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UTAH 4-H TURNS 100 IN 2012

The year 2012 marks the centennial for Utah State University Extension 4-H, part of the nation’s largest youth development organization. The theme, “Celebrating the Past, Creating the Future,” will be integrated into 4-H events held around the state through the year. Widely known for its early roots in cooking and agriculture, 4-H has grown during the last century to include offerings such as rocketry, robotics and global positioning systems. The organization reaches every corner of the country with more than 6 million youths in urban neighborhoods, suburban schoolyards and rural farming communities and supports young people from elementary school through high school, according to 4-H.org. Head, heart, hands and health are the four H’s in 4-H and are the four values members work on while participating in the program. According to Kevin Kesler, USU Extension director of Utah 4-H programs, many people attribute their success to 4-H. “It is amazing how many people tell me they were in 4-H as a youth, and they then tell me how much 4-H contributed to their success in life,” he said. “We hope that the 4-H centennial events held around the state will provide an opportunity for 4-H alumni to come together and also to experience today’s 4-H program.” According to Kesler, there are approximately 8,000 volunteers in Utah working with more than 75,000 youths in the Utah 4-H Program. The 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development, conducted by the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, shows young people involved with 4-H are nearly two times more likely to get better grades in school, nearly two times more likely to plan to go to college, 41 percent less likely to engage in risky behaviors and 25 percent more likely to positively contribute to their families and communities. The research-driven programming of 4-H allows young people to engage in issues from global food security, climate change and sustainable energy to childhood obesity and food safety, according to 4-H.org. Out-of-school 4-H programs, in-school enrichment programs, clubs and camps also offer a wide variety of science, engineering, technology and applied math educational opportunities. “Celebrating the Past, Creating the Future,” Utah 4-H’s state centennial celebration will be held Thursday, July 12, through Saturday, July 14, at Utah State University. Activities will include youth and adult workshops, youth contests, a 4-H alumni reunion, 4-H Hall of Fame awards, banquets, a barbecue on the quad, games, alumni contests and awards. Individual county events will also be held throughout the year. Contact specific county Extension offices for more information. Kesler said it is his goal that by the end of the 4-H centennial year, everyone in the state will know that 4-H is alive and well. “We invite everyone to join 4-H alumni and friends in ‘Celebrating the Past, Creating the Future,’” he said. For further information on Utah Extension’s 4-H centennial celebration, contact Kesler’s office at 435-7974444 or visit utah4h.org. For local 4-H Centennial Celebration Events contact Garfield County 4-H Office 435-676-1113 or Garfield County 4-H Assistant Cassie Lyman 435-826-4088.

PANGUITCH WEATHER

Thursday, May 31, 2012 • Issue # 946

TRACTOR PULL AND VINTAGE CAR SHOW AT QUILT WALK FESTIVAL

Saturday, June 9, 2012 will be the date for the 2nd annual tractor pull. This year there will also be a Vintage Car show. All participants are invited to kick off the event with a parade at 10:00, then following the parade there will be our famous quilt walk races with a team of 7, walking on quilts, it takes a lot of co-

operation to get 7 people down main street walking on quilts! The Tractor Pull and Vintage Car Show at the Panguitch Rodeo grounds will be next. Both are free to the public. Tractor pulls are becoming a very popular event. A Tractor Pull is a contest between different classes of tractors, small engine, medium

engine, large engine and diesel engines. They pull a sled to see how far they can pull it. The farther you go the heavier it gets. It is mostly for antique tractors but if the modern day tractors want to do it they can. There is a fee for each time a tractor pulls. It is $5.00 for a member, $10.00 for non-member. Any one can

join and it is $35.00 for the year. Registration for the event will take place that morning at 8:00 a.m. at the city offices in Panguitch. Old Tractors and Vintage cars are welcome to participate in the parade also. Please call Wally Veater at 435-616-8376 or Joe Nay at 435-676-8034 for questions or additional information. It’s really fun to watch.

LOA WEATHER

DAVCO BUILDING THE SNUGGLE INN......................................................836-2898 55 South Main, Loa ( www.thesnuggleinn.com ) Conference Rooms - meetings, socials, business, reunions, shower rooms, etc. TOSCONOS PIZZERIA.................................................836-2500 Hours: Open: Mon - Sat: 11-8pm ~ Closed Sundays. Sandwiches, Paninnis, Pizzas,Wraps, Salads, Pastas, Breadsticks, Cin-A-Stick w/Frosting, Smoothies and Specialty Coffees CREATIVE SPIRIT GALLERY & GIFTS..................836-2898 www.giftscreativespirit.com MANE-E-ACS HAIR SALON .....................................836-2602 Kimber Wood (Walk-ins, Hair Cuts, Perms, Colors, Pedicures, and Hair Extensions & Jewelry.) PACE TAX SERVICE.....................................................836-2218 Tax Preparations, Refund Loans, IRS E-Filing, and Tax Planning. THE WAYNE & GARFIELD COUNTY INSIDER is owned and operated by Snapshot Multimedia and is distributed weekly to all of Garfield County. Its purpose is to inform residents about local issues and events. Articles submitted from independent writers are not necessarily the opinion of Snapshot Multimedia. We sincerely hope you enjoy the paper and encourage input on ideas and/or suggestions for the paper. Thank you for your support.

Politics is not the art of the possible. It consists in choosing between the disastrous and the unpalatable. John Kenneth Galbraith Wayne Phone: 435-836-2622 Garfield Phone: 435-676-2621 Fax 1-888-370-8546 PO BOX 472, Loa, Utah 84747 snapshot@live.com ALL content for THE WAYNE &GARFIELD COUNTY INSIDER must be submitted on FRIDAY BEFORE 5:00 PM to be included in the following Thursday edition of the paper.

BOXHOLDER

PRE-SORT STANDARD PAID LOA, UTAH PERMIT No. 5


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May 31, 2012

Garfield County

ENTERTAINMENT & EVENTS PHS SPORTSLINE BY MACK OETTING

SUMMER READING As we start into the long summer break, I would like to encourage parents to allocate some time to have students read on a regular basis. It is very important that students in grades K-3 read out load to someone. For students in the upper grades, it is still important to designate a set amount of time for reading. As we test students at the end of the school year in reading, we find many of them will be on or above grade level. When students return in August, several will drop nearly a half of a reading level during the summer. Sometimes it takes until the middle of November to get these students back to where they were reading when they left in May. It would be very beneficial to have students continue to read during the summer to help prevent the regression in their reading proficiency. One great way to involve students in reading during the summer is to visit your local library. Find out more information on the “Dream Big” summer reading program at: http://library.utah.gov/programs/youth/summerReading.html Just as a point of information the next school board meeting is scheduled on June 14th in Bryce Valley. We will be closing this fiscal year budget and adopting the new budget for fiscal year 2013. --Superintendent Ben Dalton

ESCALANTE STREET SALE

Clean out your closets, garages, and barns. Envision Escalante is holding a street sale on Saturday, June 2, 2012. If you would like to secure a table space, stop by the Skyhoppi Thrift Store and register. The cost of the table space is $10.00. This event is proving to be a great way of cleaning out and making a little money. The newly formed Escalante Back Country Horseman Club will be participating with a tack sale. The hours for the sale will be 9:00 to 12:00.

Jory Owens is part of the Class of 2012 and I felt that I would put in some of his accomplishments. As a 9th grader Jory started his athletic career as a 79 lb wrestler, he never let his size slow him down. He took first place in Region his first year and it wasn’t till his junior year that he finally got his weight up to 105 lbs. Jory won 1A State, three years in a row, even though he moved up a weight class his senior year. These are some of Jory’s accomplishments: • Academic All State (2012) • Academic All Region (2012) • First PHS three times State Champion Wrestler • First PHS four times Region Champion Wrestler • 1A State Outstanding Wrestler for 2012 • 1A Region Outstanding Wrestler for 2010 • Outstanding Wrestler at Milford Wrestling Tournament (2009,2010,2012)

GARFIELD COUNTY 4-H

Garfield County 4-H youth and Leaders: Plan to come join the fun at this year’s 4-H Day Camp Thursday, May 31st, 2012, 9:15am-2:15pm at Tropic Reservoir: “4-H Centennial - 100 years of 4-H” Activities include canoeing, BB Guns, service project, leather craft, games, etc. Cost is $5.00 per youth which includes activities and potluck lunch (bring salad or dessert-meat provided). All youth planning on attending camp need a current medical release and code of conduct in to the Extension office since October 1st 2011 (or bring one with them to camp), 4-H camp is open our 4-Her’s in 3rd-12th grade and their families (any youth under 8 that has not yet completed 3rd grade must have their parent attend camp with them). We are looking for Teen Leaders interested in getting some service in to come help with group rotations and activities. For more information Contact Garfield County Extension Office 435-676-1114 or Cassie Lyman 435-826-4088

PANGUITCH SENIOR CENTER HOT LUNCH PROGRAM 87 N 50 W • 676-2281/676-1140 Suggested donation $2.50 60 & older, $6.00 under 60 Call before 10 AM of the day of attendance to reserve a spot

ADVERTISE IN

THE INSIDER 676-2621 Garfield

Meals include milk & breadNOTE: PLEASE BE COURTEOUS AND CALL AHEAD. The ladies work diligently to prepare a good dinner and without a head count they cannot prepare enough to feed everyone.

836-2622 Wayne

• Outstanding Wrestler at Enterprise Wrestling Tournament (2012) • Outstanding Wrestler at Panguitch invitational Tournament (2010,2011) • PHS most dedicated wrestler (2009) • Utah All-Star Classic 1A/2A All-Star team (2011,2012) Baseball: • Academic All State (2011) • Academic All Region (2011) • 1A 1st Team All State Team • 1A 1st Team All Region Team • 1A State Baseball Team Champions (2009,2011) • 1A Region Baseball Team Champions (2010) • “Grand Slam” Tournament team Champions (2008) Jory was an outstanding catcher with a gun for an arm, I don’t think many base were stolen on him. Jory maintained a 3.8 grade average all through high

school. Another year of sports has gone by and the Cats were outstanding. It started off with the Bob Cats winning the 1A State Baseball Championship. The Lady Cats captured the 1A State Championship in Cross Country. Lady Cats finished 5th at State in Volleyball and Coach Troy Norris was coach of the year. The Lady Cats after only winning 4 games all season long, the Basketball team came alive to finish 5th at State. The Bob Cats also had a good year finishing 5th in basketball at State. In track the Ladies placed 3rd and the Bob Cats finished a surprise 7th. I can’t wait till next year; the Cats didn’t lose many seniors and should have a great next year.


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May 31, 2012

ENTERTAINMENT & EVENTS www.WayneTheater.com

Wayne County

TEXT “MOVIETIMES” TO 69302 TO RECEIVE CURRENT DATES AND SHOWTIMES ON THE GO!

THE AVENGERS PG-13 Running time: 2 hrs. 22 min

SHOWTIMES 6/1(FRI) - 6:00PM 6/2(SAT) - 6:00PM 6/4 (MON) - 6:00PM 6/3 (SUN) - 3:00PM

DARK SHADOWS PG-13 Running time: 1 hrs. 53 min

SHOWTIMES 6/1(FRI) - 9:00PM 6/2(SAT) - 9:00PM 6/4(MON) - 9:00PM

For more movie information, scan this code with your Smart phone for link to The Wayne Theatre facebook page. General Admission: $6.00 Seniors 59 and over/Children 11 and younger: $5.00 Sunday matinees: $5.00

11 East Main • Bicknell, UT 84715 435-425-3123

DARCI DIXON RECEIVES MASTERS FROM U of U

SUMMER READING PROGRAM 2012

Dreams and Wishes – June 5th A skit, “The Fisherman and his Wife” will be performed by some of WHS sterling scholars! Nightly Rituals – June 12th We will be having some special guests that you won’t want to miss! Nocturnal Animals – June 19th Cindy Micheli will come visit us from Capitol Reef National Park! Fancy Nancy Party for the GIRLS …and… Camp Out Extravaganza for the BOYS - June 26th The title speaks for itself! Night, Night Skies – July 3rd The star lab from Thanksgiving Point will be here! Crawl inside and see all the constellations! Things to go bump in the night – July 10th End of Summer Reading party! Everyone that dresses like something that goes bump in the night gets their name in a drawing for free books! Faun Jackson, Tri-County Bookmobile Library

Wayne Athletics Inc. is hosting a

RUNNING CLUB!

When: Every Thursday beginning June 7th @ 5:00 What: We will talk about running, technique, nutrition, etc. Who: All ages Why: For fun (mostly), and to get fit for upcoming summer races Cost: $10 Please call Magon Bowling (491-0245) or Sarah Taylor (836-2250) to find out more.

M A Y

Darci Michelle Dixon received her Master’s Degree in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in School Counseling from the University of Utah on May 4, 2012. Darci is the daughter of Paul and Dori Dixon of Torrey, Utah and the Granddaughter of Joseph and Stella urbidge of Bicknell/ Salt Lake City, Utah and Dr. William Dixon of Orcas, Washington. Congratulations Darci, we are all very proud of you!

