Zone Hornets but bounced back even stronger by trouncing the Texas Longhorns, the Border States Tro­ jans; and the Oklahoma Chiefs. This record stood so im­ pressive it virtually guaranteed honors for the fellows from the wheat state. Utilizing a slashing, lightning-like, ground-gaining, passing attack, the Texas Longhorns, powered roughshod over all defensive mechanisms that were formulated for their destruction. However, the sails of this smooth sailing team were deflated once-by the Kansas club with whom the Texa-ns finally shared the pigskin championship. The Off-Zone Hornets, who had so effectively staunched the flow of the Jayhawker victories, and the Border States Trojans, who had been constant thorns-in-the-sides of the high riding squads, tied for third and fourth positions by splitting even with a two and two record. The Oklahoma Chiefs, who pulled cellar duty this year, were unlucky and compiled a striking record of four straight defeats.

202

All-STAR ROW 1 : Oliver, Neff,

TEAM I mel,

Philo.

ROW 2: Pierce, Tracy, Fitzgerald, Harris, Wood.


Sta te Footbal l T e a ID s

O F F-ZO N E HORN ETS ROW 1 : Madison, Shocklee, Kelly.

ROW 2 : Joh nson, Stewart, Beckett.

BORDER STATE TROJANS ROW 1 : Tracy, Jones, Hight. ROW 2: Rohlmeier, Prentice, Pierce, Harper.

OKLA H OMA C H I E F S R O W 1 : Philo, Orr, Allen.

ROW 2: Johnson, Fitzgerald, Eyestone.

KANSAS J AYHAWKS ROW 1 : Swim, Hartpence, Oliver, Norell, Southworth.

ROW 2: Hend ricks, l mel, Hen ry, Woods, Motsinger, Leffel.

TEXAS lONGHORNS ROW 1 : Neff, H a rris, Morris.

ROW 2: long, Scroggs, Ellis, Maney.

203


Jayhawks battle

to t ie

Texas Longhorns in state pigskin

competition

Kansan, Jack l mel calmly ju mps and heaves a strike downfield a s Texas defense crashes through.

Overlooking the fallen Harry Pierce and a charging Dwight Southworth, Border States' passer, J i m Tracy spies a waiting receiver.

Johnny West moreland of Oklahoma l u nges through the Kansas defense for a much needed touchdown.

In the Jayhawker victory over Texas, knocked-down passes played a prominent role.

204


The high leaping antics of Johnny Westmoreland a nd J i m Gardner draw amazed expressions from fellow players as well as spectators.

Ba sketball The trees begin to lose their mantel of varied colored leaves, the green carpet of grass becomes blotched with brown, and the wind that 11·as brisk changes to one that is biting. This re\"Olution in nature's 11·hims also affects the athletic minded stu­ dent of BNC as thev pack the kicking toe away in linement and unlimber the shoot·ing eYe. Football is dead; basketball is king; '"Long li1c the Kingt"

Class competition was highlighted by play in the Echo Tournament. The top ranking seniors had controlled league play and were prepared to defend that reputation, as well as their record of three-year-Echo-champs, against all comers. In three consecutive v<o:ars the senior crew had rolled to Echo victorv· if thev conic\ do so again, they would possess a perfect slate of four years of tournament plav.

One of the highlights of the BNC athletic vear, Homecom­ ing, opened the round bali season. The Redskins won the fifth game of the current Homecoming series Fridav, November 1 8, b1· defeating the Alumni 88- 5 5 . The game broke a tie in which each of the teams had two victories. High man for the Alumni 11·as Art Kastner 11·ho tossed in 1 8, and the victorious Redskins 1vcrc paced lll· Johnm· \\'cstmoreland 11·ho picked up 20 im­ portant counters.

The team striving to sink the smooth sailing senior schooner belonged to the junior class who had been subjected to second place by their peers long enough. The third ranking sophomores 11·ere going to run into personnel problems as second semester sadly depleted their already sparse ranks. The inexperienced frosh 11·ere rumored to be plotting an uprising that might completely foul up the pre-game predictions; so eager anticipation was the password as the stands became occupied for the court conflict.

State competition 11·as operated on a new basis this year 11·ith all games b<o:ing pla1·ed in a two week period, based on a round-robin t1·pc tournament. Tournament Champs, Kansas, defeated Off-Zone 72-33, Border States 94- 3 1 , Texas 62-48, and Oklahoma 7 1-4 3 . The second place Texas Longhorns squeezed lw Off-Zone 5 5 - 5 3 , Border States 3 7- 3 5 , and Oklahoma 4 3- 34. Third ranking Border States edged Off-Zone 38-3 5 and trounced Oklahoma 49-39, while Oklahoma won her only game of the season bv def�ting Off-Zone 5 4-47. The dungeon was occupied bv 11·inless Off-Zone who, through lack of manpower, found it difficult to even field a team.

Results ran true to form as in the first game of the evening the seniors swamped the freshmen 80- 5 2, and in the second game the juniors overwhelmed the sophomores 96- 5 6. The next e1·ening, however, heralded an upset as the freshmen five crushed the sophomores 70- 3 8 . The final game of the Tourney, as well as the year, yielded many surprises as the juniors time after time threatened the supremacy of the championship headed seniors. The abundant desire to win and the old story of experience showed on the scoreboard as it blinked its message of senior 1 ictory 46-42.

205


H o iD e e o iD i n g R E DSKINS 88

ALUM N I 55

"All roads led to the gymnasium", when on November 1 8, the BNC Redskins met the Alumni All Stars in the fifth annual Homecoming game. The bleachers were packed and "standing room only" was the rule of the evening, as expectant on­ lookers gathered to see this "eighth won­ der of ball-dom". Victories were split evenly in the four years of previous play and the result of this court duel would break the tie, one way or another. Looking over the Redskins, one could see the contemporary collegiate "greats"; nervous sophomores in their first Home­ coming game being consoled by juniors and seniors who, despite the sound trounc­ ings of two successive years, attempted to present an optimistic attitude toward the evening's conflict. In the Alumni camp, confidence was also running high. They were the "greats" of the past and held their own share of present day laurels; they had twice before given the upstart col­ legians a shellacking and were out to prove themselves capable of doing so again. The sharp blast of the referee's whistle ended all sentimental philosophizing and attention became riveted to the hardwood. The Redskins opened up a lead at the tip-off and left the grads in the dust of a smothering scoring attack. The ten-point

ALUMN I ROW 1 : Yoesel, Draper, Rairdon, Hagin, Stangeland, Alderson.

ROW 2 : Kastner, Scudday, Johnson, Bugh, Burch, Bryan.

lead they compiled might have appeared shaky until they lowered the boom, with five minutes left on the first-half clock. The rampaging Redmen struck for three straight fast breaks, and it was "off to the races" as they dropped in six more buckets before the half ended-closing out first period play with a twenty-seven point lead. That is the way it went to the wire as Coach Don Wilson played the bench in the second frame, building up an 88- 55 Redskin victory over the Alumni in the annual battle of Homecoming.

R E DS K I NS ROW 1 : Farmer,

Westmoreland,

Gardner,

Ken­

nedy.

ROW 2 : Gaede, Dryden, Oliver, Swim, Hight.

206

Horton,


an d d ski ns st r th e Re os "oil !o ff -o tip befor e ll seco nds o \ \e r . m mou nts u p on d h Enth u sia s

J i m Ga rdner with o driving lay-up increases the early lead for the Redmen.

A study in anguish os fou r of the A l u m n i watch Howard Oliver hit for two over the attempted block of F ronk Hagin.

207


Redskins roll Alumns

over

.

I ll

Hom ecom in g

feature

While strea king cross-court before a packed house, Jim Gardner keeps a wary eye on Bill Draper.

Alumnus Bill Burch is lost i n a maze of Redskins as help seems far away.

208

While assistance is forthcoming, things get "down to earth"

An example of Redskin scoring power is Howard Oliver pushing through

as Art Kastner and Howard Oliver sit this one out.

a nother two for insurance.


T o Ji r n a i-u e n t

Longhorn Harold Wayne Moore and Hornet Glen DeVore grap­ ple for possession of the leathern bubble.

For two weeks the Oklahoma Chiefs, the Kansas Jay­ hawks, the Borderstate Trojans, the Off-zone Hornets and the Texas Longhorns provided unrivale? action in that progran1 of state tean1 con1petition known as the '�B" Club Basketball Tournev. The Kansas Jayhawk; wrapped up the loop title as they powered their way over any possible opposition. The Hawks, with one of the strongest all-around teams in school history, closed out the season with a clear slate. One record was broken as the conquering Kansans racked up 94 points against one opponent and ended up with an offensive team average of 77 points per game. Texas provided the only real competition for the champions as the gentlemen from the Lone Star state controlled the ball for the first half and held the Hawkers' offensive machine to a relatively low score. The real scare came in the third period as the Longhorns got warm and pulled within two points of Kansas. It looked like a ball game down to the wire but two fast breaks, a jump shot, and a set shot, and Kansas lowered the boom. From then on the Hawks pulled steadily away, gradually widening the gap that separated the two teams. Third slot went to the Border State Trojans with an even two-two record. They defeated Oklahoma and Off­ zone and lost to Texas and Kansas. Oklahoma drew fourth position as they weathered a rough season and ended with a one-three total. The cellar spot went to the Off-zone Hornets, who found it rough going and were unable to win a game due largely to a shortage of manpower.

As teammates rush to help both men, an amazed Wayne Stallings wonders at the presence of Dick Jarrel.

Witnessed by teammates as well as the camera, Vernon

Swim's

prog ress

is ha lted

i l legally by

Chieftan, Dave Philo.

209


B-Cl ub sponsors n e w state basketball

t o u r n a rn e n t

Despite interference and amazement on the part of defense and team members, Bill H a rris floats i n for a lay-up.

Johnny Westmoreland's extended tongue is to

no

avail as Ronald Snowberger blocks his attempted drive. longhorn defense fails to stop a soaring Howard Oliver i n his bid for the basket.

Elmer Chandler and Harry Pierce sink to a very low degree as Border States and Off-Zone struggle to stay in the B-Ciub Tourney.

210


E cho T o u_ :r n a m e n t

A beautiful trophy and a charming smile from Queen Kathy Snowberger are the reward of Kenda ll Hight, most va luable player of the Echo Tourney.

With faltering steps and creakiRg bones, the suffering and senile seniors had, for four years, ruled the basketball court with an iron hand. They stood supreme, beheld with awe by the infant freshmen, the childish sophomores, and the adolescent juniors. However, in this omnipotent position they were to suffer the onslaughts of each of these aspiring aggregations. The coach of the "old men" was class sponsor, Professor Jack Rairdon, who in his stint of four year rein-holding, had never missed one of his team's games. Also in nine seasons of coaching at BNC the Professor had never lost an Echo tournament cham­ pionship. This leads one to believe that Coach Rairdon either has wonderful potential as a coach or else he is the possessor of the most effective rabbit's foot in town. In their first game of the tourney, the "old masters" showed their usual rambunctious second-half as they easily stomped past the freshmen by the score of 80-52. Ernie Farmer, veteran out-side man, paced the senior attack with a 34 point scoring spree. The other first night game featured the junior team brushing the century mark as they easily handled the sophomores 96-52. All but one of the juniors shared in the scoring as the winner of the Most Valuable Player award for the tournament, Kendall Hight, led with 24. The two losing teams opened the second night's play to decide the third position. The freshmen, in a revenge for their earlier loss, rolled to an overpowering 70- 38 victory over the luckless sopho­ mores. The first year men cleared the bench several times and fairly balanced the scoring except for Lefty Dwight Southworth's 24 point display which certainly didn't help the cause of the hapless sophomores. The championship tilt between the defending seniors and the challenging juniors was a close game down to the final gun. These two teams, primed for a victory, met head-on in a hard, fast game that saw a great deal of determination on both sides and many times players on the floor. The seniors held a slim lead throughout most of the game, never leading by more than six or eight points. There were many times that the ball game was tied up, especially in the hectic first half in which the seniors were seriously hindered by the temporary loss of the ball-hawking, hard-driving game captain, Al Kennedy and their scoring ace Ernie Farmer. Farmer picked up four fouls in the first frame and Kennedy was dropped to the floor in an attempt to stop a junior fast break. How­ ever, when the second hand crossed the last remaining marker, and the final buzzer sounded above the roar of the crowd on a score of 46-42, there remained as su­ preme in the basketball world those age­ less Titans of the court-the seniors.

The final game of the Echo Tournament finds Ernie Farmer and Dean Neff growing very tal l i n their attempts to control the ball.

211


"T -E - A -M, T-E - A -M, T- E - A -M , Team, Te am , Team "

S E N IORS ROW

1:

Biggs, Wyss, Skinner, Gardner, Jerrell.

ROW 2: Kennedy, Dryden, Farmer, Madison, H a ltom.

J U N IORS ROW

1:

Neff, Hend ricks, I mel, Harris.

ROW 2: Harper, Swim, Allen, Oliver, Horton, Hight.

SOPHOMORES ROW 1: Burr, Westmoreland, Campbell, Zabel.

ROW 2: Jones, Parrish, Stewart, Hartpence, Rohlmeier.

FRESHME N ROW 1 : Philo, Johnson, Shocklee, Kelly, Snowberger.

ROW 2: Strange, Motsinger, Norell, Southworth, Henry.

212


U A B A S I\: E T , A B A S K E T , "A BASKET, BOYS, "YOU MAKE THE BASKETS, W E ' LL M A K E THE NOISE . "

S E N IOR C H E E R LEADERS Dale Tuttle, Roberta Posey, Carol Swim, Don Conway

J U N I O R C H E E RLEADERS Glenna Yarbrough, Jo Ann Hale, Doris Bum pus

FRESHMAN C H E E RLEADERS lyn n Carr, (arolyn Rea, Jerry lambert, Jo Casey

SOPHOMOR E C H EE RLEADERS Bon n ie Haynes and Jeanie Steinbach

213


Sen iors c l ose college c areer with

fourth

consec u tive

triu mph

Despite careful observation o f t h e referee, B i l l Rohlmeier and Jack l me l gel all wrapped u p over the ball.

The seniors, victorious for a record-breaking fou r con足 secutive yea rs, demonstrate to their sponsor and coach a bit of their j u bilation.

Gerald

Dryden

disappoi nts

a

snatchy

Kendall

Hight as Bob Madison stands by to offer any needed assistance.

Jim Motsinger and Gary Hartpence "reach for the sky" as the pressure of the game begins to mou nt.

214


In the second heat of the 880-yord relay, Mitchell Dougherty, junior, h a nds off to Harold Moore; and Duane Harder, freshman, seeks to make contact with Paul Joh nson-as the sophomores disappear in a cloud of dust.

Track The early morn of May 1 , 1956, found a heavily laden sky busily dumping its contents on the roofs of slumbering college athletes. Over the racing lanes, hurdles, and jump pits there fell a veil of gauze-like mist, giving everything a soft and subdued appearance. On Track Day this could be considered a major catas­ trophe; however, as time for the first event drew nigh, the rain stopped and a cautious sun peeked bashfully through the murky gray. As the hands of the clock neared 9 : 00 a.m. there erupted from the portals of the girls' and boys' dorms alike, a mass of humanity soon to be transformed into participants and spectators. The approach was cleared for the broad jump, the pit was smoothed, officials readied their tape measures, and Track Day was under way. Revamped on a basis of class competition, T-Day found frolicking freshmen competing against stable sophomores, juniors, and seniors in an atmosphere of everybody plays-somebody wins. In the course of competition, the junior juggernaut moved crushingly ahead, impaling on flashing spikes the egos of the sub-

clued seniors and the vanquished underclassmen. In the scene ·shift from pits to hurdles, collegiate contor­ tionists expended heretofore unrevealed amounts of energy in the "ole college try". As the elusive rod was raised higher and higher, the high jump event found fellows with seemingly built-in wings taking off like home-sick angels for heights unknown. In the "high and mighty" pole vault, the wild blue yonder became a haven for soaring individuals longing for successful "crossing of the bar", while flying saucer enthusiasts had a field day as the discus was propelled by muscle power from one end of Windy Stadium to the other. The clash lanes were populated only by streaks as par­ ticipants moved rocket-like down field to the finish line as in the distance runs the steady rhythm of pound­ ing feet disclosed the possessors of stamina and deter­ mination. Field events, clashes, hurdles, and distance . . . these were all individual colors to be blended into a com­ posite picture, to be conglomerated into coherence, to become Track Day.

215


Statistics

Broad Jump-Harris Mile Run-Haddow

_________________

60 Yd. High Hurdles-Harris Shot Put-Imel

5 : 37.6

___ _________

- ----------------ďż˝---

440 Yd. Dash-Philo Discus-I mel

1 7' 1 11'

_________________

60.0

1 1 6'6"

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __________

880 Yd. Run-Philo

45'6"

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______

60 Yd. Dash-Westmoreland

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _______

High Jump-Philo, Page, Burns, Harris

8.6

6.7

2 : 22.7

__

5'2"

Securing first place i n t h e pole vault f o r t h e juniors, J a c k l mel flies high, wide, and handsome.

Pole Vault-Imel

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________

880 Yd. Relay-Sophomores

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

9'3"

1 :47.6

like extremely active kanga roos, Clifton McNabb and Johnny West­ moreland bou nd lightly over the sixty-yard high h u rd les.

Apparently aided by bare feet and an open mouth, Jerry Burns turns the high jump into a fou r-wa.y tie.

216


J unior s do1n inate ev ents a s Tr a c k D a y r e v erts to c l a ss c omp etition

J unior, Bill Harris' effortless stride catches freshman, Ronnie Orr in the 440 yard dash.

This is the tech nique which captured for Jack lmel and the juniors first place in the discuss.

As H a rris, ju nior, eagerly awaits the bator>, Leffel, of the sophomore 880-yard relay team, hands off to Westmoreland.

Carefully scrutinized, Fresh Bob Wood puts available muscle and a lot of determination into the shot put.

217


Athl etic D i :r e c t o :r s

LOUISE CLINE Senior Director

DIXIE SMITH Junior Director

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SHIRLEY TOWNS Sophomore Director

ROSALIA M ILEY Freshman Director

219


Ba sketball

Despite efforts of Evelyn Rousselle upperclass defense member, Sophomore Shirley Towns splits the net for another two.

Upperclass woman, Louise Cline, intercepts a pass i ntended for Fresh Sharon Mahin, and heads down-court.

To coin the phrase of Frederick the Great in his description of Madame Pompadour, the Empress Eliza足 beth, and Maria Theresa as being the "three female furies", one could apply it in a complementary light to the three girls' basketball teams of the college-the Frosh women, the Sophomoresses, and the Upperclass women. The light-footed ladies and their dainty drib足 bling often demonstrate to the fellows that skill that is lacking in their own play. \Vhen seen on the campus, these girls are the por足 trait of the quiet natured, self-contained individuals that everyone admires and appreciates. They go about their collegiate business in a way that one would expect from such charming girls. Yet, when a cloak of snow covers the ground and the north wind navigates its way through topcoats and mufflers, these same girls become transformed. Perhaps it is the gym shoes that lend the magic touch, for on donning this style of footwear they immediately undergo a tremendous change. Gone is the solemn, sedate lady of the classroo.m ; gone is that grave, staid girl who sat across the dinner table the night before; and in her place stands Tillie Two-points, basketball star and terror of the opposition . For the course of the game she will be the madly dash足 ing, wildly running, screaming, shouting "gal" who can outjump, outshoot, and outplay anyone on the court. Her glamorous stolidity is shaken to its foundations as she displays her talent for something aside from looking pretty and making expected comments. However, on the basketball court and in teamwork, the girls find that they can truly be ladies in Christian competition as well as in their daily walks of life. As teammate Shirley Towns "skirts" the area, Sophomore Jean McElyea steals the rebound from upperclass Evelyn Rousselle, louise Cline , and lenore Sloan.

220


Echo T o ii r n a iii e n t

On behalf of the victorious Sophomore girls' team, Captain Jean McElyea receives the Echo trophy from Queen Kathy Snowberger.

