Issuu on Google+

on

e o

a

e.-.ts

Scholastic Life

15

Administration Faculty and Curricula Classes Who's Who

Spirit

u aI

Life

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

109 '

Church

if( .

Chapel

),

..

, .- _,

""; ; ,; ( " ''

.

\4. 1 �··

,:

-

""

r( (f if

�� •

. . �'.

Religious Organizations

,

� ·

--·�

lectures

_ �

f(

Social Life

"';t

Features Campus life Organizations Athletics

129

We dedicate the 1957 ARROW...

To one whose life exemplifies the motto of the college - Character Culture-Christ.

To one who is understanding, and has the ability to make every student feel welcome.

To one who, in all the seriousness of his j ob, never loses his sense of humor .

T o o n e who i s a graduate of the college, and who left an enviable record behind him, serving as president of the Student Council; receiving the Good Citizenship Award for scholarship, leadership and sportsmanship; and being elected to Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities for two consecutive years.

To one whose Christian living will always be an inspiration to all who know him.

To you,

- Dr. Don Beaver

Orval L. McDaniel 1915-1957

A native of Independence, Kansas, Orval

L.

McDaniel attended Bresee Col足

lege, Hutchinson, Kansas, from which he received a Th. B . in 1940. For ten years he vvas the pastor of Nazarene churches in four Kansas towns. In 1949 he received an A.B. degree from Fort Hays State College and an M.S. from the same school in 1950. Soon afterwards he entered the Nazarene Theological Seminary, from which

he received the B . D. degree in 1955. He did additional graduate work at the Uni足 versity of Kansas City before moving to Bethany in the summer of 1955. Professor McDaniel joined the BNC faculty in September, 1955, as assistant professor of religion and journalism. He was also a sponsor of the an associate editor of

Reveille

Echo and

Todav at BNC.

On Easter Sunday evenmg Professor McDaniel died suddenly as the result of a stroke. A devout Christian and an effective teacher, he was appreciated deeply by fac足 ulty and students, as well as those of the local church and community who knew him.

III M eiD o r i aii•

JIMMIE LEE AARON

1934-1956

Returning to his home in Duncan, Oklahoma, after completing a revival meeting in Conway, Arkansas, Jimmie Lee Aaron was involved in an automobile accident in which he lost his life. A former student of Bethany Nazarene College and Trevecca

azarene College, Jimmie was loved and appreciated by all who knew

him . His life was lived in such a way that, although his death occasioned deep sorrow in many hearts, his family and friends can realize the true significance of the words of Paul I. Wellman in his book,

The Chain,

when he wrote:

"Lite is etemal; and love is immortal, and death is only a horizon; and

a

lwrizon is nothing save the limit of our sigl1t ...

"

Br e s e e Hall

... p

-

--==-

_...__ ..

:..

.....- ---

::.-

_-__ - -

_JF---

(

Gymnasium

)

'-----_...

Student Union

Seated: Dr. Roy H. Cantrell, Dr. Anne Greve, Mrs. Carol Lundy, Dr. C. H a rold Ripper.

Sta nding: Mr. Robert lawrence, Mr. Ha rry

Craddock, Dr. Vernon Snowberger, Dr. Donald R. Danskin, Dr. Fred Floyd.

AdiD i n i�t r a t i v e C o-.. :n e i l DR. ROY H . CANTRELL, Chairman President of the College DR. C. HAROLD RIPPER Dean of the College

DR. ANNE C. GREVE Chairman of the Division of Social Science

HARRY L. CRADDOCK Business Manager

CAROL S. LUNDY Associate Professor of English

DR. VER ON SNOWBARGER Dean of Students

DR. FRED FLOYD Professor of History

DR. RONALD R. DA SKIN Registrar

ROBERT G. LAWRENCE Chairman of the Division of Natural Sciences

Administration

-

-

;

DR. & MRS. ROY H . CANTRELL

I o " I S e l-l

\VANDA WILLIAMS, Secretary

PHYLLIS REHFELDT, Office Asst.

D e a n o:i t h e Coll ege

Dr. C. H. Ripper checks his schedule of the day's activities to assure his being i n the right place at the right time.

Experience gained while serving for several years as a pastor in the Church of the Nazarene has proven very helpful to Dr. C. Harold Ripper in his role as Dean of the College. He has proven himself to be a very capable administrator with the interest of the entire student body and faculty at heart. Dr. Ripper is a man with much responsibility, representing our col足 lege at meetings in which many of the outstanding leaders and educators of our time are present. He is very competent in selecting and organizing the curricula of the college, as well as s<:rving as an understanding counselor to those students who feel the need of advice. Although academic issues are perhaps the chief concern of Dr. Ripper, he always displays a friendliness and a deep concern for everyone he meets. In addition to his duties as Dean, Dr. Ripper serves as the head of the Department of Psychology. He is a very prominent figure in the field of the promotion of education . With all these duties and varied tasks, he still does justice to each area. His friendly and efficient staff, to whom we owe a large part of. the smooth functioning of the program of the school, contribute much to the welcoming of new students and the overcoming of the "away from home" feeling felt by many freshmen.

Office assistant Pat Colwell helps turn out the correspondence that issues from the Dean's office.

Sybil Montandon, Secretary t o the Dean, pa uses i n h e r day's work to accomodate the photographer.

Mimeograph operator Ray Miller is partly responsible for the publications originating i n the office of the Dean.

D e a n. o i S t u.de ii t s One of the most exacting and demanding jobs in the administration of the college belongs to Dr. Vernon Snowbarger, the Dean of Students. To his office come students in a steady stream with problems of all types, ranging from requests for permission to stay out after "hours," excuses for chapel cuts, or problems concern­ ing dorm life to financial problems, registration of stu­ dent automobiles, or trouble at home. He must be able and ready to help each one of them find the best solu­ tion possible for his particular problem. To the occas­ ional offender of the rules of the school, who approaches his office with much apprehension, he must be fair and unbiased in disciplinary action. Dr. Snowbarger has proven himself in this, his first year as Dean, to be a friend to all students and a capable advisor and counselor. In addition to his ad­ ministrative position, he also serves as a professor in the department of Sociology. His "extra-curricular" activities include membership in the Chamber of Com­ merce and on the board of the College Church. His job is not one easy to fill, nor richly rewarded with praise, but the efficiency with which he does it is reflected in the smoothness with which the cogs in the machinery of student activities turn.

Dr. Vernon Snowberger pauses d u ring a busy day Ia reflect upan the activities of years gone by.

Ruth Rawlings, office assistant, gives timely assistance to Ronald Arnold.

Janice Willey, secretary, adds glamor a s well a s efficiency to the office of the Dean of Students.

Office assistant Marsha Gorman records class "cuts1 the "big black book."

1 in

C on_:n 8 e l o:r o i Wo iD e n Men perform very important functions on the campus of Bethany Nazarene College, but one major task can be accomplished only by a woman. That position, the Counselor of Women, is filled by one of the most charming and gracious per足 sons to be found anywhere, Mrs. Roy H. Cantrell, the first lady of the campus. The girls find she is a very interested and sympathetic listener to every problem, whether it be of mC).jor or minor importance. She is not in her position for its monetary value, but because she feels she has a definite spot to fill on the campus. She is always a welcome guest at any party, tea, or banquet given in connection with the school. She is the very essence of culture, and her life exemplifies the higher and finer things. It is her sincere desire that every girl who enters the portals of the college will live a life that is fully dedicated to Christ and filled with the poise and culture that are necessary for happy, useful years ahead.

Mrs. Roy H. Contrell, First lady of the campus,

Mrs. Cantrell also serves as sponsor of the Beth足 Ann organization, giving her the opportunity to be of service to the wives of ministerial students, preparing them for the problems they will meet later as wives of preachers.

serves as counselor of women.

Soon after opening her office for the day

.

.

.

Mrs. Cantrell greets her fi rst "client."

Fie ld R e· p :r e s e n t a t i v e The Field Representative of the college must be a virtual "jack-of-all-trades" to fulfill all the things expected of him. As the situation varies he might find himself serving as a diplomat, a traveling salesman, a preacher, an ambassador, or an advisor to the would-be college student who has not decided where to attend school. Bethany Nazarene College is fortunate in having Rev. Cur­ tis Smith to represent her in this capacity. l-Ie has proven himself to be most capable in all of the above mentioned fields, and has done much to bolster the interest in BNC across the seven state educational zone. A graduate of the college, he has a genuine in­ terest in the promotion of Christian education. His warm sense of humor and his magnetic per­ sonality are well known not only on the campus among the students and faculty, but also across the zone by those who have heard him speak in their churches, youth camps, or district meetings. He is a capable representative of the college, and one to whom the student body can look for an example of fine Christian living.

Rev. C u rtis Smith, Field Representative, serves as B.N.C.'s ambassador of good will across the educational zone.

Secretory Phyllis Je�nings keeps the home fires b u rning

Lorrene Owens, office assistant, add resses the huge

when the field representative is 110n the road."

slacks of letters that issue from the field representative's office.

B u. s i n e s s Perhaps one of the most difficult jobs in the administration of a.n y orgatJization belongs to that individual who finds it his responsibility to keep the institution financially solvent. In this instance, it is Mr. Harry Craddock, the Business Manager of the college. His is a demanding posi足 tion, which is readily realized by the individual who has observed him hurrying to and fro across the campus, trying to meet all the appointments his busy schedule demands. But, with all of his responsibilities, Mr. Craddock has maintained the friendly relationship with the student body that makes him one of the best liked persons on the campus. He has the knack of understand足 ing the personal financial problems that confront the average student at Bethany Nazarene College, and seems to have suggestions and solutions to fit almost everv case.

Mr. Harry Craddock, Business Manager, makes another addition to his a l ready crowded schedule of the day.

Although his position demands a great part of his time, his life is not entirely monopolized by his work at the college. l-Ie is active in civic organizations, and serves the College church in the capacity of Superintendent of the Sunday School. His life is an inspiration and an example for all those who have known him.

Secretary Ruth Newberry interrupts her morning's work to answer the insistent call of the telephone.

Mrs. I rene Lawrence1 assistant secretary to the Busi ness Manager, makes another of the multitude of entries necessary to keep the records up to date.

Oiii c e

Office assistant Carolyn Colwell spends much of her time checking and rechecking columns of figures like these.

Mrs. Mildred Ha rris, office assistant, checks the card file for delinquent accounts.

Erliene Brunhau, assistant bookkeeper, finds it her job to make . the multitude of entries involved in keeplng the records u p路to路date.

Miss Florence Lundy, bookkeeper, carefully bala nces the debits and credits to keep the college "out of the red."

Re g ist r ar Dr. Donald Danskin, Registrar of the college, is another of those individuals who performs much of his work behind the scenes, but with­ out whom the administration of the college would be incomplete. He has an ipterest in the career of every student from the day the student enters the school until he is able to walk from these grounds with a college degree.

Dr. Donald Danskin, Registrar, prepares his schedule for a busy week.

If we could observe the duties of the Regis­ trar through the college career of an average stu­ dent, we would see first the careful consideration of the student's application for admiss.ion. If the application is in order, the student is admitted and, after filling out the multitude of registration forms ( secured from the Registrar), is subjected to a battery of examinations that serve to better adapt the student to college work. Records of the results of these tests are filed in the Registrar's office, where they may be referred to if the need should arise. At the end of every semester, the student must depend upon the staff of the Regis­ trar to gather together the grade slips which indi­ cate his progress. Even after graduation, if it is necessary to have copies of his records, the gradu­ ate must call upon the Registrar. All these things are necessary for the operation of the school, and the way in which they have been carried on has contributed much to the success of the college.

Office assistant Esther Kim prepares reference cards for the Registrar's files.

Mass production of correspondence is o n ly a small part of the day's work of Mrs. Wynona Burkhart, secretary.

Recorder Only one who has at some time or another served in a position similar to the one filled by Mrs. Leona McConnell Meek, the Recorder of the college, can appreciate the vast scope of the job that is hers. The average college student prob­ ably never stops long enough to think about just who is responsible for making his scholastic prog­ ress a part of his pennanent record, to be pre­ served there for the remainder of his life. Mrs. . Meek has for her responsibilities the recording of grades, maintenance of student files, distribu­ tion of grade reports, and formulation of tran­ scripts. The nature of her job demands that she spend most of her time in the background, and for that reason she might seem almost a stranger to some students. She has an intense interest in every student, however, and constantly strives to be of assistance in every way possible. Mrs. Meek's life has long been dedicated to God and the church. She has served as a mission­ ary to Africa, and now is devoting her life to the college. Her radiant personality and charming manner have made her an honored and respected member of the administrative family.

Mrs. Leona McConnell Meek, Recorder, is always busy making additions to some student's record.

Joyce Ripper, office assistant, has a cheery smile for everyone, even the photographer.

Wynona Burkhart happily issues g rade reports to a worried Dale Meesey.

Bo a r d o i T:r .. s t e e s JARREITE AYCOCK, Chairman Orville W. Jenkins Vice-Chairman

R. T. Williams, Jr. Secretary

Paul Macrory Alumni Representative

NEBRASKA DISTRICT Rev. Whitcomb Harding Mr. Blaine D. Proffitt Rev. Norman Bloom

NORTI- I WEST OKLAHOMA Rev. J. T. Gassett Dr. E. S. Phillips Rev. A. LeRoy Taylor Mr. Adolph Hill

HOUSTON DISTRICT Rev. W. Raymond McClung Rev. L. P. Durham Rev. Odell Brown

KANSAS DISTRICT Rev. Ray Hance Rev. Eugene Verbeck Mr. E. W. Snowbarger

SOUTHEAST OKLAHOMA Rev. Glen Jones Dr. B. F. Neely Rev. W. H . Deitz

SAN ANTO IO DISTRICT Rev. W. H. Davis Rev. Hearne Spruce Mr. Gene I-Ioughtling

KANSAS CITY DISTRICT Dr. Janette Aycock Dr. A. Milton Smith Rev. Jack Lee

SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA Rev. W. T. Johnson Rev. C. R. Thrasher Rev. R. T. Williams, Jr .

ORTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT Rev. J. W. Hendrickson Rev. Boyd Hancock Rev. G. E. Hawkins

LOUISIA A DISTRICT Rev. V. Dan Perryman Rev. G. M. Akin

ABILENE DISTRICT Rev. Orville W. Jenkins Mr. R. B. Chandler Rev. Lyman Wood路

SOUTH ARKA TSAS DISTRICT Rev. W. L. French Rev. Kline Dickerson Rev. J. Frank Hamm

NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA Dr. I. C. Mathis Rev. Sam Vv. Nesmith Mr. Homer D. Morrisett

DALLAS DISTRICT Dr. Paul H. Garrett Rev. Fletcher Spruce Rev. C. E. Ammons

ALUMNI Dr. Paul Macrory

ula Faculty & Curric

H -uiDa n. i t i e s Realizing the varied scope of the vocations which the graduate may follow, the Humanities Division strives to serve as the gateway through which one may enter the magic lands of English, Speech, and the Foreign Languages. It provides guidance to fuller lives and more useful service by including in its curricula adequate instruction in these fields. Attempting to bring its students to a more effective command of the mother tongue and a mastery of foreign languages, the Humanities Division offers instruction in our own native English, the harsh, almost gutteral-sounding German, and the charming, romantic Spanish. Recog­ nizing the need for greater self-confidence in speaking, both public and private, it also offers a selection of courses in the area of speech, which serves to acquaint the student with public speaking, dramatics, and de­ bate. By working hand in hand, the divisions and sub­ divisions of the language and speech departments open the gateway to any number of specialized fields. The Humanities Division is staffed by adequate, dedicated professors, and is under the very able lead­ ership of Dr. Willis B. Dobson.

MAURINE DICKERSON Was treasurer of Senior Class at BNC where she received AB Degree-Also holds MA from O k l a h o m a A&M Col­ lege-Co-sponsors the ECHO -Loves to travel, which ac· counts for her hobbies of hik­ ing and bicycling.

WILLIS B. DOBSON Received PhD from University of Texas-Hobbies in­ clude playing piano, automobile styling-Dislikes are few, but include chewing gum ( somebody else's)­ Likes freshmen, cookies and ice cream, music, Shake­ speare and Richard Nixon.

NAOMI EMMEL A graduate of BNC-Received MA from Escuela Interameri­ cana De Verano-Claims mu­ sic and cooking as favorite hobbies-Has taught at NNC -Now on leave of absence for graduate study.

J. ROBERT EMMEL A graduate of ENC and the University of Oklahoma-Has taught at ENC-Hobbies in­ c}ude cooking (has collection of 1 2-1 5,000 recipes)-Enjoys youth work-Now on leave of absence for graduate study.

GERALDINE HUHNKE Received AB from NNC and MA from State Universitv of Iovva-Was member of va� sity debate squad - Likes to eat chocolate a n d go f i s h i n g­ Hobbies are figurine painting, embroidery, and trying new recipes.

ANNA BELLE LAUGHBAUM Holds AB from G r e e n v i l l e College, where she was asso­ ciate editor of yearbook and paper-Also has MA and PhD from University of Illinois­ Hobbies i n c l u d e t ra ve l i n g , writing, hiking, photography­ Sponsors Honor Society.

CAROL LUNDY Was s e c re t a r y o f S t u d e n t Council a t BNC where she received her AB-Also has MA from U n i v e r s i t y of Texas­ Sponsor of t h e A R R O W­ Hobbies are bicycle riding, reading modern literature, and collecting cups and saucers.

F a cu l t y BESSIE OLSON A graduate of John Fletcher College, received MA from U n iv e r s i tv o f O k l a h o m a­ Sponsors M ission Band-Hob­ bies include traveling, photog­ raphy, writing - Likes people -Dislikes students who want superior grades without work­ mg.

DORIS SCHUMANN Received AB i n S p e e c h a t BNC where she won Good Citizenship Award, and MA from Oklahoma University­ Serves as Head Hostess in d in­ ing hall and is the wife of resi­ dent counselor for Chapman Hall.

31

Social S e i ei1c e The Social Science Division has perhaps one of the most important tasks given to any division of a well­ rounded college educational system-the task of pre­ paring young people to live as members of a well-or­ ganized social unit, whether that unit be a family, com­ munity, state, nation or race. It strives to give to its students a proper perspective of life and the difficulties it presents. Covering almost every phase of living, from education to psychology, from business to home eco­ nomics, and from history and political science to sociol­ ogy, the department serves as the ladder up which one may climb to a better understanding of the role of his fellowman, as well as his own purpose in life. The Social Science Division necessarily offers a wide scope of intellectual pursuit, but with this breadth it has maintained the depth of academic ability neces­ sary for the proper guidance in its field. Its faculty members are well qualified for and devoted to their work and maintain a personal interest in their students. Excellent leadership is provided by Dr. Anne Greve, divisional chairman.

JESSE ANDERSON Graduate of BNC, where he majored in B u s i n e s s Educa­ tion - Did graduate work at University of Oklahoma-Ap­ preciates Christian atmosphere at BNC-Likes to play volley ball.

32

ANNE GREVE Holder of BA, MS, and PhD degrees-Was president of college class and assistant yearbook editor-Hobbies include traveling, cooking, water color painting-Is troubled by students who sign for courses wanting good grades, but not wanting to learn.

DONALD R. DANSKIN H o l d s AB f r o m N e b r a s k a State Teachers C o ll e ge and EdD from University of Okla­ homa-Likes to play volleyball -Enjoys Christian association at BNC-Also serves as Regis­ trar of the college.

FRED FLOYD PhD from Oklahoma U niver­ sity - Graduate of Pasadena, where he was vice-president of student body - Sponsors Sen­ ior Class and Social Science Club-Likes students and gar­ dening,

JAMES GARNER Holds AB from BNC where he was president of Student Council and Assistant Busi­ ness Manager of ARROW­ Received MA from Universitv of Oklahoma and PhD fr01;1 University of Iowa-Sponsors Prayer and Fasting League.

FORREST LADD Graduate of BNC where he edited the REVEILLE ECHO-Has done work to· ward PhD at University of Kansas-Sponsors Kansas City District Club- S p e n d s his spare time in his garden.

ELDRED LA DUE Received BS in Home Eco­ nomics from BNC ('53) Holds MS in Home Econom­ ics Education from University of Illinois - Hobbies include cooking, sewing, traveling, and photography. -

F a cu l t y WESLEY G. MOON Graduate of Houghton Col­ lege ('33)- Received EdM from University of Buffalo­ Native of New York State, but likes Oklahoma weather­ Reading, h u n t i n g a n d me­ chanics are hobbies.

JACK RAIRDON Received AB and ThB from BNC and MA from Univer­ sitv of Oklahoma-Member of Who's Who in American Col­ leges and Universities-Spon­ sor of Junior Class-Attends court trials for a hobby.

C. H. RIPPER Holds PhD in psychology from University of Iowa-Served as pastor for 14 years - Would like to have some spare time­ Dislikes action based on blind prejudice.

33

DOROTHY SHELDON Received AB from John Flet­ cher College and MA from U n ivers ity of M i c h i ga n ­ Sponsors N e b r a s k a District Club - H o b hi e s a r e t ext i l e painting, n a t u r e s t u d y , and reading - L i k e s p e o p l e and traveling - Dislikes juke box "music."

LAWRENCE SNELL Alumnus of BNC - Received MA from University of Okla­ homa- Claims r e a d i n g a n d p h ot o g r a p h y as h ob b i e s ­ Member of D e l t a P i S i l o n business fraternity.

VERNON SNOWBARGER Received PhD in S o c i o l o g y from University o f Southern California - Is prominent in youth work - Dislikes people being motivated by financial standing-Serves also as Dean of Students.

F a cul t y CONSTANCE SPRUCE A Texan who received her AB from the University of Texas and MA from St. Mary's Uni­ versity - Enjoys t r a v e l i n g ­ H o b b i e s i n c l u d e a rt s a n d crafts, reading - S p o n s o r of FTA and San Antonio Dis­ trict Club.

34

DON WILSON Holder of AB from BNC and EdM from University of Okla­ homa - Is sponsor of Mens' "B" Club and coordinator of all athletic events on campus -Claims carpentry as hobby.

F i .. e A r t s The fine arts form an important part of any well­ developed life as well as being a vital division of the curriculum of a liberal arts college. On the campus of Bethany Nazurene College, the Division of Fine Arts has for its purpose the educating of young people to carry on the program of fine arts in the church, the training of teachers in the field of fine arts, and the preparation of especially gifted students for entrance into graduate work. The fact that certain fine arts courses are required for graduation, regardless of the major field, only emphasizes the desire of the Fine Arts Division, with its departments of art and music, to bring about a better understanding and appreciation of the finer things in life by striving both for the appre­ ciation of the artistic expression of others and the en· couragement of individual creativeness. Under the leadership of Professor Lester Dunn, the division has a stabilizing effect on the activities of the campus, serving as a balance between the humdrum of our busy work-a-day world and the aesthetic dream world into which men and women sometimes allow themselves to escape.

RAY BOWMAN Received BS and MS from Kansas State College - Likes to be of help-Dislikes lack of beauty where it should be found-Pet peeve is irresponsi­ bility-Enjoys painting as a hobby.

LESTER DUNN Graduate of BNC ( ' 36 ) where h e was a member of college quartet for four years-Has studied voice in Europe-Sponsors Student Council-Dislikes waiting on people and the failure of some people to assume responsibility.

EUGENE CHAMBERS Alumnus of BNC (' 52 ) -Re­ ceived MMus from University of Wichita-Hobby is photog­ raphy-Served for two years as photographer of yearbook­ Pet peeve is poor performance because of lack of practice.

NAOMI DOBSON Holds diploma in voice from Olivet ( '29 ) -Student of Elizabeth Straitmiller and Os­ car Saenger-Among her hob­ bies are k n i t t i n g, b a k i n g­ Likes to try n e w r e c i p es­ Sponsor of Treble Choir.

35

MARGARET DUNN Received B F A f r o m B N C ( '42 ) where she was a member of Phi Delta Lambda-Hob­ bies include collecting recipes, vases, bookends, and pictures -Likes friendly people-Dis­ likes waiting.

BETTY PAGAN Obtained her BMus d e gree from BNC, where she was ac­ tive in the orchestra and Music Club - Her daughter, Melva Joy, takes up most of her spare time, but she enjoys reading and listening to good records.

KEITH PAGAN Earned B M u s E d d e g ree at BNC where he was president of Music C l u b - R e c e i v e d MMusEd from University of Oklahoma - S p o ns o r s B a n d and Orchestra - Likes tinker­ ing as a hobby-Dislikes tardi­ ness.

F a cul t y ESTHER SAXON Graduate of George Peabody College-Enjoys reading, pen­ cil drawing, and cooking ( spe­ cializes in apple pies ) - Dis­ likes students who have time for everything but studying.

36

RUTH TAYLOR A graduate of BNC and Okla­ homa City University - Was college c l a s s s e c r e t a r y and choir accompanist-S p o n s o rs Northwest Oklahoma District Club-Likes people, ice cream, spare time - Dislikes narrow garage doors.

Ph ilosophy and R e l i g i o .. "Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested." These words of advice from Sir Francis Bacon, although applicable to every other department as well, are especially full of meaning to students in the Division of Philosophy and Religion. The Philosophy and Religion Division is concerned with the ethical, cultural, and spiritual development of its students. Through every phase of the instruction it offers, it stresses tolerance and clear thinking, and en­ deavors to instill into the thinking of its students the desire to search for the truth. A strong religious emphasis was part of the basic foundation of the college, and philosophy has come into importance, also. It is the purpose of this division, under the leadership of Dr. L. C. Philo, to fuse together the principles of philosophy and religion, forming a core around which men and women might prepare themselves for useful service.

HAROLD B . HOYT Alumnus of BNC ( '40 ) where he was C o l l e g e M a rs h a l l , member o f Student Council and Honor S o c i e t y - Holds DRE from Southwestern Bap­ tist Theological S e m i n a ry ­ Sponsors G os p e l Team and Abilene District Club.

L. C. PHILO Graduate of University of Michigan with DD from God's Bible School-Has served as pastor, district sup­ erintendent, and evangelist in this country and foreign fields-Likes the spiritual emphasis of the college and all students.

J. PRESCOTT JOHNSON Received AB and MS from Kansas State Teachers College -Now doing graduate work toward PhD-On leave of ab­ sence to instruct in Depart­ ment of Philosophy at U ni­ versity of Oklahoma, second semester.

37

W. N. KING Received AB, ThB from Pasa­ dena-Also holds MA, STM, and STD degrees-Is a native of Canada- Hobbies include Greek and Latin poetry.

ORVAL McDANIEL Holder of MS, AB, ThB, and BD degrees - G r a d u a t e o f Nazarene Theological Semin­ ary ( ' 5 5)- Sponsors ECHO, Arkansas District Club, Re­ ligious Organizations Council -Hobbies are books, teaching, and traveling.

F a cu l t y DONALD METZ Holds degrees from Evangeli­ cal and Reformed Seminary, University of Maryland, and Southwestern B a p t i s t Theo­ logical Seminary - S p o n s o rs Ministerial As so cia tion - En­ j oys playing golf and garden­ mg.

38

ROBERT L. SAWYER A graduate of ENC, Nazarene TI1eological S e m i n a ry, a n d Central Baptist S em i n a ry­ Now working on ThD-Was president of Senior Class in college-Hobbies include mu­ sic (piano and organ ) , house planning and decoration.

N a t u_ r a l S e i e :n c e The college student of today is preparing himself to face a world that is doubtless in the most exciting period of exploration and advancement of all time. Especially is this true in the field of natural science, with great strides being made yearly in the field of medicine, with man's knowledge expanding farther and farther beyond this planet into the universe, and with the advances which have been made in the study of the smallest world of all, the atom. This vast progress has made it necessary for a well­ informed individual to have some knowledge of the progress being made; the Natural Science Division has for its task the educating of young people in the fields of mathematics, chemistry, physics, and biology so that they might be qualified to take their places in this always expanding world in which we live. Under the capable leadership of Prof. Robert Lawrence, the fac­ ulty of the department is endeavoring to keep pace with the world of today, and to prepare their students for the world of tomorrow.

DON BEAVER Graduate of BNC, where he w a s p r e si d e n t of S t u d e n t Council - Received MS and PhD in chemistry from Okla­ homa A&M College-Sponsors Chemistry Club and Freshman Class - C l a i ms woodworking as hobby.

ROBERT LAWRENCE Was graduated from ENC-Received MA from Bos­ ton University, has done graduate work at Oklahoma A&M-Is a biological science enthusiast who enjoys hunting and fishing.

EARL GREER Received AB f r o m O l i v e t ( ' 32) where h e was vice presi­ dent of Senior Class and PhD from University of Oklahoma -Has taught at Bresee Col­ lege-Sponsors Dallas District Club.

39

EMMETT HAMMER Received A B f r o m J o h n Fletcher C o llege a n d M A from Kansas University-Likes to play golf-Dislikes imma足 ture c o l l eg e s t u d e n ts and shoes with taps.

GLENN KEYS E a r n e d B S a n d MA a t George Peabody College. Is sponsor of Sophomore Class足 Pet peeve is 7:30 classes-Hob足 bies are swimming, water ski足 ing, and horses.

F a cul t y

Pre-Med students Gordon Beckett and Paul Edmonds make an exploratory operation into the interior of 11Mortimer Muscle/' who seems to feel no pain.

40

Li bra ry An important spot on the campus of an institution of learning is the library. Especially is this true at Bethany Nazarene College, where research for weekly themes, tem1 papers, senior papers, and other research projects seems to be an almost never-ending process. This type of work is a necessary part of an education, and to do it would be impossible without the assistance of a well equipped library. The library of BNC contains well over 34,000 volumes, which cover almost every field and make it possible to do most of the required research right on the campus, instead of searching through the unfamiliar stacks of books in other libraries. A complete collection of the current issues of periodicals covering most areas is supplemented by a collection of bound volumes of these periodicals, some of which date back to the nineteenth century. A collec­ tion of over three hundred phonograph records makes it possible for students to enjoy the greatest musical works of all time, as well as enabling those interested in the foreign languages to practice the translation and enunci­ ation of words and phrases with the help of recordings made by natives of that tongue. Under the leadership of Miss Kathryn Paschall, a quali­ fied staff of librarians strive to give courteous, efficient, and prompt service to members of the student body and faculty alike.

