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athlete pat h ways believe support strengthen future

Winter 2016

Also inside:

Successful transitions are one component of a strong and aligned sport system

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Voices from the Community: Starting Stage Nakkertok Cross-country Ski Club Canada Basketball Creating Meaningful Sport Opportunities for Young Athletes with a Disability Examining Coaches Adoption and Implementation of the LTAD model Coaching – Keeping Sport Fun for All How do I recruit youth volunteers for my sport program?

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DEAR SPORT PROGRAM ENTHUSIAST Thank you continuing to share your passion for sport by designing programs that provide a variety of experiences through which our youth can find their pathway to developing their athletic and life skills. One of the reasons that I thoroughly enjoy working in sport is the passion and genuine energy exuded from the people in the industry. This issue of the Athlete Pathways shows how organizations at all levels build opportunities for sport participation at all stages and all ages. We are particularly thrilled to be focusing this issue on starting stages in sport that highlight the ability of athletes to enter into sport at a variety of stages along the pathway, including transitions from other sports. The learning continues through: • Creating Meaningful Sport Opportunities for Young Athletes with a Disability; • Coaches’ adaptation and implementation of long term athlete development;

LTAD BY THE

NUMBERS 40%

of young Canadians will volunteer in the culture, sport & recreation sector

8.75 hours

per week kids 8-18 exercise

• Coaches creating fun opportunities in sport; and • Developing opportunities for youth volunteerism. Creating fun and engaging experiences to keep our youth participating in sport is our shared goal. Whether it is as an athlete, coach, official, administrator or volunteer, there are so many ways that we can keep the love of sport alive for our young people. Thank you for making sport better in Canada. Sincerely,

Debra

Come for the sport resources, stay for the great network. Join thousands of subscribers leveraging our resources every day. Get a subscription now

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per week on average kids 8-18 spend with media

70%

Debra Gassewitz President & CEO, SIRC CS4L Leadership Team

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42 hours

of 3 and 4 year olds meet the Canadian physical activity guidelines

10 minutes

of short bouts of activity can increase physical fitness in adults

25%

of Canadian children are overweight or obese


WHAT’S INSIDE Successful transitions

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Alan Zimmermann, Director, Policy and Planning at Sport Canada talks about how successful transitions are one component of a strong and aligned sport system

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According to the authors, coaches hold the key in the progression of athletes along their developmental pathway and with the support of Sport Canada behind the LTAD model, it is vital to understand if coaches are understanding, adopting and implementing LTAD in their coaching practices.

Athlete Development at Canada Basketball A Q&A with Michele O’Keefe

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We talked with Michele O’Keefe from Canada Basketball as she shared their practices in promoting appropriate programming for athletes to pursue sport throughout their athlete development pathway.

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Starting Stages at Nakkertok Nordic Ski Club The Nakkertok racing program is one of the most successful programs in Canada. The full scope of the programs offered provide athletes with an environment that helps them to grow both mentally and physically, to become accomplished skate and classic skiers, and perform to their potential at Provincial, National, and International levels.

Creating Meaningful Sport Opportunities for Young Athletes with a Disability

Current Research: Examining Coaches Adoption and Implementation of the LTAD model

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Coaching – Keeping Sport Fun for All We all know how much sport can offer kids. While many factors contribute to drop off, a significant area worth exploring is the element of fun in sport, what coaches can do to maximize it and how much it means to young participants.

Getting involved: How do I recruit youth volunteers for my sport program?

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The majority of young people who volunteer use it as a way to build skills, establish work experience and network in order to improve their job prospects in the future.

As Canadian sport policy leaders work diligently to strengthen development pathways for athletes with a disability, it’s timely to consider some of the factors which may influence these athletes towards becoming and remaining involved in competitive sport.

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SUCCESSFUL TRANSITIONS

ARE ONE COMPONENT OF A STRONG AND ALIGNED SPORT SYSTEM Alan Zimmermann, Director, Policy and Planning Sport Canada

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e have all heard the expression “You never get a second chance to make a first impression”. Sport Canada recognizes the importance of first impressions in sport as those initial experiences can substantially influence a person’s “Sport Positive Attitudes” and determine whether or not they continue to participate. Thinking about when people develop first impressions, it is easy to picture only the Active Start and FUNdamentals stages of Long-Term Athlete Development. Many people get their first impressions of a sport early in their lives, usually in a community program or in school. But when you consider what happens to a person across all of the stages of development, these early first impression-type moments represent only a fraction of the first impressions that a person may have throughout his or her life in sport.