SOPHOMORES ROW

1:

Towns, H utchings, Herron, McElyea.

ROW 2: McNames, Burdine, Stanley, Davis.

FRESHMEN R O W 1 : Smith, Jones, Yerness.

ROW 2: Mahin, Miley, Miller, Lindsley.

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J U N IOR-SEN IOR ROW

1:

McCurley, Rousselle, Smilh, Wheeler.

ROW 2: Keys, Sloan, Womack, Cline.

The lovely ladies' part of the Reveille Echo Tourney was every bit as enjoyable as the mighty men's, and far more pleasing to the eye. The freshmen female five were the questionable factor in the minds of hair-dryer strategists. No one could predict just how good these girls would be; no one could say just how much pressure they would bring to bear on the sophomores and upper­ classmen; that would be determined on the court. The upperclassmen were banking heavily on the weight that experience would carry, hoping that "old heads" could and would prove dominant over the numerical strength of the inexperienced frosh. Their team was composed of the combined forces of the junior and senior classes, with some of the numbers being veterans of past tourney conflicts. The sophomores, who were the reigning champs of the pre­ ceeding year, were the target at which the other teams were aiming. However, this would be considerablv easier dreamed of than done, for the number one sophomore s q uad had returned practically en masse and were determined that their hold on the tournament trophy would not be broken . As the nights of the tournament approached, excitement ran through Bud Robinson and Jernigan Halls like high tension elec­ trical wiring. Monitors and residence counselors, as voltage regu­ lators, endeavored to curtail early morning discussion sessions; for no one, not even girls, could play up to their potential while look­ ing through sleep filled eyes. The referee's whistle proclaimed the beginning of a hard fought strug.gle between the champion sophomores and the "old ladies of the court", the seniors. The heavy end of the score swapped sides frequently and it was anybody's ball game right through to the final gun . However, the precision working of the well oiled sophomore scoring machine sent them out front by a score of 31 -27. Bouncing back the following evening with renewed vim, vigor, and vitality, the champs took on the frolicking fresh­ men and edged past them to the tune of 38- 3 5 . Jerry Hutchings led the sophomores with 37 points for the two games, getting 1 7 in the first night and 20 the second. The freshman's Sharon Mahin received the Most Valuable Girl's Player Trophy and netted a total of 2 l points against the sophomores-two year champs of the Women's Echo Tournament. 222

Besieged

by

upper-classmen,

sophomore

Charlolle

Slanley searches for a friendly uniform.

Sophomore Shirley Towns comes belween frosh Belly Smilh and Maurine Miller as her aclions draw skepli­ cism from Jerry H ulchings and a personal foul for herself.


U n d erclassm e n d o m in a t e action

.

I ll

women's athletics

As Sophomores Jerry H utchings and Shirley Towns live "high and wide", Clara Womack readies a pass for Evelyn Rousselle.

Everyone gets into the act as Fresh and Sophs focus their attention on the el usive a i r-filled sphere.

Jerry H utchings completes a successful ball theft as team mate Ramona Davis charges to her assistance.

In the display of dribbling prowess, Sophomore Char路 lotte Stanley successfully eludes Rosalia Miley, Fresh defense unit.

223


Violetta Yerness, Jeannie Steinbach, Shirley Towns, and Jean McElyea display the sprinting ability that bodes complications for the male clan, leap year or not.

Track

I n the softba ll throw, sophomore Shirley Towns g ives a heave noteworthy of Dimaggio or Mantle.

224

Temporarily laying aside the cloak of domesticity, the girls of BNC turned out en masse to add a touch of femininity to Track Day. Nimble afoot and dexterous of hand, the ladies displayed skills warranting the awe of the wondering male. On the dashes, their vari-colored apparel took on the appearance of a rainbow as they flitted down the marked course. In the soft足 ball throw, the horsehide was subjected to tosses noteworthy of the big league, while the basketball throw merited attention at least by the Celtics or Lakers. Dominating the field for the girls, was the strong sophomore team, which added many needed points to the faltering second year group. Had these feminine flashes not answered the call to class duty, it is more than possible that the sophs would have fallen lower than the third position which they occupied rather perilously. Despite the rather dirty weather which prevailed during certain times of the day, the girls displayed little hesita足 tion at getting their toes wet or their hair damp. They entered into the spirit of competition with a wholesome attitude, conducive to good sportsmanship, and profited greatly by their experience. Though doubtless the prospective victim of aching bones and irate muscles, the women of the campus exemplified the salubrious outlook typical of BNC at all times, but especially on Track Day.


Closely watched by other participants is Jean McElyea. and her fi rst place basketbal l :路h row.

Great expectations on the part of Frosh Jo Linsley portrays the determi颅 nation with which the g i rls pa rticipated in Track day.

Statistics

Basketball Throw-McElyea Softball Throw-Gill

____________

___________________

60 Yard Dash-Steinbach

7 1' 1 1" 1 5 3'8"

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________

8.8

With a yo-ho ond a mighty throw, junior Doris West

laura McNames hands the baton off to Shirley Towns, as members

adds to competition in the softball throw.

of the sophomore 220 relay team try unsuccessfully to break the existing record.

225


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DR. E. S. PHILLIPS Pastor

Like a giant oak he stands amidst the shrub­ bery of the congregation, a tall, muscular, gentle­ man, his head crowned by a thatch of prematurely snow white hair, a ready smile which lights his face like a neon sign, and a pleasant voice that radiates the infectious optimism that possesses him-this is Dr. E. S. Phillips, pastor of Bethany First Church, known among the rank and file of students as College Church. In this responsible position as a leader for hundreds of young people, no one could fill the pulpit, the counselor's chair, or the position of personal friend better than this stalwart Yankee who was once vice-president of Eastern Nazarene College. Long after the mem­ ory of that rough math course, or that deep phil­ osophy class has vanished, college students will look back through the pages of time and remem­ ber the inspiring messages of the First Church pastor. An example of an idiom containing more fact than fiction is that certain one which pro­ claims-"Behind every successful man there stands a good woman". An example of this axiom is Mrs. E. S . Phillips, wife of the pastor. Certainly no presumptuous "busy-body", Mrs. Phillips per­ sonifies the picture of the ideal pastor's wife, interested in her husband's work, active in the missionary society, with a burden for the salvation of souls, a true lady in every aspect of the word. Gracing considerably the Phillips' household are two charming teen-age daughters, Clara and Betty Jean, of whom their parents can be very proud. Last and least in size, though certainly not in importance is Karen, the "baby" of the family. This impish little girl is known by every­ one in the church or on the college campus and is also known to swing considerable weight with her father, especially in relation to sermon lengths. Dr. and Mrs. Phillips, Clara, Betty Jean, and Karen-the "first family" of College Church. 228

College Church

Dr. a nd Mrs. Phillips and their three daughters, Betty Jean, Karen, and Clara.


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Chu rch Person n el

DEPARTMENT H EADS Sunday School Superi ntendent, Harry Craddock; N.F.M.S. President, Mrs. E. S. Phillips; N.Y.P.S. President, Thurman Coburn.

NORMA JANE AND ROBERT BUMPUS Directors of Youth Activities

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ROBE RT GREEN Minister of Christian Education

DICK SCHUMANN Church Visitor

2 30


LESTER DUNN Director of Music

"After the Bible, which is the source book for doctrine and the standard for experience and life, and the Manual or Discipline which is the ground for organized life of the church, nothing is more important to a people than its hymnody. If one is forced to choose between the priv.ilege of preaching what the people are to believe or teach足 ing them the songs they will sing, he might do wisely to choose the latter; for men are moved as much by music and poetry, which are the language of the heart, as they are by reason and logic, which are the express.ion of the intellect. Psalms and hymns and spiritual songs are a means of expressing the spiritual life within" . . . These are the words of H. F. Reynolds, John W. Goodwin, R. T. Williams, and J. B. Chapman. The Nazarene Church is a singing church and the college church, as an example of the denom足 ination, is also a singing church. In every type of service, music is used to its fullest advantage. More than just a collection of black notes on a five lined staff, together with accompanying words, both bound in a book entitled Glorious Gospel Hymns, the music of the Church of the Nazarene is an excellent example of that dynamic exuberant spirit which is so vital to the church and its success. In the rippling tones of the piano, the melodious peal of the organ, the booming voices of the trained choir, or the inspiring qual足 ity of the individual soloist, music is a living part of Bethany Nazarene College and the College Church.

RUTH TAYLOR Church Organist CARROLL HARVILLE Church Pianist

231


Professor Lester Dunn ond the one hundred seventy-five voice choir.

Messiah It was the evenmg of December 1 1 , 1 9 5 5 _ The quietness of night had begun to fall over Bethany with only an occasional person walking briskly with up­ turned coat collar to offset the bite of the icy aiL Department stores and other business establishments, which had adopted the late shopping hours of the Yule season, were closed. On the streets, movement was at a minimum while traffic signals blinked their almost un-needed messages of red and green. In the sky above, huge billowy clouds of grey were chased across the heavens by a wintry wind that seemed to suggest the possibility of snow.

On the campus of BNC the soft glow of lights from the college church shined through the December eve­ ning with the effect of magnetism. The numerous walks which criss-cross the college grounds were sud­ denly filled with students as they moved toward the sanctuary. From the electronic speaker of the church there pealed forth the strains of beloved Christmas carols while the tree lined avenues of the city seemingly sprang into life. The tiredness of a hectic clay was forgotten, the attraction of other happenings was ig­ nored, and the blustry wintry eve held no threat to these people, for tonight they were to hear-"The MESSIAH". 2 32

Since the beginning of school, Professor Dunn had worked diligently, utilizing his musical talents to the fullest degree in the training of a gigantic choir for this occasion. Tonight, the student body of the college with townspeople of Bethany and surrounding areas would reap the results of that effort; an expectant hush fell over the audience. By one accord, the choir, accom­ panied by Mrs. Ruth Taylor, organist, Professor Carroll Harville, pianist, and under the baton of Professor Lester Dunn, began the oratorio-One hundred seventy­ five college voices were raised in tribute to "THE MESSIAH". For over an hour the congregation sat as if spellbound, while those voices proclaimed 'Glory to God", "And the Glory of the Lord", "Behold the Lamb of God" and the many other beautiful choral portions of Handel's masterpiece. Soloists, Mrs. Mabel Sonnevik, soprano; Mrs. Evelyn Robinson, contralto; Professor Gene Cham hers, tenor; and Mr_ Geron Brown, bass, added beauty upon beauty as they sang with their hearts as well as lips. When it seemed as if the ultimate had been achieved, the audience rose to receive the "Halleujcth Chorus" as it swelled forth in a glorious symphony of sound. Then, as the last strains of this marvelous musical creation faded, the choir as well as the congregation moved out of the auditorium into the night with a sense of appreciation and gratitude for "THE MESSIAH".


Aycock L e c t •• r e s

DR. JARRETTE AYCOCK

DR. LEWIS T. CORLETT

W i l l i a iD s M e iii o r i a l L e c t ii r e

DR. PAUL REES

233


Revivals and C o n. v e n t i o n s

REV. LAURISTON J. DuBOIS Opening School Convention Fall Semester

REV. 路wiLLIAM FISHE R Fall Revival

DR. MENDELL TAYLOR Opening School Convention Spring Semester

REV. J. E. WILLIAMS Spring Revival

2 34


With crystal clearness the chimes high atop Bresee Hall proclaim to the brightness of an autumn, winter, or spring morning that the hour of 1 0 )0 is at hand. Now to the majority of people that mid-morning hour holds little or no significance, but to students of B.N.C. it is a very special hour, holding a very special meaning -it is time for chapel. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday the routine of the collegiate day is broken . by an hour of worship. From the classroom, the coffee shop, and the gymnasium they come to gather in the auditorium of the Fine Arts building. Petty arguments, worries over studies, and other cares of the day are for gotten as hundreds of voices proclaim "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God".

REV. HOWARD ECKLES Missionary to Japan

Chapel offers as many solutions as there are prob足 lems-to the troubled of heart, a fiery evangelist with a soul stirring appeal; to the weak in spirit a returned missionary kindling an unquenchable fire of service and to the inquiring of mind a dynamic message, c!1alleng足 ing in every aspect to the intellect. Here, in a mid足 morning rendezvous with God, the faculty as well as the student body of B.N.C. re-activates their lives in accordance with His plan.

Chapel DR. L. T. CORLETT President of Nazarene Seminary

REV. \VH ITCOMB HARDING District Superintendent Nebraska

2 36


DR. B. F. NEELY Evangelist REV. \VILLIAM FISHER Evangelist

Spea kers DR. L. J. DUBOIS General N.Y.P.S. Secretary

DR. S. T. LUDWIG General Secretary

2 37


JUDGE JOHN BRETT Criminal Court of Appeals of Oklahoma

DEAN WESSELS Board of Pensions Headquarters : Kansas City

Ch a p e l Sp e a kers

DR. E . WAYNE GARDNER Olivet Dean of Students

REV. R. R. MILLER Under appointment to Formosa

2 38


Q u_ a :r t e t s and Trios

Doris Ammons, Evangeline Steele, Wilma Snowberger

Jack l mel, Dean Neff, Hiram Sanders, Howard Oliver

The crystal tones of sopranos, harmonious altos, booming basses, operatic tenors, and ex­ pressive baritones abound in considerable num­ ber on the campus of BNC. In the course of a school year, these individual voices are often woven into a compact group, always with pleas­ ant results. Various activities of the college constantly demand the services of these groups and they maintain a very active schedule; con­ ventions, class prayer meetings, banquets, and chapel are but a few of the campus programs which make use of their talents. From BNC numerous ministerial students go out to various churches of the educational zone and their services are often enhanced greatly by the talents of college trios or quar­ tets. The members of these organizations, who must also maintain a high scholastic average, take pride in always being prepared to answer the ca11 to these various areas of service. Re­ cently, when an intensive campaign was in progress for the news boys' dormitory, expended efforts found able assistance in these musical groups. With these organizations composed of re­ sponsible Christian young people, they often reap wonderful results from their musical mes­ sages. Furthering the cause of Christianity and adding to the Kingdom of the Lord are these melodious groups of BNC-The quartets and trios.

Lester Knight, Ronald Barlow, Dick Osborn, Lawrence Dean.

2 39


T :r i o s

Vera Winters Katherine Snowberger Patricia Swigart

...

Genell C rawford Mary Burdine Delma Montgomery

Bobbie Meador Lue Anna Allen Ruth Knutson

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240

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ROW 1 : Womack, Miller, Miller, B u rton, Owens, Martin, Cook.

ROW 2: Bonner, Flood, Jernigan, Ammons, lolmaugh.

ROW 3 : Daniel, Wallace, Lewis, Ch risty, Maney, Cribbs, Matlock.

Gospel Team Ch oir

our watchword and

West. Over the Easter holidays the organization took

Holiness unto the Lord as we're marching along,

an extended trip to Port Arthur, Texas, where they held a succession of services, having a wonderful time

"Holiness unto the Lord is song,

Sing it, shout it, loud and long Holiness unto the Lord, now and forever."

Twenty trained voices raised on high proclaiming the dynamic message of this grand old hymn of the Church, suggest to the student of BNC one orgamza­ tion-the Gospel Team Choir. By invitation, this group of roving ambassadors, along with a small retinue, carry their message in song to statewide congregations. This year, they have visited scores of state churches in the North, South, East and

242

in the Spirit of the Lord. In all these services the entire program of worship is usually �irected by the choir and officers of Gospel Team, the parent organization. Vari­ ous choral numbers are presented by the choir; special numbers in the form of a trio and a mixed quartet are also featured, while the morning message is usually given by the Gospel Team's sponsor with the sermon of the evening being presented by a ministerial student or the president of the parent organization. Thus, through these functions an outstanding representative body of the college is the Gospel Team Choir.


ROW 1 : Philo, Boyd, Mahoney, Hann, Crawford, Montgomery, Snowberger, Snowberger, Nesmith, Holla nd, Puckett, Martin, ROW 2: Madison,

Leffel, H u ghes, Johnson, Tracy, Emmert, Broce, Harris, Cinnamon, lo!maugh. ROW 3 : Southworth, Snowberger, Spire, Page, Miller, Summer, Simpson, Sloan, Neh rbass. ROW 4: Dean, Young, Johnson, Flood, Cribbs, Bonner, Matlock, Teague, Foote. ROW 5 : Smith, Womack, Daniel, Wallace, lewis, Walke, Bonner, Adams, Herron, Bond, Miller. ROW 6: Smith, Ammons, Jernigan, King, Muttoo, Hight, Goulden, Craighead, Cook, Hutchings, Taylor, Holland.

G o 8 p e l T e a In "For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them." ( Matthew 1 8 : 2 0 ) Every Thursday evening a s the hands o f the clock approach 6 : 30, a great host of BNC students prepare to attend one of the outstanding religious services of the campus. These persons must be stout of ]imb as wen as stout hearted, for the gathering place is the top floor of the educational unit of the Co11ege Church. However, the attained goa] is we11 worth the expended effort, for here in this Gospel Team service one may we11 receive the blessing of a 1ifetime. In this unique service, direction of the entire program is in the hands of students; church music majors have charge of the music while ministerial students bring the gospel message. This is a profitable arrange­ ment for a11 concerned, for with numerous speakers presenting their various points, different views are presented and at the same time constructive criti­ cism can be received. An outstanding characteristic of the overaU program is the immense amount of ·enthusiasm expressed freely by everyone, whether in prayer, singing, or testimony. This practice pays off with terrific dividends as visitation of the Spirit is not infrequent in services of the BNC Gospel Team.

President, J. D. Cook; Vice-President, Amos

H a n n; Secretary, Doris

Ammons; Sponsor, Dr. King.

243


Prayer a n d Fa stin g "And lJe said unto tlJem, This kind can come forth by nothing, but prayer and fasting." ( Mark 9 : 29 )

Friday and noon time brings t o BNC one of the outstanding services of the campus. The strains of organ music floating across the grounds herald an hour of worship rich in every aspect. Held in the College Church auditorium, the quiet rest足 fulness of the service is conducive to prayer and meditation, giving the student an opportunity to clear from his heart and mind the cobwebs of per足 sonal trials. In the solemn quietness of the sanc足 tuary the rewarding experience of close com足 munion of the individual with God is realized.

President, Dick Newtort; Vice-President, Don Conway; Secretary, Wilma Snowberger; Orga nist, Lester Knight; Sponsor, Dr. Garner.

244

With an emphasis on quiet devotion, this noon hour service is beautiful in its simplicity. The soft tones of the organ provide a holy atmosphere while silent group prayer is offered around the altar. Later, consideration of the words of organ hymns gives a richer meaning to the beautiful melodies. A pertinent message in the form of a devotional is presented by the designated leader and the service is closed by testimony and prayer. Not stupendous or colossal, or mighty in scope, but inspiring in its simplicity, and is wonderful in its rewards.


ROW 1 : Fox, Barlow, Carr, Skinner, Cantrell, Wimberley, Wellmon, Sells. ROW 2: Garnand, Rose, Copela nd, Watson, Penquite, McNames,

Joh nston. ROW 3 : Blystone, Stone, Turner, Conger, Stangeland, Potter, Hoilman, Gentz, Pulliam, Morgan. ROW 4: lang ley, Hend ricks, Archer, King, Kohnk, Henderson, Davis, Peters. ROW 5: Ramsey, Martin, Carter, Chestnut, Coons, Phillips, Watson F i n no. ROW 6: Conna lly, Franklin, Muttoo, DeVore, Penny, Hines, Needels, Bauder, Williams, Mikkelson, Womack, Barker, Carter.

