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Imam. Jurman Ibn Saif At'tahamee

www.bod.se

Houda

The origin of Houda can be traced back to 8th century Arabia where it was first presented by an Islamic occult movement known as “Al Muh’tadoon” (translated: “the guided ones”). About the Muh’tadoon and their work, activities and beliefs, very little is known and the movement has always been famous for its highly secretive and esoteric agendas. It is however a known fact, and acknowledged by many Muh’tadoon members, that the main purpose for establishing the Muh’tadoon order in 8th century Muslim Arabia was to guard and protect sacred inheritances that were left by the Prophet of Islam Muhammad before his death (in 632). Though many speculations have been made, and countless myths created around the sacred inheritance and what it really is, writing and letters that were written by Muh’tadoon scholars indicate strongly that a great portion of the inheritance that was left by the Prophet of Islam Muhammad consists mainly of holy books and scriptures. These are sacred and very important books that have been kept a secret from public knowledge for centuries and are believed to contain great esoteric knowledge about the Quran, Hadith, the bible and the future. Amongst the books that have been preserved by the Muh’tadoon movement through the centuries is Houda.

Imam. Jurman Ibn Saif At'tahamee & Dr. Muhammad MacArthur

HOUDA (Islam's best kept SECRET!)


INTRODUCTION

The origin of Houda can be traced back to 8th century Arabia where it was first presented by an Islamic occult movement known as “Al Muh’tadoon” (translated: “the guided ones”). About the Muh’tadoon and their work, activities and beliefs, very little is known and the movement has always been famous for its highly secretive and esoteric agendas. It is however a known fact, and acknowledged by many Muh’tadoon members, that the main purpose for establishing the Muh’tadoon order in 8th century Islamic Arabia was to guard and protect sacred inheritances that were left by the Prophet of Islam Muhammad before his death (in 632). Though many speculations have been made, and countless myths created around the sacred inheritance and what it really is, writing and letters that were left by Muh’tadoon scholars indicate strongly that a great portion of the prophetic inheritance that was left by the Prophet of Islam Muhammad consists mainly of holy books and scriptures. These are sacred and very important books that have been kept a secret from public knowledge for many centuries and are believed to contain great esoteric knowledge about the Quran, Hadith, 1


the bible and the future. Amongst the books that have been preserved by the Muh’tadoon movement through the centuries is Houda.

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HISTORY

The first printed copy of Houda dates back to late 9th century. Before that, Houda was studied, preserved and transmitted orally from scholars to students and very few copies of the book existed in print. The reason for not printing the book from its very first inception has been a debated issue amongst later Muh’tadoon scholars. Some believed that oral preservation was a way of protecting the content of the book from mixing with the content of the Quran and Hadith, which were at the time Houda was first published only few years old. Others have argued that oral preservation was necessary because there was a chance the book might’ve fallen in the hands of outsiders and gotten corrupted and changed with time. And some believe that Houda was preserved orally and kept only within closed scholarly circles because of the book’s highly sensitive and powerful content, which the first generation of Muh’tadoon scholars considered unsuitable and impractical for ordinary people to concern themselves with.

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When Houda was first introduced to independent (Muslim) scholars in late 9th century, many hesitated heavily on its authenticity and the vast majority of scholars were ready to renounce the unknown book as a hoax and a fabrication of the Quran and Hadith. Three major factors kept Houda from being renounced as a forgery: the book’s unbroken and undeniable chain of narration, linguistic perfection and profound accuracy in explaining and interpreting the Quran, Hadith and the Judeo-Christian holy books. These were the three main factors that gave Houda recognition and status amongst Muslim (and some Jewish) scholars in 9th century Arabia. The book’s unbroken chain of narration and linguistic perfection were immediately recognized and equalized with that of the Quran. However, Houda’s remarkable ways of interpreting and explaining the Quran, Hadith and the bible was, and still is equalized to no other source of knowledge in the world. It was Houda’s unbroken chain of narration and linguistic perfection that convinced 9th century scholars that the book couldn’t be the product of any human genius. Rather, it was a holy text inspired by God to the messenger of God Muhammad. Houda’s profound insights on the Quran, Hadith and the bible were also appreciated but only to a certain extent. It wasn’t until 4