THANK YOU

We would like to express our gratitude and appreciation for all the support, financial help, food, and love given us after Rusty’s accident. We will never forget your kindness. Thank you, Shirley, Hillary and Crystal.

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May 31, 2012

tHe lAuGhiNg pOiNt!!

Every1Counts

By Cynthia Kimball God’s mission for you may not include serving with another person. It may not be in a luxurious place with see through ocean water in tropical weather. It may not be when you want it. It may not even include your chosen time length either. And you might not be provided with an official missionary name tag. It might be when you are right in the middle of a bunch of things. But this cannot matter because you are not in charge. He is. So when He calls you, you thank Him for the mission you are going on, because it’s a compliment that He has chosen you, and you serve, serve, serve, like nobody’s business. So if God calls you on a mission to an ER room, for instance, you need to serve even if you are in pain. And when you are in the ER room, for example, you need to share the gospel with as many people as you can. Bring the spirit with you so that others can feel it and want to ask you about it. One time, when this happened to me, I had an opportunity to ask everyone that was working on me if they would pray for me. And the answer I got was an astounding, “Yes!” One person, even, came back later to check on me. “Just wanted to see how you were doing,” he asked. “Doing great, thanks, and it was because of your prayers.” “Thank you. I always

God’s Mission for You Might Not Be What You Would Have Designed, But It’s What You and Others May Need

pray. I’ve got to run, but I just wanted to make sure you were okay.” “I am. Thank you once more.” “You bet.” On this same occasion, I had a roommate in a hospital. She was coughing real badly on the other side of the curtain. “Hi, my name’s Cynthia. Are you okay over there?” “Oh, yes, I am, thank you,” said this hoarse voice, “My name’s Lori.” And then our friendship just kept blossoming. The cool thing about meeting Lori was that she had once had the gospel in her life, but had been inactive for years. So, guess what we talked about? Yup, the gospel. She told me how she loved teaching Primary and being a member of the church. And when she spoke she smiled and was filled with the spirit. Lori was in the hospital for a possible heart condition. She was to have an angiogram where doctors go up through an artery in the groin to the heart to make sure there are no blockages. And Lori was real scared about this so I posed a question to her. “Lori, would you like a priesthood blessing before your angiogram?” “Oh, I’d love one, Cindy,” she replied with a huge smile of gratitude. After Lori received her blessing she said, “I feel at peace, I feel comforted and I am now ready for my sur-

gery.” And then Lori slept soundly that night before her angiogram. So remember, the next time Heavenly Father calls you on a mission, in might be in the form of an illness, a hospital visit, an accident, loss of a family member, out of gas somewhere, the end of a relationship, etc. God’s missions are uniquely designed for you to grow and perhaps another person or persons. But before you curse Him because it’s not “a good time” to go on a mission or it’s “not the trial you would have ordered” make sure to express your gratitude that He chose you and work to look for the blessing or blessings that will come and even how you can bless others through that trial. When you do this, even if the outcome isn’t what you pray for, He will use you again, and again, and again, because you were loyal and faithful to Him. Best yet, He will pour blessings out to you. And you will find them, as long as you are looking. They might not be what you would have ordered. But make sure to look because they are there. Cynthia Kimball is a professional speaker and trainer through her company Every1Counts, LLC, and a doctoral student in Workforce Education Leadership. She also writes frequently through Deseret Connect. E-mail: kimball@every1counts.net

BEING POLITE

FIRST DAY OF PSYCHIATRY CLASS

Psychiatry students were in their Emotional Extremes class. “Let’s set some parameters,” the professor said. “What’s the opposite of joy?” he asked one student. “Sadness,” he replied. “The opposite of depression?” he asked another student. “Elation,” he replied. “The opposite of woe?” the professor asked a young woman from Texas. The Texan replied, “Sir, I believe that would be giddyup.”

STUCK IN AN ELEVATOR

The elevator in our building malfunctioned one day, leaving several of us stranded. Seeing a sign that listed two emergency phone numbers, I dialed the first and explained our situation. After what seemed to be a very long silence, the voice on the other end said, “I don’t know what you expect me to do for you. I’m a psychologist.” “A psychologist?” I replied. “Your phone is listed here as an emergency number. Can’t you help us?” “Well,” he finally responded in a measured tone. “How do you feel about being stuck in an elevator?”

LATE TO SCHOOL

The father said, “My son used to be late to school every day. I fixed that when I bought him a used car!” “Now, he is there early every day, to get a parking spot!”

PAYING BILLS

I was in small-claims court when I listened in on the case of a woman who held a good job but still had trouble paying her bills on time. “Can’t you live within your income?” asked the judge. “No, Your Honor,” she said. “It’s all I can do to live within my credit.”

ASK A SPECIALIST: Beef: Should it be What’s for Dinner?

Beef has been targeted as a protein source that is high in fat. Because of this, some consumers feel they should limit its consumption or not eat it at all. However, there are ways to prepare beef that minimize added fat. In addition, some cuts of beef are no higher in fat than other “lean” meats such as poultry and fish. It’s important to take a closer look at beef in order to make informed decisions about including it in the diet. In addition to being a good source of iron and zinc, it is also a good source of B vitamins, selenium and phosphorus. With that said, how does it stack up in calories and in vitamin/mineral density per serving? Consider this dietary information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. • Protein - A 3-ounce serving of lean beef provides 51 percent of the body’s daily requirement of protein for a 2,000-calorie diet. It is especially important for periods of rapid growth, such as childhood, adolescence and during pregnancy. Other good sources of protein include eggs, nuts, soy and dairy products. But protein is only one of several nutriThe graduating Wayne High School Class of 1962 held a 50th year reunion on May 27, ents obtained from beef. 2012, at the Lodge near Lyman, Utah to enjoy the milestone. Videos and interviews were • Zinc – Zinc supports shown of classmates that could not attend and for those who could attend we caught up on brain function and boosts the last fifty years since high school. A good time and fun was had by all. the immune system. Your body needs zinc for many essential functions such as growth, development and appetite control. Three ounces of lean beef contain 154 calories and 38 percent of the body’s requirement for zinc. It would take 13½ 3-ounce servings of salmon to get the same benefit of this mineral. That many servings of salmon would be 2,363 calories. • Iron - This mineral delivers oxygen to cells where Left to Right Back Row it is used to help produce Steve Sorenson, Barbara Brinkerhoff Taylor, Marla Turner Brinkerhoff, Nathan Chap- energy. Three ounces of pell, Linda Rae Brian Hall, Lois Faye Behunin Hoddenbach, Cora Mae Bullard Taylor, lean beef provide 14 perFaun Allen Zetterquist, Stanley Wood, Elvin Jackson, Vern Farmer, Jerry Torgerson, Al- cent of the daily requirement, again at 154 calories. fred Ekker, Alton Chappell, Phillip Sorenson, Bill Chappell It would take 2 ¾ cups of Left to Right Front Row Patsy Albrecht Wells, Elaine Balle Beltcher, Kathleen Chappell Larsen, Myra Chappell raw spinach to get the same Sharp, Norma Dean Forsyth Griffiths, Maxine Chesnut White, Alice Fay King Sackett, amount of iron. In this case, however, beef is no match Margia Giles Vandervur, Marsha Filmore Sarale. for spinach in calories since Those that have passed away in Class of 1962 this amount of spinach conRonnie Blackburn, Lana Pierce Christiansen, Larayne Rasmusssen Shedden, Neil Curtis, tains only 19 calories. John Clark,

WHS CLASS OF 1962

One day, Bill and Tom went to a restaurant for dinner. As soon as the waiter brought out two steaks, Bill quickly picked out the bigger steak for himself. Tom wasn’t happy about that: “When are you going to learn to be polite?” Bill: “If you had the chance to pick first, which one would you pick?” Tom: “The smaller piece, of course.” Bill: “What are you complaining about? The smaller piece is what you got, right?”

• B-Vitamins – These are key nutrients in turning food into energy. Beef is a major supplier of B-vitamins including riboflavin, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B-6 and vitamin B-12. Besides their role in energy production, each B vitamin has its own unique function. For example, B-12 works closely with Folate in forming red blood cells, and it maintains normal functioning of the nervous system. To get the benefits of these vitamins provided by a 3-ounce serving of beef, the following equivalents would be necessary: Vitamin B12- 7 ½ (3-ounce) servings of chicken breasts equaling 1,050 calories; Riboflavin would require 4 ½ (3-ounce servings) of white tuna meat that would come in at 491 calories; and Vitamin B6 would require consumption of 6 ½ cups of raw spinach to equal the same vitamin value found in beef. • Selenium – Selenium is an antioxidant that works with vitamin E to help prevent damage to your body’s cells. Recent studies have found adequate intake of selenium may reduce the risk of heart disease and certain types of cancer. Three-ounces of lean beef

contain 26 percent of the daily requirement for this nutrient. • Phosphorus – This nutrient helps build strong bones and teeth. A 3-ounce serving of beef contains 20 percent of the daily requirement for phosphorus. To select the most beneficial cuts of beef, choose 3-ounce serving sizes that start with 4 ounces of raw beef. Look for beef labeled with the “USDA Select” grade. It’s lower in fat and calories than “Choice” or “Prime.” Trim fat before cutting beef into strips for stir-fry or cubes for kabobs. Use low-fat cooking methods such as broiling, roasting on a rack, grilling, braising or stewing. Remove excess fat from stews, soups and casseroles by chilling them and skimming the hardened fat from the top. If you’re in a hurry, use a baster to remove surface fat. Cook with fresh ingredients that do not contribute extra fat such as hot and sweet peppers, onion, garlic, tomatoes and fresh herbs. Eating beef can be a healthy addition to any diet. Keep in mind the excellent nutritional value of beef, then concentrate on healthy ways to purchase, prepare and serve it.

Answers for this week


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May 31, 2012

TORREY NEWS The start of Memorial Day Week-end certainly was made memorable by the Wayne County wind. Some early morning motorist at mile marker 69, at Rich Cropper’s place, almost found themselves buried by a falling tree that ended up closing the highway. This is the second time in almost as many weeks that Rich has found himself up before breakfast and out in the middle of the road with his long bar Husqavarna chainsaw. Lucky enough, the Teasdale “McCartney’s” were in the line of backed up traffic and jumped right in to help clear the highway with their heavy duty Ford 350, as did some locals and many willing visitors wanting to get on their way. In impressive fashion with all the help from visiting and local volunteers, and quick action from the Torrey Town Maintenance Department, Highway 24 was re-opened to the Memorial Day traffic in record time. Anyone needing extra firewood should contact Rich Cropper. On the 24th of May, Torrey’s own renowned “House Band” the Adaptor’s made their debut on stage at the Saddelery. Jan Stringham was so deck out in his new mail order duds from Rockmount western wear that some folks mis-

by Adus Dorsey

took him for George Strait and were asking for his autograph. The Adaptors, with Jan Stringham on lead guitar and vocals, Bernie on bass and vocals, Lynsey Shelar on fiddle and Tys Winkle on the drums continue to rise to any occasion when there is music to be played. As is always the case The Adaptor’s make it a special point to advertise well and thank all the locals that consistently come out to support them. The Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival in Torrey weathered the Memorial Day wild weather on Saturday the 26th of May, as did the first Farmers Market for 2012 at the Robbers Roost Bookstore. Although Jen Howe was unwilling to relinquish ownership of her first tomato of the season some local farmers were more forthcoming with their bounteous early harvest and hand made crafts. Steve Wesson, the famous Salt Lake City based bassist came to Torrey on a visit with Rex Seabury over the Memorial Day week-end. Steve has been along time fixture in the Utah music scene and is in class all his own. Over the years Steve has played with bands such as the Oquirrh Ridge Drifters, Obadiah’s Outlaws, Smith and Wesson, The infamous Mountain Dogs and

