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Movies So, who’s going to earn an Oscar nomination? One writer takes his best guess PAGE 4

Reviews Music: Dropkick Murphys, The Game, Bonnie Bishop, Solange Video Games: “The Unfinished Swan,” “Tanks! Tanks! Tanks!” PAGES 6-7

A most deluded act PAGE 3

Tuning Up The Curtis Hammond Band plays Cyndy’s Broiler in Stanwood on Friday PAGE 11

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday, January 10, 2013


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Frankenweenie”: The elements that are the genius of director Tim Burton are all there. As he did with “Edward Scissorhands,” Burton strips away some of the shine of suburbia to show the darker side that lurks below. There is his fascination with life and death that has popped up in his “Corpse Bride.” And there is Burton’s macabre interest in life after death, a driving theme of “Beetlejuice.” It’s as if the original “Frankenweenie” is a microcosm of themes Burton’s examined in all of his other movies. As long as the film focuses on those elements, “Frankenweenie” is a thrills-and-chills ride brought to life through Burton’s quirky artistic style. Even in black and white, every scene is a splash of visual splendor. “Game Change”: The cable film starts with the realization by the John McCain team they need to come up with their own game changer to have any hope of being able to defeat Barack Obama. Danny Strong, who wrote the screenplay, sees Sarah Palin as one of the great American political stories of our time — a rather raw politician pushed into a national forum with little known about her. You might argue with the film’s politics, but the one thing that isn’t debatable is the performance by Julianne Moore as Palin. It’s Moore’s brilliant work that’s the true strength of the production. “Smash: Season One”: The NBC series about staging a Broadway musical hits a few sour notes along the way but the overall production works as a character study about those who put art above everything else. The two main stars — Katharine McPhee and Broadway veteran Megan Hilty — are amazing to listen to and watch. “Buck Rogers in the 25th Century: Season Two”: Gil Gerard plays the astronaut who finds himself a future hero. “Dallas: The Complete First Season”: This is the first season of the re-launched prime-time soap starring Larry Hagman. “Enlightened: The Complete First Season”: Laura Dern stars in the cable series. “An Idiot Abroad: Season 2”: Karl Pilkington continues to complete tasks from his bucket list. “The Hour 2”: BBC series about a passionate news trio. “Dredd”: Urban cops known as Judges keep peace in the future. Karl Urban stars. “Ghost Trap”: A young woman does community service in a haunted house.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: JAN. 15 Branded - Lionsgate The Other Dream Team - Lionsgate The Possession - Lionsgate 17 Girls - Strand Taken 2 - Fox To Rome With Love - Sony Won’t Back Down - Fox

This Weekend / Page 5 Trish Hatley and Friends perform Sunday afternoon at the Anacortes Public Library

JAN. 22 End of Watch - Universal Searching for Sugar Man - Sony JAN. 29 The Cold Light of Day - Lionsgate/ Summit Hotel Transylvania - Sony Paranormal Activity 4 - Paramount Seven Psychopaths - Sony FEB. 5 Alex Cross - Lionsgate/ Summit Celeste and Jesse Forever - Sony Flight - Paramount Here Comes the Boom - Sony n Distributed by MCT Information Services

“Barney: Let’s Go To The Moon”: Barney encourages Riff to always reach for the stars. “Hit & Run”: Former getaway driver leaves witness protection to help his girlfriend. Dax Shepard stars. “Superboy: The Complete Second Season”: Syndicated TV series about the teen of steel. “Archer: The Complete Season Three”: Cable animated spy series. “Red Dwarf X”: The Dwarfers mining ship stumbles upon the mysteriously abandoned SS Trojan. “Pathfinders: In the Company of Strangers”: The untold story of a covert military mission concealed for nearly 70 years. “Compliance”: Story of just how far one might go to obey a figure of authority. “Arts & The Mind”: Art is not a “luxury,” but central to the development of the human brain in youth. “The Jazz Singer”: The first featurelength film with completely synchronized dialogue and musical sequences is on Blu-ray to mark the film’s 90th anniversary. “Seal Team Six: The Raid on Osama Bin Laden”: Recounts the behind-thescenes decisions that brought the world’s most wanted man to justice. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews.................... 6-7 Get Involved.......................................8 At the Lincoln Theatre.......................9 On Stage, Tuning Up.................. 10-11 Travel.......................................... 12-13 Hot Tickets.......................................14 Out & About............................... 16-17 Movie Review: “Gangster Squad”...18 Movie Listings, Mini-Reviews.........19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E3

ON STAGE: JOEY PIPIA

STEP INSIDE HIS

‘Magic

Chamber’

Skagit Valley Herald staff

Delusionist

Joey Pipia, whose career as a “delusionist” has taken him Joey Pipia to stages from Las Vegas to Hollywood to Seattle and doz When: 7 p.m. ens more, returns to Skagit County this week with his “The Friday, Jan. 11 Magic Chamber” act in Anacortes. Where: The Pipia will perform at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11, at The Depot Depot Arts Arts Center. Only 30 seats are available for the intimate Center, 611 R performance, during which audience members will share the Ave., Anacortes. stage with Pipia and experience the thrills and wonder from Tickets: $20; available at inches away. Watermark Book Pipia is a central performer, writer and producer of the Company, legendary Stage Left Vaudeville Show at the Oregon Coun612 Commercial try Fair, according to a news release. His escape from a Ave., Anacortes, straightjacket while hanging 80 feet above Water Street in 360-293-4277; downtown Port Townsend was featured on National Public 800-838-3006 or www.brownpa Radio’s pertickets.com. “KUOW Presents.” He also performs at the international Moisture Festival, and tours regularly with The New Old Time Chautauqua and The Flying Karamazov Brothers.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

MOVIES

T

his year’s Oscar nominations arrive about two weeks earlier than last year’s, which means one thing is certain: As Newsday’s official Oscar predictor, I’ll be wrong a little sooner. Last year, I predicted nods for Charlize Theron in “Young Adult,” Bryce Dallas Howard in “The Help” and Andy Serkis in “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” — and struck out on all of them. (I admit that Serkis, playing a computeranimated simian, was a long shot.) But for me, the whole point of predicting the Oscars isn’t to get them right, it’s to cheer on my favorite underdogs, harrumph at the heavyweights and point out the performances and achievements that moviegoers might have missed. For instance: Why isn’t anyone talking about Jude Law’s strong performance as a dull, doughy husband in “Anna Karenina?” Did he play the role so well that no one recognized him? Or take the forgotten horror-spoof “The Cabin in the Woods” — it mashed up gore and comedy just as cleverly as Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained,” but it’s unlikely to get a single nomination (except from me). As for Zoe Kazan’s bittersweet comedic turn as a fantasy girlfriend in “Ruby Sparks,” which she co-wrote, it’s at least worth a nod. Right? We’ll find out today. Until then, here’s what I’m hoping the list of Oscar contenders looks like.

BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, “Silver Linings Playbook” The Weinstein Company via AP

A ‘Master’ class in predicting Oscar nominations Story by RAFER GUZMÁN / Newsday

Denzel Washington, “Flight” Paramount Pictures via AP

BEST PICTURE

“Argo” “The Master” “Zero Dark Thirty” “Silver Linings Playbook” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” Dream pick: “The Master.” I really loved this movie, as you will see. The other contenders may be more topical, more fun or more accessible, but they don’t hold a candle to “The Master.”

Quvenzhane Wallis “Beasts of the Southern Wild” Fox Searchlight Pictures via AP

Miserables” Helen Hunt, “The SesHugh Jackman, “Les Mis- sions” Penelope Wilton, “The erables” Daniel Day-Lewis, “Lin- Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” coln” Dream pick: Wilton. I’m Bill Murray, “Hyde Park going way off the map by on Hudson” choosing this 66-year-old Joaquin Phoenix, “The actress (familiar to Yanks Master” from television’s “Downton Denzel Washington, Abbey”), but she’s won“Flight” derful as an aging woman Dream pick: Phoenix, as trapped by her own unhapa war veteran whose emotional injuries ooze from his piness. In reality, this Oscar seems destined for Field or cracked face and crooked Adams. body. It’s an astoundingly physical performance.

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

BEST ANIMATED FILM

“Brave” “Frankenweenie” “ParaNorman” “The Pirates! Band of Misfits” “Rise of the Guardians” Dream pick:“Pirates!” This Python-esque spoof (Hugh Grant gives voice to a stumbling swashbuckler) was cheeky good fun and cleverly claymated.

