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From the Grand President

SigEp heroes in action

Chris Bittman is a 1985 graduate of the University of Colorado. He served SigEp as a regional director, started 21 new chapters as an expansion director and completed his time on the Headquarters staff as director of chapter services. After spending time on Wall Street with Merrill Lynch and then serving as president and CEO of a $5 billion San Francisco– area investment firm, he returned to his alma mater to become the chief investment officer of the University of Colorado Foundation. He is currently a partner and chief investment officer at Perella Weinberg Partners. A Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient and member of the Board of Governors for over 25 years, he was first elected to the National Board of Directors at our centennial Conclave in 2001 and served for 14 years as Grand Treasurer. Chris resides in Denver with his wife, Kenda, and their five children.

Who is your hero? Is there someone who comes immediately to mind? Bob Kerr, Wichita State ’75, was my chapter counselor when I was a 19-year-old moron. Yes, I had some growing up to do. My chapter brothers would probably tell you that when I arrived in Boulder I was likely depriving some village of their idiot. Bob acted like a father to me at a time when I was separated from my own father. He reminded me of right from wrong. He had high expectations of me — and he pushed me to start setting an example for others. He was my hero when I desperately needed one. SigEp needs heroes today, too. At Conclave last August, our undergraduate leaders decided to confront the alcohol-centric focus of fraternities by eliminating alcohol and substances from our chapter homes. Since then, brothers have rallied to take steps to educate themselves on this shift and implement it at their chapters. In every case, SigEp heroes stepped up to help make it happen. Steven Caloiaro, Nevada-Reno ’08, is a hero. As chapter counselor, Steve worked with brothers at Nevada-Reno one-on-one to help give them the confidence to buck the trend on their campus and embrace a different concept of fraternity. He worked diligently to find and recruit alumni mentors who would provide guidance and accountability. Steve also helped the chapter plan for its future, leading one of the first alumni fundraising efforts. This ultimately allowed the chapter to renovate study space and pave the way for future renovations that will equip chapter brothers with safe and effective places to live and learn. Undergraduates say Steve has been a hero by holding them accountable to their goals — ensuring that they do their best. Our brothers at the University of Northern Iowa are heroes. A year ago, the Iowa Theta Chapter made the unanimous decision to reject the campus norm and embrace a fraternity experience that values healthy relationships and character development over the alcohol-centered one we see all too often. The chapter adopted a substance-free home policy and has seen incredible results. The chapter applied for and was granted Residential Learning Community accreditation. The new member GPA increased by 0.20, and its manpower has risen to the highest on campus. The chapter has recruited a community fellow to train brothers to be mentors while giving them the opportunity to put their learning into practice.

At UCLA, the SigEp brothers have been heroes while battling a challenging Greek culture. While the university has had many incidents over the past two semesters, causing the IFC to pause all social events, the SigEp chapter has been leading a constructive conversation about substanceIn the midst of this free housing within the IFC. Despite fears about how recruit- progress, some ment might be impacted, the chapters have California Omicron Chapter decided to close clearly articulated to potential rather than change. new members in the fall and But hundreds of spring that the house was going new volunteers to be dry in common spaces have joined us, more this coming year. As a result, of the right men are recruitment numbers were as becoming SigEps, strong or stronger than other and more chapters fraternities on campus, and each week are a clear message was sent to making a stand on the entire campus that SigEp intends to create a new normal their campus. for fraternities. In the midst of this progress, some chapters have decided to close rather than change. But hundreds of new volunteers have joined us, more of the right men are becoming SigEps, and more chapters each week are making a stand on their campus. We’ve also seen more organizations willing to join our cause, including Beta Theta Pi and Delta Upsilon, both of which recently announced plans to implement similar substance-free measures. I am grateful for all of our heroes and leaders and champions — just like the ones mentioned above. But … we need you. You can choose to be a hero by mentoring a young brother or choosing to stand for our principles even if it’s unpopular. When you choose to be a SigEp hero, you can be confident that you will change someone’s life for the better. And for that, I will always be grateful. Fraternally,

Chris Bittman Grand President


O n the Cover

In this issue “The Greeks took Troy because they never stopped trying.”