Oh, the silly, insulting and downright rude places you can go! These town names made us snicker like middle schoolers. Here’s a quick look at how Tightwad, Middelfart, and others got their names Tightwad Missouri Chances are you don’t know anyone who lives in Tightwad (population: 64), but you could probably name a few cheapskates who should. As the story goes,in the early 1900s the postmaster of this town southeast of was cheated in a watermelon deal at the local store. Out of spite, he took advantage of his postmaster privilege and renamed the town Tightwad. The main attraction here is Tightwad Bank, which happens to be FDIC insured and classified as “well capitalized.” Proof that these 64 Tightwaders are still penny-pinchers? Honorable Mentions: Dollarbeg, Scotland; Pennyhill, Delaware; Money, Mississippi. No Name, Colorado When you live in a desolate unincorporated community between No Name Canyon and No Name Creek, apparently you accept your destiny of sharing the same name—or lack thereof. No Name, nearGlenwood Springs, got its name after Interstate 70 was built. A Department of Transportation official noticed that the area didn’t have a name and wrote “No Name” for Exit 119, the ramp accessing the community. It drew some attention for its absurdity, locals started to accept it, and it stuck. Later, when given the opportunity to change No Name to a proper name, the community chose to remain nameless. Honorable Mentions: Why, Arizona; Whynot, Mississippi Hell, Cayman Islands If you haven’t already been to Hell and back, head for West Bay on Grand Cayman Island. You can take a picture with the devil-disguised owner of Hell’s souvenir shop and send a wish-you-were-here postcard from Hell to family and friends. Don’t miss seeing the jagged black limestone formations that earned this tourist village its name. Most accounts recall someone saying, “This is what hell must look like.” Luckily, this one is in a tropical paradise. Honorable Mentions: Hell, Michigan; Little Heaven, Delaware; Convent, Louisiana Elephant Butte, New Mexico One of the country’s best forks in the road has to be in southwest New Mexico, where your choices are either Elephant Butte or Truth or Consequences. Tough call. Do you head for a herd of escaped circus performers, or do you take the double dare? Actually, the name Elephant Butte refers to a volcanic cone island (loosely resembling the animal’s silhouette) in the middle of a reservoir that is the largest lake in the state and a favorite vacation spot. Honorable Mentions: Monkeys Eyebrow, Kentucky; Lizard Lick, North Carolina Crapstone, England After downing the Leg O’ Mutton, it looks like you’ll make it three fourths of a kilometer before you’ll need to hit a toilet. Hopefully, you’ve got both mint sauce and granny’s Imodium in the glove box. The consensus in the small country village of Crapstone is that there’s no vile history behind the name’s origin. Crapstonites speculate it has something to do with rocks or the soil. Still, when ordering things by phone, these residents on the southeastern edge of Dartmoor have to answer the inevitable address question: “Yes, that’s right, c-r-a-p, as in crap.” Honorable Mention: North Piddle, England

many more. A local outdoor holiday barbeque favorite that is not generally enjoyed until closer to July, instead of Memorial Day, is the, avocado, onion, bacon and cheese, half pound locally grown ground beef “cotton burger”. Most of the ingredients you can get form Joe at Royals Market in Loa. The cotton can be obtained just about any where in Torrey. All you have to do is leave your back door open during dinner preparation or check your barbeque to often. The white fuzz from the famous cottonwood trees in Torrey magically attaches itself to just about everything this time of year. The old timers say it adds roughage to any meal and aids in digestion. Wayne High held their 2012 Graduation on the 25th of May. Proud parents and friends filled the auditorium, lucky enough there was plenty of tissue to go around. Many of the graduating students left early Saturday morning for a church history trip to experience important sights along the Mormon Pioneer Trail and other significant Historical Church locations. In what became a major mile stone for Wayne County and the Wayne High Class of 2012, Nellie Wilkins graduated. From the first day I met Nellie at the Wayne Middle School in Bicknell, and she smiled at me from her motorized wheel chair, I knew I had a friend forever. In what became a seven year friendship of smiles and excitement at seeing each other, I have had the wonderful opportunity to watch Nellie influence me as well her generation, and just as many Wayne County citizens. Congratulations Nellie and Thank You so much for helping me be a more understanding and enlightened human being. Memorial Day celebrations continued through-out Wayne County, Utah State and the United States of America over the weekend. Folks from faraway braved the weather to come and decorate the graves of Veterans and loved ones. American flags were in abundance reminding us all of the sacrifice and service of those that came and have went before us. Our freedoms are not free, everything comes at a cost, we all have a voice and a vote, use them wisely.

200 North 400 East • Panguitch, Utah • 676-8811 www.garfieldmemorial.org Family Practice Dr. Richard Birch Dr. Todd Mooney Dr. Mitchell Miller Becky Roberts, FNP Tim Dennis, PA-C

Speech Therapy Flora Howard Certified Nurse Midwife DeAnn Brown, CNM Anesthesiology Lewis Barney, CRNA

VISITING SPECIALISTS FOR JUNE 2012 Dr. Robert Pearson Dr. Randy Delcore Dr. Eric Maxwell Dr. Brad Webb Dr. Robert Nakken Dr. Ronald Crouch Dr. Ben Adams Dr. Aaursh Manchanda

12 14 20 4, 18 28 20 (PM) 7 13

Ear, Nose Throat .......................... 676-8842 Orthopedist.................................... 676-8842 Audiologist..................................... 676-8842 Podiatrist................................ 800-260-3668 Orthopedist.................................... 676-8842 Urologist........................................ 676-8842 Dermatology........................... 435-586-6440 Cardiology..................................... 676-8842

Our Pharmacist, Tim Smith, will provide Coumadin testing and results at outlying clinics. Please call clinic for available dates and times. Coumadin testing and results at the Garfield Memorial Clinic will be by appointment. To schedule an appointment for Mammography, please call 435-676-1267. FUTURE 2011- 2012 MAMMO DATES: June 12 - Panguitch June 27 - Panguitch June 13 - Bryce Valley (UCCP) July 17 & 18 - Kanab

Clinics - Call For Appointments

Garfield Memorial Clinic, Panguitch ................................................... 435-676-8842 (Mon - Fri) Kazan Clinic, Escalante . .........................................................435-826-4374 (Mon., Wed., Fri.) Bryce Valley Clinic, Cannonville ................................................ 435-679-8545 (Tues. & Thurs.) Circleville Clinic, Circleville . ...................................................... 435-577-2958 (Tues. & Thurs.) Physical and Speech Therapy . ............................................................................435-676-8840 Mammography .....................................................................................................435-676-1267 Diabetic Counseling(Jan Frandsen) ..................................................................... 435-676-8811 Garfield Memorial Hospital Long Term Care Center ............................................435-676-1265

BARNETT ORTHODONTICS www.bracesbybarnett.com Toll Free : 1-888 BRACE ME


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May 31, 2012

LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE TO WATER USERS The State Engineer received the following Application(s) in Wayne County (Locations in SLB&M).For more information or to receive a copy of filings, visit http://waterrights.utah. gov or call 1-866-882-4426. Persons objecting to an application must file a CLEARLY READABLE protest stating FILING NUMBER, REASONS FOR OBJECTION, PROTESTANTS` NAME AND RETURN ADDRESS, and any request for a hearing. Protest AND A $15 PROCESSING FEE MUST BE FILED with the State Engineer, Box 146300, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6300 ON OR BEFORE JUNE 20, 2012. These are informal proceedings as per Rule R655-6-2 of the Division of Water Rights. (The Period of Use is generally year-round except irrigation which is generally from Apr 1 to Oct 31 each year.) NEW APPLICATION(S) 97-2377 (A79376): Joette Rex propose(s) using 1.73 ac-ft. from groundwater (4 miles West ofEscalante) for IRRIGATION; STOCKWATERING; DOMESTIC. CHANGE APPLICATION(S) 61-2682(a38164): C. J. Graham, Louise M. Jydstrup propose(s) using 0.5 ac-ft. from groundwater (3 miles SW of Hatch) for IRRIGATION; DOMESTIC. Kent L. Jones, P.E., STATE ENGINEER Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 24 & 31, 2012.

PANGUITCH CITY SURPLUS SALE

1. 2005 Arctic Cat - 400 ATV: 4 wheel drive, manual transmission, winch, good tires, runs well. Test drive at Panguitch City Office - Minimum bid: $1000. 2. 20 feet of 10” culvert: metal, good condition. Located at the City Shop. 3. Water tank on 3 axle bumper pull trailer - 1,800 gallon tank - Minimum bid $500. Located at the City Shop Sealed bids should be turned into the Panguitch City Office at 25 S. 200 E., PO Box 75, Panguitch, UT 84759 by June 8, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. Bids will be opened at a regularly scheduled City Council Meeting on June 12, 2012 at 6:45 p.m. Funds for purchase items must be turned into the City within 10 business days. Panguitch City reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. Questions: Call Panguitch City Office at 435-676-8585. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the main entrance of the Sixth Judicial District Courthouse, 740 North Main Street, Panguitch, Utah, 84759, on June 25, 2012, at 2:00 p.m. for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed executed on August 10, 2007, recorded August 15, 2007, as Entry Number 246502, official records of Garfield County, State of Utah, by Silverado Boys Ranch, LLC, as Trustor in favor of Zions First National Bank as Trustee and Zions First National Bank as Beneficiary, covering the real property, together with all erected or affixed buildings, improvements and fixtures; all easements, rights of way and appurtenances; all water, water rights and ditch rights (including stock in utilities with ditch or irrigation rights); and all other rights, royalties and profits relating to the real property, including all minerals, oil, gas, geothermal and similar matters, more particularly described as: Parcel 1: That portion of the South half of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 14, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, lying west of the U.S. Highway right of way. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/ or removing the same. Parcel 2: The North half of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 23, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/ or removing the same. Parcel 3: The Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter and the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter and that portion of the Northeast quarter of the Northeast quarter lying West of Highway 89 in Section 23, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion lying within the boundaries of U.S. Highway 89. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. Parcel 4: That portion of the North half of the North half of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 24, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian lying West of U.S. Highway 89 right of way line. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. Parcel 5: That portion of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 24, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, lying West of the U.S. Highway 89 right of way line. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. The property is commonly known as 3800 South Highway 89, Panguitch, UT 84759. Serial numbers PC-353-5, PC-355, PC-356, PC-357-1, PC 357-B The undersigned disclaims any liability for any error in the address. The current beneficiary under the trust deed is Zions First National Bank and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default Silverado Boys Ranch LLC. The sale is subject to bankruptcy filing, payoff, reinstatement or any other circumstances that would affect the validity of the sale. If any such circumstance exists, the sale shall be void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned and the trustee and current beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. Bidders must tender to the trustee or the attorney for the trustee conducting the sale on the trustee’s behalf a $5,000.00 deposit and the balance of the purchase price must be paid within twenty-four (24) hours following the sale. The deposit must be in the form of a cashier’s check or bank official check payable to R. Steven Chambers, Trustee. Dated May 21, 2012. R. Steven Chambers, Successor Trustee, Nielsen & Senior 5217 South State Street, 4th Floor , Salt Lake City, UT 84107 (801) 327-8200 Office hours 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday – Friday Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 24, 31 & June 7, 2012

INVITATION FOR BIDS FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO BRYCE CANYON AIRPORT GARFIELD COUNTY, UTAH - U.D.O.T. NO. XXXXXX Sealed bids for improvements to the Bryce Canyon Airport, U.D.O.T. No. XXXXXX, will be received by Garfield County at the Bryce Canyon Airport, P.O. Box 640037, Bryce, Utah 84764 until June 7, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. MDT and then opened and read aloud. The work involved includes the following: SCHEDULE I FOG SEAL AND RE-MARK RUNWAY 3/21 SCHEDULE II FOG SEAL AND RE-MARK TAXIWAY A, TAXIWAY CONNECTORS AND APRON For a complete set of Plans, Specifications and Contract Documents all purchases must be made through our website at www. armstrongconsultants.com. A digital copy may be downloaded for $25.00. A hardcopy may be purchased for $50.00 for each set. There will be no refunds. Each bid must be accompanied by a Certified Check or Cashier’s Check in an amount not less than five percent of the total bid made payable to Garfield County, or by a Bid Bond in like amount executed by a Surety Company. The Bidder must supply all the information required by the proposal forms and specifications and he/she must bid on all items of every schedule. Garfield County reserves the right to waive any informality in or to reject any or all portions of the various bid items. No proposal may be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days from the opening thereof. A Pre-Bid meeting will be held at the Bryce Canyon Airport on May 31, 2012 at 1:00 p.m., MDT. All bidders are advised to examine the site to become familiar with all site conditions. The proposed contract is under and subject to Executive Order 11246 of 24 September 1965, as amended and to the equal opportunity clause and the Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications, including the goals and timetables for minority and female participation. A Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities must be submitted prior to the award of the proposed contract, including any subcontracts in excess of $10,000.00. The proposed contract is subject to the provisions of Department of Transportation Regulations 49 CFR Part 26 (Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Participation). Minimum wage rates as established by the Secretary of Labor are applicable to all schedules awarded for this project. Any questions regarding this project are to be directed to the office of Armstrong Consultants, Inc., Grand Junction, Colorado, (970) 242-0101, for interpretation. GARFIELD COUNTY, UTAH Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 17, 24 & 31, 2012 TEASDALE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Teasdale Special Service District is requesting separate sealed bids for replacement of 83 culinary water meter setters, boxes, meters, and lids. The project includes excavating and removing the old equipment and installing meter setters, boxes, meters, and lids. The Contractor will install the above mentioned owner furnished equipment and furnish and install all fittings. The project also includes furnishing and installing approximately 3,600 lineal feet of 10” diameter PVC pipeline, a meter, valves and related fittings. The meter setters, boxes, meters, and lids will be placed first and money that is left over will be used for the pipeline. There may be less than 3,600 lineal feet of 10” pipeline depending on the amount of money remaining after the meter part of the project is complete. Work will not begin on the pipeline until all meter related work is completed. Bids will be received by Dennis Hiskey at P.O. Box 70, Teasdale, Utah 84773 or at the Teasdale Special Service District Fire House at 40 East 100 South, Teasdale until 7:00 p.m. (local time) June 7 , 2012, and then at said Fire House publicly opened and read aloud. A pre-bid conference will be held at the Teasdale Fire House May 31, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. The Contract Documents may be examined or obtained at the office of Wall Engineering, 55 South Main, Fillmore, Utah 84631. 435-864-7503. wallengineering@frontiernet.net. The cost of the Documents is $25 plus postage for each set. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 17, 24 & 31, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING On June 12, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. the Panguitch City Council will hold a meeting at 25 South 200 East, Panguitch, Utah, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on the issues of: Panguitch City Ordinance NO. 2012-5 An ordinance amending the Panguitch Municipal code by adopting this section pertaining to the Municipal Energy Sales and Use Tax to replace the Utility Franchise and similar taxes, and repealing sections of the Panguitch City Code relating to such taxes and by providing that this ordinance shall become effective immediately upon posting after final passage. The hearing will be held on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the city conference room, 25 south 200 east, Panguitch Utah 84759. All interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard. Dated this 21st day of May 2012. Posted by order of the Panguitch City Council. The draft of Panguitch City Ordinance NO. 2012-5 may be reviewed at the Panguitch City Office at 25 South 200 East, Panguitch, Utah between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday beginning May 21st, 2012. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31 & June 7, 2012 PUBLIC BUDGET HEARING NOTICE Garfield County School District May 25, 2012 Garfield County School District will be proposing to the Board of Education the District’s tentative budget for fiscal year 2012-13. The budget meeting has been scheduled at Bryce Valley High School in Tropic, Utah at 5:00 p.m., on June 14, 2012. A copy of the proposed budget can be obtained on May 31, 2012 or thereafter from the District’s internet web site http://www.garfield.k12.ut.us/ or from the District Office at 145 East Center, Panguitch, Utah, 84759. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012