M i s s i o .. B a .. d "Go ye therefore and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost;" ( Matthew 28 : 1 9 )

Each Thursday evening a t 6 : 30 there assembles in the basement of the College Church a group of individuals whose desire it is to obey this scrip足 ture command. To them, the magic sounds of Africa, South America, Japan, and many other exotic foreign countries represent either real or prospective areas for mission work. As the name implies, the organization's chief concern is with the cause of missions, and though a call to the mission field is not imperative for membership, the group is composed mainly of those who are missionary-minded, whether at home or abroad. Giving not only lip service to this important work, the group gives also of its time, means, and effort. With a project emphasis on the support of the Philippe Bible Institute, the organization has also presented in various churches over the area an inspiring play, depicting a young person's struggle with a mission call. Thus, lending assist足 ance to world-wide missions through material means as well as support through prayer is the BNC chapter of the Mission Band.

President, Charles Strawn; Vice-President, lou A n n Fox; Secreta ry, Wilma Peters; Treasurer, Dolores Wellmon; Chaplain, Dale Tuttle; Sponsor, Dr. Philo.

245


ROW 1 : Spire, Sawyer, Lewis. ROW 2: Johnson, Uitts, Eatmon, Frazier. ROW 3: Womc:ck, Daniel, Wallace, Leffel. ROW 4: Southworth, Morris, Stewart, Danner.

M i n i s t e r i a l A s s o c i a t i o ii "How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him ot whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher? And how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the teet of them that preach the gespel ot peace, and bring glad tidings ot good things!"-(Romans 10:14-1 5)

President, Richard Leffel; Vice-President, Doyle Frazier; Secretary, Richy Lewis; Sponsor, Professor Sawyer.

246

The Ministerial Association, as its name im足 plies, is composed of students of the ministry who have organized for the purpose of studying problems of the ministry-both material and spir足 itual. As they collectively consider, with frank足 ness, open-mindedness and earnestness, those problems pertinent to the ministry they increase their efficiency for service in the Kingdom of God and the church. Recognizing that teamwork is superior to individualism, the organism func足 tions as a considerative and discussive panel for problems of the church and ministry, thus making possible an objective survey and possible solution. All of these activities have given knowledge for the forthcoming ministry of the members, and this year the Ministerial Association has been a valuable asset to the ministerial students of the college.


If it is possible for anyone to have as many problems as a minister, that dubious honor would certainly fall on the shoulders of his wife. For seven successful years, the class known as the Beth Arms has functioned infallibly in an informa­ tive program of inestimable value to its members. Although the course is without college credit, it is sponsored by the administration of the college and is open to the wife of any ministerial student. Beth-Ann, derived from the word Bethany, i"s the fictional name applied to a typical minister's wife who is preparing for her role as the wife of a preacher. Classes meet weekly. The organiza­ tion's sponsor, Mrs. Cantrell, lectures and leads the discussion of the group; occasional guest speakers serve to enliven the sessions. Various problems of vial interest pertaining to the preach­ er's wife, her home, her children, and her church meet with discussion of the group. The pastor's wife in relation to her husband and his work, and her relation to the community as a church worker are pertinent subjects which are dealt with. A contributing factor to the 11Preacher1s Physique" is the Beth-Anns' Banquet.

Beth-Anus

The year's social activities began with a recep­ tion, to which all the ministerial students' wives and their husbands were invited. Rev. J. T. Gassett as speaker was appreciated by both the wives and husbands. Concluding the events of the year, a lovely banquet held in the Student Union Building, featured a "Heart Throb" theme and was well attended by Beth Anns and their husbands. Rev. Whitcomb Harding, District Superintendent of the Nebraska District, served as after dinner speak­ er and was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone.

Against the backdrop of ancient Greece, the head table is an

Frank Skillern and wife< as well as other attendants, agree

example of a successful social event.

the parsonage was never like this.

247


I ID p :r e s s i o n s � D i g :r e s s i o .. s � a

.. d

Repre ssion s

When y0u receive this yearbook you will he nearing the end_of. another school year, aqd when you reaeh this page in . your · yearbook, you will he neari·ng the end of another ARROW. This book is nqt the fruit of one person's labor, but it is the result of the efforts of a gtoup of people. It is the culmination of a- combined operation 'by which the 1 956 ARROW was· brought into being. There's Phil, who always took time to pause in his virtually endless copywriting to help someone else. He's the one who sacrificed week-night study hours and Friday night dates to bring you readable copy. Without his dogged determination, encouragement, humorous comments, and unfailing ideas, we could never have made it. His blaring radio, often supplemented by off­ key gargling, and his incessant demand to "Shut the door!" kept the annual office lively even when we weren't. Dene seems to hav� developed a perpetual squint and that's understandable when you realize he hasn't seen daylight since final deadlines began. Like most of us, his working hours were around the clock, since he demanded the utmost in perfection. We'll always re­ member him risking life and limb while teetering on the basketball goal, trying to get the "right kind of shot" for section pages. Ernie is still limping, and who wouldn't be after hitting every solvent merchant in town in an effort to convince them that advertising in the ARROW is not just a charity but a worthy investment. He ·also devel­ oped quite a case of writer's cramp as he endeavored to reach pastors over the zone and secure their adver­ tisements. Of course, I'm here too, putting the ARROW to bed-I only wish it were me- ( in bed, that is ) . After eight months of my own concentrated effort ,.coupled 248

with trying to keep the others calm and at work, I'm enjoying one last dramatic moment in this, our last all-night session. Tickling the memory bone, a l t h o u gh it was far from funny at the time, we now laugh to remember the time Dene dropped a bottle and broke the bottom from the film-washing sink-just when we really needed it. As a result of carelessness on the part of the editor and photographer, there was also the time we had to make innumerable long distance telephone calls in order to get a picture of a certain chapel speaker. Unforgettable is the sinking-stomach-feeling we felt when we realized that we had no football team pic­ tures and a deadline was only two days away. Endless are the hectic situations, such as the editor amputating the end of her finger while cropping pictures-dis­ abling her for that job for quite some time. Disturbing was Phil's five day vacation to California when copy was needed by the ton, and frightening was Dene's re­ port of the strobe unit's failure in the middle of the junior lyceum. But, needless to say, we survived it all. However, we couldn't have done it without the assistance of our sponsor, Mrs. Lundy, who always knew the right advice to give ( whether we took it or not ) and she always knew the perfect way to fill unexpected gaps. Special thanks also goes to Retta at the publishers for her patience while we learned this business of putting out a yearbook; Mr. Owen arrd Mr. Curtis who were always so good humored in spite of our last minute demands for needed pictures; our advertisers for their wonderful cooperation in helping to finance the ARROW; Don for working so faithfully on the art work for the ads; the staff for its cooperation and willingness to pitch in at a moment's notice; our friends for their suggestions, practical and otherwise. Well, it looks as though the end we thought would never come is already here. It has certainly been a privi­ lege and a pleasure to edit the ' 56 ARROW. In behalf of the staff, let me say that I sincerely hope it has caught the spirit, friendships, and memorable activities of an outstanding and u n f o r g e t t a b l e school year at B.N.C.


A d v e rtis in g

In d e x

Abilene District ____________________ 266 Abilene First ________________ _______ 28 3 Ada First -------------------------- 300 Amarillo First _____ _________ ________ 276 t s - _ _ --- -- - - - --- 2 5 5 d � �� � 0 12 1� . '" Bellaire, Texas ---- ---- --'-- -- ------�- 2 54 ' �Bethany College Church ______________ 280 BEthan � Eastside -----v7_____________ 2 8 2 1 W' �l\ O r., � • U l a c- r-. Carthage, Mo. ______________________ 2 7 1 ' L !a y� M o Y' e. o l{faDallas Central ___________________ ___ 272 Dallas District ______________________ 290 Dallas First ___________________ ___ __ 293 Dallas Hampton Plac.:;..,.- ______________ 300 ___.!.- Denison, Texas ___ jX:,.e._e_,. _ ___ __ ______ 2 5 8 Dodge City, Kansas _______ _ __ ___ __ _ __ 2 7 2 Duncan Oak Avenue ________________ 2 9 5 Durant First _______________________ 2 7 7 1

f

1

Independence, Kansas _____________._ _ _ 2 76

Kansas City Armourdale ______________ 2 5 5 Kansas City District _________________ 26 1 Kansas City First ____________________ 299 Kansas City St. Paul's _Rc::::.�_________ 284 Kansas City Quindaro ________________ 2 6 3 Kansas District ------�---------------287 Killeen, Texas ______________________ 2 5 8

' Lincoln, Nebraska, First _ _ _ __ __ _____ ___ 294 Little Rock First ____________________ 2 8 8 J Longview, Texas _____________ _______ 2 7 1 Louisiana District ___________________ 2 5 2 Lubbock, Texas, First ________________ 296 • Lufkin, Texas _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ ____________ 270

El Reno ___________________________ 285 ________ ______ 263 s � �i,-;�� --o�Ta Fort Worth Glen Park __ _____________ 2 8 5 Fort Worth North Side 300 Freeport, Texas _____________________ 2 7 1

, EG� ��

Midwest City ______________________ 2 8 3 � Muskogee First _____________________ 2 59

- - - - - - - - - - - - -·-

t

Hot Springs, Ark., First ______________ 284 Hutchinson, First _ _ _ _ _______________ 2 5 2 Hutchinson, Peniel __________________ 2 8 2

, rl���Y ��tr!fe�- - ----- --- -- - - ---- - 2 7 5

�; �

Nazarene Theological Seminary _________ 2 5 7 Nebraska District ____________ ______ _ 2 5 1 New Orleans, Louisiana Churches ______ 2 7 1 Newton, Kansas ____________________ 2 54 � Norman First ____________________ _ __ 2 7 3 North Arkansas District ______________ 262

Greenville, Texas, First _______________ 267 Guymon, Okla. _____________________ 274

' Henryetta, Okla., First ______________ 2 84 Hooker, Okla. ________ _ _ __ ____ ______ 2 5 7

pe. y f,_v,� [) d <i! S$'.:JY Y'

CHURCH ADVERTISERS

I

I

Northeast Oklahoma District __________ 286 � Northwest Oklaho'm a District _________ 273 � 0 , (. 1 .k t Al L.:. ) .U '7e -.r 'f'2.-e-< • Oklahoma City First ________________ 298 Oklahoma City Lakeview Park _________ 294 i Oklahoma City Meridian Park ________ _ 297 � Oklahoma City Pennsylvania Ave. _____ 2 7 3 ' Oklahoma City Trinity ______________ . 296 �eb�� i�estJ� --- ----- -- 2 5 8 � ,. ljipca CityVIOklahoma -.,...-.._ - -- ------- 2 74 f '6 y i ,.. Y' 'fJt tJ Y> I e � � San Angelo, Texas __________________ 2 59 San Antonio District ________________ 2 89 ' �n . (\.ntowo Hatfield ________________ 2 7 3 ' S?i�ri'J p1 � h-�tN_':._�- -- - ----- ------ - - -- - 2 5 3 s Sherman, Texas, First __________ ______ 297 I South Arkansas District ____ ___________ 2 56 Southeast Oklahoma District __________ 270 Southwest Oklahoma .District _________ 292

: or;��

--_277 rtffJ

" S61lwater, Olthtfietm

�,tlJdscnt Rel� ious Organization ________ 260 ' t v I$ .:} C!e rJ h··•'l � Texarkana First _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ 264 Texarkana, North. ___________________ 2 5 4 Topeka, Kansas, First ________________ 2 5 5 l)peka, KalJ.SaS, O_pkland _ ____________ 276 ' ; v isa r r -rs ,..... • vVellington, Texas _ _ _ _ _ _____________ 269 Wichita Falls First __________________ 2 5 8 1 Wichita, Kansas, First _ _ ______________ 268 ; \Villiams Memo9a� 59 ·

COMMERCIAL ADVERTISERS

lq

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...

.

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.

Alumni Association __________________ 3 2 3 "-Eagan Plumbing ____________________ 3 1 3 ...._ Anthony Department Stores, C. R . _____ 3 1 5 -EI Taos ·Motel �----- ���-�-= ��-ll 9 -; ._O'Mealey's Cafeteria _________________ 309 . Auto Tradin' Post _____ _ _ _ __________ 3 2 2 c:'\ F.T .A. ____ ____ ____ _ ----._ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ 302 ....-Jlhilhfi€?k linic�-- - � ---_:_ _ ______ _)'tY... "-.J -Bethany Flower Shop ________________ 3 1 7 - First Nat'!. Bank, Bethany __________ __ 3 1 1 p osey A u to S uppI y _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ 3 0 5 , , ___ Bethany Lam 1dry __________ _________ 3 2 7 --. First Nat'!. Bank, Yukon __________ ____ 326 ....:l..l , .. - p0well Rexa11 Drug ___ __ ___ _ __ __ _ _ ___...,.,.,. - Av __... _ �Bethany Med1cal Center ______________ 3 1 0 Bethany Nazarene College ____________ 329 ""'Graham's Appliance - -- --- --- - - --- -- - 3 2 5 + eveille Echo, The _ _ _ _ ______________ 3 2 2 BethaHy-Tiib 1e-pu_bli'Siuilg.. o. �.-ft2,_ ereyhourrd·-Bus Company-_":___________ 3 2 7 Brown-McClure Lumber Co. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 3 1 8 AShaclicl Dental Clinic _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________ 3 1 3 Brvan, S . M.; Construction Co. ________ 324 '-·Hal Owen Photographers --------- - - - - 3 2 8 �:-- '\Social Studies Club __________________ 324 -Bt;rch-,- Fre �-"""="-- --- - ��- -� 3 -t+ { J-:l ansen-Atlee Dairy ______________ ___ _ 324 "'./Southwestern Stat . and Bank Supply ____ 3 30 .L Herman's Eat Shoppe _ _ _ _ ____________ 3 2 5 · tewart's Paint Store ______ ____ ______ 3 1 9 -'<::�<>.._ CarnatiOn . __________ __ 3 hAf Co. Ice Cream 'Hogue-St one Floor Covering __ __ ________ 3 20 -f-.. Stub and Sue Zesto __________ ________ 307 , Carters Flowers ------------------ - - - 3 1 6 -Humpty-Dumpty Stores ___________ ____ 3 0 7 - Student Council _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ __ _ 306 "' --ChambQ of Commerce ______________ 3 2 1 - Ci;ty !'; -- -- ---- ---------- - -- ----- 3 2 5 & M Cleaners ________________ _ _ __ 3 1 4 T.G.&Y. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - -� ..._ College Cleaners ____________________ 3 1 � , ��--------------�B9���� ; ""'· Kiwan·�s International ________________ 3 1 6 0.\. ,. College Shoe Shop _______________ _ __ 3 1 6 Up-to-Date Cleaners ____ ------------- 304 ':}·-� Colonial Bread _______________ _ _____ 302 "' Kraker s -------- ---- --------------- 3 1 4 Community Loan Company __ ________ 326 Ll"" 1artin & Vaughan Insurance __________ 3 0 3 - \Vehrenberg Drug _________________ _ � 0 ,r . Cook's Fountain -------------------- 3 1 3 Merritt Funeral Home _______________ 326 . &Western Auto - - - - - - =- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -� .. Dawson Mobile Service ______________ 3 2 0 "-� Munn Radio Vestern Motel ___________________ _ _ 3 2 7 Drag, The _________________________ 3 1 2 .._ . --Duteh:.S �pQJ.ting-Goods ��� � :=""=- -� 3{}-Z. 'Nazarene Publishing House ___________ 30 8 �Yukon Mill and Grain _______________ 3 1 6 _') ,.-! 'f\ I If§ . !( l') ,,Cf ..(A.;f ------ , .r vi!'-'j e . 1 ---

_ _ -

·

- - - - - - - - - --- -- - - - - --- -

f)

250

e •

_

-

--


B e s t Wi s h e s To Th e S e n i o r C9 l a s s . . .

PR EPARING

FOR

B.N.C.

0

NEB RASKA D I S TRI CT WH ITCOMB HARDING

DISTRICT SUPERI NTENDENT 25 1


LO U ISIANA DISTRICT

"Supporting

the

progr a m

of

e nt ire the

general

church."

District Camp-J u n e 29 - J u ly 8 Boys and Girls Camp-J u ly 23-27 Ft. Jessup Camp-August 3- 1 2

ELBERT DODD, District Superintendent MRS. ELBERT DODD, N.F.M.S. President EARL WHEELER, N.Y.P.S. President

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE H UTC H I NSON, KANSAS

Wilson R. Lanpher

lewis R . Thom pson

Pastor

Music and Youth

"Breaking the Bread of Life in the Heart of the Nation" 252


I

13ackinq dke Oflzofe Pror;ram of d"ke Ckurch

NAZARENE G. W. ABLA Minister

Bobby Branson

D o n Carley

I

_A s� P A �

Billie Sh re ffler

.

SAPUL A N ZA

E YOUTH

FUTURE STU DENTS FOR O U R NAZARE N E COLLEGES

253


We A

Believe

G r e et i n g s

1n

The

Co l lege

Wh ere

To

1 956

C h a racter

Towers.

Arrow

Staff

FIRST CHU RCH of the NAZARENE Newton, Ka nsas

OUR

STUDE NTS

1 955- 1 956

Clifton Norell, Minister Rubert Blankenship, S. S. Supt. Mrs. Willis Overholt, N.Y.P.S. Pres. Frieda Knak, N. F .M.S. Pres. Frank Quiring , Lay Chairman Don Tolend, Director of Music

John Norell Carl Gaede Howard Oliver Delores Jantz Lawrence Jantz

Sanctuary Entrance

THE

NORTH TEXARKANA

With Heartfelt Appreciation

CHU CH of the NAZARENE

Scho lastic a n d Spiritua l Ach ievement

37th a n d Main Streets

of Bethany Nazarene Col lege

for the

Texa rkana, Texas WELCOMES YOU

J. Lawrence Abla, Pastor •

Evangelistic in Spi rit

Spiritua l in Emphasis MARLOW SALTER, Pastor

Fundamental in Doctrine

A Friendly C h u rch Interested i n

A I R E C H U R C H o f the NAZA R E N E

YOU R Spiritual Well Being

Congratulations To The ARROW Staff and the Class of 2 54

4638

'56

Bellaire Boulevard Bellaire, Texas


ToPEI{A FIRST CHURCH oF THE NAZARENE Topeka, Kansas

1 Oth a n d Bucha nan

Edw. S. Barton Pastor

Our Students : Charlotte Stanley Martha Langley

Compliments of the

Cong ratulations to the C lass of 1 956

FIRST CHUR CH of the NAZAR ENE

ARMOURDALE

1 0 1 0 Osag e AUGUSTA ,

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

KANSAS

i!)

Charles M. Spicer, Pastor

oooo(o-�OtJ� ----)o••• --t

u

1 249 Osage Avenue

/)

L/

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS

"\\!hen Yau Are in Kansas City, Come to See Us"

WE ARE 1 OOo/o FOR BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE

Terrell C. Sanders, Jr., Minister Raymond Allen, S. S. Supt. Lorene Allen, N.Y.P.S. President Edrell Sanders, N.F.M.S. President

255


/

I

/cg

1 0

I

Glass

. Pres.-MRS. W. L. F R E N C H i r m a n C h u rch School Board-J. W . McCLUNG

25 6,/ •.


0 H O O K E R , O K LA H O M A

CONGRATU LAT IONS

TH E NAZA R E N E

C LASS

YOUNG P EOPLES S OC I ETY

OF '5 6 F R OM-

O F HOOKER

R. EARL COTION Pastor

O U R STU DE NTS:

VERA RUTH WINTER

ALBERT ZABEL

DELORES NAGEL

Nazarene Theo o ical ...__;' e m1n ar Lewis T. Corlett

1 700 East Myer Bou leva rd

Mendell Taylor

President

Ka nsa s City, Missouri

Dean 2 57


FIRST C H U R C H of the NAZ ARENE

KILLEEN TEXAS

5th a n d Burnett

CH URC H of the NAZAREN E

Wichita Fa l ls, Texas

Ivy Boh a n n a n

BUFORD

Pastor

BURGNER

Pastor

We're for B. N. C.

1 00 %

With O u r Students

Prayers

F i n a nce

Cong ratu l ations to the C lass of '56

Jimmy Burgner

Myrna Kay McCiug

a n d to Bethany Nazarene Col lege.