Serial entrepreneur Jim McKelvey, Washington-St. Louis ’87, known for mobile payments company Square, just launched his seventh startup. See page 24.

~ Theocritus

8 departments

4 Commentary Brothers weigh in on rush Fraternity in the news

6 Save the Date 12 Alumni and Volunteer News Feustel takes command at International Space Station Alumnus among NASA’s newest astronaut class Hurt creates opportunity through venture philanthropy Brothers replace OGH medallion after Hurricane Harvey Actor rides wave of fame to Antarctica Rookie reporter joins two Olympic regulars in PyeongChang Alumnus appointed VP at US Office of Investment Policy SigEp named editor of Greek research journal Alumnus leads FEMA during trying year Georgia’s Mike Macdonald follows his heart to the NFL

36 Fraternity Report 38 Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation Carlson helps pave the way for Indiana State’s newfound success Lifetime Giving

46 In Memoriam

14 32 28

chapters

8 Red Door Notes Florida Alpha’s new house gives brothers room to grow Alabama SigEps can’t be ignored

16 Chapter News SigEp returns to Florida campus and wins back charter Toledo SigEps bring home conference championship Iowa brothers mark 100 years Stanford Chapter has Rhodes and Schwarzman Scholars Chapter and undergraduate success celebrated at Carlson SigEp recognizes alumni and volunteer service

48 Index Wondering if your chapter appears in this issue of the Journal?

features

24 Square co-founder Jim McKelvey won’t quit

With a string of successful companies to his name, the insatiably curious entrepreneur continues to seek out new problems to solve.

By Beaux Carriere, Charleston ’10

28 Doing well by doing good

Jake Orville blends business savvy with desire to help others.

By T y ya N. Turner

32 Hollywood, Netflix and emerging markets

Nate Bolotin is at the forefront of a new, global film industry with XYZ Films.

By Erin Mullally, Michigan State ’99


Reader’s Guide 2017-2019 National Board of Directors

Fraternity Staff

Grand President

Chief Executive Officer

Christopher L. Bittman, Colorado ’85

grand.president@sigep.net

Spring 2018 Issue • Volume 115, Number 2 sigep.org • (804) 353-1901

Grand Treasurer

Daniel W. McVeigh, Texas Wesleyan ’90 Grand Secretary

Billy D. Maddalon, North Carolina State ’90

Editor Beaux Carriere, Charleston ’10 Associate Editor Tyya N. Turner Copy Editors Ben Ford, Arkansas Tech Renaissance; Aaron Jay Ledesma, Marquette ’14; Andrew J. Parrish, Georgia ’13 Art Direction Propolis Design Group

National Directors

Charles E. Amato, Sam Houston State ’70 Bruce W. Anderson, Texas-Austin ’71 Thomas B. Jelke, Florida International ’90 Garry C. Kief, Southern California ’70 Bradley C. Nahrstadt, Monmouth ’89 Victor K. Wilson, Georgia Renaissance

Contributors Al Alsobrook, Florida ’69 Matt Beck, Iowa ’90 Mike McDowell, Nevada-Reno ’03 Erin Mullally, Michigan State ’99 Nick Privitera, Alabama ’18 Steve Shewbrooks, Florida ’66

Subscriptions The SigEp Journal is published by Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity for alumni, volunteers, undergraduate members, parents and other supporters of the Fraternity. Published continuously since 1904, the Journal is issued twice a year. To maintain your subscription, please keep your address current at www.sigep.org/update or send address changes to address.update@sigep.net.

Submissions

Student Directors

Kyle Clark, Loyola Marymount ’18 Benjamin Pavich, Christopher Newport ’18 Jacob West, Missouri State ’20

Educational Foundation Board of Trustees President

Edward H. Hammond, Emporia State ’66 Treasurer

Stephen B. Shanklin, Murray State ’70 Secretary

Richard W. Bennet III, Central Missouri ’74

SigEp National Housing Board of Directors President

Kenneth S. Maddox, Oregon State ’75

The Journal welcomes all submissions sent to communications@sigep.net or to Journal Editor, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 310 South Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23220.