LOA TOWN 2012-13 BUDGET HEARING AND ADOPTION Loa Town will hold its budget hearing for the 20122013 fiscal year on Thursday, June 14th, 2012 at 8 pm, in conjunction with its regularly scheduled Town Board Meeting. They will adopt the budget for 2012-2013 fiscal year following the public hearing. If anyone would like to review the budget prior to this evening, you may come to the Loa Town Hall, Monday through Thursday from 11 am to 3 pm and ask for a copy of the budget. All public is welcome to attend the public hearing prior to the adoption. If you have any questions, contact Michelle Brian at 435836-2160. Published in the Wayne & Garfield County Insider, May 31st and June 7, 2012

NOTICE TO PANGUITCH CITY SECONDARY WATER USERS The Secondary irrigation water will be in the system on Monday, June 4, 2012. Watering schedules are available at the Panguitch City Office, 25 South 200 East, Panguitch, UT. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 24 & 31. 2012 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that Bryce Canyon City will hold a public hearing on June 19, 2012, at 12:00 p.m., at the Bryce Canyon City Public Safety Building 70 W 100 N for the purpose of accepting comments on the budget for the current fiscal year 2011-12 which will be opened and amended. Also, the 2012-13 budget will be adopted. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012 TROPIC TOWN PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Tropic Town will hold a public hearing on June 7, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in the Tropic Town Heritage Center 20 North Main to approve the 2012/2013 Town Budget. The public may inspect the proposed budget at the town office from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Posted this 31st Day of May 2012 Marie Niemann – Town Clerk Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING On June 12, 2012, at 7:05 p.m. the Panguitch City Council will hold a meeting at 25 South 200 East, Panguitch, Utah, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on the issues of: Panguitch City Ordinance NO. 2012-6 An ordinance amending the Panguitch Municipal code to add “Jake Brake” restrictions. The hearing will be held on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 7:05 p.m. in the city conference room, 25 south 200 east, Panguitch Utah 84759. All interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard. Dated this 21st day of May 2012. Posted by order of the Panguitch City Council. Draft ordinance NO. 20126 is available for review at the Panguitch City Office at 25 South 200 East, Panguitch, Utah between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday beginning May 21st, 2012. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31 & June 7, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICE Antimony Town will be holding a Budget Hearing for the 2013 Fiscal Year on June 7th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Community Center. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012

PUBLIC BUDGET HEARING NOTICE Garfield County School District May 25, 2012  Garfield County School District will be proposing to the Board of Education the District’s tentative budget for fiscal year 2012-13.  The budget meeting has been scheduled at Bryce Valley High School in Tropic, Utah at 5:00 p.m., on June 14, 2012. A copy of the proposed budget can be obtained on May 31, 2012 or thereafter from the District’s internet web site http://www.garfield.k12.ut.us/  or from the District Office at 145 East Center, Panguitch, Utah, 84759. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012 2012 PRIMARY ELECTION Garfield County Registered Voters in By-Mail Precincts, which includes: Antimony, Boulder, Bryce Canyon City, Cannonville, Hatch, Henrieville, and Ticaboo, should have received a letter with the voters party affiliation and options for voting in the Primary Election. Ballots will be mailed to voters and should be received by June 11 . Anyone wishing th to affiliate with a party should contact the Clerk’s Office by June 5th. Two parties will be holding primary elections inGarfield County, the Constitution Party and the Republican Party. There will be one non-partisan school board race in Panguitch Precinct #2. For questions regarding the election or voter registration, please call the Clerk’s Office at 435- 676-1163 or 435-6761120 or email at gcclerk @ mountainwest.net. Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICE Bicknell Town’s Budget Hearing for 2012-2013 will be held on 7 June, 2012, in conjunction with the regularly scheduled Town Board Meeting. It will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the town hall building, 64 W 100 N. The budget for 20112012 will be opened for revisions also. Connie Durfey, Town Clerk Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 31, 2012 BUDGET HEARING NOTICE Adoption of 2012-13 Budget Torrey Town will hold a public hearing on June 14, 2012 at 5:00. The location of the public hearing is in the Town Office at 75 East 100 North Torrey, Utah. The meeting is to adopt the 201213 budget. The public may inspect the budget at the city office between the hours of 10:00 and 3:00 after June 7, 2012. Paula Pace, Torrey Town Clerk Published in the Wayne & Garfield County Insider May 31 and June 7 2012


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May 31, 2012

LEGAL NOTICES

AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the main entrance of the Sixth Judicial District Courthouse, 740 North Main Street, Panguitch, Utah, 84759, on June 27, 2012, at 2:00 p.m. for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed executed on August 10, 2007, recorded August 15, 2007, as Entry Number 246502, official records of Garfield County, State of Utah, by Silverado Boys Ranch, LLC, as Trustor in favor of Zions First National Bank as Trustee and Zions First National Bank as Beneficiary, covering the real property, together with all erected or affixed buildings, improvements and fixtures; all easements, rights of way and appurtenances; all water, water rights, specifically including Water Right No. 611817; and ditch rights (including stock in utilities with ditch or irrigation rights); and all other rights, royalties and profits relating to the real property, including all minerals, oil, gas, geothermal and similar matters, more particularly described as: Parcel 1: That portion of the South half of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 14, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, lying west of the U.S. Highway right of way. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. Parcel 2: The North half of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 23, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. Parcel 3: The Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter and the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter and that portion of the Northeast quarter of the Northeast quarter lying West of Highway 89 in Section 23, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion lying within the boundaries of U.S. Highway 89. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. Parcel 4: That portion of the North half of the North half of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 24, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian lying West of U.S. Highway 89 right of way line. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. Parcel 5: That portion of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 24, Township 35 South, Range 5 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, lying West of the U.S. Highway 89 right of way line. EXCEPTING THEREFROM all oil, gas and/or other minerals, in, on or under said land, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring and/or removing the same. The property is commonly known as 3800 South Highway 89, Panguitch, UT 84759 Serial numbers PC-353-5, PC-355, PC-356, PC-357-1, PC 357B The undersigned disclaims any liability for any error in the address. The current beneficiary under the trust deed is Zions First National Bank and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default Silverado Boys Ranch LLC. The sale is subject to bankruptcy filing, payoff, reinstatement or any other circumstances that would affect the validity of the sale. If any such circumstance exists, the sale shall be void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned and the trustee and current beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. Bidders must tender to the trustee or the attorney for the trustee conducting the sale on the trustee’s behalf a $5,000.00 deposit and the balance of the purchase price must be paid within twenty-four (24) hours following the sale. The deposit must be in the form of a cashier’s check or bank official check payable to R. Steven Chambers, Trustee. • Dated May 24, 2012. /s/ R. Steven Chambers, R. Steven Chambers, Successor Trustee Nielsen & Senior, 5217 South State Street, 4th Floor Salt Lake City, UT 84107 • (801) 327-8200 Office hours 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • Monday – Friday THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published in The Wayne & Garfield County Insider on May 31, June 7 & 14, 2012

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AND BONDS TO BE ISSUED FOR LOA TOWN DATE HAS BEEN CHANGED PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town Council (the “Council”) of Loa Town, Wayne County, Utah (the “Issuer”) calls a public hearing on the Issuer’s proposed Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (the “Bonds”) pursuant to the Utah Local Government Bonding Act, Title 11, Chapter 14, Utah Code Annotated 1953, as amended. TIME, PLACE AND LOCATION OF PUBLIC HEARING The Issuer shall hold a public hearing on Thursday, June 7th, 2012, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. The location of the public hearing is at the Wayne County Commission Chambers in Loa Town at 18 S. Main in Loa, Utah. The purpose of the meeting is to receive input from the public with respect to the issuance of the Bonds. All members of the public are invited to attend and participate. PURPOSE FOR ISSUING BONDS The Issuer intends to issue the Bonds for the purpose of financing, in part, the costs of (i) storm drainage improvements and related improvements, and (ii) paying costs of issuing the Bonds. PARAMETERS OF THE BONDS The Issuer intends to issue the Bonds in the principal amount of not to exceed Three Hundred Thousand Dollars ($300,000), to bear interest at a rate not to exceed two and one-half percent (2.5%) per annum, to mature in not more than thirty-five (35) years from their date or dates, and to be sold at a price not less than ninety-nine percent (99%) of the total principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest to the date of delivery. EXCISE TAXES PROPOSED TO BE PLEDGED The Issuer proposes to pledge all the Local Sales and Use Tax funds received by Issuer pursuant to Title 59, Chapter 12, Part 2, Utah Code Annotated 1953, as amended, for repayment of the Bonds. A copy of the form of the Final Bond Resolution is on file in the office of the Town Clerk of the Issuer in Loa, Utah, where they may be examined during regular business hours of the Town Clerk from11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday for a period of at least thirty (30) days from and after the last date of publication of this notice. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a period of thirty (30) days from and after the last date of the publication of this notice is provided by law during which (i) any person in interest shall have the right to contest the legality of the Final Bond Resolution or the Bonds, or any provision made for the security and payment of the Bonds, and that after such time, no one shall have any cause of action to contest the regularity, formality or legality thereof for any cause whatsoever, and (ii) registered voters within Loa, Utah, may sign a written petition requesting an election to authorize the issuance of the Bonds. If written petitions which have been signed by at least 20% of the registered voters of Loa, Utah, are filed with the Issuer during said 30-day period, the Issuer shall be required to hold an election to obtain voter authorization prior to the issuance of the Bonds. If fewer than 20% of the registered voters of Loa, Utah, file a written petition during said 30-day period, the Issuer may proceed to issue the Bonds without an election. Michelle Brian , Town Clerk Published in The Wayne and Garfield County Insider on MAY 17 & 24, 2012. NOTICE OF CONSTRUCTION: Brown Brothers Construction will continue construction on Notom Road. This project includes major road construction, earthwork and drainage. Expect minor delays throughout the project for the next 3-4 months. For more information contact Brown Brothers Construction at (866)630-2685 or (435)836-2685.