KATHRYN PASCHALL Holder of AB, BS, and MA degrees-Gradu­ ate of Trevecca, where she was business manager of "Trev-Echoes"-Likes symphonies and eating­ Pet Peeve is people who are discourteous and unthoughtful of others.

Assista nt Librarians Molly Copeland and Grace Twining lend a

Changing the b u lletin board display req uires the full attention

helping hand to Grace Wallace and Reba Keys.

of Library assistants Eva Wheeler, Jeanette Cobb, Loy Williams, a nd Donna Danskin.

41

Re s idenc e C o u..-.s e l o r s

MR. AND MRS. GLENN KEYS Chapman Hall

MRS. ALICE RAY Jernigan Hall

MR. AND MRS. JESS ANDERSON Fanning Hall

42

MRS. OLIVE WRIGHT Bud Robinson Hall

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD SCHUMANN Chapman Hall

C aiDp u. s P e:r s o n.n e l

MRS. KATIE DREWRY Dietitian

MRS. JULIA WYATT School Nurse

MR. MAR YIN SIMPSON Superintendent of Grounds 43

Class Officers H oward Oliver Irma Garnand Donna Burns

_____________________

President

Vice-President

_________________

Secretary

_______________________

Clifton McNabb ..:------- �----------Treasurer Bob Viser

__________________________

Roy Simpson

Chaplain

Student Council Representative

____

Dr. Fred Floyd

______________________

Sponsor

A truck bed covered with hay provided transportation to the Senior steak fry.

Sen iors C l a s s o i 1957 Four short years ago, the class of 1957 arrived on the campus of BNC. Amid sighs and pains of home­ sickness, they began the radical adjustment from high school to college. The Sophomores, determined to make the transition to college life as difficult as pos­ sible, had charge of their initiation. The day dawned with the skies dripping. The hour was early and the participants were ill-clad for their tasks, but at the end of the day the windows of the Student Union Build­ ing were much cleaner than when the day began. Among the first of many activities was the class "Tacky Party" in the Drag. The Freshman banquet was built around an appropriate theme-"Springtime in a Gar­ den," and brought to a fitting close the activities of an inexperienced class which had learned much in two short semesters. A summer vacation later, full of plans, and excited by the possibilities offered by a new year, friends were reunited on the campus. Remembering the rigorous experience of initiation through which they had gone, the class, now Sophomores, presented a preview of college life to the new class of typically green Freshmen and later served refreshments by way of initiation of this class into the routine and ways of college life. The high­ light of the Sophomore year was the long awaited out­ ing at Price's Falls. Studies, assignments, term papers, tests, fancy clothes, and worries were tossed aside and forgotten for a whole clay while the wonders of nature were enjoyed. 46

At the outset of the Junior year, a fall party was planned at Lake Overholser, where everyone enjoyed a wiener roast followed by a hay rack ride. "Neptune's Gardens" provided the setting for the Junior -Senior banquet, with Dr. H oward Hamlin as the guest speaker. The Seniors, returning the favor, entertained the Jun­ iors later at a breakfast. The beginning of the Senior year found the class members with a sigh in their hearts as they realized that this year would bring to an end their college life at BNC. Class meetings were used to discuss such important things as the class gift, graduation announce­ ments, Senior trip, and graduation. The project was the landscaping and be a u t i f i c a tio n of the campus around the Student Union Building and, as an addi­ tional project, money was sent to British Guiana to be used for the construction of a chapel there. The last weeks of the year were full ones. Such things as the Junior-Senior Banquet, the Senior-Faculty breakfast, the Senior chapel program, and the Senior prayer meet­ ing in the College C,hurch were climaxed with the Baccalaureate service, Ivy Ring ceremony, and finally, commencement. Now the formal preparation has ended and the practical application has begun. The class of '57 will leave the campus, but the spirit and enthusiasm of BNC will remain in the hearts of each of its mem­ bers as they fill their places in life.

S e .. i o r s ROBERT ATKINSON, Centerview, Mis足 souri; AB, P h i l os o p h y and Religion; Gospel Team, Prayer and Fasting. HELEN AUSTIN, Minneapolis, Kansas; AB, Music.

HAROLD ALLEN, Lubbock, Texas; AB, Business; A C ap p e l l a , M us i c Club, Honor Society.

CHARLES BALDWIN, Bethany, Okla足 homa; AB, Religion.

ROBERT ALLEN, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Business Administration; Business Club, Mens' "B" Club.

GORDON B E C K E TT , C h a rl e s t o n , West Virginia; AB, Biology; Biology Club.

H ENRY ARNETT, B e t h a n y , O k l a 足 homa; AB, Religion; Band, Orchestra. NORMA ATKINSON, Centerview, Mis足 souri; BS, Education; Gospel Team, Prayer and Fasting.

48

1957 L U C R E T I A C A R T E R , Enid, Okla­ homa; BS, E l e m en t a ry Education; Honor Society, FTA, Social Science Club, ECHO staff, Prayer and Fast­ ing, Mission Band, Oratorio Chorus. HORACE CLASSEN, Star, Idaho; AB, Mathematics.

MARY LOU BOND, May, Oklahoma; BS, Elementary Education; FTA, Mis­ sion Band, Prayer and Fasting, College Queen, Dorm Council.

TERRY CONNALLY, LaJunta, Colo­ rado; AB, R e l i g i o n ; Mission Band, Prayer and Fasting.

DONNA BOND BURNS, K a l v e s t a , Kansas·' B S E l e m e n t a ry Education; FTA, P r a er a n d F a s ti n g , Gospel Team, Class Secretary.

y

JOSEPHINE COOK, Watonga, Okla­ homa; BS, Home Economics; Home Ec Club, FTA, Gospel Team.

JERRY BURNS, Kalvesta, Kansas; AB, Religion; Prayer and Fasting, Gospel Team. BOB CAMPBELL, E d i n b u r g , Texas; BS, Elementary Education.

49

S e -n i o :r s NANCY DAVIS, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Education. MARJORIE DILL, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Education.

TOMMY COOKSEY, Jonesboro, Ark­ ansas; AB, R e l i g i o n ; B a n d , M a l e Chorus, Mission Band, Ministerial As­ sociation.

JACK DRISCOLL, Salina, Kansas; AB, Religion.

M O L L Y C O P E L A N D , Bentonville, Arkansas; BS, Elementary Education; FTA, Honor Society, Mission Band, Prayer and Fasting.

PAUL EDMONDS, B e th a n y , O k l a ­ homa; BS, Science; Chemistry Club, Mission Band, Honor Society, Philos­ ophy Club, Class president, Who's Who.

CHARLES DANNER, Bethany, Okla­ homa; AB, Philosophy. DORIS DAVIS, B e th a n y , Oklahoma; BS, Elementarv Education; Honor So­ ciety, A Cappella, Mixed Chorus, Biol­ ogy Club, Class Cheerleader.

50

1957 LOU ANN FOX, Duncan, Oklahoma; BS, Elementary Education; A Cappel­ la, Mission Band, FTA, College Queen, Trio. HAROLD FRANKLIN, D e l t a , C o l o ­ rado; AB, Religion; M i s s i o n B a n d , Prayer and Fasting, Ministerial Asso­ ciation.

ROGER EGERTON, B e t h a n y, Okla­ homa; BS, Business.

IRMA LEE GARNAND, Bethany, Okla­ homa; BS, E l e m e n t a ry Education; FTA, Honor Society, Mission Band, Class Vice-President.

VIOLA ESKRIDGE, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; BS, Elementary Education.

HELEN GOETZ, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Elementary Education.

RUTH FIKA, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Elementary Education; Gospel Team. PHYLLIS FISHER, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Business; Business Club.

51

S e .. i o r s CHARLES HARPER, Kansas City, Mis­ souri; AB, Speech; Stuqent Council President, Class President, Philosophy Club, Honor Society, Who's Who. BILLY JOE HARRIS, Denison, Texas; BS, P h y s i c al Ed.; "B" Club, FTA, Football and Basketball, School ath­ letic director, ARROW Staff ( Busi­ ness Manager ) .

VONCIEL GORDON, Bethany, Okla­ homa; BS, Business Education; Busi­ ness Club, FTA, Mission Band, Wom­ en's "B" Club.

JOHN HENDRICKS, Topeka, Kansas; AB, R e l i g i o n - P h i l o s o p h y; Mission Band, Philosophy Club.

TED GOULDE N, Marshall, Texas; BS, Biology; B imd, O r ch e s t r a , Biology Club, Mission Band, Prayer and Fast­ mg .

ROBERT H ENDRICKS; O k l a h o m a City, Oklahoma; AB, Math .

JO ANN HALE, Lubbock, Texas; BS, Elementary E d u c a t i o n ; FTA, Class Cheerleader, Mixed Chorus, Biology Club, Prayer and Fasting.

·

G E O R G E H A N , Seoul, Korea; BS, Biology.

52

1957 DELORES JANTZ, N e w t o n , Kansas; BMusEd, Church Music. REBA KEYS, Canon City, Colorado; AB, English; FTA, Prayer and Fast­ ing, Gospel Team, Mission Bane!.

KENDALL HIGHT, Carl Junction, Mis­ souri; BS, Education; FTA, Football, Basketball.

PETER KIM, S e o u l , K o r e a ; AB, Re­ ligion.

CLIFFIE H ILL, Bethany, Oklahoma; AB, English.

NORWOOD KING, Gueydan, Louisi­ ana; AB, Religion.

BOBBY HOOVER, Mt. Vernon, Texas; BS, Physical Education. DEAN HORTON, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Biology; Biology Club, FTA, Mens' "B" Club, Football and Basketball All-Star teams, Mixed Chorus, A Cap­ pella, Heart Pal King.

53

S e u_ i o r s MELVA KNIPPERS, Many, Louisiana; BS, Elementary Education, FTA, Gos­ pel Team, Mission Band, Prayer and Fasting. BILLY LAMBERT, Blytheville, Arkan­ sas; AB, Religion.

SHIRLEY KING, West Helena, Arkan­ sas; BS, Education.

JOHN LEPPER, Bethany, Oklahoma; AB, History.

KENNETH KLEMME, E n i d , Okla­ homa; BMusEd, Church Music; Male Choir, Mission Band, Band, Prayer and Fasting.

JOHN LINNELL, Bethany, Oklahoma; AB, Business and Economics.

MERLYN KLINK, Bethany, Oklahoma; AB, Religion; Honor Society. LESTER KNIGHT, M i n e ra l Wells, Texas; AB, Music; Music Club, Prayer and Fasting, College Quartet, A Cap­ pella, Student Council, ECHO staff ( B u s i n es s M a n a ge r ) , Who's Who (two years ) .

54

19贈S 7 DON MARTIN, Bethany, Oklahoma; AB, Religion; Male Choir. YVONNE MERCER, Bethany, Okla足 homa; BS, Elementary Education.

KENNETH LUTHER, Peniel, Texas; AB, Religion.

SUE MERRILL, Marshall, Texas; AB, English; L i t e r a ry S o c i e t y , Student Council, E C H O ( E d i t or), Who's \Vho, Prayer arid F a s t i n g, M is s i o n Band.

JEAN McELYEA, Crockett, Texas; BS, Elementary E d u c a t i o n ; FT A, "B" Club, Dorm Council, Mixed Chorus, All-School athletic director, Basketball, All-School cheerleader, ECHO staff, ARROW staff ( Associate Editor).

ORVILLE MOBLEY, Sapulpa, Okla足 homa; AB, Religion.

CLIFTON McNABB, \"!ellington, Tex足 as; BS, Chemistry; Chemistry Club, "B" Club, H on o r S o c i e t y , Class Treasurer. BOB MADISON, Jasper, Alabama; AB, Religion; Ministerial Association, "B" Club, All-Star football team.

55

S e n. i o r s HOWARD OLIVER, Newt�n, Kansas; BMusEd, Music; A Cappella, Band, Men's "B" Club, Class President, Stu­ dent Council Vice-President, Who's Who, Heart Pal King. MONTE PAGE, H a y s , K a n s a s ; AB, Religion .

HAROLD \iVAYNE MOORE, Well­ ington, Texas; AB, Speech; All-Star football team.

JOSEPH PENQUITE, M i n n ea p o l i s , Kansas; AB, Religion and Philosophy; Band, Mission Band, Prayer and Fast­ ing, Ministerial Association .

JAMES MOORE, Hot Springs, Arkan­ sas; AB, Religion.

RODNEY P ITTS, Lake Charles, Louisi­ ana; AB, Religion.

FRANCIS XAVIER MUTTOO, Brit­ ish Guiana; AB, R el i g i o n ; Mission Band. DEAN NEFF, P h i l l i p s , T e xa s ; A B , Church Music and Religious Educa­ tion; Gospel Team, Men's "B" Club, A Cappella, Basketball, Football, Col­ lege Quartet.

56

1957 ROSALIE ROSE, Aline, Oklahoma; AB, Commercial Art; Prayer and Fasting, Mission Band. HARRY SCHOENHALS, Darrouzett, Texas; AB, Religion; Ministerial As­ sociation.

CAROLYN PUCKETT, Lafe, Arkansas; BS, E l e m e n t a ry E d u c a t i o n ; FTA, Prayer and Fasting, Gospel Team.

ARDITH SCHULER, Ness City, Kan­ sas; BS, Elementary Education; FTA, Mixed Chorus, Gospel Team.

FRANKLIN R O B E R T S , O k l a h o m a City, Oklahoma; BMusEd, Music Edu­ cation and Church Music.

ROY SIMPSON, Kansas City, Missouri; AB, Art; Biology Club, Student Coun­ cil ( Vice President ) , W h o ' s W h o , ARROW Staff, ECHO Staff ( Photog­ rapher ) .

RAMON ROBERTSON, Meade, Kan­ sas; AB, Religion. KENNETH ROGERS, Post, Texas; AB, Religion; A Cappella.

57

Seniors FLOYD SUMNER, B e th a n y, O k l a 足 homa; AB, Religion. lOLA SUMNER, Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Home Economics.

FRANK SKILLERN, B e t h a n y , Okla足 homa; AB, Religion.

VERNON SWIM, Hutchinson, Kansas; AB, Religion; "B" Club, Honor So足 ciety, Ministerial Association, All-Star basketball team.

ROY SLOAN, Cleveland, Kansas; AB, Religion; Male Chorus.

NORMAN TIBBETTS, Bethany, Okla足 homa; AB, Religion.

DIXIE SMITH, Carl Junction, Missouri; BS, E l e m e n t a ry E d u c a t i o n ; FTA, Heart Pal Queen. CHARLES STRAWN, B orger, Texas; AB, Religion; Student Council ( Vice President).

58

19ri 7 GRACE WALLACE, Bethany, Okla­ homa; BS, E l e m e n t a r y Education; Trio, Prayer and Fasting. LEVOY WALLACE, Birmingham, Ala­ bama; AB, P s y c h o l ogy; Prayer and Fasting, Ministerial Association.

JIM TRACY, Kansas City, M i s s o ur i ; AB, Religion.

D O R I S WEST, Alvin, Texas; A B , Speech; FTA, Literary Society, Dorm Council, Prayer and Fasting.

MARION TRUAX, San Antonio, Texas; AB, Social Science; Music Club, Prayer and Fasting, Gospel Team, Class Sec­ retary, Class Cheerleader.

EVA WHEELER, C oy l e , Oklahoma; BS, Elementary Education; FTA, Mis­ sion Band.

FORREST TYLER, C h i! t o n , Texas; AB, Religion. BOB VISER, Dallas, . Texas; BS, Ele­ mentary E cl u ca t i o n ; Gospel Team, Prayer and Fasting, FTA, A Cappella, Student C o u n c i l , C l a s s c h a pl a i n , Dorm chaplain.

59

S e n. i o r s

1957

J U L I A C LA R K W H I T E , Bethany, Oklahoma; AB, Speech. FLOE WILLIAMS, Akron, Ohio; AB, Speech.

V I R G I N I A \iV I L L I A M S , Bethany, Oklahoma; BS, Home Economics. WANDA W I L L I A M S , Tyler, Texas; BS, Economics and Business; Honor Society, Business Club, Student Coun足 cil.

JACK IMEL, L a w r e n c e , Kansas; AB, Social Science; Honor Society, Quar足 tet, Class athletic director, A Cappella, All-Star Basketball, Men's "B" Club. HENRY ZALETA, Pittsburg, Pennsyl足 vania; AB, Religion .

60

C l ass Offic e rs Gary Hartpence Dene Simpson Ramona Davis

_ __ _ _ _ ______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _______ _ _ _ _ _ _

David Philo Jack Rairdon

Vice-President

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Delores Wellmon Buddy Emmert

President

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ __

!_ ______ _ _ _ _ _

Secretary

Treasurer

Student Council Representative

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Chaplain

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________

Sponsor

Preparations for the J u n ior-Senior banquet are made by Kathy Snowberger, Oletha Ludwig, and Alma Smith.

J .. n i o r s

C l a s s o i 195S One autumn day in 1 954 there appeared on the campus of BNC a group of bewitched, bothered, and bewildered young people. That group was destined to become the graduating class of 1 958. Most of the original group are still here, bewitched, bothered, and, perhaps, even more bewildered, but they have com­ pleted their third year of college life. From the first glimpse of the "Welcome Fresh­ men ! " sign, the members of the class felt that they were a part of a great organization and were deter­ mined to leave a lasting mark in the record books of the school. They plunged into the hustle and bustle of registration with the realization that more was in­ volved than the mere filling in of innumerable blanks : the choices they made would have a lasting effect upon their lives. The first week was a fuB one, climaxed by the Get-Acquainted Sock Party in the gym. The class soon settled clown to the business of getting an edu­ cation, and the ever present term papers, exams, and countless pages of outside readings kept them more than busy. The girls took time that year to demonstrate their outstanding b a s k e tb a l l ability, however, and found themselves in possession of the first place trophy in the Reveille Echo tournament. The year was brought to an exciting close with the Freshman Banquet, with Oklahoma's governor, Raymond Gary, as guest speaker. The class members and their guests spent two delight­ ful hours among the Hawaiian palm trees, moonlight, and music before the final "Aloha" brought the eve­ ning to an end.

62

Returning for its second year at BNC, the class was full of plans for a new type of initiation for the incom­ ing Frosh. T11e plan met with the approval of the faculty and students alike, and has become a tradition on the campus. The big event of the year was the long awaited outing at Price's Falls, where the class spent the clay wading, hiking, skating, riding horseback, play­ ing softball, or indulging in a variety of other pastimes. This, the Junior year, was a big one for this class which had come so far in so short a time. At last the class members were able to get away from the "gen­ eral education core" and to enrol in some courses of their own choice. T11e Junior Lyceum, a three-act play entitled "The Barretts," was presented, and proved to be an accomplishment well worth the time and effort it required. Class meetings were important ones, with the preparations for the Junior-Senior banquet the most urgent items of business. The banquet theme, "Up the Lazy River," and the speaker, Mr. Leo Winter, Secre­ tary of the Oklahoma State Senate, proved to be a com­ bination to be long remembered. The years past have been Huitful ones, for the class can count among its members many of the leaders of campus life. However, the class cannot longer capitalize on past glories. T11e future stretches out ahead, and another year of preparation is necessary before the mem­ bers of this group will be ready to properly fill their plac�s in the world in which they live.

Juniors

Frank Baldwin Oletha Ludwig and Pat Swigart make careful preparations for their

Lo11 ell Bell

joint Speech-Voice recita l.

Eleanor Bond Glen Bond B illie Bonner Marv Burdine Glenn Burnett

\Vcslev Burpo Lavona Butler Don Carleton Don Carney Conrad Carrigan

Bill Conger Amelia Coose Oscar Coston Gcnell Crawford Thea! Crews

Forrest Cunningham !\senath Davenport Ramona Davis Doris DeVore Rebecca Dorris

I

Mary Drake Buddy Emmert Don Firestone Don Fitzgerald Ellen Fitzgerald

Doyle Frazier Dale Gardner Marge Gentz Julia Gildersleeve Bertha Gill

Bill Gooden Martha Hall Ann Hamiter Dean Harder Gary Hartpence

Jene Henderson Vera Herron Janett Higdon Ruth Hines Frankie Holland

Eldridge Hudgins Clarence Jennings

Talmadge Johnson Wendell Jones Homecoming Queen, lou Ann Fox, and her court, Mary Burdine, Genell Crawford, Pat Swigart, Vera Winters, and Oletha ludwig, harmonize to the tune of "The Old Piano Ro ll B lues."

Juniors

Edward Lee Koonce Using knowledge gained in Crafts C lass, Frankie H o l land and Melva Knippers help decorate the Col lege C h u rch for C h ristmas.

LaVerta Lane \Vayne Lawton Richard Leffel Richy Lewis Kenneth Long

Oletha Ludwig Eugene IVIcElyea Mary Lou McGraw Laura McNames Bobbie Meador

Eddie l\ Iiller Sharon !\ Iiller Lloyd l\ lillikin GypsY Nehrbass Bryan Newlon

Ruth Norman I larry

Oxford

Esther Ozias Barbara Peacock John Peard

Paul Lana

Delaine Perkins Charles Phillips Stanley Phillips David Philo Harry Pierce

Ruth Pierce Coy Presson Beverley Price John Rawls Joyce Ripper

Delta Rogers Ed Rowley Hiram Sanders LaVeta Sargent Dene Simpson

Shirley Simpson Bill Sipes Alma Smith Katherine Snowbarger LaDonna Sparks

Jim Paul Stewart Doyle Strother

Richard Stump Pat Swigart Dale Meesey gives close attention to the steaks he is preparing for the h ungry Seniors at their steak fry.

J n n i o :r s

Making preparations for the a n n u a l Heart Pal Banquet are Don Fitz足 gerald, Eunice Reep, Zola Lankford, Dot C lark and Tal Johnson.

Allen Taylor Janet Taylor Clair Uitts Melvin Unruh Gwen Walker

Deletta Washburn Phillip Washburn Dolores \Vellmon John A. Westmoreland Johnny Westmoreland

Wesley Weston W. F. White Orin Wilkins JoAnn Williams Lois Wimberley

Vera Ruth Winter Bob Womack Robert Woody Charles Zechman

Shirley Tabor

Class Officers Wesley Henry

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

Ronald Barlow

________________

Naomi Kornelsen Mary Loganbill Verla Oke

President

Vice-President

Secretary �---------Treasurer

_ _ _____________ _ ___

___

.:._______

Student Council Representative

______

Dwight Southworth Glenn Keys

_________________

Chaplain

_________________________

Sponsor

Jo Howard a nd Wesley H e n ry are presented the a l l-round Freshmen awards by Dean Snowberger.

S o p h o iD o :r e 8 C l a 8 8 o i 19ri9 Last September, seasoned - veterans from the "Fresh­ men War of 1956" began moving back into the old battle area of B. N. C. as the struggle for knowledge was resumed. This time, in place of jittery recruits up for the first fight, the mental giants of the class of ' 59, who now knew "the ropes" of this type of war, quickly plunged into the fray and had all books and professors in full retreat before the first week was over. Soldiers from every dusty part of the Great Plains enthusiasti­ cally joined in the quelling of any uprising any aggres­ sor might begin. The first skirmish of the year was with the ever­ eager freshmen. The "beanie-wearers" decided they could lick the Sophs in their favorite, basketball; the young upstarts proceeded to do just that and earned the right to be full-fledged members of the Bethany Naza­ rene College student body. The All-School Banquet brought the naming of Jo Howard and Wesley Henry as the all-around freshmen "soldiers" of 1956. As December appeared with its happy times, all bachelors were abruptly brought face to face with "Twirp Week"-that time when all unattached fe­ males drag out their man-catching tricks and go male­ hunting. Then the spirit of Christmas hit the campus. Students began to think more of parties and vacations and less of books. To keep in the joyful spirit of the season, a Sophomore Christmas Party was given com­ plete with a casket and corpse as a door prize. The

70

successful party set the mood for the long-awaited Christmas vacation. The semester ended with a sound thrashing of term papers and exams, and one-half of the year's battle was won. The second semester began on a promising note as the "blue and whites" showed their basketball prow­ ess to the other classes. The season was climaxed as the polished Sophs ran up a record score in defeating the Junior five in the consolation game of the Echo Tourn­ ament. Added to the class social events of the year was a skating party in February immensely enjoyed by all who attended. From this time on, all Sophomore thoughts turned to the one giant event of the year-the Sophomore Outing. Suddenly it was here and gone, but not for­ gotten-not at all. Who could forget the scenic beauties of Camp Classen, the appetizing meals prepared by "Chef" Lawrence and his helpers, or the many other unforgettable events of that May morning with the unlimited possibilities for a good time? Although another battle for knowledge had been won as the class of ' 59 finished their second skirmish, the fight for a diploma was not finished. Only one-half of the war had been won. Even as they were leaving for home and summer vacation, plans were being for­ mulated for their Junior Year-plans in harmony with the class motto, "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom."

Sophomores

Lue Anna Allen Under the close scrutiny of Stewart Downey, Bob C h i ld ress, and ref足 eree Dwight Southworth, Soph Verla Oke crosses the finish line in fi rst p lace in the potato relay at the Frosh initiation.

Ronald Arnold Tom Bach Mary Barker Ronald Barlow Vernon Beckett

Esther Bergen Gerald Bergen Betty Jo Blystone Charles Bohannan Bill Boles

Ruth Bonner Janette Bostick Donivan Bounds Milton Boydstun Nita Ruth Brewer

Jim Burgner Margaret Burns Wallace Cantrell Lynn Carr Roy Case

. 72.

C. L. Armstrong

Henry Cheatwood Glen Chestnut Bob Childress Jim Christy Nola Ruth Cinnamon

D;rothy Clark Carna Cole Bob Cox Stephen Cullison Waynetta Cummins

James Daniel Donna Danskin Carolyn Daugherty Delbert Dayhoff Jack Dempsey

Viola DeVore S tewart Downey Gaylord Elam Pat Easley Steve Eatmon

Doyle Ellis Joanne Fenno

Marlene Forshee David Galbraith Biology mojor Bob Woods performs a tonsi llectomy on the Science Department's pet cat, Tom.

73

Sophomores

Nita Brewer and Ben Sherrill seem to find something very amusing i n "watching the birdie."

Ann Garner Martha Gibson Thelma Gifford Joyce Gordon Marsha Gorman

Ken Granger Vincent Greer Billy Grimes Daisy Hailman Anita Hammer

Duane Harder Clarence Hawkins Wesley Henry Robert Hensley Joyce Holland

Gerald Holley Charles Hoover Richard Honaker Jo Howard Jacquel in Hoxsey

74

Gene Galbraith Robbie Gardner

Kenneth Hughes Orlando Jantz Glenda Jernigan Linda SLie Johnson Paul Johnson

Jane Johnston Karen Jones LeRoy Jones Barbara Kane Dwain Kelley

John Killfoil Naomi Kornelsen G.

W Kotwitz Jerry Lambert Zola Lankford

Joy Dee Lehman James Lewis Jo Lindsley Harry Logan Mary Loganbill

Donna Lolmaugh Bennette Luinstra

Other Lybarger Evelyn f\ lcGuire A "hen pa rty" i n the Drag breaks the monotony of a day of study.

Sophomores

Wh ile Glenn Burnett looks sadly at his empty coffee cup, John Shocklee makes the best of the lack of si lver by eating his cereal with his knife. Their situation was caused by the removal of forks and spoons from the dining h a l l .

Paul Marshall Gene rviartin Stanley Meek Dale Meesey Rosalia Miley

Albert Miller Barbara Miller James Miranda Elizabeth Mishler Arlene Moore

Bill Morris Jim Motsinger Richard Mountford Sammye Nesmith James Noggles

John Norell Robert Norton Verla Oke Ronnie Orr Lorrene Owens

7(,

Louis McNabb Billie Ruth McNair

Jane Parker Julia Penny Don Pierce Virginia Potter George Powell

Connie Price Joyce Ransom Carolyn Rea Eunice Reep Mary Lou Reeves

George Richey LeRoy Ripper Delbert Sargent Cecil Schwenke Sally Seachord

John Shocklee Rachel Smith Sharon Smith Ronald Snowbarger Don Soule

Dwight Southworth Shirley Statzer

Ray Stiverson

William Strange After a hard week in the c lassroom, Miss Dickerson, Mrs. Lundy, Mrs. Taylor and Miss Pasch a l l relax with a Saturday morning bicycle trip.

Kay Strawn Roger Strong Joanne Stroud Paul Stroud Donna Strutz

Carl Summer Gary Taylor Waneta Taylor Dale Tiry Grace Twining

David Uh Don Vail Isa Wallace Jeanette Ware Clifton Watson

Nadine Watson Obed Watters Shirlene Webb Dale Webster Lana Mae Wheatley

Bob Wheeler Loy Wi!Ji<�ms Doris Woods Bob Woods Vivian Woods

Clyde Wynn Lina Yakle Richard Young Marlene Ziebarth

-

� T U R llf rTI..E S :Ks

\

I 1

Fr e s h m e n

Class Officers Danny Steele

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ ______

President

Duane Yoesel ---------------�-Vice-President Nancy Meesey

_____________________

Secretary

Faith McClung -------'------------Treasurer Jo B urdine Earl Baker

_____

Student Council Representative

_________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Dr·. Don Beaver

Chaplain

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Sponsor

A sack-blowing and cracker-eating contest provided much a musement at the Frosh Western party.