Vice President

Advertising

Clark H. Byrum Sr., Indiana ’57 Kenneth G. Christianson, Washington State ’74 Timothy J. Harmon, Washington ’82 Craig S. Kaufman, Washington-St. Louis ’86 Jerry A. Smith, Texas-Austin ’79 Jason St. John, MarylandCollege Park ’94 Daniel P. Sullivan, WPI ’12 John D. Weir, Purdue ’01 Stephen L. Young, Kansas ’80

For information on advertising, please email communications@sigep.net.

Complete Journal archive online at: www.sigep.org/journal/archive

CONNECT WITH SIGEP

AJ Siccardi, Florida ’98 Secretary-Treasurer

Brian C. Warren Jr., Virginia ’04 Directors

VOLUNTEER District governors support our Alumni and Volunteer Corporations and help recruit new volunteers. To learn more about how to volunteer, visit sigep.org/districtgovernors to contact your district governor. Explore volunteer opportunities at sigep.org/volunteers

DONATE Visit sigep.org/give Email matt.parrish@sigep.net

Attend Join our mailing lists to stay current on SigEp events near your city. sigep.org/update Visit sigep.org/nationalprograms

NETWORK Connect with the largest private network of SigEps on LinkedIn and join the conversation at sigep.org/socialmedia

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sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Brian C. Warren Jr., Virginia ’04 ceo@sigep.net

District Governors (by district)

1: Chris Lynch, Northeastern ’07 2: David Roman, Cornell ’73 3. Ryan Hayes, Cincinnati ’03 4: Matthew W. Engelhardt, Valparaiso ’91 5: Edward E. Bishop, Virginia Tech ’73 6: Joseph W. Langella Jr., Connecticut ’83 7: Ron S. Binder, Toledo ’83 8: Josh Hodnichak, Case Western ’10 9: Steven D. Daniels, Memphis-Lambuth ’78 10: Steven B. Chaneles, Connecticut ’83 11: E. Scott Thompson II, Southern Mississippi ’99 12: Kelly L. Williams, Tennessee ’92 13: Scott Phillips Jr., Ohio State ’05 14 & 15: Brian W. Tenclinger, Louisiana State Renaissance 16: Christopher S. Dillion, Illinois ’03 17: Matt Beck, Iowa ’90 18: Matthew D. Finke, Truman State ’04 19: Luke Luttrell, Wichita State ’02 20: Glenn A. Ezell, North Texas ’87 21: Justin Burnett, Sam Houston State ’02 23: Trent Morrison, Utah State ’14 24: Michael Johnson, Eastern Washington ’01 25: James M. Amen, Sacramento State ’96 26: Renato G. Villacorte, CalPoly-Pomona ’91 Vacant districts not listed

Fraternity Services

Operations

Chapter Services

Chief Operating Officer

Senior Chapter Services Director

Paul Andersen, Northern Iowa ’16 paul.andersen@sigep.net Chapter Services Directors

Jason Esau, Murray State ’16 jason.esau@sigep.net Ben Weinberg, Drake ’17 ben.weinberg@sigep.net Director of Growth

Kyle Sutton, Cincinnati ’12 kyle.sutton@sigep.net

Information Management Information Systems and Analytics Director

Elan Radbil, Massachusetts ’16 elan.radbil@sigep.net Database and Research Coordinator

Zac Gillman, Austin Peay State ’15

Mindi Seidel

Recruitment Manager

Membership Information Coordinator

Eddie Gonnella, Maine ’17

New Chapter Development Director of Expansion

Austin Chapman, Lawrence Tech ’14 austin.chapman@sigep.net A full listing of all regional directors and new chapter development directors for the upcoming academic year can be found online at sigep.org.