Jessica Chastain, “Zero Dark Thirty” Judi Dench, “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” Zoe Kazan, “Ruby Sparks” Jennifer Lawrence, “Silver Linings Playbook” Quvenzhan Wallis, “Beasts of the Southern Wild” Dream pick: Wallis, heart- BEST DIRECTOR Ben Affleck, “Argo” breaking as a feral 9-yearPaul Thomas Anderson, old who learns what love is and prepares to live without “The Master” Kathryn Bigelow, “Zero it. Dark Thirty” David O. Russell, “Silver BEST ACTOR IN A Linings Playbook” SUPPORTING ROLE Steven Spielberg, “LinDwight Henry, “Beasts of coln” the Southern Wild” Dream pick: Anderson, Philip Seymour Hoffman, who outclasses the competi“The Master” tion on nearly every level, Tommy Lee Jones, “Linthough the battle will ulticoln” mately come down to SpielJude Law, “Anna Karberg and Bigelow. enina” Matthew McConaughey, BEST ORIGINAL “Magic Mike” SCREENPLAY Dream pick: Hoffman, “The Cabin in the as a dubious spiritual guru. Rarely has one role encom- Woods” “Django Unchained” passed so many contradic“Flight” tions — savior, huckster, “The Master” angel, devil, man, beast “Zero Dark Thirty” — and Hoffman pulls it off Dream pick: “Flight.” flawlessly. Writer John Gatins combined his two worst fears — BEST ACTRESS IN dying in a plane crash and A SUPPORTING ROLE Amy Adams, “The Master” drinking himself to death — into one funny, harrowing Sally Field, “Lincoln” and sneakily profound film. Anne Hathaway, “Les


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area WINTER FILM SERIES “Mr. Roberts” is up next in the Anacortes Public Library series at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11, at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Academy Award nominee Nick Alphin introduces and share insights about each selection in the Friday night series. Free. Henry Fonda stars as Lt. Doug Roberts, a respected officer aboard a WWII Navy supply ship who longs for combat duty; James Cagney is the draconian Capt. Morton who refuses Roberts’ transfer; and Jack Lemmon as the scheming Ensign Pulver. Directed by John Ford, this screenplay is based on a 1946 novel and a 1948 Broadway play that also starred Fonda. Won one Oscar. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes. org.

EMPTY BOWL PROJECT La Conner High School students will hold the third annual Empty Bowl Dinner from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11, in the La Conner High School culinary arts room, 502 N. Sixth St., La Conner. Enjoy a meal of homemade soup, bread, coffee and cookies. $5. Add a hand-painted bowl (yours to keep) for $10 more. Proceeds will be donated to Friendship House to help it build a new kitchen. For information, contact Melanie Graham at 360-466-3173 or email mgraham@lc.k12.wa.us.

LIBRARY BIRTHDAY BASH The Anacortes Public Library will host a celebration of 10 years in its current location from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Join other library supporters for cake and beverages. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org.

Jazz at the library Trish Hatley and Friends will perform from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan 13, the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-2931910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org.

“MUSIC AND MEMORIES” The inaugural “Music and Memories” auction to benefit The Bradford House and Gentry House will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, at St. Joseph Center, 215 N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. Hans & Phil, Trish Hatley and Joan Penney will perform live music. Buffet dinner and live and silent auctions. Skagit Adult Day Program, the parent organization for The Bradford House and Gentry House, is designed to serve individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Tickets: $50, available at www.skagitadultdaycare.org. For information or tickets, call 360-428-5972.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Solange

can imagine the rest. As in its obvious predecessor, “Fairytale “True” of New York” by the Pogues, affection accompanies spite in “The Season’s Upon A shimmering Us”; but warmth is all you hear by the time New York dance EP the song’s brandy-soaked chorus hits. And originally released as so it goes throughout “Signed and Sealed a digital download in Blood,” which demonstrates that for this in late November, long-running Boston band, loving and fight“True” became objectified on CD and vinyl ing aren’t opposites but rather complemenTuesday, and though the physical release tary manifestations of the only thing that doesn’t feature any new stuff, it’s nice to matters: passion. have such an infectiously heavy dance In “The Boys Are Back” they exit Interrecord occupy space in the world. state 93 “looking for trouble,” yet pause Solange Knowles, as you may know, is to buy roses from “a bum at the light”; in Jay-Z’s sister-in-law, but ignore the Beyonce “Burn” they resolve to “kiss the finest girl” connection, at least when it comes to nepo- before going down in a blaze tonight. With tistic skepticism. Here Solange crafts her cranked guitars and breakneck tempos, the own brand of dance music, one thick with music gallops forcefully but shimmers with wobbly bass and a dense dose of late-1970s beauty too, as in the bagpipes-enriched loft music, early-’80s post-disco and syrupy “Out of Our Heads” and “Rose Tattoo,” early-’00s NYC house music. A collaborawhich features banjo from Winston Martion with the British producer-musician Dev shall of Mumford & Sons. “We’re gonna Hynes (best known under the monikers cause a riot / We’re gonna rip it up,” they Lightspeed Champion and Blood Orange), joyfully threaten in “Out of Our Heads,” “True” delivers seven takes on funky dance and it’s wiser to join them than to resist. music that’s smooth without being cheesy, and well-lubricated with solid, snare-driven n Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times rhythms. At its best — “Lovers in the Parking Future Lot,” “Losing You” and the seductive slow- “Pluto 3D” house jam “Bad Girls” — Solange offers beat-heavy seduction that dwells in that Nayvadius Cash mystical moment when Saturday night col- was the quiet hiplides with Sunday morning on the dance hop story of the year, floor. What’s best, despite its New York-cen- as hits beamed in tric vibe, anyone looking for a beat-heavy from his April debut, record to crank at full volume while stuck in titled “Pluto.” Then came Nov. 27, and the traffic need look no further. rerelease, titled “Pluto 3D,” with three new songs and two remixes, attacked the Billn Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times board charts. Pluto had surprising critical legs, too Dropkick — I wish rap fans were this open-minded about Auto-Tune when Nicki indulges it. Murphys But I can’t accuse Future of selling out “Signed and because he’s a newbie, can’t mock his singSealed in Blood” ing because it’s entirely cloaked, can’t call his rapping a retread because it came from An early connowhere. Or rather, Pluto. tender for 2013’s Narrowly escaping some middle filler, finest Christmas song only the unstoppable “Same Damn Time” arrives halfway through the new Dropkick Murphys album in “The Season’s Upon Us.” and mindless “Tony Montana” come back to top the openers: “Parachute,” in which R. It’s a rowdy Celtic-punk number in which singer Ken Casey runs down the charms of Kelly bungee-jumps onto you, and “Straight Up,” in which Future declares, “I’m-a go to his extended family, member by miserable Mars and take the baddest broad.” Easily member: “My nephew’s a horrible, wise more fun than Drake. little twit,” he barks, “He once gave me a nice gift-wrapped box full of” — well, you n Dan Weiss, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Broadcast

“Berberian Sound Studio” From its start in the mid-’90s, Broadcast seemed influenced by soundtrack music. Like Stereolab, it looked back to visions of the future, building on space-age music from the ’60s and spacious electronics of the ’70s to create something that sounded new and contemporary, especially on 2000’s seminal “The Noise Made By People.” Broadcast’s vocalist Trish Keenan died in January 2011, but she and partner James Cargill had already composed the soundtrack to British director Peter Strickland’s “Berberian Sound Studio,” a film about an obsessive film sound engineer (Cargill is also working to assemble a final Broadcast album). With 39 tracks in 40 minutes, the album plays as a continuous soundscape: sometimes churchy and imposing, sometimes pastoral and beautiful, sometimes angelic and ethereal, sometimes punctuated by unsettling screams and eerie voices. It’s uneasy listening, but also a fascinating blend of daydream reveries and nightmarish horrors. n Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Bonnie Bishop

The Game

“Jesus Piece” The Game has titled this album “Jesus Piece,” and an African-American Christ graces the cover. That doesn’t mean Game has become a holy roller or that his newest work is ruled by religious imagery. Instead, it’s about going bad and loving God — how a rhymespitting MC can have a gangster lean while remaining spiritual. There’s an unadulterated bacchanalia of drugs, thugs and carnality on “Celebration” and the barking “Ali Bomaye” untouched by the Holy Spirit. Yet Game’s struggle between staying street and keeping God in his heart (and the club) is clear on bumping, dippy cuts like “Heaven’s Arms,” when he strolls into the VIP area with “Part the Red Sea in red Louboutins, who the don?/ Packing heat like two LeBrons/ It keep you higher than heaven’s arms.” The tension between earthly goods and higher ground is most palpable when Jamie Foxx goes with Game to the Lord’s house on “Hallelujah.” After telling the Almighty he’s trying to reach Him with all his might, Game admits that thinking about young girls while in church is wrong: “I wanna live righteous and you know I love Jesus/ But you can’t catch the Holy Ghost in a Prius.”

“Free”

n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

In the second song on “Free,” Bonnie Bishop sings about a woman who “ain’t no shrinkin’ violet.” You’d never mistake the Nashville-based Texas native for one, either, after you hear Bishop belt out this swaggeringly Stonesy rocker. And that’s not the only bracingly organic blast the raspy-voiced singer delivers here: There are also “Keep Using Me” and “Bad Seed.” Bishop proves just as potent as a balladeer. She co-wrote, with Al Anderson, “Not Cause I Wanted To,” one of the standout tracks on Bonnie Raitt’s latest album, “Slipstream.” That song is not here, but you do get the equally stellar “World Like This” and “The Best Songs Come From Broken Hearts.”