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A first impression experience happens every time a person makes a transition in sport - changing teams, clubs, leagues or even sports – for a variety of reasons including moving to a new city, affordability, promotion to a new competitive level, and so on. Each of these transitions represents an opportunity to strengthen “Sport Positive Attitudes”. Conversely, each transition also challenges a person’s continued involvement in sport. If you think back to your personal history in sport, you will likely discover that you made a number of transitions. Perhaps some went well and others were a bit more rocky. There is considerable research showing the impact of a positive first impression - just as there is a lot of evidence that a negative first impression may have lingering effects. When these transitions in sport go well, it can be one of the steps along the way to a lifetime of sport, and for some, a

World Championship, Olympic and/ or Paralympic podium. When they go poorly, people quit sport and may not come back. If the expression “You never get a second chance to make a first impression” holds true in a sport context then the knowledge and understanding of these transition points should be of critical importance to sport leaders.

THINK BACK TO YOUR PERSONAL HISTORY IN SPORT AND ALL THOSE TRANSITIONS.

Do you know why certain ones went well and why others did not? What could have happened that would have changed the negative experiences into positive ones?


TO AID THESE TRANSITION POINTS, YOU CAN ASK:

At what stages of development are people joining our sport and from which sports are these people coming most often? Where are the internal transitions in our sport? What are people experiencing when they transition to our sport or within our sport? Is it a positive experience? What do we need to know about a person’s background to make the transition more successful to our sport? What is our sport doing now to facilitate transitions? Consider your answers to these questions. One way to improve transition success is to use the answers to the questions above to create transition environments that are welcoming, supportive, and developmentally appropriate. A major factor in transition success is whether or not the person making the transition already has the necessary skills and attributes. Your sport’s

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Athlete Development Matrix (ADM) can help identify which skills are needed wherever these transitions are occurring. Well-designed assessment tests will reveal the gaps that need to be addressed with each person. This information would be useful to a coach or technical leader whether the person is transitioning within a sport (e.g. from a provincial to national team), or from another sport (e.g. trampoline to freestyle). Using this information, you can design programs or tailor coaching to improve transition experiences at these critical junctures. In addition to thinking about skills, you may want to consider the transition barriers faced by under-represented groups. Many Canadians such as women, persons with a disability and Aboriginal peoples, face obstacles such as marginalization, prejudice and racism. These are strong deterrents to participation in sport. Resources such as Actively Engaging Women and Girls, No Accidental Champions and new resources to strengthen the engagement of Aboriginal participants in sport include insights and recommendations for sport leaders to address these factors. To improve transition environments you should also consider the needs of these groups and proactively address the systemic and cultural barriers impeding their transitions.

By striving to ensure that every person’s transition is a positive one, more people will continue in sport. The benefits to sport organizations who are knowledgeable of these transition points and good at facilitating a person’s introduction and progression in sport are easy to describe. Greater recruitment. Greater retention. Greater results. To learn more about the Government of Canada’s role as the single largest investor in Canada’s sport system, please visit www.Canada.ca/Sport or join us on Facebook and Twitter. ∆

For more information on Sport Canada programs and services, you will find us online via: Web: Canada.ca/Sport Twitter: @SportCanada_EN Facebook: facebook.com/SportCanadaEN

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Voices from the Community Athlete Development at Canada Basketball:

Q&A WITH

MICHELE O’KEEFE , President & CEO

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he goal of Canadian sport is to provide opportunities for children and youth to take part in positive experiences in sport that match their stage in skill and development. We talked with Michele O’Keefe from Canada Basketball as she shared their practices in promoting appropriate programming for athletes to pursue sport throughout their athlete development pathway.

Why do you personally love basketball? I’ve been involved with basketball since 7th grade. I played on club and school teams all through high school and university. Basketball has introduced me to my best friends and has gotten me the best jobs. I have learned how to work in a team environment, how to look at the big picture and respect for all.

Canada Basketball worked with NBA Canada to develop a program called Jr. NBA Rookie Division. This is a LTAD appropriate program for children learning to be athletic using basketball.