OBITUARIES

THOMAS CLARK CALLISTER III (December 24, 1936 – May 22, 2012)

After several years of struggling with the effects of CLL/Lymphoma, our kind and beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend, Thomas Clark Callister, age 75, passed away peacefully at home in Delta, UT surrounded by his family, on May 22, 2012. Born on December 24, 1936 in Delta, UT, to Leland Clark and Nelle Riding Callister. He attended school in Delta graduating from Delta High School in 1955. He served in the National Guard and attended college at BYU, Northern Pioneer College and Delta Tech Center. On July 2, 1965 he married Barbara Barton, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They started married life living in Fillmore, UT. Where he spent several years farming in McCornick. Later moved to Delta UT. where he worked as a Supervisor for the Contel Telephone Company. Transferred from Delta to Washington State, Arizona & Tremonton, UT retiring in 1991 after 25 yrs. He worked several construction jobs in Colorado & Wyoming…then returned to Telephone work in 1995 by moving to Panguitch, UT to work for South Central Communications for 10

After several years of struggling with the effects of C L L / Ly m p h o m a , our kind and beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend, Thomas Clark Callister, age 75, passed away peacefully at home in Delta, UT surrounded by his family, on May 22, 2012. Born on December 24, 1936 in Delta, UT, to Leland Clark and Nelle Riding Callister. He attended school in Delta graduating from Delta High School in 1955. He served in the National Guard and attended college at BYU, Northern Pioneer College and Delta Tech Center. On July 2, 1965 he married Barbara Barton, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They started married life living in Fillmore, UT. Where he spent several years farming in McCornick. Later moved to Delta UT. where he worked as a Supervisor for the Contel Telephone Company. Transferred from Delta to Washington State, Arizona & Tremonton, UT retiring in 1991 after 25 yrs. He worked several construction jobs in Colorado & Wyoming…then returned to Telephone work in 1995 by moving to Panguitch, UT to work for South Central Communications for 10 yrs. Retiring in 2005. He was an active member of the LDS Church, a faithful home teacher and served as a counselor and secretary in his High Priest Quorum. He served as a city councilman during the planning and construction of IPP. One of his greatest loves was read-

ing. He enjoyed gardening and sharing his bounties with neighbors & friends. Built his own home and could fix anything. He lived to go camping & hunting. And was never happier than when he was spending time with his family. They were his life! To Tom there was “no such thing as a stranger”… he was beyond sociable and made friends everywhere he went. He was a peace maker, his love was unconditional. And for him, forgiveness came easy. He never complained and his daily motto was : I’m just happy to be here! The keepers of his memories: wife Barbara of Delta, UT; children, Thomas Clark “Shim” and (Traci) Callister of Oak City, UT; Monica and (Clarke) Christensen of Oak City, UT; Angela Dustin of Richfield, UT; 11 grandchildren and 3 ½ great-grandchildren; siblings, Maureen Grizzle of Taylorsville, UT. Gary (Char) Callister of Hatch, UT; Scott (Barbara) Callister of Cedar City, UT; Cathy (John) Pace of Enoch, UT; Duane Callister of Gunnison, UT; numerous nieces, nephews & friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Leland Callister; mother, Nelle Sorensen; sister, Carolyn Bishop and baby sister Nancy Lee. Funeral Services will be held on Tuesday, May 29th at 11:00 a.m. At Delta 3rd Ward. Delta UT. Viewing Monday Evening from 6 to 8 pm and Tuesday from 9:30-10:30 am at the Delta 3rd Ward. Interment in the Delta Cemetery. Online condolences at www.rasmussenmortuary.com

AGNES LITTLEFIELD

Tropic, UT Agnes Johnson Ott Littlefield, 94, passed away on May 28, 2012. Agnes was born on January 19, 1918 in Tropic to James Robert Ott and Janet Matilda Johnson. Agnes married Ira Walter Littlefield on June 20, 1935 in Henrieville, UT. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Manti LDS Temple. Together they had 5 children: Rosalyn Marie, Helen Edna, Marion Walter, Linda and Edwin James. Ira passed away on June 10, 2000. Agnes was a member of the LDS Church, serving in the Relief Society Presidency. She loved quilting and tatting and always had a big garden. Her greatest love was taking care of her family and her home. She was the ultimate homemaker! Agnes is survived by children: Rosalyn Marie (McKay) Bailey, Escalante; Marion Walter (Catherine) Littlefield, Tropic; and Linda (Robert) Gates, CA. She is also survived by 15 grandchildren, 41 great-grandchildren and 6 great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, parents, children; Helen Edna (James T.) Beatty and Edwin James Littlefield; siblings: James (Virginia) Ott, Susan, Valaite, Joe (Mabel) Ott, Hope (Charley) Wintch, Louie (Alton) Shakespear, Sara (Malen) Littlefield, Rose (Garn) Olsen, Layton (Bessie) Ott and Wallace (Mary) Ott. Funeral services will be held on Friday, June 1, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. in the Tropic Ward Chapel. Friends may call prior to services at the church from 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Interment will follow in the Georgetown Cemetery. Funeral Directors: Magleby Mortuary, Richfield, Salina and Manti. Online guestbook at www.maglebymortuary.com


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May 31, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

Garfield: 676-2621 • Wayne: 836-2622

HELP WANTED WAYNE HIGH BOYS BASKETBALL COACH FULL-TIME TEACHER Wayne High School is seeking to fill the position of Boys FOR ESCALANTE Basketball Coach for the 2012-2013 school year. APTS IN LOA ELEMENTARY This position will require adequate knowledge of Basketball 2 bedroom & 3 Bedroom SALARY: Beginning Step rules, skills, Schedules and safety procedures to properly prepare apartments for rent in Loa, No and Lane according to the Smoking. Call Megan, 836- 2011-2012 Garfield County students for high school league participation. Applicants must have a current coaching, CPR and First Aid 2399 School District Certified Salcertificate. ary Schedule. MODERN CABIN Must also posses the ability to work and interact well with Fully furnished, private fan- QUALIFICATIONS: Appli- student athletes, demonstrate professional and ethical character, cants must have a valid Utah tastic setting, 2B, 2B, Garage, and have excellent communication skills. Applicants must comA/C, Gas Fireplace, 4WD rec- Teaching License and a cur- mit to the appropriate amount of time and effort to facilitate efrent transcript of credit. Preommended, D Country Road, fective practices and scheduled games. 1st, last and Security Deposit. vious teaching experience is He/she must be able to work cooperatively with high school preferred, but not required. $680/month. No Animals. Call Monica at 208-720-2217 All applicants must be finger- faculty, staff and administration. Applicants must exhibit a willprinted and satisfactorily pass ingness to promote and encourage healthy, safe and sportsman an employment background like conduct. TORREY HOUSE This position will start this summer 2012, with planning and check. FOR RENT Interested participating in summer camps and training. 3 bedroom,1 Bath.425 806 0947 APPLICATION: Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. individuals should submit a HOME FOR RENT Garfield County School Dis- Wayne School District is an equal opportunity employer providIN LOA trict Certified application, re- ing programs and services to all persons on a non-discriminatory Nice home for rent in Loa sume, three current letters of basis. Wayne School District reserves the right to accept reject located at 244 S. 100 W. All recommendation, and a tran- any or all applications. Resumes must be sent or brought to Mr. kitchen appliances are includ- script. Elmer at the Wayne High School office. ed, 3 BR, Bathroom, Laundry Please direct questions to Wayne High School • PO Box 217, Bicknell Utah • 84715 Room, Lg. Family Room. For Superintendent Ben Dalton, (435)425-3411 more info, please contact Stan 435-676-8821, and application Chappell at Garkane Energy packets to: Garfield County FULL-TIME TEACHER FULL-TIME TEACHER (435) 836-2795. School District, P.O. Box 398, FOR BOULDER FOR PANGUITCH 145 East Center, Panguitch, ELEMENTARY ELEMENTARY FOR A FOR RENT Utah 84759. Online applica- SALARY: Beginning Step ONE YEAR CONTRACT 2 Homes in Bicknell tions are available at: (http:// and Lane according to the SALARY: Beginning Step Call Peggy www.garfield.k12.ut.us/index. 2011-2012 Garfield County and Lane according to the 435-491-0999 php/do/employment) School District Certified Sal- 2011-2012 Garfield County Applications will be ary Schedule. School District Certified Salscreened and the most quali- QUALIFICATIONS: Appli- ary Schedule. BUSINESS fied candidates will be granted cants must have a valid Utah QUALIFICATIONS: AppliFOR SALE Teaching License and a curinterviews. rent transcript of credit. Pre- cants must have a valid Utah DEADLINE: vious teaching experience is Teaching License and a curOPEN UNTIL FILLED FOR SALE Garfield School District is an preferred, but not required. rent transcript of credit. PreTHE SNUGGLE INN vious teaching experience is The Snuggle Inn is for Equal Opportunity Employer, All applicants must be finger- preferred, but not required. printed and satisfactorily pass Affirmative Action and ADA sale. I just turned 76 and it’s an employment background All applicants must be fingertime to retire a second time. I printed and satisfactorily pass check. have other plans and it’s time APPLICATION: Interested an employment background to move on. Only interested individuals should submit a check. persons need to inquire, 1-435Garfield County School Dis- APPLICATION: Interested 836-2898 or 1-435-616-2898. trict Certified application, re- individuals should submit a Qualifications: You MUST sume, three current letters of Garfield County School Dishave the funds to cash me out, Barney Trucking is lookrecommendation, and a tran- trict Certified application, reor are capable of getting your ing for truck drivers in the script. sume, three current letters of own financing. Details at Panguitch, UT area. Please direct questions to recommendation, and a tranwww.loopnet.com, commerGreat pay and benefits. Superintendent Ben Dalton, script. cial in LOA, UTAH. Valid CDL with Doubles 435-676-8821, and application Please direct questions to endorsement required.To packets to: Garfield County Principal Nick Reynolds, 435MARIA’S GRILL School District, P.O. Box 398, 676-8847, and application apply, go to www.barneyFor Sale By Owner. 145 East Center, Panguitch, packets to: Garfield County trucking.com Price Reduced Utah 84759. Online applicaor call 435-529-4422. Manager and Staff Available tions are available at: (http:// School District, P.O. Box 398, Call 836-2760 www.garfield.k12.ut.us/index. 145 East Center, Panguitch, Utah 84759. Online applicaphp/do/employment) OVER THE ROAD tions are available at: (http:// Applications will be FLATBED TRUCK REAL ESTATE www.garfield.k12.ut.us/index. screened and the most qualiDRIVER POSITION php/do/employment) fied candidates will be granted AVAILABLE BEAUTIFUL Applications will be interviews. 3 Bedroom 2 bath SFH, 1/3 Valid CDL, Clean Driving Re- DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL screened and the most qualiacre, 1800 Square feet. Re- cord, at least 3 years over the FILLED fied candidates will be granted cently remodeled. New Roof. road (OTR) driving required. Garfield School District interviews. Move-in Ready. 2 garages For more information call is an Equal Opportunity EmDEADLINE: and 2 car carport plus 1 stor- Derek at Edwards Trucking at ployer, Affirmative Action and OPEN UNTIL FILLED age building. 120 North 200 435-691-1169 ADA Garfield School District is an East, Loa. $105K + cc. Call Equal Opportunity Employer, 435-691-0689 GARFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT Affirmative Action and ADA BUSINESS ADMINISTRATOR FOR SALE Please address credentials and requests for information to: MISC ITEMS 17 ACRE RANCH Garfield County School District Office, P.O. Box 398, 145 East IN LYMAN, UTAH Center, Panguitch, UT 84759, (435) 676-8821 or Fax (435) 676JOAN’S Details at: www.loopnet.com 8266 COLLECTIBLES Ranch Lyman, Utah: DICK SALARY: Salary to be negotiated based upon experience and 50 years of Joanns antiques DAVIS: 1-435-836-2898 or education. QUALIFICATIONS: Candidates holding a masters degree in and collectibles. Selling ev1-435-616-2898 business administration, accounting, finance or other related erything and moving on. In fields will be given preference. The successful candidate should Storage Center South of BickHOUSE FOR SALE have experience in the following areas: budget development and nell. Call 435-896-7092, and I TORREY management, purchasing, payroll and employee benefits pro- will meet you there, or watch Sleeping Rainbow Estates for signs on the road. 40-50 Native Trees, 3 BR 2 grams, proficiency in using word processing, spread sheeting, and data base management. Preference will be given to candiBath, Incredible Views, 2000 TOP PRICES PAID Sq ft. with 2000 sq ft. detached dates with previous school finance experience. FOR SILVER COINS RESPONSIBILITIES: The Business Administrator is respongarage. 2 Acres. Call Lowell 1964 and earlier Wanted: sible for the coordination and management of all fiscal resources at 425-3824 or cell 435-896of the District. He/She also serves as an advisor to the SuperinDimes, Quarters, Half Dol7092 tendent and School Board on all fiscal issues. The Business Ad- lars, Dollars, 435-896-5810 ministrator has supervisory responsibilities based on the needs of 3 ACRES FOR SALE the District under the supervision of the Superintendent. in Loa. Beautiful views. APPLICATION: Candidates should submit a formal application FARM EQUIP $29,999 Call 435-691-0689. that includes a letter of interest, a current resume and at least (rtn) three current letters of recommendation. Online applications NEW HOLLAND are available at: (http://www.garfield.k12.ut.us/index.php/do/ SKYLINER 1033 employment) PRICE REDUCED Hay Hauler, $5000. Good DEADLINE: All applications and other materials must arrive at 2 bedroom 2 Bathroom home shape, Hanksville.Call 435School District Office at 145 East Center Street for sale on 2 acres along Hwy the Garfield 542-3464 or 435-491-0317 (P.O. Box 398), Panguitch, Utah 84759. The District reserves 12 in Torrey. Many new upgrades including hardwood the right to hire the most qualified candidate any time after SLIDE-IN SPRAYERS floors.Berber carpet, Fenced Wednesday, June 06, 2012, 5:00 P.M FOR RENT Garfield School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer, garden, Deck with AMAZThe Upper Sevier ConservaAffirmative Action and ADA ING views of Boulder and tion District has two sprayers Thousand Lakes. 4200 Hwy that slide into the back of a 12 - $140,000. Call Monica at 691-5464. truck for rent. Cost is $1 per acre; minimum $50. Contact Anne Excell weekdays @ YARD SALE 676-8189 or Kade Fullmer @ 616-2659. YARD SALE Clothes, Sound Equipment, Electrical Materials, Tools, Ladders, Computer CompoLIVESTOCK nents, plus more at 252 N 100 E, Loa. Sale is June 9th startGOATS FOR SALE. ing at 9:00 a.m. Nubian, Kids and Nanny Call 836-2619

RENTALS

SERVICES

GROUP GUITAR LESSONS WITH NATE WOODWARD Tuesday & Thursdays every week, beginning June 5th ending August 16th For ages 8 & up, $40 a month To sign up contact Nate Woodward at 435-491-0239 or nathan.woodward@wayne. k12.ut.us If interested in taking drum lessons, also call!