Sonic Liberation Front

n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

n Karl Stark, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Jetway Confidential” It feels like the 1970s on this CD from Philly freejazz big band the Sonic Liberation Front. The band members reaffirm links to the city’s archetypal freejazzers, the Sun Ra Arkestra, dedicating the tuneful “Jetway Confidential No. 3” to their older confreres. (The piece was commissioned by Philly presenter Ars Nova Workshop.) The Front, led by drummer and composer Kevin Diehl, features a percussive, African-laced undertow that dips heavy into grooves. Blurts and squeals also abound, as does an artful sense of space and sound.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘The Unfinished Swan’

pseudo guide to each mission) you partake in solving puzzle after puzzle. The game unfolds like an extended fairy tale, Platform: Play so discovering pages to the story is crucial Station 3 to progressing. Genre: Puzzle Other successful puzzle games have Publisher: Sony used the contrast of whites, blacks and ESRB Rating: E for grays to amazing success, but “Swan” Everyone doesn’t quite reach those heights. Grade: 2.5 stars Too often you may be left thinking, (out of 5) “yeah, but why?” because other than uncovering these pages there isn’t much The video game as art has been a topic to enjoy. of conversation in gaming circles for The game is rich with moving music several years now and “The Unfinished and the act of discovery as a gameplay Swan” injects itself into the debate both element feels novel until it fails to reach a literally and metaphorically. proper crescendo and thus feels monotoYou play as Monroe, who keeps a nous. painting of an unfinished swan that his Younger gamers with a thirst for disrecently deceased mother painted. As the covery may take to this game with gusto game unfolds in a series of stark white while veteran players may wonder what levels, you use the controller to fling paint all the fuss is about. splotches all over the place. “The Unfinished Swan” is more suited The paint slowly reveals the design, for a trendy downtown gallery showing and along with the swan (which acts as a than for the Louvre.

‘Tank! Tank! Tank!’

Platform: Wii U Genre: Arcade Publisher: Namco Bandai Games ESRB Rating: E for Everyone Grade: 1 star One of my favorite games as a child was “Tank” on the Atari. Premise: Two tanks, shooting at each other until one wins. Flat 2-D screen, simple controls, simple pleasure. “Tank! Tank! Tank!” is three times the name but not triple the fun. It has no real connection to the joystick game of my youth. It feels like a slimmed-down version of basic tank battle, if that is even possible considering the ease of that nearly four-decade-old 8-bit classic. Up to four players can hop onto the

Wii U and battle it out, either as a team against waves of enemies or versus each other in various modes. This provides the best experience of the game, considering its tedium and brevity in other areas. There is no story. The controls are easy to grasp. Turn toward a target and press a button to shoot. That constitutes the depth of your gaming experience. The game handles the aiming for you, which means you better hope it points you toward the gigantic spider or robot heading your way — otherwise you’re toast. You must constantly unlock newer tanks to replay the levels you already beat to unlock more tanks and then you’ve seen all the game has to offer. I’m all for games that aim for accessibility, but I watch 4-year-olds playing more complicated fare on iPads. Anyone looking to spend $50 on a console game would expect more than this. n Follow Chris Campbell @campbler or email him at game_on_games@mac.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

GET INVOLVED ART CALL TO ARTISTS: United General Hospital’s Fine Art Committee seeks uplifting, healing art by local artists for display in the Sedro-Woolley hospital’s “Gallery Hall.” Artwork, in any medium, can be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going toward the purchase of a permanent art collection. Contact Patsy Prutzman by email: patsy prutzman@gmail.com. CALL FOR RECYCLED ART: Entries are due today for the fourth annual Recycled Art Show & Contest, set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 12-13, at Concrete Center, 45821 Railroad St., Concrete. Held in conjunction with the Skagit Eagle Festival, the show features artworks incorporating at least 60 percent recycled materials. No entry fee. For information, contact Northwest Garden Bling at 360-708-3279.

and ages 11 and younger. Next up: Mixed Media Self Portraits: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26. Explore a variety of media and put together a dimensional collage that reflects your individualism. Line Wash Drawing: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23. Try this fun way to draw with india ink and a twig as a drawing tool, then add color with a watercolor wash.

PAPER PLAYSHOPS: Join Kari Bishay to get creative and “play with stuff” at the Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Workshops are held from 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. All materials are provided. $18 each class. Preregistration required: 360-464-2229 or www. anacortescenterfor happiness.org. Next up: Greeting card extravaganza: Jan. 13. Learn strategies for creating unique birthday and thank you cards, then stamp, emboss, CALL FOR ARTISANS, MUSIcut, punch, layer and build CIANS, SPONSORS: The Mount enough for your entire year of Vernon Downtown Association is card-giving occasions. accepting new applications from artisans and musicians through ART CLASSES: Dakota Art Jan. 25 for the 29th annual Tulip offers a variety of art classes and Festival Street Fair, set for April workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-41619-21 in downtown Mount Vernon. Participant selections will be 6556, ext. 5, or www.dakotaart center.com. made by March 1. Sponsorships are available. For information or an application prospectus, DANCE visit www.mountvernondownBEGINNER SQUARE DANCE town.org/events.html or email LESSONS: 7 p.m. Tuesdays at mvstreetfaircoordinator@gmail. the Mount Vernon Senior Cencom. ter, 1401 Cleveland St. Families, couples, singles welcome. First ART CLASSES two weeks are free, then $4 per FAMILY ART DAYS AT MoNA: lesson. 360-424-4608 or 360-4249675. The Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner, offers ROMANIAN CROATIAN Family Art Days each month. Sessions are open to all ages and FUSION DANCE WORKSHOP: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays and 5 skill levels and include guided to 7 p.m. Saturdays during Januwalk-throughs of exhibitions. ary at the Anacortes Center for Limited to 15 participants per session. To register: 360-466-4446, Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Dance Master John ext. 108, or FAD@museumofLovric is joined by guest Dance nwart.org. Information: www. museumofnwart.org. Workshops Master Anamaria Dulama (visitare free with museum admission. ing from Romania) to offer this Admission: $8 adults, $5 seniors, special series of classes. $10 per $3 students, free for members session. Free for children. For

information or to register, call 360-464-2229 or visit www.ana cortescenterforhappiness.org. SWING DANCE: The Mount Vernon High School jazz bands will present a swing dance from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18, at Christ The King Church, 2111 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon. Enjoy dance lessons, live music, silent auction, dessert sale and raffle. $6, $10 couple, $20 family. Proceeds will benefit the MVHS Band and Orchestra Boosters.

MUSIC FREE MUSIC JAMS: Come and play or just watch the fun at Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. N.W., Stanwood. Free for participants and spectators. Teen jam: 7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesday each month. Jam night: 8 p.m. Thursdays. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. PIANO MASTER CLASS: With Haochen Zhang, noon to 2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, at the Western Washington Performing Arts Center Concert Hall on the WWU campus in Bellingham. Free. 360-650-3130 or www.wwu. edu/sanfordhill.

ON STAGE OPEN MIC: 7 p.m. Thursdays, The Soup Bowl at Common Ground, 351 Pease Road, Burlington. Sign-ups begin at 6 p.m. All ages are welcome to perform or come to watch and listen. Free. For information, contact Tobie Ann at 425-870-6784.

Jan. 11-Feb. 1. Each day kids will complete a mission teaching the importance of being a superhero while developing basic motor skills. Creative superhero attire is encouraged. $20-$35. Art at the Y: Creative Paper Crafting: Ages 7 to 12, 4:30 to 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Jan. 14-Feb. 6. Participants will complete six to eight projects, including origami, book building and more. $45-$65. Y Fun Club: MLK Jr. Day: Kindergarten to sixth grade, noon to 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 21. Activities will include swimming, YouthFit, LEGO Camp and more. $20-$30, second child discount available. Swim lessons: Ages 3 to 13, weekday evenings and Saturday mornings. YMCA staff members offer swimming lessons year round. Winter Youth Indoor Soccer: Ages 5 to 12, Jan. 28-March 16. Winter league includes a weekly practice. $55-$65. SENIOR HIKE: Join Friends of the Forest from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, Jan. 11, for a gentle 1.5mile hike through forest and wetland habitats in Anacortes. Meet at the end of 32nd Street, off of D Avenue. Learn about the beaver that maintain the wetlands, and the winter waterfowl that visit there. Free. 360-293-3725 or www.friendsoftheacfl.org.