As a tall, young girl, basketball gave me a safe place where I could be proud of my height and not shy away from it. It isn’t easy being a young girl but knowing that my teammates always supported me gave me confidence.

Both of these programs were created with fun as the primary purpose – allow the children to have fun while learning to be active playing basketball. There are modified games which are much more appropriate than full 5on5 with a size 7 basketball.

What is the most popular program (as well as stage and/or age) for initial sign up to basketball? Why?

Would you consider Basketball ideally suited for early and/or late entry? Why?

There are two programs that usually attract first-time basketball players – Jr. NBA Rookie Division and Steve Nash Youth Basketball (SNYB).

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SNYB is a program that includes curriculum, practice plans and a coaching kit as well as a jersey and ball for the youngsters. We’ve also created a community environment through Facebook and the SNYB website offering blogs and coaching tips.

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The adult game of basketball – 5on5 – is not suited for early entry. That is why we have SNYB and Jr. NBA Rookie Division.

We have also published a curriculum book called Mini Basketball. In this book we discuss different competition models – specifically, 3on3 for youngster on one basket with a smaller ball. As they become more mature, they can advance to 4on4 and eventually 5on5. 3on3 is especially effective as all of the players get a chance to touch to ball. There certainly is no fun in being the smaller athlete and never getting to handle the ball.


5on5 is certainly a sport that can be started later. One challenge is the technical aspects of the highly specialized skills. Children who start younger and learn in a healthy environment will have an advantage.

From which other sports do you often see athletes transfer to basketball?

What is the latest point to transfer into your sport and still experience high performance success? The early Train to Compete stage is usually the latest point that athletes can transfer to our sport and still experience success at the high performance level.

What life skills does basketball help to teach? Basketball is a great sport through which athletes can learn important life skills like: communication, leadership, responsibility, concentration dealing with adversity, co-operation, imagery, trust, proper nutrition, sleep. ∆

Soccer is the most common sport we see transfer from.

For more information contact Canada Basketball: Web: www.basketball.ca Twitter: @CanBball Facebook: facebook.com/CanadaBasketball

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Voices from the Community Starting stages at

NAKKERTOK NORDIC SKI CLUB Carolyn Johnson Grall Nakkertok Racing Director Photographs courtesy of Ian Austen, Toni Scheier, Rob Smith, Corina Zechel

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he Nakkertok racing program is one of the most successful programs in Canada. The full scope of the programs offered provide athletes with an environment that helps them to grow both mentally and physically, to become accomplished skate and classic skiers, and perform to their potential at Provincial, National, and International levels. Nakkertok has produced 2 women Olympians and presently has 2 athletes on the National team. Nakkertok has been able to carefully and deliberately nurture a racing program with five levels, fully aligned with the Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) Model, each representing an entry level to the Racing Program. These levels of entry are Learn to Ski Plus (LTS+=Active Start) with athletes between 8-9 years old,

Racing Rabbits (Learning to Train) who are 9-11 years old, Training to Train, being 12-14 years old, Learning to Compete, 15-18 yrs old, and the Nakkertok Junior Development Team (Training to Compete) which is made up of athletes who are 18-23 years old and attending university. The most common entry points of the racing program occur at the LTS+ and

Perianne Jones, 2010 and 2014 Olympics. Peri started her skiing at Nakkertok when she was 14 years old as a Learn to Compete athlete. 8

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Racing Rabbits stages. At these entry stages the athletes develop agility and skiing skills, age appropriate cardiovascular development and long lasting friendships. Nakkertok aligned its racing programs with the LTAD in 2009 with the intent of having athletes develop at their own pace allowing them to train with appropriate ages or stages. Presently Nakkertok develops 250 racers in these programs. Thanks in part to a challenging training environment provided