F :r e s h i.-. e n. C l a s s o i 196 0 Like strange objects from outer space, unknown forces which proved to be the Freshman class of 1957 appeared upon the campus of BNC. Like the green men from Mars, enthusiastic, eager, and confused, the Freshmen pulled out their ray guns and shot right into the "hub hub" of enlistment. Among their first offi­ cial acts was the selection of Dr. Don Beaver to navi­ gate their path through the fog of the unknown-their first year in college. Almost immediately after their arrival, the Fresh­ men found themselves amidst names and faces very unfamiliar at the all-school Get Acquainted party. It took only a short time for them to get acquainted, how­ ever, and soon they were sporting green beanie caps supplied by the Sophs as part of the initiation into this strange world of college life. During the week of initi­ ation, the Frosh became quite proficient at such things as eating breakfast on the floor with the aid of only a knife. On the big day when they had a chance to strike back at the Sophs through competition in soft­ ball, relay races, etc., they piled up enough points to remove the beanies, and become full-fledged members of the BNC family. The Frosh soon plunged into the social aspects of campus life, beginning with the annual "Twirp Week," which was interesting to watch, seeing the boys make themselves available and the girls just happening to drop by to make the dates . The first big event in the college careers of these new students came with the 80

Christmas banquet when, with all beauty and loveli­ ness, the girls, clad in layers of ruffles and surrounded with the sweet fragrance of corsages, were escorted by dinner-jacketed dates who charmed them with their manliness and dignity. The beginning of the second semester found the Freshmen full of plans for an exciting conclusion to their first year of college life. Cowboy hats, boots, spurs, and full western regalia were in evidence at the West­ ern party at the Youth Center. Following close on the heels of this was Heart Pal week with all of its surprises. \iVith much enthusiasm and the determination to write its name in the record books, the Frosh basketball team surprised the upperclassmen with its strength, and battled its way into second place in the Echo Tourna­ ment. Winding up the second semester, and high­ lighting the entire year, the Freshman banquet, "The Sidewalks of Paris," was presented after weeks of plan­ ning and preparation. Undaunted by the occasional blunders they might have made, and unimpressed by the successes they en­ joyed, the Freshmen closed their books, put away the term papers and note books, and made their way once more back to the planets from which they came. Over the campus there settled a strange quietness, but BNC realized that when these students should return next year, it would be with greater hopes, higher goals, and a year of experience. This is surely a class to watch for great things in the future.

;� � "

::.;,..·�=* ""

'

""'�'""

�·

·' t ;-�

.�

F :r e s h m e n

Carolyn Alexander After a courtship of fourteen years, Homer (Jack lmel) a n d S u s i e (JoAnn H a le) g ladden the heart of Susie's mother (Reba Keys) with the announcement of their coming marriage i n a skit at the Senior steak fry.

Johnny Allbritton Curtis Ammons Verli n Anthony Earl Baker Carol Barlow

Marilyn Barton Janie Basham Caurie Beaver Murlene Belcher Charlene Belew

Loewen Best Ann Blue Anne Bohlke Jim Bolton Jerrell Bradford

Glenn Breithaupt Oleta Brenneman Don Bridgewater Diane Sue Briggs Myrna Brock

R7

Kathy Alexander

Jo Burdine Mary Busby Naomi Campbell Ray Cantwell Rex Carmichael

l\ I arvin Carroll Jacquelyn Charton Charles Childress Frances Classen Vada Ann Clifton

Jeanie Close Jeanette Cobb Philip Cobb Pat Colwell Marie Combs

Joyce Corbin Joyce Cox Janice Crockett Philip Cromeans Ronald Crosley

Martha Cruzen Marlene Curless Lee Cypert Barbara Danner Bill Dennis

Henry Depue Carl Dimond Roy Lee Dorris Barbara Douglas Jo Dupree

83

Freshmen

Energetic Fresh, clad in white T shirts, ties, and green beanie caps, give the "old college try" in a tug-o-war at the Freshman initiation.

Carl ton Easley Alpha Elder

Jimmy Elkins Sharon Fales Patsy Falk Joe Farrow Donald Flood

Farrell Fouts Bill Fowler Daphne Freeman Marvis Freeman Jean Frolich

Elvira Frost Don Gadbow Lura Yvonne Gann I\lelvin Gerring Angie Gibson

Velda Gordon Donna Granger Lois Graves Larry Green LaJuanda Haley

84

Le11 is Hall l\ Iarjorie

Hall

Melvin Hames Marrietta Hann Duane Harrod

Ren Hart Ruth Ann Hart James Haskins Doyle Hawthorn Charles Hebard

Beverly Helm Laurel Helsel Gary Henderson Larry Henderson Lloyd Henthorn

Karyn Herren Perry Hipple Arlys Hodgson Jerry Hogan Kathy Hollis

Owalah Honaker Eugene Hood Sonny Hostutler Jack Houts Norma Howard

Bobby H uffaker Del ton Issac Bertha James Kenneth Jantz

85

F :r e s h m e n

B i l l Fowler appears quite anxious to become a participant i n the game in which Joyce Swa rtz and Carolyn Alexander are engaged at the Freshman party.

B. Gene Jones Edna Lee Killam Mary Faith Kinsey Martha Kisner Peggy Kitchen

Wynell Knight Jerry Kreie Eleanor Kroeze Nina Lackey Linda Land

Wales Lankford Edwin Latham Kenneth Leonard Vera Lewis Beverly Lightner

Bobbie Loper Phyllis Lounsbury Myra Luginbyhal Rony Lundy Jean Lybarger

86

Linda Lee Johnson Pat Johnson

Olen McClain Faith McClung Jim McGraw Ernest McNabb Florence McNames

Don McWhinney Charles J\ilahoney John Malloy Janice Matlock Billy Meek

W. H. Meek Nancy Meesey John Metcalf Robert Miley Angie Miller

Lucy Miller Ray Miller Phyllis Mingus John Moon Joyce Moore

Sylvia Moore Charles I V!oreland Joanne Mowry LaDonna Murray Wanda Murray

Chester Naramor Charles Neal Rosalie Nelson Carol Nice Geraldine Nicholson

R7

F :r e s h m e n

Dr. Snowberger enjoys h i s lemon meringue pie, w h i le Dr. Ripper appears to be looking for more.

Lilly Owens Glenda Packwood Marilyn Page Patricia Parette Janis Parrish

Leon Patton Don Paxton Judith Payne Forrest Pershall Scott Peters

Rose Pethoud Loyce Phillips J. M. Phipps Howard Plunkett Aubrey Poe

Clayton Posey Roberta Powell Robert Prentice Marshall Pryor Ruth Rawlings

QQ

Beverly Oliver Denny Owens

Raymond Reagor Phyllis Rehfeldt Twila Reiss Lyn-Nell Reynolds Maurice Richardson

Don Robb Gayle Robichaux Tommy Robinson !Vlildred Rock Paul Rodgers

Barbara Rogers Sue Rogers Carol Jean Ross Earl Ross Pat Ross

LuKretia Rowe Lon Runner Jimmy Rutherford Glen Rutledge Della Samson

1adlyn Sanders Bertha Santin Ed Schubert Robert Schubert Madalyn Shannon

Albert Sharp Charles Sharp Annetta Shepperd Ben Sherrill Yvonne Shoemaker

F r e s h III e n

Foreign students Fuad Safadi, David Uh, Esther Kim and Helen Oshiro compare notes on their homelands.

Sidney Simcox Jerry Sims Sarah Sims Farris Skinner Eugene Sloan

Verla Sloan Clariece Smith Doris Smith Bob Snodgrass Carl Soliday

Arthur Sponagel Kay Spruce Shirley Standridge La Rena Stanley Naoma Stark

Juanita Stearman Kathleen Stearns Danny Steele Barbara Stipes Phil Streun

on

Glen Shore Lynn Shue

Paul Stringer Joyce Stringfield Nella Strutz Jean Sturgeon Carolyn Sulzer

Ralph Ann Swann Joyce Swartz William Tennyson Noah Thacker Annadelle Thrasher

James Turner Russell Walborn Jimmie Walker William Wallace Linda Warrick

Jo Kathryn \Varner Kathryn Watson Alvina Webster Delores West Paul Whitaker

Robert E. White Jean Whitley Marie \Vhittington Clifton Wiens D urward Wiens

M ildred Wigley Richard Wikoff Lynn Williams Fern Willison James Wilmoth

Fresh men

Dewayne Vvimberley Teddy Wire

"Queen of the Coke Machine", A n n B l u e , surveys her kingdom from her throne in the Student Union Building.

Dorothv Worley Charles Wray

Mary Wynn Duane Yoesel

Pat York Dwain Young

Robert Schubert and Myra Luginbyhl exhi b it their ski l l at playing games at the Frosh Western Party.

92

GAYLAND AUBREY ThB

PARK BURKHART ThB

DON HALE ThB

P o s t - G r a d -u a t e s

DENNIS H ILL ThB

LAWRENCE JANTZ ThB

RICHARD SCHUMANN ThB

CARSON SNOW ThB

93

Special s

Carolyn Anderson

Mona White

Esther Kim

Lawrence Miller

laying the "ground work" for the Senior project are David U h and Bobby Loper.

94

DOLORES WELLMON Nicaragua, Central America

PAUL EDMONDS Bethany, Oklahoma

VERA RUTH WINTER Hooker, Oklahoma

HOWARD OLIVER Newton, Kansas

KATHERINE SNOWBARGER Sylvia, Kansas

ROY S IMPSON Kansas City, Missouri

OLETHA LUDWIG Kansas City, Missouri

GARY HARTPENCE Ottawa, Kansas

LESTER KNIGHT Mineral Wells, Texas

C HARLES HARPER Kansas City, Missouri

f

TALMA D

GE JO HNsoN D un ca n, Oklah o ma

RICHY LEWIS Weston, Missouri

�t u

I»�

S«<t>.k � r� ; •.ru!tnw-cb �til!...ny, � ..�r 11it/ MN.r: �

��v->����..A: un.eo

College C h ii r c h College students are faced with many adjustments that must be made when they leave their homes and go to an institution of higher learning to further their education. Some problems are common to students everywhere-the adjustment to dormitory life, the re­ sponsibility of being "their own boss," the making of new friends, and countless others. Christian young people face even more important adjustments during their college years. Not the least of these is leaving the church in their home town, perhaps the church which they have attended all their lives, and finding a place in a strange city in an unfamiliar church. The students of Bethany Nazarene College are fortunate in finding as their new church home Bethany First Church of the Nazarene, more affectionately known as the College Church. Its membership and adminis­ trative personnel are interested in the students of the college, and do much to add to the spiritual welfare of every one of them.

DR. E. S. PHILLIPS Pastor

Dr. E. S. Phillips, pastor, fills the pulpit in a man­ ner that would do credit to any church in any denom­ ination. His genuine interest in every member of his church, college students included, supplemented by his infectious smile and radiant optimism, has been indelibly impressed on the memories of all who know him. His inspiring messages contribute much to the spirituality of the campus and will long be remem­ bered by those who have heard them. In the parsonage of almost every successful church can be found the nucleus around which that success is built-the pastor and his family. The College Church is no exception, for Mrs. Phillips, like her husband, maintains a genuine interest in the members of the church. Interested in every phase of the work of the church, she is especially active in the missionary so­ ciety. The entire Phillips family, including daughters Clara, Betty Jean, and Karen, grace the parsonage in a way that has endeared them to the hearts of the con­ gregation and college students alike.

DR. AND MRS. PHILLIPS, BETTY JEAN, KAREN, AND CLARA

1 10

MR. HARRY CRADDOCK Superintendent, Sunday School

ROBERT GREEN Minister of Christian Education

C h Ji r e h GENE GORE Director of Youth Activities

1 12

THURMAN COBURN NYPS President

MRS. E. S. PHILLIPS NFMS President

LESTER DUNN Director of Music

RUTH TAYLOR Organist

P e r s o :n n e l MARGARET DUNN Pianist

MRS. RAYMOND BROWNING Church Visitor

113

Revivals and C o n v e n t i o .. s

REV. MARK MOORE Opening Convention

REV. CURTIS SMITH Spring Revival

MRS. ESTELLE CRUTCHER Fall Revival

1 14

Aycock L e c t u. r e s

REV. L. A. OGDEN First Semester

REV. ROY STEVENS Second Semester

115

REV. R. T. WILLIAMS, JR. MADOLYN WRIGHT

REV. W. H . DAVIS Superintendent, San Antonio District

Ch apel

MISS OLVETTE CULLEY Missionary, Nicaragua

1 16

DR. JARRETTE AYCOCK Superintendent, Kansas City District

REV. A. K. BRACKEN Bethany, Oklahoma

DR. V. H . LEWIS General Secretary of Evangelism

Ch a pel

REV. JACK FORD Manchester, England

REV. WILSON LANPHER Hutchinson, Kansas

1 17

DR. C . WARREN JONES Bethany, Oklahoma

REV. JOE EDWARDS Oklahoma City, Oklahoh1a

Ch a p e l

DR. S. T. LUD\iVIG Secretary, Church of the Nazarene

118

REV. GEREN ROBERTS Pilot Point, Texas

Q u a rt e t s

Jack l mel, Dean Neff, Howard H i ra m Sanders

{

Rex Carmichael, Ben Sherrill, Marshal Pryor.

Ronald Ba rlow, D a n ny Steele, Henry Ch eatwood, Harold Allen

Alpha Elder, Jim McGraw, Earl Ross, Coy Presson

Trios Vera Winter Kathy Snowbarger Pat Swigart

Lue Anna Allen Bobbie Meador Jane Joh nston

Mary Burdine Genell Crawford Delta Rogers

Jo Howard Eun ice Reep Virg inia Potter

Sharon Fales Alma Smith Bertha Gill

1 20

�·

'

•• -

I 1 Bottom row: Summer, Miller, Lolmaugh, Page, Close, Belew.

Second row: Barnes, Marshall, Bonner, Smith, Ha rt, Miller, Cinna mon.

Third row: Carrigan, C h risty, Henry, Dennis, Poe.

Gospel Team Officers: Carl Summer, pres.; Vadine Bonner, sec.; Bob Womack, song leader; Jim Ch risty, pianist.

Gospel Team was organized to encourage spiritual­ ity within the student body and to provide an outlet for the students in the propagation of the gospel. These aims are carried out through weekly meetings under the leadership of student preachers, and other student workers, enabling them to take an active part in the spreading of the gospel and, at the same time, gain con­ fidence that will mean much to them when they take their places in full time Christian work. These services are primarily evangelistic in nature, and offer oppor­ tunity to all who attend to participate in prayer, group singing, or testimony. While, to the casual observer, this type of program might seem to lead to a monoton­ ous grind, Gospel Team has not become a mere prov­ ing ground for future preachers. Its services are alive, vibrant with song and praise, and those who attend are richly rewarded for the time and effort they expend.

122

Organized to function as an additional service of足 fered by the Gospel Team, the Gospel Team Choir has become a well-known organization in its own right. Its reputation as a talented singing group has spread across the state of Oklahoma and into the neighboring states. Its members receive no scholastic credit for the time and effort they expend in t11e many practices nec足 essary to assure satisfactory performances when they sing for special services in churches in the surrounding areas. The choir made several trips during the school year, including such places as Woodward, Fairview, Midwest City, and Oklahoma City on their list of en足 gagements, serving the college, the church, and Christ with their musical ability.

While the choir endeavors to limit its trips to Sunday services to reduce the amount of interference with its members' scholastic obligations, one of its most important appearances this year was at a youth rally on the Northwest Oklahoma District. Meeting with the young people of the district for the day's activi足 ties, the choir performed during the evening service, which was held in the Woodward city auditorium. Many of the members of the choir an> planning to _ spend their lives in full time Christian service, and the experiences they have gained while singing with the choir have provided them with a background which will be valuable to them in their later lives, as well as providing opportunities to be of service during their years of preparation.

Gospel Team Choir

Bottom row: Wheatley, Page, Close, Moore, Cinnamon, Belew.

Second row: B. Miller, Warner, Kroeze, Moore, Hart, H a ley, S. Miller.

Third row: Poe, Uitts, Dennis, Henry, Ch risty, Womack.

Bottom row: Cremeans, Joh nston, Howard, Stearman, Garnand, Wheatley, Puckett, Ca rter, Easley. Norman, Gentz, Copeland, Hend ricks.

Third row: Sherrill, L. Wallace, G. Wa llace,

Emmert, Snowberger, Peacock, Williams, Colwell, Shan non, Lou nsbury, Briggs. Marshall, Close.

Fourth

row:

Fifth row: Wimberley, Keys, Johnson, Miller, Merrill, Bonner,

Six row: James, Worley, Steele, Logan, Drake, N . Atkinson, R. Atkinson, Willison, Danskin, Alexander.

Garner, Allen, Back, Linds ley, DeVore, Carrigan, Sloan. Moreland.

Second row: Stroud, Statzer, Lankford,

Knippers, Crawford, Campbell, Falk.

Seventh row: Dr.

Eighth row: Chestnut, Zechman, H a rtpence, Smith, Ch risty, Westmoreland, Grimes,

Ninth row: Daniel, Elam, Riggs.

Pra y er an d Fa sting Officers: Roger Riggs, pres.; Levay Wal lace, vice-pres.; Grac': Wallace, sec.; Lester Knight, organist; Dr. Garner, sponsor.

1 24

Once each week-at noon on Friday-the entire student body and faculty are offered the opportunity to forget for a while the hustle and bustle and worries presented by college life. This opportunity comes when the strains of the organ in the College Church call them to the sanctuary for the weekly meeting of the Prayer and Fasting League. These meetings, under the direction and l ea d e r s h i p of the group's student officers, offer an hour of quiet meditation and prayer which, with the scrip.. ture reading and devotional, help the individ足 ual to review the week, and count the blessings which have been bestowed upon his life_ The purpose of the Prayer and Fasting League is to aid the development of Christian character and to pray for the various needs of the college and the student body; its services, aided by the quiet and solemn tones of the organ, are conducive to an attitude of worship, and those who have faithfully participated in them have realized much in spiritual benefits.

Composed of individuals who feel a divine call for their services as missionaries of the gospel in foreign lands and those who are definitely interested in the promotion of foreign missions, Mission Band, in its weekly meetings, strives to promote on the campus of BNC a vital interest in the cause of missions. Its meet­ ings are interesting ones, varying from strictly evange­ listic services to programs presented by the foreign students on campus or interesting films of many lands where the gospel is being spread by missionaries of the Church of the Nazarene, some of whom are "graduates" of the campus Mission Band. Believing that a true concern for missions necessitates some hard work, the organization undertakes each year a special missionary project which is selected in cooperation with the Gen­ eral Secretary of Foreign Missions of the church. In a special chapel program, this year's project, the build­ ing of a chapel in British Guiana, was presented to the students and faculty, giving them an opportunity to help spread the gospel around the world.

Officers: Francis Muttoo, pres.; L o u Ann Fox, vice-pres.; Delo res Wel lman, sec.; Lynn Carr 1 trees.; Miss Olson, sponsor.

M i s s i o n B a n. d Bottom row: Rowley, Allen, Joh nston, Garnand, Blue, Ca rr, Fitzgerald, Keys, Miss Olson, Sponsor. Copeland, Carter, Watson.

Third row: Klemme, Brewer, Smith, Knippers, Shu maker, Easley.

Second row: Cantrell, Sanders, Rowe,

Fourth row: Stark, Gifford, Spruce, Young.

Fifth row: Connal ly, Colwell, Shannon, Worley, J a mes, Naramor, Muttoo.

g. ,

....,.

Bottom row: Corrigan, Cantrell, Ammons, Daniel, Rohlmeier, Lankford. Second row: Perkins, Joh nson, Franklin, Marshall, Ch risty, Robinson, lambert. Third row: Uitts, Rowley, Madison, Stewart, Southworth, Watters, Wallace, Soliday, Easley, Philo.

M in i st e ri a l A s so c i a t ion Officers: David Philo, pres.; Doyle Frazier, vice-pres.; Dale Meesey, sec.; Clarence Jennings, trees.; Dr. Metz, spans.

Organized so that ministerial students would be pro­ vided with an opportunity to collectively consider, dis­ cuss, and interpret the problems peculiar to the min­ istry, the Ministerial Association is profitable not only as a campus organization, but also as a means of increas­ ing the efficiency of future ministers of the Church of the Nazarene. Its semi-monthly meetings, through the use of informative films, outstanding guest speakers and round table discussions, help its members to realize the responsibility of their calling and acquaint them with the problems that might have to be faced in the future. The frank, open discussions of these probl_�ms and the arrival at possible solutions for them serve "as invalu­ able aids to these preachers of tomorrow. All is not work with no play for the members of the Ministerial Association, however, because an im­ portant social event of the year is the annual Ministerial Association banquet for members and their guests, which was held this year in Oklahoma City and feat­ ured Rev. Curtis Smith as guest speaker.

126

An organization which limits its member­ ship to "ladies only," the Beth Anns is the training ground for future preachers' wives. The group was formed with the purpose of edu­ cating the wives of ministerial students and informing them of the problems which they, as wives of preachers, will meet. The name, Beth Ann, is derived from the word Bethany, and signifies the typical minister's wife. Although the class is without college credit, its semi-monthly meetings enjoy good attend­ ance by those ladies who are interested in bet­ ter preparing themselves for future service. The class meetings offer a chance to visit with others, but their benefits do not stop there. The programs include study courses aimed at revealing the specific difficulties arising in the lives of the minister and his family, and offer ideas for the solution of these problems. The annual Valentine Banquet, held this year in the Student Union B u i l d i n g and featuring "Heart-to-Heart" as its theme, offered an op­ portunity to put into practice some of the knowledge gained in the class meetings and provided an enjoyable evening for all.

Officers: Mona White, pres.; Grace Wallace, vice·pres.; Wynona Burkhart, sec.; Shirley Riggs, treas.; Phyllis Jennings, p u b. chair.; Mrs. Cantrell, sponsor.

B e t h A n .. s Bottom row: Allbritton, Burkhart, Wallace, Zaleta, Klink, Bell. Boomer.

Second Row: White, Jen nings, Watters, Cox, Meek, Wire, Jackson, Baldwin,

Third row: Vail, Aubrey, Sumner, McClain, Daniel, Wallace, King, Jarvis, Hicks, Grimes.

H o iD e c o m i n g Coron ation

Homecoming Queen lou Ann Fox flashes a royal smile to her subjects

and with her court surveys her kingdom

then presents the championship trophy to Redskin captain Bill Harris.

1 30

9fom ecoming ff)u ee n

H e a rt P a l C o :r o n a t i o :n

The royal couple approach the throne roomďż˝

take their places

in front of

the throne

With their royal court, composed of Princesses Genell Crawford and Eunice Reep, a nd Princes Jerry Lambert and Buddy Emmert, the regal pair look benignly upon their s u bjects.

where Heart Pal King Dean Neff crowns his Queen, Verla Oke.

1 32

g{ea rl &fa / f!i)ueen

E cho C o r o n a t i o :n

After

inspecting

basketball team,

her honor guard formed

by the

Senior

Echo Tourna ment champions, Queen Jo

receives assistance from Page Jerry Lambert,

路 is supplied with tfte royal robe by Page Wesley H enry,

and, with Princesses Eunice Reep and Genell Crawford, poses for a royal portrait.

1 34

[/o riffo ward

Robert Browning (Harold Wayne Moore) recites to Elizabeth Barrett (Oietha Ludwig) one of her .own poems.

Miss Milford

(Sammye

Nesmith), a

novelist friend

of

Elizabeth, converses with John Kenyon (J im Burgner), a wealthy patron of the arts.

•• T h e B a :r :r e t t s �� Octavius (James R. Lewis), Elizabeth's younger brother, tells his poetess sister that she reminds h i m of the painted angels i n the story books of his childhood.

Elizabeth shields her younger sister, Henrietta (lola Lank­ ford), from their stern, overbearing father, Edward Mou lton-Barrett (Ed Rowley).

1 36

Devoted friends, along with members of h e r family, welcome Elizabeth home again.

H e n rietta (Zola Lan kford) gives her fiancee, Capt. Certees Cook

(Clair

Uitts), a few last

minute

instructions before introducing him to Elizabeth.

The Barrett children gather around their father as he prays that they might become more appreciative of him.

Millie {Doris Woods) a n nounces the arrival of the famous Mr. Robert Browning.

1 37

The Dark Days

John, the beloved (George Kline), comforts Peter (Don Firestone) as the time of their Master's crucifixion draws nigh.

J ude• lscariot (Dene Simpson) seeks sympathy from Mary Magdalene (laDonna Sparks) alter h e has betrayed Jesus.

John

Salome (Margaret Burns) looks on as Ma ry,

Mark

and

Rhoda

(Verla

Oke) clear the ta ble as they discuss their ob·

ponders her Son's inevita ble death.

servations at the Feast of the Passover.

-

.. 1 � . a... ! .

1 38

(Jerry Lambert)

the mother of Ch rist (Nola Cinnamon),

• •• •.� • .• �

Jonas (loy Williams), Eleazar (J im Burg足 ner), and Mary, the wife of Jonas (Reba Keys) greet the wife of the high priest (Joyce

Holland).

Mary awaits the glorious resurrection of her son, Jesus.

The lady Rebecca confides in Jonas' wife re足 garding her sorrow for the high priest's accusations against Jesus.

Friends of Jesus gather in the Upper Room with Mary, His mother, d u ring the dark days which preceded the resurrection.

Jonas, keeper of the Upper Room, listens os Joseph of Arimotheo (Paul Edmonds) confesses that he, too, believes that Jesus is the Son of God.

L y c e u. III S a n d Reci tal s

D IGBY BELL Student Council Lyceum

FLO WILLIAMS Speech Recital

140

CHARLES HARPER Speech Recital

RUTH PIERCE Speech Recital

KATHERINE SNOWBARGER AND VERA RUTI-I WINTER Fine Arts Recital

PAT SWIGART AND OLETHA LUDWIG Speech-Voice Recital

ROGER STRONG Fine Arts Recital

141

Ly c e l.I III S a n. d R e c i:t a l s

RENA STANLEY AND B EVERLY HELM Fine Arts Recital

DON CARLETON Fine Arts Recital

142

MYRA LUGINBYHL Fine Arts Recital

路.

The Alumni Association's float featured "four a nd twenty blackbirds ba ked in a pie." The Redskin cheerleaders, leading the parade, rode in style.

H o iD e c o iD One of the biggest events of the entire school year on the campus of Bethany Nazarene College is the annual Homecoming. Every really "big" event should be properly announced, and tradition has it that these important festivities be heralded by the Homecoming Parade. This year was no exception and, for weeks before the actual date of the parade, minds were ex足 hausting all possible angles to lend a new twist to the various floats. For days there were heard here and there the mysterious whisperings of plans, and on the eve of the parade were heard across the campus the ham足 mering and sawing entailed in the actual construction of these mobile monuments.

Old Mother Goose herself represented J e rnigan Hall.

Performing for the Abilene District were Old King Cole and his fiddlers.

The day of the parade dawned bright and. clear and, as the tension mounted almost to the breaking point, the hour at last arrived when the numerous floats be足 gan their slow, creaking journey to the place of assem足 blage, Windy Stadium. There, under the supervision

Complete with a cha rming bu woman, Bud Robinson presen three men in tub.11

144

Riding herd on the Alumni's hopes was the Social Science Club's Little Bo Peep. Little Miss Muffet bravely represented the Home Ec Club .

g Para d e

FTA aptly presented "The Old Woman i n the Shoe" with their entry.

of the Student Council, the parade was lined up and began its tour of the city. Traffic was brought to a standstill as the police escort led the parade through the main streets of the town. The flashing of photog­ raphers' flash bulbs and the grinding of movie cameras reminded the casual bystander that this event was being recorded for posterity. Intermingled with the many floats, which derived their themes from well-known nursery rhymes, were the shiny convertibles upon which rode the yet-to-be­ announced Homecoming Queen and her princesses. As the parade slowly ground to a halt and as the dis­ mantling of the floats began, there was the realization in the hearts of those connected with the day's activity that the population of the town, the faculty and ad­ ministration of the college, the present student body, and the alumni had once again been linked together with a common bond-the Homecoming Parade.

:!r1 candlestick maKer, and wasber esentation of "rub-a-dub-dub,

Chapman H a l l's "Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater," fore­ told disaster for the Alumni.

14 5

Dr. and Mrs. Cantrell, with the officers of the J u nior a n d Senior classes, dine at the head table amid river scenes featuring mill ponds, cotton gins, and tiny fishermen.

Gary H a rtpence, president of the J u nior class, acts .as Master of Ceremonies.

.T u. n. i o r - S e 1

Miss Geraldine H u h n ke escorts the speaker, leo Winter, who is disguised as her uncle, Heinrich Ott, from Germany.

The flower-bedecked ladies and their h a ndsomely-dressed escorts en j oy their desserts a nd after d i n ner entertainment.

146

Looks of contentment sig nify the complete success of the evening.

The meal is served by raggedly dressed ''Tom Sawyers'1 and "Betsies11 sup­ plied by the Freshman class.

A n n o u itcin g E n g a gemen ts Were

Oletha Ludwig and Gary Hartpence

Pat Swigart and Chuck H a rper

147

S o p h o iD o r e o .. t i .. g

An enth usiastic group of Sophs alight from the buses at Camp Classen, site of the outing.

"Drugstore ccwboys'1 leave camp on a bouncing tou r of the co u ntryside. linda Joh nson gives directions to a heaving Bob Wood, as h e fu rnishes the 1'go-power" for a boat ride.

Sharon Smith finds it difficult to choose between milk a n d coffee to make her breakfast complete.

A picnic l u nch i n the woods added to the day's fun.

148

F :r e s h iD a n

Waiters supplied by the Sophomore class added a touch of authenticity to the sidewalk cafe scene.

louis Terrier, speaker of the evening, informed his listeners about life i n France.

Class officers dined at the head table i n front of a backdrop featuring the Arc of Triumph.

Duane Yoesel, vice-president of the class, acted as Master of Ceremonies.

149

C h r i s t iD a s B a n q u_ e t

Happy faces and empty plates testify to the quality of the meal.

Delma Montgomery and Jim Tracy

Donna Phillips and Don Firestone

Naomi Kornelsen and Orlando Jantz

Lue Anna Allen and Ed Rowley

1 50

Heart Pal B a n q ii e t

Master of Ceremonies Tal Johnson explains the evening's program.

These a nnou nced their intentions of being perma nent "heart pals" . .

.

Vernon Swim and Shirley Tabor

Bob Snodgrass and lou Ann Fox

Donna Granger and Charles Danner

151

� -"'� i .1'-

t

Mix up some pop corn, studies, hair styling, a n d girls-you have a typical evening in the women's dorms.

Some of the most impo spent togeth<

A concealed tope recorder has preserved some very amusing remarks.

With looks of envy, Alma Smith, Bertha Gill and lura Gann admire Flo Williams' new formal.

