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Beef Business ‘

Saskatchewan’s largest circulated magazine Saskatchewan`s Premiere Cattlecattle Industry Publication Saskatchewan’s largest circulated cattleindustry industry magazine ‘

September 2010 May 2010

January 2014

A Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association Publication Publication Mail Agreement #40011906

Working for Producers


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We sell results... that count! “The added milk and udder quality in our cow herd has made us money!” – Miles Kingdon, Cow Boss Quilchena Cattle Co.

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Davidson Gelbvieh & Lonesome Dove Ranch

Vernon & Eileen Davidson 306-625-3755 davidsongelbvieh@sasktel.net www.davidsongelbvieh.com Tara & Ross Davidson & Family 306-625-3513 lonesomedoveranch@sasktel.net www.davidsonlonesomedoveranch.com

Gelbvieh Stock Exchange Sale Group Don Okell - 403-793-4549 jenty@eidnet.org www.jentygelbviehs.com Gary or Nolan Pahl - 403-977-2057 garypahl@shockware.com www.towerviewranch.com Wade Watson - 403-528-7456 wjw@cciwireless.ca www.watsoncattle.ca

Prairie Gelbvieh Alliance Sale Group Kirk Hurlburt - 306-222-8210 hurlburtlivestock@sasktel.net Wayne Selin - 306-793-4568 loisselin@hotmail.com

Fir River Livestock

Dave Hrebeniuk - 306-865-6603 Darcy, Renee, Colt & Kenzie Hrebeniuk 306-865-7859 Hudson Bay, SK firriver@xplornet.com www.gelbviehworld.com

EYOT Valley Ranch

Foursquare Gelbvieh

Lynne & Larry Fecho 780-718-5477 Millet, AB perfecho@aol.com www.evgelbvieh.com

Roger & Kim Sayer 403-875-8418 Carstairs, AB rogerandkimsayer@yahoo.ca

Keriness Cattle Company Ltd.

Ron, Carol, Ross, Gail, Owen & Aaron Birch Ron & Carol 403-792-2123 Aaron 403-485-5518 Lomond, AB aaron@tbfarms.ca www.tbfarms.ca

Kert Ness - 403-860-4634 kertness@shaw.ca Joe Ness - 403-852-7332 Airdrie, AB jonus@telus.blackberry.net

V&V Farms

Vern & Vivienne Pancoast 403-548-6678 Redcliff, AB vvfarms@xplornet.com

Stone Gate Farm

Twin Bridge Farms Ltd.

Maple Grove Gelbvieh

Lee & Neal Wirgau 204-278-3255 Narcisse, MB maplegrove@xplornet.com

Nelson Gelbvieh Darrell & Leila Hickman 780-581-0077 Duane Nelson - 403-331-9086 Vermilion, AB Glenwood, AB darrell.hickman@lakelandcollege.ca nelson.lad@gmail.com Man-Sask Gelbvieh Assoc.

c/o Lee Wirgau - 204-278-3255 Narcisse, MB maplegrove@xplornet.com

Royal Western Gelbvieh

Dayspring Cattle

Dan & Marilyn Nielsen Adam Nielsen -403-887-4971 Sylvan Lake, AB www.dayspringcattle.com

Gelbvieh Association of

Rodney & Tanya Hollman Alberta/BC 403-588-8620 Innisfail, AB c/o Merv Tuplin - 780-450-1280 rodscattle@platinum.ca Edmonton, AB www.royalwesterngelbvieh.com mervtuplin@gmail.com

Skyline Way NE, Calgary, Alberta T2E 6V1 CANADIAN GELBVIEH 5160Ph: 403.250.8640 • Fax: 403.291.5624 Email: gelbvieh@gelbvieh.ca • www.gelbvieh.ca ASSOCIATION


Contents Cover photo courtesy of Paula Larson, D'Arcy, SK

Beef Business A Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association (SSGA) Publication

A Proud Saskatchewan Tradition Since 1913

Industry News 6

COOL on the Table in US Farm Bill Talks

8

CETA Offers Opportunities for Canadian Beef

11

WTO Reasserts Its Relevance in Bali

11

Straw Man Team Develops Industry-Wide Beef Strategy

14

Spring Creek Beef Feeds a Growing Market Segment

17

Former SSGA President Gary Jones Inducted Into the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall of Fame (SAHF)

Markets and Trade 18

Retail Meat Price Survey

21

Weekly Charts

22

Alternative Manure Management: Getting the Most Out of Manure

24

2013 Review of Beef Supply

27

Antibiotic Stewardship

Subscriptions - Wilma Switzer Box 4752, Evraz Place, Regina, SK S4P 3Y4 Tel: 306-757-8523 Fax: 306-569-8799 email: ssga.admin@sasktel.net Subscription Rate: 1 yr $26.50 (GST included) Published 5 times per year Advertising Sales - Tracy Cornea Tel: 306-693-9329 Fax: 306-692-4961 email: tracy.cornea@gmail.com Design and Layout - Jackson Designs Candace Schwartz Tel: 306-772-0376 email: cjacksondesigns@gmail.com

Feature

Science and Production 33

Livestock Services of Saskatchewan

35

Where’s the Beef? Active Missing Livestock File

39

A Report From the SSGA President

Association News and Reports Stewardship 40

SK PCAP - Good News Story for One Species at Risk

42

Calendar of Events

43

Advertiser Index

?

General Manager: Chad MacPherson Administrative Assistant: Wilma Switzer Box 4752, Evraz Place, Regina, SK S4P 3Y4 Tel: 306-757-8523 Fax: 306-569-8799 email: ssga@sasktel.net OR ssga.admin@sasktel.net Website: www.skstockgrowers.com

Prairie Conservation Action Plan (PCAP) Manager: Natasha Wilkie Box 4752, Evraz Place, Regina, SK S4P 3Y4 Tel: 306-352-0472 Fax: 306-569-8799 email: pcap@sasktel.net SSGA reserves the right to refuse advertising and to edit manuscripts. Contents of Beef Business may be reproduced with written permission obtained from the SSGA Manager and proper credit given to the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association. Articles submitted may not be the opinion of the Association. SSGA assumes no responsibility for any actions or decisions taken by any reader from this publication based on any and all information provided. Publications Mail Agreement #40011906 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses (covers only) to: Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association Box 4752, Regina, SK S4P 3Y4

Did you know that the SSGA is Saskatchewan's oldest agricultural association?

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Joy Agnew Jeff Gaye Carrie Gillis Charlie Gracey

Contributors Harold Martens Leigh Rosengren Leanne Thompson Cam Wilk

This magazine is printed on paper that is comprised of 50% recycled paper and 25% post-consumer waste. It is acid-free, elemental chlorine-free and is FSC certified

JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ŠBEEF BUSINESS | 5


Industry News COOL on the Table in US Farm Bill Talks While Canada continues to fight US mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) legislation through the World Trade Organization (WTO), there is a chance it will be killed in the US Farm Bill process. The Farm Bill is a comprehensive package passed by Congress every five years. It includes legislation on a wide array of issues including agriculture and food policy. COOL was part of the 2008 Farm Bill. Negotiations on the new bill are ongoing through a joint Senate/House Conference Committee, and some US beef interests are hoping to see COOL dropped from the bill in the negotiating process. Several committee members spoke against COOL in their opening statements, while only one spoke in favour. Colin Woodall of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association said there’s still quite a bit of negotiating left. “We hope to continue our pressure on both Houses,” he said, adding that he doesn’t expect the Farm Bill to be passed and signed into law before mid-January. Woodall says that COOL has been hurting the US industry, and the prospect of retaliation if WTO upholds Canada’s position is a very serious threat. Meanwhile, the National Farmers’ Union (US NFU) supports COOL, and according to a statement on their website Canada’s talk of retaliation is “just a scare tactic.” Woodall doesn’t see it that way. “The fact that the NFU continues to blow off the idea of retaliation is a disservice to their members and the industry,” he said. “We know retaliation is coming. Retaliation is real,” Woodall said. “The NFU hasn’t been engaged in the WTO process. They don’t know what they’re talking about.” Woodall is hoping that Congress will proactively drop COOL rather than waiting for a WTO ruling that will cause further damage. The NFU insists that new regulations requiring labels to show where an animal is born, where it is slaughtered and where

6

it is butchered have brought COOL into compliance with a 2012 WTO ruling that the law is a discriminatory trade practice. Woodall disagrees. “Everybody outside of the NFU knows [the new regulation] has made this issue worse, not better,” he said. “We expect the WTO to rule against it for a third time” at its Compliance Panel hearings. John Masswohl, Director of Government and International Relations for the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, is even more blunt. “It doesn’t get any closer to a slam-dunk,” he said. There is no way the US proposal complies with the WTO ruling.” Masswohl says it will take some time for the WTO Compliance Panel to run its course, which will inevitably include appeals. In the meantime, he says, market forces will hurt producers.“Tyson Foods has stopped buying Canadian-fed cattle,” Masswohl said. “Thirty percent of cattle through the Tyson plant at Pasco, Washington were Canadian-fed.” Masswohl said that packing plants need to operate at near-capacity to be profitable. With a shortage of cattle in the US, “companies like Tyson are holding their breath to see if Congress does the right thing in the Farm Bill and repeals COOL.” Otherwise, he said, “if I were a betting man I’d bet that Tyson’s Pasco plant won’t be around past the first quarter.”

says. Fixing COOL is the right thing to do,” Masswohl said. “It looks like there’s a reasonable chance the Farm Bill will be passed with COOL repealed. That’s what we’re hoping to see.” Woodall hopes so too. “Any member who votes for COOL is voting to place retaliation on one of the largest parts of our agriculture industry, and that’s US livestock.” B

Masswohl said that a feedlot owner he spoke to at the Washington State Cattlemen’s Association meeting in November said that if the Tyson plant goes, he’s closing his feedlots. If you're a producer in Washington or Idaho you don't relish the thought of losing a major buyer, get used to the thought of losing ten cents a pound on transportation.” he said. And then, he said, more producers will be competing to sell to fewer buyers, driving prices lower. “If you care about US agriculture and US jobs, it doesn’t matter what the WTO

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

JANUARY 2014


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At Ole Farms we have grown to where we will be breeding over 2000 cows next year. With this growth we have learned that in order to be pro�itable a cow must feed herself on forages for as many days as possible with a minimum of mechanical intervention. She must calve by herself because dif�icult calving eats at pro�its and is not tolerated. Cows must be able to hold condition and rebreed without being pampered. Cows must be deep, thick and easy �leshing, with solid feet and udders. We raise our purebred Angus bulls with these qualities in mind. Our sale bulls are 21 months of age. They are moderate, forage developed and ready to make your operation more pro�itable.

