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NATURAL DEFENSE

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WINTER 2015

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PRESIDENTS’ CLUB

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RACER READY

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WHAT’S IN YOUR BACKPACK

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MEN IN BLACK

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PUNK SKI

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SCANDINAVIA

BRING ON THE SNOW

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COLD FUSION

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GREAT COATS

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SPOTLIGHT ON FRESH THINKING

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WINTER FLIGHT

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ALL THINGS POLAR BEAR

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BRIGHT IDEAS

ALPEN SKI

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Co-Founder and Director of Fashion Patti Russell Director of Marketing and Advertising John Roe

Marketing and Advertising Manager Angela Esguerra Marketing Assistant Ashley Ang

Softgoods Divisional Merchandising Manager Robyn Haliburton

ON COVER:

Kask Elite Lady Helmet, $600

Goldbergh Metallic Down Jacket, $880

Branding Specialist Shawna Labine Art Director Agata Piskunowicz

Production Director Mark Kristofic Production Manager Lisa Crowley

Photographers Christoph Strube, Luis Albequerque, Caroline Van t’Hoff

BACK COVER

Canada Goose Sporting Life Exclusive Woodland Parka, $785

Fjallraven Koste ¼ Zip Sweater, $180 Albee Gloves, $65

Wardrobe Stylist Annie Aldworth Soft Stylist Serge Kerbel

Hair & Make Up Lori-Ann Lazary

Copy Frank De Jesus, Dane Jesperson, Julie Nieuwenhus, Sarah Isbister Special Thanks to the rest of the Sporting Life Team

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NEVER STOP EXPLORING


35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

BRING ON the SNOW 35

years young. Who would have thought it? When we started our Sporting Life adventure in 1979 with a 10,000 square foot store on Yonge Street, who could have guessed that we would have grown to where we are today! This fall with the addition of our new Markville Mall store in Markham and our new Lansdowne location in Ottawa’s Glebe neighbourhood, Sporting Life will have six locations plus an online store representing over 195,000 square feet of great equipment, footwear and fashions and more. What excites us most is this is just the beginning and we are not slowing down! In the fall of 2015 we will be reopening in our “new” Sherway Mall location in the malls new $350 million expansion wing and in fall 2016 we are opening locations in Richmond Hill’s, Hillcrest Mall and our first out of province location in Alberta, at South Centre Mall in Calgary. Western Canada, here we come! Sporting Life is more than just a store selling goods. We have always been strong supporters of ski racing since our first winter supporting kids and families involved in this great sport. Now we cannot wait to be part of Ottawa’s passionate ski racing family. We have taken great pains to make sure we are ready and will offer many unique race services like the Winterstieger SC machine- one of two in North America, and the only one in Canada. As well we take pride in giving back to our community. Toronto’s Sporting Life 10K in support of Camp Oochigeas has grown to Canada’s second largest run with over 30,000 runners, and on Mothers’ Day 2015 the Sporting Life 10K in support of Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, is coming to Ottawa! The core values that have made us successful will never change. It all starts with delivering an exceptional shopping experience with top-notch friendly customer service delivered by enthusiastic, passionate staff. We take pride in giving our staff the knowledge and expertise to help our customers make informedbuying decisions. If you are in our stores shopping for new skis or a

snowboard, chances are the sales associate helping you is speaking from personal experience, having tested that very product at our on-hill staff product testing days. We send our ski boot-fitters all over the globe to work with the worlds best athletes so they can bring that knowledge back to our stores and provide our customers with the right custom fittings that deliver comfort and performance – the key ingredients for a great day on the slopes! Sporting Life is unique. New customers and suppliers always tell us they have never seen anything like it. The assortment is unique: Outerwear, running shoes and street wear, fashion, yoga-fitness, swimwear, skis, sandals, bikes and boards. This mix of active lifestyle merchandise we believe is unique not only to Canada and North America, but to the world. We will continue to deliver our fun “fash-letic” shopping experience - a marriage of fashion and athletics. In the pages to come you will see some of the exciting brands, styles and trends that our buyers have curated for you. Now that the fall is upon us, and the air is getting a little cooler, we are not afraid to admit that “WE LOVE WINTER!” Not only do we love the cold and the snow, we travel the world to find the latest trends and fashions so our customers can enjoy the winter while staying warm and looking great.  We thank our staff who work so hard day in and day out to create a wonderful shopping experience.  And of course we thank you - our valued customers, for being part of our Sporting Life family.   We look forward to seeing you in the stores and out on the ski hills this winter! Warmly, Patti, David and Brian

Co-Founders

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ALPEN SKI On Jenica (far right): Maui Jim Maverick Sunglasses, $310 Moose Knuckles Plaid Moto Jacket, $495 Joie Fair Isle Sweater, $220 Sanctuary Clothing Civilian Jeans, $169 True Character Arm Warmer, $55 Michael Kors Belt, $98 Sporting Life Cabin Sock, $10 Frye Veronica Boot, $378 On Kelleth (far left): Woolrich John Rick & Bros. Eugene Parka, $895 Equipment Leopard Print Blouse, $284 Hudson Jeans Krysta Plaid Skinny Jean, $280 Barbour International Quilted Leather Glove, $95 Michael Kors Belt, $88 Sporting Life Cabin Sock, $10 Ugg Zea Boot, $225 On Bear: Anon M2 Goggle, $275 Burton Parkitect Snowboard, $470 Burton Custom Bindings, $200


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Anon Talan Hemp Helmet, $130 Oakley Canopy Askel Lund Svindal Pro Goggle, $190 Moncler Grenoble Montrod Jacket, $2470 Peak Performance Supreme Sweater, $300 Zero RH Hero Pants, $500 Salomon Quest Pro 110 Ski Boots, $500 Salomon SC-1 Carbon Fibre Poles, $100 10


35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

SOS Pom Pom Hat, $320 Alprausch Distressed Leather Coat, $795 Alprausch Gingham Scarf, $60 True Character Arm Warmer, $55 Estelle Red Gnome, $20 Luis Trenker Corduroy Knicker, $295 Krimson Klover Snowflake Tight, $60 Luis Trenker Tall Suede Boots, $840

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Alp N Rock Slopeside Pullover, $400 Alprausch Bolgen Snow Pant, $475 Alprausch Hoody, $200 Woolrich John Rich & Bros. Serenity Toque, $100

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12 1 PJ Salvage Moose Print Pyjamas, $85 2 Ammann Bern Boot, $390 3 Polar Piece Arctic Onesie, $180 4 Nixon Mod Watch, $85 5 Oakley Elevate Braided Goggle, $145

13 6 Artistry Cards Ski / Snowshoe Card,$20 7 Stephan Baby Knit Moose / Fox Hat, $25 8 Nutcracker Tartan Ornament, $12 9 Kikkerland Acorn Radio & Speaker, $30 10 Sporting Life Cabin Sock, $10

15 11 Ore Pet Gnome/Stick Dog Toy, $12 12 Moncler Men’s Gibran Quilted Jacket $1470 13 Spirithoods Red Fox Hood, $155 14 Woolrich John Rich & Bros. Serenity Toque, $100 15 Ray Ban Leather Wayfarers, $380