Learn to Ski Plus and Racing Rab


Train to Compete girls having fun and competing hard at Nationals 2015

by our three professional staff, along with the commitment of the club, the parents of athletes, and 61 volunteer coaches, Nakkertok enjoys a high athlete-retention rate (95% stay in the programs from year to year). All five racing programs have grown steadily with the greatest number of athletes in our Learn to Complete program (52). With these numbers, and the growth, Nakkertok has sent a team of 60 to the Canadian National Championships for the past 3 years and have won the Canadian title 6 years in a row. At home, Nakkertok hosts the largest race in Canada by numbers. This year’s event hosted 673 athletes from as far away as Yukon, British Columbia, and Newfoundland. The Easterns Championships have been hosted in consecutive years since 2010,

bbits at the Cookie Race

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Train-to-Train athletes with the new Piston bully

and as a cross-country community at Nakkertok since 2012, and organized by over 200 volunteers. The growth has been significant and Nakkertok has been able to maintain a balance in the programs to allow skiers to develop at the rate they need as individuals. The size of our programs allows us to develop a combination of mixed gender and single gender training opportunities in many year-of-birth and age categories. This mix allows us to challenge the skiers in different ways, while maintaining and developing strong social ties. Many athletes “ grow up” with Nakkertok as their backyard playground, training facility, and family.

All this is accomplished through devoted coaching and developmental programming composed by the lead coaches of each program. The overall intent is to follow the LTAD Model and is designed to mix fun with challenging training through game based and technical activities, 11 months of the year. Nakkertok’s last entry level following the LTAD Model is the Ski for Life program developed by coaches for the adults. This program follows the same fundamentals in training as the other racing programs. It was initiated this year for the adults who want to continue growing as skiers. It has reached its maximum capacity. ∆ Contact us at: Website: nakkertok.ca Twitter: @NakkertokRacing Facebook: facebook.com/NakkertokRacing

NJDT athlete at Haywood Easterns Championships with onlookers

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CREATING MEANINGFUL SPORT OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG ATHLETES WITH A DISABILITY Jason Dunkerley

4-time Paralympian (medalist), T11 Middle Distance Track

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s Canadian sport policy leaders work diligently to strengthen development pathways for athletes with a disability, it’s timely to consider some of the factors which may influence these athletes towards becoming and remaining involved in competitive sport. I have spent a lot of time thinking about sport development for athletes with a disability. I grew up in Northern Ireland as one of three brothers with congenital blindness. Our parents encouraged us to be active. Although neighbourhood children were curious, we were generally accepted. We adapted our own games, rode bikes, and couldn’t wait to go outside after school. When we immigrated to Canada, my brothers and I attended a school for students with visual impairment where sport was encouraged. We were exposed to a variety of sports within a safe and supportive environment, which galvanized us to work hard and develop athletic competency. For my brothers, this meant specializing in wrestling; for me, middle distance running. By the time I entered university in the fall of 1997, I had the confidence to ask the cross country and track coach if I could join the team. He had no qualms about me coming to practices, although he had never coached a blind runner before. By training and spending time with the 10

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team, I soon improved to the point where I qualified for my first national Para Athletics team. This is my own experience and it is anything but typical, as in reality there is no common road for emerging athletes with a disability. What is apparent is that it is not easy for many children with disabilities to enter the sport system. As many as 78 % of parents of children with disabilities claim that their children do not participate in community programs (Picard, 2012). Just 3 % of Canadian children with disabilities participate in organized sport, compared to 36 % of their able-bodied peers. When it comes to unstructured physical activity, nearly a quarter of young people with disabilities do not take part, compared to just 2 % on the able-bodied side (Levelling the Playing field, 2012). There are a number of factors which may impact access to sport among young people with disabilities, including: • A positive or negative first experience – creating a reason to continue;

• Level of knowledge on how to accommodate participants with a disability; • Barriers (attitude; accessibility, etc) which may marginalize those with disabilities within sport settings; • Parental concerns related to the safety of sport and to minimize injury risk; • Level of awareness about the inclusive programs, organizations and services which are available. Young people need to be able to envision the possibility that they could follow in the footsteps of their role models, no matter how unfounded this may be. I grew up idolizing the professional soccer stars of the late 1980’s; I thought I could be like them one day, and nobody dissuaded me otherwise. Instilling this type of imaginative force among young people with disabilities is particularly important I think, given that members of this demographic often count themselves out. This is not to suggest that parents or sport leaders should mislead anybody into attempting to be someone they are not. Rather, it is to propose that emerging athletes with disabilities should be encouraged to envision success in spite of the limitations they may face.