Every girl who is graduated from Bethany Naza­ rene College counts among her fondest memories those days which were spent in the dormitories. From the first clay of her freshman year, when she approached the formidable looking building for the first time, heard her footsteps echo through the empty halls, and won­ dered if she would ever be able to feel at home among these strange surroundings, until the day when she finally bade the girls who had become close friends farewell for the last time, the benefits she had received and the contributions she had made to others were innumerable. Dormitory life necessarily places its subjects into close contact with one another, and this association necessitates many adjustments in the lives of every girl who is successful in her attempt to make the most of the opportunities of college life. Living under the con­ gested conditions in the average dormitory, it is neces­ sary that each girl learn to care for not only her posses­ sions, but to be considerate of others and to treat them

t :r m i t o :r i e s

Pop corn, records, Dr. Peppers-who needs bays?

ings of college life are prayer chapel.

and their belongings with a high degree of respect. Rules are necessary to the satisfactory operation of the dormitory, but the rules are reasonable and are en足 forced equally to all. Life in the dormitory brings with it the making of friendships that will remain intact through the years. The sharing of joys and sorrows, clothing and books, successes and failures, and food and boy friends draws girls close together in a relationship not unlike the relationships found in their families back home. Hours spent studying together, discussing mutual problems, praying together in the prayer chapels, or sharing their experiences after a date draw these girls together in deep rooted friendships that will last after many other events of their college careers are forgotten. Dorm life is a necessary and unavoidable part of college life, but every girl will promptly declare that the memories asso足 ciated with it are indelibly stamped in her memory, to be fondly recalled as some of the happiest times in her life.

While Verla Oke d rowns h e r sorrows with a "big ora nge," a n d Marsha Gorman makes with the music, Sammye Nesmith croons her ''Love Sick Blues."

Bud Robinson's day n u rsery is well populated.

While Joh n Norell and Glenn Burnett try to do some serious studying, Eugene McElyea and Jim Paul Stewart appear to find something very a m using about 11The Democratic Digest."

Among the most important events in any person's life are those happen�ngs, whether by chance or by in­ tention, that lead to the formation of associations and friendships with others. The type of person that one calls his friend many times indicates in part the char­ acter of the person himself. During one of the most important periods of a young man's life-those years of transition between his teens and adulthood-it is nec­ essary that his friends be chosen wisely, for those friend­ ships are the ones most likely to have a lasting effect upon his life. For the young man who attends college, these years are spent associating with fellow students, some of whom will be counted among his closest friends for the rest of his life. Because of this, it is important that he choose a college that offers men of the highest caliber with whom he will associate. Bethany Nazarene College offers just such a selection of young men and the close associations connected with dormitory life are wholesome ones and the friendships made are of the highest quality. With the completion of Chapman Hall early in the year, the dormitory facilities for men at BNC were greatly improved. The old "barracks" were completely

Clifton Watson, performing a d uty expected of a good roommate, makes sure that Ronnie Orr is awake for breakfast.

J. W. Phipps, Marvin Carroll, a n d Ch

over the forg'

1 54

� ID i t o r i e s vacated in favor of Fanning Hall and the new dormi­ tory. Living in the new building did not change the typical dormitory atmosphere, however, and the same habits of studying together; sharing with each other everything from clothing to cars, books to baseball gloves, and guitars to girls; enjoying the age old "bull sessions"; and offering a helping hand when the need presents itself, remained the same. The casual friend­ ships that brought fellows together as roommates de­ veloped into almost fraternal relationships. The sharing of weals and woes became an accepted part of dormi­ tory life. With an emphasis on right relationships to others, to God, and to education, dormitory life em­ phasizes the motto of the college-Character-Culture­ Christ.

No story is that funny! Schu bert, Johnson, Ch eatwood, Emmert and Barlow must be trying out for a tooth paste ad.

Supervised by residence counselors who manifest a genuine interest in their charges, the dormitories offer opportunities to grow not only scholastically, but also socially and spiritually. The future may bring the geographical separation of old friends and roommates, but there will alwavs " remain the memories of the years spent together in the dormitories on the cam­ pus of BNC.

While Gary Hartpence attacks his d u sty shoes, J i m Motsinger contemplates some outside reading f o r his Courtship and Marriage class.

k m a n reminisce o f days g o n e by, looking

tents of their wallets.

1 55

SUNtHIIS __ . . .V --·-

...SUNIMU .1$ IHITR!D61 .z.i $OMS .20 *NIIJ.A �·� MIU:.$/ttlkU $M!fl1S .zs .U> .10-J$ .(1$#1'>1f.I(J H-::c .I(J-'.ZO -�

During one of those few·a nd.far·between moments when they are not plagued with a line of h u ngry customers, three charming fountain waitresses, Linda Joh nson, Pat Joh nson,_ and Jean Lybarger, pause to catch their breath.

Th e Drag One of the most unique spots to be found anywhere on campus is the Drag, located in the Memorial Student Union B uilding. Boasting of a modern fountain service from which are served cold drinks, coffee, candy, sandwiches and a variety of other "necessities of life," the Drag is a well known meeting place for various class and club committees. Since its installation in the Student Union Building, it has served as host for the annual Student Council table tennis tournament. At almost any hour of the day or evening, one can find a host of collegians discussing any number of world shaking issues, from the Middle East situation to the next Saturday night's dating possibilities. Besides serving as an eating place for those who thoughtlessly let the regular meal time in the dining hall slip by unnoticed, the Drag serves as an ever ready avenue of escape for those individuals who feel the need to "get away from it all" for a few minutes after a particularly hard tussle with their books and assignments. Its ping pong tables offer an ever present opportunity for a not-too-strenuous period of physical activity. Its numerous booths and tables provide ample room for round table discussions, games of chess or checkers, or just relaxing with an iced Coke. The prestige of the Drag was greatly increased with its transfer from the basement of Fanning Hall to its present location in the Student Union Building, and every alumnus of the college, past and future, will always remember the happy hours of fellowship spent in BNC's recreational and social center, the Drag.

While Gordon Beckett explains his latest joke" to A n n B l ue, Joyce Holland appears intrigued at the plight of Dale Meesey, who searches for his money, to the consternation of Ellen Fitzgerald.

1 56

A crowd of interested spectators watch Ed Rowley and Bob Hendricks play their semi-fina l match in the yearly table tennis tournament.

linda Johnson demonstrates the technique she uses in preparing the excellent coffee served in the Drag.

With an expectant look o n their faces, Reba Keys and Jo Dupree play peek-a-boo with the postman, hoping to find a letter from home, prefera bly with cash enclosed.

Enjoying a reprieve from long hours of study, a g roup of students relax around the Drag counter.

1 57

'"r � i :r p Week

A shy Ronnie Barlow receives help with his jacket from A n n Blue

Every year at Bethany Nazarene College, the social customs are reversed for one week, giving the ladies the opportunity to select their dates. Of course, every such golden opportunity must have some disadvantage, and during this week the girls must foot all the bills. Officially dubbed "Twirp Week", this period of selec­ tive service, which finds every available male ready and eager to be drafted, is sponsored by the Student Coun­ cil. Besides asking for the dates and paying the bills, the ladies are expected to extend to the geiJtlemen all the common courtesies they would require from their male escorts during the other fifty-one weeks of the year : holding the door, carrying books, walking on the outside of the sidewalk, seating the fellows in the din­ ing hall, arranging the entertainment and transporta­ tion, and calling for their dates at the men's dorms. Anxious to be of all possible assistance to the fair ladies in distress, the Student Council goes to great lengths to arrange a variety of entertainment for the "Twirps" and their dates. Endeavoring to be as original as possible, however, many of the gals dream up 6 : 00 a.m. breakfast dates and impromptu parties. When im�ginations fail, there are the usual places to go­ club meetings, church services, dinner dates, ball games, and, this year, the Junior lyceum, a play entitled "The Barretts." As the week draws to a close, sighs of relief are heard from both sides of the campus as the girls hap­ pily revert to their waiting game, and the fellows are once again the aggressors. Both sexes are happy to play their nat­ ural parts in the game of romance, but both are well pleased with the happy times and humorous exper­ iences brought into their lives by Twirp Week.

Eunice Reep phones for a date, then

.

.

.

Eagerly approaches the dorm

.

. .

Where she picks up Dean Neff, beginning an enjoyable evening, nTwirp style."

1 58

B \ O LOGY! / rf 1

CLU B

BI OLOGY MAJORS

SCIENC E S

Seated: Emmert, Snowberger, B u rdine, Walker, Oke, Strawn.

Sta nding: Fitzgerald, Joh nson, Simpson, lewis.

S t u. d e n t C o u. II e i l

TALMADGE JOHNSON President 160

Forming the nucleus around which the many activi­ ties of the campus rotate, the Student Council carries more responsibility than any other student organiza­ tion on campus. I ts members are elected annually by the student body, and it is the official medium through which the student body and administration may com­ municate. The Student Council began the year by planning and presenting an all-school Get Acquainted party during the first week of the semester. Held at the Youth Center, it featured a carnival theme and boasted of such attractions as pie eating contests and shooting galleries, as well as a nice program of entertainment. Throughout the year, the Council planned banquets during the Christmas and Valentine seasons, super­ vised the Heart Fund Drive, sponsored the annual Twirp Week and a table tennis tournament, and pre­ sented two lyceums. In addition, the C ouncil was re­ sponsible for a chapel program each week. This year's project was the beautification and improvement of the facilities of the Memorial Student Union Building. In addition to the social benefits it offers to the student body, the Student Council provides opportun­ ity for students to have a voice in the operations of the school and to better realize the advantages of a demo­ cratic form of government.

\

J/ '

i

f

.

I I

\\

v

....

CHARLES STRAWN Vice-President First Semester

RICHY LEvVIS Coordinator of Religious Activities

ROY S IMPSON Vice-President Second Semester

KATHERINE SNOWBARGER Secretary

PROFESSOR LESTER DUNN Sponsor

161

Reba Keys, Ellen Fitzgerald, Sue Rogers, Jo Dupree, Kathryn Watson, Eunice Reep, Sammye Nesmith, Pat Johnson.

A yearbook is the compilation and condensation of a complete-as-possible record of the events of a school year. Since only one yearbook can be published in any one year, that book is of utmost importance to many people. Graduating seniors will look wistfully back over their college careers by glancing through its pages; members of the alumni will judge by its content the progress being made by their alma mater; members of the student body will cherish it, with its abundance of friends' autographs, as a memento of the happy days spent in college; and the staff will remember the har­ ried days spent in its preparation, with the thrill they experienced at its completion. 1 62

This is the yearbook of Bethany Nazarene Col­ lege-the ARROW. From the corners of the cam­ pus, from the athletic fields, from the recesses of the photographer's darkroom, came a steady stream of information, statistics, pictures, and the other items vital to the makeup of this book. After frantic hours of trimming and pasting pictures, writing and rewrit­ ing copy, checking and rechecking layouts, the days of proof reading, the ARROW went to press. Its pres­ entation to the student body occasioned a celebration by the members of the staff, as they breathed a sigh of relief that, for another year, a gigantic task was completed.

DON FITZGERALD Editor

BILLY JOE HARRIS Business Manager

JEAN McELYEA Associate Editor

CAROL LUNDY Sponsor

PHIL STREU Photographer

163

Verla Oke, Sharon Fa les, loy Wi lliams, lucretia Ca rter, J i m Ch risty, Bertha Gill, Jo Howard, Dwight Southworth, Zola Lankford, Jerry la mbert, Jean McElyea, Tal Johnson.

Clhe Cf<eoeille 8cho People crowd around the scene of an accident, or hurry after the wailing siren of a fire engine, or strain their necks to see strange sights in the heavens for one reason-the satisfaction of a natural curiosity. BNC students are not exceptions, and they have a burning desire to be informed. To quench this thirst for knowledge, campus events are an足 nounced and recorded in the columns of the student news足 paper, the REVEILLE ECHO. Published every other week during the school term, the ECHO ferrets out of the darkest corners those events that might remain in obscurity forever were it not for its inquiring揃staff of reporters. The big events on the campus calendar are heralded far in advance so that every student may have opportunity to make ample prep足 arations for them.

GWEN WALKER Editor

1 64

Featuring articles by various officers of the student body, timely editorials, up-to-date comments on the news of the world, interesting feature stories and a lively sports page, the ECHO covers well every phase of campus life. Refusing to sacrifice accuracy for the spectacular, it has become the trademark of dependability to which the members of the student body turn for information concerning the goings-on of the campus.

EUGENE McELYEA Associate Editor

JOYCE RANSOM Associate Editor

....

ORVAL McDANIEL Sponsor

MAURINE DICKERSON Sponsor

WENDELL JO ES Business Manager

DENE SIMPSON Photographer

165

Officers: Howard Ol iver, pres.; Dea n Neff, vice-pres.; Vera Winter, sec.;

Its members possessing some of the finest talent to be found among c o l l e g e s of the Church of the Nazarene, the A Cappella Choir serves a more useful purpose than being a mere social organization. The choir meets each day for a practice session, and requires many hours of valuable time from its devoted members. It is in much demand for weekend services, and represents the college across the educa足 tional zone when it sings at revivals, district assemblies, and other gatherings. Its annual tour covers most of the districts on the zone, and allows the choir to serve as a huge "public relations man," strengthening the ties between the college and the churches across the zone. Here on campus it makes a vital contribution to the spiritual atmosphere of chapel, church, and revival services. Directed by Professor Les足 ter Dunn, the choir holds a position of prom足 inence among the campus organizations.

Lester D u nn, director.

A Ca pp e l l a Choi r Bottom row: Rogers, Packwood, Winter, Helm, Haxsey, Clifton, Cruzen, Johnston,

Clark.

Second

row:

Gibson, Crawford,

Snowberger,

Meador, Allen, Rawlings, Swiga rt, Oliver, Ware. Third row: Allen, Rogers, Doskocil, Steele, J. Burdine, M. Burdine, Barlow, lssacs, Oliver, Cheatwood.

166

Fourth row: Lankford, Cantwell, Emmert, Rowls, Neff, Fa rrow, Galbraith, Yoesel, lana, Pryor.

Bottom row: Metca lf, Clark, Rehfeldt, Rock, Reese, Kornelsen, B. Oliver. Gadbow, Duane Harder, Phipps.

Second row: DeVore, Reynolds, Dean Harder, Moon, Ja ntz, Bach,

Third row: Watson, Taylor, Hen ry, Dennis, Whitaker, Isaac, Davy, H . Oliver, Presson, Mountford.

Fourth

row: Prof. Pagan, Stringfield, Penquite, Gibson.

Ba n d Providing a means of expression for those ad­ vocates of the woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments, the band represents a group of deter­ mined students who find time in their busy sched­ ules to assemble and practice three times each week in order to further their musical ability. The band has found a place of importance on campus, providing the necessary impetus of enthusiasm at the annual Homecoming basketball game, as well as entertaining the student body with its chapel programs and special concerts. Smaller, special­ ized ensembles, composed of various band mem­ bers, provide the proper mood for numerous pep rallies and queen coronations as well as perform­ ing both on campus and off in special church services. Under the leadership of Assistant Pro­ fessor Keith Pagan, the band has experienced an almost phenomenal growth in the past few years, and promises to continue to play an important part in campus activities.

Officers: Howard Oliver, pres.; Richard Mountford, vice·pres.; trees.

Naomi

Kornelsen, sec.­

Martha Gibson, librarian; Melvin Davy, student director; Prof. Pagan, sponsor.

1 67

Officially named Beta Sigma Lambda, the Biology Club was founded to promote interest in the biological sciences, to afford an outlet for this interest, and to serve the school, nation, and community by bringing about through science a richer realization of the Creator of the universe. The Biology Club is affiliated with the Oklahoma Academy of Science, and club membership is open to any student interested in the field of biological science.

Officers: Jerry Parrish, pres.; Gordon Beckett, vice-pres.; Daisy Heilman, sec.; Ronald Barlow, trees.; Lynn Carr, pub licity chairman; Pat Colwell and Madalyn Shannon, Freshman representatives; Prof. Lawrence, sponsor.

Under the . sponsor�hip of Professor Robert Lawrence, the club carries on an active program each year. Activities of this year included the regularly scheduled club meetings, a dog oper­ ation, several educational films, the club project, and a field trip. These activities have more sig­ nificance than the entertainment value they offer for, by participating in them, the club members better prepare themselves to serve in the future as doctors, dentists, l a b o r a t o r y technicians, edu­ cators, or in a variety of other similar fields.

B i o l o g y C l u. b Bottom row: DeVore1 Barlow, Statzer, Colwell, Garner, Shannon, Hoi lman.

168

Second row: Watson, Wood, Streun, Barlow, Goulden, Carr.

Bottom row: l. Owens, Nice, Fisher, Dupree, Nicholson.

Organized to promote interest in the field of business and to increase and strengthen the prestige of the Business department, the Business Club is composed of students who are planning to make their careers in the field of business or those who, for other reasons, have a keen interest in this area.

Second row: Emmert, Webster, Shocklee, D. Owens, Reagor, Arnold.

Officers: Phyllis Fisher, pres.; Charles Hoover, vice-pres.; Lorrene Owens, sec.; Dr. Danskin, spans.

The bi-monthly programs are arranged so as to give instruction in addition to that received in the class room as well as to pro足 mote a closer social relationship among the students of the business department. These programs are designed to motivate these students to better prepare themselves to meet future competition, and may include discussions led by prominent business men, films intended to inform students of the possibilities in the world of business, or field trips to banks, insurance agencies, or other business concerns. With this active calender of events, the club becomes more than a mere social organization, and is a vital part of the preparation of its members for their careers. 1 69

A member of the National Chemistrv So­ ciety, the Chemistry Associates of Bethany Nazarene College, more familiarly known as the Chemistry Club, was organized to develop a more intense interest in the field of chemistry and the opportunities it offers. Far from being composed of exponents of alchemy and the mysterious wizatds of old, the club offers a pro­ gram of interest to all who are even remotely interested in the field.

Officers: John Norell, pres.; Forrest Cunninghom, vice-pres.; Clifton McNabb, sec.treas.; Dr. Beaver, sponsor.

Utilizing the close· proximity of the college to several inaustrial and research laboratories, the club members are able, through field trips, to better acquaint themselves with the possi­ bilities in the field of chemistry. On at least two occasions during the year, the club mem­ bers disentangle t h e m s el v e s from the maze of rubber tubing, beakers, flasks, and Bunsen burners, and emerge from the haze of the lab­ oratory to enjoy their annual banquets and reunions with their more mature members who have found their places in industry, research, and education.

C h e m i s t r y C l u_ b Bottom row: Dean Harder, Whitaker, Duane Harder, Fitzgerald.

1 70

Second row: Wilmoth, Farrow, McNabb, Norell, Dr. Beaver.

Bottom row: Keys, Sparks, Bergen, Knippers, Wimberley, Carter, Miller, Alexander, Gildersleeve, Gentz. Puckett, King, Stroud, Powell, Crockett, Rowe, Smith, Simpson.

Third row:

Potter, Henderson, McElyea,

Second

row:

Goetz, Garnand,

Hale, Ripper, Wheeler, Cole,

McNames, Helsel. Fourth row: Davenport, Smith, Davis, Taylor, Campbell, Hendricks, Bond, Wood, Wellman, Gifford, Copeland, Tabor.

F. T. A . Officers: I rma Garnand, pres.; lois Wimberley, vice-pres.;

Ramona Davis, sec.; Bob

Hendricks, treas.; Frankie Holland, historian; Miss Spruce, sponsor.

The John R. Mott chapter of the Future Teachers of America was founded for the pur­ poses of acquainting its members with the opportunities to be found in teaching and de­ veloping student leadership. Through its study of the lives of great teachers the club also helps cultivate the qualities essential to becoming good teachers. As its name implies, the club is primarily of interest to those who plan careers as teachers, but it can be of help to anyone who will some day have children in school and will need to understand some of the problems to be faced by teachers. Educational films, panel discussions, and vis­ iting lecturers are utilized by the club to make its meetings worthwhile to every member. The club is active both on campus and off, cooper­ ating with schools in this area to provide sub­ stitute teachers as the demand arises.

171

Because of the need of the promotion of bet­ ter homemaking methods and the desire to better educate the homemaker of tomorrow, the Home Ec Club came into existence. The club is held together by the mutual bond of the desire to gain experience today that will be helpful and useful now and in the future. Its membership is open to girls who are plan­ n ing careers or are otherwise interested in any of the many areas included in the field of home economics and who have qualified them­ selves for membership by enrolling in or com­ pleting a course in the Home Economics de­ partment. The activities of the year in which the club engaged include the p r e p a ra t i o n of a float which was entered in the annual Homecoming Parade, various parties, a style show, visits to the Convalescent Home, and a field trip. Officers: Laura McNames, pres.; Esther Bergen, vice-pres.; Karen Jones, sec.; Jo Lindsley, trees.; Dr. Greve and Miss La Due, sponsors.

H o iD e E e o :n o iD i e s Bottom row: Cook, C. Alexander, K. Alexander, Bergen, Puckett. La Due.

1 72

Second row: Dr. Greve, F. McNa mes, Neh rbass, Lindsley, Henderson, Miss

Third row: Ha ley, Sumner, Lightner, l. McNa mes, Jones.

Bottom row: Fenno, Herron, Williams, DeVore, Garnand, Dr. laughba um.

Second row: l mel, ludwig, Swigart, Walker, Smith, Carter, Snow·

berger, Hendricks. , Third row: Taylor, Galbraith, Orr, Watters, McNabb, Norell, Harper, Henry, Fitzgerald.

H o n. o :r S o c i e t y Officers: Ch!lrles Harper, pres.; Clifton McNabb, vice·pres.; Wanda Williams, sec.; Dr. laughbaum, sponsor.

Phi Delta Lambda is the way the Greeks say it; the average student calls it the Honor Society, but no matter how it is described this organization represents the intelligentsia of the campus. The Greek symbols "Phi" for Philoso­ phia ( l ove of wisdom ) , "Delta" for Dikaio­ sune ( righteousness ) , and "Lam bela" for La­ trela ( service ) summarize the purposes and interests of the organization. Phi Delta Lambda is a national organization which was formed to promote scholarship and friendly relations among students of the col- . leges of the Church of the Nazarene. The pre­ requisite for membership is the attainment of the grade average for one academic year which is required by the college for graduation with honors. Far from being a mere group of i ntel­ lectuals, however, the society counts among its members many of the leaders of campus l ife.

173

BNC's Philosophy Club was organized to stimulate the interest of the students in mat­ ters of philosophical c o n c e r n , to provide a means for student participation and expres­ sion in philosophical investigation and discus­ sion, and to provide means by which students of similar interests may develop socially and culturally.

Officers: Gary H a rtpence, pres.; Forrest C u n n ingham, vice-pres.; Roger Riggs, sec.; Prof. Joh nson, sponsor.

The active membership of the club is com­ posed of students who have chosen their major or minor in the field of philosophy. Individuals who evidence an i nterest in philosophy and desire to attend the meetings of the organiza­ tion are eligible for associate membership. The club's monthly meetings, which are devoted to the discussion of philosophical problems, are climaxed by the annual Philosophy Club ban­ quet, at which Dr. Carl Bangs from Olivet Nazarene College was the guest speaker this year.

P h i l o s o p h y C I .. b Bottom row: Prof. Joh nson_, Tal Johnson, McElyea, Hendricks.

Second Row: Riggs, Harper, C u n ningham, Dan ner. Third row: Rowley,

Pitts, Strawn, Ha rtpence, Philo.

1 74

Bottom row: Smith, Dr. Floyd, Gill.

Second row: C a rter, F. Williams, Gorman.

Third row: Taylor, L. Wi lliams, Bond.

S o c i a l S c i e n c e C l u. b Officers: Bertha Gill, pres.; Marsha Gorman, vice-pres.; Gary Taylor, editor, BNC Historian; Glen Bond, sec.-treas.; Dr. Floyd, sponsor.

With its membership open to all students interested in the fields of history, political sci足 ence, and sociology, the Social Science Club has for its goal the promotion of interest i n the values of social science in o u r American society. Its meetings utilize i nteresting films, field trips, and group discussions to show how the study of s o c i a l s c i e n c e will aid in the study of current world problems. Of special interest to the group this year were the 1956 presidential c a m p a i g n s and election, which were closely followed by the members of the club. Activities of the year included the prepara足 tion of a float for the Homecoming parade and the publication of the BNC Historian. The club chose for its project the purchase of a sprig of ivy from the home of Washington Irving, prominent historian.

175

Officers: Nita Brewer, pres.; Carna Cole, sec.; Twilla Reiss, lib.; LaRena Stanley, pianist;

Another group on campus endowed with special m usical talent is the Treble Choir. Al足 though one of its purposes is to be an aid to the fulfillment of the music requirement of the general education core, the choir has come to be more than that to those who have been active in it. Its annual Christmas program and a combined concert with the Male Choir during Music \iVeek are the most important events on its campus calendar. Its scope ex足 tends beyond the campus, however, as the choir is available for off campus engagements. The organization provides a social outlet for its members also, and this year entertained the Male Choir at a party during the first semester, and enjoyed a hamburger fry the second semester. U n der the direction of Mrs . Naomi Dobson, the choir has endeared itself to the hearts of its members, providing never足 to-be-forgotten experiences.

Mrs. Dobson, sponsor.

Treble Choir Bottom row: Hann, Joh nson, Sturgeon, Ja mes, Spruce, Pethoud, Mrs. Dobson. Second row: Bostick, Meesey.

1 76

Third row: Rock, Gibson, Worley, Fa les, Parrish, Campbell.

Stan ley, Sloan, Brewer, Webster, Seachord,

Fourth row: Shumaker, Barton, Wynn, Cole, Bohlke, Reiss.

Bottom row: Breithaupt, Hammiter, Loper, Cooksey, Sloan.

Second row: Flood, J arvis, Carrigan, McGraw, Persh a l l .

Third row: Miley, Perkins,

Dennis, Ross, Rutledge, Prentice, Joanne Mowry, accompanist; Prof. Eugene Chambers, di rector.

Male Choir Officers: Tommy Cooksey, pres.; Glen Rutledge, vice-pres.; Forrest Pershall, chaplain; Director, Professor Chambers.

Organized to provide an opportunity to exer­ cise the abilities of those men interested in sing­ ing and making a contribution on behalf of the school, the Male Choir has enjoyed its de­ served measure of success in this, its second year. A well-known group on campus, it has come into its own off campus as well by presenting a num­ ber of concerts and weekend performances at churches in the BNC area. A tour of several churches across the zone highlighted the Easter season, giving the choir members an additional opportunity to help promote the cause of Christ. The calendar of social events for the year included a volley ball party and a wiener roast, giving vent to the athletic and culinary abilities of the group. Directed by Assistant Professor Eugene Cham­ bers, the Male Choir has found and is filling well its place in campus life.

1 77

Representing the highest athletic achieve足 ment on the campus, the Men's "B" Club is dedicated to the promotion of interest in ath足 letics, and the establishment of closer relation足 ships among those men who have won letters. To receive an athletic award, the recipient must have participated in a majority of the games played by his team in two or more major sports, and m]JSt have shown ability above average in one of these sports.

Officers: B i l l Harris, pres.; B o b Allen, vice-pres.; Vernon Swim, sec.-treas.

Bottom row: Emmert, Westmoreland, ! mel.

178

The "B" Club makes nominations each year for the good sportsmanship award, given annu足 ally to the individual, elected by the athletic committee, who has e x h i b i t e d the highest qualities of sportsmanship and fair play during the year. The annual project of the club is aimed at improving the facilities of the athletic department, and this year a new score board and clock was purchased for the gymnasium.

Second row: Fitzgerald, McNabb, Leffel, Neff.

Third row: Horton, OHver, Swim, Allen.

Men's Athletics

program is played, but played on a scale that is in keep­ ing with the educational and financial standing of the school. Competition is primarily on an intra-mural basis, with the main exception being the annual Home­ coming basketball game, when members of the alumni form a team which competes against the all-school team. Athletics begin in the fall with touch football, played on campus in a locatiop and at a time conven­ ient enough so that niost of those interested in watch­ ing or participating are able to do so. As Old Man Winter approaches, blowing his chilly breath across the campus, the athletic program retreats to the gymnas­ ium and all thoughts turn to basketball . Highlighting the season are the Homecoming game and the Reveille Echo tournament. Volleyball is played during the per­ iod of transition from winter to sprin g and, as the weather becomes favorable, softball is the predominat­ ing athletic endeavor. A fitting finish to the activities of the year is the All-Sports Day, during which the Seniors challenge teams chosen from the other three classes in games of football, softball, and box soccer, with an all-school party concluding the day. The ath1etic program of the school is an important phase of college life, contributing much to school spir­ it as well as affording opportunity for recreation and physical exercise and offering to the spectator some of the best in athletic entertainment. DON W ILSON

Head of the Athletic Department

Athletics at B. N. C. Every social unit, whether it be a family, com­ munity, church, or student body of an educational institution, needs some common interest to draw the individuals composing the group close together and strengthen the bond of fellowship among them. Beth­ any Nazarene College, with its widely varied program, is fortunate in having several such common interests which are shared by members of the student body. One of these is the athletic program, which serves a two-fold purpose : the attraction of members of the student body to a common point of interest, and the promotion of physical development. T11e college has not tried to over-emphasize the importance of athletics but, rather, has tried to include physical activity in its well rounded program . T11e de­ sire to win has not become dominant over the desire for fair play, and the opportunity to participate is pre­ sented to all who wish to play. Every sport in which enough interest is aroused to merit its inclusion in the

1 80

B ILLY JOE HARRI S

All-School Athletic Director

A thletic D i :r e e t o :r s

JACK I M EL Senior

JOHNNY WESTMORELAND Junior

BOBBY H UFFAKER Freshman

JOHN NORELL Sophomore

181

Sophomore tailback Paul Johnson passes over freshman defenders Billy Meek and Bob H uffaker for a Soph touchdown in their second victory of the season aver the luckless frosh.

Football After getting off to a slow start because of a ditch which was dug across Windy Stadium to facilitate a new drainage system, the football program made a rapid recovery, and spectators saw this year a better brand of football than has been seen on this campus for some time. With a schedule of from two to four games each week, every fellow with the urge to excel at the sport had ample opportunity to prove himself. The mighty Seniors, displaying one of the most power­ ful teams ever to play on campus, reign as football cham­ pions after rolling over every opponent with ease. On their road to victory, they ·carved their names into the BNC Hall of Fame by setting a new scoring record when they trounced an inexperienced Freshman team by the score of 98-6. The final standings were just about what had been pre­ dicted at the beginning of the season with the Juniors, Sopho­ mores, and Freshmen following the undefeated Seniors in that order. The Juniors compiled a 6-2-l record, the Sopho­ mores finished 3-5- l , while the luckless Frosh were unable to garner a single victory.