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35TH A N N I V E R S A RY Peuterey Meila Down Jacket, $799 Moncler Merino Turtleneck, $290 Paige Edgemon Skirt, $295 Moncler Quilted Boot, $870 Moncler Ophelie Animal Print Bag, $870 Armani Jeans Driving Glove, $85 Nixon Watch, $275 Ray Ban Sunglasses, $175 Plush Fleece Lined Tights, $46 Arcade Buffalo Check Belt, $26 POC Fornix Helmet, $170 Salomon X-Pro 90W Ski Boots, $500 Fred Perry Barrel Bag, $145

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Plush Cable Knit Hat, $65 Milly Wool Toggle Coat, $1395 Barbour Bragar Scarf, $80 Sanctuary Houndstooth Printed Leggings, $129 Frenchy Yummy Cashmere Gloves, $195 Sorel Toronto Lace Boot, $180

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On Jenica (left): Maui Jim Maverick Sunglasses, $310 Moose Knuckles Plaid Moto Jacket, $495 Joie Fair Isle Sweater, $220 Sanctuary Clothing Civilian Jeans, $169 True Character Arm Warmer, $55 Michael Kors Belt, $98 Sporting Life Cabin Sock, $10 Frye Veronica Boot, $378 On Kelleth (right): Woolrich John Rick & Bros. Eugene Parka, $895 Barbour International Quilted Leather Glove, $95

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I love winter

I love snow Canada Pooch Pacific Dog Poncho, $30 Ore Pet Gnome Dog Toy, $12 Ore Pet Hamburger Dog Toy, $12

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www.mooseknucklescanada.com


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At Sporting Life, fashion and function meet on the slopes with superior style

here was a time when sportswear was just that, clothing to wear for sports and leisure, the sort of attire that the affluent set would break out of their closets specifically for fun in the sun or snow. Well, times have changed, and just as we no longer don formal wear for dinner, so goes the integration of sportswear into our mainstream wardrobes and lives. Nowhere is this more apparent than in winter. The aerodynamics necessary for speed and performance and the chilly conditions have always regulated fashion for this particular sport to a certain slim silhouette with a requirement for warmth. These technical aspects take precedence in dressing for the slopes; however, skiwear and all manner of winter-sports related attire are enjoying a fashion renaissance. What comes down the runway is effectively changing what comes down the hill. Fashion itself has been drastically affected by sport in the last couple of decades. As our lives have become more active and integrated, so have our wardrobes. Ready to wear designers increasingly look to the street for inspiration and it would seem that sportswear brands are following suit. Every new fashion season brings fresh trends and styles to street wear, and those themes are coming into their own in the world of sport. Sitting in her office, Robyn Haliburton is surrounded by international fashion magazines and vendor ‘lookbooks’ interspersed with enough purchase orders and budget spreadsheets to make an accountant’s head spin. She exudes a high level of excitement that matches the fast paced world that surrounds her. As Sporting Life’s Divisional Merchandise Manager, Haliburton can’t help but smile when talking about what’s in store for the Sporting Life customers this fall. “We’ve travelled the world to find lines, and collections within lines, that were direct takedowns in terms of colour stories, trends and themes that we were seeing in street ap-

parel,” she says. “However, the product itself is extremely warm and wearable.” For this winter, Haliburton and her intrepid team at Sporting Life have curated an offering based on the season’s predominant themes including: ‘Natural Defense’, ‘Punk Ski’, ‘High Contrast’, ‘Men in Black’, ‘Bright Ideas’, and classic heritage pieces. “This is really very exciting for us. As recently as five years ago, outerwear and skiwear wasn’t always following fashion,” she says with enthusiasm. The ‘Natural Defense’ theme is categorized by soft and neutral, typically unseasonal hues; such as winter white, beige and heather grey. Here, for men winter camouflage takes center stage. For women’s apparel, however, the look takes on a more gentle and romantic flavour. The look is as at home on top of the mountain as it is by the fire, hot toddy in hand. The feeling is feminine and sensual, and you can see why Haliburton has lovingly nicknamed it “hot chocolate and butter cream”. Textured and layered knits, whether cabled or popcorn are key here, as they were earlier in the year on high fashion runways. From fluffy legwarmers to pom-pom trim, fur finishes the luxe snow-godess look. “Warm and fuzzy, cozy, chic and beautiful,” says Haliburton. “This theme will not be confused with any other season.” One standout piece is a sumptuous leather and fur knee length parka from Duohtavuohta, a luxury coat maker far up north in Finnish Lapland. This splendid parka called “The Aksovaara” is one of the most exclusive items you can invest in this year, with only 36 pieces made worldwide. Completely handmade, using ultra-lightweight reindeer leather and decorated with hand-painted ornamentation, this coat is a work of art you can wear. The antithesis to this angelic theme

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1 Peuterey Down Quilted Coat, $1160 2 Versace Down Quilted Coat, $1715 3 Duvetica Ace Two-Tone Down Coat, $950 4 Johnny Yiu Down Coat, $880 5 SAM NY Hudson Parka, $895 6 Woolrich John Rich & Bros. Wool Buffalo Check Coat, $995 7 Fusalp Wool Courmayer Coat, $2450 8 Johnny Yiu Belted Down Coat, $1090 9 Mackage Kay Down Coat, $750

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is the hard-edged ‘Punk Ski’. Comprised of jackets with motorcycle styling, metal studs and the requisite plaid, the trappings of rebellion are made winter-worthy in this group. German ski icon brand Bogner’s black, down-filled, water-repellent and breathable classic Perfecto style motorcycle jacket, asymmetrical zipped with leopard print lining, is a great example. One of the most original interpretations of this look comes to us via the ultra-hip Swedish ski brand SOS. Their most recent take on its popular “Snow Doll” jacket is a distinct, black and white hybrid of a classic Chanel inspired jacket with white

“The look is as at home on top of the mountain as it is by the fire” piping, sleeve zippers and three front pockets. “I just love the feminine silhouettes with the hard edgy feel,” Haliburton says with a twinkle in her eye. The ‘High Contrast’ theme continues with black, but ups the ante by pairing it with white. Whether done up in black with white racing stripes, traditional hounds tooth or colour-blocked à la pairing a black sport pant with a stark white parka; the look is modern with a nod to mod. Haliburton beams when talking about the look. “This season we found that almost every line had a white jacket. That doesn’t happen every year. We bought the best,” she explains with a grin. And if you are more inclined to look like a sleek secret agent than a spiky rocker, there is the ‘Men in Black’ theme. This is not the ordinary black of seasons past. “What is the new black?” asks Haliburton. “It is black with texture, black with shine, very dark and black is being used differently; you see matte black cars and watches – this is an extension of that. It lends itself to a tech appearance,” she explains. To wit: Zegna’s black “Icon” jacket. On the cutting edge of tech-fashion, the “Icon” is a Bluetooth enabled, slim-fitting, waterproof, breathable three-season jacket with a detachable quilted liner. A discreet controller device in the sleeve and strategically located holes let you bring ear-bud headphones up through the lining and out the collar – the ultimate marriage of form and function in a high tech world. “The technical now [in skiwear] is so technical, it’s aspirational” says Haliburton. Bright colours of the ultra-vivid-Technicolor variety are a big part of this season’s fashion mosaic for both sexes; a direct