STU D E N TS

You have our contin ued prayers and Cong ratulations

C lass of '56

support.

WE MAKE YOU F E E L WE LCOME

.

-

���.... �\

-_..,. ....

'

�-

... _

.

, )· -:.>:,.

•.

"

.

CENTRAL NAZARENE CH URCH is for

BETHANY NAZARE NE COLLEGE

Rev. a n d Mrs. H. F. Crews

Com p l i ments of the

CHU R CH of the N AZ A R E N E 23 1

Our Student:

Daisy Hailman

West Texas St .

D E N I SON, TEXAS

258

Alvin Maule, Pastor Dick Mitchell, N.Y.P.S. Pres. Thelma Religo, S. S. Supt.

Omaha, Nebraska


" F ''

a

t E 1 mira

M U S I( O G E E ,

O I( L A .

C O N G RAT U LAT I O N S

to Bethany

Naza rene

College

and Arrow Sta ff ·

Students: Charles Rodgers James Holcomb

George M. lake Minister

"B oostmg . B . N. C . " 825 N. Beaver Street

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE San Angelo, Texas

Caddo and Jackson

Charles W. Ogden, Minister •

"The Singing Church in the Wool Capital of the World"

Frank McConnell-Pastor Arston Woods-Educational Director Clint Coats-Sunday School Supt. Dorthy Luginbyhl-Pianist and N.F.M.S. Pres. Vestol Nichols-Chorister THE GROWING CHURCH WHERE EVERYBODY IS HAPPY AND EVERYBODY LIKES TO SING.

259


S T UD E N T

J. D. Cook

Dick Newton

Gospel Team

Prayer and Fasting

0 R G A N

R E L I

I

z A T

G I

0

I

u s

260

0 N s

TOM BOYD Director Religious Activities

"A l l

TO

THE

G LO RY

O F

G O D11

Dick Leffel

Charles Strawn

Ministerial Assoc.

Mission Band


PUS H ING EVE RY INTEREST OF THE C H U RCH

AN D SPONSO RING THE

DR. JARRETTE AYCOCK. Dist. Supt.

KA NSAS C ITY RES C UE M I SSION

The Only Genuine Rescue Mission in the Denomination 261


NORTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT REV. J. W. HEN DRICKSON REV. HARVEY RATHBURN MR. ELBERT TYLER

_ _

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

MRS. J. W. HEN DRICKSON

REV. J. L. EMME RT

_ _ _ _

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

REV. MARION GUY

_ _

_ _ _

_ _ _ _

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ . _ _

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ __

_

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

_

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

REV. J . W. HENDRICKSON

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

District Supt. District Sec. District Treas. N . F.M.S. Pres. N .Y.P.S. Pres. Ch urch Schoo l C h m .

Students from North Arkansas District

Dist. Supt.

A D V I S O RY B O A R D REV.

BOYD

HANCOCK REV.

PAUL WATSO N MR.

ALFRED

F E LT S

MR.

262

BERT T R U MBLE


AZA

0 2843 N ORTH 1 3TH STREET

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS

B ETHANY

B E S T

NAZARE N E

W I S H E S -

T 0 -

-

CO LLEGE - - -

-

J ERALD R. LOCKE

Pastor

J IMMY MOTSINGER

L I NDA JOH NSON

R ICHARD MONTFORD

S T A T E AT A D A M S

• •

SANCTUARY AND PARSONAGE

"A

L I V E

C H U R C H

REV. C. A. SMITH Pastor

W I T H

A

L I V E

M E S S A G E"

263


T E X A R K A N A

FI RST FLETCH E R SPRUCE Pastor

------====

_ - - .--- - . -

Sanctua 264


- -==�

----

v

-=-=c

l

& ' � IV rr: ..._ lr" '

J r; -

· ----

"""

.---..

) -

Parsonage

-

1 6 1 9 W. 8th Street

'

I

Itional Unit - 8th at Brown Street

265


THE ABILENE DISTRICT Orville Jenkins District Superintendent

D i st r i ct C a m p M e e t i n g - C a m p A r r o w h e a d A u g u st 2 0 -26, 1 956

Mrs. 0. W. Jenkins N .F.M.S. President

S u p p po r t i n g Rev. Wm. Dorough N.Y.P.S. President

BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE Y e a r By Y e a r

Rev. D. M. Duke Church School Chm.

266


Greenville, Texas •

...... upporttng

PPesent

ra yers

Students i n B. N . C.

oney ents

Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Donaldson

267


SANCTUARY

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE W I C H I TA, K A N SA S

G. A. GOUGH, Min ister

KEN S. ARMSTRONG, Associate Minister

268

W. I. GOUGH, Visiting Minister


"We Are Proud of Our Young People Who

Rev. John Ferguson Pastor

Harold Moore Class of

1957

'

Have Chosen Bethany Nazarene College"

Roberta Posey Class of

1956

Clifton McNabb Class of

1957

Glenna Yarbrough Class of

1957

Donivan Bounds Class of

1 9 59

269


SOUTHEAST OI(LAHOMA DISTRICT

Education

and

C h r i st i a n i t y

bring

success

1n

life.

MRS. L. A. R I C HARDSON-District N . F .M.S. President BILL W.

BUTCHE R-District N .Y.P.S. H.

DE ITZ-Sunday School Board Chairman

HAROLD C . ORVI LLE

President

HARCOU RT-District Secretary

E. WILLIAMS-District Treasurer

C9ongratulations @lass of '56

GlEN J O N ES Dist. Supt.

Compliments of

L UFKIN TEXA S Church of the Nazarene The New Church - 108 Moody Street

"Stands for the entire program of the church around the world."

S. S. Supt.-Rex Weisinger N.F.M.S. Pres.-Mrs. Myrtle McCall N.Y.P.S. Pres.-Barbara Pletcher Music Director-Mollie Massingill Pianist-Barbara Pletcher Organist-Kathy Boyd 270

Mrs. Emma Irick Pastor


A H E A RTY V O T E O F I t' s APPROVAL TO B. N . C.

Time rn

C a rt h a ge, F ROM T H E

Missouri

FIRST CH U R CH o f the N A Z A R E N E LONGVIEW, TEXAS To

*

Extend

Wishes C lass

FLOYD W. ROWE, Pastor GENE WATSON, S. S. Superintendent

to

of

the 1 956

from

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

PAT W I LLIAMS, Treasurer

Ross W. Hayslip

J O H N I E BURCH, Secretary

Carthage, Mo.

Min ister

C omplim ents of

NE

B e st

Com p liments

the of

O R LEA N S, LO U I S I A N A AZA RE E C H U RC H ES

FREEPORT

C E NTRAL C H U R C H -3606 Magazine St. Rev. M. M. Snyder, Pastor Telephone U ptown 6994

0

DOWNTOWN C H U RC H -4 1 00 N . Robertson St. Rev. C . E. Bordelen, Pastor

Freeport, Texas

Telephone Crescent 8382 •

F I RST C H U R C H - 1 0 1 3 Dante St. Rev. Robert J . Mil ler, Pastor Telephone Wa l n ut 1 057 WEST BAN K C H U RC H-757 McArth ur St. Harvey, Louisiana Rev. E. A. Dix, Pastor Telephone F i l more 1 -8858

C. R. WATSON

G. N. RHOTON

Pastor

S. S. Supt.

271


A CH U RC H WITH YESTE RDAY in its traditions TODAY in it.s g rasp TOMORROW in its p lans

Avenue "A" at Cedar

J?IRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE Dodge

C ity,

Kansas

Dependably Supporti ng the Tota l Prog ram of the Church.

M I LO l . ARNOLD Pastor

i n D a l l a s, Texas VISIT . . .

Cl 4de E. Ammons, Pastor


ennsg van1a

e

venue

-t

"'

:��.i, : :;.

I

:-'

�; t�-;.. ;;ecd

': -r---'

----

P enn Ave . at W e s t Park O klahoma City

C. R. THRASHER Pastor

MRS. M . L. WYCOFF N.F.M.S. Pres.

M. L. STONE S. S. Supt.

MRS. WAYNE ESKRIDGE N.Y.P.S. Pres.

NORMAN FIRST CHURCH

Apache and Alameda NORMAN, OKLAHOMA Greets Her Students in Bethany Naza rene College: and In

Dr. Roy H . Can­ tre l l with the en­

SAN

tire fa c u l t y and

ANTO N I O

student body.

SALUTES

Jerry Lambert a n d Lynn Carr

THE

C LA S S

Loy Watson-Pastor Charles (Chuck) Wilson-Educ. Director

OF

Luke Man n-Sunday School Supt.

56

Paul ine Lee-N. Y . P. S.

President

ALL ALUMN I OF B N C

Hearne W. Spruce Pastor

273


COMPLIMENTS of

FIRST CHURCH o f the

NAZARENE

718

S. 4th ST.

Ponca Gity O K L A H O M A Our Students Wesley Burpo, Ruth Pierce and Janet Ware

L. J . M I N KLER, Pastor

Congratu lations

rr@la

ss

of IQ56"

O u r Students: E ileen

Brya n

Melvin

Davy

CHURCH of the NAZARENE 8th & Rooseve lt Guymon,

JAMES

Oklahoma

C.

H ESTE R

Min ister

274

RUTH ANN HESTER "Class of 1 976"


Nacogdoches Crockett

Cameron

Lu fk in

Ro ck d a le

Bryon

Newton Conroe

HOUSTON

Beaumont Pasaden a

El Campo

Bay City

Alvin

Port Acres o "' o<\


C H U R C H

O F

T H E

I ndependence, Kansas

Congratulations Class of

..

, 56"

OUR STUD ENTS Elizabeth Mishler, John Spire and Clair Uitts M. D. Smith S. S. S u pt. Millie Bacon N . F.M. S . Pres. Bob Randels N.Y. P . S . Pres.

Board of Stewards足

Board of Trustees足

l. R. Price, Chmn. Hester Van Dyne Merle A. Hudson Ethel Yates W. J. McDaniel Wesley Helm Bernice Bryant

Basil Metcalf, Chmn. 0. S. Palmer H . Wayne Van Dyne William Bales W. l. Rogers

FIRST

CHURCH

AMA R I L LO ,

TEXAS

1 924 Polk Street

Paul M. Sadowsky, Th.M. Pastor

Com p l i ments of

TOP E KA

CHURCH of

OAKLAN D

the

TOPEKA,

l. A. OGDEN, Min ister

Proudly Boosts a n d Suppo rts BETHANY NAZARE N E COLLEGE

276

NAZARENE

934 Michigan.

MYRON

KANSAS

R I C H EY

Pastor

"In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make straight your paths." Prov.

3 :6 R.S.V.


WE BELIEVE WHOLE H EARTED LY IN

B. N . C. !

"The End of Your Search for a Friendly Church"

0

e

1 1 th at South Lowry

STI LLWATER, OKLA.

Carl Powers, Pastor

l. D. Brower, S. S. Supt. Sh irley C renshaw, N.Y. P.S. Pres. Mrs. J ames Barlow, N . F.M.S. Pres. Mrs. Jess Wa its, Director of Music

The Powers

"A Growing Church With A Glowing Heart"

Poi nting Men to Ch rist at the "Gateway of Lake Texoma"

Organ ized in 1 906 by Ja me� B. Chapman DURANT,

O KLAHOMA

The C lass of 1 956 The Arrow Staff •

H a rold C . Ha rcourt, Pastor H . C . Rustin

Leman Mi l ler

Chairman of Church Board

Secretary

277


Vvesley Elliott-Braman

Richard Alderson-Newkirk Merrill Morgan-Pawnee

John R. Ferguson, Jr.-Fairview Jack Houts-Fargo Everett Rust-Freedom Harry Moyer-Cedar Springs

W. I . Poteet-Harmon J. C. Fechner-Jet \V. W. Ridenour-Helena E. J. Neufeld-Garber

James Hester-Guymon R, Earl Cotton-Hooker \V. 0. Johnson-Beaver

Oklahoma

North

The pastors and leaders of the Northwest Oklahoma District Arston Woods-Director of Rei. Educ. Williams Memorial Noble Hathaway-Meridian Park Carson Snow-Oak Ridge

believe in and back Bethany Nazarene College.

Arthur Johannes-Waynoka Larry Wade-Shattuck Mrs. Frankie Chaplin-Camp Creek

Mrs. Vida Robinson-Dover Mrs. Louie Boomer-Olivet Crescent J. E. Zimmerman-Crescent E. M. Glover-Cora

278

J. T. GASSETT Superintendent

DARRELL SLACK Church School Board Chairman

Darrell L. Slack-Bethany Eastside John T. Bogart-Blackwell Southside Melvin Riddle-Blackwell l st

Rev. & Mrs. E. A. Rawlings-Hennessy Gene Gore-Texoma


L . A . Beasler-Cherokee

E . C . Stegall, Jr .-Pond Creek Bob R . Fetters-Medford

K. R . Meade-Alva

C . \V. Schardein-Perry

J . Calvin Neal-Ponca West Side

W. E . Tyler-Tonkawa

Edwin Weisbroecker-Watonga Indian Mission

Paul C . Temple-\Vatonga

Paul Stroud-Thomas Mission

V. L . Brockman-Custer City

M . B . Hartzler-Waterloo D�ve Severin-Britton Carl Powers-Stillwater

July 2-1 3BOYS' & GI RLS Camps July 1 6-20JAMES H E ST E R N . Y .P .S. President

N.Y.P.S. Camp at Camp Fellow­ ship (near \Vichita, Kansas)

Dr. E . S . Phillips-Bethany l st Frank J . Kemendo

July 2 3-27-

Lakeview Chapel

C . E . Riddle-Edmond

Conventions and Assemblv At Bethanv First Church 0

'

October l -2Church School Workshop At Enid, Okla. Wade Powers-Enid Main C . A . Smith-Enid l st

M R S . FRANK KEMENDO

L. J . Minkler-Ponca l st

N.F.M.S. President

E . L. Looman-Guthrie

Lowell Arnot-Sharon

Russell Human-Cheyenne

Glen Bailey-Richland

G . W . Bloodworth-M ooreland

Bryce Cook-Laverne

Frank McConnell-Williams Memorial

Theo R . Louthan-Vici

Carl Collins-Kingfisher

Bob Green-Dir. of Rei. Educ.Bethany l st

Kenneth Pollard-Cleo Springs

279


Three Quarter Century Club

Church Choir

Educational Unit

C O LLE GE

Caravan

D R . E . S. PHILLIPS Pastor

S U P P O R TI N G T H E C OLLE GE $27,000. PLEDGED FOR THE NEW BOYS' DORMITORY Foreign M issions ( E aster Offe ring)

$3,600. EDUCATIONAL BUDGET

Youth Center Grounds

Workers

Meeting

Church School Board


First Grade Promotion

Youth Choir

Church Bus

S E E I{ I N G T O M E E T T H E NE E D S OF A L L A GE S . Summer Camp

Youth Institute

College Church

Youth Center

NYPS Council

NFMS Council


GLEN ANDERSON

ARDEN SICKENBURGER

M R S . W . J. BALDWIN

S.S. Supt.

N .Y.P.S. Pres.

N.F.M.S. Pres.

EAST SIDE CHURCH of the NAZA RENE B E T H A N Y I O K LA H O M A

"A FRI ENDLY C H U RC H NEAR THE CAMPUS"

DARRELL L . SLACK M i nister

PENIEL CH URCH of the NAZARENE H U TC H I N S O N , K A N S A S

We a t Peniel Are Back of Bethany Nazarene College

J. H . KUSTAN BORTER, S.S. S u pt. REV. & MRS. C. G. WHITE

MRS. W I LMA F R I ESEN, N . F .M.S. Pres. DWIGHT ROYCE, N .Y.P.S. Pres.

282

PAT GOODEN Our Student


"TH E C H U RC H WHERE YOU FEEL THE WELCOME"

W. E. CHANDLER, Min ister K E N N ETH EPPERSON, S.S. Supt. STEVE STEVENSON, N .Y.P.S. P res. MRS. ALBERT B E C K, N . F.M.S. Pres.

I Q56

@ongratulations 7o CJhe @lass o WE

PLEDGE

YOU

OUR

-

BEST

BNC Representative on the General N.Y.P.S. Counci l

J O H N BERESFORD, Ed ucational Director D I C K LITTRE LL, Pastor

}.,IRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE . ABILE N E, TEXAS A

G R E A T

C H U R C H

B O O S T I N G

A

G R E A T

C O L L E G E

283


FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE Corner of 8th and Trudgeon H E N RYETTA, OKLAHOMA

THE C H U RC H WITH

e R EVE RENCE for the Past e PROGRAM for the Present e VISION for the Future

" B O O S T E R S F O R

B . N . C . "

ST. PAU L ' S CHU R CH of the NAZARENE Indiana at 29th

KANSAS C ITY, MO.

Sanctuary

HOT SPRINGS FIRST CHURCH South and Third HOT SPRI NGS NAT'l PARK, ARK.

JAC K LEE Pastor

O U R STU DE NTS: lEON WYSS J IMMY TRACY

REV. J. F. HAMM

ROY SIMPSON

Pastor

DEAN S IMPSO N MARGARET McCOY K E N N ET H SMITH

284

11CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR N EW BOY'S DORMITORY11


G L E N PA R K 0

NAZARENE

5036 WICH ITA STREET FT. WORTH, TEXAS

Giving a Christ Ce-n tered

essage to

Southeast Fort

orth

J. REYNDAL RUSSELL Minister

0 E L RENO, OKLAHOMA

TRUSTEES

STEWARDS

R. H. Stroud

Mrs. M. Taylor

Carl Odom

Mrs. Sadie Bales

E.

l.

Kisner

Mrs. Hannah Yount

E. G. Andrews

Eddie Rogers

D. M. Clawson

Gerald Couch luther Dungan Mrs. Johanna Eichholz Sunday School Supt.-Bailey Cantrell, Jr.

500

South Rock Island

N. Y. P. S. President-James R. Emmert •

N. F: M. S. Presidenf-Mrs. Carl Prentice

REV.

CARL

PRENTICE

Pastor

Carl Prentice, J r .

Paul Stroud

OUR STUDENTS :

George Prentice

James R . Emmert

2u o )­


N O R T H E A S T O K L A. D I S T R I C T

S UPPOR TING BETHAN Y NAZARENE COLLEGE WITH

YOUTH OF THE C H U RC H O U R MONEY PRAYERS OF THE PEOPLE -

D R . I . C. MATH I S Dist. Supt.

286

MRS. I . C . MATHIS

ROBERT WEATHERS

ALBERT NEUSCHWANGER

J. R. BLANKENSHIP

N.F.M.S. Pres.

N.Y.P.S. Pres.

Church School Board Chm.

Dist. Jr. Director


I( A

T

A

G REETS BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE - - - AND THE CLASS OF

'56

ADVISORY BOARD Milo Arnold

Wi lson La n pher E. W. Snowberger

R ussel l E l l iott

A

GROW I N G A

D I STRICT

C O N G RAT U LATE S SCHOOL

GROWING

RAY HANCE Dist. Supt.

C L I FTON NORRELL

C . A. WARKENTI N

MILTON H UXMAN

Dist. Sec.

Dist. Treas .

N.Y.P.S. Pres.

MRS. RAY HANCE

C. E. ROWLAND

N . F .M.S. Pres.

C h u rch School Board Chmn.

CAMP

MEETING

and

D I STRICT

A S S E M B LY

Held At BRESEE PARK I N HUTC H I NSON, KANSAS J U LY 30-AUGUST 5 287


1906 - 1 956 THE

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY OF

. :��f���;.�:g . ���-: . ': · -.: :;::'.',:.· ; � � � .; ;i ·�·:·�-.· .

>

�!��::�;:-_ ·�·:.

t t ze

R o c k

l= i

-�'->. . • ··- • • . _ .__ _ ..__ - ...