1 82

All-STAR TEAM Bottom row: l mel, Westmoreland, fitzgerald. Second row: Harper, H a rris, H u ffaker, Johnson. Third row: Webster, Childress, Southworth.

SEN IORS 45-FRESHMEN 0 S E N I ORS 38-SOPHOMORES 27 S E N I ORS 48-J U N IORS 24 S E N IORS 98-FRESHMEN 6 S E N I ORS 56-SOPHOMORES 1 4 S E N I ORS 38-J U N IORS 36 S E N IORS 78-FRESHMEN 20 S E N I ORS 2 1 -SOPHOMORES 1 9 S E N I ORS 72-J U N IORS 24

J U N IORS Kneeling: Hartpence, Johnson, Westmoreland, Bu rpo. Standing:

Burnett, Stewart,

Philo,

Pierce,

Fitzgerald.

S E N I ORS Kneeling: Hend ricks, lmel, Hight, Moore, Neff, Daugherty. Sta n d i n g : Madison, Harris, Allen, Swim, Page, Harper.

J U N IORS 24-SEN IORS 48 J U N I ORS 35-SOPHOMORES 28 J U N IORS 41 -FRESHMEN 35 J U N IORS 36-SE N I ORS 38 J U N I ORS 44-SOPHOMORES 32 J U N I ORS 54-FRESHMEN 20 J U N I ORS 24-S E N I ORS 72 J U N IORS 1 9-SOPHOMORES 1 9 J U N IORS 27-FRESHMEN 1 3

SOPHOMORES 27-SEN IORS 38 SOPHOMORES 28-J U N IORS 35 SOPHOMORES 68-FRESHMEN 24 SOPHOMORES 1 4-SENIORS 56 SOPHOMORES 32-J U N IORS 44 SOPHOMORES 27-FRESHMEN 20 SOPHOMORES 1 9-SENIORS 2 1 SOPHOMORES 1 9-J U N IORS 1 9 SOPHOMORES 45-FRESHMEN 1 2 FRESHMAN Kneeling:

Sch u bert,

Robinson,

H uffaker,

Haskins.

Standing: Hood, Owens, Turner, Ammons.

SOPHOMORES Kneel i n g : Johnson, Childress, Webster. Standing:

Cantrell,

H e n ry, Southworth, Wood.

FRESHMEN 0 -SEN I ORS 45 FRESHMEN 35-J U N I ORS 41 FRESHMEN 24-SO PHOMORES 68 FRESHMEN 6 -SE N I ORS 98 FRESHMEN 20-J U N IORS 54 FRESHMEN 20-SOPHOMORES 27 FRESHMEN 20-S E N IORS 78 FRESHMEN 1 3-J U N I ORS 27 FRESHMEN 1 2-SOPHOMORES 45

1 83

Senior tailback Bill Harris h u rriedly looks for a receiver as he is rushed by h a rd charging J unior lineman Harry Pierce.

Bob Wood,

Sophomore

center,

makes a

futile effort to h a u l down a wayward pass as freshman defender J i m Turner brea ks up the play.

Kendall Hight, Senior end, goes high to pull i n a touch足 down pass as Sophomores Bob Wood and John Shocklee try in vain to prevent the score.

Bill Harris, Senior tailback, performs a modern ballet step in a desperate attempt to avoid the tag freshman Bob Huffaker is so gracefully applying.

1 84

Senior Bill Harris ond Soph Dwight Southworth strain for control of a jump ball in the opening g a me of the Echo tournament.

Ba sketball As the chilly breath of the north wind and the falling of autumn leaves announced that another Okla­ homa winter was approaching, BNC watched. her ath­ letes reluctantly leave their outdoor arena and retreat to the gymnasium where the much punished pigskin would be forgotten as their attention turned from punting and passing to dribbling and driving when basketball became the center of attraction . Anywhere the game is played, basketball thrives on keen competition and, at BNC, where it is played un­ der an intra-mural program, the desire to win is great. This season saw some basketball games of the highest quality. The individual scoring record was broken and rebroken, with Senior Howard Oliver's 42 point out­ burst finally becoming the mark at which players of the future will shoot. Earlier in the season, Sophomore Ron Snowbarger had tumbled the old record with a 39 point scoring effort. Highlighting the BNC basketball season were the annual Homecoming game and the R e v e i l l e Echo

tournament. The Homecoming game, won this year by the Redskins for the second straight time, was the big­ gest athletic event of the year, and saw hundreds of alumni returning to support their team and renew old friendships. The Seniors, exhibiting superior manpower and height, had little difficulty in winning the annual Echo tourney. The final results of the regular season occasioned little surprise to anyone. The seniors took the cham­ pionship with an 8-l record; tied for second place were the Sophomores and Freshmen with 5-4 records; while

the Juniors were firmly entrenched in the cellar with a 0-9 record . As the sounds of enthusiastic cheers and the mut­ terings of "\Vait 'til next year" died away, and the basketballs were once more placed in storage, BNC had reason to be j ustly proud of the ability of her ath­ letes and the way in which they had conducted them­ selves.

185

Like an electric charge passing through its con­ ducting wire, a twinge of excitement was circu­ lating around the campus of BNC. Weeks had been spent in preparation for this night and now, at last, it had arrived. This was no ordinary night, because there was to be a basketball ganie-not just an ordinary basketball game, but, once again, it was Homecoming time at BNC. Renewing for the sixth time the annual contest between the Alumni and the Reclskins, this game promised to furnish all the excitement usually associated with an event of its kind. ·

Reviewing the individual records of the players of each team, and observing the differences in height and experience, pre-game prophets foresaw a sad evening for the Redskins and their fans. The Alumni boasted of a team composed of the outstanding players seen on the campus for the past five years, including two members of the championship team fielded by the graduating class of 1 9 56. The Redskins, able to number among their starting five only three men with previous experience in Homecoming c o m p e t i t i o n , had been hampered in their workouts by campus con­ flicts, and apparently lacked the height and ball

ALUM N I Kneeling: J . Yoesel, Burch, Scuddoy, Roirdon, Gardner, Johnson.

Standing: Former, Hagin,

Draper, Kastner, Kennedy, Coach Rairdon.

H o i-u e e o iD i n g R E D SKIN S 70

ALU M N I 63

R EDSKINS Kneeling: Westmoreland, Hight, Ha rris, Bu rpo, Snowberger. Oliver, Swim, D. Yoesel.

Standing: Leffel, Horton,

handling ability necessary for a smooth operating team. Determined to prove their critics wrong, the Redskins got off to a strong start and, surpris­ ingly enough, found themselves deadlocked with the Alumni at the end of the first half, the score­ board reading 32-32. The second half promised to be just as evenly matched, with the score re­ maining close, until Redskin reserve Dick Leffel checked into the game. \Vith h is accurate jump­ shots, he quickly contributed 10 points to the Redskins' tally. vVith this difference being too much for the "old men" to overcome, the Reel­ skins loped to the finish, leading all the way, and the final score was 70-63. Alumnus Ernie Farmer salvaged some honor for his team, however, by scoring a total of 27 points for the evening, taking high scoring honors. Following him was Johnnie Westmoreland, who led the Redskins' scoring efforts with a 20 point contribution . The victory gave the Redskins a 4-2 edge over the Alumni for the series of Homecoming games, and gave rise to renewed Alumni threats, warn ing the Rcdskins to be on their toes when another year would bring another Homecoming game.

1 86

Members of both teams look on while Redskin Howard Oliver balances on his fingertips a basketball which Alumnus Frank Hagin appears very anxious

Ia

possess.

While Vernon Swim offers vocal support, Dean Horton pulls down a wayward rebound for the Redskins.

While Jim Gardner and AI Kennedy of the Alumni look on, Redskin Vernon Swim launches another of his unerring one hand jump shots.

Jerry Yoesel slips a long jump shot past the outstretched hand of Kendall Hight.

1 87

Amid the open-mouthed stares of members of both teams, Ernie Farmer _ and Kenda l l Hight g o high i n the endeavor to control a jump balL

Redskin, Dean Horton, makes a futile attempt to stop the Alumni's Ernie Farmer from scoring two important points.

All eyes are on Wesley Burpo, Redskin guard, as he prepares to drop in two more points for the Redmen.

Ernie Farmer casts a n unbelieving gla nce over his shoulder to see his lay-up rol l off the rim.

1 88

One of the biggest athletic events of the school year at Bethany

Nazarene College, taking second place only to the annual Homecom­ ing game, is the Reveille Echo basketball tournament. Climaxing

the regular season of intra-mural play, this tourney offers to the inter­ ested spectator a glimpse of every team on campus in action. No

team is designated as the favorite in this tournament because, regard­

less of however dreary a showing it might have made during the regu­

lar season, any team is likely to be the "dark horse" and upset any pre-tournament predictions. During the weekend of these games, class

spirit is at a higher level than during any other similar period during the year, and the gymnasium is packed as loyal class members come to watch their teams compete in BNC's "World Series of Basket­

ball ."

The first night's schedule pitted a powerful Freshman team

against a Junior team which had been weakened by injuries and a severe manpower shortage. After a fiercely fought first half, which

found them on the short end of a 24- 1 3 score, the Juniors rallied

briefly and threatened to make a good contest of the game, but Frosh Jerry Kreie's fifteen point outburst in the second half proved

too great a margin to overcome and the Juniors fell in defeat, 56-39.

Freshman Don Woolridge pushes up a one­ hand jump shot over Senior defender Howard Oliver in the tour·ney finals.

E c h o T o u r n a iii e ii t

The second game of the evening found an experienced Senior team playing a scrappy Sophomore five. Senior

Howard Oliver, bowing out of his college career in style,

scored forty-one points and proved to be the big difference

as the Seniors romped the Sophs by a score of 87-6 1 .

I n the second evening of play, Sophomore Ron Snow­

barger, scoring thirty points, led his team to a 97- 5 5 rout

of the Juniors in the consolation bracket, leaving the Jun­ iors firmly anchored in last place of the tournament, with

the Sophs in third place. In the winners' bracket, the

Seniors faced the Freshmen for the championship and

the trophy. Exhibiting a powerful zone defense, the Seniors held the Freshmen to a mere 37 points while

J u nior Wesley Burpo, finding his prog ress checked by Soph Ron Snowberger, finds teammate David Philo ready to help him out of trouble.

Bill Harris and Howard Oliver contributed 18 and 1 7

points respectively to the Seniors' total of 6 3, leading their team into the championship berth.

1 89

SENIORS Kneeling: McNabb, Daugherty, Harris, l mel, Hendricks. Stand足 ing: Horton, Madison, Oliver, Swim, Ha rper, lee Davis, Coach. SENI ORS 50-FRESHMEN

39

SEN IORS 62-J U N I ORS

40

SENI ORS 30-SOPHOMORES 59 SENIORS 55-FRESHMEN

28

SEN I ORS 55-SOPHOMORES 54 SENI ORS 57-FRESHMEN

41

SENIORS 43-J U N IORS

36

S E N I ORS 65-SOPHOMORES 58 . SENI ORS 9 1 -J U N I ORS

22

J U N IORS Kneeling: Burpo, long, Fitzgerald.

Standing: Philo, Perkins,

Coach Rairdon, Burnell, Hartpence. J U N I ORS 52-SOPHOMORES 83 J U N I ORS 40-SENIORS

62

J U N I ORS 56-FRESHMEN

62

J U N IORS 54-SOPHOMORES 67 J U N I ORS 36-SEN IORS

43

J U N I ORS 35-FRESHMEN

55

J U N I ORS 36-SOPHOMORES 49 J U NIORS 22-SENIORS

91

J U NIORS 45-FRESHMEN

65

SOPHOMORES Kneeling: Watters, Norell, Shocklee, Southworth, Snowberger. Standing: Wood, Bach, Coach Anderson, Henry, Motsinger. SOPHOMORES 83-J U N I ORS 52 SOPHOMORES 54-FROSH

44

SOPHOMORES 59-SEN IORS 39 SOPHOMORES 55-FROSH

64

SOPHOMORES 54-SENI ORS 55 SOPHOMORES 67-J U NIORS 54 SOPHOMORES 58-SENIORS 65 SOPHOMORES 49-J U N I ORS 36 SOPHOMORES 58-FROSH

FRESHMEN Kneeling: Robb, Yoesel, Turner, Ross.

Sta nding: Coach Wil足

son, McNabb, Huffaker, - Prentice, Kerie, Woolridge, Kline. FRESHMEN 39-SENIORS

50

FRESHMEN 44-SO PHOMORES 54 FRESHMEN 62-J U N IORS

56

FRESHMEN 28-SENIORS

55

FRESHMEN 64-SOPHOMORES 55 FRESHMEN 4 1 -SEN IORS

57

FRESHMEN 55-J U N IORS

35

FRESHMEN 67-SOPHOMORES 58 FRESHMEN 65-J U N I ORS

1 90

45

67

Fresh man Jim Turner outstretches Senior Dean Horton to control a jump ball for the Frosh.

Over the p rotest of Sophomore John Shocklee, Vernon Swim adds two points to the Seniors' score

Ernie McNabb, Frosh center, reaches over J u nior Gary H artpence to pull down an important rebound.

Freshman Jerry Kreie and J u nior Gary Ha rtpence battle for a rebound in their first Echo tourney game.

191

Cla ss Ch e e rlea d e rs

S EN IORS Doris Davis, JoAn n Hale, Reba Keys

J U N I ORS Bobbie Meador, Oletha Ludwig, Ellen Fitzgerald

FRESHMEN Janis Parrish, Jo Du pree, Marshal l Pryor, Karyn Herren, Joyce Stringfield

SOPHOMORES Linda Joh nson, Lynn Ca rr, Esther Bergen

A lunging J i m Burgner, Sophomore catcher, reaches Frosh Phil Cromeans too late as he slides across the plate, while Soph pitcher, Dwight Southworth, looks on.

Softbal l According to the poets and novelists, every spring "a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of love." On the campus of Bethany Nazarene College the young men are not exceptions to the rule, but sharing the limelight of attention with their romantic endeavors is the national pastime, the grand old game of baseball. Very definitely hampered by the lack of adequate space to play the game, the attention of these would-be "pros" is diverted to baseball's first cousin, softball. Follow足 ing the pattern set by the competition in the other sports on campus, intramural play is emphasized, with the possibility being considered of fielding an all-school team to compete in non-league competition with teams sponsored by churches in the surrounding area. On almost anv afternoon of the school week can be seen on the s oftball diamond a motley array of "uniforms" and can be heard the crack of a sh meeting horse hide as the more avid enthusiasts of the game make the most of the fair weather and the opportunity to find relief from books and studies it offers. When a league game is being played, shouts of encouragement are heard across the campus as the players and their

fans exercise their vocal chords as well as their bodies. Competition is keen, but is kept on a level befitting the standards of the college. As the ARRO\V goes to press, the season is not far enough developed to establish a definite trend which might reveal how the standings will look at the end of the season. However, if pre-season predictions are fulfilled, the Seniors, with good pitching and plenty of long-distance hitting, will make a clean sweep of the athletic championships, adding the softball crown to their collection of trophies, which includes the football and basketball championships. If the Juniors are unable to upset the Seniors and enthrone themselves in the championship berth, they should have no trouble oc足 cupying second place. The Freshmen looked surpris足 ingly strong as they defeated the Sophomores in a softball game during the initiation day festivities, and, barring scholastic difficulties, should field a team that will win third place, leaving the hapless Sophomores in the cellar. However, as often happens, these predic足 tions could prove to be false, and only the season's end will reveal the softball champions of 1 9 57. 193

S ENIORS Kneeli ng: l mel, Neff, Davis, Daugherty, Hend ricks.

Sta nding: Hight, Moore,

Harris, Allen, Madison, Ha rper.

J U N IORS Kneeling:

Bond,

Johnson,

Burpo,

Burnett,

Rowley.

Standing: Emmert, Coach Westmoreland, Parrish, H udgi ns, Stewart, H a rtpence.

SOPHOMORES Kneeling: Watters, Kotwitz, Wood, Hen ry, Granger. Standing: Ellis, Bach, Southworth, Orr, Nore l l .

FRESHMEN Kneeling: Schubert, Peters, Yoesel, Shore, Coach Owens.

Sta nding: Hall, Fa rrow, Kline, Gadbow, Ammons, Poe.

194

.

.

FIRST HAlF

. ..

!) c

f ... ... ... ..

S £ CO

:: ... ..s I

) }

:

l

t i

«

' •

I :

J

/

'1.

s.

'\

),

: ' • s

)1

D HAlf

... ...... .. ..

'

' • '

;

I ;

• '

'1 '

• l

: l • l • l

,,

• l

I:

. ! l • • s • l

/ ,r

, ,.' /

1

/

. '/ / L /,

• J J .' / / / 1 '

"

� � � . ...

SECONO

fiRST HAtf

... . -

..

- ..

c

c

::;

(; . l A:

; -- i / 7 2 I •

l

l . ' l

I ' l , . l I . '

2 J • ' 0•••

11

: .a "'r

·

-

/e .,

'

.

'

,.

'

"'=-

...

H A t f

Athletic Directors D IXIE SMITH Senior

LAURA McNAME S Junior

JO LI

OSLEY

Sophomore

JEAN McELYEA

!

All-School

PAT

JOH

SON

Freshman

As laura McNames drives past Joyce Swartz, Sue Rogers moves in to impede her prog ress while Ramona Davis offers vocal support and Mildred Rock prepares to move i n for the rebound.

Ba sketball While the term "athletics" is usually associated with the "he-man" type of individual, the fairer sex on the campus of Bethany Nazarene College offers much to observe in this area as well as those fields in which the average young lady is content to dwell . While basketball is the major sport played by the girls of B C, volleyball, tennis, badminton, table ten­ nis, and softball also enjoy a measure of popularity in their seasons. With the degree of ability ranging from a few very good players to a few who are not so good, with the majority being classed in between, the women's athletic program offers much to the spec­ tator and to those who are interested in actual par­ ticipation . After watching their male counterparts represent their respective classes for two months on the football field, the girls were more than ready to get into the show when cold weather brought the advent of the basketball season. Playing strictly on an intra-mural basis, the program was hampered this year by the lack of participants. A solution was arrived at, however, which provided for two teams, one representing the

Junior and Senior classes and the other composed of Freshmen and Sophomores. C o m p e t i t i o n was keen throughout the regular season which, at its conclusion, found the Jun ior-Senior team in the lead by the scant margin of one game, having won four and lost three. The annual Echo Tournament brought the chance for revenge to the Freshmen-Sophomores and they capi­ talized on their opportunity, defeating the upperclass team by a score of 38- 1 6 to win the trophy. With competition in other sports seeming almost anti-climactic a fter the nerve-wracking struggles on the basketball court, most of the girls were content to lapse back into their world of buttons, bows, satin, and lace. Others, however, were determined to play, some for the competition, some for the exercise, and some for both . The volleyball and table tennis tournament� had a good following, while tennis, badminton and the others were restricted for the most part to the physical education classes. Realizing the importance of devel­ oping well rounded personalities, the campus ladies demonstrated again that girls do have a place in ath­ letic competition . 197

J U N I OR-SENIOR Kneeling: Smith, Lane, McGraw, Herron. Stand足 ing:

West, Coach Burpo, Burdine, McNames1 Davis.

S cores

FRESHMEN-SOPHOMORE Kneeling: Nice, Parette, Smith, L Johnson, Swartz.

Sta nding: Rogers, P. Johnson,

Coach Prentice, Lindsley, Thacker, Rock.

1 98

J U N IOR-SENIOR 30

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 3 1

J U N IOR-SENIOR 36

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 34

J U N I OR-SENIOR 41

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 33

J U N I OR-S E N I OR 3 1

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 40

J U N IOR-SENIOR 38

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 27

J U N IOR-S E N I OR 1 6

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 1 5

J U N IOR-SENIOR 1 0

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 1 8

While Sue Rogers moves in to help, Pat Johnson engages Jea n McElyea in a fight for the ball.

Lauro McNomes fires a long shot over the outstretched h a nd of Linda Johnson while Sue Rogers ond Dixie Smith woit for the rebound.

The "mystery of the disoppeoring boll" is reflected in the faces of Jo Lindsley, Pat Johnson, ond La Verla lane as they look for a wayward rebound.

Doris West charges past Joyce Swartz toward the basket in a n attempt to enter her name in the scoring corumn.

1 99

An Open Letter to the ARROW of 1957 Dear ARROW,

I think I must feel something like a proud father must feel when he carries his first born son down the aisle of the church for the christening. I have a feeling of pride mixed with apprehension-proud that at last you are ready to face the world, and apprehensive that perhaps you may not meet the standards that have been set up for you. But, like the proud father, I bid you the best of fortunes as you face the world on your own merits. There have been many things to remember about the months spent in bringing you into existence. Count­ less have been the hours spent in preparing for you. There have been many happy moments, times that I shal l remember always, and there have been as many . anxiOus moments, times that I shall likewise remember. You are not the result of one person's labor, but rather the product of a great many people who have spent much time and effort on your behalf, and to them should go the credit for your successes if you are fort­ unate to be blessed with such . ooking back over your short life, I can remember . � distinctly those months of the first semester when i n �he bliss of my ignorance, you were, for the most art, Ignored. Th o� e were the days when it seemed you were demandmg great amounts of time when the staff was obligat�d to sit behind typewriters and type up . the forms mvolved m the making of individual pic­ tures. Little did we realize then that the final week before deadlines would find us sitting, standing, kneel­ ing, running, walking, yelling, whispering, and prob­ ably many other things as well, trying to prepare you for the day of your presentation.

p

Happy were the moments when we knew that at last all pictures for the class pages were finished, when layout plans were completed, when the first pages were turned in to the printer, when the last sheet of a great stack of copy was written, and finally, when we saw you for the first time, a new creation, the product of our imaginations and efforts. Anxious were the times when we suddenlv realized that the pictures of one of the revival speakers had never been taken, making it necessary to write and wait long days for the picture to arrive; when we were reminded that pictures of two of the largest organiza­ tions on campus had never been taken, with tl1e final deadline bearing hard upon us; when the call came from the printer that the pictures of one whole class had been pasted up on left-hand pages ( thank good­ ness, they hadn't, really ) ; when Dene informed us that our supply of photographic paper was exhausted with at least a hundred pictures yet to be printed; and

200

the most anxious times of all, when we tried franti­ cally to get all the pictures taken b�fore everyone went home for the Easter vacation. Included in the long list of people who have played an important part in your life's story is every staff mem­ ber. They were faithful to help when the need arose, and without them you would not be here. Some of them deserve special credit for the parts they played. There was Jean, who took tim� off from her busy sched­ ule to attend the ACP convention in Cleveland so that we might be informed about this business of publish­ ing a yearbook. She was the one who could always seem to make a bad situation appear better, and who never lost her head when all about her were losing theirs. Thanks go to Mrs. Lundy for the time she spent reading and correcting copy. I've often wondered if she realized that we were using her as a dictionary, knowing that she would catch and correct our errors when we were too lazy to look up the correct spelling of a word. Dene played a most important part i n your creation, spending countless hours i n the darkroom, somehow producing useable prints even from the worst of the negatives given to him. Phil walked miles and spent much time and patience trying to get decent pictures of the many elusive subjects of which we had to have pictures. Less noticeable, but just as important, were Eunice and Sammye, who contributed many after­ noons to typing, trimming and pasting pictures, and doing countless other jobs which were given them. Retta, at the printer's, was always able to make the best of something we had carelessly "goofed up," and Bill turned out some literary masterpieces in h is letters, trying to sell the ads n ecessary to finance the costs of publication. Rusty was the one who could always coax his car to make "just one more trip" to the printer's. Without the help of Reba, Jean, Wesley, and Pat, the copy for the classes might have never been written . Without all these and their contributions, ARROW of 1 9 57, you could not have been.

I deem it an honor to have played a part i n your creation. As you are placed on your own to face a world of demanding students, your life will not be an easy one, for you will also face the close scrutiny of the j udges of the Associated Collegiate Press, where your merits and faults will be revealed without prejudice. I t is my hope that whatever honor you might incur upon yourself will be well deserved. Always remember, however, that your purpose is not to satisfy the j udges alone, but you have an obligation to the students of Bethany Nazarene College. W h a t e v e r awards you might receive will be in vain if you do not present life as it really was during the school year of 1 9 56-57. Now, my job is finished; you are on your own . Good luck!

O u r A d v e rti s e rs C h u rc h e s

201

Adver tising Index CI IURCH ADVERTISERS Abilene District Abilene Fi�t Amarillo First Ardmore First

____________________

_______________________

______________________

----------------------

216 240 214 211

Henryetta, Okla ., First Hooker, Okla. Hot Springs, Ark., First Hutchinson, First Hutchinson, Peniel Houston District

208 2 31 207 225 230 222

_______________

______________________

______________

___________________

__________________

Bellaire, Texas 214 Bethany College Church 2 36 Bethany Eastside 220 Blytheville, Ark. - - ------------------22 3 _____________________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_____________

______ _____________

Camden, Arkansas Carthage, Mo. Crockett, Texas Cushing, Okla.

__________________

_____________________

_____________________

_____________________

219 219 221 240

Dallas Central 213 Dallas District - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - ---- - - 241 Dallas First 204 Denison, Texas 21 1 Dodge City, Kansas 206 Duncan Oak Avenue 235 Durant First 232 ______________________

________________________

________________

Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas

230

_______________

City District City First City St. Paul's District

228 215 206 218

_________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_______________

_____________________

Lincoln, Nebraska, First Little Rock First Lufkin, Texas

231 229 208

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

____________________

______________________

Muskogee First

226

_____________________

____

_________________

________________

_______________________

E l Reno

Independence, Kansas

___________________________

226

Nazarene Theological Seminary ebraska District ew Orleans, Louisiana Churches Norman First North Arkansas District Northwest Oklahoma District

_ _ _ _ _ _ __

___________________

_ _ _ _ _ _

______________________

_________ __ _ _ _

Guymon, Okla .

_____________________

2 31

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

210 203 220 220 2 32 238

Odessa, Texas Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

______________________

F (rst Pennsylvania Ave. Southside Trinity

________________

_ _ _ _ _

____________

______________

Ponca City, Oklahoma Port Arthur, Texas

_______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

San Antonio District San Antonio Hatfield Sapulpa First Sherman, Texas, First South Arkansas District Southeast Oklahoma District Southwest Oklahoma District Student Religious Organization

________________

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

_______________

______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

__________

Texarkana First Tulsa Central Tulsa First

_________

____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

________________________

Waco, Texas Wellington, Texas \Vichita, Kansas, First \Villiams Memorial, Bethany

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ ____

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

_______________

__________

209 224 209 211 212 225 207 217 209 205 212 221 207 227 2 34 219 213 210 214 214 242 206

COI\ ! M ERCIAL ADVERTISERS Alumni Association Anthony Department Stores, C. R. Art's Barber Shop

_________________

____

__________________

Bates Shoes Bethany Book Shop Bethany Flower Shop Bethany Laundry Bethany ·Nazarene College BrO\m-�!cCiure Lumber Co.

_ ___ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __

_________________

________________

___________________

____________

__________

269 250 261 256 267 258 257 266 251

l'clts Shoe Store First Nat'!. Bank, Bethany First Nat'!. Bank, Yukon

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________

_____________

Gilbert Clinic Graham's Appliance Griese] Motor Co.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_________________

__________________

Hal Owen Photographers I-Iansen-Atlee Dairy Herman's Eat Shoppe Hick'ry Pit Barbecue Hague-Stone Floor Covering Humpty-Dumpty Stores

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

________________

Carters Flowers City Cafe College Cleaners Colonial Bread Community Loan Community Craig Ayers Pontiac Co. · Curtis Studios

_____________________

____________ ________ ____ _

____________________

_____________________

________

______________

______________________

Dan's Medical Center Drag, The

_______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Eagan Plumbing

202

____________________

256 264 257 255 263 245 264 256 268 247

________________

__________

______________

J & M Cleaners Jessie Chambers Texaco Service

__________ __________

________

247 252 253 244 2 54 2 59 246 2 54 265 260 249 2 59 260 256

Oklahoma Natural Cas O'l\ 1caley's Cafeteria

______________

________________

Posey Auto Supply Powell Rexall Drug

__________________

__________________

Shadid Dental Clinic Shafer Mobile Service Smith, Tom, Deep Rock Service Southwestern Stat. & Bank Supply Stewart's Paint Store Student Council

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

________________

_______

______

________________

_ _ _ _ ________________

T.CAY.

__________________________

Up-to-Date Cleaners

_________________

Wehrenberg Drug Western Auto Western Motel Woodring & Son, Bill, Carage

__________________

______________________

____________________

Kiwanis International Kraker's

________________

___________________________

2 54 264

Yarlang Motor Co. Yukon Mill and Crain Yukon National Bank

________

__________________

Martin & Vaughan Insurance Merritt Funeral Home

__________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

248 249

_______________

_ _ _ _ ____________

251 255 263 261 257 257 242 270 2 59 262 2 50 253 265 2 50 249 264 261 2 54 2 59

f:Jreeti ngs fro m a Fi rs t f:J ra der to

fi l l f:J raduati ng Sen i ors .

RUSTY HARDING

NE B RA SKA D I STRI CT

203

C-H U R C-H

NAZA �-l: N� Robert G. Nielson, Pastor Chester 0. Galloway Director of Religious Education 204

Tenth and Beckley Dallas

CHURCH of the NAZARENE S A P U L P A , O I( L A H O M A

C o ngratu lations to BNC and t h e C lass of '57

Park and lincoln Streets

S up p o r t i n g

Our G. W. ABLA

C 0LLEGE

Pastor

Wi t h

S t u de n ts Pr a y e r s Fi n a nces 205

FIRST CHURCH of th e NAZARENE D O D G E C I T Y, K A N S A S

Avenue "A" at Cedar

A

Debt A

to

Yes terday

Program A

for

V i s i o n

Today

for

M I LO l. ARNOLD Pastor

Tomorrow

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH of the NAZARENE KANSAS C ITY, MO.

WILLIAMS MEMORIAL 82 5

. Beaver Street

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

JACK LEE

Frank McConnell-Pastor

Pastor

Arston \Voods-Educational Director Cl int Coats-Sunday School Supt.