influence from the ready to wear shows in Europe where colour has been reigning supreme. Orange, pink, green, and blue or flashes of neon, all of the brightest hues are a huge part of the colour palette for big mountain skiing, touring, and mountaineering wear this fall and winter. “We saw intense colour start to come in after Nike’s volt coloured sneakers in 2011; it’s everywhere now and that is really exciting for us,” Haliburton said. Florals, which are getting major play on the runway, are a big part of the theme as well. Two-piece ski jacket and vest combos from Switzerland’s Jet Set label and snowboarding jackets from Burton are blooming with all kinds of tropical flora this year. One brand that is championing the look is Bogner. Germany’s premier skiwear design house has gone wild with wildflowers from the Himalayas in their current fall/winter collection. Inspired by the flora that grows in the shadows of Mt. Everest in Nepal and Tibet, Bogner’s most impressive and memorable looks this season are the Leya and Kaja down ski jackets, and the Lene ski pants, decorated with rhododendrons and lotus blossoms. While historians debate the ancient origins and more recent heritage of skiing, with evidence existing from China, to Norway and Russia, there is one image that has been celebrated in our collective consciousness – that of the ‘Alpen’ skier. This Tyrolean style, which is seen every year from many ski brands, has crossed over to the fashion world legitimizing traditional ski motifs as street-wear trends. Gingham, the Swiss cross, woodland animals and the Bernese mountain dog all feature prominently here. Think cozy cottages and Swiss chalets. One of the highlighted looks this season from Alprausch is a ski jacket accented with a touch of traditional alpine red and white gingham check. This is paired with fullon gingham ski pants - a high tech outfit with a touch of alpine kitsch for good measure. “ This theme is so recognizable for winter; it is as nautical [style] is to the first day of spring,” says Haliburton. As we wrap up our discussion, Haliburton’s unrelenting enthusiasm shows no sign of slowing. “We have always been very proud of the ‘fashletic’ selection we offer our customers,” she says. “It’s fantastic how brands have come to embrace that philosophy as well. Now, there are so many style personas to take from the street to the slope. You just have to decide who you want to be on the hill.”

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HIGH CONTRAST

“Whether done up in black with white racing stripes, traditional hounds tooth or colour-blocked à la pairing a black sport pant with a stark white parka; the look is modern with a nod to mod.”


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Barbour International Houndstooth Coat, $885 Barbour International Frida Jean, $220 Dr. Martens 8 Eyelet Patent Boot, $160

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SOS Pom Hat, $320 Ray Ban Aviator Sunglasses, $200 Lacroix Cortina Jacket, $2835 S’No Queen Turtleneck, $165 Salomon Shiva Pole, $70 Mitchie’s Matching Python Glove, $130 Frauenschuh Dixie Pant, $325 Salomon X-Pro 90W Ski Boot, $500

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Kask Elite Lady Helmet, $600 Goldbergh Metallic Down Jacket, $880 Goldbergh Striped Pant, $769 Goldbergh Âź Zip Turtleneck, $265 Burton Veda Glove, $115 Lange RX80LV Ski Boots, $400 Salomon SC-1 Carbon Fibre Poles, $100

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10 1 Kikkerland Key Ring Perpetual Calendar, $7 2 Pine & Pillow, $40 3 Armani Jeans Glove, $85 4 Nixon Kensington Watch, $150 5 Fire & Ice Fia Jacket, $809 6 Goldbergh Leopard Âź Zip turtleneck, $265 7 Moncler Bootie, $620 8 Missoni Home Bianconero Candle, $115 9 P.J. Salvage Ankle Socks, $27 10 Ray Ban New Wayfarer Sunglass, $170 Ray Ban Original Wayfarer Liteforce Sunglass, $235 Ray Ban Clubmaster Sunglass, $200


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11 Sorel Conquest Carly Boot, $280 12 Moncler Quilted Tote Bag, $805 13 Eyebobs Reading Glasses, $85 14 Volcom Printed Sweatpants, $42 15 Oakley A-Frame 2.0 Shaun White Pro Model Goggles, $170 16 Lange RX 80 LV Ski Boot, $400 17 Joie Blouse, $198

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SOS Moto Doll Jacket, $725 SOS Judy Short, $475 S’No Queen Blingy Turtleneck, $165 S’No Queen Blingy Tight, $140 Salomon X-Pro 90W Ski Boots, $500 Head Absolut Joy Skis, $600

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Toni Sailer Pom Beanie, $199 Oakley A Frame 2.0 Goggle, $170 Toni Sailer Pauline Jacket, $2479 Toni Sailer Anais Striped Pant, $729 Toni Sailer Âź Zip Saschi Turtleneck, $249

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M.Miller Trooper Hat, $450 Goldbergh Leopard Print Jacket, $880 M.Miller Fur Vest, $1245 Sporting Life Turtleneck, $90 M.Miller Stretch Pant, $350


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Spyder Eternity Suit, $1400 M.Miller Deirdra Âź Zip Turtleneck, $325 Fani the Label Rabbit Hood, $785

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SPOTLIGHT ON FRESH THINKING

HARRICANA We’ve all heard the platitude about turning lemons into lemonade, but rarely do we see those words come to true fruition (excuse the pun) in real life. One exception to this is designer Mariouche Gagné of eco-luxe apparel brand Harricana. Gagné, born in the First Nations village of Loretteville, Quebec, stumbled upon a cottage industry whilst a college student studying fashion in Europe.

Gagné’s instructors, recognizing her ability, encouraged her to enter competitions. She won several and while working on her Master’s Degree in design management at Milan’s Domus Academy, she participated in the Fur Council of Canada’s Fur Design Student Contest. Gagné entered a reversible ski outfit. Lacking some required materials, she used her mother’s old fur coat to add finishing touches. Gagné won second prize. “I was a fashion designer, I had a different approach to fur, than perhaps, the furriers did. They have a certain relationship with the material, whereas I saw the possibility of working with recycled fur,” says Gagné. What she saw became Harricana, featuring fashionable and modern outerwear and accessories, created from luxurious recycled materials. Named for the 500 km long Harricana River in Canada along whose shores the first fur exchanges took place, almost 90% of the fur used by the brand comes from Quebec. Who knew one brand could make such a difference? Since 1993 by recycling vintage furs, Harricana has saved the lives of more than 800,000 animals and has enabled the label to breathe new life into more than 80,000 coats, silk scarves, cashmere scarves and wedding gowns. They would never have been worn again if they had not been remodeled. “Fur, silk, and cashmere are luxurious yet durable materials. The pieces I make are a gift that you can pass on to your daughter and she can pass on to her daughter” Gagné says. The Harricana collection is infused with modernity, but is also fun and

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innovative. There are items that can be worn two ways, three ways or are often reversible. Gagné’s own personal style is still true to her Canadian roots, which includes an avid love for the outdoors and winter sport. However, it is also influenced by her time in the fashion capitals of the continent, including Paris and Milan. “When I decided to stay in Europe and continue to study, I called home and told my mother to sell my sewing machine and snowboard,” she says. The two major influences of Canada and Europe combine for an haute hippie or what Gagné describes as a “glamorous gypsy” look. “I am really lucky to have the relationship that I have with Sporting Life,” says Gagné. “They

know the brand well and will take the more fun pieces or newer styles without hesitation. They have great taste and they trust me.” By giving gorgeous materials a second life and transforming them into unique pieces, Harricana proves that luxe fashion can also be sustainable and uniquely Canadian. “When I was living in Europe away from my family and people, I realized there was nowhere I could buy something that made me feel Canadian. I wanted to feel where I was from, the snow, and the mountains and Inuit heritage. Hopefully, that’s what I’ve achieved. Rough, modern, and authentic – not a costume,” says Gagné.