.

r s t

MIN ISTERS

288

PO N D E R W. GILLILA N D

J . OTTIS SAYES

B E RTHA SPRENGER

Pastor

E ducation

Assista n t

DAVID a n � VIOLA KLI N E Music a n d Youth

..

---


MRS. PEARL KEETON N . F .M.S. Pres.

REV. HOWARD BORGESON N .Y .P.S. Pres.

REV. T. A. BURTON C h u rch School C h m n .

A D V I S O RY B O A R D MR. E. E. GALBRAITH

REV. LEE GAI N ES

REV. IVY BOHAN N O N

MR. RAY HOSTUTLER

REV. W. H. DAVIS District Supt.

REV. W. H. DAVIS District Supt.

O U R STUDENTS

Romana Davis David Galbraith Gene Galbraith Jo Howard Kenneth Hughes Eleanor Manbeck Windell McGraw

Norma Jane Bumpus Terry Brattin Bill Campbell Robert Campbell W. l. Crawford Carolyn Daughterty Mitchell Daughterty

Dwight Neuenschwander Pat Robinson Naomi Stewart Carl Summer Kenneth Terry Marian Truax Doris Woods 289

'


M R S . PAUL H . GARRETT N.F.M.S. Pres.

DALLAS DISTRICT

""""""

AREA HAVE SU PPORTED

'\. '\. '\. C H RISTIAN EDUCATION !

DR. PAUL H . GARRETT Dist. Supt.

ADMINISTRAT.ION BUILDING BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE

2<;()


ADVISORY BOARD

Rev. Clyde Ammons Secretary

Fletcher Spruce

Mr. Nee! Thompson

Mr. W . L . Crawford

CHURCH SCHOOL BOARD

Rev. H . F. Crews Chairman

Rev. Fletcher Spruce

Rev. Fred Fike

Rev. E . B . Matthews

Mr. Ned Thompson

Leon Martin

N.Y.P.S. OFFICERS

Si•

Rev. Lawrence Gholson President

C. M . Knight

Rev. M . A . Wagstaff Sec.-Treasurer

Rev. Leon Martin High School Supt.

Miss Karen Watson Teen-age Rep.

Carlton Mathews

N.F.M.S. OFFICERS •

i\ lrs. Clyde E . Ammons Vice Pres.

Mrs. Fred Fike

Mrs. H . B . Brooks Recording Sec.

Mrs. L . Crawford Treasurer

Mrs. Fletcher Spruce Supt. of Publicity

Mrs. H . F. Crews Supt. of Study

2Yl


SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA DISTRIC T

S UPPOR TING BETHAN Y NAZARENE COLLEGE -

l 3 3 STU DENTS -

N .Y.P.S. CAMP A N D I NSTITUTE J U LY 2-6, 1 956 DISTRICT CAMP MEETING AUGUST 3 - 1 2, 1 956

MRS. W. T. J O H NSON N . F. M. S.

W. T. JOHNSON Dist. Supt.

"C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S

292

1 5 6

A R R O W11


:-

-

-

-

-

-

I

I

Robert G. N ielson, Pastor Chester 0. Galloway

Tenth and Beckley 路

Dallas

Director of Religious Education 293


C ON GRATULATIONS TO THE

C L A S S of ' 5 6 C . B. KOPC HO, S.S. S u pt. LLOYDE GRAMER, N.Y.P.S. Pres. R EV. KAT H E R I N E HARDMAN, N. F.M.S. President DICK STANSBURY, Music Director

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZAREN E 33rd and "C" Streets J. H. WHITE, Minister

LI NCOLN, N E BRASKA

--

LAKE VIEW PARK C H U RCH OF T H E NAZARE N E

294

FRANK J . KEMENDO . Pastor

3426 N . W. 50TH ST. OKLAHOMA C ITY, OKLA.


-

-

-

---

-

-· -

-

-- ­ •

"

.

-

-

-

-

OAK AVEN U E CHURCH of the NAZ AREN E 1 70 1

Oak Avenue

DUNCAN, OKLAHOMA

CONGRATULATING

*

Adm i n i stration

*

Facu lty

*

Seniors of 1 956

Pastor: EARL C. DARDEN

. '

Sunday School Supt.: D. WAYNE SLEDGE

"THE HEART OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION first, THE ED UCATION OF THE HEART"

.

is

.

--

"Keep thy heart with all diligence; for out of it are tl1e issues of life" ( Proverbs

4:23)

Lou Ann Fox, Lowrence Dean, Talmadge Johnson

295


SANCTUARY

FI RST. CHURCH of the NAZA RENE L U BBOCK,

TEXAS

M I LTON POOLE, Pastor

路 "Congratula tions to a wonderful Student Body"

TRINITY CHURCH WALTER H I NTZ S.S. Supt. MRS. M. V. LISTER N. F.M.S. Pres. BOB J U N G N .Y.P.S. Pres.

S. W. 29TH AT I N DIANA JOE L. BEAN Minister

296

O KLAH O MA CITY, O KLAH O MA


0 S H E Rl\1AN, TEXAS

�...:;_... ;;. ..... I

"'-'-...,.

'

REV. & MRS.

J.

T. C RAWFORD

1 1 0 1 E. HOUSTON ST.

MERIDIAN PARK 0

-

Forty-fourth and Meridian REV. NOBLE HATHAWAY, Pastor

p lJICOP'

--

.--- ·

'

I

I

B U I L D I N G

F O R

P L A N N I N G

T O D A Y F O R

T O M O R R O W

297


''B R I N G T H E M I N '' is the theme of the Oklahoma C ity First Church Sunday School . . . over 400 "unchurched" boys and girls brought in each Sunday by

3

buses and

many passenger cars .

"We go - - - They Com e ! "

R. T. WILLIAMS

Oklahoma City's "SINGING C H URCH"

c. R A. y, drive r

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE 90 1 N . W. 6TH STREET

••••� :=::E>OO� ----<)ooo•

MIN ISTERS R. T. WI LLIAMS

HARPER

l.

COLE

R. T. U LRICH, Ed ucational Assistant 298

C H U RCH A N D E DUCATIONAL B U I L DI NG


--

. -

--

--

Now under construction, M eyer Blvd. at Rockhill Road •

Present Location FORTY - FI RST ST. & HAR R ISON AVE . lO 1 - 23 1 5 KANSAS C I TY, M O .

.- ,

itton

_,.

-


N O R T II S I D E C H U R C H o f t h e N A Z A R E N E H.

B.

DEAN,

Pastor

N. W. 2 1 st a n d Roosevelt Sts. F OR T

W O R T H ,

T EXAS

"North Fort Worth Evangelistic Center " This ad is one more expression of our a ppreciation for Bethany Nazarene College as she works in this educational zone to spread scriptural Holi ness.

HAMPTON PLACE

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

REV. H . M. C U RTIS, Pastor

North Oak Avenue at Ninth

J. DUDLEY POWERS Miniser of Music

JOHN R. DAVIDSON M i nister

BURLINGTON & E PE NARD

DALLA S, TEXA S 300

A DA F I RST C H U RC H

MRS. GUYNN COOPER, Secretary J IM HAlEY, Su nday School Superintendent MRS. GRADY GIBSON, N . F.M.S. President MRS. K E N N ETH McANAllY, N.Y.P.S. Pres.


The Teacher You Are to be, You Are Now Becoming

�uiclt.'d-

Sporti ng Goods and Hobbies

fi)IJI,ch;J

!!�::::s:p:o:n:in:Q:G;o;od:s:':":ob:bl;es:;;:: · :!!!��· -.

I

i

�� _;- �

r--��

- ,

_.

CORONADO

F. cr. :A.

I, .

i

-J

SHOPPING

CENTER

PFLUEGER, SHAKESPEARE, HED DON, ZEBCO, JOHN­ SON, LANGLEY FISHING TAC K L E & EQU I PMENT •

REMINGTON AND W I N C H ESTER GUNS •

DU.RA-CRAFT MARI N E ���

EQU I PMENT

WI LSON, BEN PEARSON, WRIGHT & M'GILL SPORTING GOODS •

H U NTING, FISHI NG, ARCH ERY, CAMPING EQU I PMENT •

COMPLETE

BICYCLE •

DEPARTMENT

John R. Mott Chapter

DUTCH DUTTON

BUD WATTS

Bethany Nazarene College

4000 N. McART H U R BLVD.

PHONE W H 9-3051

Oklahoma City

302


INSURANCE

REAL ESTATE

BONDS

FORMERLY PAUL HOAG AGENCY

--

-

u r needs e

-

FAC I LITIES

• STU DY -

- - -

- - To be sure you a re prope r ly i nsured

• RECORDS - - - - - So that po licies won't lapse • "LEGWORK" - - - - Wi l li n g n ess to run errands i n the interest

of the best protection for our c lients . •

ASSOCIATES: Mer l i n

C . Ma rtin

F red

Va ughan,

Pa ul

Hoag

WH

9-5602

Jr. 2 1 7 E. MAI N

303


UP-T O - D ATE C LE AN E R S

"Come in for the best in Dry Cleaning, Pressing and La undry Service. " 1 1 6 S . W. Main

WE H RE N B E RG

304

Phone WH 9-240 1

DRUG


� en tors

' ' ' I

I I

\VELLI NGTON, TEXAS

305


TOM BOYD

ROBERTA POSEY

Religious Activities

Arrow Editor

BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE

SHIRLEY STANGELAND

S U E M ERRILL

Secretary

Echo Editor

STU D E NT

C O U NCIL

C H U C K HARPER President

C O N G RATU LAT E S '56

ARROW

THE

S TA F F

JIM GARDNER Senior Rep.

Vice President

306

PAUL JOHNSON

GARY HARTPENCE

LESTER KNIGHT

Freshman Rep.

Sophomore Rep.

Junior Rep.


....... ourse

eer

( Completely recarpeted for your pleasure )

-

39th

&

MacArthur Com p l i m ents of

Associ ate

J ;,' '

'

\

'

J

Friendly Standard Hum pty-D umpty Store 1 23 S. Col lege

Bethany, Okla.

Betha ny

F. W. Wa l ker, Mg r .

307 •


"GO

.

.

.

and teach"

Wit h 0 ft 8

Ill

i ft d

e e e you and your Publishing House

are in the world's greatest business -that of winning souls to Christ. We ai·e yokema tes in disseminating the full gospel to the whole world by the printed page.

With one mind in beliefs and objectives and loyalty to our church, we can do much for the Kingdom. Let's keep strong ties within our church family.

Naza re n e

PU B LI S H I N G H O U S E . PASADENA � KANSAS CITY . TORONTO BETHANY BOOK SHOP 308

SERVING THE BETHANY AREA


....... ervlce

3 1 ST & MAY - WI 3-0430

3 1 9 N. W. 2 3RD - JA 8-2942

T H O M A S O N H A R D WA R E

"L e t 1 06

E.

S

o

1v

Pri n ting

Ma i n

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

Us

316

E. Main

e

Y

o u

r

Problems"

Telephone WH

9-3425

309


Comp liments of

-

-路

BETHANY MEDICAL CENTER DR. LEON GILBE RT

DR. PAU L MACRORY

DR. ERIC MOTLEY

310


OF BETHANY

F I RST I N NAM E - F I RST I N S E RV ICE

WE

SERVE

OUR

COMMUN I TY

OUR

DE POS ITORS

0UR

B 0 R R' O W E R S

MEMBE R OF F . D . I .C.

31 1


MRS. KATIE DREWRY Manager

312


"We Are Here to Serve You"

SUNDRIE S DRUGS PRE S C RI PTI ONS - 9arefully Compounded -

1 26 S. Vv. MAIN

PHONE WH 9- 5656

Complimen ts 0

DR. RALPH SHAD I D

PLUMBI NG

and

H EAT I NG

DR. E DWARD SHADI D

ROY E . EAGAN

DR. WALTER THOMPSON 1 1 1 S. W. 1 st Street

BETHANY

WH 9-2778

31 3


ONE AN D TWO DAY SERVIC E

Bethany's fi nest a n d most modern Dry Clea ners

"A lways Boosting B-P C" ELMER MA N N and JAY R . JACOS.S, Owners

1 1 5 S. COLLEGE

Phone WH 9-3332

Compliments of

C A R N A T I O N I

u

e

C r e a m

C o m p a n y

KRAKER'S

LAmEs AND MEN's WEAR

Sportswear for Coliege

Joe and Jane

0

f

Use Our Convenient Lay-Away Plan 1 2 2 S. W. Main

Phone WH 9-3440 B ETHANY

314

O K L A H O M A


COMPLIMENTS OF

M U N N RA D I O AND

TE LEVI S I O N

HEADQUARTERS FOR

C9ompliments o Your Friendly

M 0 T 0 R 0 LA •

HOUSE RADIOS

CAR RADIOS

TELEVISION

T. G. & Y. STO R E B ETHANY Headquarters for College Students

1 2 8 West Main

B ETHA N Y Phone WH 9-2698

ommun1t

BETHANY, OI(LAHO�IA 315


C a r t e r 's Flowers and Gifts

YUKONS BEST FL0UR �DII� ----<l• ... ....,.._

AS K

2600 N. MacArthur

Free Del ivery

YOUR

GROC E R

Yukon Mill & Grain Co. WI 3-33 1 4

B ET H A N Y K I WA N I S

YUKON, OKLAHOMA

Congratulations

CLU B Serving the C h urch School Com m u n ity

COLLEGE SHOE SHOP 1 05 South Co l iege 316


T h e B ROW N - Mc C L U R E L U M B E R C O M PA N Y from "A Home-Town Concern"

309

East Ma i n Street

*

Phones WH

9-5607

WH

9-5608

WH

9-56p9

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

"Striving daily to build a bigger and better Bethany"

Melvin McC lure

Roy Brown

Th/� GAS' Rome work BEmR the�n -ruMhine

This tiny GAS flame in your Automatic GAS Clothes Dryer actually dries clothes better than sunshine. It saves money, too. Costs so very little to use, saves clothes from wind and dust, saves time and trouble of taking clothes to and from a clothes line. Try a new Automatic GAS Clothes Dryer, and you'll never be without one another week.

See your GAS appliance

dealer for a demonstration.

O H LR H O m R n RTU R R L �� 318


Com p l i ments of

STE WARTS PAINT

CO U RTS

STORE

PA I N T

H IGHWAY 66 PHONE WH 9-9540

B E T I-I A N Y

426

WH

E. MAIN

9-3273

Compliments of

COLLE G E CLE A NE R S

PHILBRICK CLINIC

'. ot11. 1,j;...:., .-

..... �

',

. .

"Might A s Well Have The Bes t " BETHANY

Mr. and Mrs. N . A. Little

2 1 2 S.

College

WH

9-2284

319


H O G U E - STO N E FLOOR

COVERING

COMPANY

"CARPETS FOR EVERY PURPOSE"

23RD & CLASSEN

M E R R I TT F U N E RA L H O M E Northwest 39th St.

PHONE JA 8-4493

DAWS O N M O B I L SERVICE

BETWE E N BETHANY & WARR ACRES

Hammond Organ

201 N. E. Main BETHANY

C HAPEL 320

C HE ST E R SHAFER Manager


'

LI FE INSURANCE C O MPA NY

UNCLE FRED liFE - HOSPITAliZATION - ACCIDENT TOUR - RETIREMENT AND SAVINGS

Com p liments

Of

G o m p l i m e n ts 0

COOK'S FOUNTAIN

ROSCOE A N D I DA COOK Owners

*Located in Wehrenburg Dru g Store •

OF CONGRATU LATIONS SE N IOR C LASS A N D T H E '56 ARROW

32 1


AUTO TRADI N POST

LEROY RIPPER - Sales. Rep.

WH 9-3296

1 20 S. COLLEGE BETHANY, O KLAHOMA

Ohe

1 956

Cf<eoeille 1 955 322

8cho



1 S. M. BRYAN CONSTRUCTION CO. GENERAL

' ' B u i lders

of

t h e

Bethany Nazarene College

Social

studies c

CONGRATULATES

CONTRACTI NG

New

B o vs'

D o r m i t o r v' '

HANSEN & ATLEE DAIRY INC.

lub WE GIVE S&H G R E E N STAMPS

THE

1 80 1 S. Penn. ' 56 ARROW STAFF

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SPEC IALIZING IN­ HOME COOKED FOODS

1 07 S. COLLEGE

BETHANY, OKLA.

' APPLIANCES

e

FUR NITURE

1 1 0 W. Ma in Street

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"Large E nough to Serve You Small Enough to Know You Humble E nough to Appre­ ciate You r Business. " •

1 1 8 S. W. Main

General Electric and RCA Appliances Phone WH 9-3894

J. L. JENNINGS

JULIA JENNINGS

BETHAIY 325


lOANS A N D FINANC ING

INVESTMENTS

Borrow O n :

6% Paid o n Investments

C a rs

I nterest P a i d Sem i-An n ua l ly

F u rn iture Co-S ig ners JACK DAVIDSON

DELORES NAGEL

CHARLSTA CURRY

JACK S H E EKS

See Us About Your F i n a ncial Problems

COMMUNITY LOAN & INVESTME NT COMPANY 1 05 COLLEGE

WH 9-4 1 88

"We Are Helping to B uild A Better Bethany"

:¥fiuU Jltalional flJan/c

9lJejtenda�le f/Jankln? f7ince

326

�892

BOX 85


"On H ig hway 66" - one mile west of B. N.C.

e A I R CONDITION ED

AAA

T.V. I N ROOMS e

APPROVE D

e PRIVATE BAT HS

PANEL RAY H EATI NG e Owned and Operated by Naza renes MR. A N D MRS. J O H N DI FFEE

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How long has it been since · · .· · you traveled by

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YOU'LL BE AMAZED at the many new features of today's modern GREYHOUND coaches! Revolutionary air­ suspension ride. Advanced air-conditioning. Picture windows. Comfortable e.a sy · chairs. And yes . . . even washrooms on the �xclusive Scenicruisers! More much more comfort! Yet Greyhound fares are lower. today than they were twenty-five years ago. .

Greyltoun.-'t new ScenlcrviJe•• and Hltltway Trcrvelert are •ow operGtln g on mony fhrv tclteclules all onr Am.,lcG.

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Special Services to Students 1 1 2 s. w. 1 st

WH 9-4063 BETHANY 327


GREE TINGS from

Hal Owen Studio

letha Saunders

Bessie Farley

Virginia Baker

328

Hal Owen

Mary McGuire

The l ma Ames

Hazel H i l l

Pearl McHaney


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Memorial Hall

329


a n

d

L I T H O G R A P H I N G •

Produced in a modern ly equipped p la nt.

Where machines cast new type for every job, which means that every letter produces a c lean, c lear, sharp impression.

Where the best of camera and p late making equipment is operated by caref u l ly trained men who take pride in their obi lity to do better litho­ graphing.

Where every order that com es to the p lant is

looked upon by the craftsmen as an opportunity to d isp lay their ski ll.

Where Q UALITY p r i n t i n g a n d

lithographing

standa rds are maintained.

S T A T I O N E R Y A B A N K S U P P LY •

lAWTON

AND

THE

P R I NTING

PONCA CITY

DIVISION

IN

AMARILLO

O KLAHOMA C ITY

The Arrow Annual Was Produced in This Plant


S t u den t In dex DAMS, RAYMOND 3 1 2 3 N.W. 1 6th, Oklahoma City, Okla . _ _

DAMS, YVONNE Route I , Anderson, Mo. _

KKERMAN, JOHN Coffeyville, Kans.

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LLEN, HAROLD 3 3 1 7 26th St., Lubbock, Texas _

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LEXANDER, J IMMY 909 Meadow Lane, Tyler, Texas _

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BELL. SAM 1 1 0 5 Cave Springs, E l Dorado, Kans. _

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BERGEN, ESTHER Ensign, Kansas

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BE RGEN, GERALD Anderson, Missouri

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MMONS, DORIS

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NGLIN, PAUL 1 6 3 5 Loris Lane, Dallas, Texas _

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R C H E R , FREDA 1 5 04 North 2nd, Sayre, Okla. _

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RMSTRONG, C . L . 1 0 North Little, Fort Scott, Kans. _

R OLD, RONALD Monument, Kansas

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TKINSON, ROBERT 2 0 8 71! North College, Bethany, Okla. _

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ABCOCK, BESS 909 Washington, Great Bend, Kans. _

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AILEY, DWAYNE 0. Route 3 , Augusta, Kansas

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ARHAM, PATRICIA Route l , Cabot, Ark.