Nurturing self-belief, desire and confidence in these athletes is to equip them with the tools to forge sporting opportunities of their own. This said, influencing individuals with a disability to continue in sport is undoubtedly a team effort. Below are a few considerations and resources. FOR PARENTS:

Expose children to a variety of structured and unstructured activities; Introduce children to integrated and segregated programs: segregated programs will allow children to derive confidence while integration maintains community linkages; Treat children with disabilities as you would your other children; Connect with parent groups and seek out mentors for your children - research points to the benefit of peer support in influencing behaviour towards sport and physical activity.

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FOR SPORT PROVIDERS:

Create environments which promote confidence and a positive experience for all; Learn how best to accommodate and challenge athletes with disabilities – it’s ok to not have all the answers. Be curious, open-minded and creative; Refer to physical activity resources, disability sport organizations such as the Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association or Ontario Blind Sports Association, and helpful tips.

FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES:

Believe in yourself and what is important to you; Look for positive reinforcement from family, friends, coaches and mentors; Own your involvement in sport – solicit support, be adaptable, persistent and ambitious.

The increase in opportunities for athletes with disabilities to participate in almost any sport in recent years is a testament to the progress that is being made. When we look at Canada’s place in the world, it’s generally accepted that our pool of talented athletes with a disability is aging and that there is a need to identify a next generation (No Accidental Champions, 2011). However, by continuing to build awareness of the rich resources that are available, and by exposing emerging athletes with a disability to meaningful sport opportunities that in turn inspire them to believe in themselves, I think we are building an important foundation towards enhancing opportunities for athletes of all abilities to achieve their sporting potential. ∆ References: “No Accidental Champions: LTAD for Athletes with Disabilities (2nd Edition)”. Canadian Sport for Life, 2011. Accessed online, February 25, 2016. “Levelling the Playing field: a Natural Progression from Playground to Podium for Canadians with Disabilities”. Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, June 2012. Martin Ginis, Kathleen, et al. “Peer-Delivered Physical Activity Interventions: An Overlooked Opportunity for Physical Activity Promotion”. Translational Behavioral Medicine, Volume 3, Issue 4, December 2013. Accessed online, January 18, 2016. Picard, André. “Don’t Shut Disabled Kids Out of Society”. The Globe and Mail, January 30, 2012. Accessed online, February 26, 2016.

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CURRENT RESEARCH EXAMINING COACHES ADOPTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LTAD MODEL

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IRC is pleased to be working together with Sport Canada to share current research on topics informing policy and promoting quality sport programming. Here we are sharing a recent article examining the RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COACHES AND THE LONG-TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL.

Charlotte Beaudoin, Bettina Callary & François Trudeau (2015), Coaches’ Adoption and Implementation of Sport Canada’s Long-Term Athlete Development Model .SAGE Open, 1-16. (Research supported by the Sport Participation Research Initiative)

Highlights from the research Athlete development has a longstanding history as a subject holding great interest to sport participation at all levels. In Canada, the creation of the long-term athlete development (LTAD) model has been shown to be one of the country’s most unifying theories when it comes to athletes engaging in sport at all ages and at all levels. According to the authors, coaches hold the key in the progression of athletes along their developmental pathway and with the support of Sport Canada behind the LTAD model, it is vital to understand if coaches are understanding, adopting and implementing LTAD in their coaching practices. The authors use Rogers’s Diffusion of Innovations as their framework to examine the adoption of LTAD

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as a social innovation. The purpose of their investigation was to “explore how coaches adopted and implemented Sport Canada’s LTAD model and to understand the barriers and enablers they see in these processes”. A case study of coaches who either had decided to adopt the LTAD model or a second group who were in the implementation stage was used. The following observations were shared: • More than half the coaches in the adoption part of the study reported very good knowledge of LTAD. Much of the knowledge was gained through coaching certification courses and most of these coaches had longer coaching experience.

• Many coaches observed that early stage sport in Canada is driven by parent volunteers who have little exposure to LTAD training and this created a challenge in developing basic skills in early development stages. • Coaches in early development sports claimed less knowledge of LTAD and what knowledge that was there claimed an incompatibility between the model and coaching implementation. • Coaches have positive associations with LTAD as a method to develop the athlete at the personal level. There was no association with LTAD in relation to athletic


performance probably as there is little evidence showing that this model is more effective than others. • Coaches see LTAD as creating a common language to talk to other in the athletic community particularly parents. • Coaches perceived LTAD to be compatible with their current philosophies of coaching. However, there is an incompatibility drawn between LTAD and the organizational

structure of sport that supports and sometimes emphasizes short-term success (defined by winning). This emphasis does not support later developing athletes and brings into play ‘relative age effect’. Also of concern in this compatibility scenario combined with emphasis on success is the migration towards early specialization which is contrary to LTAD philosophy.

difficult to implement in short term scenarios. Without seeing short-term success, parental and coach confidence in LTAD is difficult. Many coaches then implement only selected aspects of the model, instead of its entirety. It is suggested that sports introduce shortterm goals so that coaches and athletes have measurement stages along the LTAD progression.