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SPOTLIGHT ON FRESH THINKING

ERINSNOW

FUNNY HOW ONE LITTLE FOUR-LETTER word, “snow”, can conjure up such a strong sensory response. Just close your eyes and imagine swirling crystals in the air, fluffy yet crunchy underfoot, all held together with crisp clean air. Great thinking on the part of New York based designer Erin Isakov. In choosing a name for her brand, she looked to her roots for inspiration. “Skiing is in my DNA. As soon as I could stand I was on skis,” she explains. Thus Erin Snow was born. Isakov grew up in California where her love of the outdoors and sport began. “I had a clear sense of my personal style, and fashion was very important to me” she says. “There really wasn’t much snowboarding gear or clothing for women. Whatever was available was very street-inspired and boyish. I specifically started Erin Snow as a winter sport apparel company to address that need. When I was young, the snow-sport

world was extremely glamorous and sexy. My goal was to bring that back.” In keeping with her background, skiwear is a big focus and there is no denying the popularity of the ‘Jes’ pant. Constructed of a 4-way stretch, water and wind repellent, heat retaining and breathable fabric, they are a staple in every ski wardrobe. The removable foot stirrup transforms this pant into an appropriate piece for any outfit in need of support and warmth and with a skinny leg fit you can tuck into any boot. This staple item is also Isakov’s favorite piece at Sporting Life. With a global outlook, real city chic and functional sensitivity, Erin Snow is a standout brand. “I sort of took a departure when I started Erin Snow and now it seems the entire world, and the fashion world especially, have embraced the idea that sport is very much a driver in apparel. Things have come full circle for me,” says Isakov.

FANI the LABEL THIRD GENERATION GERMAN

furrier, Fani Tsanikidou, takes on the fluffy family tradition with wit and whimsy. Fani - The Label started in 2009 by Tsanikidou, is known globally for unique hats and accessories. Stylish, trendy and most importantly warm, the brand’s offerings put the fun back in fur. In 1960, Tsanikidou’s maternal grandparents founded a furrier specializing in men’s hats in Frankfurt. In the 1980’s, Tsanikidou’s parents enlarged the collection, producing women’s hats and accessories, at the same time, also, becoming wholesalers for fashion companies. After working in the family business for six years and studying fashion at Institute Marangoni in Milan and Lon-

don, and at the famous SAGA Design School in Copenhagen, it was time for Fani to launch her own brand. It is aptly named for her beloved maternal grandmother with whom she shares her name. “I love to create an item, select the material and convert it into a final product. Working with real fur demands a high responsibility and awareness of its significance. I respect the material and I try to use every centimeter of it. To have the possibility to design and produce my ideas and see their success is my daily inspiration” says Tsanikidou. And of course she can’t help but inject a little personal style. "Personal style for me is to express yourself

through your outfit. Fani - The Label is a winter label, so it has to be warm, soft and comfortable.”

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Products driven by function and always delivering on the promise of what they’ve been designed for You could “We’re a creative-driven company with in Canada.” call it the little a unique perspective, that different way In addition to being one of the world’s parka that could, of looking at things has been a big part leading manufacturers of extreme but that wouldn’t be the whole story. of our success. By keeping production weather outerwear, Canada Goose also Sure Canada Goose has conquered the in Canada, we’ve created jobs, become demonstrates great corporate responworld with their down-filled jackets, a champion for local manufacturing sibility by partnering with The Conserspotted everywhere from vation Alliance and Polar New York City to Shanghai Bears International. “A lot and the Arctic, but for this of companies seem to just unofficial Canadian ambasbe waking up to the idea sador, brand success is as that doing good is good much in the outerwear as it for business, but for us it’s is in the genes. For president always been a part of who and CEO, Dani Reiss, it’s a we are and what we do,” family affair. Since joining Says Reiss. “It’s baked into the company in 1997 and takour business model.” The ing the reigns of the business brand has had a relationin 2001, Reiss has not only ship with Polar Bears Intercontinued what his maternal national (PBI), a non-profit grandfather started in 1957, organization dedicated to he has taken Canada Goose the worldwide conservation soaring to new heights, pun of the polar bear habitat, for intended. In fact, Reiss is the many years and Reiss also one to reference flight when serves as the Chairman of we had a moment to catch the Board. With two-thirds up with the dynamic execuof the world’s polar bear tive. “I’m inspired by travel; population residing in Cannot necessarily just the desada, Reiss says, “We felt a tination, but the journey – I strong connection to their often get my best ideas when cause, as our products and I’m looking out the airplane our company are interwindow,” he says. twined in the iconic nature Some of Reiss’ best ideas of the northern landscape.” to date include the move To help support the orgato produce only under the nization, Canada Goose Canada Goose created the Polar Bears International name Canada Goose (the created the PBI Collection, (PBI) Collection where a portion of all PBI sales goes company had previously and a portion of all PBI back to the organization, giving people a unique way to been called Metro Sportsjacket and accessory sales help protect the polar bear population. wear) and to remain made in go back to the organization, Canada. “It would be easy to move our and we’ve built Canada’s largest apparel which gives people a unique way to help manufacturing offshore, it would cer- manufacturing infrastructure,” says protect the polar bear population and tainly be cheaper, but then what would Reiss. “I’m extremely proud to be able to habitat. be the difference between us and any say we’ve built the largest, most recogAnd don’t forget the aptly named other apparel company,” he queries. nized global apparel brand that is made “Goose People”, a diverse group of

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global ambassadors – adventurers, athletes, scientists, and artists. “All of whom embody our values and lifestyle, stand for something bigger than themselves, and inspire others through epic adventures and accomplishments,” Reiss enthuses. “They’re people who dream big dreams and take big swings, in whatever way they choose, no matter where they live or play around the globe.” The same can be said of Reiss who seems to be as equally passionate about responsibility as he is adventure. “I try to get to the North every year, especially Churchill, MB, and those trips have definitely impacted the way I think,” he says. “One of the most memorable experiences though was spending New Years in a tent in the interior of Antarctica a few years ago.” The brand shows no sign of slowing

down with rapid growth both nationally and globally, fostered certainly by a commitment to innovation. The newest development, available at Sporting Life, are Technical Shells made out of a fabric

Reiss proudly. “It works perfectly with our HyBridge® Lite products to provide warmth and wet-weather protection, but on its own, it’s an unbelievable rainjacket to wear anytime of the year.” The innovation doesn’t stop there. “I want to keep doing what we’re doing and that is bringing the brand of Canada to the world,” Says Reiss. “We’ve got so many ideas and plans for the future, our only challenge is how to get there in the right – and authentic – way. I’m not interested in slapping our logo on any product out there just because we can. We’ll continue to focus on making the best products in their category. We want to stay relevant for a long time, by being a brand that people around the world respect, and one that Canadians are proud to call their own.”