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www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 7


Industry News CETA Offers Opportunities for Canadian Beef The Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union offers substantial opportunities for Canadian beef producers, but there are challenges to be met. To benefit from CETA, most producers will have to make adjustments to their production and marketing practices. The agreement opens up duty-free European market access for 50,000 tonnes of Canadian beef, including 35,000 tonnes of fresh product and 15,000 tonnes of frozen. This is in addition to 15,000 tonnes of high-quality beef exported to Europe under existing quotas, on which tariffs and duties will be eliminated. In a Foreign Affairs and International Trade document, the federal government says that Saskatchewan will “benefit significantly” from the agreement. “The EU is already Saskatchewan’s third-largest trading partner and export destination. CETA will eliminate tariffs on almost all of Saskatchewan’s key exports and provide access to new market opportunities in the EU,” according to the government’s How CETA Will Benefit Saskatchewan.” CETA will benefit those producers who are able to produce beef specifically for the European market. The EU does not permit meat from animals treated with growth hormones or with beta-agonists such as Optaflexx, Paylean or Zilmax. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is authorized to administer EU protocols for verifying compliance. This is done through producer control systems (traceability and record-keeping), veterinary examinations and carcass inspection. EU standards are controlled not only at the producer level. Meat intended for export to Europe must come from approved slaughter- houses, cutting plants and cold stores. Most of the approved facilities are located in Ontario and Quebec. With increased production of beef for the EU market, more facilities

across the country may seek certification. Since 2007, Canada has been listed by the World Organization for Animal Health as a country with controlled risk of BSE (most European countries fall into the same category). Europe has banned Specified Risk Materials, specifically skull, brain, trigeminal ganglia, eyes, spinal cord, distal ileum, and the dorsal root ganglia of cattle aged 30 months or older. Hygiene protocols for packing and handling of beef are enforced, including restrictions on wood pallets for fresh unpackaged meat and wood penning for sick animals. B

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25 Simmental Bulls sell

20 Angus Bulls sell

20 Hereford Bulls sell City View Simmentals The Barnett Family Moose Jaw, SK (306) 691 3747

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Industry News WTO Reasserts Its Relevance in Bali The World Trade Organization (WTO) emerged from last month’s meetings in Bali with renewed relevance and some real progress on issues of interest to farmers. The ninth WTO Ministerial Conference, or MC9, reached agreement on “the Bali Package” – a number of decisions designed to facilitate trade, improve food security, improve trade for less-developed countries and boost development in general. “People had talked about the death of the WTO,” Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz told Beef Business. “The big news is the WTO is still alive.” Ritz and International Trade Minister Ed Fast attended the meetings for Canada. Ritz said the WTO “will continue to be the multi-lateral forum for rules-based trade.” The WTO’s relevance had been questioned since members had repeatedly failed to agree on trade rules following the Doha Development Agenda in 2001. WTO rules call for unanimous consent among member states.“It can be very difficult when you can’t get agreement among 160 countries. Everyone has a veto,” Ritz said. “But there can be consensus.”

John Masswohl of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association was in Bali for the conference. He said that if the WTO had failed to agree on trade rules, developed countries would have carried on with bilateral and multilateral trade deals on their own, leaving developing nations behind. “The danger is developed countries are doing other deals,” Masswohl said. “The message is, if WTO can’t agree on anything, we’re not going to wait around. Many African countries and some South American countries will get left behind.” If the Bali conference did not succeed, Masswohl said, the whole Doha Round would probably be terminated. “The message got through. You could see it in the hallways, there was a lot of effort to keep that from happening,” Masswohl said. While Canada is vigorously pursuing trade agreements with other countries, the WTO still has an important role to play, Ritz said. He points to the disagreement with the US over Country Of Origin Labeling (COOL) laws as an example of how the world body can be useful. The Bali conference produced a Trade Facilitation Agreement, which intends to reduce border costs

and red tape for exporters while sharing information and increasing transparency of customs rules. The Ministers also called for elimination of export subsidies. “We see export subsidies as distorting trade,” Ritz said. “They act as a trade barrier in reverse.” Reduction in maximum repayment periods for export credits, structured review of the administration of tariff quotas, and progress on the issue of food security for vulnerable populations were among the key agriculture-related decisions in the agreement. Unfettered trade in agricultural products is one of a number of tools available to increase food security, Ritz said. “Canada has achieved unprecedented success this year in its bilateral and multilateral discussions with Japan, Korea and Europe,” Ritz said. “The WTO agreement will help Canadian farmers and agricultural exporters maximize opportunities in international markets.” B

Straw Man Team Develops Industry-Wide Beef Strategy By the time you read this, the Straw Man Beef Industry Strategy will have released its final report. The Straw Man initiative is an effort to take advantage of what some key players see as a moment of opportunity for the Canadian beef sector. Dave Andrews, one of Straw Man’s primary participants, said “there is a lot of optimism in the beef industry today.” “There’s good reason to be optimistic after a long dry spell” Andrews said, referring specifically to the BSE crisis that began in 2003. “Finally we see some light, and some better prices.”

JANUARY 2014

The Straw Man Team takes pains to point out that they are not a new organization for producers, but a process for arriving at a comprehensive strategy. They have engaged beef associations as well as businesses ranging from farms and ranches to feedlots, packing and processing facilities and retail/food service outlets. The team sees the present opportunity as a shining light. This light is the convergence of three separate “beams.” The first beam is what they call the “supply beam.” Andrews says “Canada is in an excellent position. Nobody else in the world has the same ability to produce high-quality grain-finished beef.” He

said Canada has the capacity to increase its overall cow herd, and it also has the capacity to increase the availability of feed grains. At the same time, the opportunity includes a “demand beam.” From cut to grade to price to production system, the team says, the Canadian beef industry has the ability to deliver what the customer demands. What’s more, according to Andrews, “Our customers are in a position to afford premium beef products.” The final component of the ray of opportunity is the “The ‘Assurance Beam’ – the care and commitment to food safety, animal continued on page 12

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 11


Industry News Beef Strategy cont. from pg. 11 welfare and responsible production practices. And the stamp of Canada and the assurances and reputation that our nation provides,” says the Straw Man website. The figurative “straw man” is made up of a heart – the consumer – and five “bones.” “Customers are the heart of the whole industry,” said Andrews. “As an industry we’ve paid lip service to what our customers want – instead we produce what we want to produce. But demand is centred around environmental sustainability, food safety – the whole strategy hinges on that.”

about beef, but without an ax to grind,” he said. “We put ideas together, but the ideas are completely malleable. We receive comments and criticism from across the industry. We’ve never put ourselves in a position to defend a suggestion we’ve made,” he said. “This is truly an industryled strategy from top to bottom.” As this article was being written, the team had just finished a “Meeting Place” session in Calgary and was preparing its final report for end of December release. Andrews is excited by the process and the prospects of emerging with a sound

The five “bone” components are information flow; performance measurement; marketing and promotion; the “one-tongue” bone, or speaking with a single voice; and the “meeting-place” bone. “A lot of what we see as demands has to do with tracking animals, having data in place to support customers’ needs,” Andrews said. “It’s about providing information flow systems, and a data system from genetics to retail to food service.” The Straw Man Strategy began just over a year ago when the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA) co-hosted a Beef Summit with Cargill and the Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association (ACFA). Fiftythree leaders from all sectors of the industry attended. A three-person team – Andrews, Kim McConnell and John Kolk – developed a draft strategy which they presented to summits last spring. The process has continued with further development and consultations. Andrews, whose beef background includes ranching and industry politics – he has been president of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association among other things – says he has never seen a process quite like Straw Man.

strategy. “There’s a tremendous amount of interest from packers, retail, food service, government – everyone who wants a say in the industry,” he said. “I’d never have thought a year ago that we’d have this amount of buy-in from across the industry.” For more information on the Straw Man strategy, and to see the final report, visit http://strawmanbeef.com. B

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| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

JANUARY 2014


Industry News Spring Creek Beef Feeds a Growing Market Segment There’s more than one kind of consumer, so it makes sense that there’s more than one kind of beef. Spring Creek Beef has found its niche and is committed to it. Spring Creek is a product of Highland Feeders Ltd, a feedlot and farm near Vegreville, Alberta. The farm’s roots run deep, starting when Ukrainian immigrant Peter Kotelko established a homestead in Alberta in 1901. Peter’s grandson Mike runs the farm/ feedlot operation today. The family started Spring Creek in 2004, when Bern Kotelko (Mike’s brother) and his daughter Kirstin sought to diversify the farm’s business by catering to a growing demand for beef raised without antibiotics or added hormones. They initially sold their beef to independent restaurants and butchers, says Producer Liaison Melissa Downing, “but we have significantly increased the number of cattle in our program over the last ten years to the point where we now have commitments with national retailers.”

Spring Creek pays producers a premium which is determined by a number of factors including seasonal variance in supply and demand. Cattle are fed at Highland Feeders, and processed at JBS Canada in Brooks, Alberta.

to export into Europe.” Similarly, she says, Spring Creek would have trouble maintaining a consistent supply line of over-30-months cattle. “At this time, our program is only for cattle under 30 months,” she said.

“Our products are aimed toward consumers looking for a high quality, traceable beef product raised without antibiotics or added hormones,” Downing said. “We are CFIA approved and thirdparty audited to validate our claims, which relays integrity to the consumer.”