Volunteer Services Volunteer Engagement Director

Callie Verderosa, M.A.Ed. callie.verderosa@sigep.net Volunteer Engagement Manager

Timothy Laboy-Coparropa, Christopher Newport ’17

Member Safety Member Safety Director

Kathy Johnston kathy.johnston@sigep.net

Programs and Events Programs and Events Director

Stacy D. Nicodemus, CMP stacy.nicodemus@sigep.net Leadership Programs and Events Project Manager

Laura C. Curzi, PMP

Leadership Programs Strategy Director

Davis R. Orr, Alabama ’14

Leadership Programs Manager

Alex W. Stepanek, Northern Iowa ’16

Fundraising and Advancement Director of Foundation Operations

Emily Lowry Millhiser emily.lowry@sigep.net Director of Advancement

Matt Parrish, Georgia ’08 matt.parrish@sigep.net Associate Director of Advancement

Debbie Hunt

Marketing and Communications Marketing and Communications Director

James Poole, Virginia Commonwealth ’14 james.poole@sigep.net

Strategic Communications Director

Andrew J. Parrish, Georgia ’13 Digital Media Director

Aaron Jay Ledesma, Marquette ’14 Communications Manager and Associate Editor

Tyya N. Turner

Communications Manager

Ben Ford, Arkansas Tech Renaissance

Finance Chief Financial Officer

Gary Huff, Central Arkansas ’91 gary.huff@sigep.net Revenue Manager

Donna B. Jarvis Accounting Director

Jennifer Pendergrast

Auxiliary Services Auxiliary Services Director

Kyle Baker, Virginia Commonwealth Renaissance kyle.baker@sigep.net

SigEp National Housing Managing Director

Zachary Stull, Nebraska ’14 zach.stull@sigep.net Asset Managers

Alex Hendee, Fort Hays State ’13 Ben Hutto, South Carolina ’16 Conner Jackson, Nebraska ’16 Jamison Shields, Oregon State ’17

Jacob K. Bredstrand, Washington State ’11

SENH Controller

Major Gift Officer

SENH Executive Assistant

Kevin Knudson, Nebraska ’15

Cassandra Ratti

Donor Relations Manager

Operations and Accounting Assistants

Brittany Outar

Melia H. Motley

Lisa Nguyen Jennifer O’Donnell


Commentary Brothers weigh in on rush On Nov. 13, 2017, SigEp CEO Brian Warren spoke on HLN about the problems associated with rush. “One of the things we’ve been vocal about is the need to abolish this system of rush,” Warren told reporter Carol Costello. Warren shared that rush has, in many cases, “become a funnel for high-risk individuals seeking the high-risk experience we are trying to get away from.” Several brothers responded with their thoughts about the future of recruitment for SigEp. Greek life expert calls for end to rush Brothers, After 20 years working in Greek life, I’ve come to a conclusion: Rush sucks. Why? Rush forces us to make long-term decisions from short-term data. It’s in the name. We literally “rush” to recruit people instead of really getting to know them. If a guy is looking for a typical “frat” experience, what does he do? He participates in rush and tries to convince the brothers that he’s a “chill dude” who really wants to join. Do good men join through rush too? Sure. But hidden among them are the guys that get our chapters closed. And far more good men can be recruited outside of rush. Good recruitment is absolutely necessary. Rush is not. My experience says there’s a better way. I’ve spoken on over 500 campuses, consulted with more than 20 national fraternities and sororities, and taught thousands of chapters how to recruit more and better members. The answer: Recruit 365 days a year. When we recruit year-round, we have time to identify, select and recruit the best members for our chapters. This model leverages our existing networks of friends and classmates, as well as networks we create through programs like the Balanced Man Scholarship. So, try this: Don’t add recruitment events to your calendar, add recruitment to the events on your calendar. Show potential members what makes SigEp different. David Stollman Maryland-College Park ’94 Stollman is the owner of CAMPUSPEAK, Inc. 4

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Brother says Balanced Man Scholarship changed his chapter Dear Brothers, The Balanced Man Scholarship can redefine the way we recruit. Just like any competitive scholarship program, it attracts the highest performers — students who have a record of hard work and success. At my chapter, the scholarship even forced us to raise our minimum standards around GPA, campus involvement and leadership experience because our scholarship applicants were so strong. Our goal is to recruit 80 percent of our new members through the scholarship. This past year, we were able to recruit 35 new members, including valedictorians, all-state athletes, multiple Associated Student Body executives, nonprofit founders and a Gatorade Player of the Year. These men finished their first semester with a 3.53 GPA — the highest among any IFC or Panhellenic chapter, and the highest recorded fraternity GPA in the history of our campus. The Balanced Man Scholarship is a tool that has carried my chapter to the next level, and I believe it has the ability to raise the standard for SigEp chapters nationwide. Taylor Swanson Washington State ’19 Swanson is a former vice president of recruitment at the Buchanan Cup-winning Washington State Chapter.