KIDDIE CHEER CAMP: Mount Vernon High School cheerleaders will hold their annual Kiddie Cheer Camp from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, Jan. 15-17, at LaVenture Middle School, 1200 LaVenture Road, RECREATION Mount Vernon. Campers will FITNESS AND FUN AT THE perform Friday, Jan. 18, during Y: Skagit Family YMCA offers halftime of the Mount Vernon a variety of activities for kids at boys’ basketball game. $35 cost 215 E. Fulton St., Mount Vernon. includes camp T-shirts and poms. For information, call 360-336Proceeds support the MVHS 9622 or visit www.skagitymca.org. cheer program. Registration Next up: forms available at mountvernon Winter YouthFit: Ages 8 to high.mountvernonschools.org. 12, 4:15 to 5:15 p.m. Tuesdays 360-428-6109, ext. 41252. and Thursdays, through Feb. 7. Healthy tips, gym activities, group THEATER games and more. $10-$40. THEATER CLASSES: AnaSuperheroes in Training: Ages 3 to 6, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Fridays, cortes Community Theatre’s

Class Act School for the Performing Arts is enrolling kids from preschool through 12th grade for winter classes on acting and theater arts. Classes are held at ACT, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre. com/classact. Imagination Explorers (preschool age): 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 29-March 5, or Wednesdays, Jan. 30-March 6. Students will take part in creative dramatic games designed to use their imagination, improve self-confidence and provide social interaction as they create crazy characters, sing and dance. $50. Superhero Stories (kindergarten through second grade): 4 to 5:15 p.m. Fridays, Feb. 1-March 8. Students will create their own superhero as they play fun theatre games and work on their acting skills. Class will culminate in a performance March 8, on ACT’s Second Stage. $50. Alice in Wonderland (grades 3-6): 4 to 5:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Jan. 28-March 6. Students will stage a retelling of the classic tale of Alice’s trip down the rabbit hole, starting with auditioning, creation of a character, memorization of lines and culminating with a full public performance complete with costumes and makeup March 8-9 on ACT’s Second Stage. $100. Are We There Yet? (grades 7-12: 3 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Jan. 22-Feb. 28. This class starts with auditioning for a part and continues with creation of a character, memorization of lines and a full public performance with costumes and makeup March 1-2 on ACT’s Second Stage. $100.

WORKSHOPS DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY: FROM AUTOMATIC MODE TO CREATIVE MODE: 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Tony Locke of Alternative Focus Workshops will explain the creative features in today’s digital cameras, helping even beginners make the leap from automatic to creative mode. Free. 360-2931910, ext. 21, or library.cityofana cortes.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E9

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

“The Sessions” plays Jan. 11-14 at the Lincoln Theatre.

‘The Sessions’

7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Jan. 11-12 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 13 7:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14 “The Sessions” tells the story of a man confined to an iron lung who is determined at age 38 to lose his virginity. With the help of his therapists and the guidance of his priest, he sets out to make his dream a reality. Starring Helen Hunt, John Hawkes and William H. Macy. Rated R. $10 general, $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 children 12 and under.

The Met Live in HD: ‘Les Troyens’ Noon Sunday, Jan. 13

The Met offers a rare opportunity to witness Berlioz’s vast epic, last performed at the Met in 2003. Deborah Voigt, Susan Graham, Marcello Giordani and Dwayne Croft lead the cast, portraying characters

from the Trojan War. Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi marshals the largescale musical forces. In Italian with English subtitles. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students and children with $2 off for Lincoln members.

NT Live: ‘The Magistrate’ 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17

Academy Award nominee and Tony Award-winner John Lithgow (“Shrek,” “Third Rock from the Sun,” “The World According To Garp”) takes the title role in Arthur Wing Pinero’s uproarious Victorian farce, directed by Olivier Awardwinner Timothy Sheader. When amiable magistrate Posket (Lithgow) marries Agatha (Olivier Awardwinner Nancy Carroll, “After the Dance”), little does he realize she’s dropped five years from her age — and her son’s. When her deception looks set to be revealed, it sparks a series of hilarious indignities and outrageous mishaps. $15 general; $13 seniors; $11 students with $2 off for Lincoln members.


E10 Thursday, January 10, 2013

Thursday, January 10, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area January 11-20 JOANNA BLENDULF

TUNING UP Playing at area venues January 10-17 JEFFREY COHAN

FRIDAY.11

JOHN LENTI

CURTIS HAMMOND BAND 8 p.m., Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndysbroiler.com.

FRIDAY.18 EARLY MUSIC SERIES: “THE SUN KING’S MUSIC” 7:30 p.m., Croatian Cultural Center, 801 Fifth St., Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. 360-293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation.org.

Friday.11

Sunday.13

MAGIC

MUSIC

“The Magic Chamber”: Joey Pipia, 7 p.m., The Depot Arts Center, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. $20. Tickets at Watermark Book Company, 612 Commercial Ave., Anacortes, 360-293-4277; 800-8383006 or www.brownpapertickets.com.

Saturday.12 MUSIC

viaVoice: a cappella quartet, 7:30 p.m., Maple Hall, 104 Commercial, La Conner. $15-$17, free for ages 17 and younger accompanied by an adult. 360-466-2665 or www.laconnerarts.com.

“Jazz at the Library”: Trish Hatley and Friends, 2 to 3 p.m., Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 30.

Monday.14 No events submitted

Tuesday.15 MUSIC

Haochen Zhang: Sanford-Hill Piano Series, 7:30 p.m., Western Washington University Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, Bellingham. $9-$24. 360-6506146 or www.tickets.wwu.edu.

THURSDAY.10

Wednesday.16 No events submitted

Saturday.19 No events submitted

Thursday.17

Sunday.20

MUSIC

MUSIC

Early Music Series: “The Sun King’s Music”, 7:30 p.m., Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $15 suggested donation, free for ages 18 and younger. 360-629-6110 or www.salishseafestival.org.

Friday.18

Jazz at the Camano Center: Brian Cunningham Quartet, 4 to 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, $10 students ages 17 and younger. 360-387-0222.

Rattletrap Ruckus: 8 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

FRIDAY.11 Trish Hatley: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Band Showdown: Curse of the Black Tongue, The Social Schema, Touks, 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $1. 360-778-1067.

Barefeet: 9 p.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

Blueberry Hill, Birdsview (bluegrass): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. No cover. 360-445-3000.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Chris Stevens and the Surf Monkeys: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Curtis Hammond Band: 8 p.m., Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyn dysbroiler.com.

Lumpkins: 10 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

SATURDAY.12 The Scott Greene Band, Daniel Kirkpatrick and the Bayonets, Sanoma: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Ben Rice Trio: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

Junkyard Jane: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Jack Mattingly & The Distractions: 9 p.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Son of Kong (classic rock): 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S First. St., Mount Vernon. No cover. 360-336-3626.

Woodrush (alternative, Americana): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. No cover. 360-445-3000.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Mark DuFresne Band: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Ben Rice Trio: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

The Ride: 8 p.m., Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com.

MUSIC

Early Music Series: “The Sun King’s Music”, 7:30 p.m., Croatian Cultural Center, 801 Fifth St., Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. 360-293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation.org.

SUNDAY.13 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

WEDNESDAY.16 Terry Nelson & Friends: 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House, 315 E. Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-4488.

Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Two Gallants, Future Twin: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12. 360-778-1067.

THURSDAY.17 Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Rattletrap Ruckus: 8 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360-9271949 or www.redlightbelling ham.com.


E10 Thursday, January 10, 2013

Thursday, January 10, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area January 11-20 JOANNA BLENDULF

TUNING UP Playing at area venues January 10-17 JEFFREY COHAN

FRIDAY.11

JOHN LENTI

CURTIS HAMMOND BAND 8 p.m., Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndysbroiler.com.

FRIDAY.18 EARLY MUSIC SERIES: “THE SUN KING’S MUSIC” 7:30 p.m., Croatian Cultural Center, 801 Fifth St., Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. 360-293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation.org.

Friday.11

Sunday.13

MAGIC

MUSIC

“The Magic Chamber”: Joey Pipia, 7 p.m., The Depot Arts Center, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. $20. Tickets at Watermark Book Company, 612 Commercial Ave., Anacortes, 360-293-4277; 800-8383006 or www.brownpapertickets.com.

Saturday.12 MUSIC

viaVoice: a cappella quartet, 7:30 p.m., Maple Hall, 104 Commercial, La Conner. $15-$17, free for ages 17 and younger accompanied by an adult. 360-466-2665 or www.laconnerarts.com.

“Jazz at the Library”: Trish Hatley and Friends, 2 to 3 p.m., Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 30.

Monday.14 No events submitted

Tuesday.15 MUSIC

Haochen Zhang: Sanford-Hill Piano Series, 7:30 p.m., Western Washington University Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, Bellingham. $9-$24. 360-6506146 or www.tickets.wwu.edu.

THURSDAY.10

Wednesday.16 No events submitted

Saturday.19 No events submitted

Thursday.17

Sunday.20

MUSIC

MUSIC

Early Music Series: “The Sun King’s Music”, 7:30 p.m., Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $15 suggested donation, free for ages 18 and younger. 360-629-6110 or www.salishseafestival.org.

Friday.18

Jazz at the Camano Center: Brian Cunningham Quartet, 4 to 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, $10 students ages 17 and younger. 360-387-0222.

Rattletrap Ruckus: 8 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

FRIDAY.11 Trish Hatley: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Band Showdown: Curse of the Black Tongue, The Social Schema, Touks, 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $1. 360-778-1067.