Spring Creek is a growing enterprise that presents an opportunity for nicheoriented producers. “We’ve been steadily expanding since 2004 and see continued growth for many years to come,” Downing said. “We are actively looking for ranchers to join our program.” B

Their product seems well-suited to the opening European market, but Downing says they are busy enough meeting domestic demand. “Domestic demand is already exceeding our ability to supply,” she said. “We are not currently aggressively seeking opportunities

Indeed, you can find Spring Creek beef in Sobeys, Safeway and Co-op stores, A&W and South Street Burger, as well as several independent restaurants. The beef is distributed through an exclusive supply agreement with JBS Foods Canada. Downing says that producers wanting to sell to Spring Creek should get in touch with her (melissa@springcreek.ca or 780436-0335) to discuss their eligibility. “In some cases, small management changes may need to be implemented so the producer’s cattle qualify in the future,” she said. “We are primarily looking for Angusinfluenced cattle, 600 to 1,000 pounds,” Downing said. Cattle must not have received any antibiotics or added hormones since birth, and producers are required to have accurate treatment records and raise their cattle in a humane manner.

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Assiniboia, SK: Box 96/Highway #13 West Estevan, SK: Box 905/280 Kensington Avenue Pangman, SK: Box 120/411 Mergens Street Radville, SK: Box 69/Highway 28 South Weyburn, SK: 96 - 17 Street NE

JANUARY 2014


COMMERCIAL CATTLE ABC CATTLE CO., WHITEWOOD, SK BAR CR ANGUS, PERDUE, SK BLAIR’S.AG CATTLE CO., LANIGAN, SK BORDERLAND CATTLE CO., ROCKGLEN, SK BRIDGEWAY LIVESTOCK, WAWOTA, SK DAVIDSON GELBVIEH/LONESOME DOVE RANCH, PONTEIX, SK EASTONDALE ANGUS, WAWOTA, SK HATFIELD SHORTHORNS, GLADSTONE, MB KENRAY RANCH, REDVERS, SK LAKELAND COLLEGE, VERMILION, AB MCINTOSH LIVESTOCK, MAYMONT, SK MOOSE CREEK, KISBEY, SK NEXERA LAND AND CATTLE, DRAKE, SK PHANTOM CREEK LIVESTOCK, SWIFT CURRENT, SK SMART FARMS, MOSSOMIN, SK VERMUELEN FARMS, CEYLON, SK WHITECAP CHAROLAIS/HOWE RED ANGUS, MOOSE JAW, SK WILGENBUSCH CHAROLAIS, HALBRITE, SK WRAZ RED ANGUS, WAWOTA, SK

BRYCES BAR B RANCH LTD. & W. SHAUN BRYCE, ARCOLA, SK CRESCENT CREEK ANGUS, GOODEVE, SK FLYING F RANCH, WEYBURN, SK FORDEN FAIRVIEW FARM, PUNNICHY, SK HORSESHOE E CHAROLAIS, KENASTON, SK MCINTOSH LIVESTOCK, MAYMONT, SK MCTAVISH CHAROLAIS, MOOSOMIN, SK PHEASANTDALE CATTLE COMPANY LTD., BALCARRES, SK REMITALL FARMS INC., OLDS, AB STONEY CREEK SIMMENTAL, KENDAL, SK TERRY & STACEY HUNT, ROSE VALLEY, SK U6 LIVESTOCK, WYNYARD, SK WRAZ RED ANGUS, WAWOTA, SK

REED ANDREW, Regina, SK BLAIRSWEST LAND AND CATTLE, Drake, SK GLENDAR ANGUS, Mankota, SK JASON DAVIS, Saskatoon, SK STONEY RIDGE CATTLE CO., Southey, SK LAKELAND COLLEGE STUDENT MANAGED FARM, Vermilion, AB ANDREW DOERKSEN, Carrot River, SK CALICO CATTLE CO., Whitewood, SK JOHN BROWN FARMS OF CARLYLE, Regina, SK JASON AND STEPHANIE FRADETTE, Lake Alma, SK DARRYL & MARIA FRIESEN, Carrot River, SK GEHL RANCH, Hodgeville, SK GORD & SANDY GERRARD, Southey, SK GOOD ANGUS, Acadia, AB TOM GRIEVE, Fillmore, SK TRIPLE H FARM LTD., Middle Lake, SK MOOSE CREEK RED ANGUS, Kisbey, SK JEREMY & ROXANNE KNAPP, Southey, SK DOERKSEN FARMS / 98 RANCH INC., Lake Alma, SK MCVICAR STOCK FARMS LTD., Colonsay, SK MEBS RANCH, Broadview, SK PRETTY FARM LTD., Weyburn, SK RAYMOND LAND & CATTLE LTD, Aneroid, SK SENTES FARMS, Raymore, SK PHEASANTDALE CATTLE COMPANY LTD., Balcarres, SK COLD CREEK CATTLE CO., Drinkwater, SK DEREK WESTMAN, Vermilion, AB WESTMAN FARMS, Vermilion, AB KYLE WESTMAN, Vermilion, AB MURRAY WESTMAN, Vermilion, AB GRANT ZALINKO, Rouleau, SK

See you next year! November 24-29, 2014 www.agribition.com


FEATURING THE LARGEST SIRE GROUPS IN CANADA OF HARVESTOR, BRILLIANCE, IMPRINT & POTENTIAL

SAV HARVESTOR

SAV BRILLIANCE

CONNEALY IMPRINT

Please join us at our family bull & female sale. Thursday March 20th, 2014 at the ranch, Peebles, Saskatchewan 150 Angus bulls 35 heifers

SAV ELIMINATOR OVER 40 PROGENY SELL

SAV POTENTIAL OVER 40 PROGENY SELL

WWW.JOHNSON-LIVESTOCK.COM Phone or text Andrew at 306-736-7393 David at 306-736-8631

16

INSTAGRAM: JOHNSON_LIVESTOCK

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

JANUARY 2014


Industry News Former SSGA President Gary Jones Inducted into the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall of Fame (SAHF) “It’s an honour,” Jones said. “I just can’t think of what I did to deserve it.” It probably has something to do with a lifetime spent not only in beef production, but in advocating for producers and the industry. Jones's SAHF resume includes a career as a rancher, entrepreneur, President of the SSGA and of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), delegate and delegation chair on numerous international trade missions and conferences, board member, advisor to provincial and federal governments, and even a rodeo announcer, . Jones has long advocated open borders and free trade as producers’ best opportunity to get fair market value for their beef. He was involved in discussions years ago that relate directly to the major trade issues of today.

Jones was born in Picture Butte, Alberta. In 1960 he married Penny Moneo of Wood Mountain SK and in 1962 they moved to Crane Valley where they continue to live and farm. He joined the SSGA in the late sixties and served as President in 1977 and 1978. His passion for the export side of the beef business led Jones, as President of the CCA from 1982-84, to work on developing international markets for Canadian beef. He served on several delegations including trips across Canada and to the US, Australia and New Zealand. He was on the first delegations to Japan that allowed livestock producers to participate, and he joined government missions to Brussels with Robert Stanfield and to East Germany and Romania with Senator Hazen Argue. On the home front, Jones chaired the federal government’s Meat Industry Advisory Committee under

three governments and four Agriculture Ministers. He was on the Canadian Western Agribition’s first Board and helped to bring rodeo to that event. He is a generous contributor to community projects and a helpful neighbour. In addition to his SAHF induction, Jones had been honoured as a Saskatchewan Livestock Association Honour Roll recipient in 2001. In 2013, he was presented with the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal and was inducted into the North American South Devon Association Hall of Fame. B

Johne’s Disease surveillance Program Any purebred cattle producer located in Saskatchewan who is interested in participating is eligible to apply. Program A blood test is conducted on every mature cow and bull in the herd. If Johne’s is found in a herd, veterinary consultation will be provided to complete a Johne’s disease risk assessment and develop a customized management plan. The identity of program participants and individual test results will be kept confidential. Costs Covered Veterinary fees for blood collection, laboratory testing, sample shipping and veterinary fees for Johne’s Risk Assessment and Management Planning are covered. How can I access this program? All purebred Saskatchewan cattle producers are eligible for this program. Enrollment is limited to a maximum of 50 herds per year. Space is available on a first-come, first serve basis. For more information, contact: Chad MacPherson, Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association 306-757-8523, ssga@sasktel.net

JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 17


Markets and Trade RETAIL MEAT PRICE SURVEY as of December 17, 2013 ($/lb)

CUTS Ground beef/lean Ground beef/regular Roast/cross rib Roast/rib Roast/outside round Steak/rib eye Steak/round Steak/sirloin Steak/T-bone Steak/tenderloin

EXTRA FOODS 3.75 1.88 * * 4.28 12.19 6.39 12.24 11.46 *

SAFEWAY 4.44 3.79 6.39 * 8.89 15.00 6.89 16.00 * 20.00

SOBEYS 3.84 2.90 4.99 * * 9.99 * 10.94 5.98 18.09

* these items were not in the display case at these stores on this date

SSGA 100th Anniversary Belt Buckles Please contact the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association office for orders:

$250 plus shipping and GST

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| ŠBEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

Box 4752, Main Floor, Canada Centre Building Evraz Place, Regina, SK S4P 3Y4 TEL: (306) 757-8523 FAX: (306) 569-8799 Email: ssga@sasktel.net www.skstockgrowers.com

JANUARY 2014


JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 19


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Markets and Trade SK Weekly Average Price Heifers 500-600 lbs

2011 2012 2013

170.00 160.00 150.00 140.00 130.00 120.00 110.00 100.00 90.00 80.00

Source: CanFax

AB Fed Steer Prices

2012 2013

Source: CanFax

1.0400

130.00

1.0200

120.00 2010

110.00

2011

100.00

2012

90.00

2013

80.00

CDN $ - US terms

Price per hundred weight

2011

Weekly Canadian Dollar

140.00

1.0000 2012

0.9800

2013 5 yr avg

0.9600 0.9400

Wk 1 Wk 4 Wk 7 Wk 10 Wk 13 Wk 16 Wk 19 Wk 22 Wk 25 Wk 28 Wk 31 Wk 34 Wk 37 Wk 40 Wk 43 Wk 46 Wk 49 Wk 52

70.00

0.9200

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52

Source: CanFax

Source: Bank of Canada

Source: CanFax

Lethbridge Barley Price

Weekly Canadian Dollar 1.0400

300.00 280.00

1.0000 2012

0.9800

2013 5 yr avg

0.9600

Price per tonne

1.0200

260.00 240.00

2010

220.00

2011

200.00

2012

180.00

2013

160.00

0.9400 0.9200

Source: Bank of Canada Source: CanFax

Wk 1 Wk 4 Wk 7 Wk 10 Wk 13 Wk 16 Wk 19 Wk 22 Wk 25 Wk 28 Wk 31 Wk 34 Wk 37 Wk 40 Wk 43 Wk 46 Wk 49 Wk 52