Alumnus cites scholarship as reason he joined Brothers, There are many outstanding men on college campuses who want nothing to do with a fraternity — until they are introduced to SigEp through something as simple as the Balanced Man Scholarship. I would have never joined SigEp (or any fraternity for that matter) if I hadn’t learned about the scholarship. It appealed to me initially simply as a way to help pay tuition. I wasn’t interested in a typical rush process, so I didn’t visit fraternities at freshman orientation events. But once I realized the character of Maine Alpha’s brothers and how truly different the chapter was from other fraternities, I was much more comfortable participating in recruitment events. As a brother, I benefited from the leadership and personal development our Fraternity provides, including learning to work with diverse groups and appreciate varying viewpoints, to manage conflicting priorities, and to be diligent in my research and work. SigEp also cemented my belief in a balanced lifestyle that includes fitness. Thinking back, I still remember smiling and feeling proud when we recruited many other young men who were not initially interested in a fraternity until they learned how truly different SigEp is. Ben Lakin Maine ’07 Lakin is a Smith & Nephew staff scientist specializing in biomaterials and advanced healing for sports medicine. He was selected as a member of SigEp’s 40 under 40 in 2015.


Fraternity in the news Lawmaker’s proposed fraternity ban is ‘shot across the bow’ After proposing a bill that would ban fraternities and sororities from Tennessee’s public colleges and universities, state Rep. John DeBerry has said his bill is an attempt to start a conversation and enact reform. The bill has been met with criticism by university administrations and Greek organizations. DeBerry is now speaking with leaders from both groups about the bill’s language and, in recent interviews, has softened his stance on trying to ban groups outright. “The old Animal House mentality and that culture and that imagery, it has to go away,” he said. “It’s not cute anymore and it most certainly is not acceptable anymore.” DeBerry called his legislation a “shot across the bow” in an effort to bring more accountability and transparency among sororities and fraternities at state schools. ~ The Tennessean

Beta joins SigEp in move to substance-free Beta Theta Pi announced in February that all of its chapter homes would become substance-free spaces by Aug. 15, 2020. This closely aligns with SigEp’s own timeline, which calls for chapters to implement a substance-free facilities policy by Aug. 1, 2020. [W]e call on all of our peer fraternities to enact similar measures .... With Farmhouse, Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Phi Epsilon having already stepped forward on this matter, imagine if all 70 other inter/national fraternities took this same substance-free housing step we all know is inevitable and needed. ~ S. Wayne Kay General Secretary, Beta Theta Pi

DU becomes latest to make homes substance-free On May 16, 2018, Delta Upsilon publicly committed to making its chapter homes substance-free by Aug. 1, 2020. Delta Upsilon chapter facilities must be safe, productive places to live and learn at all times. ... Removing alcohol from our facilities sends a clear message about our purpose, values and commitment to make campuses safe for all students. ~ E. Bruce McKinney International Fraternity President, Delta Upsilon

Yale administration supports SigEp on substance-free “It’s a really commendable initiative,” said Yale College Dean Marvin Chun. “We want these spaces to be safe and welcoming for all the students, and I think initiatives like this are fantastic.” ~ Yale Daily News

Florida presidents call for a ‘new normal’; one says SigEp offers model for Greek life