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BOHANNAN, CHARLES Box 44, Alpine, Texas

BOND, DONNA Ingalls, Kansas

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AUDER, SHI RLEY Box 2 1 3, Scottsbluff, Neb. _

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BONNER, VADEAN Tichnor, Ark.

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BOUNDS, DON IV AN Route 3, Box 48, Wellington, Texas

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B URKHART, PARK D . 1 09 N . E . Main, Bethany, Okla. _

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BRADSHAW, LEON 9 4 1 South Faulkner, Pampa, Texas

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BOYDSTON, M I LTON R . 1 1 5 North Donald, Bethany, Okla .

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BROCE, ELA I N E Elwood, Kansas

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B U RNS, J E R RY Cimarron, Kansas

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B ROWN, DANIEL E . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 96 302 South Peniel, Bethany, Okla. BROWN, DAVID 1 07 302 South Peniel, Bethany, Okla. . BROWN, HAROLD 49, 86, 1 8 5 2 5 24 N . W . 39th, Oklahoma City, Okla. _

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B U RPO, WESLEY 9 1 6 South 8th, Ponca City, Okla. BURR, LYNN

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B U RNS, MARGARET l 0 2 8 4th Ave., Birmingham, Ala. _

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Sublette, Kansas BURTON, SUE 3 1 6 Thomas, Atlanta, Texas _

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BUTLER, LAVONA 506 North College, Bethany, Okla. _

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CAMPBELL, B ILL 1 2 1 7 South 1 2 th, Abilene, Texas _

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CAMPBELL, NEVA - - - - - - '- - - - - - - - 1 00, I 07 2 7 1 7 West Water, Springfield, Mo. CAMPBELL, ROBERT B. 6 1 0 North l Oth, Edinburg, Texas _

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CARNEY, DON - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - 96 1 300 South Walnut, McPherson, Kansas CARR, LYNN 1 0 7, 1 9 5 , 2 1 3, 2 4 5 1 50 5 Ann Arbor, Norman, Okla. CARRICK, CHARLENE Route 2 , Gould, Okla.

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CARTER, LOIS 3808 Park Street, Greenville, Texas _

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CARTER, LUCRETIA 3 2 1 West State, Enid, Okla. _

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CARTER, MARTHA 3 2 1 West State, Enid, Okla. _

BROCKMAN, VERNON Box 2 1 4, Bethany, Okla.

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B U RNETT, GLENN 96, 1 7 5 1 1 36 South Terrace Drive, \Vichita, Kans.

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BREWER, NITA 1 07, 1 86, 1 94, 1 9 8 l l 0 East Modoc, Nowata, Okla. _

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B URKHART, WYNONA I 09 N . E . Main, Bethany, Okla.

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BOSTICK, JANETTE 80 5 South 2nd, ,Lamesa, Texas

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B U RGNER, J I MMY 1 64 I Victory, Wichita Falls, Texas

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BOOMER, CAROLE Box 6 5 2 , Bethany, Okla.

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BURDINE, MARY 96, 1 84, 1 9 8 , 220, 240 344 East Park, Orange, Texas

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BONNER, BILLIE Tichnor, Ark.

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BURCH, BOB Box 644, Bethany, Okla.

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1 06, 2 0 3 ECKETT, VERNON 2 2 1 7 West Washington, Charleston 2 , \,Yest Virginia _

B U MPUS, NORMA JANE Box 3 6 3, Bethany, Okla.

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BOND, GLEN Route 2 , Ingalls, Kansas

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BOND, ELEANOR Ingalls, Kansas

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4 1 , 86, 1 0 1 , 1 70, 1 84, 1 96, 2 1 3 2 5 2 7 Bush Blvd ., Birmingham, Ala.

BUMPUS, DORIS

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CARLETON, DON 2948 9th Street, Port Arthur, Texas

ECKETT, GOR DON 2 2 1 7 West Washington, Charleston 2 , \,Y est Virginia _

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BOOMER, W . 0. 4 I 9 East Main, Bethany, Okla.

E�L, LA VETA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 96, 1 9 7 Johnstown, Neb. _

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EALS, SH ELDA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 70 306 North Beaver, Beth;my, Okla. _

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CANTRELL, WALLY West Helena, Ark.

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BUFFI NGTON, SYLVIA Satanta, Kansas

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BOYD, BEVERLY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 86 Box 892, Bethany, Okla.

ATES, W I LLIAM S . 4 1 1 \:Vest I 6th, Bartlesville, Okla. _

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ARRETI,, BARBARA 29 1 1 North Mai n , Houston, Texas _

BRYAN, E I LEEN Box 2 24, Guymon, Okla.

BOX, LEON 1 07, 1 8 5 5 2 0 North College, Bethany, Okla.

ARNETT, ROSE MARY 9 1 5 North Main, Blackwell, Okla. _

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BOLDT, D E RALD Chase, Kansas

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BOND, RUTH Ingalls, Kansas

ARLOW, RONALD 1 06, 1 9 5 , 2 39, 2 4 5 Box 778, Bartlesville, Okla.

EARD, WYVETTA Knowles, Oklahoma

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BROYLES, LORETA 2 5, 7 1 , 1 6 1 , 1 74, 1 9 4 Route 2 , Alma, Arkansas

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ARKER, l'viARY 6 3 1 71! Cedar, Yukon, Okla. _

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ALLARD, CHARLES Route "6", Center, Texas _

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ALDWIN, CHARLES Box '1 2 5, Bfthany, Okla. _

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BOND, MARION 6 1 0 North Donald, Bethany, Okla.

U B REY, GAYLAND ------ - - - - - - - - - - - 70 Route 2 , Dover, Okb.

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TKINSON, NORMA JO 2 0 8 71! North College, Bethany, Okla.

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BLYSTONE, BETTY JO 36 1 8 Campbell, Kansas City, Mo.

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B IGGS, BUDDY 96, 1 00, 1 0 1 3 1 4 E . Raclor St., Nashville 1 1 , Tenn.

LLEN, ROBERT E . 86, 1 9 7 , 1 98, 2 0 3 , 2 1 2 5 5 02 N . W . Ave., Bethany, Okla.

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BIGGS, GEORGE Box 84, \Vaysicle, Kansas

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LLEN, LUE ANNA 1 06, 1 84, 1 9 8, 240 980 Argentine Blvd., Kansas City, Kans. _

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CASE, CHARLES C . - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 1 4 2 1 N.E . Main, Bethany, Okla. CASE, MELBA LYNN 4 2 1 N . E . Main, Bethany, Okla.

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CASE, ROY 1 0 0 5 Graymont Ave., Birmingham, Ala. _

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CASEY, J O 1 07, 1 1 0, 2 1 3 1 8 0 3 N . E . Madison, Okla. City, Okla. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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. . 96, 1 84 CASEY, JUAN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 80 3 N.E. Madison, Okla. City, Okla.

C U LLISO , STEPHEN - - ·· - - - - - - - - - - · 1 0 8 4 2 1 N . E . Main, Bethany, Okla.

CHANDLER, ELMER - - - - - - · _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87 520 orth College, Bethany, Okla.

C U MM I NS, WAYNETTA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08, 1 97 Box 9 1 3, Grove, Texas

CHEATWOOD, H ENRY _ _ _ _ _ 1 07, 1 5 2 , 1 84 3 1 0 1 Drexel, Shreveport, Louisiana

CUNNI CHAM, FORREST _ _ _ 97, 1 8 8, 1 96 746 N . E . Washington Blvd . , Bartlesville, Okla .

CHESNUT, GLEN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 07, 2 4 5 1 40 2 \\'alker Ave., Powhattan, Kansas C H I LDRESS, BOBBY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 07, 1 6 3 406 1h Wolfe, Galena Park, Texas CHOATE, K I RBY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 97 2 0 8 1h North College, Bethany, Okla. CHRISTY, JIM _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 07, 242 Route 1, Leavenworth, Kansas C I NNAMON, NOLA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 07, 1 86, 2 4 3 Vici, Oklahoma

CYPERT, CLAUD - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 87 Route 3, Brownsfield, Texas DAILY, HAROLD - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ _ _ _ 72 Route 2, Alma, Ark. DA I E L, JAMES _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08, 242, 2 4 3 , 246 Box 389, Searcy, Ark. DANNER, CHARLES _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 97, 246 206 orth 9th, Columbus, Miss.

CLARK, BEVERLY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 97 5 1 4 Cleveland, Sand Springs, Okla.

DANSKI , DON A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ! 0 8 1 2 3 North Redman, Bethany, Okla.

CLARK, DOT _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 34, 1 07, 1 8 5 , 1 86 De Queen, Arkansas

DAUGHERTY, CAROLYN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 8 Box 6 2 5 , Monahans, Texas

CLASSEN, HORACE E . _ _ _ _ _ · - - - - - - - - 87 208 orth College, Bethany, Okla.

DAUGHE RTY, M ITCHELL _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87 Box 6 2 5 , Monahans, Texas

CLASSEN, PAULINE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 1 208 North College, Bethany, Okla.

DAVENPORT, ASENATH _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 302 North Donald, Bethany, Okla.

CLAXTON, JOANNE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ___ 1 07 1 2 78 N.\V. 58th Terrace, Miami, Fla.

DAVIS, BARBARA - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - 7 3 5 1 2 Logsdon, Bethany, Okla.

CLEM ENTS, GAYLE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 57, 1 07, 1 9 3 4620 S. Galapago, Englewood, Colo.

DAVIS, BEATRICE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 97 606 South Holloway, Bethany, Okla.

CLINE, MARGARET LOU I SE . _ 7 2 , 1 59, 1 6 5 , 1 94, 2 1 8, 2 1 9, 2 2 1 Gage, Okla.

DAVIS, LEE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87, 1 0 1 , 1 70 Route 3, Carthage, Mo.

CLOUD, ALICE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ 7 2 , 1 94 Higgins, Texas COKER, KENNETH - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 2 3 0 3 2 S.W. 24th, Okla . City, Okla. COLLIER, FRANCIS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 07 9 1 0 Fairview Drive, Bethany, Okla. CONGER, W I LLIAM D. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 07, 2 4 5 Route I , Codell, Kansas CONNALLY, TERRY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87, 2 4 5 Route I , La Junta, Colo.

CONWAY,_ DO _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 72, I 5 8, 2 I 3, 244 Box 574, Bethany, Okla. COOK, J. D. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 72, 242, 24 3 Box 684, Bethany, Okla . COOK, JO _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 4 3 , 87, 1 9 1 509 Shannon Drive, Bethany, Okla . COOKSEY, TOMMY - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - 87 1 0 1 S . E . 7th, Bethany, Okla. COOr S, MAXINE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87, 2 4 5 7 3 2 South Main, Springfield, Mo. COPELAND, MOLLY _ _ _ _ _ 86, 87, 1 96, 2 4 5 Route 1 , Lowell, Ark. COURTNEY, PAT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 72 General Delivery, Bethany, Okla. CRAIG, GRACE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 72, 1 47, 1 60 Meade, Kansas CRAIGHEAD, WENDEL _ _ _ _ 97, 1 87, 1 90, 1 94, 2 4 3 Box l l , Burr Oak, Kansas CRAWFORD, GENELL _ _ _ _ _ _ 97, 1 84, 1 9 8 , 2 4 0 , 24 3 1 1 07 East College, Sherman, Texas CRAWFORD, W. L. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08 1 5 1 5 West Griffin, Midland, Texas CRIBBS, S I D EY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08 , 2 4 2 , 2 4 3 2 2 0 Ohio, Wichita, Kansas CRISTY, L E E ROY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08 Box 349, West Plains, Mo. CRUMPLEY, REX - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- 87 3 0 3 1h N.W. 1 st, Bethany, Okla.

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DAVIS, RAMONA ___ 97, 1 96, 220, 2 2 2 , 2 4 5 9 2 4 North Weatherford, Midland, Texas DEAN, LAWRENCE _ _ _ _ 1 08 , 1 74 , 2 39 , 2 4 3 9 1 I Hackberry, Duncan, Okla.

DEDMAN, KENNETH - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- I 0 8 Box 1 07, Lorrgview, Texas DEMETRE, JERRY - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - -- - 87 Box 5 59, Bethany, Okla . DEMPSEY, JACK _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 8 Box 2 3, St. Charles, Ark. DEVORE, DORIS - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ·· - - 97 509 W. Boulder, Colorado Springs, Colo. DEVORE, GLEN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ! 08 , 1 9 3 , 209 Box 1 34, Naches, Wash. DEVORE, VIOLA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08, 24 5 Box 2 5 , Tabor, Iowa D I FFEE, ROB B I E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 7 3 , 4 3 7500 .W. 39th, Okla. City, Okla . D I FFEE, VICTOR _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 8 1 I 8 North Donald, Bethany, Okla. DODGEN, MARVIN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 8 4 5 0 7 Ramsey, Austin, Texas DOSKOC IL, LARRY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 1 , 1 08 , 1 84 Route l , Pratt, Kansas DOWNEY, STEWART _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 8 8 1 0 West Chisum, Artesia, N . Mex. D R I SCOLL, JACK D. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 7 2 0 2 N.\V . 2 n d , Salna, Kansas DRYDEN, GERALD _ _ _ _ _ _ 7 3 , 206, 2 1 2, 2 1 4 2I I A orth College, Bethany, Okla. DRYDEN, RUTH _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 7 3 2 1 I A North College, Bethany, Okla . DUFF, P H I L _ _ _ _ _ _ 4 2 , 97, 1 6 2, 1 6 3 , 1 8 3, 1 90 1 42 8 Butler Ave., Los Angeles 2 5 , Calif.

EDMONDS, PAU L _ _ _ _ 84, 87, 8 5 , l l 4, 1 2 3, 1 5 3 , 1 70, 1 88 706 North Donald, Bethany, Okla. EDMONDS, SAM _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 5 3 , 73, 193 3 0 3 N .W . 2nd, Bethany, Okla. EGERTON, ROGER - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- 87 3 0 5 S .W . 3rd, Bethany, Okla. E LLIOTT, IMAGENE - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- 82 1 ! O lh North College, Bethany, Okla. ELLIS, J IMMY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ 1 09, 203 Bqx 8 5 , Abernathy, Texas E M M E RT, BUDDY _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ 97, 1 6 3, 243 I 0 0 5 Cherry, Orange, Texas E M R I C H , ROBERT L. - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - 73 Miltonvale, Kansas ENSMINGER, W I NONA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 97, 197 3 0 l lh N.W. Main, Bethany, Okla. ENTERLI E, NORMAN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 97, 1 87 Gray, Oklahoma EYESTONE, JACK _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 97, 1 0 1 , 1 6 3, 203 1 2 7 North Cheyenne, Bartlesville, Okla. FARMER, E RNEST K . _ _ _ _ 44, 7 3 , 1 3 3, 1 8 3, 1 89 , 1 90, 1 94, 200, 2 0 1 , 206, 2 1 2 l I4

orth M u eller, Bethany, Okla.

FARMER, DARLENE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 88 1 1 4 North Mueller, Bethany, Okla. FENNO, JOANNE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 34, l 09, 245 La Moure, N . Dak. FIKA, B I LL - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- 97 I 07 South Peniel, Bethany, Okla . fo' I KA, RUTH - - - - - - ---- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - 88 1 07 South Peniel, Bethany, Okla. fo'INK, CARMALETA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 09 Route l , Roosevelt, Okla. fo'IRESTONE, DO I - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 97 2 2 0 South Locust, Fayetteville, Ark. fo' ISI IER, PHYLLIS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ 88, 197 3 I 8 South Beaver, Bethany, Okla. fo'ITZGERALD, ALEX _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ 1 09 1 0 6 1h S . E . Main, Bethany, Okla. fo'ITZGERALD, DON _ _ _ _ _ _ 97, 1 89 , 202, 203 7600 South H udson, Okla. City, Okla. fo'ITZGERALD, ELLEN - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - 97 Route 7, Box 248, Okla. City, Okla. fo'LOOD, CHARLENE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 09, 1 8 5 , 1 9 1 , 2 4 2 , 243 402 West Lincoln, Blackwell, Okla . FLOOD, LARRY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 88, 1 9 3 402 West Lincoln, Blackwell, Okla. FLOYD, RAC H E L - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 88 31 1 orth College, Bethany, Okla. FOOTE, W I LDA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ 97, 243 Route 2 , Seagraves, Texas FOLEY, NANCY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 09 Route 2, Greenville, Texas FORSHEE, MARLENE _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 09 4 2 0 North C, Duncan, Okla. FOSTER, MARY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 97 42 5 North Elm, lola, Kansas FOX, JAMES - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -97, 1 8 5 3402 Culver, Dallas, Texas

DURR, RONALD _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 08 Route 6, Springfield, Mo.

FOX, LOU ANN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 8 , 1 3 8, 1 4 5, 1 47, 1 84, 1 94, 2 4 ) 9 1 2 Duncan Ave., Duncan, Okla.

EASLEY, PATRICIA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 8 7 2 1 3 Fulton, Houston, Texas

FRANKLIN, HAROLD _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 88, 1 9 3, 245 8 3 5 A Street, Delta, Colorado

EATMO , STEVE _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 09 , 1 1 2, 1 62 , 2 4 6 S O l North Broadway, Blytheville, Ark.

FRAZIER, DOYLE - - - - - - - - - - --- - --98, 246 30 2 1h S . E . Main, Bethany, Okla.


GAEDE . CARL 9 8, 1 38, 1 89, 206, 207 309 Allison, Newton, Kansas

HALTOM, VIRGINIA 1 07 Beatty, Coffeyville, Kansas

GALBRAITH, DAVID 1902 West 7th, Austin, Texas

HAM ITER, ANN 1 1 5 South Redman, Bethany, Okla.

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lANCER, KEN �842 Michigan Ave., St. Louis, Mo. _ _ _ _ _ _

.EEN, WINOGENE . 3 1 5 North Rosedale, Tulsa, Okla. _

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.EER, VINCENT ALLAN '00 North Donald, Bethany, Okla. _

EVE, MARJORIE lox 206, Newton, Iowa _

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HOPKINS, SHEILIA 402 North Peniel, Bethany, Okla. -

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I IOWLAND, E RNEST 4 1 7 S.W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla.

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HENDERSON, MARY J E NE 4 8 3 7 Bromfield, Dallas, Texas

HUTC H I NGS, J E R RY 99, 2 2 0, 2 2 1 , 2 2 2 , 24 3 Route I , Ivanhoe, Texas

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I I ENSLEY, ROBERT 8 DeQuincy Ave., DeQueen, Ark. _

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H IGDON, J EANETTE 2 2 4 N.W. Ave., Hamlin, Texas

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HIGGINS, MARCIA LEE 5 0 7 East 4th Ave., H u tchinson, Kansas HIGI IT, KENDALL

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89, 1 3 8, 1 42, 1 6 5 , 1 99, 2 0 3 , 206, 2 1 1 , 2 1 4, 2 4 3 702 South Roney, Carl Junction, Mo. __

H I LL, P H ILLIP - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 5 Route 2, Box 5 5 8, Helena, Ark. H I NES, MARY 4 2 1 S.W. 3rd, Bethany_, Okla. _

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H ESS, LEON 5964 N.W. 39th, Okla. City, Okla .

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HAYNES, BONNIE 98, 1 59, 1 9 3 , 1 97, 2 1 3 80 5 Calderwood, Pasadena, Calif.

I I ENRY, WESLEY 1 09, 1 8 5 , 2 0 3 , 2 1 2 60 5 East 1 6th, H u tchinson, Kansas

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I I UGI IES, JAMES KENNETH 1 1 0, 2 4 3 704 North Colorado, Midland, Texas

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I I UDGINS, ELDRIDGE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 99 1 72 0 South Oakland, Arlington, Va.