“A lot of companies seem to just be waking up to the idea that doing good is good for business, but for us it’s always been a part of who we are and what we do,”

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created by Canada Goose called Tri-Durance HST™. It is waterproof, windproof yet still breathable, as well as flexible – it features a four-way stretch. Unlike other hard shell fabrics that used to dominate the market, Tri-Durance HS has a surprisingly soft hand-feel. “The feedback we’re hearing from customers is that this truly is category-breaking,” says


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All things polar bear 1

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Helly Hansen Kids 2-Piece Base Layer Set, $80 Canada Goose Elijah Jacket, $275 Delux WWF Polar Bear Hat, $30 Pine Polar Bear Pillow, $55 Goldbergh Polar Bear Sweater, $240 Spirithoods Polar Bear Hat, $120 Delux WWF Polar Bear Mitten, $30 Canada Goose PBI Chilliwack Jacket, $645 Perfect Moment Printed Pant, $435

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BRIGHT IDEAS ORANGE, PINK, GREEN, AND BLUE OR FLASHES OF NEON, ALL OF THE BRIGHTEST HUES ARE A HUGE PART OF THE COLOUR PALETTE FOR BIG MOUNTAIN SKIING, TOURING, AND MOUNTAINEERING WEAR THIS FALL AND WINTER

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Anon M1 Goggles, $230 Picture Organic Clothing Appolo One Piece Suit, $595 The North Face Quince Hooded Jacket, $340 Picture Organic Clothing T-Shirt, $36 Swany Gloves, $50 Full Tilt Booter Ski Boot, $400

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Fani The Label Double Pom Beanie, $165 Arc’Teryx Sentinel Fani Down The Label Double Beanie, $165 Jacket, $560 Kjus Kids Arctic Jacket, $329Pom Canada Goose Arc’Teryx Sentinel Jacket, $560 Hybridge Gloves, $125 The North Face Borealis Backpack, $100 Kjus Arctic Down Jacket, Kjus Kids Pants, $219 Second Skin for Sporting Life Apres Ski$329 Canada110W Goose Gloves, $125 Turtleneck, $120 Salomon X-Max SkiHybridge Boots, $550 GoPro North Harness, Face Borealis 4 Silver Edition, $450 Go The Pro Chest $50 Backpack, $99 Kjus Pants, $219 Second Skin for Sporting Life Apres Ski Turtleneck, $120 Salomon X-Max 110W Ski Boots, $549.90 Go Pro Black Edition Camera, DO NOT LIST PRICE? Go Pro Chest Harness, $50

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35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

THE

W

PR E SI DE NT ’S CLUB

hen Sporting Life called a summit meeting on the business of skiing with some of the industry’s biggest movers and shakers, they said they would all be sitting together at one table. What came to mind was the stereotypical large family dinner that has become the hallmark of holiday gatherings over the years. With ten ski and boot brands represented around the table, one could not be sure what to expect. Loud voices. Disagreements. Awkward moments. Competition. Maybe a little one-upmanship. The idea of a round table discussion concept was both exciting and intriguing. But, as the day of the summit arrived, company loyalty, competition and egos were checked at the boardroom door. Instead, the room had the air of a group of skiers, interested in discussing the past, the present and the future of the sport that we all love so much. At the table from the retail side were David Russell, Co-Founder and President of Sporting Life; John Roe, Marketing Director for Sporting Life; and Kevin Pidgeon, Ottawa ski retail legend. From the ski/boot manufacturing side was Chris Horan, Canadian Vice President and General Manager for Groupe Rossignol (Rossignol, Dynastar, Lange); Rob Morash, General Manager for Head Canada; Murray Nussbaum, General Manager at Marker Volkl Dalbello Canada; and David Deasley, President of Amer Sports (Atomic/ Salomon). Right up front, the biggest thing that stood out was that titles like retailer, ski company, and consumer were trumped on this day by the spirit of family that lies deep within the fabric of every soul

48

who enjoys ripping down snow covered mountains - and everyone at this table was an avowed soul skier. The discussion started from a broad, philosophical standpoint with everyone agreeing on the universal truth, that skiing is the ultimate family sport. The notion of family itself, and its intrinsic connection to the sport, may be the best way of keeping skiing healthy and relevant, in an increasingly sedentary world, where couch-based techactivity is quickly becoming the national pastime. “Ten years from now, if you look at Western Europe and North America, the numbers of skiing baby-boomers is going to diminish, and that will affect business. But, skiing is the best family sport around, and that will ultimately keep it going. Spend a whole day with a four-year-old, and then take them

“I think the industry has been progressive, and to a certain extent embraced technology to enhance the skiing experience.” skiing. It’s a lot more fun when you’re skiing,” said Russell. “I like to think that my greatest competitors are my fellow ski manufacturers, but in reality, it’s probably Apple Inc. and their iPhone, iPads and iPods,” said David Deasley. Rob Morash agreed. “Electronics are competition for anyone out there in business, skiing or otherwise; and its both parents and kids who are hooked on tech. What we in the ski industry can do, and are doing, is ensure that we can

GET THE GOODS We gave the panel the opportunity to talk about what is new and exciting in their lines this year, so read carefully if you’ve got some cash earmarked for new ski goodies!

HEAD “At Head, we believe there’s always a way to right size, or right spec equipment, and we’ve done that this season by developing a series of skis tailored to help women ski better. These skis are cutting edge and are built with Graphene,” said Morash. “It’s an amazing new material that’s both lightweight and incredibly strong. Graphene is so cool that the Nobel Prize people gave its inventors the prize in Physics in 2010. The skis in this line (which we call The Head Joy Series) are lighter weight and allow you to balance the skis better, to put the girth where you need it.”


SUPER JOY The superlight ski that packs more action and joy into your day. Thanks to Graphene™, the world’s lightest, thinnest and strongest material, skiing will no longer be the same. This revolutionary material allows for lighter skis with unparalleled balance and control, that will fill your day with joy.

H E A D.CO M / 24 H RJ OY


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embrace technology to help promote the sport. Whether its using technology to promote the sport or enhance the experience.” Kevin Pidgeon, who ran Ottawa’s Tommy & Lefebvre for 30 years built on Morash’s point. “I think the industry has been progressive, and to a certain extent embraced technology to enhance the

“The junior ski business is up, we’ve all felt it, and that is a real positive in our industry,” said Nussbaum. “This shows that families are driving the business, and parents that have stopped skiing are coming back because their kids are skiing now.” “The junior business is a big part of our overall ski business,” chimed in

The family can spend the day together...have an experience together, and the value in that is priceless Despite the reality of an aging ski population, and an assault from the techno hoards, the group agreed that there is good news on the horizon and it comes from increased sales in junior and women’s ski equipment.

SALOMON / ATOMIC “Salomon was the first company into boot customization, because you can’t beat a comfortable boot. It makes the day more enjoyable” said Deasely. “You ski better, and longer. It’s all about custom, easy to fit boots. This season at Salomon and Atomic, the focus is on custom fit boot stations, and easy to fit boots. Much like a hockey skate, you can put it in the oven and in fifteen minutes you have a molded fit. Memory Fit and Custom Shell are the two key stories for our brands.”

ROSSIGNOL / DYNASTAR

skiing experience. The GoPro camera is a good example of this. It’s been a huge success worldwide, and skiing has been part of that because it is an adrenaline driven sport.” When the discussion turned to the challenges of perceived high cost of skiing making it a sport for the elite, the group had some interesting insights. “The overall cost of the sport over the last twenty years has actually gone down,” said Chris Horan. “Relative to the value you are getting, it’s an inexpensive sport because the whole family is engaged. The family can spend the day together...have an experience together, and the value in that is priceless.” Despite the reality of an aging ski population, and an assault from the techno hoards, the group agreed that there is good news on the horizon and it comes from increased sales in junior and women’s ski equipment.