In November, Florida State President and SigEp alumnus John Thrasher, Florida State ’65, suspended all fraternities and sororities following the death of a Pi Kappa West Virginia president Phi pledge from his campus. “For this suspends fraternity activities suspension to end, there will need to be a West Virginia University has temporarily new normal for Greek life at the universuspended all social programming and sity,” Thrasher said. “There must be a recruitment for the school’s 16 fraterninew culture, and our students must be full ties. During the pause, the school has participants in creating it.” Thrasher lifted introduced several reforms, including the suspension in February after the school stronger oversight and higher academic issued several policy changes that include requirements for fraternities and sororilimiting the presence of alcohol at Greek ties. By fall 2020, members and chapters events. must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good In an opinion piece published in the standing with the school. University of Florida student paper, President Kent Fuchs addressed the future of Greek life on his campus. As someone who has worked closely with college students for nearly four I stand with President Thrasher and all decades, I know that today’s students other leaders who are setting a higher can lead the way in solving their own standard for all students, particularly biggest problem — reining in the small members of the Greek community. ... number of students whose increasingly Amid these institutional efforts, fraterninegative behavior is damaging the reputies and sororities also need to take it tation and credibility of all. upon themselves to raise the bar. To make this happen, alumni and The good news is some already are. national chapters of fraternities and In the past two years, SigEp, nationsororities, along with students and ally and locally, has undergone a University leadership, must step up to transformation. Policy changes remove combat behavior that flouts their pledging from membership and estaborganizations’ — and our University’s — lish substance-free chapter houses as core values. the fraternity standard. The fraternity ~ E. Gordon Gee has worked to establish what it calls the Balanced Man Program, which eliminates President, West Virginia University hazing and instills purpose, perspective, academic excellence, integrity, physical health and mental wellness. ~ KenT Fuchs President, University of Florida

commentary

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Save the Date

July 2018

Ball State Alumni Golf Outing Kokomo, Ind. ............................................. 7/13 dpark@bsu.edu

Florida Gulf Coast Alumni Casino Night Fort Myers, Fla. .......................................... 7/14 scottpstryker@gmail.com

August 2018

South Dakota State Novotny Memorial Golf Tournament Harrisburg, S.D. .......................................... 8/4 sdalpha.alumniboard@gmail.com

September 2018 Indiana 1960s Reunion

Bloomington, Ind. ..................................... 9/7-9 mtucker@mtapartners.com

J.B. Blakeman Memorial Scholarship Golf Scramble Morehead, Ky. ............................................. 9/8 alumni.moreheadstate.edu/blakemangolf

Bowling Green State Class of 1968 50th Reunion Bowling Green, Ohio ............................... 9/12-15 rmoiii@aol.com

Rensselaer Alumni Annual Meeting & Mixer Troy, N.Y. ................................................... 9/29 alumni.sigepnyd.com

Valparaiso Homecoming Alumni Celebration Valparaiso, Ind. ......................................... 9/29 avc-communications@valposigeps.org

Washington State Homecoming Pullman, Wash. ........................................ 9/29 programming@wsusigep.org

October 2018 Trine Homecoming

Angola, Ind. ............................................ 10/5-7 lambdahousecommunications@gmail.com

Toledo Homecoming Toledo, Ohio ............................................ 10/6-7 sigeptoledo.com

Morehead State Homecoming

clyde.findley@icloud.com

California-Davis Homecoming Game & Tailgate Davis, Calif. .............................................. 10/28 pdlarimer@hotmail.com

Colorado Homecoming Weekend Boulder, Colo. .......................................... 10/28 jmjohnwilliam@gmail.com

November 2018

South Florida Founder’s Day Celebration Tampa, Fla. ................................................. 11/1 sigeptampabay.com

Elon Homecoming Elon, N.C. ................................................ 11/2-4 ncmuavc@gmail.com

Florida Gulf Coast Founders Day Fort Myers, Fla. .......................................... 11/3 facebook.com/FGCUSigEpAlumni

SUNY-Fredonia 38th Annual Alumni Banquet Fredonia, N.Y. ............................................. 11/3 seanmurph29@yahoo.com

West Chester 40th Anniversary Celebration West Chester, Pa. ....................................... 11/3 mselby@wcufoundation.org

Life After College Indianapolis, Ind. ................................... 11/17-18 sigep.org/LAC

December 2018

Arizona State Annual Holiday Luncheon Tempe, Ariz. ............................................... 12/8 elsundevil@yahoo.com

February 2019 Sam Houston State Annual Meeting & Reunion

Montgomery, Texas ............................... 2/16-18 sigep.org/txeta-facebook