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HENDRICKS, JOHN 86, 88, 2 1 2 , 2 4 5 1 3 1 4 North Monroe, Topeka, Kansas

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"TOM, DICK 5 3, 74, 1 46, 2 1 2 17 Beatty, Coffeyville, Kansas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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HOGAN, GERALD 2 1 00 West 24th, Pine Bluff, Ark.

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I- lOWLAND, DELMA -- - --4 1 7 S.W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla.

�E, J O ANN ;os 39th, Lubbock, Texas _

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HODGSON, S H E R R I L L 5 0 8 North Asbury, Bethany, Okla.

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HARTPENCE, GA RY . 62, 94, 98, 99, 1 6 2, 1 6 5, 1 70, 1 78, 1 8 1 , 1 9 3 , 2 0 3 , 209, 2 1 2 2 1 6 Elm, Ottawa, Kansas

LE, DON - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 74 703 N.W. 30 Terrace, Okla. City, Okla. _

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HAWTI IORN, DOYLE L. 8 1 3 N.W. 6th, Okla. City, Okla.

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HOWARD, J O 1 007 Alametos, San Antonio, Texas

59, 1 09 , 1 9 5, 24 5 [LMAN, DAISY 507 Layfette, Omaha, Nebr.

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I IARRISON, MARY ANNA Box 6 7 1 , Bethany, Okla.

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H E R RON, VERA 98, 1 97, 220, 2 4 3 Box 2 6 3 , Cimarron, Kansas

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HARRIS, MARY RUTH 1 09, 1 9 1 , 2 4 3 604 orth Columbus, Marshall, Texas

IMES, B I LLY JACK - -.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 09 2 1 6 N.W. 26th, Okla. City, Okla. DDOW, B IL L 1 0 North Peniel, Bethany, Okla.

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I I E R R ICK, ROBERT 60, 89, 9 1 , 1 66, 1 8 8 Route 3, Farmington, N . Mex.

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HOLLAND, FRANKIE Route 3, Okarche, Okla.

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�AY, DOROTHY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 98, 1 86 l 04 5 South Hobart, Pampa, Texas _

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HOLLADAY, JOE Little Rock, Ark.

I IARRIS, HARRY 1 20 7 Ray Ave., Kansas City, Kansas

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DODSON, BARBARA 44, 74, 1 94 2009 New Boston Rd., Texarkana, Texas _

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LEASON, J . M . 906 South 9th, Chickasha, Okla. _

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HARRIS, B ILLY JOE 88, 1 89, 202, 2 0 3 , 2 1 2 6 3 2 East Gandy, Denison, Texas

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:IBSON, MARTHA 1 09, 1 8 5, 1 86 7 1 9 North College, Bethany, Okla. _

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;EQRGE, CANTLEY 2708 S.W. 48th, Okla. City, Okla. _ _ __ _ _ _

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ASSETT, DON 2 1 9 North Donald, Bethany, Okla. _

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88, 1 2 7, 1 40, 1 5 3, 1 6 2, 1 78, 1 84, 203, 2 1 2 74 3 5 vVayne, Kansas City, Mo.

84, 86, 88, 1 94, 1 96, 2 4 5 409 N.W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. _ _ _ _

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HARDER, DUANF. Meade, Kansas

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ARNER, ANN 302 North College, Bethany, Okla.

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GARDNER, ROB B I E 416 East 1 2 th Ave., Pine Bluff, Ark.

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HANN, AMOS 1 1 1 2 East I Oth, Winfield, Kansas

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GARDNE R, J I M 5 3 , 7 3 , 1 38, 1 59, 1 78, 1 84, 1 9 3, 1 96, 2 0 5 , 206, 207, 2 0 8, 2 1 2 404 East Kansas, Meade, Kansas _

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HAMITER, DAN 1 1 5 South Redman, Bethany, Okla .

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46, 88, 89, 1 84, 1 89, 202, 2 0 3 , 204, 2 1 2, 2 39 2 2 00 Ohio Street, Lawrence, Kansas _

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I NGRAM, W ILMA 5 0 Z North Donald, Bethany, Okla. _ _

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IRVINE, VI RGINIA Route 2, Neodesha, Kansas

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JAMES, ROBERT 946 Battin, Wichita, Kansas _

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JANTZ, LAWRENCE 5 1 5 East 3rd, Newton, Kansas

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J A R RELL, D E JUANA 2 0 5 North Mueller, Bethany, Okla. _

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JARRELL, D I C K 76, 209, 2 1 2 20 5 North Mueller, Bethany, Okla. _

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J ENNINGS, CLARENCE Box 876, Collidge, Arizona _

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J E NNINGS, J IM M I E L . 44 1 South College, Salina, Kansas _ _ _ _ _ _

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J O H NSON, L I NDA 101, 1 10 3048 Roosevelt, Kansas City, Kansas

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J E RNIGAN, GLENDA 1 1 0, 242, 2 4 3 1 0 20 West Santa Fe, Blackwell, Okla.

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JANTZ, DOLORES 5 1 5 East 3rd, Newton, Kansas

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J OHNSON, NORMA 309 East Ayers, Edmond, Okla.

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JOHNSON, PAUL

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1 04, I I O, 2 0 3, 207,

1 402 Patton Drive, Odessa, Texas

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JOHNSON, TALMADGE

99, 1 6 3, 1 84, 2 0 3 , 243. 246 Box 249, Duncan, Oklahoma __

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LEWIS, JAMES RAY

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LEWIS, R I C HY Weston, Mo.

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LOGANBILL, MARY I l l , 1 1 2, 1 86 204 South College, Bethany, Okla . _ _ _ __ _ __

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LOLMAUGI I , DONNA I l l , 242, 2 4 3 2 2 1 West Lincoln, Blackwell, Okla. ______

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LONG, KENNETH Olton, Texas

KING, HENRY 2 1 , 99, 1 7 1 , 1 8 5 1 00 8 H ickory, Sweetwater, Texas ___________

KING, SH I RLEY 89, 1 94, 2 4 5 2 2 1 South 7th, West Helena, Ark. _____________

K I RBY, DORSEY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 76 36 1 8 Campbell, Kansas City, Mo. KIRK, WILMA 2 2 2 1 N.W. 20th, Okla. City, Okla.

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KLEMME, KENNETH A. - - - - - - - - - - - - - 89 1 2 29 North 1 1 th, Enid, Okla. KLIN ER, VICKY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 76 General Delivery, Bethany, Okla. ______________

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84, 89, 1 3 1 , 1 78, 1 8 1 , 1 84, 2 39, 2 4 1 , 244 1 2 1 6 S.E. 4th Ave., Mineral Wells, Tex. __

UTSON, GLENN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - 99 1 006 East 9th, Hastings, Nebr. UTSON, RUTH 1 04, I l l , 1 60 , 240 1 006 East 9th, Hastings, ebr. _____

KOHNK, ALTHEA 54, 77, 1 94, 2 4 5 9 0 3 West 4th, Grand Island, Nebr. ________

KOTWITZ, G. W. Drexel, Mo.

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99, I l l , 1 8 5

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1 2, 99, 2 0 3

LUDWIG, OLETi lA 3 5 , 99, 1 6 1 , 1 84, 1 96 6946 Paseo, Kansas City, Mo. __

KING, NORWOOD D . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 89 Gueydan, La.

KORNELSEN, NAOMI Minneola, Kansas

I l l , 220

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L I NTON, E U N ICE I l l , 1 86, 1 9 8 2620 Concord, Colorado Springs, Colo.

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KEYS, REBA 86, 89, 1 4 5, 1 47, 1 9 2, 2 2 1 1 00 8 Logan, Canon City, Colo.

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94, 99, 1 9 3 , 246

LINDSLEY, JO Johnson Kansas

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KNIGHT, LESTER

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LIMBOCKER, SHELDA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 99 Box 3 5 3, Olton, Texas

KENNEDY, ALLYN 42, 76, 1 89, 206, 2 1 2 3 1 0 N.W. l st, Bethany, Okla.

I ERIM, LAVER E Box 3 7 1 , Bethany, Okla.

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KELLY, JOHN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 57, 76, 1 88 1 6 36 Junction Ave., Sturgis, S. Dak.

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LEWIS, ROBERT 3 0 1 East Fulton, Sinton, Texas

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KIM PETER - - - - - - - - - - - - Seoul, Korea

99

44, I l l , 1 1 2, 1 6 2, 242, 243 6 1 6 East Walnut, H illsboro, Texas

KELLY, BI G I l l , 1 84, 2 0 3 4000 . W . 5th Ave . , Miami, Fla.

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KAUTH, MARILYN - - - - - - - - -- - - - --99, 1 7 1 Route 3 , Fredonia, Kansas

KENNEDY, JANICE 1 1 2 Thornton Lane, Elk City, Okla.

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LEWIS, GRETA . -----------------99 2 2 1 7 6th, Texas City, Texas

JONTE, JOHN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --99, 1 87 1 24 3 East Wall, Fort Scott, Kansas

ebr.

34, I l l

LEPPER, JOH - - - - - -� - - - - 77 Vet. H u t 9 , Bethany, Okla.

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Me AMES, LAURA l 00, 1 9 1 , 1 94, 2 20, 245 Box 5 0 3 , Claremore, Okla.

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LENZ, GLEN ALBERT Roseland, Nebr.

JONES, WE DELL 99, 2 0 3 , 2 1 2 2 1 5 East South Ave., Harrison, Ark.

KAN E , BARBARA 2 2 0 1 Grand Ave., Omaha,

LANKFORD, ZOLA Hennessey, Okla.

LEFFEL, RICHARD 94, 99, 2 0 3 , 2 4 3, 246 1 5 1 9 East 3rd, Hutchinson, Kansas

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JONES, LEROY 2 1 07 West 7th, Clovis, N. Mex.

McNAIR, B ILLIE RUTH 207 South 1 st, Duncan, Okla.

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JOH NSTON, RAMO A 4 5 , 1 1 0, 1 86, 2 4 5 5 0 0 7 South 3 1 st West Ave., Tulsa, Okla. JONES, KAREN MAE . Route 3, Hutchinson, Kansas

LANGLEY, MARTI-lA 99, 1 60 , 1 86, 2 4 5 2 5 4 4 Minnesota, Topeka, Kansas

L U INSTRA, BENNY I l l , 1 84, 1 8 5 2 2 1 North Cheyenne, Bartlesville, Okla. ________

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LUKENS, GRAHAM 3 1 7 North 7th, Atchison, Kansas

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MACE, WANDA 204 .W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. __

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MADDOX, DON Ill 522 orth College, Bethany, Okla . MADISON, B O B 89, 2 0 3 , 2 1 2 , 2 1 4, 243 2 0 1 6 l st Street, Galena Park, Texas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ ____

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MAHIN, SHARON 1 1 1 , 2 1 9 , 220 54 3 Cecil Road, Topeka, Kansas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

MAHONEY, CHARLIE 7 1 07 Gregory, Shreveport, La.

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MANBECK, ELEANOR 7 2 3 West Parker, Waterloo, I owa

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LUTHER, KE NETH - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 89 Box 692, Bethany, Okla.

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MARINES, ELAINE 1 00 3 Harris, Ardmore, Okla.

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MARSHALL, PAUL 2 0 2 North Virginia, Lyons, Kansas

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MAR T I N, BETTY Route 2, Denison, Texas

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MARTIN, DON - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- 89 7 2 0 North Donald, Bethany, Okla. MARTIN, GEN L � - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 1 2 Route 3 , Troup, Texas MARTIN, HAZEL Mound City, M o .

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MATLOCK, J IMMY Muldrow, Okla.

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MAY, GENE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 7, 1 88 1 0 4 ¥.! N.W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla . MAYO, MARY ETTA 1 809 Sayle, Greenville, Texas

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MEAZELL, ORMAN - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- 77 411 .W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla. M E E K, STANLEY 'f 2 2 4 Sterling Drive, Okla. City, Okla.

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t-.IE ESEY, DALE 774 1 Rannells Ave., Maplewood, Mo.

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McCLEERY, LEE ROY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 99 Harmon, Okla. McCLUNG, MYRNA 1 00, 1 40 5 'Vest Elm, Breckenridge, Texas

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M E RR I LL, SU E 90, 1 30, 1 78, 192 4 1 07 Victory Drive, Marshall, Texas

McCOY MARGARET 5700 Charlotte, Kansas City, Mo.

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M I KKELSON, EVELYN 101, 3 346 1 6th Ave., M i nneapolis, Minn.

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McCURLEY, CLIFFIE Route 2 , Fayetteville, Arkansas

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M I KKELSO , VERNA 3 346 1 6th Ave., South, Minneapolis, Minn.

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McDUFF, PRESTON Ill 1 807 North McAurther, Bethany, Okla.

M ILEY, CHA RLOTTE Route 2 , Chanute, Kansas

McELYEA, EUGENE AUGUSTUS

M I LEY, ROSALIA 1 1 2 , 1 86, 2 1 8, 2 20, 222 Route 2 , Box 204, Chanute, Kansas

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42, 1 00, 1 9 0 I l l South Grace S t . , Crockett, Texas

McELYEA, JEA

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McNABB, CLIFTON 5 7 , 89, 1 88, 1 89 Route 2, Wellington, Texas

M I LLER, MARY Route 1 1 , Box 7 39, Fort Worth, Texas

LAMB E RT, J ERRY 5 2, 1 1 1 , 2 1 3 1 29 West Gray, Norman, Okla.

McNABB, IVA Greenbrier, Ark.

M I LLER, MAURINE Fowler, Kansas

LANA, PAUL ------ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 99 7 1 4 North Weigle, Watonga, Okla .

McNABB, LOU I S Route 3, Greenbrier, Ark.

LANE, LAVE RTA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 99 Rock Port, Mo.

McNABB, WILLIAM - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 77 Box 7 7 1 , Bethany, Okla.

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M I LLER, BARBARA 1 1 2, 242, 243 6209 M uskogee, Des Moine, Iowa

LAMBERT, B ILLY F. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 89 Box 5 3 3, Bethany, Okla.

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McMINN, MARTHA 40 1 West Gay, Gladewater, Texas

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LAMB, AULEEN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7 7 7 1 4 North College, Bethany, Okla.

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MEADOR, BOBBIE 1 00, 1 60, 1 84, 1 98, 240 1 800 Elder Drive, Arlington, Texas

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McB EE, W I LLIAM C. Box 30 1 , Sulphur, Okla.

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MANEY, TEX 1 00, 2 0 3 , 242 Route 1 , Box 1 26 D, B urkburnet, Texas

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LUNDY, BEVERLY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 77 1 29 North Donald. Bethany, Okla.

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M ILLER, DELANE I sabella, Okla.

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M ILLE R , SHARON 1 00, 242, 243 6 1 5 S.W. 6 l st, Des Moines, Iowa __________

M ILLER, WALTER E. Westville, Fla.

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M I L L I K I N, LOYD 1 1 7 North Donald, Bethanv, Okla. _

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NOGGLES, JAMES 7 1 2 5 East Mission, Spokane, Wash. _

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PITTS, RODNEY 1 72 3 Foster, Lake Charles, La . _

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1 00 , 1 6 1 , 1 84, 1 9 5 M ILLSAP, KATHRYN Star Route " B " , Hominv, Okla.

NORELL, JOHN 58, 1 1 3 , 1 88, 203, 2 1 2 2 2 7 East 1 Oth, Newton, Kansas

POSEY, ROBERTA 79, J 3 ? , 1 78, 1 96, 2 1 3 1 2 0 5 8th Street, Wellington, Texas

M I RANDA, JAMES D . Gould, Okla .

NORTON, BOBBY 44, 1 1 3 , 1 44, 1 8 5 3 2 1 N_Vi'_ Avenue, Hamlin, Texas

POTTER, VIRGINIA 1 1 3, 1 1 4, 1 9 8, 2 4 5 2 2 1 5 North Lewis, Tulsa, Okla.

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M ISHLER, ELIZABETH 1 3 1 'Vest Spruce, I n dependence, Kansas _ _

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MOORE, ERNEST Route 1 , Box 1 4 3 , Oklahoma Citv, Okla. _

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NAGEL, DELORES Box -4 5 3, Hooker, Okla . _

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N E E DLES, JOHN C . Box 36, Jet, Okla. N E E LY, D I ANE

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OZIAS, ESTHE R Centerview, 1\' lo .

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POWELL, GEORGE 5 2 2 Shannon Drive, Bethany, Okla.

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PACE, ANN 1 0 l N Cherokee, Bartlesville, Okla. _

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PAGAN, PATSY Box 487, Stroud, Okla . _

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PENNY, J ULIA Clever, Mo.

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PERSHALL, M E RLE 90 5 Davis, Clovis, N . Mex. _

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PRICE, BEVERLY 5 3 5 3 N . W . 4 5th, Okla . City, Okla. _

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PRICE, CONNIE East Star Route, Nowata, Okla. _

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PUC KETT, CAROLYN L�fe, Ark.

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PULLIAM, LENA LOU Box 1 296, Duncan, Okla. _

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P U RTEE, DEAN 1 40 5 West Washington, Jonesboro, Ark. _

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RAWLS, JOHN Route 1 , Box 1 54A, Lufkin, Texas _

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PUGH, CHARLES F. 304 North Donald, Bethany, Okla. _

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REEVES, MARY LOU 308 South College, Bethany, Okla.

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PITTS, MYRLENE 4 l l lh North Central, Bethany, Okla.

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REESE, JOHN E . Vet. Hut 7, Bethany, Okla .

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P I E RCE, HARRY 90, 99, 2 0 2 , 2 0 3 , 204 Route l , Sarcoxie, M o . _

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REEP, E U NICE 8609 'Voodward, Overland Park, Kansas

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PH ILO, DAVE 2 0 2 , 2 0 3 , 209, 2 1 2 , 1 1 3, 2 4 3 1 08 N _,V_ 7nd, Bethany, Okla. _

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PRENT ICE, GEORGE Bethany, Okla.

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4 1 4 8 South Zenith, Tulsa, Okla. R I GGS, ROGER 90, 1 0 8 North Mueller, Bethany, Okla. _

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RIPPER, JOYCE 5 0 1 North Willow, Bethany, Okla . _

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ROBERTS, FRANKLIN 60 1 S . E . 32nd, Okla. City, Okla.

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ROBINSON, PATSY 79, 1 6 1 , 1 94 1 8 2 5 Baylor Ave., Waco, Texas _

ROBINSON, SUE Box 4 5, Dover, Okla. _

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RODGERS, C H U C K 1 3 3 2 Locust, Muskogee, Okla. _

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RANSOM, JOYCE 2 1 5 S . E . 4 3rd, Okla. City, Okla.

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PHILLIPS, JANELLE 68, 79, 1 9 0, 1 94, 2 4 5 207 South Asbury, Bethany, Okla. PI I ILLIPS, J ULIA Box 4 2 , High Springs, Fla.

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RAMSEY, DOROTHY 2009 Mary Lou, Longview, Texas

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PETERSON, DELORES 4 7 ] 2 Nebraska Ave., Omaha, Nebr. _

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PETERS, WILMA GLEE l 06 South Redman, Bethany, Okla. _

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PENQUITE, B I L L 72 3 East 8th, Minneapolis, Kansas _

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PEARSON, T_ J 307 lh 'Vest Main, Bethany, Okla. _

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PEARSON, MABEL 307lh West Main, Bethany, Okla. _

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PEARCE, MAUREEN 72 3 N . Redmond, Bethany, Okla. _

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PRENTICE, CARL 400 N.W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla . _

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78, 24 1 , 244

NOEL, A R K l 0 5 lh N .W . 3rd, Bethany, Okla. _

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N E W E NSCHWANDER, DWIGHT E . 1 2 29 S . E . 1 9th Terrace, Okla. City, Okla . _

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3 5, 4 2 , 78, 1 59 , 1 68, 1 84, 2 39 2 9 1 5 Ivandell, Dallas 1 1 , Texas

OSBORN. DICK

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N E S M I T H , SAMMYE 1 2 , 1 1 0, 1 1 3, 2 4 3 1 1 6 East Maple, Cushing, Okla. _

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N E H RBASS, PATRICIA Route 3 , Lawrence, Kansas _

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ORR, RONNIE 98, 1 04, 1 1 3, 1 9 3, 2 0 3 Route 2, Anadarko, Okla.