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Sporting Life’s John Roe. “This is why we have invested in the junior business with the junior half-back program. It is a great way for families to get their kids properly outfitted for safety and performance; and then, the package can be returned at the end of the season for a credit for half the value purchased to use for the following year.” “And we are selling more women’s skis,” added Deasley. “I don’t know if this means more women are skiing; but, what we do know is that more women are skiing on women’s skis than ever before. And the evolution in comfort and warmth of women’s ski boots has helped as well.” The point about women’s boots shifted the discussion towards ski boots in general, which according to the round table panel have been quietly changing in radical ways over the past five years. Deasley hit the point home when

“At Rossignol, depending on the skier type, we have a patented new technology called Airtip which is light, reduces the swing weight, makes it easier for the skier and is more forgiving, but still allows performance. It’s available in our Experience line and our Temptation line, so we’ve got it for both men and women. In boots, both for Rossignol and Lange, we have the Walk-to-Ride system, a safety component on the outsole,” said Horan.


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he noted , “Anyone who hasn’t tried boots on in the last five years has no idea how far they’ve come!” What’s the major difference? Just as ski shapes have changed dramatically over the past twenty years, so have boots. because they’ve evolved with newer skis. Boot angles have shifted, and fit has improved vastly, especially in the realm of women’s boots. The current generation of boots is also more flexible, and they’re segmented into skier level categories; so, everyone gets the boot that suits them best. They are also easier to customize and can be tweaked for maximum comfort. Despite all the technological advancements, according to Dave Russell, boots still need to fit properly to perform well.“If boots aren’t fitted properly to a person’s foot, they can’t manage, perform and control the skis efficiently. One of the things we’re proud of at Sporting Life is that we guarantee the fit of each and every boot sold. If there are problems with your boots, we’ll fix them.”

Looking into the crystal ball

Looking ahead five years down the road, there are several things that may change the sport of skiing. For starters, new stronger and lighter material will pave the way to stronger and lighter equipment. The rocker/ camber technology currently prevalent in ski technology will also evolve, according to our ski industry experts. Versatility will increase as skis continue to blur the line between on-mountain and off-mountain, and the current wide underfoot widths will probably adjust and shrink somewhat as skis get narrower and less chunky. This is a trend from the very wide that’s been seen out west for a while now. Technological advancement aside, one of the most important things to remember is the need to keep skis tuned properly. “It’s so important to have finely tuned skis,” Deasley pointed out. “Skiing on finely tuned skis is the best feeling in the world. Often at ski demo days, a consumer will think they

52

are in love with the new skis they are trying; but in truth, they are in love with the fact that the skis they’re on are well tuned.” Morash agreed and remarked ”Having your skis serviced on a regular basis is a big part of the investment in the purchase of skis. It’s no different than the auto industry, where you have to have your car serviced regularly.” So, if you haven’t bought new skis since Jean Chretien was Prime Minister and visions of shiny new skis, and state of the art “smart” boots are dancing in your head, why go into a retailer like Sporting Life, rather than shopping online or through swaps? For Horan, shopping in person, when making significant purchases like ski equipment, is a no-brainer. “When you walk into Sporting Life you’re buying equipment from people who receive extensive product training. Combined, there are hundreds of years of experience on the floor at any given time, and that’s rare.” A point Nussbaum quickly elaborated on.“Knowledgeable front-line staff is extremely important. They need to be comfortable speaking about the products in the store. The uniqueness of Sporting Life is that they not only do in-depth product knowledge sessions, they also do follow-ups on an ongoing basis. That’s what sets Sporting Life apart from other ski retailers.” Deasley also kicked in with a final comment. “I have noticed that with Sporting Life’s staff, what is learned from the manufacturer is being communicated and translated directly to the consumer - and that can’t be said for all retailers.”

VOLKL “The latest technology we’ve come up with at Volkl is called V-Werks, which are all ‘carbon fibre jacket’ skis. V-Werks skis are probably the lightest skis you’ll find on the market. They’ve got very low swing weight. They’re very lively, they pop and address the front side and backside of the mountain, and we’ve just introduced a line for touring and big mountain skiing. The skis literally weigh nothing,” said Nussbaum with a grin.

THE RETAIL PERSPECTIVE “It’s very clear that all these companies are trying to address all ends of the marketplace as broadly as they can, so that no skier is left behind, and that’s really great,” said Russell. “Things that I like this season: lightweight is a big trend and comfort is a big trend. From a ski goggle to a jacket to a boot, there’s been tremendous change in the last 5 to 7 years. When we’re specifically talking skis and boots, the quality across the board is dramatically better than it has ever been, especially as it relates to versatility and being lightweight there’s a real, profound difference in the performance of ski products that are out there now.” 


35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

RACER READY Courtney: POC Skull Orbic X Helmet, $220 POC Retina Julia Mancuso Pro Goggle, $160 Karbon Sporting Life Spirit Downhill Racing Suit, $300 Lange RS110SC Ski Boots, $425 Leki World Cup SL Race Poles, $150 Leki Cobra Gateguard, $80

Craig: Oakley Canopy Ski Goggle, $190 Karbon Sporting Life Spirit Downhill Racing Suit, $320 Leki World Cup Trigger Race Gloves, $320 Head Raptor 130 RS Ski Boot, $700 Rossignol Hero FIS GS Skis, $730 Rossignol Axial3 150 MFX Bindings, $300

Leki World Cup Venom SL Trigger S Ski Pole, $200

Head World Cup Rebels iSL R.D. Ski (ski only), $800

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Rossignol Hero FIS SL Ski (ski only), $830

Rossignol Hero World Cup SI 130 Ski Boot, $650

Lange RS 110 SC Ski Boot, $425

POC Skull Orbic X Race Helmet, $220

POC Retina Big Ski Goggle, $160


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Anon M2 Inside Out Goggle, $275 Norrona Lofoton Gore-Tex Shell Jacket, $720 Norrona Gore-Tex Pants, $680 Kjus Blackcomb Hoody, $429 Canada Goose Hybridge Gloves, $125 Salomon XA Pro 3D GTX Trail Shoe, $170 Robert Graham Socks, $30

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Anon Talan Hemp Helmet, $130 Anon M2 Imbearassing Goggle, $275 Kjus FRX Pro Shell Jacket, $949 Kjus Blackcomb Hoody, $429 The North Face T-Shirt, $340 Kjus FRX Pro Pants, $699 Salomon Ghost FS80 Ski Boots, $200 Dakine Heli Pro Backpack, $90

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This page: (Clockwise) Pendleton Chief Joseph Throw, $350 Timex Ironman Sleek 250 Lap Tap Screen Watch, $125 Canada Goose Hybridge Lite Hoody, $550 Oakley Frogskin Sunglass, $125 Arc’Teryx Rolling Beanie, $40 Sporting Life Cashmere Full Zip Hoody, $315 Salomon Speedcross 3 Trail Shoe, $135 Opposite Page: (Clockwise) Fani the Label Infinity Scarf with Coyote, $245 Fire & Ice Elisa Hoody, $279 Fire & Ice Rose Down Skirt, $289 Oakley Canopy 80’s Goggle, $215 Darn Tough Majesty Ski Socks, $25 Rossignol All Track Pro 110 Ski Boot, $549 Cobi Style Travel Pouches, $8 Fjallraven Kanken Backpack, $80 Oakley Special Edition Holbrook Sunglass, $155 Fitbit Flex Fitness Monitor, $100 Canada Goose Hybridge Lite Jacket, $495 Timex Ironman 50 Lap Chronograph Watch, $90