April 2019

Washington State Alumni Golf Tournament

moreheadstate.edu/homecoming

Pullman, Wash. ....................................... 4/5-6

Indiana State Homecoming

programming@wsusigep.org

joebart45@hotmail.com

Louisiana State Annual Alumni/Parents Day Baton Rouge, La. ...................................... 10/20 jkallen27@bellsouth.net sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Harrisonburg, Va. ................................. 10/27-29

Morehead, Ky. ...................................... 10/18-20

Terre Haute, Ind. .................................. 10/20-21

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James Madison Homecoming Reunion


commentary

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Red Door Notes

The red door on SigEp chapter houses started at Syracuse University in 1928. While not the only factor in a highperforming chapter, well-appointed chapter facilities support transformative experiences created by the Balanced Man Program and Residential Learning Communities.

Florida Alpha’s new house gives brothers room to grow By Al Alsobrook, Florida ’69

A $4.5 million renovation is helping SigEp’s University of Florida Chapter become a nationally recognized leader in the Greek world. The new home was designed to support every aspect of a student’s development, and alumni are already seeing the investment pay off. Florida Alpha’s chapter home was originally built in 1955, and a large east wing was added in 1985. During the facility’s renovation, which was completed in August 2017, most everything except the zip code was changed. Still, alumni were excited to see some of their favorite elements of the home preserved. “We were able to keep some of the loved look of the past and update the house to support the needs of the younger generation,” said chapter volunteer Steve Shewbrooks, Florida ’66. A core focus of the renovation was increasing the amount of space dedicated to residential learning. Named in memory of Florida brother Jim Lang, ’61, a new academic center in the home occupies parts of the first and second floors. The Lang Center is one of the most popular spaces in the house and features a suite for a live-in resident scholar, a faculty office, two classrooms and a library. “Parents have been very receptive to the house and its generous offering of study spaces,” said Chapter President Graham Boone, ’20. “On a daily basis, brothers are using the two classrooms for serious study. We like to think the learning center concept contributes to the chapter’s 3.5 GPA, the highest on campus among fraternities.” The chapter’s first faculty fellow, Ernesto Escoto, holds office hours every Friday at the house, and the chapter is working with him to plan a course he can teach on site. The brothers would like to see Escoto, director of the university’s Counseling and Wellness Center, lead a class focused on mental health and other issues that impact students like substance abuse and sexual assault. The 17,401-square-foot property was designed to support a chapter of more than 100 brothers. In addition to the resident scholar suite, the renovated house 8

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

has beds for 44 students and a guest room for visiting Fraternity staff or volunteers. Brothers who don’t live in the home have access to lockers in the facility’s new exercise room, making it easier for them to utilize the space. Brothers share two daily meals in a 100-seat dining room where floor-toceiling windows open onto a terrace with overflow seating for another 40. This area of the house is bustling throughout the day as members drop in between classes to enjoy meals prepared in a state-of-theart kitchen. An enclosed courtyard and new living room are two other popular spots for brothers and guests looking to relax, play games, or root on the Florida Gators during away games. Two new women’s

restrooms and wheelchair access have made the space more welcoming to friends and the university community. “We have hosted several guest speakers in our dining hall and in the large classroom, and we have a mini church event several times throughout the month led by one of our brothers,” Boone reported. “Events like these allow us to host members of our community and show that our Fraternity house can be an asset to the university and the surrounding area.” Most recently, the chapter hosted University of Florida President Kent Fuchs at a dinner in his honor. Fuchs has publicly recognized SigEp for its innovative programming and leadership among fraternities.

Florida Alpha’s chapter home was completely renovated to provide more space for residential learning. The $4.5 million project was supported by 285 donors, including a major gift from Mike Watford, ’75, for whom the house was renamed “Watford House.”

The new living room is one of the many spaces where brothers can socialize in the substance-free living-learning community.