Barefeet: 9 p.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

Blueberry Hill, Birdsview (bluegrass): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. No cover. 360-445-3000.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Chris Stevens and the Surf Monkeys: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Curtis Hammond Band: 8 p.m., Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyn dysbroiler.com.

Lumpkins: 10 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

SATURDAY.12 The Scott Greene Band, Daniel Kirkpatrick and the Bayonets, Sanoma: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Ben Rice Trio: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

Junkyard Jane: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Jack Mattingly & The Distractions: 9 p.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Son of Kong (classic rock): 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S First. St., Mount Vernon. No cover. 360-336-3626.

Woodrush (alternative, Americana): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. No cover. 360-445-3000.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Mark DuFresne Band: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Ben Rice Trio: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

The Ride: 8 p.m., Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com.

MUSIC

Early Music Series: “The Sun King’s Music”, 7:30 p.m., Croatian Cultural Center, 801 Fifth St., Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. 360-293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation.org.

SUNDAY.13 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

WEDNESDAY.16 Terry Nelson & Friends: 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House, 315 E. Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-4488.

Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Two Gallants, Future Twin: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12. 360-778-1067.

THURSDAY.17 Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Rattletrap Ruckus: 8 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360-9271949 or www.redlightbelling ham.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

TRAVEL

G

REENVILLE, Maine — If you love the idea of cross-country skiing or snowshoeing through a snowy forest, stoking a wood stove at midnight, and eating great meals in good company around long wooden tables, then consider a winter adventure in northern Maine. The Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) operates backcountry lodges in the Moosehead Lake region of Maine near Greenville. In winter, visitors reach the lodges by skiing in, and snowshoeing is popular on nearby trails. The trip is ideal for those who are moderately athletic, game to test their cross-country or snowshoeing skills, and not averse to extreme winter weather. If you’re sociable by nature, you’ll find your fill of community and conversation at the communal dinner tables. If you tend toward the solitary, that too is easily found in the private cabins and big wilderness of Maine. My traveling companion Donna Lawlor and I set off for the lodges from Portland, Maine’s biggest city, in the midst of a nor’easter. The 150-mile car trip took five hours due to the storm. We arrived in whiteout conditions at the AMC’s winter parking lot, where our luggage was picked up by friendly staff on snowmobiles. Guests can have one item per person transported to the lodges this way, so you only need to carry a map and a backpack of basic emergency gear on the trail. It was 22 degrees Fahrenheit with heavily falling snow as we headed to our first destination, Little Lyford Lodge and Cabins, by cross-country ski. The trail was snowed over as fast as workers could groom it. We struggled a bit in the strong winds and blowing snow but slogged on. The

If you go

Donna Lawlor cross-country skis on the Lodge to Lodge trail between camps at the Appalachian Mountain Club’s backcountry wilderness lodge near Greenville, Maine.

Photos by Lynn Dombek / AP

A SNOWY ADVENTURE IN A MAINE BACKCOUNTRY LODGE By LYNN DOMBEK / Associated Press

six-mile trek to the lodge took three hours. The Little Lyford camps were built in 1874 to house lumbermen who worked the forests around the West Branch of the Pleasant River. “The camps inherited their layout from the logging days — individual cabins cluster around a dining lodge that serves meals, with a pond or river nearby,” wrote Sarah Jane Shangraw in the 2005 issue of AMC’s Appalachia journal. And indeed, as we skied down a hill into camp, you

Appalachian Mountain Club Maine Wilderness Lodges: Located 20 miles east of Greenville, Maine, in the Moosehead Lake region; www. outdoors.org/maine lodges. Lodges are open late December to early March and mid-May to late October. Getting there: Nearest commercial airports: Bangor, Maine (70 miles from Greenville) or Portland, Maine (150 miles). Boston is 265 miles away. The drive from Greenville to the AMC winter parking lot is 11 miles on a plowed forest road followed by six to eight miles of groomed cross-country ski trails to access the cabins. Cabins are vehicle-accessible via unpaved roads in summer. Rates: Winter perperson lodging includes sit-down breakfast and dinner plus bag lunch starting at $101 daily for Little Lyford cabins, $66 for bunkhouse. Rates are higher for Gorman Chairback and vary by date. Gear rentals: Northwoods Outfitters in Greenville, www.maine outfitter.com.

could almost imagine the scene 100 years earlier, with the rough log buildings and smoke curling out of the chimneys — until we spied The interior of a two large solar panels on a rustic cabin at south-facing hill. the Appalachian The Lyford crew, led Mountain Club’s by manager Chuck James, Little Lyford Lodge was amiable and welcomand Cabins, a ing. After we were shown backcountry where the weather reports wilderness lodge are posted and the location near Greenville, of the showers, sauna and Maine. The cabin composting toilets, we were has no electricity, is taken to our little cabin heated by a wood stove and lit by gas on a hill. It was outfitted with bunks, a wood stove, a lamp. In winter, dresser and a gas lamp for visitors can reach light (no electricity). Perthe lodges and fect, I thought to myself, as cabins only by I brought in more wood to cross-country stoke the fire. skiing.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E13

TRAVEL Local travel VACATION CRUISE OPTIONS: Representatives from Holland America Line and AAA Travel will discuss new cruise itineraries to destinations around the world at 6 p.m. today, Jan. 10, at AAA Travel, 1600 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Free. RSVP: 360-848-2090. “ACROSS NORTHERN FRANCE”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Cultural traveler Rudy Gahler describes his “Road Scholar” trip to Brittany and Normandy, complete with historical notes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org.

This photo shows a rustic cabin in the snow at the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Little Lyford Lodge and Cabins All meals are included in the lodging rate (which starts at $101 a person for cabins), and the hearty dinner of warm soup, steak tips, rice and vegetables was served promptly at 6 p.m. (Vegetarian and other special diets can be accommodated.) Lyford can house 50 people in its nine cabins and bunkhouse, but rarely has that many guests. At our first meal, 16 people sat at two long tables. Our dinner companions ranged in age from 12 to 60-something, a mix of couples, families and friends. We talked about our nextday plans, comparing maps and routes. Catherine and Curt Menyhart were doing a 15-mile loop between lodges. Others were trekking to Gulf Hagas, a gorge also known as the “Grand Canyon of Maine.” We chose an ungroomed trail around two ponds. The trail’s 18 inches of newly fallen snow made a soft landing for the repeated

falls I took while getting used to skiing again after a 25-year hiatus. We also skied some of the groomed trails, which are clearly marked and are rated easy, intermediate or difficult. Curt Menyhart puzzled awhile over the “C2C” marking on the trails he and Catherine took between two lodges until he figured out it meant “Camp to Camp.” Some trails also double as routes for snowmobiling, a popular sport in Maine. The AMC bought Little Lyford in 2003 and since then has conserved nearly 70,000 acres and built 80 miles of trails. “If we can help build a stronger economy by providing new opportunities for outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism, get local kids out and through a concerted effort of environmental education, we’ll have succeeded in not only protecting a priceless natural

resource but also in contributing to the overall health of the local community,” said AMC senior vice president Walter Graff in an email. After two nights at Little Lyford, we spent our final two nights at Gorman Chairback Lodge and Cabins, which another guest, Dennis Encarnation, characterized as going “from rustic to deluxe.” Unlike Little Lyford, Gorman’s four modern cabins have private bathrooms and electricity. Gorman also offers eight rustic cabins and a bunkhouse for 12. Meals are a bit more sophisticated than at Lyford, and you can buy beer or wine. It would be hard to mistake it for a 19th century logging camp, save for the towering pine trees that surround the older cabins by the lake. But it’s charming still, and the remote location does offer a retreat. Encarnation’s wife, Kathryn Graven, said she wanted a getaway with

no computer or phones; the couple and their two sons spent evenings playing games like Boggle and cribbage. Our snowshoe trek the next day took us alongside Henderson Brook. We could hear it running under the snow and saw it in open spots in the ice. It was snowing again and the winds blew hard through the high tops of massive pine and hardwood trees on the ridge. The crackle of beech leaves still clinging to frozen branches complemented the shushshush of our snowshoes through the deep snow. In a few spots, we used ropes the AMC strung across the brook to move ourselves along. By our last day, the snow had stopped but the temperature had fallen to 8 degrees, with winds gusting to 44 mph. To return to the parking lot, we chose a trail that was longer than our original route but more protected, the eight-mile Long Pond trail.