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POC Fornix Helmet, $170 Oakley A Frame 2.0 Goggle, $170 Picture Organic Clothing Dallas Jacket, $275 Picture Organic Clothing Links Mitt, $40 Picture Organic Clothing Dallas Pants, $230 Ride Hera Snowboard Boots, $270 Ride OMG Snowboard, $500

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35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

POC Fornix Helmet, $170 POC Retina Big NXT Goggle, $230 Buff Neck Gaiter, $24 The North Face Quince Hooded Jacket, $340 The North Face Summit Series FuseForm™ Jacket, $500 Arc’Teryx Covert Hooded Jacket, $200 The North Face Hyalite Shell Pant, $350 POW Gloves, $70 Salomon Quest Pro 110 Ski Boot, $500 Salomon X-Drive 80 Premium Ski, $1050

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WHAT’S IN YOUR

BACKPACK 2

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1 Dakine Heli Pro 20L Backpack, $90

11Spider Tech Pre-Cut Elbow Kinesiology Tape, $20

2 Bison Designs Survival Bracelet, $14

12 PHD Hacky Sack, $6

3 Arc’Teryx Bird Head Beanie, $40

13 Klean Kanteen 16oz Bottle, $21

4 Honey Stinger Energy Chews, $2.49

14 Icebreaker Oasis Half Zip Top, $110

5 Swiss Army Hunter XT Knife, $60

15 Buff Neck Gaiter, $24

6 Komperdell Carbon Compact Hiking Poles, $130

16 Woolrich Plaid Shirt, $70

7 Bridgedale Mid Vertige Sock, $36

17 Hugo Boss Orange Paris Silicone Watch $150

8 GoPro 4 Silver Edition, $450

18 Salomon Speedcross 3 Trail Shoe, $100

9 Icebreaker T-Shirt, $70

19 Sporting Life Two-Pack Bandanas, $10

10 Spy Fold Sunglasses, $180


MEN IN BLACK


Maui Jim Maverick Sunglasses, $310 Moose Knuckles Jacket, $695 John Varvatos Cobalt V-Neck Tee, $75 John Varvatos Bowery Slim Straight Jean, $258 Diesel Belt, $190 Converse All Star Shoes $60

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Barbour International 4 Pocket Jacket, $600 Barbour International Throttle Quarter Zip Sweater, $180 Barbour International T-Shirt, $65 Diesel Belt, $190 BOSS Maine Jeans, $185 Hugo Boss Chronograph Watch, $450

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Mackage Perry Hooded Jacket, $790 Nixon Watch, $225 PYA Crew Neck T-Shirt, $65 (shown on page 67) Ray Ban Original Wayfarers, $190(shown on page 67) Citizens of Humanity Jeans, $214 (shown on page 67) Diesel Belt, $190 (shown on page 67)

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BOSS Green Quilted Jacket, $545 BOSS Green Hooded Sweater, $345 Hugo Boss Chronograph Watch, $450 BOSS Green Tech Pants, $205

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(Left to Right; Top to Bottom) New Balance 501 $70 Arc’Teryx Alpha SV Glove, $300 Duvetica Bailo Jacket, $1000 POC Skull Orbic Helmet, $220 Klean Kanteen 16oz Bottle, $33 Oakley Airwave with Black Iridium Lens, $600 Lange RX 100 Ski Boot, $500

(Left to Right; Top to Bottom ) Kikkerland Compass Paperweight, $20 Persol 0649 Sunglass, $380 Nixon Private SS Watch, $175 Blundstone Chisel Boot, $190 Moncler Full Zip Camo Hoody, $750 BOSS Maine Pants, $175 Hugo Boss Black Origin Chronograph Watch, $395 HS Black Optic Sock, $13

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Spyder Core Knit Hat, $35 Spyder GT Vertex Core Sweater, $180 Second Skin for Sporting Life Off Piste Âź Zip Turtleneck, $120 Spyder Tarantula Pants, $275 UGG Munroe Boot, $298 Salomon Quest Pro 110 Ski Boots, $500 Volkl RTM 84 Skis, $1200


U K SK


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39 $26 9 et, k 91 c $ t, Ja 0 cia Pa n u $16 d L i , ot er Pla n o a g B l Te Bo ye 8E ner B o g a r te n s M Dr.

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Bogner Leya Ja cket, $2 Glen Pri 238 nce Tart an Scarf Niki Bik , $60 i Turtlen eck, $4 Erin Sn 5 ow Jes R a ce r P Frye Ve ant, $37 ronica S 5 hort Bo S O S Fo ot, $378 x Boot Covers, $1650

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Anon W M-1 Lipst ick Gogg les, $230 S OS F u r J a cket, $55 Sporting 75 Life Exclu sive Turt leneck, $ SOS Plaid 90 Pants, $ Salomon 540 X-Max 11 0W Ski B oots, $5 50

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S C A N D I N AV I A : SOUNDS

of S I L E N C E

Skiing summit to sea amongst the serenity and astounding beauty of Norway’s Lyngen Alps in the Arctic Circle is magical BY

B

Julie Nieuwenhuys PHOTOGRAPHY Caroline van t’Hoff

lue skies, soaring seagulls and salty sea air; for a fleeting moment, I wonder if I’m in the Mediterranean. But then, reality hits me when I jump into the deep blue water off the sailboat and the Arctic Ice engulfs me and shock sets in. It might have been brash to jump off a snowy boat into an ice-cold fjord; so, back on the boat, I quickly put on some clothes and I am handed a typical Norse specialty - a shot of Aquavit, a double distilled potato 40% liqueur. Skål! While most skiers stored away their skis in April, it is not quite the end of our winter. We have found the ultimate way to prolong our ski season by a few weeks. We are at the small Norwegian airport of Tromsø, 300 kilometres above the Arctic Circle, where we welcome our tired friends, who have flown in from North America. Our crew for this Arctic adventure consists of pro skier, Molly Baker, a film crew from Mt. Baker and a few of our lucky Dutch friends. It’s an eclectic group; and although our backgrounds are completely different, we all share a passion for skiing. For the next month, we’ll be traveling by ski, boat and car through the Lyngen Alps in the northern Scandinavian region in this remote area, which is on the same latitude as Siberia and Alaska. Impressive mountains and deep blue fjords dominate the scenery.