• Coaches feel that the longterm aspect of the model is

• The long-term positive effects of incorporating LTAD into sport systems is only beginning to show. • Professional development for coaches is recommended to help with the big picture understanding of the LTAD model and the transition of athletes between stages. Coaches need to understand the model as a whole outside of the stage they are involved in so they can also transfer this understanding to athletes, parents and other coaches. ∆

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COACHING – KEEPING SPORT FUN FOR ALL

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e all know how much sport can offer kids; we’ve got numerous research studies along with our personal experiences to back it up. Research also shows us that most sport participation rates peak at 13 years old and then continuously drop throughout the teenage years. While many factors contribute to this drop off, a significant area worth exploring is the element of fun in sport, what coaches can do to maximize it and how much it means to young participants.

What if you discover a kid on and again to have a detrimental effect on a young person’s mental and your team isn’t having fun? For children, not having fun can stem from a variety of reasons; maybe they’re just not having a good day and the next practice they will be back to their regular selves. On the other hand, if you notice that a kid that once seemed to love the game now seems sullen, uninterested, aggressive or acting out in any other way, chances are there’s something going on that needs to be addressed. It’s become a common practice for parents to get their children specializing in their given sport as early as possible with the thought that ‘more time to practice will make a better athlete’. While intentions may be good, early sport specialization has been proven time

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physical development and can end in burnout and eventual dropping out of sport altogether. Burnout can be addressed by a child taking a break from sport, attending fewer practices or allowing them to try something new altogether. If burnout or sport specialization is not a factor, explore the parents’ expectations of their child or the particular sport played, and if necessary, you may wish to examine your own outlook as well.

What should coaches aim for? • Focus on skill development and individual improvement rather than focusing on winning competitions and games.

• Modified games add some variety to practices and keep kids engaged. Keep things active and organized; try to minimize wait times and maximize participation. • Be realistic about attention spans, athletic abilities and talent. Not all children mature the same way, pick up skills at the same speed or will be the next prodigy headed for greatness. • Allow opportunities for socialization and friendship building – everyone has more fun if they have a friend to joke around with. • Make it clear that mistakes or misses are part of the learning


process. This approach helps to reduce stress and anxiety when trying something new and encourages kids to keep trying. • Place a strong emphasis on group goals, teamwork, and team cohesion. While the focus shouldn’t be on winning, don’t

be afraid to set a few challenging goals for kids to work toward. By being aware of the common pitfalls young people face in sport as they grow up, a coach can better influence and meet their needs. If you’re enthusiastic about your sport and your role as their coach, children will pick up on it and show a similar excitement for what you’re trying to teach. It should be a no-brainer that creating a fun, exciting and positive environment in sport will keep kids returning to the field year after year. ∆

References Bengoechea E, Strean W, Williams D. Understanding and promoting fun in youth sport: coaches’ perspectives. Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy. November 2004;9(2):197-214. Martin N. Keeping It Fun in Youth Sport: What Coaches Should Know and Do. Strategies (08924562). September 2014;27(5):27-32. Strachan L. Enhancing Coach-Parent Relationships in Youth Sports: Increasing Harmony and Minimizing Hassle. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching [serial online]. March 2011;6(1):47-48. Strean W, Holt N. Coaches’, athletes’, and parents’ perceptions of fun in youth sports: assumptions about learning and implications for practice. / Perceptions des entraineurs, des athletes et des parents, sur le plaisir eprouve par les jeunes dans la pratique sportive: perspectives d’apprentissage et implications dans la pratique. Avante. 2000;6(3):83-98. Visek A, Manning H. The FUN MAPS: A Youth Sport Scientific Breakthrough. Olympic Coach. December 2014;25(4):39-42.