DAY TRIPS: Camano Center offers trips for seniors and others, departing from and returning to Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. 360-3870222 or www.camano center.org. Seattle Boat Show: Tuesday, Jan. 29. Check out the latest boats and boating gear. $15-$20, transportation only. Buy tickets at the door for $12. Pay by Jan. 15. Frye Museum and Volunteer Park Conservatory Tour: Tuesday, Feb. 12. Enjoy a docent tour of the 60-year-old Frye Museum, lunch in its cafe, and then tour the 100-year-old conservatory. $21-$26, includes tour and transportation. Lunch on your own. Pay by Jan. 29. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). For information or to register, call 360336-6215. Olympia Capitol Tour and Exploration: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, departing from and returning to Hillcrest Park, Mount Vernon. Enjoy a private tour of the Leg-

islature building, no-host lunch and exploration of more local and historical attractions around Olympia. $61-$63. Register by Feb. 27. Bellevue Botanical Garden and Washington Park Arboretum: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, April 19, departing from and returning to Hillcrest Park, Mount Vernon. Enjoy a docent-led tour of the garden’s 53 acres of cultivated gardens, restored woodlands and natural wetlands. After a no-host lunch, check out the seasonal flora and fauna of the arboretum’s 230 acres on the shores of Lake Washington. Both tours include walking up to one mile and uneven surfaces. $61-$63. Register by April 12. ESCORTED TOURS: The Whatcom County Tour Program offers a variety of day trips and longer tours, with most trips departing from and returning to the Bellingham Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St., Bellingham. For information or to register: 360-733-4030, press #, ext. 47015, or wccoa.org/ index.php/Tours. STANWOOD SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: The Stanwood Senior Center offers occasional trips around the Puget Sound area and beyond, departing from and returning to the center, 7430 276th St. NW, Stanwood. For information or reservations, contact Sandy Kitchens at 360629-7403. PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Anacortes Public Library accepts U.S. passport applications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Passport forms and information on fees and how to apply are available at http://travel.state.gov, or pick up an application and passport guide at the library.


E14 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

BONUS

HOT TICKETS LADY GAGA: Jan. 14, 2013, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. CIRQUE ZIVA: Jan. 17, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. QUICKSAND: Jan. 18, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. JACKSON BROWNE: Jan. 20, Benaroya Hall, Seattle. 206-215-4747 or www.live nation.com. MONTEREY JAZZ FESTIVAL ON TOUR: Jan. 22, Benaroya Hall, Seattle. 866-833-4747. DOWN: Jan. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. PINBACK: Jan. 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. THE WALKMEN: Jan. 27, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livebation.com. “AMALUNA”: Cirque du Soleil: Jan. 31-Feb. 24, 2013, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800450-1480 or www.cirquedusoleil.com. LEWIS BLACK: Jan. 31, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com. LEWIS BLACK: Feb. 1, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MUSE: Feb. 1, KeyArena, Seattle. 800745-3000 or www.livenation.com. INTERNATIONAL GUITAR NIGHT 2013: Feb. 2, with Martin Taylor, Solorazaf, Celso Machado and Brian Gore: Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. $23-$32. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre.org. THE SONICS, MUDHONEY: Feb. 2, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. EXCISION: Feb. 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. ELLIE GOULDING: Feb. 4, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. INTERNATIONAL GUITAR NIGHT: Feb. 6, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. BENJAMIN FRANCIS LEFTWICH: Feb. 7, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or www.brownpapertickets.com. SOUNDGARDEN: Feb. 7-8, The Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.live nation.com. RA RA RIOT: Feb. 8, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. LED ZEPAGAIN: Feb. 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. SUPER DIAMOND (Tribute to Neil Diamond): Feb. 9, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. TOMAHAWK: Feb. 12, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. MARILYN MANSON: Feb. 12, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. LEFTOVER SALMON: Feb. 15, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.live nation.com. PILOBOLUS: Feb. 16, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Feb. 16-17, Showbox

at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: Feb. 17, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett.com. COHEED AND CAMBRIA, BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME: Feb. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. EELS: Feb. 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. FEED ME, TEETH: Feb. 20-21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. GALACTIC: FEATURING COREY GLOVER: Feb. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. MICHAEL KAESHAMMER: Feb. 22, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. STS9: Feb. 22, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. AARON NEVILLE: Feb. 23, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com. IVAN & ALYOSHA: Feb. 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PENNYWISE, LAGWAGON: Feb. 23, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. HEY MARSEILLES: March 1, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. MARC MARON (comedy): March 1, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. YO GABBA GABBA! LIVE!: March 1-2, The Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MOE: March 2, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. ANBERLIN: March 3, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: March 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. FRIGHTENED RABBIT: March 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: March 9, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. MAROON 5, WITH NEON TREES & OWL CITY: March 11, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO: March 13, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. VOLBEAT: March 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BRIAN REGAN: March 13, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.live nation.com. RIHANNA: with A$AP Rocky: April 3, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. NANCI GRIFFITH: April 5, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. LORD OF THE DANCE: April 5, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com.

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E15

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

OUT & ABOUT ART

Monday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. 360-676-8548 or www. alliedarts.org.

bers-only preview from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11, at the QUILT MUSEUM TEMWhatcom Museum’s LightPORARY CLOSURE: The catcher Building, 250 Flora La Conner Quilt & Textile St., Bellingham. The show Museum will be closed NEW MoNA EXHIBIwill open to the public Satthrough mid-February, TIONS: Two new exhibits urday, Jan. 12, and continue while contractors install will open with a reception through March 24. The a fire suppression system, from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturshow features 65 paintings restore the first level and day, Jan. 12, and continue from Marin’s collection refinish the museum’s through March 13 at the by 26 Mexican-American floors. Museum of Northwest Art, artists, averaging 16 inches Watch for the museum 121 S. First St., La Conner. square and smaller and to reopen in mid-February “Eduardo Calderón: ranging from photo-realism with the exhibit “Color, Portraits of 20 Northwest to portraits to landscapes. Design & Inspiration: Artists”: Calderón interMarin will deliver a pubKaffe Fassett & Brandon viewed a cross section of lic lecture at 2 p.m. SaturMably in La Conner.” 360Northwest artists rangday, Jan. 12, in the Rotunda 466-4288 or www.laconner ing in age, background Room at the museum’s Old quilts.com. and mediums each uses City Hall, 121 Prospect St., to make art, and photoBellingham. “SHADES OF BLUE”: graphed the artists in their Museum hours are The invitational art show homes. The exhibition noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday celebrating the beauty of includes Calderón’s audio through Sunday; open “blue” continues through and transcribed interviews until 8 p.m. Thursdays and Jan. 30 at Rob Schouten with the artists about influ- at 10 a.m. Saturdays. $10, Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, ences, backgrounds and $8 student/senior/military, Greenbank. Artists include what brought them to the $4.50 ages 4 and younger. Robert Adamson, Maryon Northwest (if the artist was $5 reduced admission on Attwood, Anne Belov, not already a native). The Thursdays. 360-778-8930 or Karen Bolstad, Dan Freeshow also includes works www.whatcommuseum.org. man, Dan Ishler, Pete by each artist. Jordan, Barbara Mundell, “Black and White Color NATIVE ARTISTS: Kathleen Otley, Rob Study from the Permanent Award-winning Pacific Schouten, Sharon Spencer, Northwest artists will be Jan Swalwell, Lloyd Whan- Original prints by Skagit Valley artists Natalie Niblack Collection”: Presenting and Kris Ekstrand Molesworth will be on view at the black, a symbol for sophis- featured at “A Gathering of nell and Angéle Woolery. Rexville Grocery, 19271 Best Road, during January. tication and authority, and Native Artists 2013” from Gallery hours are 11 a.m. white, which suggests purity 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday to 4 p.m. weekdays and 10 The grocery is open daily until 7 p.m. An informal gallery reception for the artists will be held and neutrality, the exhibiand Sunday, Jan. 19-20, at a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends (Tuesdays and Wednesdays Wednesday, Jan., 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. 360-708-6626. tion offers an atypical look the Skagit County HistoriPictured: “Impel” by Kris Ekstrand Molesworth at the Northwest palette. cal Museum, 501 S. Fourth by appointment). 360-222Plus, excerpts from studies St., La Conner. Artists will 3070 or www.robschouten that tackle the question, show and sell a variety of gallery.com. “Are black and white colNative and Native-inspired MORE SMALL PAINTham. Gallery hours are 11 ors?” as well as the science art. A special presentation INGS: A show featuring a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday “FIELDS AND FIGand history behind black Saturday evening will feasmall paintings on canvas through Saturday or by URES”: A show of new ture “Neqáx Kwélengsen” and paper by Anne Martin appointment. 360-293-3577 and white. work by Karen Kosoglad Museum hours are noon from the Samish Nation. McCool continues through or www.annemartinmccool. continues through Feb. 3, to 5 p.m. Sundays and Visitors are invited to com. at Lisa Harris Gallery, 1922 Jan. 31 at Anne Martin Mondays, and 10 a.m. to watch and learn as the artMcCool Gallery, 711 ComPike Place, Seattle. Kosoists carve, weave, make basMEMBER SHOW: Allied 5 p.m. Tuesdays through glad draws and paints from mercial Ave., Anacortes. Arts of Whatcom County’s Saturdays. $8, $5 seniors, $3 kets or hats, knit and create. life, using models and com- The show also includes students, free for members Visitors can also participate paintings and prints by annual Members Show posing her landscapes on and ages 11 and younger. in a silent auction of the Cathy Schoenberg, sculpcontinues through Jan. site. Her gestural manner 360-466-4446 or www. artists’ works. Admission: tures by Tracy Powel, glass 26 at the Allied Arts Galof working balances realmuseumofnwart.org. $5, $4 seniors, $10 famiism with abstraction, avoid- art by Bob Metke, ceramics lery, 1418 Cornwall Ave., lies. 360-466-3365 or www. Bellingham. The show will ing literal description. Gal- by Patsy Thola Chamber“CHICANITAS: SMALL skagitcounty.net/museum. feature work from nearly lery hours are 10:30 a.m. to lain, jewelry by Carole PAINTINGS FROM THE 100 Allied Arts members, 5:30 p.m. Monday through Cunningham and Debbie ONE-DAY SHOW: Gallery Aldrich, turned wood by including professional art- CHEECH MARIN COLLECSaturday, and 11 a.m. to 4 TION”: Actor/comedian Cygnus will host a one-day ists, students and new or p.m. Sunday. 206-443-3315 George Way, baskets by Cheech Marin will be the show and sale of paintings Jane Hyde and handwoven emerging artists. Gallery or www.lisaharrisgallery. by Clayton James from scarves by Martha Totten- hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. featured guest at a memcom.