140.00

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52

CDN $ - US terms

2010

Wk 1 Wk 4 Wk 7 Wk 10 Wk 13 Wk 16 Wk 19 Wk 22 Wk 25 Wk 28 Wk 31 Wk 34 Wk 37 Wk 40 Wk 43 Wk 46 Wk 49 Wk 52

2010

Price per hundred weight

190.00 180.00 170.00 160.00 150.00 140.00 130.00 120.00 110.00 100.00 90.00

Wk 1 Wk 4 Wk 7 Wk 10 Wk 13 Wk 16 Wk 19 Wk 22 Wk 25 Wk 28 Wk 31 Wk 34 Wk 37 Wk 40 Wk 43 Wk 46 Wk 49 Wk 52

Price per hundred weight

SK Weekly Average Price 500-600 lbs Steers

Source: CanFax

For more information visit www.canfax.ca

JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ŠBEEF BUSINESS | 21


Feature Alternative Manure Management: Getting the Most out of Manure Nutrients

by Joy Agnew and Carrie Gillis of Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) Manure is often spread on land primarily as a waste disposal method. The nutrient content of manure and other benefits of applying manure to soil such as increased soil organic matter content and improved soil quality are a bonus. But fertilizer prices are rising along with producers’ desire to maximize the value of the manure applied to the land. Manure management practices such as stockpiling and composting affect the nutrient content and physical properties of manure. The Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) set out to determine how these practices affect the nutrient content to help producers get the most out of their manure nutrients. When manure is handled and exposed to elements, the nutrients are lost to volatilization and/or leaching. Nutrient losses during storage and after land application reduce not only the nutrient value of the manure but may have negative impacts on ground and surface water due to nutrient leaching and runoff. Other researchers have evaluated the impact of application timing, application method (surface or subsurface) and stockpile management (covered or uncovered) on nutrient losses. PAMI

evaluated the effect of manure processing by comparing the nutrient contents for four different manure storage strategies using solid beef manure: 1. Stockpiling 2. Composting 3. Solid state anaerobic digestion 4. Solid state anaerobic digestion prior to composting The moisture content, organic matter and nutrient comparisons for these different strategies are summarized in Table 1. It should be noted that these results represent a single manure source (Poundmaker AgVentures) and nutrient content is highly dependent on feed and stock management. This information is meant to show the effect of composting and digestion on the nutrient content of manure. Overall, PAMI found no major differences in the total nutrient content among the manure management strategies. Composting alone reduced moisture content and increased the concentrations of total N, P, K and S, but a large portion of the plant available N (ammonia-N) was lost to ammonia volatilization

Table 1. Nutrient analysis data (wet tonne basis) from composting and digestion trials with Poundmaker solid beef cattle manure. Digested + Stockpiled Composted Digested Composted Parameter Manure Manure Manure Manure Moisture content (%) 44.5a to 79.3 30.1 66.6 to 79.3 25.9 to 65.4

a

Organic matter (%)

18.1a to 78.4

24.1

45.4 to 60.2

19.1 to 30.2

Ammonia-N (kg/tonne)

a

1.32 to 2.01

0.51

1.89 to 3.23

0.59 to 0.67

Total N (kg/tonne)

3.45 to 5.96a

5.84

5.1 to 6.57

4.37 to 6.39

Total P (kg/tonne)

1.09 to 1.83

3.36

1.42 to 2.13

1.09 to 2.09

Total K (kg/tonne)

1.46 to 6.05

8.2

2.32 to 4.41

2.5 to 5.48

Total S (kg/tonne) Total C by combustion (kg/tonne)

0.6 to 1.43

1.9

0.68 to 1.19

0.44 to 0.45

72 to 83

64

62 to 82

71 to 73

during composting. Digestion alone resulted in a wet product (digestate) with increased total N, P, K and ammonia-N concentrations compared to stockpiling. Composting the digestate helped to dry the material (making it less costly to haul and land apply) but resulted in losses of ammonia-N. It was also observed that the compost and digestate was more of a humus-like product than stockpiled manure, smelled more “earthy”, and was more homogenous. These traits make composted manure easier and more socially acceptable to land apply than raw or stockpiled manure. The actual monetary value of manure nutrients, however, is low. PAMI compiled nutrient content information from a variety of sources to better represent the nutrient range for all solid beef manure. The nutrient contents of beef manure and their associated dollar value are summarized in Table 2. The values are based on 2013 fertilizer prices. Since the crop requirements of N and P do not match the nutrient content of manure, manure application rates that satisfy one nutrient often result in over- or underapplication of the other. The nutrients that are over-applied can then be lost to the atmosphere, end up running-off the land to surface waters, or leach into the groundwater table, leading to degraded waters due to eutrophication and the growth of algal blooms. Although the dollar value of the nutrients is relatively low, composting and digestion have other benefits that are more difficult to quantify. Composting reduces the moisture content of the manure, making it more cost effective to haul and apply to the land. Digestion generates biogas which can be converted to energy. Composting and digestion have also

Manure that had been in a stockpile for an extended period of time (over one month undisturbed)

continued on pg. 29

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Feature 2013 Review of Beef Supply by Charlie Gracey

As the year ends it is possible to see a pretty clear picture of what is going on in the national beef herd. It is timely that we should do so because I see the industry as “off balance”and a bit uncertain of its future. We find ourselves in a most curious position. After the long debacle of BSE we have seen export markets opening up to an encouraging degree, particularly the expanded quota into Europe. But we are not in a good position to take advantage of these opportunities because the breeding herd has shrunk, since 2005, by 1.3 million head or -27% from its peak and, as yet, there is no convincing sign that the herd has started to expand. Meanwhile, with both cow and heifer slaughter down about 3% in the US, their cycle may have bottomed and is poised to expand. I think I understand the basis for the present uncertainty. Sure the Canada Europe Trade Agreement (CETA) has been announced and the beef quota is reported to be approximately 65,000 tonnes, but all of the details regarding access have yet to be worked out. Some have described CETA as a bigger deal than NAFTA but I won’t join the cheering section until our exports there begin to overtake our exports to the US and that won’t be any time soon. Meanwhile producers are still under the cloud of the damnable COOL provisions that continue to weigh on cattle prices in Canada.

24

Is the industry ready to play a larger role on the world beef stage? That depends on whether we can turn the national herd around. Here in Canada heifer kill is down about 9% this year. Also, exports of fed cattle are down 17% and assuming that the fed cattle exports were in the same heifer to steer ratio as in the domestic kill (1 heifer to 1.64 steers) then slaughter heifer disposals (domestic plus exports) are down 10%. That’s an encouraging indicator. But feeder cattle exports are double what they were a year ago and those increased exports will include an increased number of heifers which will partly offset the decline in heifer slaughter. Further offsetting the decline in heifer disposals we see an almost 20% increase in cow slaughter. That number is much higher than the 11% increase in domestic cow slaughter but slaughter cow and bull exports to the US are up 75% over last year. Certainly those exports contain a disproportionate number of bulls because domestic bull slaughter is down sharply. But year over year the slaughter disposal ratio between bulls and cows is 1:10 and that is how I worked out a 20% increase in cow slaughter (domestic plus exports). And no, the increase can’t be attributed to increased dairy slaughter. The culling rate year after year in the dairy herd is pretty constant and the dairy herd itself is pretty stable. So almost all of the increase in cow disposals have been beef cows. So, however one looks at it, the beef breeding herd in 2013 continued to decline and 2014 will mark the ninth consecutive year of decline. We now must wait to see whether there has been any increase in heifer retention this fall. With the strong prices for feeder calves this fall and with the sharp increase in feeder cattle exports, I doubt that there has been a significant increase in heifer retention. Even if there has been a hold back in heifers their calves won’t show up in the market- place until the fall of 2015 and those calves won’t contribute to the

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

beef supply until late in 2016. So my guess is that beef output will continue to decline and we won’t see a significant increase in beef supply before 2017 at the earliest. I know every producer understands this but it bears repeating that this is an industry with a long production cycle. Confidence in the long-term prospects for the industry will need to be restored before any sustained expansion in production can be expected. Present efforts to resolve the COOL debacle and thus to restore “free trade” in cattle and beef are critically important. So our prospects for playing a larger role on the world beef stage are going to be delayed for a while yet. A huge effort has been made by both government and industry leaders but now the important thing is to restore confidence in the minds of cow calf producers because only they can determine how much product will be available for export markets. A concluding note of interest is that in Saskatchewan the decline in beef cow numbers since 2005 has been 28.4%, which is slightly above the national average but the number of farms with cattle has declined 32.8%. This means that the average cow herd size has increased from about 70 to 80 cows. The same trend was apparent in Manitoba but in all other provinces average cow herd size either declined or remained unchanged. B

JANUARY 2014


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JANUARY 2014


Feature Antibiotic Stewardship

by Leigh Rosengren DVM PhD, Rosengren Epidemiology Consulting Ltd. Antibiotics are an invaluable tool in beef production. Just imagine going into calving season without antibiotics to treat septic calves or the fall without the ability to treat pneumonia. Fortunately Canadian producers have access to an effective toolkit of medicines, but our access to antibiotics is a privilege that comes with responsibilities. Antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to modern medicine. Resistance can make a bacterial infection untreatable or can force doctors and veterinarians to use less effective products, products with more side effects, or products that are more expensive. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem: The prevalence of resistant bacteria on farms, in hospitals, and in communities is rising while the research pipeline to develop new antibiotics has dried up. Resistance develops with all antibiotic use – the speed, persistence, and consequence of the resistance varies but ultimately resistance will emerge to any antibiotic. Antibiotics are classified according to their mechanism of action. In general, when bacteria develop resistance to a drug they become resistant to all the drugs in that family. Worse yet, bacteria can acquire resistance to multiple drugs from different families at once creating the so-called “superbugs”. So, even when the products we use in agriculture differ from those in human medicine, resistance which affects animals and people can develop. Veterinary and human medicine share the consequences from resistant bacteria. This is why we must co-operate to find solutions. Antibiotic stewardship means weighing the immediate benefit against the societal cost. Costs include the potential emergence of resistant pathogens in your herd, the potential emergence of resistant foodborne pathogens, or restricted access to antibiotics in veterinary medicine.