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Ain’t no mountain high enough

From Tromsø, we drive through desolate countryside passing fishing boats and red wooden houses with grassy roofs, which provide insulation for the houses. We are in no hurry, especially as at this time of year when there is no darkness. In May, this region experiences 24 hours of daylight, a phenomenon known as the midnight sun. This allows touring in the middle of the night, while enjoying the stunning orange and pink skies. On the ferry to the isle of Uløya, a strong fishy aroma wafts towards us. On the quay, we see giant wooden racks, where hundreds of fish hang to dry. It turns out to be cod, which is exported to Africa and Italy. We quickly attach our skins to our skis and begin our climb through an open and spacious birch forest. We eventually emerge from the forest where we notice the calm fjords below us, reflecting the white snow-covered mountains and dark clouds. This dramatic backdrop gives us a boost of energy. The more height we gain, the further we can see, and in the distance we spot the Barents Sea. On the summit of Kjelvågtinden at 1,104 metres we soak up the magical surroundings and are humbled by the beauty and magnitude of these ancient mountains. After a cup of hot tea, we’re stoked to continue towards the hard-earned descent. We point our skis toward


On the summit of Kjelvågtinden at 1,104 metres we soak up the magical surroundings and are humbled by the beauty and magnitude these ancient mountains.

the fjord — which has now turned golden in the bright sun — and cruise down towards the shimmering water. In the distance, a herd of reindeer appears and they seem just as surprised to see us as we are to see them. What a surreal experience to ski powder on an island among wild reindeer! Back at sea level another surprise awaits us. Johannes, a 13-year-old local boy, has readied his boat to take us fishing. Unfortunately, we don’t catch any fish: but, on the other side of the fjord, we discover gnarly couloirs funneling into the sea. They can only be reached by boat. This suits us just fine, because a brand new yacht awaits us in Tromsø. From the deck of the ship, we scope out our next heavenly remote lines.

Sail away

The Arctic Ice, a 47-foot boat that has been adapted to

manage the extreme circumstances of the region, awaits us in the harbour. Together with our skipper and the owner of Boreal Yachting, Ivar Bertelsen, we hoist the sails. We sail past white sandy beaches, bordered by extreme mountains featuring Alaskan style spine lines. The snow conditions vary every day and we ski all sorts of snow, from corn snow to powder to breakable crust. We tour remote peaks that are inaccessible except by boat and barely see another person for days. The nights are spent in tiny villages, some with as few as seven residents. In this remote wilderness, we ski big open bowls, 40-degree chutes and technical lines. The skiing in Lyngen is phenomenal; but, since there are no lifts you earn your turns! This suits us just fine, skinning up we fully experience the magical surroundings. We climb about 350 metres per hour toward the peaks that measure between 1000-1600 metres.

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The elevated temperatures of the last days have turned the snow near our boat into crushed ice, which makes for a rough start. The first hour is always the hardest, as we plow through a dense birch forest with spotty views of the summit. Every hour or so, we take a short break, sip some hot tea and eat a granola bar. We skin at a steady pace to preserve our energy. The serenity of the landscape is overwhelming; the silence brings calmness and peace of mind. Lost in the repetitive movement, we reach a trancelike state. After a few hours the weather turns, just as it was forecast. It’s snowing and a strong wind has started to blow. According to the map, we are close to a couloir, which would be fun to ski. We navigate with a compass and quickly find the entrance. We discuss what the safest line is, where we want to ski it and who goes first. After a threehour climb, it’s finally time to start our descent. One by one we drop in, the snow is soft and the skiing is fantastic. Our 10-minute run is worth every second of hard work!

Who let the dogs out?

In the distance, we hear hundreds of barking dogs, two hundred and seventy Alaskan Huskies to be exact. They are enthusiastically jumping in, their pens waiting to be petted.

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Just like us, they can’t wait to get going. As we set off into the big open plains high above the fjord, I feel like an Arctic explorer on an expedition in past times. In a traditional Sami tent (similar to a North American aboriginal tipi) used by the local nomadic people, we enjoy the afterglow of our day around a crackling fire. We fall asleep, with howling hounds in the background .

All the time in the world

Even although we have been in Lyngen for nearly a month, we still can’t get used to the constant daylight and keep ‘forgetting’ to go to bed on time. Even at 2 a.m., while the birds are still singing, we have energy to burn. Next to our fisherman’s cabin, we build a small jib course with a rail and an upside-down fishing boat as a kicker. We let the boys test the course and after a few minor crashes, they start landing 360’s. We cheer them on and with cold Arctic beers in hand; we enjoy our last night in this amazing place. MidMay, in the middle of the night and far above the Arctic Circle, our skiing seasons ends. Surrounded by friends, we celebrate the fantastic winter we have had and secretly long for the next!


N A T U R A L

D E F E N S E

Soft and neutral, typically unseasonal hues such as winter white, beige and heather grey, this look is as at home on top of the mountain as it is by the fire, hot toddy in hand. Textured and layered knits, whether cabled or popcorn. From fluffy legwarmers to pom-pom trim, fur finishes this luxe snow-godess look.


35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

Canada Goose Sporting Life Exclusive Woodland Parka, $785 Fjallraven Koste Âź Zip Sweater, $180 Albee Gloves, $65 The North Face Buckland Pant, $120 Blundstone Chisel Boots, $190

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Frauenschuh Paris Jacket, $1560 M.Miller Deirdra 1/4 Zip Turtleneck,$325 Frauenschuh Christie Pant, $1040 Frye Veronica Short Boot, $378

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Parajumpers Vail Shearling Coat, $4460 Vince Sweater, $485 Citizens of Humanity Rocket Skinny Jeans, $185 Luis Trenker Tall Suede Boots, $840 Barbour Lady Jane Leather Glove, $76

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Canada Goose Aviator Hat, $225 Sporting Life Bandana, $10 Moncler Grenoble Luchon Jacket, $1970 Moncler Âź Button Sweater, $450 Swany Warp Speed Glove, $135 Tenson Tamarack Pants, $330 Lange RX100 Ski Boot, $500

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35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

Fani The Label Hood, $650 Harricana Kanosak Sweater, $569 Harricana Kiluk Fringe Scarf, $229 Odd Molly Ruffle Dress, $260 Harricana Manna Mitts, $139 Harricana Ipiktok Legging, $239 M.Miller Kylie Leg Warmer, $535 Manitobah Mukluks Snowy Owl Boots, $200

Opposite Page (Clockwise) Moncler Grenoble Beanie with Fur Pom, $235 S’Well Birch 17oz Bottle, $35 Pine Antler Cushion, $35 Me to We Wood Bracelet, $13 Me to We Peace Necklace, $20 Hudson’s Bay Company Millenium Fleece Throw, $40 Nutcracker Birch Candle Holder, $25 UGG Bonham Boot, $190 Manitobah Mukluks Snowy Owl Boots, $200 Moncler Cable Knit Sweater, $820 Bark Toggle Sweater, $698 Ray Ban Aviators, $195 Mighty Purse Phone Charger Purse, $120 Rosemary and Time Antler Hook, $60

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35TH A N N I V E R S A RY

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MODEL SHOT (Phil with Watch?)

WWW.SPORTINGLIFE.CA

YONGE STREET STORE 2665 Yonge Street, M4P 2J6 Toronto Tel: (416) 485-1611

BIKES & BOARDS STORE 2454 Yonge Street, M4P 2H5 Toronto Tel: (416) 485-4440

SHERWAY GARDENS 25 The West Mall, M9C 1B8 Etobicoke Tel: (416) 620-7750

COLLINGWOOD STORE 222 Huronontario St. L9Y 2M2 Collingwood Tel: (705) 445-3773

MARKVILLE MALL 5000 Highway 7 East, L3R 4M9 Markham Tel: (905) 258-1111

LANSDOWNE PARK 943 Bank Street K1S 3W7 Ottawa Tel: (613) 236-9731

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Sporting Life Fall/Winter 2014/15  

Sporting Life Fall/Winter 2014/15