AT REXVILLE GROCERY

noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at 109 Commercial St., La Conner. The show will feature more than 20 oil paintings, some previously unseen by the public. All proceeds will benefit the artist, who will turn 95 in February. 360-708-4787 or www.gallerycygnus.com. “WILD EAST MEETS WILD WEST”: A show of photographs from Nakhodka, Russia, by Georgy Pakin continues through Jan. 6 at the Whatcom Museum Lightcatcher Building, 250 Flora St., Bellingham. Pakin’s photos vividly portray daily life in and around Nakhodka during Soviet and post-Soviet times, including the presence of Americans in Nakhodka, its large fishing operations and other activities. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. $10; $8 students, military, seniors ages 62 and older, $4.50 ages 5 and younger. 360-778-8930 or www.what commuseum.org. “CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM, SELECTIONS FROM THE IRVINE MUSEUM”: The exhibit continues through Feb. 17 at the Whatcom Museum, 250 Flora St., Bellingham. The show features 50 paintings from the Impressionist Period (1890-1930) showcasing an array of California landscapes, from coastal beaches to vast deserts. Also called California plein air painting, California Impressionism focused on capturing the special light and color of the state’s landscape and helped to define modern landscape painting. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. $10, $8 student/senior/military, $4.50 children ages 5 and younger, free for museum members. 360-778-8933 or www.whatcommuseum.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E17

OUT & ABOUT ACRYLIC PAINTINGS: A show of new paintings by Jennifer Bowman continues through Jan. 29 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Also showing are photographs by Randy Dana, Dick Garvey and Lewis Jones; fused glass by Robin Larson; pastels by Amanda Houston; and acrylics by Joel Brock. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-2936938 or www.scottmilo.com.

Monday through Friday. 360-416-7812.

screening and discussion about faith-based health care systems and how their policies affect LGBT persons and others. For information, call 360-856-4676 or visit www.pflagskagit.org.

Alphin will introduce and share insights about each selection. Free. 360-2931910, ext. 21, or library. FESTIVAL cityofanacortes.org. SKAGIT EAGLE FESTINext up: VAL: The event takes place Friday, Jan. 11: “Mr. every weekend during JanRoberts” (see Page 5 for uary in and around ConMARITIME SPEAKER details). crete, Rockport and MarSERIES: “MODEL BOATS”: Friday, Jan. 18: “Contact” blemount. Enjoy indoor 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, Friday, Jan. 25: “Under and outdoor activities Anacortes Public Library, the Tuscan Sun” including eagle watching, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. free tours, walks and eduRandy Flodquist will disMODEL RAILROAD cational programs, arts and cuss the art and science OPEN HOUSE: The crafts, wine tasting, river of model boats. Free. 360Whatcom-Skagit Model rafting, music, dance and 293-1910, ext. 21, or library. Railroad Club will host an more. Bring your camera cityofanacortes.org. open house from 11 a.m. “FIRST SNOW”: Works and dress for the unpreto 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, by Aleut artist Thomas dictable weather. For the “ICE AGE FLOODS at 1469 Silver Run Lane, Stream are featured in a latest information, contact NATIONAL GEOLOGIC Alger. The club operates new show at Arctic Raven the Concrete Chamber of TRAIL”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, large, permanent HO- and Gallery, 130 S. First St., FriCommerce at 360-853-8784 Jan. 23, Anacortes Public N-scale model railroad day Harbor. Stream uses or visit www.skagiteagle Library, 1220 10th St., layouts. Admission is by geometric designs embodied festival.com. Anacortes. Gene Kiver, donation to help continue in his creatures to reflect the professor emeritus of geol- building the layouts. www. importance of Aleut spiriLECTURES ogy, details one of the larg- whatcomskagitmrc.org. tual beliefs. 888-378-3222 or AND TALKS est documented floods in www.arcticraven.com. Earth history, sending 500 SPAGHETTI FEED AND “RESOLUTIONARY cubic miles of water across PROGRAM: The Skagit, ART SHOW CLOSING THINKING”: THE KEY TO the Pacific Northwest. Free. Whatcom, Island Trail PARTY: The third annual FINDING YOUR PASSION 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or Maintaining Organization potluck party for the clos& PURPOSE TO REACH ing of the show “Honey, I YOUR GOALS IN TODAY’S library.cityofanacortes.org. (SWITMO) will present a Shrunk The Art” will take spaghetti feed fundraiser WORLD: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. place from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, at Skagit MUSIC from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Saturday, Jan. 26, at Matzke Valley Food Co-op, room Jan. 12, at the Sedro-WoolJAZZ AT THE CAMANO Fine Art Gallery & Sculpley Community Center, 703 309, 202 S. First St., Mount CENTER: The Brian Cunture Park, 2345 Blanche Pacific St., Sedro-Woolley. Vernon. Learn to use ningham Quartet will perWay, Camano Island. The Enjoy food provided by resolutionary thinking to form from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunshow features small-format solve, prevent or alleviate Joy’s Bakery of Sedroday, Jan. 20, at the Camano paintings, sculptures, glass Woolley, along with a proproblems or circumstances Center, 606 Arrowhead and more by 40 artists. Gal- that disrupt, prevent or gram featuring the Alaskan Road, Camano Island. $20, lery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 adventures of two local frustrate personal, human $10 students ages 17 and p.m. Saturday and Sunday, motorcyclists. $10, $5 ages and planetary well-being. younger. 360-387-0222. or by appointment. The 12 and younger. Tickets are Free. Preregister with a show’s final day is Feb. 27. available at Joy’s Bakery or co-op cashier, call 360-336OPEN MIC: All ages, 7 www.matzkefineart.com. call the SWITMO office at 5087, ext. 139, or email jill@ p.m. Thursdays, The Soup 360-424-0407. skagitfoodcoop.com. Bowl at Common Ground, “GLACIAL SPEED”: A 351 Pease Road, Burlingshow of recent artwork by SWING DANCE: The “HOSPITAL MERGERS ton. Sign-ups begin at 6 Cynthia Camlin continues Mount Vernon High School & RELIGIOUS RESTRICthrough Jan. 13 at the Skagit TIONS: HEALTH CARE FOR p.m. All ages are welcome jazz bands will present Valley College Art Gallery LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL to perform or come to a swing dance from 7 to watch and listen. Free. For in the Gary Knutzen Cardi- AND TRANSGENDERED 9:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18, at nal Center on the SVC cam- PERSONS”: PFLAG Skagit information, contact Tobie Christ The King Church, Ann at 425-870-6784. pus, 2405 E. College Way, 2111 Riverside Drive, will host a presentation Mount Vernon. The exhibit and discussion from 7 to Mount Vernon. Enjoy MORE FUN interprets environmental dance lessons, live music, 8:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, change through visual meta- in the Safe Haven room at silent auction, dessert sale WINTER FILM SERIES: phors, depicting the phases Central United Methodist and raffle. $6, $10 couple, 7 p.m. Fridays at the Anaof melting glaciers through Church, 1013 Polte Road, cortes Public Library, 1220 $20 family. Proceeds will abstracted forms. Gallery benefit the MVHS Band 10th St., Anacortes. AcadSedro-Woolley. The meethours are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ing will include a DVD emy Award nominee Nick and Orchestra Boosters.