JANUARY 2014

Decisions about antibiotic use in your herd are best addressed with your veterinarian. When making these decisions, consider effects beyond the farm. It is particularly important to discuss protocols for antibiotics labeled for use in cattle that are considered critically important to human health. These include fluoroquinolones (i.e. A180*) and newer generation cephalosporins (i.e. Excenel®, Excede®). Regulations on these products have tightened considerably in Europe and the United States. In Canada, these products are to be used under veterinary prescription only and extra-label use is not recommended. A strong veterinaryclient-patient relationship is the best way to ensure this resource is managed appropriately. Canadian consumers are on high alert for food safety hazards. Consumers can be exposed to foodborne pathogens if meat is handled or prepared improperly. If the pathogen is resistant and the consumer becomes ill, treatment could be compromised. The direct risks come from Salmonella and Campylobacter spp.. Fortunately, Canada has an effective food-safety chain including on-farm food safety, HACCP and modern kitchens. This means that few resistant bacteria make it to the consumer’s plate. Government monitoring shows the prevalence of Salmonella and Campylobacter is low in retail beef and those found rarely carry resistance to the first-line treatments for those diseases. This means the risk is negligible. This is supported by an American study by Dr. Scott Hurd that estimated the annual risk from fluoroquinolone use in dairy heifers to treat Bovine Respiratory Disease was 1 case every 13 years for Campylobacter and 1 case every 293 years for Salmonella spp..

yet understand all the links between on-farm antimicrobial use and human health Antibiotics are societal drugs and resistance can emerge any time an antibiotic is used. Canada does not keep statistics showing how much, why, when and where antimicrobials are used in livestock and poultry. Furthermore, we are in the business of producing food and consumer concern is high. Until we can transparently provide antibiotic usage statistics, Canada’s livestock industry remains in a position that is easy to criticize and difficult to defend. Access to antibiotics is a privilege. This privilege enables us to raise healthy animals; and healthy animals make safe food. Canada has strict regulations which ensure all antibiotic residues are long removed from the animal by the time it enters the food chain so all Canadian meat is antibiotic free. Consumers believe this because claims are backed by data. I believe that we need transparent antibiotic use reporting to maintain trust and maintain access to these vital medicines. The next time you need to treat an animal, I encourage you to think beyond the farm. Be a conscientious antibiotic steward. When a consumer questions you about antibiotic use in the beef industry, speak out. Consumers need to know that sick animals need medicine, all Canadian meat is antibiotic free, and the risk from resistant bacteria in beef is negligible. It is our job to tell them. B

So if the direct risk of foodborne resistant bacteria is low, why should the beef industry be concerned about this issue? Antibiotic resistance is a complex phenomenon. We do not

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Feature Manure Management cont. from pg. 22 been shown to reduce the pathogen and weed seed content of manure and help reduce the overall carbon footprint of the livestock industry. Finally, composting and digestion also helps reduce odours associated with manure management which may help improve the social acceptance and sustainability of the industry. PAMI is working on a comprehensive study to quantify these benefits and compare the costs and environmental impacts of different solid manure management strategies. This

study, funded by the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association through the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation

Program, will be available to producers in early 2014. B

Table 2. Summary of nutrient content and value of solid beef manure (several sources). Nutrient Nitrogen Phosphorous Potassium

Nutrient Content 0.345% to 0.657% 0.109% to 0.336% 0.146% to 0.605% Total

$/tonne $4.31 to $7.99 $1.47 to $4.55 $1.43 to $5.93 $7.21 to $18.47

“Cattle coming into my feedlot are usually heavier, so I treat ’em with long lasting ZACTRAN on arrival.”

Heavier weight cattle are often at lower risk to BRD so it makes sense to treat them with the fast acting,1 long lasting2 product that won’t break the bank. (And it’s plastic, so you won’t break the bottle either.) ®

Treat them with ZACTRAN .

Ask your veterinarian why ZACTRAN is ideal for cattle in your feedlot.

1. Giguère S, Huang R, Malinski TJ, Dorr PM, Tessman RK & Somerville BA. Disposition of gamithromycin in plasma, pulmonary epithelial lining fluid, bronchoalveolar cells, and lung tissue in cattle. Am. J. Vet. Res. 72(3): 326-330 (2011). 2. Based on label claims. ZACTRAN® is a registered trademark of Merial Limited. © 2014 Merial Canada Inc. All rights reserved. ZACT-13-7560-JAD-E

3515 Zactran Metaphylazis-BB.indd 1 Client: Merial Project: Zactran Metaphylazis Date: January 2014 Designer: BM

JANUARY 2014

Publication: Beef Business Size: 5" x 4.875" Bleed: none Colour: CMYK

2013-12-11 2:13 PM Agency: ON Communication Inc Agency Contact: Raellen Seaman Telephone: 519-434-1365 Ext.228 Email: raellen@oncommunication.ca

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 29


VERIFIED BEEF PRODUCTION IN SASKATCHEWAN

Cattle producers in Saskatchewan can qualify for funding provided through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative Funding is available for 50% of approved equipment costs up to $750 per producer. Eligible equipment includes: chute neck extenders / livestock weigh scales / record keeping software To Be Eligible, Beef Producers Must Have: $2,500 in Cattle Sales Completed VBP Training Not Claimed Previously


ON-FARM FOOD SAFETY TRAINING 2014 WINTER WORKSHOPS TOWN

DATE

FACILITY & TIME

EVENT PARTNER

ELROSE WHITEWOOD SPIRITWOOD KERROBERT BIGGAR TURTLEFORD ESTEVAN CHAPLIN UNITY THEODORE MAIDSTONE HAFFORD LEADER ASSINIBOIA OSLER WYMARK MAPLE CREEK SHAUNAVON WADENA LANIGAN WATROUS LUCKY LAKE CRAIK MEADOW LAKE STRASBOURG KILLDEER SEDLEY

JAN 13, 2014 (MON) JAN 15, 2014 (WED) JAN 15, 2014 (WED) JAN 15, 2014 (WED) JAN 27, 2014 (MON) JAN 27, 2014 (MON) JAN 29, 2014 (WED) JAN 29, 2014 (WED) JAN 30, 2014 (THU) FEB 3, 2014 (MON) FEB 3, 2014 (MON) FEB 5, 2014 (Wed) FEB 6, 2014 (THU) FEB 6, 2014 (THU) FEB 7, 2014 (FRI) FEB 10, 2014 (MON) FEB 13, 2014 (THU) FEB 19, 2014 (WED) FEB 19, 2014 (WED) FEB 24, 2014 (MON) FEB 26, 2014 (WED) FEB 28, 2014 (FRI) MAR 3, 2014 (MON) MAR 4, 2014 (TUE) MAR 5, 2014 (WED) MAR 6, 2014 (THU) MAR 12, 2014 (WED)

SCOUT HUT – 2:00PM

EAGLE CREEK AEGP

COMMUNITY CENTRE – 2:00PM

L. SOURIS AEGP

PIONEER CENTRE – 3:30PM

MINISTRY OF AG

PRAIRIELAND CENTRE – 2:00PM

EAGLE CREEK AEGP

MACPHERSON HALL – 2:00PM

EAGLE CREEK AEGP

TBA – 1:30PM

NORTH SASK AEGP

LEGION HALL – 2:00PM

U. SOURIS AEGP

LEGION HALL – 2:00PM

OLD WIVES AEGP

TBA – 1:30PM

NORTH SASK AEGP

REC. COMPLEX – 2:00PM

ASSINIBOINE AEGP

TBA – 1:30PM

NORTH SASK AEGP

TBA – 1:30PM

NORTH SASK AEGP

COMMUNITY HALL – 1:30PM

SOUTH SASK AEGP

TBA

MINISTRY OF AG

YOUTH CENTRE – 1:30PM

SOUTH SASK AEGP

MENNONITE CHURCH – 2:00PM

SWIFT AEGP

ROYAL CAN LEGION – 2:00PM

SWIFT AEGP

CULTURAL CENTRE – 2:00PM

SWIFT AEGP

SENIOR CENTRE – 10:00AM

MINISTRY OF AG

HERITAGE CENTRE – 1:00PM

MINISTRY OF AG

HERITAGE ROOM – 1:00PM

MINISTRY OF AG

TBA – 1:30PM

SOUTH SASK AEGP

TBA – 1:00PM

WASCANA AEGP

SENIOR CENTRE – 1:00PM

BEAVER RIVER AEGP

WILDLIFE HALL – 1:00PM

MINISTRY OF AG

TBA

MINISTRY OF AG

TBA – 1:00PM

WASCANA AEGP

Producers need to complete the Verified Beef Production training in order to be eligible for equipment funding. The training can be completed by attending a workshop or taking the online course—both offered at no cost! Beef producers that are interested in attending a VBP Workshop can refer to the list on the left for locations nearby. Please RSVP for the workshop you are interested in attending by contacting: Coy Schellenberg Provincial Coordinator for VBP in Sask. Workshops that do not get enough interest will be cancelled, so please RSVP!


LaBatte Simmentals

34th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Friday, February 28, 2014 at 1:00 pm l Johnstone Auction Market, Moose Jaw, SK Sale Offering: 50 Polled Red Simmental Bulls 30 Polled Black Simmental Bulls 20 Polled Red & Black Females Guest Consignor: Meadow Acres Farms, Lampman, SK

Visit our website www.LaBatteSimmentals.com for information on our program and herd sires, plus a bull sale preview. Bulls Sold in 2013

LaBatte Simmentals

invite our fellow cattle producers to our

Bulls Sold in 2013

34th Annual Sale

“Where Cattlemen Come For Herdbulls” Our breeding program emphasizes calving ease, thickness, depth, polled, performance, hair coats, and testicular size.