GARFIELD SCHOOL DISTRICT PART-TIME PARAPROFESSIONALS. These positions will be 19 hours weekly, no benefits. SALARY: Beginning paraprofessional hourly rate according to 2011 - 2012 Garfield County School District Classified Salary Schedule ($9.16 hourly). QUALIFICATIONS: Applicants must have at least a High School Diploma, two years college education preferred, or may complete the Para Pro Test. Must be fingerprinted and satisfactorily pass an employment background check. Must work well with children. APPLICATION: Interested individuals should submit a Garfield County School District classified application. For new applicants, there should be a completed application, resume`, 3 current letters of recommendation, and a transcript. Please direct questions to Superintendent Ben Dalton, 435-6768821, and application packets to: Garfield County School District P.O. Box 398, 145 East Center , Panguitch, Utah 84759 (435) 676-8821 Online application available www.garfield.k12.ut.us Applications will be screened and the most qualified candidates will be granted interviews. DEADLINE: June 8, 2012 at 3:00PM Garfield School District is an equal opportunity employer. Garfield School District reserves the right to accept or reject any or all applications. WHS SCIENCE TEACHER Wayne School District is accepting applications for a Science Teacher at Wayne High School. Qualifications include a current Utah Secondary Teaching License able to teach Physics, Chemistry, Earth Systems and Biology. Qualifications 1. Plan a program of study that is consistent with Utah State core. 2. Cultivate and nurture high expectations of students. 3. Create and foster a learning environment that is conducive to learning and appropriate to the maturity and interest of all high school level students. 4. Show evidence of good communication and team skills. 5. Committed to providing quality instruction. Application Procedure 1. Applicant must submit a letter of application indicating his/ her interest in the position. A university placement file should be sent to Wayne School District, or, if a placement file is unavailable, a current resume, a university transcript showing all course work, a copy of applicant’s teaching certificate, and four letters of recommendation should accompany the application letter. 2. Applicants will be screened based on the documents submitted and interviews will be scheduled with those deemed most qualified. 3. Application materials should be sent to: Superintendent Burke Torgerson Wayne School District PO Box 127, Bicknell, UT 84715, (435)425-3813 This position will close on June 15, 2012. Specific questions about job duties may be directed to Principal Mark Elmer at Wayne High School, mark.elmer@wayne. k12.ut.us (435)425-3411 or Superintendent Burke Torgerson at Wayne School District, burke.torgerson@wayne.k12.ut.us (435)425-3813. Wayne School District is an equal opportunity employer; however, the District reserves the right to reject any or all applications. GARFIELD MEMORIAL THRIFT STORE VOLUNTEER RETAIL SERVICES SUPERVISOR Full-time with benefits Requisition #126410 Apply at www.intermountainhealthcare.org Job Description The Volunteer Retail Services Supervisor is an important team member who plays a vital role in helping the hospital gift shop run efficiently. The Supervisor oversees retail operations for the gift shop and its personnel. The Supervisor regulates inventory control, sales and purchasing to increase profits and provide quality customer service. The Volunteer Retail Services Supervisor works closely with hospital volunteers and administration and has the opportunity to truly make a difference in the lives of many on a daily basis. Entry Rate: $12.69/hour Benefits Eligible: Yes Shift Details: This position is full-time position. Gift shop hours are Monday through Saturday 10 am - 6 pm. Shifts may include days, weekends, and holidays. Minimum Requirements * One year experience in a retail leadership role with experience in cashiering and cash management. * Demonstrated interpersonal skills, customer service, business management and organization skills. * Demonstrated intermediate keyboarding/computer skills. Physical Requirements * Carrying; Hearing/Listening; Lifting; Manual Dexterity; Pulling/Pushing; Seeing; Speaking; Squatting/Kneeling; Standing; Walking Please Note All positions subject to close without notice Intermountain Healthcare is an equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V


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May 31, 2012

WHY YOUNG WORKERS SHOULD CARE ABOUT SOCIAL SECURITY By Mickie Douglas

Summer will be here before we know it. That means millions of high school and college students will be searching for jobs. Whether a new worker is beginning the career of a lifetime or just earning some extra money for the school year to come, there is one question that is likely to be on each new worker’s mind when they see their first pay stub: Where’s the rest of my money? Generally, employers are required to withhold Social Security and Medicare tax from a worker’s paycheck. The amounts you pay in Social Security and Medicare taxes are matched by your employer. Usually the money that is withheld is referred to as “Social Security taxes” on the employee’s payroll statement. Sometimes the deduction is labeled as “FICA taxes,” which stands for Federal Insurance Contributions Act.

So let us tell you how that money is being used, and what’s in it for you. The taxes paid now translate to a lifetime of protection, when you eventually retire or if you become disabled. In the event that you die young, your dependent children and spouse may be able to receive survivors benefits based on your work. Today you probably have family members — grandparents, for example — who already enjoy Social Security benefits that your Social Security taxes help provide. You may be a long way from retirement now, so you may find it hard to appreciate the value of benefits that could be 40 or 50 years away. But consider that your Social Security taxes could pay off sooner than you think. Social Security provides valuable disability benefits — and studies show that a 20-year-

old has about a three in 10 chance of becoming disabled sometime before reaching retirement age. Another bit of helpful advice for young workers: be wary if you’re offered a job “under the table” or “off the books.” If you work for any employer who pays you only in cash, understand that you’re likely not getting Social Security credit for the work you’re doing. Want to learn more about Social Security and what it means to young workers? If so, we invite you to enjoy a webcast: Social Security 101: What’s In It For Me? The webcast will fill you in on the details you should know to get the most out of Social Security. Check it out at www.socialsecurity. gov/webinars/social_security_101.html. If you have questions about Social Security, the best place to go is online — to www.socialsecurity.gov.

WEDDINGS Lowe - Duncan

Darrel and Jennifer Lowe are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter

Shelby Lynne to Kevin Lee Duncan

son of the late Lorraine Chappell and the late Lee A. Duncan ont the First of June Two Thousand and Twelve in the Manti Temple for time and all eternity. The pleasure of your company is requested at a reception held in their honor Saturday June 2, 2012 From 2:00 to 4:00 P.M. at The Mill Lodge 1900 South SR 24 Lyman, UT 84749

Ellenburg - Taft

Erica Ellenburg Daughter of Dennis & Kelli Ellenburg and Seth Elias Taft Son of Andrew & Joni Taft

APPLY FOR AN ANTLERLESS BIG GAME PERMIT

Applications accepted starting June 1, 2012 You won’t have to juggle a printed guidebook and a website when you apply for a cow elk, doe deer or doe pronghorn hunting permit for this fall’s hunts. Instead, everything you need to apply will be available in one spot online. Detailed maps, boundary descriptions, a list of available hunts, all of the information you need to apply, and a link to the application itself, are among the items mits. Coons leads the Division you’ll find at wildlife.utah. “Once you get used to of Wildlife Resources team gov/guidebooks. not having a printed guide- that writes and produces Applications for permits book,” says Staci Coons, Utah’s hunting, fishing and will be accepted through “we think you’ll like it. trapping guidebooks. wildlife.utah.gov starting For more information, When you go to our webJune 1. Your application site, you’ll find lots of good call the nearest Division of must be received through information. And all of it Wildlife Resources office the website no later than 11 or the DWR’s Salt Lake will be available in one p.m. on June 21 to be inCity office at 801-538spot.” cluded in the draw for per4700.

Will be married on June 9, 2012 in the Orlando Florida LDS Temple A reception will be held in their honor that evening at 461 Blanding Boulevard Orange Park, Florida Grandparents of the Groom are Charles and Janee Blackburn, Loa and the late Karl and Margaret Taft

AG MARKET NEWS Receipts: 828; Last Week: 754. Last Year: 841. Feeder Steers: mixed but mostly steady on similar offerings. Feeder Heifers: mixed but mostly 2.00-3.00 higher; Holstein Steers: to few for comparison; Slaughter Cows: 1.00-2.00 lower; Slaughter Bulls: 1.00-2.00 higher. Feeder Steers: Medium and Large Frame 2: 200250 lbs 178.00-191.00; 250-300 lbs 180.00-191.91; 300-350 lbs scarce; 350400 lbs 157.00-172.00; 400-450 lbs 161.00-177.00; 450-500 lbs 151.00-166.50; 500-550 lbs 149.00-166.50; 550-600 lbs 148.00-161.50; 600-650 lbs 154.50-165.50; 650-700 lbs 153.00161.00; 700-750 lbs 146.50-157.50; 750-800 lbs 141.50-145.00; 800-850 lbs 135.00-144.50; 850-900 lbs 128.50-138.75; 900-950 lbs 134.00-135.50; 9501000 lbs 121.00-128.00. Holsteins Steers: Large Frame 3: Bull Calves: scarce; 200-300 lbs scarce; 300-500 lbs scarce; 500700 lbs 84.00-104.00; 700-900 lbs scarce; 9001000 lbs scarce. Feeder Heifers: Medium and Large Frame 1-2: 200250 lbs scarce; 250-300 lbs 172.00-174.00; 300-350 lbs 165.00-171.50; 350400 lbs scarce; 400-450 lbs 140.00-154.00; 450-500 lbs 142.00-156.00; 500550 lbs 139.00-152.50; 550-600 lbs 141.00152.00; 600-650 lbs 139.50-152.00; 650-700 lbs 129.00-144.50; 700-750 lbs 130.00-144.00;750-800 lbs 125.00-136.00; 800-850 lbs 128.00-134.00; 850-900 lbs 130.50-132.75; 900950 lbs 110.50-118.50; 950-1000 lbs 108.00120.00.Heiferettes: 60.00110.50. Stock Cows: Bred Cows: 910.00-1,280.00/ hd; Older Pairs: 1,375.001,460.00. Slaughter Cows: Boning 80-85% Lean: 72.5085.00; Breaking 75-80% Lean: 74.00-83.00; Commercial: scarce; Cutter 8590% Lean: 64.25-74.00. Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade 1000-1500 lbs 88.00-97.00; 1500-2100 lbs 96.00-105.25; Yield Grade 2 1000-1500 lbs 74.75-87.50; 1500-2005 lbs 86.50-95.00; Feeder Bulls: 670-1099 lbs 80.2587.00.