FISH HATCHERY TOURS: Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group will offer free guided tours of the Marblemount Fish Hatchery facility from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through Jan. 27, at 8319 Fish Hatchery Road, Marblemount. Learn about the enhancement group, hatchery operations, salmon and their life cycle and other visitors to the area, such as bald eagles. Tours start inside the visitors’ center. The hatchery is open daily for self-guided tours. 360336-0172, ext. 304, or educa tion@skagitfisheries.org. EAGLE WATCHING: View bald eagles wintering on the Skagit River from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through Jan. 27, at three eagle watcher stations on Highway 20: Howard Miller Steelhead Park in Rockport, Sutter Creek rest area at milepost 100 and the Marblemount Fish Hatchery, 8319 Fish Hatchery Road. Volunteers will provide spotting scopes and binoculars. Free. 360856-5700. CRAB FEST: The annual event will take place from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, at Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. Enjoy a whole Dungeness crab, with side dishes, dessert and more. Swingnuts Jazz will provide live entertainment. A cash bar will be available. 360387-0222 or www.camano center.org.

ties will be available in a casual setting. The event will include a fashion show at 3 p.m., prize drawings and a “man cave” where guys can hang out, watch sports on HD-TV and enjoy an adult beverage. Tickets: $8 advance, $10 at the door. skagitweddingshow.com or 866-585-6752 or 360-428-5972. ANTIQUES DISCOVERY: American Association of University Women will present the sixth annual Antiques Discovery appraisal event from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland St. Bring in your potential treasures to be evaluated by certified appraisers Don Jensen and Kathleen Victor. $10 per item. Proceeds support Skagit Valley College women’s scholarships. 360757-6500. DINNER/AUCTION: Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County will hold a winter fundraiser from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, in the Sedro-Woolley Community Center, 715 Pacific St. Gourmet pasta dinner provided by Cascade Job Corps Culinary Arts Program. Silent auction, raffle packages and kids activities. Admission by donation at the door or during event. All proceeds benefit SedroWoolley Boys & Girls Club programs. 360-419-5524 or jreid@bgcskagit.org.

STAR PARTY: Explore the night sky and view distant SKAGIT WEDDING galaxies, planets and nebulas SHOW: Prospective brides beginning at dark Friday, and grooms can find every- Jan. 18, at Fort Nugent Park, thing they’ll need for their 2075 SW Fort Nugent Road, big day from 11 a.m. to Oak Harbor. No telescope 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 20, at is needed and all ages are the Swinomish Casino & welcome. Dress warmly. Lodge, 12885 Casino Drive, Canceled if cloudy. Free. For Anacortes. Vendors from information, call Dan PulSkagit, Snohomish, Island, len at 360-679-7664 or visit Whatcom, and King coun- www.icas-wa.webs.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, January 10, 2013

MOVIES

‘Gangster Squad’ makes for decent gangland Western By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The Old West died hard in the City of Angels. And in the years after World War II, battle-hardened veterans came home to a town “under enemy occupation,” when the only way to fight off the Mob was with a six gun, your two fists and the right hat.

‘GANGSTER SQUAD’ HHH

Cast: Sean Penn, Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone, Josh Brolin, Anthony Mackie, Robert Patrick Running time: 1:50 MPAA rating: R for strong violence and language

“Gangster Squad” is a gang-war drama built on Western conventions, a rootin’ tootin’, Camel-smokin’, whiskey swillin’ shoot-’emup about a lawless period in L.A.’s history when a small cadre of cops, working outside the law, took on mob boss Mickey Cohen in a fight for “the soul of Los Angeles.” Josh Brolin ably handles the John Wayne role, the paragon of virtue, an incorruptible police sergeant tasked by the only honest police chief (Nick Nolte) to chase out mob boss Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn, pugnacious, ferocious). Ryan Gosling is Jerry Waters, the cynical detective/ gunslinger who will have to take sides, but is going to take some convincing. Anthony Mackie’s the knife-throwing street cop from the black side of town. Robert Patrick is the aged pistolero and holdover from the “real Wild West.” Michael Pena represents the city’s Hispanic underclass,

Warner Bros. Pictures via AP

Ryan Gosling (left) and Josh Brolin star in “Gangster Squad.” a kid who needs to prove himself. And Giovanni Ribisi is “the brains,” the cop with the glasses and the Army-based knowledge of wiretaps. They’re a regular “Magnificent Six.” “Who’s the tomato?” That would be Emma Stone, playing the “dancehall girl,” the mobster’s young moll “poached” by

the handsome Jerry. “Zombieland” director Ruben Fleischer may not do much with this pictorially that suggests “Western,” but he keeps the characters iconic, the morality straightforward and the action clean. Will Beall’s script is peppered with character “types” — gunsels with scars and World War II-vintage

machine guns. Of course Jon Polito shows up, as he has in every gangster period piece since “Miller’s Crossing.” And Beall’s dialogue gives “Gangster Squad” an extra kick. Insults: “He’s got a smart mouth, but he’s dumb where it counts.” Compliments: “Push comes to shove, kid’ll stay

behind his gun.” This “inspired by a true story” tale has much in common with an earlier Nolte fedoras-and-fistfights cop picture, “Mulholland Falls,” named for a hillside where brutal cops sent gangsters tumbling after one of their “Get outta town” lectures. Brolin & Co. even pay a visit there.

All in all, “Gangster Squad” is a solid piece of work, and that solid piece of work Brolin anchors it in the kind of square-jawed moral rectitude that makes you wish Hollywood made more REAL Westerns, just for him. He’s fine in a trenchcoat and fedora. But somebody get that man a horse.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, January 10, 2013 - E19

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS

details of politics. Daniel DayLewis creates a Lincoln who is Compiled from news services. calmly self-confident, patient Ratings are one to four stars. and willing to play politics in a realistic way. Not about an icon of history, but about a “Life of Pi”: A miraculous achievement of storytelling and president who was scorned by some of his opponents as a a landmark of visual mastery. hayseed from the backwoods. Inspired by a worldwide bestHe understood them better seller that seemed unfilmable, than they did him. Sure to win it is a triumph over its difficulties. It is also a moving spiritual many Academy Award nominations. Drama, PG-13, 149 minachievement, a movie whose title could have been shortened utes. HHHH to “Life.” The story involves the “Rise of the Guardians” — 227 days that its teenage hero Hyperactive 3D animated fantasy regarding the plight of Jack (Suraj Sharma) spends drifting Frost, who nobody seems able across the Pacific in the same to see. Called upon in a crisis to lifeboat as a Bengal tiger. The movie quietly combines various help the Guardians (Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, religious traditions to enfold etc.), he saves the day. Younger its story in the wonder of life. How remarkable that these two children like the breakneck mammals, and the fish beneath action, magical ability to fly, and the young hero who has tired them and birds above them, of being overlooked. Animated are all here. One of the year’s best. Fantasy, PG, 125 minutes. adventure, PG, 89 minutes. HHH HHHH “Skyfall” — “Skyfall” trium “Lincoln” — Steven Spielphantly reinvents 007 in one of berg’s new film focuses on only a few months of Lincoln’s the best Bonds ever made. This is a full-blooded, joyous, intellife, including the passage of ligent celebration of a beloved the 13th Amendment ending cultural icon, with Daniel Craig slavery, the surrender of the taking full possession of a role Confederacy and his assashe earlier played unconvincingly. sination. Rarely has a film attended more carefully to the The film at last provides a role

worthy of Judi Dench, returning as M, who is one of the best actors of her generation. She is all but the co-star, with a lot of screen time, poignant dialogue, and a character who is far more complex and sympathetic than we expect. In this 50th year of the James Bond series, with the dismal “Quantum of Solace” (2008) still in our minds, I don’t know what I expected in Bond No. 23, but certainly not an experience this invigorating. Action, PG-13, 143 minutes. HHHH “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” — “The Hobbit” is stuffed with Hollywood’s latest technology — 3-D, high-speed projection and Dolby’s Atmos surround sound system. The result is some eye candy that truly dazzles and some that utterly distracts, at least in its test-run of 48 frames a second, double the projection rate that has been standard since silentfilm days. It’s also overstuffed with, well, stuff. Prologues and sidestepping backstory. Long, boring councils among dwarves, wizards and elves. A shallow blood feud extrapolated from sketchy appendices to J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” to give the film a bad

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guy. Fantasy-action, PG-13, 169 minutes. HH1⁄2 “The Impossible” — The tsunami that devastated the Pacific Basin in the winter of 2004 remains one of the worst natural disasters in history. We were in Europe when it struck, and we sat mesmerized, watching the news on TV -- again and again, that towering wall of water looming from the sea, tossing trucks, buses and its helpless victims aside. In this terrifying triumph of special effects, Juan Antonio Bayona’s film becomes a powerful story of a family’s cohesive strength. With Naomi Watts, Ewan McGregor and Tom Holland. One of the best films of 2012. Drama, PG-13, 114 minutes. HHHH “Zero Dark Thirty” — Two hours of watching a loner female CIA strategist who knows she is right — and the payoff that she is. Jessica Chastain stars as Maya, who was right all along, providing the film with a timely heroine. Lots of murky action in the big capture and death, but lacking the split-second timing and relentless action of director Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker.” Thriller, R, 157 minutes. HHH

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Jan. 11-17 Gangster Squad (R): Friday-Saturday: 1:20, 3:40, 6:30, 8:50; SundayThursday: 1:20, 3:40, 6:30 Les Miserables (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:00, 4:15, 7:30 Lincoln (PG-13): FridayThursday: 1:10, 4:25, 7:45 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC4FUN (888-262-4386). CONCRETE THEATRE Jan. 11-13 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (PG-13): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403

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360 January 10 2013