IPU 3Z Black Polled Purebred Stubby x Hero

We produce bulls that will interest ALL cattle producers. Yes! We do sell some bulls higher than some commercial producers can justify investing in, yet 70% of our bulls sell at or below our sale average. There is a quality bull for everyone at a LaBatte Bull Sale.

IPU 180Z Black Polled Purebred Poker Face x Driftwood

We offer - semen tested bulls, free wintering, and free delivery. Sight unseen purchase program available. Call Barry to discuss your needs at 306-969-4820 or 306-815-7900 (cell).

IPU 133Z Black Polled Purebred Liner 56U x Above Par

For DVD’s and printed catalogues, call or email Barry at:

IPU 144Z Black Polled Purebred Black Advance x G Opportunity

labatte.simm@sasktel.net

Visit our website for a link to our online catalogue at:

www.LaBatteSimmentals.com Sale Day Phone Numbers:

IPU 66Z Red Polled Purebred Hot Iron x Accelerator

Barry LaBatte 306-815-7900

Johnstone Auction Market 306-693-4715

IPU 64Z Red Polled Purebred Accelerator x Red Quorum

Barry & Brenda LaBatte

P.O. Box 72, Gladmar, SK S0C 1A0 Home: 306-969-4820 Cell: 306-815-7900

IPU 56Z Red Polled Purebred Stubby x Revolution x 105L

Email: labatte.simm@sasktel.net Website: www.LaBatteSimmentals.com Pre-sale bull evaluation visits are always welcome.

IPU 60Z Red Polled Purebred Hot Iron x Touchdown


Science and Production Livestock Services of Saskatchewan

by Cam Wilk P. Ag. - Livestock Branch, Saskatchewan Agriculture I have contributed a number of articles on behalf of Saskatchewan Agriculture to past issues of Beef Business addressing topics ranging from timely payment on sale of livestock, livestock inspection services and stray animals. The livestock inspection program along with my group of district managers and their respective inspection staff are moving to a new organization. The authority to carry out the duties of the legislation will be transferred to the Livestock Services of Saskatchewan Corp. (LSS) on January 1, 2014.

brand registry, have traditionally been provided in Saskatchewan through Ministry of Agriculture livestock inspectors. This government role was unique, no other agricultural commodity purchased or sold in Saskatchewan has a government service verifying ownership; both Alberta and British Columbia have industry delivered livestock brand inspection; and Manitoba has no brand inspection.

The provincial government will continue to be responsible for legislation governing livestock inspection. B

Livestock Services of Saskatchewan Corp. (LSS) is a non-profit entity which will facilitate the delivery of livestock brand inspection services, manage the brand registry, and the licensing of livestock dealers in Saskatchewan. The provincial government will continue working with LSS Corp. to ensure a smooth transition. The contact information for your nearest livestock inspector, brand registration and dealer licensing remains the same. Eventually the new visual identity will be incorporated into our documents and forms. The only change you will notice is GST will be added to the inspection fee as the new organization is not GST exempt. LSS is owned and operated by the five main livestock producer groups requiring inspection services. The groups governing LSS Corp. are the Saskatchewan Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association, Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association, Saskatchewan Cattle Feeders Association, Saskatchewan Horse Federation and Livestock Marketers of Saskatchewan. The new LSS Corp. will work to provide more efficient brand inspection in the province.

Farm and Ranch Water Infrastructure Program The program supports the development of secure water supplies for agricultural or value-added agri-business use to expand irrigated acres, the livestock industry, encourage rural economic activity and mitigate the impacts of drought. Eligible projects include: wells, dugouts, pipelines, community wells, well decommissioning and irrigation infrastructure to the edge of the irrigable land parcel. For applications and eligibility details: - Visit www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/GF2-FRWIP; - Phone1-877-874-5365; or - Email fpbinfo@gov.sk.ca.

Livestock brand inspection services, which ensure animals offered for sale are rightfully owned and verified through a

JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ŠBEEF BUSINESS | 33


Science and Production Active Missing Livestock Files January 2014

Area missing from Cutknife PFRA

Thackeray

Number of head

Animal description

9

2

Brand location

RCMP subdivision

Livestock Branch contact

Date reported

Cows with calves

LS

Cutknife

North Battleford 306.446.7404

Nov 1

Red cow Red bull calf

LH

Unity

North Battleford 306.446.7404

Nov 20

Brand description

NVB

Lizard Lake pasture

3

2 cows 1 calf

RH

North Battleford

North Battleford 306.446.7404

Nov 19

Coronach

6

1 black cow 5 black calves

RH

Coronach

Moose Jaw 306.694.3709

Nov 13

2

Yearling heifers BLK, BBF or BWF

Moose Jaw

Moose Jaw 306.694.3709

Oct 22

Moose Jaw

RR RH

Information provided by Livestock Services of Saskatchewan

Protect you r i nvestm e nt YOUR BRAND IS YOUR ANIMALS’ RETURN ADDRESS For more information about branding and livestock inspection, contact: Brand Registrar: Carol Lenton, Regina, 306-787-4682 District Livestock Managers: Dave Augustine, Swift Current, 306-778-8312 Bill McConwell, Moose Jaw, 306-694-3709 Ron Sabin, North Battleford, 306-446-7404 Les Tipton, Saskatoon, 306-933-7660 Robert Solomon, Yorkton, 306-786-5712 Garth Woods, Moosomin, 306-435-4582 Barry DeJaeger, Winnipeg, 204-694-0830

JANUARY 2014

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JANUARY 2014


www.shlivestock.com


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JANUARY 2014


Association News and Reports A Report From Harold Martens President, Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association corporation called the “Livestock Services of Saskatchewan Corporation”. The brand inspection will be operating with representatives from the following five groups making up the board of directors; the SSGA, the SCA, Livestock Marketers of Saskatchewan, the Saskatchewan Horse Federation and the Saskatchewan Cattle Feeders Association. • We are involved with the provincial government in setting up an Assurance Funding process for ensuring that producers will be paid for dealers who default on paying for cattle they have purchased. In the last three years, farmers and ranchers across the province have seen some of the highest production levels and this year seems to be no exception. The rains came at the right time and the cool weather in July gave crops the jump start required to have some very high yields. Pea crops of over 60 bushels; durum wheat over 70 bushels; canola at 70 bushels and barley at 100 bushels per acre. Those grain volumes begin to make it so that the operators feeding cattle will be able to see some profit. It has a significant impact on the market and we are seeing strong prices for yearlings and calves in this year’s run. Statistics Canada has reported beef cattle numbers in 2013 and they show that the beef cow herd in Saskatchewan is at 2.85 million head; cows are at 1.16 million and calves at 1.08 million. Those numbers give Saskatchewan 30% of the beef cattle in Canada. The statistics also show that 7192 producers in Saskatchewan have more than 47 head and make up over 75% of the beef cattle in the province. The SSGA Board committees are working on a number of issues in the province and they are:

• We are working with the federal and provincial governments to set up a price insurance program similar to the one currently operating in Alberta. • We are working with the provincial government on changes to the way surface rights are handled in the province. In addition to the items above, the Livestock Branch of the provincial government is asking the SSGA Board for their input into what the future of the cattle industry will look like and how to make it grow and continue being a viable part of the agriculture industry.

There are two other issues we see coming soon and they are the changes to the Wildlife Habitat Protection Act and the sale of Crown land to lessees. We will keep you apprised of the SSGA’s involvement in both. The transition of the PFRA will be carefully monitored to ensure that the transition runs smoothly and that all interests will be well served. It looks like there is going to be some profit in the market place this year and when I see the live cattle futures, I am optimistic about the future for our producers. We are a membership driven organization. It costs you a $100 for a membership, so please consider joining us. It is extremely important for you to know that all of the Board of Directors are paying their own costs and none of us have our expenses paid. We are working to serve you in the cattle industry and if there are any concerns that you may have please call me at 1-306-741-3961 or Chad at the SSGA office at 1-306-757-8523 in Regina. B

Traceability is an important part of the National Beef strategy and we want to be working to ensure that the best interests of Saskatchewan producers will be taken into consideration. The Provincial Lands Act will be updated in the future and it is our intention to work with the province on improving client service; clarifying language and administration; identifying solutions for land-use conflicts; developing enforcement mechanisms; and strengthening regulatory frameworks.

• Brands inspection services will be delivered via a new non-profit

JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 39


Stewardship Good News Story for One Species at Risk submitted by Leanne Thompson for SK PCAP

The Swift Fox is about the size of a jack rabbit or large house cat with a blacktipped tail. Its smaller size and lighter colour distinguish the Swift Fox from the more common Red Fox. It gets its name from its speed. Individuals have been clocked at over 60 km/hr (37 mph) but its small size gives the illusion of even greater speed. Historically, large populations of Swift Foxes ranged across the Canadian Prairies. Rapid declines in the abundance of this species began in the late 1800s as foxes were trapped for furs or eliminated during predator control programs. By the early 1900s, the Swift Fox had been eliminated from its Canadian range. In 1978, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Species in Canada (COSEWIC) officially listed this species as Extirpated (i.e. completely removed) in Canada. Beginning in 1983, captive-raised foxes from Canada and trans-located wild born Swift Foxes from the United States were reintroduced into southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. These introductions have proved successful in providing a foundation for establishing populations of Swift Foxes in these provinces. In fact, populations have been establishing so successfully that the Swift Fox was downlisted from Extirpated to Endangered in 1999 (COSEWIC 1999, 2002) and downlisted again to Threatened in 2009. Historically, Swift Foxes lived throughout southern Alberta from east of the foothills into southwestern Saskatchewan, ranging north to the 53rd parallel. When the reintroductions started, Swift Foxes were introduced annually at two sites in southeastern Alberta: one near the Alberta-Saskatchewan border (the “border population”) and another in the Milk River Ridge area. Introductions were also conducted in Grasslands National Park and the Wood Mountain area of Saskatchewan. A number of provincial and national surveys of Swift Foxes have occurred

40

since their reintroduction. Data collected from 1989-1991 indicated that foxes in the border population numbered approximately 150-250. A subsequent 1994 survey of this area indicated a decline in the border population to 100135 foxes, however a national census for Swift Foxes conducted in the winter of 1996 and 1997 estimated that the Canadian population was in excess of 289 individuals; further the Alberta/ Saskatchewan border population was estimated to be 192 foxes. An encouraging statistic from the 1996-97 survey was that 80% of the foxes captured during this survey were wild born. Another border population survey in 1999 indicated that Swift Foxes also increased in size by as much as 1.38 times since the 1996-97 survey of that population. An international census was conducted during the winter of 2000-01. This study surveyed the same 108 Canadian townships from the 199697 survey and an additional 80 townships in Montana. The study revealed that the Swift Fox population had tripled since the 1996-97 survey. The total population was estimated to be 877 foxes, with 560 in the border population, 96 in Grasslands National Park and 221 in Montana.

unimpeded. As such, well managed native prairie commonly used as grazing land for livestock is a preferred location for this small fox. Currently, populations occupy a relatively small proportion of the historical range of the Swift Fox in Canada. While some expansion of the current distribution is possible, it will likely be limited as a large amount of the remaining historical Canadian habitat has been cultivated and may not provide suitable Swift Fox habitat. Livestock producers and land managers of native rangeland will have an important role in the future of this species. Through careful management and conservation of native rangeland, Swift Fox populations are expected to continue to thrive alongside livestock grazing in the future. B For more information on the Swift Fox please visit the Government of Canada’s Species at Risk website www.registrelepsararegistry.gc.ca..