centuries later, when the Muslim world fell at the hands of Europeans and heavy colonization and slavery afflicted the African continent and the state of Israel returned to the world as a nation that Houda’s true miracles could be appreciated fully. Muh’tadoon scholars, who only a few years earlier accepted Houda as a divinely inspired book that was sent “merely” to give insight and deeper understanding of the holy books and to initiate the end of times, were now witnessing the manifestation of many great prophecies that were foretold in the book(s) centuries earlier. These were prophecies that were foretold centuries earlier by the prophet (Muhammad) himself and their manifestation changed the opinions and understanding of (Muh’tadoon) scholars globally. Houda was now recognized as the ultimate de-coder of the Quran, Hadith and the bible and knowledge of the future. Muh’tadoon scholars throughout the Muslim world were now beginning to prepare for the last and final signs. That preparation came in the form of massive and vigorous studying, interpreting, translating and attempting to understand the deeper meaning and implication of many sacred books. Even the books that were considered weak in narration and ignored by the scholars only a few decades earlier were now being opened and studied with great care and prepared for discloser at the 5


right moment. That moment would come when the final major signs manifested in the world. These would be signs that would mark the beginning of the end and the right moment to disclose many sacred and “hidden” (i.e. Muh’tadoon) scriptures. Amongst these signs would be the return of Israel as a nation, a “Roman” (i.e. European/Western) invasion of Iraq and Sham (i.e. modern day Syria, Lebanon, etc.) and the reign of an Abyssinian (i.e. black African) in Rome (i.e. the West). These would be the final signs amongst the great signs and they would occur right before the fulfillment of many great prophecies. The last of these three signs (i.e. the reign of an Abyssinian in Rome) would be seen 4-6 years before the discloser of Houda, 5-8 years before the coming of the Mahdi and 9 years before the return of Jesus. This will be the purpose for disclosing Houda in the first quarter of the second decade of the 21th century.

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TRANSLATION

Since the printing of the first copy, five attempts have been made to translate Houda in four different languages, with each attempt taking place within the same (20th) century. The first attempt was made in early 1950s when the book was translated into Farsi (Persian) by Iranian Muh’tadoon scholars. It did not take too long before the Farsi translation was rejected by the majority of (Sunni) Muh’tadoon scholars, who deemed the Farsi translation a “mistranslation” designed to fit “non-Islamic” (i.e. Shia) ideologies and beliefs. It would take more than four decades, three more attempts in three different languages (Hindi, German and English) before a moderate translation of Houda could be produced by a Kuwaiti scholar name Imam At’tahamee.

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Imam Jurman Ibn Saif At’tahamee was a Kuwaiti scholar, a teacher of the Arabic language and student of the late great Saudi scholar Abdullah Ibn Baaz. He spent most of his life studying and teaching the Arabic language and Fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) and he received honors for his knowledge in Usul Al-Hadith (principles of Hadith). He spent most of his life working as a teacher in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, but he also spent some time in the U.K and Germany where he worked with Islamic relief organizations and taught the Arabic language. At’ tahamee finished his first English rendition of Houda in the fall of 1988. Unfortunately, that rendition was rejected for having minor flaws in translation. It would take him more than nine years, only three years before his death, before his second English rendition of Houda would be ready and accepted by Muh’tadoon scholars as a “moderate” translation of the original text. At’tahamee’s second English rendition remains till this day the only translation of Houda agreed upon by both Sunni and Shia branches of the Muh’tadoon movement. This spectacular achievement belonged exclusively to At’tahamee and it occurred for various reasons. It wasn’t because of any profound knowledge that At’tahamee possessed and other scholars lacked that led to the unprecedented acceptance that 8


he received for his work. Rather, it was because of the personality traits that he possessed, and others lacked, that made him and his work acceptable to both branches of the same movement. Imam At’tahamee was known for his moderate religious views and complete rejection of sectarianism in his religion (Islam). He never identified himself with any particular branch of Islam and although his religious beliefs and philosophy were congruent with that of Sunni Islam, he never labeled himself a Sunni nor did he reject the beliefs of the Shia. He labeled himself simply as a “Muslim� who followed the Quran and the teachings of Prophet Muhammad and he was famous for his patience and tolerance towards Muslims and non-Muslims alike. He studied both Sunni and Shia text books with deep respect and appreciation, sometimes even quoting hadith from Shia sources that he considered authentic. He was also knowledgeable with the Judeo-Christian tradition and he often quoted verses from the New Testament to prove the prophetic position of Jesus in the gospels and the prophecies of the coming of Prophet Muhammad in the Old Testament. Also his careful and distant relationship with the Saudi and Kuwaiti government increased him in popularity. He was never affiliated with any political party or politician in the 9