Cong ratulations to Ou r Students

Dorthy Luginbyhl-Pianist

Mrs. Charlotte Sprowls-N.F.M . S . Pres.

Vestal Nichols-Chorister

Jimmy Tracy Roy Simpson Dean Sim pson

206

THE GROWING C H U RCH WHERE EVERYBODY I S HAPPY AND EVERYBODY LIKES TO SING

GRACE CHURCH

HOT SPRINGS FIRST CHURCH

o f the

NAZARENE

o f the

NAZARENE

PORT ARTH U R , TEXAS

South and Third HOT SPR I N GS NAT'L PARK, ARK.

W. M. lynch, Pastor

Our Students: Don Carlton N ina Lackey Charlene Bradford J e rre l l Bradford

J . F. HAMM Pastor

Congratulations A r row

S t a ff

of

to

Congratulations to

the

B. N. C. and the C lass of 1 957

1 957

SOUTHEA ST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT Education

and

C h r i s t i a n ity

bring

success

i n

l i fe

Advisory Boa rd: W. H. Deitz H. M. Curtis Leonard Stubbs H . C . R ustin

Mrs. L. A. Richa rdson-District N. F. M. S. President John L. Harrison-District N. Y. P. S. C ha irman W. H . Deitz-District C hurch School Chairman Mrs. Glen Jones-District J u n ior Superintendent GLEN JONES Dist. Supt.

f9ongratulations f9lass of

'57 207

CHURCH of fue NAZARENE L U FKIN, TEXA S

Congratulations to the

*

Ad m i n ist r a ti o n

*

Facu lty

*

S e n i o rs of '57

FIR S T CHUR C H of the NAZARENE Corner 8th & Trudgeon H e nryetta, O k lahoma

�� 208

W. H. Deitz, Pastor

B E R NARD SMITH, S u nday Sch o o l S u p't.

J. J. PAC KWOOD, N. Y . P. S. P resident

MYRTLE H. D E ITZ, N . F . M. S. President

e

J O E BEVAN, C h a i r m a n Board of Trustees

WALTE R SNOWDER, C h u rch Secreta ry

18 o o s t e r s

f o 1f

18. n. CS. "

The P ennsglvania Avenu e

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

C. R . THRASH E R Pastor

M. L. STONE S. S. Supt.

P e nn Av e . a t W e s t P a rk O kl a h o m a Cit�

M R S . J . D . WOLFE N .F.M . S . Pres.

KEN GRANGE R N.Y.P. S . Pres.

ODESSA FI RST C H U RCH of the N AZA R E N E

SAN

A N TO N 1 0

SALUTES BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE

TH E C LASS OF 57

Corner of 3rd and Amburgey Street Odessa, Texas

Pearl Keeton, Pastor 926 East 1 8th Street Phone FE 7-2840

Hearne W. Spruce Pastor

209

lJrirst Qtqurrq nf tqr N a�arrur " CONGRATU LATIONS TO

T H E O F

M. E. BELCHER S. S. Supt.

CLASS

' 5 7 "

Delaware and East Twelfth Street TU LSA, OKLAHOMA

J . L. H UTCHESON N .Y.P.S. Pres.

MRS. F. H. ROGERS N. F.M.S. Pres.

E. H . SANDERS Pastor

C9omp liments of

Naz arene Theolo g ical Semi n ary 210

Lewis T. Corlett

1 700 East Myer Bou levard

Mende l l Taylor

President

Ka nsas City, Missouri

Dean

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

F I R S T C H U R C H of the N A Z A R E N E

23 1 West Texas Street

AR DMORE, OKLAHOMA

DENISON, TEXAS

C O N G RAT U LA T I O N S College

Nazarene

Bethany

and Our Students James Wilmoth

C. C. Calhoun

REV. H. F. CREWS Pastor

Pastor

J.

WE DEEPLY APPREC IATE THE

Doyle Strothers

H . \Vilmoth

S. S. Supt.

GREAT WOR K BEING DO N E

A. H . Fitzgerald

Minister of Music

BY BETHANY NAZARE NE COLLEGE

ide CHURCH OF THE

l1twuen.e.

1 5 1 9 S . E. 2 9th St. - OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA REV. M, L. T U R B Y F I LL, Pastor ..----

.

� or bounteous blessings of health, wealth, and happiness; For freedom of worship in the secu rity of a great land; \ For the Love of God in whom we have Life Eternal;

...--

GIVE THANKS TO GOD IN HIS HOUSE

·WORSRIP·SERV

211

TRINITY CHURCH of the NAZARENE W. DONALD WELLMAN Pastor WALTE',{ H INTZ-S. S. Supt.

GENE GALBRAITH-Minister

MRS. CLYDE WEST -N. F. M. S. Pres.

BOB JU

G-Church Secretary

S. W. 29th at I ndiana Oklahoma C ity, Oklahoma looking

To

B.N.C.

For The

F uture

FIRS T CHURCH of the NAZARENE 1 1 0 1 East Houston Sherman, Tex as R EV. J. T. C RAWFORD 212

-

-

-

Pastor

of Music

Rev. CLYDE E. AMMONS,

Pastor

E. B R U C E W A D E,

Minister

Of

OFFICE:

Music

4 1 05

TELEPHON E

VICTOR STREET

TA ylor

7 - 4293

H a s k el l at V i c t o r DALLAS, TEXAS

E v e ry D e p artm e n t o f D A LL A S C E N T R A L

\

S E N D S THE I R C O N G RA T U LA T I O N S T O F A C U LTY A N D S T U D E NT S O F

\

BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE \

N. Y. P. S. PRESID E NT

S. S. SUPERINTEND E NT

GENE J UST ICE

J. J. C H ISUM

C9ong ratulations

Seniors

- TULSA CENTRAL CHURCH of the N AZARENE

21 3

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

) __

We l l ington

Com p li m ents of

CHURCH of the NAZAR ENE

4638 Be l la i re Blvd. Bellaire, Tex as

r e x as

.__

_

嚙線 p porting BNC

With

Prayers Money St u d e n ts

Rev. John R. Ferguson Pastor

We Are Proud of Our Students MARlOW SAlTER Pastor

Donivan Bounds C lifton McNabb Ernest McNabb Harold Wayne Moore

FIRST CHURCH AMARI LLO,

TEXAS

1 924 Polk Street

FIRST CHU R C H of the NAZARENE 1 0 0 1 South 1 9th Street WACO, TEXAS

We Salute Bethany Nazarene Col lege "Congratulations to Dr. Cantrell the Faculty and the Graduates of 1957"

l. A. OGDEN, Minister

Congratu lations to All Students a n d Grads of B. N . C .

214

N E LS O N G. M I N K Pastor

Jirst Qhurch of the Jlazar�ne

M eyer Blvd. at Rockhill Road

K A N SAS C I TY, M O .

LO 1 - 23 1 5

o'l .Afitton SmdA/ ?21J./ 5Z>tUtirv 21 5

With Best Wishes to Bethany Nazarene College and her

Class of 1 957

District Camp Meeting Camp Arrowhead-Aug. 1 9-2 5 Workers: Dr. B. V. Sea ls Rev. J. E. Wil liams Prof. R. J . Lush

A bilene District Church of the Nazarene Orvil l e W. J e n kins District Superinte ndent

216

San flntonio (District N. Y. P. S. Pres.

ADVISORY BOARD

H. R. Borgeson Dist. Secretary

T. A. Burton

Charles W. Ogden Ivy Bohannon

Ch u rch School C h m n . L. E. H u mrich

E. E. Gal bra ith

N . F. M. S. Pres. Pea rl Keeton

Ardell Setliff

Dist. Treasurer Hearne Spruce REV. W. H. DAVIS Dist. Supt.

O U R STUDENTS Paul Brown

Romano Davis

Alma Smith

Terry Brattin

David Galbraith

Kay Spruce

Robert Campbell

Gene Hood

Carl Summer

Janice Crokett

Jo Howard

Marian Truax

Phil Cremeans

Johnny Hostilles

Jim Turner

Carolyn Daughterty

Kenneth Hughes

linda Warrick

Mitchell Daughterty

Billy Meek

Richard Young

Nancy Davis

Carl Ross

C h r i s t i a n

rr

E d u c a t i o n

B r i n g s

S u c c e s s

W e S a l u t e 18 o t h f! a c u l t y fi n d S t u d e n t s " 217

c 0

c

N .

L

G

A

R

s

A

s

T u L

0

A

F

T

I 0

'5

N

7

s RAY HANCE Dist. Supt.

MIL TON HUXMAN N. Y. P. S. Pres.

C E. ROWLAN D Church School Board Chmn.

MRS. RAY HANCE N . F. M. S. Pres.

I{ A N S A S D I STRICT

218

TEXARKANA FIRST Fletcher Spruce

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Pastor

E ig hth at Brown Texarkana, "T:exas

S e n d i n g C o n g r a t u la t i o n s t o t h e A r r o w S t aff of 1 9 5 7

CHURCH of the NAZARENE CAM D E N, A R KA N SA S

Congratul ations

Dick J a rrell, Pastor

to The Class of '57 from

Ross W. Hayslip, Min ister

THE C H U R CH of the NAZAREN E

Backing the Entire Program of the Church

C hestn ut at Grant Sts. Ca rthage, Mo. "A Spiritual Church with a Friendly Hand"

C o n g ratu lati o n s t o B.N.C.

And Th e of

C la ss

1 957 219

C omplimen ts of

NORMAN FI RST CH URCH

the

N EW O R LEANS, LOU I S I A N A

Apache a nd Alameda GREETS BNC AND HER STU D ENTS

N AZARE N E CH U RC H ES CE NTRAL C HURCH-3606 Magazine St. Rev. M. M. Snyder, Pastor Telephone Uptown 6994 DOWNTOWN CHURCH-4 1 00 N. Robertson St. Rev. C. E. Bordelen, Pastor Telephone Crescent 8382 FIRST CHURCH-1 0 1 3 Dante St. Rev. Robert J . Mil ler, Pastor Telephone Wal n ut 1 057 WEST BA N K CHURCH-757 McArthur St. Harvey, louisiana Rev. E. A. Dix, Pastor Telephone Filmore 1 -8858

Darrel l. Slack Min ister

Jerry Lambert and Lynn Carr

Loy Watson

Lawrence Dean

Pastor

Minister of Music

John Wi l kerson

Ruth Engle

S. S. Supt.

N. Y. P. S. Pres.

Roy Lem mons S. S. Supt.

MAI N AT HAMMOND

220

Mrs. Garl Daug herty

W. J. Baldwin

N . F. M. S. Pres.

N . Y. P. S. Pres.

SOUTH ARKANSAS

Q DISTRICT

W. L. FRENCH Dist. Supt.

" C o ngra t u la t i o n s to th e C la s s of ' 5 7 " . "Boostmg B. N. C . "

CHURCH of the NAZARENE C ROCKETT, T EXAS

FIRST CHURCH of tbe NAZARENE Caddo and Jackson

San Angelo, Texas

Charles W. Ogden, Minister

" The Singing Church in the Wool Capital Seated-Rev. W . H . Barnett, Pastor

of the World"

Standing-Jean McElyea, Eugene McElyea Students

221

DISTRICT

HOUSTON S e r v i n g

T h e

F a b u l o u s

G u lf

C oa st

Sect i o n

of

Tex a s

C o n g ratu lates

BETHANY NAZAREN E COLLEGE a n d the

" C L A S S

O F

'57 "

D ISTRICT N.Y.P.S. CAMP & I NSTITUTE J une 3-7 Camp Ross Sterling, Baytown, Texas

D ISTR ICT BOYS & GI R LS CAMP W. RAYMOND McCLUNG District Superintendent

J u ne 1 0- 1 4 Camp Ross Sterling, Baytown, Texas

M. GRANVILLE ROGERS Chu rch School Board Chairman MRS. W. RAYMON D McCLUNG N .F.M.S. President DWIGHT BOLTON J u nior Society Director MARLOW SALTER District Treasurer W. M. LYNCH District Secretary

DISTRICT ADVISORY BOARD L. P. DURHAM ODELL BROWN T. T. BOYD

VAN THURMAN

RALPH WRIGHT

N.Y.P.S. President

Holiness 222

HER ITAGE - VISION - TASK

BLYTHEVILLE, ARI(ANSAS FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE W . R. DONALDSON, Pastor

FIRST and SYCAMORE

BILL FOWLER

JEANETTE COBB

BILLY LAMBERT

STEVE EATMAN

PHILIP COBB

GARY TAYLOR

S up p o r t i ng B N C Wi t h O u r Prayers

*

Money

*

S tu d e n t s 223

"

T H E S I N G I N G C H U R C H " O F O K LA H O M A C I TY

CONGRATULATIONS t o t h e

C l a s s

o f

1957

FIRST CIIURCH of the NAZARENE OI(LAHOMA CITY

R . T . WILLIAMS Pastor

224

FRED McGRAW

Dir. of Christian Education

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE 2 1 1 East 4th H UTCH I NSON, KANSAS Wilson R. Lanpher, Pastor

F I R ST CHURCH o f the NAZA R E N E PONCA C ITY, OKLAHOMA

L. J. Min kler, Pastor

OUR STUDENTS Wesley Burpo Carolyn Alexander Janet Ware Ruth Pierce

7 1 8 S. 4th Street

C9 o n g r a t u l a t i o n s C9 l a s s o f

57 225

t•l II j� 11 11

11U_n_R_Z_R_R_E_n_E__ E L RENO, OKLAHOMA

Supporting the P ro g ra m o f

18 . n . f9 . REV. CARL PRENTICE Pastor

MARTHA KISNER

BUDDY PRENTICE

JEAN STURGEON

FIRST

JAMES R. EMMERT

CHURCH

"F" at Elmira

M U S I( O G E E , O I( L A .

C O N G RAT U LAT I O N S to

Bethany

Nazarene

Col lege

and

Arrow Staff

George M. Lake Minister

226

SOUTHWE ST

OKLAHOMA

DISTRICT

W. T. J O H NSON, District Su perintendent has s u pported B.N.C. with over $20,000 on Chapman H a l l, 1 52 students and our prayers.

AN AGGRESSIVE DISTRICT cooperating with the entire church prepared for the future by KEEPING STEP WITH T HE FAITH OF THE PAST

LOY WATSON District Chairman Church Schools

BOB CARROLL District President N.Y.P.S.

SUMMER CAMPS Boys and Girls Camp June 1 7-20 N .Y.P.S. Camp June 24-28 District Camp Meeting August 2-1 1

All camps will be held at the Dis足 trict Campground three and one足 half miles w e s t o f A n a d a r k o , Oklahoma.

MRS. W. T. JOHNSON District President N.F.M.S.

227

1Kausas (!!ity 1llistrirt ADVISORY BOA R D

DR. A. MILTON SMITH REV. PAUL SODOWSKY DR. J O H N STOC KTO N M. F RA N K T URN ER District Treasurer

Mrs. Del l Aycock

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __

Rev. Preston Thea l l Rev. Harper Cole Rev. Jea rld locke Rev. Jack lee

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

District N .Y. P.S. Pres.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

District Secretary

District Home Mission Treas.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

DR. JARRETTE AYCOCK District Superintendent

228

District N.F.M.S. Pres.

District Center Treas.

C ONGRATULATI O NS TO THE CLASS OF '57

JJroaJcaslin9 KARK LITTLE ROCK "Arkansas' Preferred Station" Twice Da ily Sunday

LITTLE ROCK'S

11 11 8 11 1 :30 1 0:30

A.M. P .M. A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.

�� MARYLAN D AVE N U E AND BATTE RY STREET "In the heart of Little Rock with Little Rock at heart"

"CHUCK" WILSON Minister of Music

KLINE F. D I C KERSON Minister

229

P E N I E L C H U RC H o f t h e N A Z A R E N E REV. C. G. WHITE Pastor

H U T C H I N S O N , K A N SA S 0 u R s T u D E PAT GOODEN

N T s

Gongratulations To The Glass of

M. D . SMITH S. S. Supt.

1957

FERN WILLIAMS

OUR STUDENTS Elizabeth Mishler

ETHE L YATES N.F.M.S. Pres.

Beverly Helm Clair Uitts

BOB RANDELS N.Y.P.S. Pres.

FI RST

C H U R C H

O F

N A Z A R E N E South El eventh a n d Wa l n ut I ndependence, Kansas

2 30

C ONGRATULATIONS TO THE

C L A S S of ' 5 7 C. B. KOPCHO, S.S. S upt. LLOYDE GRAMER, N.Y.P.S. Pres. MRS. RUTH GANSHORN, N. F.M.S. President LAUREN SANDE RS, Music Director

FIRST CHURC H of the NAZARENE 33rd and "C" Streets L I NCOLN, NEBRASKA

J. H. WHITE, Minister

G U Y M O N , O K LA H O M A

CHURCH of the NAZARENE Backing

Compliments of

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

B. N. C.

Hooker, Oklahoma

R. Earl Cotton

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

Denver Grounds, Jr. Martha Witzke

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Pastor

S. S. Supt.

N.Y.P.S. Pres.

OuR STUDENTS :

Leon Jennings W. J. Bryan

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Escol 0. Pierce

_ _ _ _ _

Mrs. W. J. Bryan

_ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ __

Pastor

S. S. Supt.

N.Y.P.S. Pres.

N.F.M.S. Pres. KNOW GOD

OuR STUDENTS :

Melvin Davy

Vera Winters Juanita Stearman

BE STRON G

DO EXPLOITS

Cecil Schwenki 231

A CHURCH WITH A WELCOME A T THE "GA TE WA Y TO TEXOMALAND "

F I R S T C H UR C H o f t h e NAZ A R E NE D U RA NT, OKLA H O MA

f9o n g ra t u l a te s Th e fi r ro w S ta ff o f

1 957

SU PPORT ING B.N.C. WITH STUDE NTS WITH BU DGET PAYMENTS WITH PRAYERS

HAROLD C. HARCO U RT, Pastor

2589 Mem bers

53 C hurches

REV. J . W. HENDRICKSON Dist. Supt.

Students From North Arkansas District

232

M E R I D I A N PA R K

_$ CHURCH of the N AZ A RE N E ) }

FO RTY- FOURTH & M E R I D IAN

'{

NOBLE HATHAWAY, Pastor

QUINDARO CHURCH of the NAZARENE 2843 NORTH 1 3TH STREET

I( A N S A S C I T Y , K A N S A S

B E S T

B E T H A N Y

W I S H E S

T 0 -

--

NAZARE N E

C O L L E G E - - -

JERALD R. LOCKE Pastor

JIM MOTSINGER

RICHARD MONTFORD LINDA JOHNSON

A

Fri e n d ly

C h u rc h

PAT JOHNSON

W i t h

A

Spiri t u a l

Uplift 233

STUDENT

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION S

Seated left to right: Richey Lewis, Prof. Orville McDa niel, Dale Messee. Standing L to R: Roger Riggs, Carl Sumner, David Philo, Francis Mutto.

e M i n i ste r i a l Asso c i a t i o n

e

Prayer and

e

Fasti n g

Gospel Team

e 234

M i ssi o n

Band

-------

,. .�

� I OAK AVEN U E CHURCH of the NAZAREN E 1 70 1 Oak Avenue

DUNCAN, OKLAHOMA

CONGRATULAT I N G

* Ad m i n istration * Facu lty * Sen iors of 1 95 7

G. D. GADBOW Pastor

D. \"'AYNE SLEDGE S. S. Supt.

"THE HEART OF CHRISTIAN ED UCATION is first, THE ED UCATION OF THE HEART" "Keep thy heart with all diligence; for out of it are the issues of life"

( Proverbs 4 : 2 3 ) 235

T H E

C O L L I

Cradle Roll-Nursery

Pastor

Minister of Education

Primary-Caravan Kinder Garten-Graded Church

Of fe rs 2 36

a

Progrt

}E

CHURCH

Youth-Summer Camp

Adult-Missionary Society

Young Adult-Sunday School

Home Dept.-Visitation

Juniors-Junior Choir

for Everyone 2 37

NORTHWEST OKJ DR. E . S. PH l l l l PS Advisory Board Sec.

B o o s t i ng B e t h a ny Naz a re n e Co l leg e

FRANK J. KEMENDO Advisory Boord

J. T. GASSETT Superintendent

H. l . CRADDOCK Advi sory Board

W . J. BRYAN Advisory Board

DR. FRED FLOYD Dist. Secretary

lV!RS. FRANK KEl\!ENDO N.F.M.S. President

DR. D. R. DANSKIN Dist. Treasurer

MRS. D . R. DANSKIN N . F.M.S. Treasurer

238

MRS. ROY H. CANTRELL N .F.M.S. Vice路Pres.

MRS. J. T . GASSETT Study Secretary

MRS. EMMA BRACKEN N . F .M.S. Secretary

MRS. E . S. PH i l l i PS Publicity Secretary

MRS. CARSON SNOW Box Work Secretary

MRS. D. l . SLACK Membership Secretary

MRS. NOBLE HATHAWAY 110ther Sheep'' Sec.

�HOMA DISTRICT FRANK McCO N N E l l C h u rc h School Treas.

Wi t h O u r S t u d e n ts , Fi n a n ces A n d P r ay e r s

BOB FETTERS Church School Board

DARREL L. SLACK Church School Board Chm.

l. J . MINKLER Church School Board

BOB G R E E N Church School Boord

DON SCH U N EMAN Church School Boord

i\IELVIN L. RIDDLE N.Y.P.S. President

MRS. FRANK McCON N E l l Prayer an d Fasting

MRS. M. l . R I D D L E N.Y.P.S. Secretary

MRS. BOB FETTERS Children's Worker

MRS. A. D . G R I M J u n i o r Director

BOB FETTERS N.Y.P.S. Vice-Pres.

J. C. F E C H N E R N.Y.P.S. Treasurer

MRS. PAUL TEMPLE T een·Age Worker

RUTH RAW L I NGS Teen-Age Rep.

DAV I D P H I L O Teen-Age Rep.

2 39

Bes t Wis h es Sen i o rs Pro m

Key C9i ty of Wes t Texas

D I C K LITTRELL,

Pastor

FIRST CHURCH of th e NAZARENE Abi lene, A

G r e a t

C h u r c h

Texas

B o o s t i n g

A

G r e a t

C o l l e g e

C U S H I N G , O I( L A H O M A

CHU R C H of the NAZAR E NE

- ··· -

Rev. S. W. Nesmith. Pastor 240

A Program For All

S u p p o r t i n g C9 h r i s t i a n G d u c a t i o n

DALLA S D I S TR I CT

c H

A l

R I s T

l F 0 R

F 0 R

c

DR. PAUL H . GARRETT Dist. Supt.

H R I s T

A L L

ADVISORY BOARD

CHURCH SCHOOL BOARD

Rev. Clyde Ammons

Rev. H. F. Crews, Chairman

Rev. Fletcher Spruce

Rev. Fletcher Spruce

Mr. Ned Thompson

Rev. Fred Fike

Rev. W. L. Crawford

Rev. E. B. Matthews Mr. Ned Thompson Rev. Leon Martin

Rev. Milton Parrish, N.Y.P.S. Pres.

Mrs-. Paul H. Garrett, N.F.M.S. Pres.

241

SANCTUARY

FIRST CHURCH of th e NAZARE NE W I C H I TA, KAN SAS

G . A . GOUGH, Minister

KEN S. ARMSTRONG, Associate Minister

242

W. I. GOUGH, Visiting Minister

Com m e rcial

243

C9ompliments of

� 1\ ( J.< \ T t £ -:- s

! \G.

R />. 'V t 0 '1: 1-H. � · � \ 1 0 4 H � ;j, N o\ ':' 0 �

N 'II

T

E

F

c M

D

R

S

T

D

£

R. -

T

L

[

0

N

t

N

T

L

.

1-!

�.

GILBERT CLINIC DR. LEON GILBERT

DR. K E N N ETH OGG

Phone WH 9-244 1

244

Ol<cA.

CRAIG AYE RS PONTIAC CO. YU KON, O K LA HOMA

Comp lete Service Dept.

N ew a n d Used Cars

B o o sting The Program of Bethany Nazarene College 245

GREE TINGS from

Hal Owen Studio Hal Owens

Bessie Farley

Jean McKee

246

Mary McGuire

Hazel Hill

Doris Mandernacht

Mazie Jones

Pearl McHaney

1 1 1 S . W. F I RST

EAGAN PLUMBING CO.

The Best I n Plumbi n g & H eating

TOM SMITH

FELTS

D E E P R OC K S E R V I C E

5960 N.W. 39th BETHANY, O KLA.

WH 9-9543

:JJtudenl f!JJu�ine�J �fi�tecialed 247

2 1 7 E. MAI N STREET

e

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

PHONE WHitney 9-5602

Dea r Friends:

N E E D I n su rance?

SEE

US!

W e Write A l l Kinds, I nc l u d i ng Life.

N E E D to Buy or Se l l Your Home?

SEE US!

There Are 2 Bonded Brokers a nd 1 Bonded Sa les­ m a n in O u r Office.

N E E D New Car Financing?

SEE

US!

5 V2 % I nterest Rate.

Remember-It is better to HAVE i n surance and not need it-than to NEED i n sura n ce a n d not have it.

Si ncere ly, Mer l i n C. Martin Fred Va u g h a n , J r.

WESTERN

MOTEL

"On Hig hway 66" - one m ile west of B.N.C. e AIR CONDITIONED

AAA

T.V. I N ROOMS e

APPROV E D

PAN E L RAY H EATING e

e PR IVATE BATHS

Owned and Operated by Nazarenes MR. AND MRS. J O H N DIFFEE

H O G U E - S T O N E

M E R R I TT FU N E RA L H O M E Northwest 39th St.

FLOOR COVERING COMPANY

BETWEE N BETHANY & WARR ACRES

Hammond Organ

"Carpets for Every Purpose" 23rd & C LASSEN

P H O N E JA 8-4493

CHAPEL

249

Western Auto Asso c i a t e

C9ompliments of Your Friendly

T. G. &

Y.

STO RE

B ETHANY

Headquarters for College Students

1 23 S. Col lege

Bethany, Okla.

Department Store Serving the College and the Community

BETHANY, OKLAHOl\IA 250

T h e B ROW N - McC L U R E L U M B E R CO M PA N Y from "A Home-Town Concern" 309 East Ma i n Street

*

Phones WH 9-5607

WH 9-5608

WH 9-5609

BETHANY, O K LAHOMA

"Striving daily to build a bigger and better Bethany"

Melvin McC lure

Roy Brown

Th/s GAS' l!otne worh BEmR thon $Unshine

This tiny GAS flame in your Automatic GAS Clothes Dryer actually dries clothes better than sunshine. It saves money, too. Costs so very little to use, saves clothes from wind and dust, saves time and trouble of taking clothes to and from a clothes line. Try a new Automatic GAS Clothes Dryer, and you'll never be without one another week.

See your GAS appliance

dealer for a demonstration.

O H LR H O m R n RTU R R L �� 251

FIRST N AT I O N A L BAN K OF BETHANY

F I RST I N NAME - F I RST I N S ERV ICE

WE

S E RV E

OUR

COMMU N I TY

OUR

DEPOS ITORS

OUR

BORROWERS

MEMBER O F

2 52

F . D . I .C .

UP-T O - D ATE C LE ANE R S

" Come in for the best in Dry C leaning, Pressing and La undry Service. "

1 1 6 S . W . Main

Phone WH 9-240 1

f¥,A,{)/ Jllalional $ani o{r:!lul:on

91Jejtendable fJJankln? /Fince

�892 '

-�-

. ""·�-"""'

�.!":"i.�� �-.""'"

- .

:�-"'""

'5�� - -�

b

r�--� ""

-;.tJM� :;" .

*�:; �"'.:� �

253

YUKONS BEST

B ET H A N Y K I WA N I S CLUB

FLOUR

Serving the AS K

C h urch

GRO C E R

YOUR

School Com m u n ity

Yukon Mill & Grain Co. Y U KON, OKLAHOMA

G RA H A M'S APPLIANCES

e

FURN ITURE

1 1 0 W. Ma in Street

HANSEN

&

ATLEE

DAIRY INC.

WE GIVE S&H GREEN STAMPS

Ge neral E lectric and RCA Appliances Phone WH 9-3894

BETHAIY 254

1 80 1

S. Pen n .

Good Food and Friendly Service 3 19 N. W. 2 3RD

-

JA 8-294 2

3 1ST & MAY - WI 3-0430

255

CARTER�s FLOWERS A N D GI FTS Corsages With 11Personal ity11

STUDE N TS

W E LCOME

AT

DON'S MEDICAL CENTER PHARMACY .

Distinctive Arra ngements

2600 N. MacArthur 205 W. MAI N

We Give Every Order

WH 9-5 1 78

Our Individual Attention

Free City Wide Del ivery

WI 3-33 1 4

BATE S SHO E S

DON SELF-Pharmacist

JESSE CHAM BERS T EXACO S E R V I CE STAT I O N

WH 9-9572

409 E. MAIN

FIRESTO N E T I RES & BATTERIES Why

Not

Get

T h e

Best Comp lete

256

O ne

Stop

Service

Compliments of

COLLE G E CLE ANE R S

S HAFE R

M OBIL

SERVICE

One Day La undry Service The Best in Dry Cleaning

"iUi«ht As Well Have The Best" � E . Paul Ridings Owner

Bethany Laundry

C H ESTER SHAFER Owner

20 1 E. Ma in BETHANY

Co mp l im en ts of DR. RALPH SHAD I D

D R . E DWARD SHAD I D

DR. WALTE R THOMPSON

Special Services to Students WH 9-4063

1 1 2 S. W. 1 st BETHANY

BETHANY

2 57

Compliments of Your

F R I E N D LY STGo. N DARD

H U M PTY D U M PTY S T O R E

G R I ES EL M OTO R Y U KON, O KLAHOMA PHONES: YUKON

OKLAHOMA CITY

4-22 1 1

W I 2-5878

STE WARTS PAINT STORE

E. W. WALKER, Mgr.

BETHANY, OKLA.