ADVERTISE IN

THE INSIDER 676-2621 Garfield 836-2622 Wayne


The Garfield County Insider

Page Page 10 10

September August May 23, 20, 31, 2010 2009 2012

ESCALANTE NEWS

Marlene Haws Ph: 826-4859 • marleneh@color-country.net First of all I have an apology to make to Peggy Soren. At our last D.U.P. meeting someone told me she had recently had hip surgery. Not so! She has had that surgery done but it was in 1994 or did she say 1995? Anyway she and her family had a good laugh about it. I am sooo glad they found humor in it and didn’t get mad. Thanks to them for being good sports! I am sorry! Quite a few of our residents have been on the sick list lately. Hopefully they are all on the mend. Danny Spencer has been in and out of the emergency room and hospital. First with a bleeding ulcer then with nose bleeds. They hope his problems have stabilized and we hope that is true too. Tommy Alvey has made a trip or two to the hospital also. The last time being with pneumonia. As hard as that is on the patients it is also hard on the caregiver, so we can all sympathize. Rolain Alvey has been busy visiting her doctors. We all hope her reports were good. Tionna Miller spent a couple of days in the hospital but is home now on bed rest until her new baby gets here. Word was received by McKay and Rose Bailey that Terrill (McKay’s brother) and Koleen Bailey’s 20 year old grandson, Cody, has had his leg amputated. He has been treated for cancer in it for some time but finally had to have an amputation. His mother and father are Terrie and Adrian Clarke of Henderson, Nevada. We wish Cody the best. Yukon Norman is home again after spending a few weeks with her daughter, Lana Roberts, in Redmond. She was anxious to get home to see the improvements Bill and Linda Overall had made at her home. It’s lookin’ good! The new city council member is Louise Barnes. She has lived here quite a long time now and has always attended city meetings and been pretty civic minded so she should be good on the council. A surprise 80th birthday party was held for Lane Liston last Saturday. His and Geraldine’s whole family was here for the occasion, with the exception of their son Gary and his daughter Sharla, who both had other obligations in Arizona and couldn’t get away. Lot’s of friends and family were there to wish Lane a “Happy Birthday” and nobody went away hungry! It was a very pleasant afternoon. Gloria Porter was at the party. She has graduated to a cane now and is doing

better all the time. There was a Mother’s Tea at the school last week. Three lady teachers were honored there. Sue Bassett and Marlene Dunn, who are both retiring, and Amanda Johnson who will be leaving. It is always hard to lose good teachers, but we wish all of them the very best. I’m sure our children will miss them. A play was presented by the Escalante High School students. The name of it was “Grease.” I didn’t get to attend, much to my dismay, but I hear it turned out great. Congratulations to them and their teachers who helped with it. Deon and Arnold Alvey went to Loa to visit with their daughter Janeen Duncan and family and to pick up some plants from the greenhouse. Now they may have to raise all those plants in the house if it doesn’t warm up soon. Last week the temperatures were in the 80’s, this week they have been down to near freezing again! The Alvey’s daughter, Denice, and her husband, Andy Dube, came from Las Vegas to spend the weekend with them. They don’t get to come very often so it was good to see them again. Taylor Lynn Porter, daughter of Clint and Shanna Porter, Cedar City, graduated from high school with her class and also received an award for “Athlete of the year” in the girls division. Congratulations Taylor, now your next task will be to sew all the buttons back on your dad’s shirt! Martha Schow has had her friend, Glenna Ridge from West Jordan, visiting her for a few days. I heard them say Martha hadn’t baked banana bread yet while Glenna is here but she could probably find some in the freezer! Alvin and Joan Cowles, Richfield, spent the weekend with Margean Schow. Don and Lillian Coleman report that their granddaughter, Candy and Alan Garcia and family, Tooele, paid them a visit last week. Candy has been going to school and by December, if all goes well, she will be a full fledged registered nurse. Congratulations to her. Well done Candy! (She is the daughter of Joyce and Danny Rollins.) Many, many people came “back home” for the Memorial weekend. Loreta Shurtz, who is now 94 years old, came “home” again. Her children always see to it that she gets here for Memorial Day. I visited with her children at the play: Ivan Shurtz, Don Shurtz and Dorothy Cowles. They said Gordon was here too and Virginia may have been but I didn’t see her.

Lynn and Garna McInelly, Beaver, Donna Rae Barker, Monroe and Valerie Davies, Aurora, came to town and brought their mom, Mary Ellen Coleman, with them. They are good to see that she gets back once in a while too. Jim and Lola Alvey and Steve and LaVee Wiscombe were here from Mapleton. Steve and Beth Blakey, came from Springville and the Blakey’s were the speakers in the First Ward Sacrament Meeting on Sunday. Beth said her mom, Eva Dean Liston, sent a message to all her friends here that she loves and misses all of them. They are hoping to be able to bring her down for a visit before long. Jimmy and Amy Alvey spend a lot of time here with the Meisenbach’s. They live in Mapleton. Jimmy is Jim and Lola Alvey’s son and Amy is Johnny and Peggy Meisenbach’s daughter. They love it here! Jim and Evelyn (Lyman) Corning have had a big crowd at their home. (They bought the Hal Shurtz home). Most of the Randal and Gwen Lyman family have been here for a Lyman family reunion. It is always so nice to see these families that you don’t get to see that often. It looks like Dick and Mary Lyman may have made it back in time to fill their motel for the weekend. Ron and Linda Mecham and their daughter, Heather, came from Las Vegas for the weekend. They divided their time between the Hawses, Alvey’s and Liston’s. Janice and Dean Gledhill had their son, Gary, daughter Rochelle, and their families here. I think they also celebrated a birthday for one of them on Saturday. Brent and Patrice Cottam and Myron and Sanette Cottam had their families here. They, along with Doyle Cottam and the family of Karen and Sherrill Ott, Tropic, joined together for a family reunion dinner at Tropic Reservoir one day. Chad and Jordon Cottam are home from Wyoming and it sounds like they are settled in Cedar City for a while. Jared and Heather Dunton had part of Jared’s family here on the weekend. Heather says they don’t get together that often, so that was nice! Carol and Russell Sorensen, St. George, were at the home of Pratt and Arcola Gates and Jared Smith and family visited Jareds’s mother, Margo Smith. All of them made a trip to the Hole In the Rock. Tracie Robison visited her mom, Dixie Mitchell, and Whitney Brooks visited

her parents, Jay and Derlynne Brooks. I visited briefly with Nickie and Evan Excell and Brian and Sue Lynn Griffin at church. I also visited with Marty and Debbie Vidrine. Bill Vidrine was with them at the play the night before. Vernon and Peg Roundy had their family here as did Gene and Renon Reed. Wayne and Venid Bailey were here from Salt Lake and were supposed to meet Flora Marchant and part of her family here. I hope they made connections. It would have been fun to see all of them. The Leland Porter Reunion was well attended. They had dinner and a reunion program at the church on Saturday morning, then met at the home of Ben and Renee Porter that evening (Probably to eat the left-overs from the meal earlier). Then had dinner at the home of DeLane Griffin after church on Sunday. If being well fed makes for a happy family we should all be the happiest people in the world! I would guess that, as a whole, the celebration on Saturday was a great success, in spite of the windy weather. The play, “Sawdust Memories,” all about the Escalante sawmills over the years, was well done (written by Quinn Griffin). Mary Steed Shumway and her sons were honored at the end for all their efforts in keeping their sawmill going for so many years, after the death of their husband and father, Paul Steed. The many jobs they provided have been sorely missed. No reports on anything else but everyone seemed to be having a good time. I hate to end on a sad note but we need to express our condolences to Dennis Lott and family whose brother Don passed away at his home in Taylorsville on May 22, 2012.

ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION

Paula Pace, Town Clerk Torrey Town celebrated Arbor Day on April 27, 2012 by planting twenty four trees at the Torrey cemetery and along main street Torrey. The trees selected to plant at the cemetery were Purple Ash, and along main street Fremont Cotton less Cottonwoods were planted to maintain the pioneer tradition of our existing trees planted so many years ago. Trees that had to be removed that were diseased and dying were replaced with new trees, which will eventually give the same beautiful look that now exists on Torrey,s main street. We also celebrated becoming a “Tree City U.S.A.”following the guidelines of the Arbor Day Foundation, and the Division of Natural Resources for planting new trees, and nurturing and caring for them, and the trees that are already in our Town. In the past two years our town has planted thirty nine trees that we will be caring for, giving the beauty and benefits that trees give back to our community. The Division of Natural Resources has a quote that is so true: “The best time to plant a tree was 20-years ago. The second best time is now.” Torrey Town is committed to that motto, and plans to nurture and care for our trees, and next Arbor Day plant more, and hopefully we will have families join us as we did this year, teaching their children the value of planting trees. We also had three woman from the Czech Republic, traveling through the national parks, seeing our posters on Arbor Day, come and helped us plant trees. Thank you for all the volunteers and our dedicated town maintenance men who dug holes and put the drip systems to our trees. Cake and ice cream was served at our park pavilion after the trees were planted, which we feel completed the Arbor Day celebration.


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BIRTHDAYS

FYI PANGUITCH By: Mack Oetting ~ E-mail: mackoetting @gmail.com It seems to always snow on the LDS Conference weekend and the Easter Egg hunt is always on the coldest day of the year, well its Memorial Day weekend and the wind is blowing as usually. It blew so hard on Friday that we weren’t able to put up the flags on the road into the cemetery. The cemetery looks beautiful, the lawns were manicured and the flags on the Veterans graves really added to the beauty. Many thanks to all of you who took part in putting up the flags and maintaining the cemetery. Thanks to those that reported to us about the graves that didn’t have markers on them, I believe that we picked up six more Veterans to honor. The wind does serve a purpose; it makes the flags look good. The Class of 2012 had their graduation last Thursday evening and it was delightful. Normally the school gives out the scholarships at the awards assemble, but they did it at the Commencement Ceremony. Thousands of dollars in scholarships were awarded; the students would like to thank all the Businesses, Clubs and Personal Awards that were handed out. This is a very bright class and they are the future of Country. The first Annual Panguitch Western Round-up on Saturday, was a huge success, with a lot of good deals that were picked up at the Garage Sale that started the day off. There were book signings and gun fights and a lot of excitement all day long. The day finished off with the movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, at the Gem Theater. It was good for the downtown businesses and many of the Motels in town had no vacancy signs up. I hope this will be an on going event each year, Memorial weekend kicks off the summer and there are a lot of tourists in our area. We have a new – old business in town: SMOKIN’ HOT ANTIQUES+ COLLECTABLES AT THE OLD FIRE HOUSE. Carletta Johnson, who has been the proprietor at the Three Bee’s store for the last seven years, now has her own store in the Old Fire House. Carletta is a delightful young lady, who has all sorts of fun stuff in her store. She buys, sells and trades in the antique business. If you need a special piece for your house or a gift for a friend stop by and visit with Carletta and if she doesn’t have it she will find it for you. Her energy will rub off on you; even if you don’t need anything stop by a visit. How busy was Bryce Canyon on the day of the Eclipse, on a normal day they move 2000 passenger and on a busy day about 3,000. That Sunday they moved 9,500 people and with a astronomy night show, the drivers didn’t finish till 1:00 am in the morning. There will be another solar event on June 5, the planet Venus will pass in front of the sun, sometime during the daytime, I don’t know what time that will be, but watch the news. Have you checked out the Fish on top of the Court House? Take a pair of binoculars with you and see what a work of art the fish is, it looks like it just came out of the Lake. The cement is finished and it looks like the lawn is ready to be laid. I think that the exterior is finished and now the fun begins with the interior, it’s always the slow part of any job. The Lions Club did their semi annual road clean up last Wednesday and with the help of the FCCLA club it went pretty fast. With all of the help that the High School kids have been with highway cleanups this year they have learned a good lesson. It is not fun picking up someone else’s trash. Next week will start the Quilt Walk Festival on Thursday the 7th. This will be the 15th year for this event. The Quilt classes will run Thursday thru Saturday and will have instructors from all over the Country teaching the latest Quilting techniques. The Play starring myself will be the evening fare, with a new twist the food will be prepared in Dutch ovens and will be very tasty. Saturday morning will be the Panguitch Lions Club first breakfast for the summer, it’s all you can eat, pancakes, eggs, sausage and bacon, my favorite. There will be a tractor parade and they will go down to the fair grounds for a good old tractor pull. The kids will have a quilt race, where there will be prizes for the winners. I forgot! The Chocolate Fest is on Wednesday night. It is a chocolate lovers delight. Agriculture water will start on June 4th, be sure that you check with the City for when it’s your turn. The blocks will run west to east for the water, this system worked well last year giving you more water pressure, instead of quadrants like in the past. I hate to report that Panguitch is losing two very bright young people in our school system, Tasha Barnes and Lark Reynolds. Tasha Barnes was a 5th grade teacher, she has earned the respect of her fellow educators and the children loved her. When the school board cut her position, she applied and got a teaching job in Duchene. Good luck to you Ms. Barnes, you will be a success anywhere you go and it will be a terrible loss for the students in our school. Lark Reynolds, Garfield County School District Business Manager will be going North. Lark along with Janis Hatch bailed out the district from what could have been bankruptcy. They did it by long hours and a lot of know how and sweat. Pat, our Daughter Shawn and Granddaughter Teah are going down to Mexico to visit the family that Teah lived with for 6 months while she learned Spanish. I am staying home to pay the ransom. So if there isn’t a column next week it’s because I couldn’t figure out how to send it off. Pray for rain! Mack O.