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GETTING INVOLVED: HOW DO I RECRUIT YOUTH VOLUNTEERS FOR MY SPORT PROGRAM?

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ccording to recent reports, over 40% of young Canadians will volunteer in the culture, sport & recreation sector - this is great news for sport leaders! The majority of young people who volunteer use it as a way to build skills, establish work experience and network in order to improve their job prospects in the future. So how do I go about finding booth (if possible) or hand out flyers. Today’s youth are media people to recruit? savvy so the internet is always The first option that should come a good bet; use local online to mind is high schools and post newspapers, social media outlets, secondary institutions. Many job boards, press releases, school schools now require that youth fulfill or library newsletters or your own a certain amount of volunteer hours organizational website to get the in order to graduate. This number word out. can fluctuate from 5 hours, up to a more demanding requirement What’s in it for them? of 100 hours of volunteer service. Focusing your initial outreach on Volunteering will likely be a new students is a great way to begin experience for the youth you but there are many other options are aiming to attract, so be sure to outline clearly what the job available. entails and how it would benefit Think of all the places in your them. For example, volunteering community that local youth could lead to potential summer typically gather – malls, churches, employment, resume experience, movie theatres, grocery stores, forming contacts or improving restaurants, recreation areas or their applications for scholarships. sports arenas. Don’t be afraid to Young people typically have busy make a personal connection to schedules so you’ll want to be your organization by speaking convincing in your ad as to why they to people face to face – set up a should consider working for you for free. 16

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TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT RECRUITING VOLUNTEERS CHECK OUT SOME OF THE RESOURCES BELOW: New Strategies for Involving Youth – Volunteer Canada

So you want to host a youth conference: How to make your next event truly engaging – Charity Village

Attracting Youth Volunteers


Recruiting is essentially a sales job that comes with its challenges but if you are patient and persistent in your efforts you will see results. Create a strategy, put a face to your organization and garner support from as many people as you can muster, including current and former volunteers, board members, parents, or other prominent community members. ∆

References

According to recent reports, over 40% of young Canadians will volunteer in the culture, sport & recreation sector

Bouchet A, Lehe A. Volunteer Coaches in Youth Sports Organizations: Their Values, Motivations & How To Recruit, & Retain. Journal Of Youth Sports. April 2010;5(1):21-24. Busser J, Carruthers C. Youth sport volunteer coach motivation. Managing Leisure. January 2010;15(1/2):128-139 Engelberg T, Skinner J, Zakus D. What does commitment mean to volunteers in youth sport organizations?. Sport In Society. January 2, 2014;17(1):52-67. LaVetter D, Stahura K. Negligent Hiring in Youth Sports: Background Screening of Volunteers. Journal Of Youth Sports. April 2010;5(1):9-15. Shannon C, Robertson B, Morrison K, Werner T. Understanding Constraints Younger Youth Face in Engaging as Volunteers. Journal Of Park & Recreation Administration. Winter2009 2009;27(4):17-37

Watch for our next issue ! Articles from: • Water Polo Canada • Speed Skating Canada • A Coach’s Perspective FRANÇAIS

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The Future

Editor Debra Gassewitz, SIRC Content Nancy Rebel, SIRC Circulation Kim Sparling, SIRC Design Josyane Morin Translation Alexandre Contreras Marcel Nadeau

www.sirc.ca For more information: info@sirc.ca Sport Information Resource Centre (SIRC) is Canada’s national sport resource centre, established over 40 years ago. Mailing address: SIRC PO Box 53169, Rideau Centre RO Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 1C5 Disclaimer: Author’s opinions expressed in the articles are not necessarily those of SIRCuit, its publisher, the Editor, or the Editorial Board. SIRC makes no representations or warranties whatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness or suitability for any purpose of the content. Copyright © 2016 SIRC. All rights reserved. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored, transmitted, or disseminated, in any form, or by any means, without prior written permission from SIRC, to whom all requests to reproduce copyright material should be directed, in writing.

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Special Thanks Jason Dunkerley Nakkertok Nordic Ski Club Canada Basketball Sport Canada Alan Zimmermann Rebeccah Bornemann Craig Andreas Photos courtesy of Canada Basketball Nakertok Nordic Ski Club Ian Austen Toni Scheier Rob Smith Corina Zechel SIRC

Athlete Pathways Winter 2016  
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