Y U KO N N AT I O N A L BAN K YUKON, OKLAHOMA

The

Friend ly

Member

B a n k

of

Federal Deposit I nsurance Corporation

C ongratulations to

426 E. Ma in

W H 9-3273

B E T H A N Y N A ZA R E N E C O L L E G E

2 59

O N E AND TWO DAY SERVICE

Betha ny's f i nest a n d most modern D r y Clea ners

"Always Boosting B.N. C. " ELMER MANN, Owner

Phone WH 9-3332

1 1 5 S. COLLEGE

H I C I( ďż˝ R Y P I T B A R - B - C U E

38 1 6 N. May

260 '

YA R LA N G M OT O R CO M PA N Y

Arts

301 N.E. Main BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

B arber Shop ART KASTNER

BOB WOMACK

DON KASTN E R

"We Specialize in Flat Tops"

Packard

Studebaker

Art Kastner

Bob Womack

Don Kastner

P O W E LL RE XALL D R U G S T O R E

Sundries

Drugs Prescriptions

Phone WH 9-5656

1 26 S. W. Mai n BETHANY, OKLA.

261

. :-� .�

.. � .

. . .· .

TALMADGE J O H NSON . C H ARLES STRAWN KAT H E R I N E SNOWBARGER RICHY LEWIS DON F ITZGERALD GWEN WALKER ROY S IMPSON BU DDY EMMERT VERLA OKE JO B U RD I N E

L O AN S A N D F I N A N C E S

IN V E S T M E N T S

Borrow O n:

6 % Paid On Investments

Cars F u rn iture

Interest Paid Sem i-Ann ua l ly

Co-Sig ners

JACK DAVIDSON

ANN OUITHER

CI !ARLESTA CURRY

See Us About Your Financia l Problems

C O MMUNITY L O AN & INVE S TMENT C O MPANY WH 9-4 1 88

Box 85

2 1 7 E . Main We Are Helping to Build A Better Bethany

263

CURTIS STUDIO 28 1 5 C lassen Boulevard

OKLAHOMA C ITY, O KLAHOMA

1 1 8 S. W. Main

Phone JAckson 5-2229 Your

B u siness

Apprecia ted

J . L. and Julia Jennings

B I L L WOO D R I N G

&

SON

GA RAGE

KRAKER'S

LADIES AND MEN's WEAR

Sportswear for College

Joe and Jane Use Our Convenient Lay-Away Plan

1 2 2 S. \\1. 200 E . Main

264

WH 9-355 1

M ai n

Phone

B ETHANY

WH 9-3440

WEHRENBURG DRUG

·• �· ..I•.. �; -

•ttfj

"

.

" ' ' ''

'

B ethany' s M o s t Mod ern Drug S t o r e We Give S&H Green Stamps

Phone WH 9-5636

3ferman's [at Skoppe Serving the Students of B. N. C .

1 0 9 So. College BETHANY, O KLAHOMA

265

B E THA NY NAZ A R E N E C O L L E G E

Administration Building

S e rv i n g 7h e S t u d e n ts , Va re n ts, an d C9 h u r c h e s , o f t h e G d u c a t i o n a l Zo n e 266

u Good religious writings are, first of all, faithful to the Bible.

This is the bedrock principle of your Publishing House.

Uphold the Word-along with your Publishing House.

Nazarene

PU B L I S H ING

HOUS E

� KANSAS CITY � PASADENA � TORONTO

Bethany Bool� Shop

Serving The Bethany Area 267

THE

D RAG MRS. DREWRY, Mgr.

268

BETHANY NAZARENE COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION B o o s ti n g Our

Alma-Mater

269

<IN

PI

I

l NG

a �d Ll

Produced

I

m

H O G I < A II==')* H Y

a modernly equipped pla nt.

Where machines cast new type for every job, which means that every letter produces a clean, clear, sharp impression.

Where the best of camera a nd plate making eq uipment is operated by carefully trained men who take pride in their ability to do better l itho­ graphing.

Where every order that comes to the plant is looked u pon by the craftsmen •

as an opportunity to display their skil l .

Where QUALITY printing and lithog raphing sta ndards a re ma inta ined. •

S T AT I O N . R Y A B A N K S U P P LY 4500 N. SANTA FE

OKLAHOMA C ITY

The Arrow Annual Was Produced in This Plant 270

Student Index ALEXANDER, CAROLYN Route 1, Ponca City, Okla. ALEXANDER, KATHY 244 5 Overton Road, Dallas, Texas ALLBRITTON, JOHNNY Robeline, La. ALLEN, HAROLD 3 3 1 7 26th St., Lubbock, Texas ALLEN, LUE ANNA 908 Argentine Blvd., Kansas City, Kansas ALLEN, ROBERT 5 502 N. West Avenue, Bethany, Okla . AMMONS, CURTIS 5726 Morning Side, Dallas, Texas ANDERSON, CAROLYN Box 663, Bethany, Okla. ANTHONY, VERLIN Cleo Springs, Okla. ARMSTRONG, C. L. 1 0 N. Little, Fort Scott, Ark. ARNETT, HENRY Box 563, Bethany, Okla. ARNOLD, RONALD Monument, Kansas ATKINSON, NORMA Centerview, Mo. ATKINSON, ROBERT Centerview, Mo. AUBREY, GAYLAND 701 N . College, Bethany, Okla. AUSTIN, HELEN 3 1 1 N. Sheridan, Minneapolis, Kan. _________

_____________

___________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __

______________

_________________

_______________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

______________

______________

________________

_______________

______________

_____________

______________

_________________

BACH, TOM 2720 E . 7th St., Tucson, Ariz. BAKER, EARL � Route 1 , Springdale, Ark. BALDWIN, CHARLES Box 425, Bethany, Okla. BALDWIN, FRANK Denver, Colo. BARKER, MARY 6 3 P h Cedar, Yukon, Okla. BARLOvV, CAROL Box 778, Bartlesville, Okla. BARLOW, RONALD Box 778, Bartlesville, Okla. BARTON, MARILYN Route 1, Columbus, Kansas BASHAM, JANIE 9 1 0 Lincoln Ave., La Junta, Colo. BEAVER, CAURIE Route 2, Stella, Mo. BECKETT, GORDON 2 2 1 7 W. Washington, Charleston, \Vest Virginia BECKETT, VERNON 2 2 1 7 W. \Vashington, Charleston, West Virginia BELCHER, MURLENE 2428 E. 1 3th Place, Tulsa, Okla . BELEW, CHARLENE Box 1 0 3, Vici, Okla. BELL, LOWELL Route 1 , Lubbock, Texas

__ __ __ ___ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -

---

_____________

_ _ _ __ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _

__________________

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __

______________

__________________

_ ____ ________ __ _

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

______________

____________

______ _______

__________________

82 82 82 48 72

BERGEN, ESTHER ---------------Ensign, Kansas BERGEN, GERALD Route 1, Anderson, Mo. BEST, LOEWEN 1 1 1 2 N. 3 1 , Duncan, Okla. BLUE, ANN Box 3 38, Atlanta, Texas BLYSTONE, BETTY JO 36 1 8 Campbell, Kansas City, Mo. BOHANNAN, CHARLES Box 44, Alpine, Texas BOHLKE, ANNE -----------------703 8th Ave., Clinton, Iowa BOLES, BILL --------------------402 N. E. 1st, Bethany, Okla. BOLTON, JIM 407 E . Park Lane, Pasadena, Texas BOND, ELEANOR Ingalls, Kansas BOND, GLEN -------------- ---- -Ingalls, Kansas BOND, MARY LOU May, Okla. BONNER, BILLIE Tichnor, Ark. BONNER, RUTH Tichnor, Ark. BOSTICK, JANETTE 8 0 5 S. 2nd, Lamesa, Texas BOUNDS, DONIVAN Route 1, Box 1 48, Wellington, Texas BOYDSTUN, ' l vfiLTON 1 24 S. W . 3rd, Bethany, Okla. BRADFORD, JERRELL 3026 Ozark Ave., Port Arthur, Texas BREITHAUPT, GLENN Route 4, Lawrence, Kansas BRENNEMAN, OLETA Route 4, Howard, . Kansas BREWER, NITA -------- ---- ----- -1 1 0 E. Modoc, Nowata, Okla. BRIDGEWATER, DON Box 307, Larned, Kansas BRIGGS, DIANE SUE Box 1 1 7, Guthrie, Okla . BROCK, MYRNA Route 1, Vineyard, Texas BURDINE, JO --------------------344 E . Park, Orange, Texas BURDINE, MARY 344 E. Park, Orange, Texas BURGNER, JIM 1641 Victory, Wichita Falls, Texas BURKHART, PARK Vet. Apt. No. 1 3, Bethany, Okla. BURNETT, GLENN 1 1 36 S. Terrace Dr., vVichita, Kansas BURNS, DONNA BOND 200 N. College, Bethany, Okla. BURNS, JERRY ------------------200 N. College, Bethany, Okla. BURNS, MARGARET 1 028 4th Ave., Birmingham, Ala.

_______________

__________________

______________________

____________

___________

48 82 94

____________________

82

___________ _____

72 48

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _

72

_________________

48

_________________

48

______________

93

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

48

____________

72 82

____________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

48

_ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ __

64 72

____________

82

______________

72

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

72 82

_________________

82

___________________

48

________________

72 82

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

___________

_____

82 64

______________

72 72 82

BURPO, WESLEY ----------------- 64 9 1 6 S. 8th, Ponca City, Okla . BUSBY, MARY -------------------- 8 3 Box 3 3 32, Arsenal, Ark. BUTLER, LAVONA 64 506 N. College, Bethany, Okla. ________________

82 CAMPBELL, BOB 6 1 0 N. 1 6th, Edinburg, Texas CAMPBELL, NAOMI -------------1 3 3 W . Buffalo, Yuma, Colo. CANTRELL, WALLACE 220 S. 4th, West Helena, Ark. CANTWELL, RAY 4740 E . Washington, Indianapolis, Ind. CARLETON, DON � ' 2948 9th St., Port Arthur, Texas CARMICHAEL, REX 1 1 5 Main, Yukon, Okla . CARNEY, DON 1 300 S. Walnut, McPherson, Kansas CARR, LYNN --------------------1 50 5 Ann Arbor, Norman, Okla. CARRIGAN, CONRAD Box 39 3, Beebe, Ark. CARROLL, MARVIN 5 1 1 N. 6th, Fairview, Okla. CASE, ROY ----------------------1005 Graymont Ave., Birmingham, Alabama CARTER, LUCRETIA --- ----- - ---3 2 1 W. State, Enid, Okla. CHARTON, JACQUELYN 207 N . W . Main, Bethany, Okla. CHEATWOOD, HENRY 2722 Stonewall, Shreveport, La . CHESTNUT, GLEN 1 402 V.'alker, Kansas City, Kansas CHILDRESS, BOB 7006 Boyce, Houston, Texas CHILDRESS, CHARLES Route 4 , Norman, Okla. CHRISTY, JIM Rt. 1 , Leavenworth, Kansas CINNAMON, NOLA Vici, Okla . CLARK, DOROTHY --- --- --------DeQueen, Ark. CLASSEN, HORACE 3 1 0 N. W. 1 st, Bethany, Okla. CLASSEN, FRANCES Mead, Kansas CLIFTON, VADA ANN 26 1 0 E . Washington, North Little Rock, Ark. _________________

72 72

____ _ _ __ _ _ _

82

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

72 82 64 64 49 64

---------------

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__ ____ ___ _ _ ____ ___ _

____________

72

______________

72 72 72 82

__________

___ ________

82

____ ___________

82

_________________

72

____________

82

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

82

__ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

82 83

_ _ _ _ _ _ ________

64

______________

72

__ __________

93 64 49 49 49 72

49 83 72 83 64 83 64 72 64 83 72 49 83 73 73 73 83 73 73 73 49 83 83

CLOSE, JEANIE Box 54, Kingsdown, Kansas

83

COBB, JEANETTE 1 0 1 E . Cherry, Blytheville, Ark.

83

COBB, PHILIP Blytheville, Ark.

83

___________________

________________

__ __ ______ __________

COLE, CARNA -------------------- 7 3 Curtis, Neb.

271

COLWELL, PAT ---------- -------8 0 5 N. College, Bethany, Okla. COMBS, MARIE Box 788, Jacksonville, Texas CONGER, BILL ------------------Codell, Kansas CONNALLY, TERRY Route I, LaJunta, Colo. COOK, JOSEPHINE 509 N. College, Bethany, Okla . COOKSEY, TOMMY 3735 N. Williams, Oklahoma City, Okla. COOSE, AMELIA Nady, Ark. COPELAND, MOLLY Rt. 1, Lowell, Ark. CORBIN, JOYCE 1 E . Apache, Tulsa, Okla . COSTON, OSCAR ----------------Vet. Apt. No. 8, Bethany, Okla . COX, BOB ------ ---- -------------609 W . Russ, Enid, Okla. COX, JOYCE ------ ------------ --1 609 Sam Houston, Sweetwater, Texas CRAWFORD, GENELL 1 1 07 E. College, Sherman, Texas CREWS, THEAL Box 2 1 4, Bethany, Okla. CROCKETT, JANICE 826 W . Mulberry, San Antonio, Texas CROMEANS, PHILIP -------------3 7 1 6 Congress, Austin, Texas CROSLEY, RONALD Elkhart, Kansas CRUZEN, MARTHA Box 2 5 3,. Watonga, Okla. CULLISON, STEPHEN 2 0 8 % S. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. CUMMINS, WAYNETTA . Box 9 1 3, Groves, Texas CUNNINGHAM, FORREST 746 N. E. Washington Blvd. Bartlesville, Okla. CURLESS, MARLENE 3 1 0 S. Cypress, Kansas City, Mo. CYPERT, LEE MORE Rt. 3 , Brownfield, Texas ____________ ______

______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

_ _ ___ _ _ ___ _ __ _

_ _ _______________

_____________

_________________

____________

__________________

_____________

______________

______________

____________

__________

________

_____________

___ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

DANIEL, JAMES -----------------Box 389, Searcy, Ark. DANNER, CHARLES 505 N. W. l Oth, Bethany, Okla. DANNER, BARBARA 5 0 5 N. W. l Oth, Bethany, Okla. DANSKIN, DONNA 1 2 3 N. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. DAUGHERTY, CAROLYN 708 W. 7th, Monahans, Texas DAVENPORT, ASENATH 3 0 5 N. E. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. DAVIS, DORIS 2 1 1 N. College, Bethany, Okla. DAVIS, NANCY 507 N. Beulah, Bethany, Okla. DAVIS, RAMONA ----------------602 Brooks Dr., Midland, Texas DAYHOFF, DELBERT 2 1 09 30th, Great Bend, Kansas __ ___

______ __

__________ _ _ _

_______________

_________

---·-------

____________________

__ __________ _ ______

_________ ____

272

83 83 64 49 49

DEMPSEY, JACK Box 2 3, St. Charles, Ark . . DENNIS, BILL -------- -----------1 1 1 4 Mote St., Hot Springs, Ark. DEPUE, H ENRY Rt. 5, Box 5 7 3 A, Okla. City, Okla. DeVORE, DORIS -----------------509 W. Boulder, Colorado Springs, Colo. DeVORE, VIOLA Box 2 5 , Tabor, Ohio DILL, MARJORIE 1 06 S. W. l Oth, Bethany, Okla. DIMOND, CARL Box 67, Little River, Kansas DORRIS, REBECCA 403 N. Mueller, Bethany, Okla . DORRIS, ROY LEE 403 N . W . 7th, Bethany, Okla. DOUGLAS, BARBARA 1 08 S. Oak, Bristow, Okla. DOWNEY, STEWART 6 1 0 N . 1 4th, Artesia, New Mexico DRAKE, MARY Rifle, Colorado DRISCOLL, JACK Vet. Hut No. 1 2, Bethany, Okla. DUPREE, JO --------------------Rt. 1 , Box 1 74, Atlanta, Texas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ __ _ _ _

__________________

_________________

50

_________________

64 50 83 64 73 83

__________________

_______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

________ _____

_____________

___________________

_________________

64 64 83 83 83 83 73 73 64

EASLEY, CARLTON Eldorado, Okla . EASLEY, PAT 721 3 Fulton, Houston, Texas EATMON, STEVE 5 0 1 N . Broadway, Blytheville, Ark. EDMONDS, PAUL 706 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. EGERTON, ROGER 305 S . W . 3rd, Bethany, Okla . ELAM, GAYLORD 1 008 Michigan, Winfield, Kansas ELDER, ALPHA ----- ------------404 W. 2nd St., Breckenridge, Texas ELKINS, JIMMY 2 1 00 W. 24th, Pine Bluff, Ark. ELLIS, DOYLE ------ ------------Box 593, Gaylord, Kansas ENIMERT, BUDDY 1 00 5 Cherry St., Orange, Texas ESKRIDGE, VIOLA 4.4 32 N. W . 1 8th, Okla. City, Okla.

_______________

____________________

_ _________ _______

__ _ _ ______ ____ __ _

_______________

________________

__________________

83 83

_______________

73 50 83 73 73 64 50 50 64 73

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

FALES, SHARON Box 424, Arnold, Neb. FALK, PATSY Rt. 2, Wellington, Texas FARROW, JOE 9 1 0 'A'. 5th, Cisco, Texas FENNO, JOANNE LaMoure, North Dakota FIKA, RUTH --------------------Box 674, Bethany, Okla. FIRESTONE, DON Box 97, Vivian, La. FISHER, PHYLLIS --- ---- --'-------3 1 8 S . Beaver, Bethany, Okla. FITZGERALD, DON Rt. 7 , Box 248, Okla . City, Okla . FITZGERALD, ELLEN Rt. 7 , Box 248, Okla. City, Okla. _________________

______________ _ _

_ ____

___________________

_________________

________________

______________

____________

73 83 83 64 73 50

FLOOD, DONALD 402 'A'- Lincoln, Blackwell, Okla. FORSHEE, MARLENE � 420 North C , Duncan, Okla . . FOUTS, FARRELL ---------------3 3 1 Leland, Topeka, Kansas FOWLER, BILL --- - --------------Luxora, Ark. FOX, LOU ANN -----------------9 1 2 Duncan, Duncan, Okla. FRANKLIN, HAROLD ------------1 1 3 Asbury, Bethany, Okla. FRAZIER, DOYLE Bethany, Okla . FREEMAN, DAPH€NE Box 287, New London, Texas FREEMAN, MARVIS --------- - - --2927 Cherry, Dallas, Texas FROLICH, BERNICE Rt. 1 2, Box 439, Okla. City, Okla. FROST, ELVIRA 2400 W. 2nd, Topeka, Kansas ________________

-------

----

________________

83

____________

64 83

_ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

83

__ _______________

73 65 50 83 84 73 73 50 51 73 84 84 73 65 51 84 84 84 73 51 65 51 65 65

GADBOW, DON -----------------1 704 Parkvie>v, Duncan, Okla. GALBRAITH, DAVID 1902 W . 7th, Austin, Texas GALBRAITH, GENE 1 902 W. 7th, Austin, Texas GANN, LURA -- ---- --------------8 1 1 Ethel, Austin, Texas GARDNER, DALE 4 1 6 E . 1 2th, Pine Bluff, Ark. GARDNER, ROBBIE 4 1 6 E. 1 2th, Pine Bluff, Ark. GARNAND, IRMA LEE 409 N. W . 2nd, Bethany, Okla. GAR ER, ANN 302 N. College, Bethany, Okla. GENTZ, MARJORIE --------------3 2 0 Basswood, Houston, Texas GERRING, MELVIN 304 N. College, Bethany, Okla. GIBSON, ANGIE ----------------1 2 36 N. Sierra Bonita, Pasadena, Calif. GIBSON, MARTHA 1 828 N. W. 30th, Okla. City, Okla. GIFFORD, THELMA Lipscomb, Texas GILDERSLEEVE, JULIA 42 1 vV. 1 3th, Concordia, Kansas GILL, BERTHA ------------------Box 1 384, Texas City, Texas GOETZ, HELEN 304 N . E . 2nd St., Bethany, Okla. GOODEN, BILL 1 06 N . Mueller, Bethany, Okla. GORDON, JOYCE Holdenville, Okla. GORDON, VELDA ---------------Box 1 02, Caddo, Okla. G(!RDON, VONCIEL ------------Bethany, Okla. GORMAN, MARSHA 2 1 40 8th St., Port Arthur, Texas GOULDEN, TED ------ -----------1 1 3 Merrill, Marshall, Texas GRANGER, DONNA 2 3 5 1 A Lane, St. Louis, Mo. _ _ __ _________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

______________

___________

_ _ _________ _____ _ _ _

______________

________________

______________

__________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

____ ______________

__ ___ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ ___

______________

______________

84 73 81 84 51 51 65 84 84 84 84 84 73 74 84 65 74 51 74 65 84 84 74 74 65 65 51 65 74 84 52 74 52 84

GRANGER, KEN 308 N. W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. GRAVES, LOIS ------------------2009 E. l Oth, Pueblo, Colo. GREEN, LARRY -------- -------- -268 Wichita, Shreveport, La. GREER, VINCENT 700 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. GRIMES, BILLY JACK 1 080 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. __________________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ __ __ _ __ _ _ _

HAlLMAN, DAISY 2 1 07 N. 4th, Ironton, Ohio HALE, DON 6703 N . W . 3 0th Terrace, Oklahoma City, Okla. HALE, JO ANN 3004 47th St., Lubbock, Texas HALEY, LaJUANDA 1 320 Summerville NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico HALL, LEWIS 5 1 06 McCorkel Ave. SE, Charleston, West Virginia HALL, MARJORIE Longdale, Okla. HALL, MARTHA 3249 N. Madison, Tulsa, Okla. HAMES, MELVIN 6 1 0 N. Central, Hamlin, Texas HAMITER, ANN 1 1 5 S . Redmond, Bethany, Okla. HAMMER, ANITA 5920 N. W. 24, Bethany, Okla. HAN, GEORGE Seoul, Korea HANN, MARRIETTA 1 1 1 2 E . I Oth, Winfield, Kansas HARDER, DEAN Mead, Kansas HARDER, DUANE Mead, Kansas HARPER, CHARLES 74 3 5 Wayne, Kansas City, Mo. HARRIS, BILLY JOE 632 E . Gandy, Denison, Texas HARROD, DUANE Rt. 1 , Olton, Texas HART, REN 32 1 E . 6th St., Amarillo, Texas HART, RUTH ANN l O l l Gregory, Hutchison, Kansas HARTPENCE, GARY 2 1 6 Elm, Ottawa, Kansas HASKINS, JAMES 29 1 5 N. Place, Okla. City, Okla. HAWKINS, CLARENCE Box 1 092, Post, Texas HAWTHORNE, DOYLE 8 1 5 1h N. W. 6th, Okla. City, Okla. HEBARD, CHARLES 308 S. W . 3rd, Bethany, Okla. HELM, BEVERLY 74 1 5 E . 3rd, Tulsa, Okla. HELSEL, LAUREL 1 1 1 9 Colorado Ave., LaJunta, Colo. HENDERSON, GARY 1 820 5th Ave., Kearney, Neb. HENDERSON, JENE 4837 Bromfield, Dallas, Texas

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________

84 74 74

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

- - - - - - - - - - - - -· -

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

74 93

_____________

________________

52

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ ________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

84

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________________

85

__________ _________

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

___________________

______________

__________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ ___ _ _

______________

85 65 85 65 74 52 85 65 74 52

____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__________________

_______________

________________

_____________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_____________ _ ___ _

____________

___ _ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

84

HENDERSON, LARRY 500 1h N . Peniel, Bethany, Okla. HENDRICKS, JOHN 1 3 1 4 N. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas HENDRICKS, ROBERT 5 5 27 N. W . 4 1 st St., Oklahoma City, Okla. HENRY, WESLEY ---------------6 0 5 E. 1 6th, Hutchinson, Kansas HENSLEY, ROBERT 8 DeQuincy, DeQueen, Ark. HENTHORN, LLOYD 6 5 2 1 N. W. 1 2th, Okla. City, Okla. HERREN, KARYN Rt. 3, Enid, Okla. HERRON, VERA Box 2 6 3 , Cimarron, Kansas H IGDON, JANETT 2 2 4 N. W. Ave. "H", Hamlin, Texas HIGHT, KENDALL Carl Junction, Mo. HILL, CLIFFIE 2081h N . W . 2nd, Bethany, Okla. HILL, DENNIS Richton Park, Ill. HINES, RUTH Box 752, Bethany, Okla. HIPPLE, PERRY 5 1 1 E . Mohave, Tucson, Ariz. HODGSON, ARLYS 5 0 8 N . Asbury, Bethany, Okla. HOGAN, TILDON 9 1 6 W. 45th, North Little Rock, Ark. HOLLAND, FRANKIE Rt. 3, Okarche, Okla. HOLLAND, JOYCE 4 508 W. 24th, Little Rock, Ark. HOLLEY, GERALD Box 2 1 8, Vivian, La. HOLLIS, KATHY 17 S. Meadowcliff Dr., Little Rock, Ark. HONAKER, OWALAH 7 1 9 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. HONAKER, RICHARD 1 0 1 S. E. 7th, Bethany, Okla. HOOD, EUGENE 608 E . Colorado, Victoria, Texas HOOVER, BOBBY Mt. Vernon, Texas HOOVER, CHARLES 404 N. E . 2nd, Bethany, Okla . HORTON, DEAN 7 2 5 N . College, Bethany, Okla. HOSTUTLER, SONNY Box 3 1 47, Corpus Christi, Texas HOUTS, JACK Box 66, Fargo, Okla. HOWARD, JO 1 007 Alametos, San Antonio, Texas HOWARD, NORMA 1 320 S. Jenson, E l Reno, Okla. HOXSEY, JACQUELIN 601 E . First, McCook, Neb. HUDGINS, ELDRIDGE 2 2 5 Sleepy H ollow Rd., Falls Church, Virginia HUFFAKER, BOBBY -------------Rt. 3, Post, Texas __________________

__ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__

74

52

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

_

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_______________

-------------�

_ _ ____ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

______________

________________

________________

- - - - - - - - -· - - - -

______________

85

______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

85

___________ __

65

_____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

85

_____________

74

____________________

85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _

85

____________

85

____________

85 65

85 52 52 74 74 85

HUGHES, KENNETH 1 40 1 Rankin Road, Midland, Texas

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

IMEL, JACK ---------------------- 60 Lawrence, Kansas ISAAC, DEL TON ------------------ 8 5 1 020 C St., Fairbury, Neb. JAMES, BERTHA 32 1 1 Engelwood, Plaza, vVichita, Kansas JANTZ, DELORES 5 1 5 E . 3rd, Newton, Kansas JANTZ, KENNETH 2 0 8 W. 3rd, Scott City, Kansas JANTZ, LAWRENCE 5 1 5 E . 3rd, Newton, Kansas JANTZ, ORLANDO Box 5 1 6, Scott City, Kansas JENNINGS, CLARENCE Box 2 04, Bethany, Okla. JENNINGS, PHYLLIS 1 14 N . Mueller, Bethany, Okla. JERNIGAN, GLENDA 1 020 W . Santa Fe, Blackwell, Okla. JOHNSON, LINDA LEE 603 N. 4th, Durant, Okla. JOHNSON, LINDA SUE 3002 N . Bethany, Kansas City, Kansas JOHNSON, PATSY 3 002 S. Bethany, "Kansas City, Kansas JOHNSON, PAUL 900 W . 24th, Odessa, Texas JOHNSON, TALMADGE Box 249, Duncan, Okla. JOHNSTON, JANE 5007 3 1 st W. Ave., Tulsa, Okla. JONES, B. GENE 436 W. Adams, McAlester, Okla. JONES, KAREN Rt. 3 , Hutchinson, Kansas JONES, LeROY 2 1 09 W . 7th, Clovis, New Mexico JONES, WENDELL 2 1 5 E . South Ave., Harrison, Ark.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

65

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

65

_ _ _____________

53 53 93 65 85 85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ __________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________

________________

85 65 74 74 85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _____

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

_______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

85

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _ _ _ __ _

74

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

85 53

KANE, BARBARA 2201 Grand Ave., Omaha, Neb. KELLEY, DWAIN 5 0 5 N . Mueller, Bethany, Okla. KEYS, REBA 1 008 Logan, Canon City, Colo. KILLAM, EDNA LEE 207 N. Beaver, Bethany, Okla. KILLFOIL, JOHN Box 26 1 , Syracuse, Kansas KIM, ESTHE R Seoul, Korea KIM, PETER Seoul, Korea KING, NORWOOD Gueydan, La. KING, SHIRLEY 2 2 1 S. 7th, West Hellena, Ark. KINSEY, MARY FAITH 1 207 N. 8th St., Wichita Falls, Texas

_ _ _ _ _ ____________

74

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

53

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

85

___ _ __________

85

_________________

74 85 74 65

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

____ ______ ___________

_______________

------··----- ------

____________

85

75

85 53 85 93 75 65 94 78 86 75 86 75 65 75 86 75 75 65

75 75 53 86 75 94 53 53 54 86

273

KISNER, MARTHA 1 3 1 6 S. Jenson, El Reno, Okla. KITCHEN, PEGGY 8 0 1 N. Beard, Shawnee, Okla. KLEMME, KENNETH 1 220 N. 1 1th St., Enid, Okla. KLINK, MERLYN 522 Shannon Dr., Bethany, Okla. KNIGHT, LESTER ---------------1 2 1 6 S. E. Fourth Ave., Mineral Wells, Texas KNIGHT, LESTER 1 2 1 6 S. E . Fourth Ave., Mineral Wells, Texas KNIGHT, WYNELL 703 S. E . 6th, Mineral Wells, Texas KNIPPERS, MELVA Box 328, Many, La. KOONCE, EDWARD LEE 5000 N. W. 1 9th, Okla. City, Okla. KORNELSEN, NAOMI Minneola, Kansas KOTWITZ, G. W. Rt. 1 , Drexel, Mo. KREIE, JERRY Ford, Kansas KROEZE, ELEANOR -------------Tecumesah, Neb.