PATIENT INFORMATION

TREATING MINOR EAR PROBLEMS Earwax Impaction Many people equate earwax with dirt, using cotton-tipped swabs or applicators (e.g., Q-tips) to remove every trace after morning showers. They perceive the brown stain on the cotton applicator as successful dirt removal. However, removing earwax every day is actually dangerous. Earwax helps fight bacterial ear infections and protects the inside of the ear. Removing it can make you more prone to swimmer’s ear and other ear infections. Earwax moves outward naturally as your jaw moves. Using cotton-tipped swabs can disrupt the normal outward movement, creating a hard clot of impacted earwax. Impacted earwax can cause reduced hearing, a feeling of fullness in the ears, itching in the ear, or ringing in the ear. Dangerous or Ineffective Earwax Removal Techniques To prevent ear injury, never insert any device in the ears to remove earwax. Home use of oral irrigators (i.e., Waterpik or other flossers) can rupture your eardrum. You may also see ads for hollow, wax-soaked cloth tubes called ear candles, available at health food stores, pharmacies, and hundreds of Internet sites. Ear candles are advertised to remove earwax when they are inserted into your ear and set on fire. However, they do not work, and physicians find that the burning wax from the candle can enter the ear and cause burns or even a hole in your eardrum. They should never be used, under any circumstances. Safe Earwax Removal Several legitimate products remove impacted earwax safely at home, such as Debrox, Mack’s Wax Away, and Murine for Ear Wax Removal System. They all contain carbamide peroxide. It is similar to hydrogen peroxide placed on a skin wound, in that it releases oxygen when it is placed in the ear. The foaming action gently causes the earwax impaction to loosen, so it can be washed out. Earwax removal products are only for those over the age of 12 years. They should not be used if you have ear drainage or discharge, ear pain, irritation or rash in the ear, or an injury or perforation of the eardrum. They should also not be used if you feel dizzy or have recently had ear surgery. To use the products, lie on the bed with one ear pointed upward. Place 5 to 10 drops of the solution into the upward ear and allow it to remain for several minutes. Then gently wash the ear with warm water from an ear syringe (supplied with some of the packages). This can be repeated twice daily for up to 4 days if needed. If excessive earwax remains after this, you should consult a physician. Always remember that the proper way to clean the ears is to use a wet washcloth over your finger during your morning shower. Remember, if you have questions, Consult your Pharmacist.

Phyllis was born June 8, 1922 in Salt Lake City, Utah to John S. and Janet Swan Larsen. She is the oldest of 4 children, Lowell (deceased) and Gatha Larsen,Rock Springs, Wyoming; Homer Larsen Bountiful, Utah; Richard and Connie Larsen Bicknell, Utah and sister-inlaw Myrna Larsen (deceased). She grew up in Bicknell, Utah, where she helped her parents farm and began a lifetime of gathering friends. She married James P. Heaton on February 28, 1943, in Bicknell. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Manti Temple. After their marriage they lived in Bicknell for a few years before moving to Huntington, Utah. Phyllis and Jim enjoyed a large group of friends there who were still gathering and enjoying each others company well into their 80s. In 1957 with their young family they moved to Monticello, Utah where they raised their children. Phyllis still spends her summers with her daughter and son-in-law in Monticello where she enjoys farming (i.e. gardening) and visiting all her old friends there. Phyllis and Jimmy spent 10 years being snow-birds before they bought a home in Washington, Utah. Jimmy died on March 11, 1998. Phyllis resides in Washington where she still loves to garden and spend time doing good things for her friends and neighbors. She is the mother of 5 children including Danny Heaton (deceased); Diann (Warren) Rogers, Manti,Utah; Paula (Jack) Randolph, Monticello, Utah; Becky (Joe) Peterson, Price, Utah and Roger (Shawn) Heaton, Montrose, Colorado. She has 16 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.

KATIE W. CHAPPELL

The children of Katie Chappell extend an invitation to all her friends and neighbors to celebrate her 90th birthday with her. There will be an open house for all to come and visit on Saturday, June 16, 2012 from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Cultural Hall of the Loa Church. We request no gifts, but written memories and pictures are most welcome. Please come and join us on this special occasion. Katie was born on June 17, 1922 in Loa, Utah. She is the daughter of Mae Potter and James E. Webster. She married Blain M. Chappell. They had six children, Hildred, Deanna, Bill, Mathew, Charles and Sue. Katie has lived most of her life in Loa, but now spends fall and winters in St. George. Katie has served in many church callings and on two missions, four six-month missions at Cove Fort and a second mission in Salt Lake as a Family History Missionary. She also served in the 4-H program for 22 years. Katie and Blain were part of the Elk Horn Square Dance Club and spent many hours dancing.


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May 31, 2012

GARKANE THANKS ITS CONSUMER/MEMBERS FOR PATIENCE & UNDERSTANDING DURING PRE-ARRANGED OUTAGES

Garkane Energy would like to thank its consumer/ members for their patience and understanding during the two WAPA Pre-arranged power outages during April and May. These two outages were necessary for the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA), at Glen Canyon to do the necessary work to install a backup transformer to feed Garkane’s transmission line out of the dam. This back-up transformer will provide Garkane consumers/members with greater reliability out of Glen Canyon in case of a transformer malfunction or failure. This installation also provides Garkane a redundant transformer for backup at Glen Canyon. Areas that were affected include: All of Kane and Garfield counties (except Antimony and Panguitch),

and Northern Arizona, (except Colorado City and Hildale). We also thank all law enforcement, hospitals, telephone entities, and Churches for their assistance in spreading the word and for their patience and understanding during the two pre-arranged outages, which both ran from midnight, Saturday Night (12:00 a.m.) to approximately 6:00 a.m Sunday Morning (6 hours total) both days (April 15th and

May 20th). During these two WAPA outages Garkane crews werer able to work on a variety of projects throughout the system that needed to be accomplished, which could only be done when the power was out. These pre-arranged outages serve as a reminder to our consumer/members to always be prepared for a power outage by choosing an easily accessible closet or cupboard for an emergency supply of flashlights,

batteries, and other needed items. If you have access to the internet through a cell phone during an outage – please go to Garkane’s website at: GarkaneEnergy. com or “like us” on facebook and we’ll keep you up-to-date on information about the outage, i.e estimated outage time frame, cause of the outage, and restoration efforts. Again, thank you for your patience and understanding during the two outages.

ADVERTISE IN THE INSIDER 676-2621 Garfield 836-2622 Wayne

VISITING SPECIALISTS FOR JUNE 2012 Dr. Rand Colbert Dr. Ben Adams Dr. Pearson Dr. Hammond Dr. Stephanz Dr. Hunsaker Dr. Terence Heath Dr. Crouch Brent Fox Dr. Shihurowych Dr. Duerkson Dr. Bingham Dr. Jon Obray Dr. Rick Obray Dr. Nakken

Dermatology Dermatology Ears, Nose Throat Nephrology Nephrology Opthamology OB-GYN Urology Audiology Urology Electrodiagnosis Cardiology (Ref only) Pain Management Pain Management Orthopedic

800-986-6440 800-986-6440 877-867-8719 801-377-4623 801-377-4623 435-896-8142 435-865-9500 435-867-0325 800-244-9001 435-893-0580 435-893-0580 801-373-4366 435-893-0580 435-893-0580 435-896-6498

4, 11 18, 25 5, 19 13 20 11 7, 8, 21, 22 13, 27 12, 19 27 14, 28 7 14 28 Tues & Fri

OBSERVING THE VENUS TRANSIT

By Kate Magargal Remember back in June 2004, when TV news stations paused their usual coverage to broadcast a rare astronomical event? TV personalities sat quietly as we watched our sister-planet move between us and the sun. It was a Venus transit, the first such event to occur since the invention of television. Venus transits occur in pairs separated by 8 years due to ‘resonance,‘ or the patterns of alignments, caused by the orbital periods of Earth and Venus. Late on Tuesday, June 5th, we will have an opportunity to see the last Venus transit of our lifetimes. In Astronomy, a transit is when one body crosses in front of another. In the case of a Venus transit, Venus travels across the face of the sun. Since Venus’ apparent (and actual) size is so much smaller than the sun, it will not block much of the sun’s light. However, careful observers can see the tiny dot of Venus move across the bright disk of our closest star. No record exists of observations of a Venus transit before the invention of the telescope in the early 1600s. Only 7 Venus transits have occurred since that time. Astronomers took advantage of these events to generate the first relatively accurate estimates of Earth’s distance to the sun and the size of our solar system. In 2004, astronomers used data collected during the Venus transit to help us understand what can be learned of exoplanets, planets around stars other than our sun, during transits. You and your family can share in this history of discovery by viewing the Venus transit yourself! Safety Information. NEVER LOOK AT THE SUN WITHOUT SPECIAL EQUIPMENT. Similar to viewing the solar eclipse a few weeks ago, special, but affordable, equipment is needed to look at the sun for the Venus transit. Purchase a pair of ‘eclipse glasses’ to safely and easily look at the sun. The Venus transit can also be viewed indirectly with a pinhole projector - a simple, cheap construction project the whole family can help with. Pinhole projector instructions can be found on this website: http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/how.html. Details. Venus will take almost 7 hours to complete it’s path across the sun. In the Western Hemisphere, we will see the beginning of the transit and the sun will set with Venus still moving across it. Venus makes first contact with the sun’s disk just after 4:05pm. Venus will be in the middle of it’s path across the sun at 7:27pm. Sunset is at 8:47pm. Locations. The Venus transit can be seen anywhere the sun is visible after 4:05pm (with your special equipment). To see the transit center at 7:27pm, you will need a spot with a good western horizon. Guided viewing is planned at both Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef National Parks. Check at the visitor centers for details. Astronomy Save-the-Dates. As always, astronomy fun will continue throughout the year. More astronomical events will be announced in the paper as they draw near Remember to mark your calendars for the annual Heritage Starfest on October 12-13th (www.heritagestarfest.com). Enjoy the Venus transit safely and enjoy our night skies this spring.


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PROVIDING FOR YOUR PETS

Many people have pets that they are devoted and attached to. Perhaps you are concerned about what would happen to your pets if you were no longer able to take care of them. Below are answers to the most commonly asked questions. Can I provide for my pets if I am unable to take care of them? Yes, you can. This applies to any domestic animal. The law allows you to choose a caretaker for your pets. If you become sick or disabled, you should designate the custody and care of your pets to a friend or relative until your health improves. You do this by writing a note or a document that authorizes someone to care for your pets in your absence. You can also include directions for the care of your pets in your will

or trust. Before you name someone as caretaker for your pets, you should discuss it with them to make sure that they are willing to take the responsibility. Can I provide financially for my pets during my illness or disability, or after my death? Yes. During any sickness or injury, the person who is handling your financial affairs can also be given the power to provide for your pets. You may provide funds to your caretaker for food, supplies and veterinary care. A lump sum distribution can be provided to the caretaker after your death. If you have a trust, certain provisions can be included to empower the trustee(s) to assist in your animal’s care. Funds can be given to the caretaker specifically for pet care. Can I create a trust just for my pets? Yes, the use of trusts is allowed to provide for the care of an animal. You can set forth your wishes for a caretaker of your choice, and direct how funds may be spent. You can provide that in special circumstances, such as an illness or emergency, your pet caretaker can spend additional funds.

If I can’t find a caretaker, can I name a humane society or animal shelter? Yes. A cash gift along with the designation of the shelter of your choice may be appropriate and could result in a longer adoption period for your pets. You may wish to state your wishes as to the new home for your pets including pet names, and any special needs. Gifts to shelters or an animal sanctuary of your choice are considered charitable donations and can bring tax savings. What else can I do to protect the pets I love? You could carry a note in your purse or wallet explaining that you have pets at home that depend on you. List their names, what kind of pet and what care they need. You may wish to include the name and phone number of a friend or relative who can gain legal access to your home or yard. In conclusion, your estate planning can entail issues related to the care of a pet. Pets can be a very important part of one’s life. If your pets are very important to you, do not neglect to plan for them when considering your estate planning affairs. Jeffery J. McKenna is a local attorney serving clients in Utah, Arizona and Nevada. He is a shareholder at the law firm of Barney, McKenna, and Olmstead with offices in St. George and Mesquite. If you have questions you would like addressed in these articles, you can contact him at 435 628-1711 or jmckenna@ barney-mckenna.com.

Boulder Mountain Realty, Inc.

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Cathy Bagley, Broker Amanda Brown, Sales Agent 245 East Main, P.O. Box 9, Torrey 425-3200

www.bouldermountainrealty.com

NEW LISTINGS AND NEW PRICES

SLEEPING RAINBOW ESTATES. .78/acre corner lot with eastern views. Lot 60. City water available. $40,000. 4.75 ACRES ON THE NORTHERN EDGE OF SLEEPING RAINBOW. Great Torrey views. City water available under terms of ordinance. Lot 4. $125,000. PRICE REDUCED TO $83,000 ON PIONEER BRICK HOME IN LOA. 3 bedroom home in good condition. Huge front porch. 200 square foot studio, plus 200 square foot shop with many possibilities. .3/acre corner lot with mountain views to the south. Privacy fence. 274 South Main Street, Loa. $83,000. VICTORIAN IN TEASDALE. Charm, appeal and great condition. Two-story, four bedroom home with wonderful kitchen, central air, hardwood floors and a terrific yard. Very comfortable and pleasant with a delightful unique quality. .66/acre with 1 share of irrigation water. 16 East Center Street, Teasdale. Very reasonably priced at $180,000. SPACIOUS AND COMFORTABLE. Custom built log home with large windows and open decks to enjoy views of Boulder Mountain, Thousand Lake Mountain and the red cliffs below. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths. Loft with balcony. Vaulted ceilings. .66/acre landscaped lot with sprinkler system. Large garage with office space. Suitable for single family living or group-owned vacation retreat. 125 South 44 West, Teasdale. $349,000. Check the website for price changes and new listings.

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May 31, 2012 Wayne & Garfield County Insider