Following a five-year schedule, a census was conducted in the winter of 200506. In total, 196 foxes were caught and released. For the first time, 100% of captured foxes were wild born. Canadian fox numbers and densities were similar to the high levels documented in 2001 with a 2006 population abundance estimate of 647 foxes indicating a stable population for Canadian Swift Foxes. Populations in Montana increased significantly to an estimated 515 animals for a combined 2006 population estimate of 1162 foxes. This success has been achieved with considerable support from landowners, ranchers, hunters, farmers, and generous individuals and charitable foundations. Swift Foxes prefer open, sparsely vegetated, short-grass and mixed-grass prairie, where visibility and mobility are

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

Photo courtesy of the Calgary Zoo

JANUARY 2014


JANUARY 2014

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Calendar of Events January 22-24 January 23 January 25 Jan 28-29 February 1 February 4-5 February 9 February 10 February 13 February 15 February 17 February 19-21 February 20 February 27 February 28 February 28 March 1 March 2 March 3 March 3 March 4-7 March 6 March 9 March 11 March 18 March 20 April 10

JANUARY 2014 SK Beef Industry Conference SSGA Semi-annual Meeting MC Quantock Bull Sale Native Prairie Restoration Workshop FEBRUARY Hill 70 Quantock Ranch Barn Burnin’ Bull Sale Manitoba Beef Producers AGM 3rd Annual Diamond M Ranch Bull & Female Sale Advertising deadline for March magazine Chapman Cattle Co. 100% Forage Developed 2 Yr. Old Angus Bull Sale Double Bar D Annual Bull & Female Sale Ole Farms 9th Annual Family Day Sale AB Beef Industry Conference Nordal Limousin & Angus Bull Sale 1st Annual Benlock Farms Bull Sale LaBatte Simmentals 34th Annual Bull & Female Sale Early Sunset Ranch Annual Production Sale MARCH 20th Annual McMillen Ranching Ltd. Bull Sale R Plus Simmental Bull Sale 3rd Annual Palmer Charolais with Nielson Land & Cattle Charolais, Black & Red Angus Bull Sale 11th Annual Ashworth Farm & Ranch Bull Sale Canadian Cattlemen’s Association AGM In Pursuit of Perfection Bull Sale/Spring Creek Simmentals Standard Hill Connection Polled Hereford & Black Angus Sale McTavish Charolais & Red Angus and Guest Bull Sale Cityview Simmentals/Ivanhoe Angus Bull Sale Johnson Livestock Family Bull & female Sale APRIL Advertising deadline for May magazine

Saskatoon, SK Saskatoon, SK Lloydminster, AB/SK Regina, SK Lloydminster, AB/SK Brandon, MB Estevan, SK Stettler, AB Grenfell, SK Athabasca, AB Red Deer, AB Saskatoon, SK Grandora, SK Moose Jaw, SK Edam, SK Carieville, SK Estevan, SK Bladworth, SK Oungre, SK Ottawa, ON Moosomin, SK Maidstone, SK Moosomin, SK Moose Jaw, SK Peebles, SK

SSGA BOARD OF DIRECTORS THE EXECUTIVE

Harold Martens President/Director at Large Swift Current, SK

DIRECTORS AT LARGE Phone: 773-6782

Doug Gillespie 1st Vice President/Director at Large Neville, SK Phone: 627-3619 Shane Jahnke 2nd Vice President/Director at Large Gouldtown, SK Calvin Knoss Past President/Director at Large Rockglen, SK Brooks Whitney Finance Chair Maple Creek, SK

42

Phone: 784-2899

Phone: 476-2512

Phone: 662-4420

Grant Alexander, Weyburn Ryan Beierbach, Whitewood Helen Finucane, Regina Gerald Schultz, Success Roy Rutledge, Assiniboia Robin Wiggins, Fox Valley Kelcy Elford, Caronport Henry McCarthy, Wawota Fred Lansdall, Leross

ZONE CHAIR DIRECTORS Zone 1 - Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 - Zone 5 - Zone 6 - Zone 7 - Zone 12 -

Lloyd Thompson, Carnduff Ken MacDonald, Indian Head Terry Ostrander, Hallonquist Brooks Whitney, Maple Creek Bill Huber, Lipton Brent Griffin, Elbow Keith Day, Lacadena Larry Flaig, Assiniboia

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

456-2500 532-4809 584-2773 773-6860 642-5358 666-2103 355-2335 739-2205 675-4499

AFFILIATE DIRECTORS

Garner Deobald - Charolais Affiliate, Hodgeville 677-2589 Jack Ford - SaskMilk Affiliate, Wishart 328-4700 Tara Fritz - SImmental Affiliate, Shaunavon 297-3147 Laird Senft - Angus Affiliate, Fort Qu’Appelle 332-4823 Arron Huber - Shorthorn Affiliate, Lipton 336-2706

APPOINTED DIRECTORS

Dr. Andy Acton- Veterinary Advisor, Ogema

459-2422

SASKATCHEWAN CCA DIRECTORS 486-2146 695-2157 553-2213 662-4420 336-2684 854-2050 375-2934 266-2070

Lynn Grant, Val Marie Brent Griffin, Elbow Pat Hayes, Val Marie Reg Schellenberg, Beechy Perry Rasmuson, Moosomin

298-2268 854-2050 298-2284 859-4905 435-3110

Listings of email and fax numbers can be found on the SSGA website at www.skstockgrowers.com

JANUARY 2014


Advertiser Index Abe’s Signs

44

Allen Leigh Security & Communications

45

Arm River Red Angus

46

Ashworth Farm & Ranch Sale

19

Gibson Livestock

45

New Vision Agro

46

Grayson & Co.

46

Norheim Ranching

44

Hill 70 Quantock Ranch

3

Northstar Seed Ltd.

46

Ivanhoe Angus

10

Ole Farms

7

Jackson Designs

45

Palmer

20

John Brown Farms

46

Paysen

36

Johnson Livestock Angus

16

Plain Jan’s

44

Beef Improvement Opportunities/ Fort Supply

25

Benlock Farms Sale

28

Bill Laidlaw Chartered Accountant Professional Corp.

Johnstone Auction

46

R Plus Simmentals

44

23

Kelara Farms

44

Rosetown Flighting Supply

44

Canada Beef Inc

Insert

Kramer Auctions

45

Saskatchewan Angus Assoc.

45

Kyle Welding & Machine Shop

45

Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

33

LaBatte Simmentals

32

Saskatchewan Verified Beef

30, 31

Lane Realty Corp.

12, 45

Saskatoon Processing Company

45

Linthicum Herefords

44

Sittler Composting

46

Livestock Services of SK

35

Solar West

45

Man-SK Gelbvieh

46

Spring Creek Simmentals

38

Manitou Maine-Anjou

44

Standard Hill Livestock

37

Masterfeeds

45

Superior Livestock Auction

45

McClay Design

44

Target Cattle Concepts

45

McMillen Ranching Ltd.

41

Terra Grain Fuels

44

MC Quantock

Insert

Western Litho

46

McTavish Charolais

34

Weyburn Inland Terminal

46

Merial

8, 29

Young’s Equipment

46

Nielson Land & Cattle Sale

20

Zoetis

48

Nerbas Bros. Inc.

45

Canadian Cattle Identification Agency 47 Canadian Gelbvieh Association

4

Canadian Western Agribition

15

Chapman Cattle Co.

9

Chartop Charolais

45

Cityview Simmentals

10

Cowtown Livestock Exchange, Inc.

44

Diamond M Ranch

26

Double Bar D Farms

2

E. Bourassa & Sons

14

Early Sunset Ranch

13

Edward Jones

44

Friendly Acres

44

Frostfree Nose Pumps

46 44

Gem Silage

SSGA Meeting Notice SSGA SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING January 23rd, 2014 at 10:00 am Saskatoon Inn and Conference Centre, Saskatoon, SK Please submit resolutions to: the SSGA office Box 4752, Evraz Place, Regina, SK S4P 3Y4 Phone: 306-757-8523 Fax: 306-569-8799 email: ssga@sasktel.net For a full SK Beef Industry Conference agenda visit www.saskbeefconference.com JANUARY 2014

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 43


NEW LI STI N G

We’ve got you covered *Book Before April 1, For Best Pricing, Free Delivery, and Payment Terms

Self Unloading Hay Trailers Continuous Steel Fencing

Up North Silage Covers • Up North Silage Bags • Up North Silage Shield • Up North Grain Bags • Gem Bale Wrap • Gem Silage Baggers • Gem Bacteria Blend • Gandy Inoculant Applicators • Net Wrap • Twine • Bale End Caps • Silage Tape • Zipper Tools • Poly Fastener • Secure Covers™

Livestock Handling Equipment We Will Save You Money!