________________

________________

____________

_________________

________________

_______________

_______________

__________

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

________________

- - -- - - ---- ------�---

LACKEY, NINA ---------- --------4225 32nd St., Port Arthur, Texas LAMBERT, BILLY 4 1 4 E . Cherry, Blytheville, Ark. LAMBERT, JERRY 1 29 W . Gray, Norman, Okla. LANA, PAUL 906 N. Weigle, Watonga, Okla. LAND, LINDA ------------------4 1 7 Ritchey, Gainesville, Texas LANE, LA VERTA Rock Port, Mo. LANKFORD, WALES Box 347, Hennessey, Okla. LANKFORD, ZOLA 5 1 5 S . Cherokee, Hennessey, Okla . LATHAM, EDWIN 1 30 3 Ross, Vernon, Texas LAWTON, WAYNE 1 1 1 N. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. LEFFEL, RICHARD 1 5 1 9 E. 3rd, Hutchinson, Kansas LEHMAN, JOY DEE Vet Hut No. 1 6 , Bethany, Okla. LEONARD, KENNETH 907 S. Wewoka, Wewoka, Okla. LEPPER, JOHN Vet. Apt. No. 9, Bethany, Okla. LEWIS, JAMES RAY Box 565, Bethany, Okla. LEWIS, RICHY Weston, Mo. LEWIS, VERA 2 2 1 7 6th Ave., North Texas City, Texas LIGHTNER, BEVERLY ANN Rt. 5, Box 597, Okla. City, Okla. LINDSLEY, JO Johnson, Kansas LINNELL, JOHN -----------------1 2 5 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla .. _ _ _ ___ __ _ _ __ __ _ _ _

________________

_____________________

________________

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

_______________

________________

________ _______

_ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

______________

_____ _ _ _ _ ___

___________________

______________

___________________

____________________

______

___________________

274

86 86 54 54 54

LOGAN, HARRY -----------------Ordway, Colorado LOGANBILL, MARY 204 S. College, Bethany, Okla. LOLMAUGH, DONNA ------------2 2 1 W . Lincoln, Blackwell, Okla. LONG, KENNETH Rt. 1 , Olton, Texas LOPER, BOBBIE 7 1 1 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. LOUNSBURY, PHYLLIS 1 409 Center, Emporia, Kansas LUDWIG, OLETHA 6946 Pasco, Kansas City, Kansas LUGINBYHAL, MYRA 3 1 8 N. W. 5th, Bethany, Okla. LUINSTRA, BENNETTE Box 2 5 5, Bethany, Okla. L UNDY, RONY 1 29 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. LUTHER, KENNETH Box 692, Bethany, Okla. LYBARGER, JEAN ---------------1 50 5 Washington Ave., Conway, Ark. LYBARGER, OTHER 1 50 5 Washington Ave., Conway, Ark. ______________

_ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ ________

___________

54

_______________

86 54 66 75 75 86

____________

__________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ __

_____________

______________

86

86 54 75 66 86 66

McCLAIN, OLEN Bethany, Okla. McCLUNG, FAITH 5 2 5 Hohldale, Houston, Texas McELYEA, EUGENE 1 1 1 S. Grace, Crockett, Texas McELYEA, JEAN Box 5 0 3, Crockett, Texas McGRAW, JAMES 2 0 E . Winthrope Rd., Kansas City, Mo. McGRAW, MARY LOU Rt. 2, Republic, Mo. McGUIRE, EVELYN 1 1 1 0 S . Walnut, McPherson, Kan. McNABB, CLIFTON -------- -----Rt. 2 , Box 2 , Wellington, Texas McNABB, ERNEST Rt. 2, Box 2, Wellington, Texas McNABB, LOUIS Rt. 3, Greenbrier, Ark. McNAIR, BILLIE RUTH 207 S. First, Duncan, Okla. McNAMES, FLORENCE Box 5 0 3, Claremore, Okla. McNAMES, LAURA Box 5 0 3, Claremore, Okla. McWHINNEY, DON 981 3 Brook Lane, Raytown 3 3, Mo. MADISON, BOB 1 6 3 3 Liberty Road, Lexington, Ky. MAHONEY, CHARLES 4 0 1 6 Belmont, Shreveport, La. MALLOY, JOHN ----- -----------1 00 N. Osage, Bartlesville, Okla. MARSHALL, PAUL Rt. 4, Lyons, Kansas MARTIN, DON ------------------Box 4 1 2, Bethany, Okla·. _ _ _______________

_______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ ___

__________________

________________

____________

86

_ _____________

75 86

_______________

66 66 75 86 54 75 66 86

____ _____________ _

__________

________ ___

________________

______________

__________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

86 75 54

____ ___________

75 75 75 66 86 86 66 86 75 86 55 86 75

87 87 66 55 87 66 75

MARTIN, GENE -----------------Rt. 3 , Troup, Texas MATLOCK, JANICE --------------2 3 1 1 Wyoming, Carlsbad, N. M . MEADOR, BOBBIE 720 Circle Dr., Arlington, Texas MEEK, BILLY -------------------Odessa, Texas MEEK, STANLEY ----------------4224 Sterling, Okla. City, Okla. MEEK, W. H . 504 S. Willow, Sherman, Texas MEESEY, DALE ---------- -- -----7741 Rannells, St. Louis 1 7, Mo. MEESEY, NANCY 7741 Rannells, St. Louis, Mo. MERCER, YVONNE 308 S . W . 3rd, Bethany, Okla. MERRILL, SUE 4 1 0 7 Hickory Dr., Marshall, Texas METCALF, JOHN - -- -------------46 3 3 S. 3 1 st W. Avenue, Tulsa, Okla. MILEY, ROBERT ----------------Rt. 2, Chanute, Kansas MILEY, ROSALIE ----------------Rt. 2, Chanute, Kansas MILLER, ALBERT ---------------4508 Stanley, Okl:i . City, Okla. MILLER, ANGIE ------------ ----2827 Emmett, Dallas, Texas MILLER, BARBARA 6209 Muskogee, Des Moines, Iowa MILLER, EDDIE ----------------Rt. 2, Box 243, Westville, Fla. MILLER, LAWRENCE Box 243, Bethany, Okla. MILLER, LUCY Rt. 1 , Westville, Fla. MILLER, RAY - -- ---------------- Bethany, Okla. MILLER, SHARON ---------------61 5 S. W. 6 1 st, Des Moines, Iowa MILLIKIN, LLOYD 1 0 3 S. E. 5th, Bethany, Okla. MINGUS, PHYLLIS 908 N. Belleview Place, Indianapolis, Ind. MIRANDA, JAMES 4 1 7 N. Willow, Bethany, Okla. MISHLER, ELIZABETH 1 3 1 W. Spruce, Independence, Kan. MOBLEY, ORVILLE 208 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. MOON, JOHN W. ---- ------ ------702 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. MOORE, ARLENE ---------------1 1 1 2 First N.E ., Mason City, Iowa MOORE, HAROLD WAYNE 1 7 1 7 El Paso, Wellington, Texas MOORE, JAMES -----------------Hot Springs, Ark. MOORE, JOYCE - ----- -----------Vienna, Illinois MOORE, SYLVIA ----------------441 4 42nd St., Lubbock, Texas MORELAND, CHARLES 4 2 34 Norfolk, St. Louis, Mo. MORRIS, BILL Box 3 0 5, Cisco, Texas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

·- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -· - - - - - - - - - -

_______________

------�------------

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________

__________________

_______________

55

_______________

87 76 76

________________

____________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ _

87 66 87

_______

55 87 87 76 55

___________

___________________

76 87 66 87 76 87 76 87 55 55 87 87 76 76 87 76 66 94 87 87 66 66 87 76 76 55 87 76 56 56 87 87 87 76

l\10TSINGER, JIM 3002 N Bethany, Kansas City, Mo. MOUNTFORD, RICHARD 2 2 36 Russell, Kansas City, Kan. MOWRY, JOANNE 509 W. 1 1 th, North Platte, Neb. MURRAY, LaDONNA 301 S. College, Bethany, Okla. MURRAY, WANDA Rt. 1 , Tahaoka, Texas MUTTOO, FRANCIS Philippi Corentyne Berbice, British Guinea, South America

________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

_______________

_____________

__ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ ___ __ _ _ __ __

NARAMOR, CHESTER Springdale, Ark. NEAL, CHARLES 245 Basswood, Houston, Texas NEFF, DEAN Phillips, Texas NEHRBASS, GYPSY - -------------Rt. 3, Lawrence, Kansas NELSON, ROSALIE Kenesaw, Neb. NESMITH, SAMMYE 1 1 6 E. Maple, Cushing, Okla. NEWLON, BRYAN 5 0 5 N. Central, Bethany, Okla . . NICE, CAROL -------------------Rt. 1 , Kingfisher, Okla. NICHOLSON, GERALDINE Ingalls, Kansas NOGGLES, JAMES 3 0 3 3 S. W. 2 3rcl, Okla. City, Okla. NORELL, JOHN 924 W. Edwards, Springfield, Ill. NORMAN, RUTH 49 1 4 40th Place, Hyattsville, Mel. NORTON, ROBERT Box 14 3, Hamlin, Texas ____________

_________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____

_______________

_____________

____ ____________

________

________________

__________________

________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

_______________

76 76 87 87 87 56

PARRISH, . JANIS 3222. N. 6th, Enid, Okla. PATTON, LEON 1 1 6 Grand, Houston, Texas· PAXTON, DON ------------------1 4 1 3 W. 1 3th, Plainview, Texas PAYNE, JUDITII -----------------Rt. 2, Mountain View, Okla. PEACOCK, BARBARA Rt. 1, Box 1 4, Pelican, La. PEARD, JOHN -------------------3809 N. Land, Okla. City, Okla. PENNY, JULIA Rt. 1 , Clever, Mo. PENQUITE, JOSEPH 7 3 2 E . 8th, Minneapolis, Kansas PERKINS, DELAINE Hutchinson, Kansas PERSHALL, FORREST 9 0 5 Davis, Clovis, New Mexico PETERS, SCOTT Box 375, Foss, Okla. PETHOUD, ROSE ----------------1 1 1 5 N. 3rcl, Salina, Kansas PHILLIPS, CHARLES 5000 N. W. l Oth, Okla. City, Okla. PHILLIPS, LOYCE 1 2 1 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla . PHILO, DAVID 108 N. W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. PHIPPS, J . M. --------------------Box 142, Sublett, Kansas PIERCE, DON -------------------538 N. W. 8th, Bethany, Okla. PIERCE, HARRY Rt. 1 , Sarcoxie, Mo. PIERCE, RUTH ---- ------------ --Box 1 4 1 3, Ponca City, Okla. PITTS, RODNEY 1 72 3 Foster, Lake Charles, La. PLUNKETT, HOWARD Coolidge, Kansas POE, AUBREY -------------------5806 E . 84th, Kansas City, Mo. POSEY, CLAYTON 708 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. POTTER, VIRGINIA 22 1 5 N. Lewis, Tulsa, Okla. POWELL, GEORGE 8 1 2 Ave. F, Burkburnett, Texas POWELL, ROBERTA Rt. 2, Lee's Summit, Mo. PRENTICE, ROBERT 506 S. Rock Island, El Reno, Okla. PRESSON, COY Broseley, Mo. PRICE, BEVERLEY 5 3 5 3 N. W. 45th, Okla. City, Okla. PRICE, CONNIE East Star, Nowata, �Okla. PRYOR, MARSHALL 1 008 W. Fox, Carlsbad, N. M. PUCKETT, CAROLYN Lafe, Arkansas

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

_____________

____ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

87 87 56 66 S7 76 66 87 87 76 76 66 76

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________

__________________

______________

________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _

_________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ ____

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __

OKE, VERLA 6019 Reeds Road, Mission, Kansas OLIVER, BEVERLY . 3 1 5 Vv. 8th, Newton, Kansas OLIVER, HOWARD 3 1 5 W. 8th, Newton, Kansas ORR, RONNIE Rt. 2, Anadarko, Okla. OWENS, DENNY - --------- ------1 3 1 6 W. 7th, Emporia, Kansas OWENS, LILLY ----- --- ----------1 60 1 vVilcox, Indianapolis, Ind. OWENS, LORRENE 1 2 1 Texas, Woodward, Okla. OXFORD, HARRY Rt. 1 , Mableville, Ark. OZIAS, ESTHER -- ----- ----------Centerview, Mo. _____________________

--�------------

_______________

________________

____

______________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

76 88

__ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ___

56

_ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ __ _

76 88 88 76 66 66

_______________

____ __ __ _ _ ___ _

__ __ _ _ _ _ __ ___

___________________

_______________

__________________

PACKWOOD, GLENDA WILKINS Box 6 1 2, Claude, Texas PAGE, MARILYN 525 W. 1 6th, Hays, Kansas PAGE, MONTE ------ ----------- -5 2 5 W. 1 6th, Hays, Kansas PARETTE, PAT Rt. 3, Morrilton, Ark. PARKER, JANE Box 487, Vivian, La. __

_________________

___________________

_ __ ___ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ ___ __

88

_________ _____

88

_____________

56

88 88 88 88 66 66 77 56 67 88 88 88 67 88 67 88 77 67 67 56 88 88 88 77 77 88 88 67

_____________

____________

�----------

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _

____________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

_____________

____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

________________

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _____

__ _ ___ __ _ __ _ _ ___ _

_ _ _ __________

__________________

- - - -------�---

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ __ _

____________ ____

_ _________ _________

77

___________

88

_______________

57

RANSOM, JOYCE 2 1 5 S. E . 43rd, Okla, City, Okla.

77

77

RAWLINGS, RUTH Box 4 1 1 , Hennessey, Okla.

88

_______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

____________________

67

88

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

RAWLS, JOHN ------------------Rt. 1 , Box 1 54A, Lufkin, Texas REA, CAROLYN ---------------:--804 W . 42nd, North Little Rock, Ark. REAGOR, RAYMOND ------------6 1 2 W. Elm, Hillsboro, Texas REEP, EUNICE 7 5 32 Anioch, Overland Park, Kan. REEVES, MARY LOU 308 S. College, Bethany, Okla. REHFELDT, PHYLLIS 6 300 College, Kansas City, Mo. REISS, TWILA ------------------Rt. 3, Loins, Kansas REYNOLDS, LYN-NELL Bellefont, Kansas RICHARDSON, MAURICE --------1 60 3 Schaer, North Little Rock, Ark. RICHEY, GEORGE -- ------------Box 1 88, Mt. Pleasant, Texas RIPPER, JOYCE 5 0 1 N. Willow, Bethany, Okla. RIPPER, LeROY - ---- - -- - - -------501 N. Willow, Bethany, Okla. ROBB, DON ---------------------Box 5 2 1 , Bethany, Okla. ROBERTS, FRANKLIN 6 0 1 S. E . 32nd, Okla. City, Okla. ROBERTSON, RAMON Meade, Kansas ROBICHAUX, GAYLE Rt. 5, Box 1 9 1 , Houston 1 5, Texas ROBINSON, TOMMY 8 6 3 3 Grove Cress Dr., Dallas, Texas ROCK, MILDRED 2 1 0 5 E . l l th, Cheyenne, Wyo. RODGERS, PAUL 3 1 4 W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. ROGERS, BARBARA - ---------- --2024 Ash, Parsons, Kansas ROGERS, DELTA Box 5 37, Post, Texas ROGERS, KENNETH Box 5 37, Post, Texas ROGERS, SUE -- -- --- -- - ------- --7 34 Clearlake, Fort Worth, Texas ROSE, ROSALIE Box 1 32, Aline, Okla. ROSS, CAROL JEAN 604 Prince, Clovis, N. M. ROSS, EARL --------------------Rt. 2, Alma, Ark. ROSS, PAT 1 5 1 2 Harrop, Pasadena, Texas ROWE, LuKRETIA 1 024 Tank, Neodesha, Kansas ROWLEY, ED 8 5 2 8 Woodmont, Houston, Texas RUNNER, LON Rt. 1 , Box 2 1 2, Canon City, Colo. RUTHERFORD, JIMMY 1 0 1 2 Houston, Terrell, Texas RUTLEDGE, GLEN 1 1 4 N. West Ave., Bethany, Okla.

67 77 89 77 77 89 89 89 89 77 67 77 89 57 57 89 89 89 89 89 67 57 89 57 89 89 89 89 67 89 89 89

SAMSON, DELLA ----------------- 90 717 E . 1 8th, Pittsburg, Kansas SANDERS, HIRAM ---------------- 67 2 740 E. 1 2 th, Tulsa, Okla . SANDERS, MADLYN 90 Box 42, Plainview, Texas ______________

275

SANTIN, BERTHA Rafael Angel dela Pena, Mexico D.F. SARGENT, DELBERT 1 02 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. SARGENT, LaVETA 1 02 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. SCHOENHALS, HARRY Box 84 1 , Darrouzett, Texas SCHUBERT, ED. 6927 Amber, ' Houston, Texas SCHUBERT, ROBERT 6927 Amber, Houston, Texas SCHULER, ARDITH Ness City, Kansas SCHUMANN, RICHARD 1 14 N. W . 2nd, Bethany, Okla. SCHWENKE, CECIL 1 0 8 S. E. 9th, Bethany, Okla. SEACHORD, SALLY 6 1 3 5 Ohern St., Omaha, Neb . SHANNON, MADALYN · 5 1 1 N. College, Bethany, Okla. SHARP, ALBERT ----------------1 1 9 ¥2 S. College, Bethany, Okla. SHARP, CHARLES 1 1 9 1h S. College, Bethany, Okla. SHEPPERD, ANNETTA Rt. 2, Minco, Okla. SHERRILL, BEN Rt. 1 , Box 244, Vicksburg, Miss. SHOCKLEE, JOHN 1 2 1 6 S. Ewing, Dallas, Texas SHOEMAKER, YVONNE Rt. 2, Eldorado, Okla. SHORE, GLEN Johnson, Kansas SHUE, LYNN 9 1 0 N. 6th, Fredonia, Kansas SIMCOX, SIDNEY 661 3 N. W. 29th, Okla. City, Okla. SIMPSON, DENE 302¥2 N: College, Bethany, Okla . SIMPSON, ROY 9 1 00 E . 69th Terrace, Kansas City, Mo. SIMPSON, SHIRLEY 1 07 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. SIMS, JERRY Cedar Hill, Texas SIMS, SARAH Cedar Hill, Texas SIPES, BILL 1 2 3 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. SKILLERN, FRANK --------------8 1 5 N. College, Bethany, Okla. SKINNER, FARRIS Russellville, Ark. SLOAN, EUGENE Aline, Okla. SLOAN, ROY Cleveland, Kansas SLOAN, VERLA 323 W. Fulton, Blackwell, Okla. SMITH, ALMA 39 1 8 Redwood Drive, Corpus Christi, Texas SMITH, CLARIECE 1 009 Woodrow, Little Rock, Ark. SMITH, DIXIE Carl Junction, Mo. ________________

_____________

_______________

___________

__________________

_____________

______________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

______________

_______________

___________

________________

___________

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - ·· - - -

________________

__________

_ _ ____ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ __ _ _

____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_________________

______ __ ________ _ __

_______________

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ·· - -

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ ____ ___

______________________

___________

____

_________________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ___ _ _

__________________

____________________

_______________

____________________

276

90 77 67 57 90 90 57 93 77 77 90 90 90 90 90 77 90 90 90 90 67 58

SMITH, DORIS 1 0 1 0 Lynn, Winfield, Kansas SMITH, RACHEL Box 2 3, Alfalfa, Okla. SMITH, SHARON 407 N. Main, Bentonville, Ark. SNODGRASS, BOB 7 3 3 Missouri, Lawrence, Kan. SNOW, CARSON 7 1 5 N . College, Bethany, Okla. SNOWBARGER, KATHERINE Rt. 2, Sylvia, Kansas SNOWBARGER, RONALD Sylvia, Kansas SOLIDAY, CARL 307 E . Elm, Dodge City, Kansas SOULE, DON --------------------25 Shannon Dr., Bethany, Okla. SOUTHWORTH, DWIGHT 1 609 "A" Street, Garden City, Kan. SPARKS, LaDONNA 1 07 S. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. SPONAGEL, ARTHUR 1 30 3 W. Spofford, Spokane, Wash. SPRUCE, KAY 227 Beatrice, San Antonio, Texas STANDRIDGE, SHIRLEY 514 W. 14, Ada, Okla. STANLEY, LaRENA Mooreland, Okla. STARK, NAOMA Prescott, Kansas STATZER, SHIRLEY 429 N. W. l i th, Okla. City, Okla. STEARMAN, JUANITA Box 704, Hooker, Okla. STEARNS, KATHLEEN 2 3 32 Gore, Lawton, Okla. STEELE, DANNY 702 E . 8th, Coffeeville, Kansas STEWART, JIM PAUL Box 8 50, Jasper, Ala. STIPES, BARBARA 3 0 1 S. W. 7th, Bethany, Okla. STIVERSON, RAY 2 1 0 W. Main, Bethany, Okla. STRANGE, BYRON Bethany, Okla. STRAWN, CHARLES 5 4 1 Gilbert, Borger, Texas STRAWN, KAY 541 Gilbert, Borger, Texas STREUN, PHIL ------------------4404 S. E . 2 3rd, Okla. City, Okla. STRINGER, PAUL 46 1 3 E . Independence, Tulsa, Okla. STRINGFIELD, JOYCE 5 2 3 1 Buena Vista Drive, Kansas City, Kansas STRONG, ROGER 1 309 W. Mountain, Fort Collins, Colo. STROTHER, DOYLE 548 8th Avenue NW, Ardmore, Okla. STROUD, JOANNE 5009 E . 3rd, Tulsa, Okla. STROUD, PAUL 1 1 5 S. W . 2nd, Bethany, Okla. STRUTZ, DONNA Oaks, North Dakota ___________________

_________________

_________________

________________

_________________

______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

________

_______________

_____________

____________________

__________

_______________

__________________

______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __

____________

- - - - - - - - - - - - ·· - - - -

____________

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

67

_______________

90

______________

90

___________________

67 58

________________

90

____________

90 58 90

____________ ____

______________

67

___ ___________

90 58

_ _

__________________

_________________

90 77 77 90 93 67 77 90 77 77 67

STRUTZ, NELLA ----------------Oaks, North Dakota STUMP, RICHARD Box 763, Texhoma, Okla. STURGEON, JEAN 7 0 1 S . Mahan, E l Reno, Okla. SULZER, CAROLYN Solgohachia, Ark. SUMMER, CARL Box 1 077, Freer, Texas SUMNER, FLOYD Bethany, Okla. SUMNER, lOLA Bethany, Okla. SWANN, RALPH ANN 1 2 07 Engle, Dallas, Texas SWARTZ, JOYCE Rt. l , Dewey, Okla. SWIGART, PAT 1 602 1 4th St., Woodward, Okla. SWIM, VERNON 4 1 6 E . 9th, Hutchinson, Kansas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

_______________

______________

_________________

________________

__________________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

_________________

__________________

_________________

91 67 91 91 78 58 58 91 91 67 58

90 TABOR, SHIRLEY 1 7 1 0 N. Madison, Hutchinson, Kan. TAYLOR, ALLAN Rt. 5, Lubbock, Texas TAYLOR, GARY 1 2 7 E . Vine, Blytheville, Ark. TAYLOR, JANET 1 2 7 E. Vine, Blytheville, Ark. TAYLOR, WANETA Rt. 3, West Plains, Mo. TENNYSON, WILLIAM 1 6 0 3 S . Eastern, Okla. City, Okla. THACKER, NOAH Box 504, Kirbyville, Texas THRASHER, ANNADELLE Buffalo, Okla. TIBBETTS, NORMAN ------------8 1 4 N. West Avenue, Bethany, Okla. TIRY, DALE 627 E . Drain, Colo. Springs, Colo. TRACY, JIM 6027 E. 1 2th St., Kansas City, Mo. TRUAX, MARION 2 0 2 Buena, San Antonio, Texas TURNER, JAMES Box l 0 , Ballinger, Texas TWINING, GRACE Letona, Ark. TYLER, FORREST ---------------Rt. l, Box 78, Chilton, Texas ________________

90

_________________

90

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

90

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

90

_______________

77

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

90

________________

90

______ ___

90 67 l.JO

77 77 58 78 90 91 91 78 67 78 78 78

______________________

______________________

_________________

_________________

_______________

68 68 78 68 78 91 91 91 58 78 59 59 91 78 59

UH, DAVID ---------------------- 78 Seoul, Korea UITTS, CLAIR ------------------- 68 Rt. 4, Independence, Kansas UNRUH, MELVIN 68 403 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. ________________

VAIL, DON -------------- -------- 78 Dodge City, Kansas VISER, BOB ------------ ---------- 59 504 Shannon Dr., Bethany, Okla. WALBORN, RUSSELL 724 N . Donald, Bethany, Okla. WALKER, GWEN 22 B St. Northwest, Miami, Okla.

____________

________________

91 68

WALKER, JIMMIE 4020 N. W. 9th, Okla. City, Okla. 'vVALLACE, GRACE 3 0 3 ¥2 N. College, Bethany, Okla. WALLACE, ISA 7 3 1 1 N. W. 42nd, Okla. City, Okla. WALLACE, LeVOY 303¥2 N. College, Bethany, Okla. WALLACE, WILLIAM Rt. 1 0, Box 3 37, Okla. City, Okla. WARE, JEANETTE 5 1 2 N. Stephen, Ponca City, Okla. WARRICK, LINDA 666 N . Sam Houston, San Benito, Texas WARNER, JO KATHRYN Box l l 06, Nederland, Texas WASHBURN, DELETTA 304112 N. College, Bethany, Okla. WASHBURN, PHILLIP 304¥2 N. College, Bethany, Okla. WATSON, CLIFTON 1 706 Houston, Longview, Texas WATSON, KATHRYN 1 5 1 9 Circle Dr., \Voodward, Okla. WATSON, NADINE 30 5 Cleveland St., Springdale, Ark. WATTERS, OBED 208 W. Main, Bethany, Okla. WEBB, SHIRLENE 670 3 N. W. 26th, Okla. City, Okla . WEBSTER, ALVIAN 2603 Clarendon, Dallas, Texas WEBSTER, DALE Box 388, Rogers, Ark. WELLMON, DOLORES Apartado, Managua, Nicaragua WEST, DELORES Rt. 2 , Box 6 1 , Leavenworth, Kan. WEST, DORIS Rt. l, Box 604A, Alvin, Texas \VESTMORELAND, JOHN A. 1 66 5 Dunmoor, Memphis, Tenn. WESTMORELAND, JOHNNIE 509 N. Willow, Bethany, Okla. WESTON, WESLEY 1 1 1 0 N. W. 2nd, Okla. City, Okla.

_______________

_______________

____ _____________ _ _

_______________

____________

�--------- -----

_______________

__________

__________

____________

_ _ _ _ __________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____

_______________

________________

________________

______________

________________

_ _ __ ____ _ __

_____________ ____

___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

______

______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

9.1 59 78 59 91

WHEATLEY, LONA MAE Alpena, Ark. WHEELER, BOB 3 0 1 N. Beaver, Bethany, Okla. WHEELER, EVA ----------------Rt. 1, Coyle, Okla. WHITAKER, PAUL 1 0 8 N . West Avenue, Bethany, Okla. \VI-liTE, JULIA CLARK 1 0 8 S. W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla . \\iHITE, ROBERT 302 E. Kelley, Augusta, Kansas WHITE, W. F. Bethany, Okla. WHITLEY, JEAN 2645 Pike Road, Birmingham, Ala. WHITTINGTON, MARIE 2707 Polk, Amarillo, Texas WIENS, CLIFTON 3 Glines Court, Harrison, Ark. WIENS, DURWARD 3 Glines Court, Harrison, Ark. WIGLEY, MILDRED 6 3 3 2 ¥2 Fountain, Los Angeles 28, Calif. WIKOFF, RICHARD 672 1 N . W . 28th, Okla. City, Okla. WILKINS, ORIN 5000 N . W. l Oth, Okla. City, Okla . WILLIAMS, FLOE 2962 Trenton Road, Akron, Ohio WILLIAMS, JoANN 601 Nelray, Austin, Texas WILLIAMS, LOY 1 32 S. Crescent, Kansas City, Mo. WILLIAMS, LYNN Box 2 1 4, Erick, Okla. WILLIAMS, VIRGINIA 1 1 5 N. W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. WILLIAMS, WANDA 406 E. Line St., Tyler, Texas WILLISON, FERN 322 E . Fifth, Hutchison, Kansas WILMOTH, JAMES 1420 G Ave. N.W., Ardmore, Okla.

_________

_________________

_______ _________

____________

78

________________

91

____________________

91 68

__________________

__________

68

________________

78

__ __ _ ___ __ _ _ __

91

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

78 78 78 91 78 68 91

______________

__________________

________________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_________________

________________

____________

59

______________

68

________________

68

__ _ __ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _

68

78 78 59 91 60 91 68 91 91 91 91 91 91 68 60 68 78 91

WIMBERLEY, DEWAYNE Rt. l , Box 32, Edmond, Okla. WIMBERLEY, LOIS Rt. l, Box 32, Edmond, Okla. WINTER, VERA RUTH 1 1 0 N . Missouri, Hooker, Okla. WIRE, TEDDY 907 Mueller, Bethany, Okla. WOMACK, BOB Box 322, Bethany, Okla. WOODS, DORIS � Box 689, Harlingen, Texas WOOD, ROBERT Trousdale, Kansas WOODS, VIVIAN North Star Route, Dodge City, Kansas WOODY, ROBERT 805 Cherry, Lamar, Mo. WORLEY, DOROTHY 1 9 1 7 W. Madison, Topeka, Kan. WRAY, CHARLES 1 2 1 6 Jackson, Topeka, Kan. WYNN, CLYDE 5 00 Walnut Lane, Bethany, Okla. WYNN, MARY Rt. 2, Lamar, Mo.

_________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

__________

___________________

__________________

--

--------------

_________________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

________________

__________________

___________________

YAKLE, LINA Box 3 8 1 , Bethany, Okla. YOESEL, DUANE 5 1 40 Beverley, Mission, Kan. YOUNG, RICHARD 1 56 Gladstone, San Antonio, Texas YORK, PAT 5 0 6 S. Spruce, Roswell, N. M . YOUNG, DWAIN 1 4 2 8 S. 1 2th, Chickasha, Okla.

____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

60

ZALETA, HENRY 8 1 1 Becks Run Road, Pittsburg, Penn. ZECHMAN, CHARLES Nazarene Indian Mission Rt. 3 , Clinton, Okla .. ZIEBARTH, MARLENE 105 l Oth Ave., St. James, Minn .

_________________

60 91 91

____________

____________

92 68 68 92 68 78 78 78 68 92 92 78 92 78 92 78 92 92 60 68 78

277

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs

Au tographs


1957 Arrow