Muslim world and he always openly condemned all acts of disobedience and corruption from governments in the Muslim world. Moderate religious views mixed with profound skills in Arabic grammar and rhetoric, deep understanding of the various religious texts and complete rejection of sectarianism made Imam Jurman Ibn Saif At’tahamee the right person to be charged with the task of translating Houda into modern English. This was in mid 1980s. Since then, Imam At’tahamee’s second English rendition has been labeled “the seal of translations” and no other translation has been given nearly the same acceptance or authority by Muh’tadoon scholars. Few attempts have been made to translate Houda after At’tahamee’s death, with the latest translation being in Turkish. Every translation after At’tahamee has been rejected for being “inadequate” or “deficient” in translation, with some translations being labeled as plain fabrications and forgeries of the original text.

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COMMENTARIES

The first commentaries on Houda were written in 1089 by an Iraqi Muh’tadoon scholar name Imam Bashar As’shamari Hamdi. As’shamari’s work made a great impact on the scholars of his time, and those who came after him and his work added much to the understanding of the book. The commentaries that are included in this preview edition of At’tahamee’s 2nd English edition are taken from various different commentary books and they include the works of great Muh’tadoon scholars such as Muhammad Ibn Hamdala (1506), Ahmed Naim (1580), Qadi Mustafa A’Suyufi (1755), Muhammad A’Zaidani (1784), Ahmed Celik Nursi (1895), Abdullah Abu Luqman (1910), Tariq Ibn Al’Kalbi (1972), Zaid Ibn Nuwass (1983), Jurman Ibn Saif At’tahamee (1997) and Ahmed At’thani (1998). These commentaries were written in the light of the Quran and Hadith and they are the understanding of rightly guided Muh’tadoon Muslim scholars who interpreted the book through the lens of their time and age.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

All praise and glory is due to Allah, the creator and sustainer of the heavens and the earth. Him alone do we worship and Him alone do we seek for guidance and help. I bare witness that none has the right to be worshiped except Allah, the creator and the heavens and the earth, and I bare witness that Muhammad is His slave and messenger whom He has sent with the truth and guided to the straight path and sent as a shining light and mercy for the whole world. I would like to begin by thanking the Bremen council for giving me the honor and trust of working with a project of this magnitude and for allowing me to be part of a long legacy of scholars and students knowledge. I would also like to thank my wife Shannon MacArthur and my three beautiful children Ibrahim, Muhammad and Idriss for giving me the support and courage that I needed to finish this project. I would also like to thank the good people of Ancient Staff Publishing for supporting this cause with great and uncompromising courage and strength. And lastly, I would like to send special thanks and prayers to Imam Jurman At’tahamee for doing the hard work that allows us to do the easy work. Only Allah can reward 13


you fully for your deeds and I ask Allah to forgive you and provide for you from His mercy. I pray and hope that my efforts and the efforts of those who went before me will bring enlightenment and knowledge to the world and I hope that this book will change the world for the better. All the good that comes from it belong to Allah, and all the mistakes and short comings are from me.

Dr. Muhammad MacArthur. (2010).

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Imam. Jurman Ibn Saif At'tahamee

www.bod.se

Houda

The origin of Houda can be traced back to 8th century Arabia where it was first presented by an Islamic occult movement known as “Al Muh’tadoon” (translated: “the guided ones”). About the Muh’tadoon and their work, activities and beliefs, very little is known and the movement has always been famous for its highly secretive and esoteric agendas. It is however a known fact, and acknowledged by many Muh’tadoon members, that the main purpose for establishing the Muh’tadoon order in 8th century Muslim Arabia was to guard and protect sacred inheritances that were left by the Prophet of Islam Muhammad before his death (in 632). Though many speculations have been made, and countless myths created around the sacred inheritance and what it really is, writing and letters that were written by Muh’tadoon scholars indicate strongly that a great portion of the inheritance that was left by the Prophet of Islam Muhammad consists mainly of holy books and scriptures. These are sacred and very important books that have been kept a secret from public knowledge for centuries and are believed to contain great esoteric knowledge about the Quran, Hadith, the bible and the future. Amongst the books that have been preserved by the Muh’tadoon movement through the centuries is Houda.

Imam. Jurman Ibn Saif At'tahamee & Dr. Muhammad MacArthur

HOUDA (Islam's best kept SECRET!)

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HOUDA (Islam's best kept SECRET!) Imam. Jurman Ibn Saif At'tahamee & Dr. Muhammad MacArthur INTRODUCTION 1 thebibleandthefuture.Amongstt...