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4 1 , 78, 1 8 3, 1 84, 1 9 2 , 1 94, 1 9 6 1 1 4 North Peniel, Bethany, Okla. _

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88, 90, 1 2 5 , 1 78, 1 79, 1 84, 1 89, 1 94, 1 9 8, 202, 207, 2 1 2 , 2 39 3 1 5 'Vest 8th, Newton, Kansas

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N EA L , DWIGHT 1 3 1 2 vV. Ponca, Ponca Citv, Okla.

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OKE, VERLA . 27, 1 04, 1 1 0, 1 1 3, 1 9 3 60 1 9 Reeds Road, Mission, Kansas

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1\ IO U NTFORD, RICI-IARD D . l l 3, 1 8 5 , 198 2 2 3 6 Russell, Kansas Citv, Kansas M U R ROW, WAYNE Route 2 , Alva, Okla .

OGDEN, CHARLENE Box 390. Kilgore, Texas

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OWENS, LORRENE 1 1 3, 1 9 7, 2 4 2 1 2 1 Texas AYenue, Woodward, Okla.

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OWENS, BOBB I E Route 2 , 'Voodward, Okla.

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1\ I OSELEY, DELETTA Route 1 , Stephenville, Texas MOTSINGER, J I M

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M ORGAN, JANICE 3 2 3 1 9th St., Port Arthur, Texas _

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46, 90, 209

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M O R E LAND, CHARLES 4 2 34 Norfolk Ave., St. $Louis, Mo. _

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M ITCHELL, FLORENE 1 00 1 8 1 8 South Van Buren, Little Rock, Ark. _

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ROGERS, KENNETH Box 5 3 7, Post, Texas

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ROGERS, MARTHA 2 0 2 4 Ash, Parsons, Kansas _

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ROGERS, JOHN 6 1 7 N .W. 8th, Oklahoma City, Okla. _

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ROH LMEIER, B ILL 1 0 1 , 2 0 1 , 203, 2 1 2 Box 5 7, Humboldt, Nebr. .

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ROSE. ROSALIE --- -- - - - -- - -- 50, 9 1 , 2 4 5 Box 1 3 2, Aline, Okla.

SLOAN. ROY Cleveland, Kansas

ROUSSELLE, EVELYN

S M ITH. ALMA ___ 2 1 0'9 1 7th Street, Corpus Christi, Texas

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42, 80, 1 9 2 , 1 94. 2 1 9, 2 2 1 , 222

Route 2 . McCook, Nebr. __

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SAFADI, FUAD General Deliverv, Bethany, Okla. _ _ _

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SANDERS, H I RAM 2740 East 1 2 , Tulsa, Okla. __

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SANDERS, JAMES 2740 East 1 2 , Tulsa, Okla. _ _ _

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SARGENT, DELBERT - - - -- - ---- - -- - - - - - 1 1 4 Steinauer, Nebr. SAYERS, RODNEY Route 2, Cherokee, Okla. _

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SCI-lAUER, DOROTHY ____ ___ 400 North Asburv, Bethany, Okla. _

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SCHMIDT, MARJORIE Box 3 1 1 , Sublette, Kansas

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SCHOENHALS, HARRY Box 84 1 , Darrouzett, Texas

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SCH M IDT, DEAN Route 2, Ingalls, Kansas

SCHULER, ARDITH Ness City, Kansas

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SCROGGS, M . G . 1 1 4, 1 8 5 , 2 0 3 1 2 1 6 Virginia Place, Fort 'North, Texas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

SEACHORD, SALLY 1 1 4, 1 86 6 1 3 5 Ohern Street, Omaha, Nebr. __ _ ___ __ __ __ __

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SHACKELFORD, CAROLYN 2 l l 2 N. Rhode Island, Oklahoma City, Okla .

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SHOTTS, DALE 318 orth 6th, Sterling, . Kansas SICKENBERGER, ARDEN Box 32, Bethany, Okla.

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SIM PSON, DENE ! 0 1 , 1 59 3 0 1 2 East 27th, Kansas !City 27, Mo. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ ____

SIM PSON, ROY 50, 9 1 , 9 2 , 1 9 3 , 243 30 1 2 East 27th, Kansas City, Mo. ___ _ ___ _

STROUD, JOANNE 5009 East 3rd, Tulsa, Okla. STROU D, PAUL

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SMITH. DIXIE TOY Carl Junction, M o .

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SMITH, KENNETH 4 5 38 Virginia, Kans:�s City, M o .

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S M I T H , M A E BELLE 94 5 Parallel, Atchison, Kansas

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SMITH. RACHEL B o x I 5 , Homestead, Okla. _

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SMITH. ROBERT _ 1 1 5 , 1 84, 2 4 3 9 0 8 Clarkson, Little Rock, Ark. __

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SMITH, ROGER . . Route 1 , Box 74, Meno, Okla. _

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SLOAN, DOROTHY JANE Cleveland, Kansas SLOAN, LENORE

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SLOAN, L U C I LLE Aline, Okla.

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STU M P , RICHARD Box 7 6 3 , Texhoma, Okla. _ _

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SUMMER. CARL Box I 077, Freer, Texas

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S U M t E R , FLOYD ---------- --- 9 1 4 1 9 N . E . Main, Bethany, Okla. _ __ _ _

SUMNER, lOLA 419 .E. Main, Bethany, Okla. _ _ _ _ _ __ _

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SNOW, CARSON - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 80 7 1 5 North College, Bethany, Okla.

SUTTERFIELD, CAL YIN 6720 . W . 8th, Okla. City, Okla.

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SNOWBARGER, KAT H E R I NE 94, I 04 , 1 3 8, 1 40 , 1 4 2 , 1 4 3 , I 60, 1 84, 1 96, 1 9 8, 2 \ 1 , 240, 2 4 3 Route 2 , Sylvia, Kansas

SUTTON, KE NETH 40 3 1 Mt. Ranier, Dallas, Texas

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SNOWBARGER, RONALD Sylvia, Kansas

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SNO\VBA RGER, W I LMA _ 36, 68, 8 1 , 1 26, 1 60 , 1 94, 2 39 , 2 4 3 , 244 1 2 0 5 S.\V. 28th, Okla. City, Okla. SOUTHWORTH, DWIGHT 1 0 3 , 1 04, 1 06, l i Z , 1 1 5 , 2 0 3 , 204, 2 1 2 , 243, 246 1 609 A . Street, Garden City, Kansas __

SPARKS, LADONNA Box 1 1 5, Bethany, Okla. __

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SPIRE, JOHN L. 1 0 1 , 2 4 3 , 246 504 South l Oth, I ndependence, Kansas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

SPOON, DARRELL 1 1 6 North College, Bethany, Okla.

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SPOON, REBA JOAN - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - 8 1 1 1 6 North College, Bethany, Okla. STALLINGS, WAYNE 1 1 5 , 1 84, 209 I l l \Vest Home Ave. , Flint, Mich. STA NDELAND, S H I RLEY 8 1 , 1 2 8, 1 38, 1 39, 1 78, 1 79, 1 94, 1 96, 245 70 5 North Pine, Ponca City, Okla. _ _ _ _

STANLEY, CHARLOTTE

! 0 3 , 1 84, 2 2 0 , 221 5 4 3 Cecil Road, Topeka, Kansas ___

STATZER, S H IRLEY 429 N.W. I I th, Okla. Citv, Okla.

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STEELE, EVANGELINE

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203 West l Oth, Jasper, Ala.

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STEWART, NAOMI 607 Essex Street, San Antonio, Texas

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STIVERSON, RAYMOND \ 1 5, 1 8 5 6 0 3 N.W. Avenue, Bethany, Okla.

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SWIGART, PATRICIA 9 3 , 1 0 2 , 1 3 8, 1 42 , 1 6 1 , 1 70, 1 84, 1 96, 1 9 8, 240 1 602 1 4th Street, \Voodward, Okla. __

S W I M , CAROL - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - 8 1 562 5 Park, Kansas City, M o . SWIM, VERNON

2 9 , 9 1 , 1 4 2 , 1 89 , 1 96, 2 0 3 , 206, 2 1 2 , Z I 3 , 209 4 1 6 East 9th, H utchinson, Kansas _ _ _ _

TAYLOR, ALICE NEEL 86, 9 2 , 24 3 308 South Ohio, Roswell, N. Mex. _ _ _ _ _ _ __

TAYLOR, ALLAN 3 6 1 5 36th Street, Lubbock, Texas _

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TAYLOR, JANET 1 2 7 East Vine, Blytheville, Ark.

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TEAGUE, GLENDA 1 0 5 1 2 2 m!, Orlando, Fla. __

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TEAS, PATSY - - -- - - -- - - - - - --- - - -- 40, 1 1 5 Box 3 4 3 , Lovington, N. Mex. TENNYSOt , WILLIAM GARRETI-I 1 60 3 S . Eastern, Okla. City, Okla.

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TERRELL, JAMES 2 8 2 5 Palm, Abilene, Texas

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TIBBETTS, NORMAN - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - 9 2 Route I , Densmore, Kansas T I RY, DALE 6 2 7 East Varian, Colo. Springs, Colo.

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S U MPTER, JACK Route I , Box 1 4 -A, New Iberia, La .

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STEWART, JAMES PAUL

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Route I , El Reno, Okla.

SKILLERN, FRANK 8 1 5 North College, Bethany, Okla .

SKIN 1ER, EARL 4 2 , 57, 80, 1 88, 2 1 2 , 2 4 5 5 Z 1 5 3 3rcl Avenue, Kenosha, Wis.

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STEINBACH, EUGENIA ! 0 1 , 1 44, 1 9 3 , 2 1 3 Route 2 , Box 2 5 5 , Port Orchard, \Vas\1.

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STRAW l, CHARLES 5 3 , 84, 9 \ , 2 4 5 5 4 1 Gilbert Street, Borger, Texas

STROTHER, DOYLE ) 4 8 N . W . 8th, Ardmore, Okla.

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SMITH, CLARK _ 4 1 0 S . E . 2nd, Bethany, Okla.

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4 1 , 8 1 , 1 24, 1 84, 1 94, 2 39 702 East 8th, Coffeyville, Kansas

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STRAWN, KAY 5 4 1 Gilbert Street, Borger, Texas

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S I M PSON, SHI RLEY 1 07 North Peniel, Bethany, Okla.

STRANGE, BYRON _ _ 1 1 5, 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 6th Avenue North, Texas City, Texas

SMITH. BETTY 1 04, 1 1 5, 2 20, 2 2 1 604 West l Oth, Holdenville, Okla.

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SHOCKLER, JOHN 1 1 2, 1 1 5 , 203 2 0 2 Peach Orchard S t . , Jackson, Miss. _ _ __ __ _ _

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SHEETS; JACK 5 2 1 West Second, Pine Bluff, Ark. SHIPLEY, MARILYNN

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SMITH, SHARON 407 North Main, Bentonville, Ark.

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SCHURMAN, JOYCE 2601 H ighview Drive, Nashville, Ten n .

SELLS, MARY LOU May, Okla.

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SCHUBERT, JOHN 9 1 , 1 90 , 207 6927 Amber, Houston 2 2 , Texas _ _ _ ___

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ROWLEY. ED 1 1 4, 1 44, 1 74 8426 \Vooclmont, Houston, Texas _ _ _ __

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1 0 2 , 1 86, 207, 2 1 8, 2 2 0, 2 2 1 , 2 2 2

Box 2 1 6, Palco, Kansas TRACY, J I M 9 2 , 2 0 2 , 2 0 3 , 204, 2 4 3 6027 East 1 2 th, Kansas City, M o . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

TR UAX, 1\: IARIAN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 9 2 2 0 2 Buona, S a n Antonio, Texas T U RNER, HELEN Route Z , Eastland, Texas

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68, 69, 8 1 , 1 1 9, 1 2 1 , 1 40 , 1 46, 1 5 8, 1 74, 1 9 5 , 2 1 3 , 2 4 5 Kalvesta, Kansas

STONEROAD, MARY 4 5 , 1 1 5 , 1 86 807 North Evans, El Reno, Okla.

TYLER, FOREST - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 9 2 Route 2 , H illsboro, Texas

STONE, VERA 1 709 Ellis, Wichita, Kansas

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JITTS, CLA I R _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 , 1 87, 246 Route 4, I ndependence, Kansas

!AIL, DONALD W . Dodge City, Kansas

!ARBLE, DARRELL Harlingen, Texas

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'EACH, S H I RLEY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 6 5 , 1 0 2 6 2 1 6 Annan Way, Los Angeles 4 2 , Calif.

TERM I LION, E LV I N _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 02 3 2 0 1 Gabrel, Parsons, Kansas

1ERNESS, V I OLITA ___ 1 1 6, 1 8 5 , 1 86, 2 2 0 92 5 Tulip Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 'ISER, BOB _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 5 , 96 504 Shannon Drive, Bethany, Okla.

'ISER, DONNA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 02 504 Shannon Drive, Bethany, Okla. VACHTEL, REBECCA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 1 34 2 Stratford, Nashville, Tenn.

VADE, W ILBURN Post, Texas

VAGONER, HENRY Elkhart, Kansas

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VALCHER, THELMA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 5 1 5 North Central, Bethany, Okla .

VALDEN, KENNETH Route 2, Sylvia, Kansas

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VALKER, GWEN _ _ 1 0 2 , 1 60, 1 94 , 196, 2 4 3 Route 2 , Gentry, Ark.

VALLACE, GAYLEN R. __ 1 1 6 , 242, 2 4 3 , 246 320 South Prouty, Watonga, Okla .

VALLACE , GRACE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 9 2 3 0 3 North College, Bethany, Okla.

VALLACE , I S A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 7 3 1 1 N.W. 42nd, Okla. City, Okla.

VALLACE, LEVOY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 9 2 , 242 3 0 3 North College, Bethany, Okla .

v' ARD, CAROLYN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 1 7 1 7 Robins, Conway, Ark.

v'ARE, JEANNETTE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ! 06, 1 1 6, 1 84 424 South Lake, Ponca City, Okla .

VASHBURN, P H I LL I P EARL

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3 5 , 57, 5 8 , 1 02 , 1 88

1 70 3 Link Street, Orange, Texas

v'ATSON, CLIFTON _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6, 2 4 5 1 706 Houston, Longview, Texas

v'ATSON, NADINE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6, 2 4 5 3 0 5 Cleveland, Springdale, Ark.

VATTE RS, OBED

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6 0 1 East l i th , Leon, Iowa

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WEBB, S H I RLENE - - -路 - - - - - - - - _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 6703 N.W. 26th, Okla . City, Okla. WEBSTER, DALE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 H i P .O. Box 388, Rogers, Ark. WELLMON, DOLORES _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 , 2 4 5 Apartado 3 0 2 , Managua, Nicaragua, Central America WEST, DORIS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 9 2 , 1 9 2, 1 94 Route 1 , Box 406 A, Alvin, Texas WESTMORELAND, JOHN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 1 664 Dunmoor, Memphis, Ten n . WESTMORELAND, JOHNNY _ _ _ 1 02 , 1 3 8, 1 89 , 204, 2 0 5 , 206, 2 1 2 509 North Willow, Bethany, Okla . WESTON, CHARLETTA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 Route 3, Box 4 2 3 , Okla. City 7, Okla . WESTON, WESLEY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 Route 3 , Box 42 3 , Okla. City 7, Okla. _________________

WHEATLEY, LONA Alpena, Ark.

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WHEELER, BOB _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 804 North College, Bethany, Okla . W H E ELER, EVA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 9 2 , 2 2 1 Route 1 , Coyle, Okla . WH ITE , FLOYD C. Elkhart, Kansas

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WH ITE, JULIA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 9 2 3 0 5 N . W . 1 st, Bethany, Okla. WHITE, ROBERT _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ 1 1 6 3 0 5 N.W. 1 st, Bethany, Okla . W H ITE, W. F. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 36, 1 0 2 , 1 44 Vet. Hut 1 9, Bethany, Okla .

WICKER, PAT _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ l l o 2 6 0 3 West 1 2th, Dallas, Texas

WILLEY, JANICE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2 5, 1 1 6 600 North Redmond, Bethany, Okla. WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 8 6 2 Magnolia, Lake Jackson, Texas W I LLIAMS, FLOE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 9 2 , 1 4 7 , 1 70 2962 Trenton Rd., Acron, Ohio WILLIAMS, VIRGINIA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 86, 92 1 1 5 N.vV. Avenue, Bethany, Okla. W I LLIAMS, WANDA

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1 1 5 Vaughn, Tyler, Texas WILLIAMSON, CALVIN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 3729 S.W. 40th, Oklahoma City, Okla.

WINTER, VERA RUTH ___ 94, 1 0 2 , 1 3 8 , 1 40, 1 4 2 , 1 59, 1 6 1 , 1 84, 1 96, 1 9 8, 240 Hooker, Okla . W I R E , DOROTHEA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 2 , 1 9 2 , 1 94 1 09 N.W. 7th, Bethany, Okla. WITTLER , EMMALEE Jansen, Nebr.

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WOMACK, BOB _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 , 242, 243, 246 Box 3 2 2 , Bethany, Okla . WOMACK, CLARA _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 2 , 1 94, 2 2 1 , 2 4 5 Route 1 , Telephone, Texas WOOD, ROBERT D. Trousdale; Kansas

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WOOD, WILMA JEAN Trousdale, Kansas

118

WOODS, DORIS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6, 1 69 Box 689, Harlingen, Texas WOODS, VIVIAN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6, 1 86 North Star Route, Dodge City, Kansas WRIGHT, E UGENE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 1 1 3 5 North Purdue, Okla . City, Okla. WRIGHT, JOHNNY EARL _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 Route 1 , Box 5 5, Pineland, Texas WRIGHT, MADOLYN _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 2 , 1 2 2, 1 7 2 2 4 3 5 North Jordan, Okla . City, Okla. WYSS, LEON _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 34, 8 2 , 2 1 2 1 04 N . E . 8th, Bethany, Okla.

YAMAMOTO, KOI C H I Yokohama, Japan

________________

1 17

YARBROUGH, GLENNA _ _ _ _ _ _ 44, 92, 2 1 3 Route I , Box 66, Vinson, Okla. __________

YARBROUGH, CAROL Box 3 0 3 , Chase, Kansas

1 1 6, 1 86

YOUNG, DWAIN _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 6 1 42 8 South 1 Z , Chickasha, Okla. YOUNG, ROY - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - 9 2 , 24 3 General Delivery, Bethany, Okla.

ZABEL, ALBERT RAY Hooker, Okla .

__ _ _ __ _ _ ___

1 02, 2 1 2

ZALETA, HENRY -- - -- - - - - - - - -- -- --- - 92 8 1 1 Becks Run Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. ZENTZ, CRYSTAL _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2, 1 9 1 24 1 5 \Vest Boulder, Colo. Springs, Colo.

W I LLISON, SH IRLEY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 9 2 , 1 00, 1 8 5 6 0 5 North 2nd, Garden City, Kansas

ZIEBARTH, ELLIS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 82, 1 59, 1 9 7 1 0 5 South l Oth Ave . , S t . James, Minn .

WILSON, ARLESS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8 2 Route 5 , Box Z 36, Marshall, Texas

ZIEBARTH, MARLENE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 4 3, 1 1 6 1 0 5 South l Oth Ave., St. James, Minn.

W IMBERLEY, LOIS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 0 2 , 2 4 5 Route 1 , Box 3 2 , Edmond, Okla .

Z I MME RMEN, ROBERT Box 1 02 , Bertha, Minn.

______________

82

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