403-342-7522 888-552-5505 gemsilage@telus.net Bay #9, 108-105 Burnt Lake Trail • (Burnt Lake Business Centre) • Red Deer, Alberta T4S 0K6

those s” “famou

Roper

gloves

custom printed roper gloves

More on the web

www.plainjans.com

620-872-5777

p l a i nj a n s

3.5” x 2.5” | Maximum om: Font Size: 30 pt

fr

WWW.NORHEIMRANCHING.COM

Maine-Anjou Bulls

Friendly Acres Seed Farm

(since 1970)

Fullblood Bulls and Females for Sale

www.friendlyacres.sk.ca

306-744-2332

Gary & Sandy Graham - Marsden, SK Ph: (306) 823-3432 email: grahamgs@sasktel.net

kevin.elmy@friendlyacres.sk.ca Grazing & Silage Corn Cover Crops - Tillage Radish® Forage Blends Gallagher Fencing Fridge Forage Winter Triticale Thunder Soybeans Call for local retailers

www.manitoumaineanjou.ca

Linthicum Ranch Open replacement and Bred Heifers for sale, Hereford Black & Baldy Heifers for sale. Also, commercial Hereford Bulls Murray & Jan Frank (306) 266-4377 (306) 266-4417

Glentworth, SK

3.5” x 2.5” | Maximum Font Size: 30 pt

Super Edge™ flighting for You work hard for your money. grain augers, combines & Make it work hard for you.seed cleaning plants

You work hard for your money. Make it work hard for you. 3.5” x 2.5” | Maximum Font Size: 30 pt

Tyler Knibbs

Financial Advisor

Tyler Knibbs 461 King Street Unit 3 hard for your money. You work Financial Advisor Estevan, SK S4A 1K6 Make it306-634-4870 work for you. 461 hard King Street .

BL BILL LAIDLAW CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT PROF. CORP.

ROSETOWN FLIGHTING SUPPLY Rosetown, SK

BILL LAIDLAW CA.CFP.

Chartered Accountant

.

Unit 3

nks .

Tyler Knibbs Estevan, SK S4A 1K6

Financial Advisor www.edwardjones.com . Member – Canadian Investor 461 KingProtection Street Fund Unit 3 Estevan, SK S4A 1K6 306-634-4870

306-634-4870

Left and right hand available in all sizes. Helicoid & Sectional

Complete Auger Repairs

www.edwardjones.com www.edwardjones.com

Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund Protection Fund Member – Canadian Investor

Phone 1-866-882-2243 • Fax 1-306-882-2217 www.flightingsupply.com

rfsdealerinfo@sasktel.net

We have over 16,000 square feet of inventory and over 400 different sizes of Flighting on hand and ready to ship OVERNIGHT DELIVERY TO MAJOR CENTRES

CT

604 Government Road S. Weyburn, SK S4H 2B4 Ph: 306.842.5344 Fax: 306.842.5345 Bill@BillLaidlaw.ca

Cowtown Livestock Exchange Inc. Maple Creek, SK

Regular Sales every Tuesday @ 11:00 a.m. Locally Owned & Operated Call for info on Presort & Other Sales Phone 306-662-2648 Toll Free: 1-800-239-5933

www.cowtownlivestock.com

more on the web

plainjans.com

Registered Red & Black Simmental Bulls For Sale by Private Treaty Kelly & Tara Fritz Kelly 306-297-8861 or Tara 306-297-8000

2 miles South of Shaunavon, SK on Hwy #37, 4 miles East

44

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

Call (306) 345-2280 or visit www.terragrainfuels.com for more information.

JANUARY 2014


Wireless & IP Cow Cam Systems (Livestock Monitoring Systems) Makes your calving easier, safer & More Profitable! Pricing from $450.00 - $2685.00

Saves 3 - 5 calves a year! Less stress to the cow while calving Save 100's of trips to the barn! WiFi ready systems now available

“Saskatchewan’s Farm & Ranch Specialists”

For all of your buying or selling needs... Contact one of our Farm & Ranch Specialists today! To view our properties visit our website at: www.lanerealtycorp.com

Ph: 306-569-3380

Fax: 306-569-3414

(watch from your iPhone/Andriod/PC Tablet)

since 1996

We specialize in solutions. www.allenleigh.ca

Brandon, MB PH: 1-866-289-8164 ®

a Tradition of Quality in Animal Nutrition

For Beef Nutrition Solutions Call

www.kylewelding.com Box 310, Kyle, SK S0L1T0

306-375-2271

Over 60 years of service!

Galvanized Water Tanks From 100 to 4100 gal.

Livestock Water Troughs - From 400 to 1250 gal.

Jerry Glab Jack Wagman Kurtis Reid Roger Kostron

1-306-891-8914 1-306-536-1004 1-306-220-2226 1-306-491-9096

Regina Mill Saskatoon Mill Humboldt Mill

1-877-440-2727 1-888-681-4111 1-800-747-9186

17,400 (20’)

$

P.O.Box 1807 (Head Office), North Battleford, SK S9A 3W8 P: 306.445.5000 TF: 1.800.529.9958

ONE CULTURE - ONE TEAM, TOGETHER WE’RE BETTER!

Black Angus Bulls

Pick up your copy of your product catalogue at your local dealer.

Duralite

Aluminum Trailers Starting at

www.nerbasbroangus.com

Shellmouth, MB CANADA 204-564-2540 All Sales by Private Treaty

Canadian Livestock Auction. Ltd.

Chartop Charolais Glen and Lyn Sauder Box 569, Gull Lake, SK S0N 1A0 Ph: (306) 672-3979 Fax: (306) 672-4347 Purebred CHAROLAIS & RED ANGUS Bulls for Sale Commercial Herd * Visitors always welcome

RYAN GIBSON BUS: 306-692-9668 CELL: 306-631-0070

Your AD could be here!

FAX: 306-692-3252 TOLL-FREE: 1-800-667-7176

Contact Tracy Cornea at

We are a Canadian distributor for Pneu-Dart

306-693-9329

Pneu-darT

Graham McKenzie

306.861.7074 JANUARY 2014

Deadstock Removal

INC.

Dale Watson

306.861.4618

3018 Miners Ave. Saskatoon, SK S7K 4Z8 Phone (306) 934-4887 Toll-free 1-800-803-9714

www.skstockgrowers.com | ©BEEF BUSINESS | 45


Integrity Commitment Results

All types of commercial and purebred livestock auctions and farm sales. Wash rack facilities for livestock

www.johnstoneauction.ca

Wayne or Scott Johnstone Box 818, Moose Jaw, SK 306-693-4715 (Bus) Fax 306-691-6650

Forage Seed Corn Seed Neil McLeod 306-831-9401

Proudly providing legal services since 1883

(306) 693-6176

e-mail us at: admin@graysonandcompany.com 350 Langdon Crescent Moose Jaw, SK S6H 0X4

Helen Finucane office: 306-775-1443 cell: 306-537-2648 phone: 306-584-2773 Carlyle, SK Celebrating 40 years in Canada! For Upcoming Gelbvieh Sales and Breeders in your area contact: Cynthia Wirgau Secretary (204) 278-3255 maplegrove@xplornet.com

Your AD could be here! Contact Tracy Cornea at 306-693-9329

www.gelbvieh.ca

FROSTFREE NOSEPUMPS LTD. SIMPLE & RELIABLE YEAR-ROUND LIVESTOCK WATERING

866-843-6744 (306) 567- 4702

Box 688, Davidson, SK S0G

Your AD could be here! Contact Tracy Cornea at 306-693-9329

•Saves money

NEW VISION AGRO Box 479 Hague, SK S0K 1X0 PH: (306) 225-2226 FX: (306) 225-2063

email: newvisionagro@sasktel.net www.newvisionagro.com

Dealer & Distributor For:

•Saves time

- Jay-Lor Vertical Feed Mixers - Feed-Rite - Cargill Rite Now Minerals - Baler twine, netwrap, silage bunker, covers, plastic wrap, Grain Bags

•Saves the environment

www.FrostfreeNosepumps.com

Check with us before you buy! ®

AARON BOHN Pro-Pellet Division

Compost Turners, Spreaders, Screeners, Baggers

Weyburn Inland Terminal Ltd. Box 698, Weyburn Saskatchewan, Canada S4H 2K8 Sask. Toll Free 1-800-552-8808 Tel: (306) 842-7436 Fax: (306) 842-0303 Cell: (306) 861-1757 email: a.bohn@wit.ca www.wit.ca

46

| ©BEEF BUSINESS | www.skstockgrowers.com

Brent Hansen Environmental 204-726-3335, www.globalrepair.ca

JANUARY 2014


TAG RETENTION: HEADS UP!

Though common tag hazards include twine, wire fence, heavy brush and some bale feeders, there are EIGHT best practices you can use to maximize tag retention. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Properly restrain the animal, which will help stabilize its head while you apply the tag. Use the recommended tag applicator and pin for the specific tag and brand. Apply tags as recommended by the manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directions. Use tags and tag applicators that are clean and free of debris. Apply antiseptic to tags and tag applicator between animals while tagging to help control infection. 6. Disinfect both sides of the animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ear before applying the tag. 7. Tag clean ears. Do not tag ears covered in debris. 8. Do not apply a new tag in a hole from a previous tag.

COMPLIMENTARY TRACEABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES: TOLL-FREE: 1-877-909-2333 EMAIL: info@canadaid.ca

Learn more at

www.canadaid.ca


VACCINATE FOR SCOURS WHEN THE TIME IS RIGHT! Blood levels are highest two weeks post vaccination.

When the time is right.

Initial vaccination 6-9 weeks before calving

Peak Colostral Antibody Development occurs 2-5 weeks before calving1 First year booster 3-6 weeks before calving †

† First year doses should be at least 3 weeks apart

Annual booster 3-6 weeks before calving

Reference: 1. Morrow DA, editor. Current Therapy in Theriogenology: Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of reproductive diseases in animals. Philadelphia (PA): WB Saunders; 1980:1143 pp. Zoetis™ and ScourGuard™4KC are trademarks of Zoetis or its licensors, used under license by Zoetis Canada Inc. ©2013 Zoetis Inc. All rights reserved. SCG-075 SCG4 JADP05 1113E

Calving

ScourGuard™ 4KC helps you to maximize colostrum quality when administered 3 to 6 weeks before birth. Go to timing-is-everything.ca for more details on how to maximize colostrum production.

Beef Business January 2014  

Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association's Beef Business magazine. Saskatchewan's premiere cattle industry publication.

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