Above: An enclosed courtyard is a year-round gathering spot for Florida brothers and guests. The chapter regularly invites the surrounding community to attend events, including guest speakers and religious services, at the new home. Right: Prominent Florida alumni gather for a photo during their home’s grand opening. Front row, from left: Mike Watford and the Honorable James Alderman, ’58, former Florida Supreme Court chief justice. Back row, from left: Steve Shewbrooks, Bert Harris and Bryson Ridgway.

about what a fresh start could mean for Florida Alpha, and fundraising efforts On Oct. 14, 2017, more than 100 Florida continued as alumni became excited alumni, undergraduates and guests about a chapter that would be supported gathered to celebrate the official grand by both the Balanced Man Program and a opening of the newly renovated house. state-of-the-art learning community. The event was the finish line for a long With the help of SigEp’s professional and, at times, arduous journey that began staff, the chapter recruited its first new in 2009. The renovation would not have members in the spring of 2016. And after been possible without significant financial years of planning, countless meetings contributions from alumni and countless and hundreds of fundraising phone hours of volunteer time — way more time calls, the renovation began in November than Bert Harris, ’74, could have ever 2016. Ten months later, the project was anticipated, he said. completed just in time for students to As president of the chapter’s educamove in for the fall 2017 semester. tional foundation, Harris helped “It was nothing short of a project spearhead fundraising efforts. He and management miracle that the renovation fellow alumni-volunteers managed to was completed on schedule in spite of the raise $2.8 million from 285 donors, includmany problems encountered during the ing one brother, Mike Watford, ’75, who project,” said Shewbrooks. contributed $1.4 million of the total. That miracle wouldn’t have been possiFlorida Alpha alumni first began ble without Brett Ogilvie, ’86. Ogilvie, a discussing the renovation in 2009. senior technology consultant in Orlando, Chapter volunteers partnered with volunteered his time as project manager fundraising consulting firm Pennington for the renovation. Under his guidance, & Company to strengthen their alumni alumni spent months meeting with their communication and annual fundraisarchitect, brainstorming ideas, visiting ing efforts. By 2010, a feasibility study other fraternity houses, and researching suggested that alumni were eager to options for every aspect of the project. support a project, and so Florida volunOn-site construction support was teers began the hard work of raising provided by Michael Lewis, ’74, and nearly $3 million. volunteers met weekly with the project’s Their efforts were complicated when architect and contractor throughout the cultural issues began to plague the chaprenovation. Once the team began stripter, leading to a temporary closure at the ping the home down to its studs, they end of 2012. However, Harris was serving encountered unforeseen construction as Grand President at the time and helped issues, including asbestos in old building alumni turn a difficult situation into a materials and underlying mechanical galvanizing one. He provided perspective

The long road to a new home

problems that proved costly. Luckily, the group had a contingency plan and was able to move forward by prioritizing certain projects. However, the added costs would have brought the renovation to a halt were it not for an additional major gift from Watford. With renovations complete, alumni are now channeling their fundraising energy toward scholarships that will support the chapter’s continued growth. Harris and Alumni and Volunteer Corporation President Bryson Ridgway, ’05, reminded alumni of the importance of continued fundraising in a recent newsletter. They believe donors have good reason to be bullish about investing in the chapter. “At a time when the Greek system has been under fire, we think it is good for us to remember that our new Florida Alpha is different,” Ridgway recently told fellow volunteers. “The young men of our new chapter have done very well holding each other accountable, lifting each other up to be more successful, and making their brotherhood strong.” To read about the chapter’s success since returning to campus, see page 16. red door notes

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Alabama SigEps have moved to a new home on University Boulevard, a main thoroughfare that runs through the heart of the campus.

Alabama SigEps can’t be ignored The chapter, now the largest on campus, is challenging campus norms as brothers move into their new substance-free home. By Nick Privitera, Alabama ’18

Creating positive change on a campus that prides itself on tradition can be a daunting task, but it is one the SigEps at University of Alabama have taken on with vigor. Since moving into their newly renovated house on University Boulevard, the brothers of Alabama Beta have used their newfound visibility to lead the charge in changing Greek life for the better. The university invested $5 million in a renovation that has turned a former Kappa Alpha Fraternity house into a facility capable of supporting a top-notch living-learning community. SigEp National Housing consulted on the design, construction and financing, and ultimately made the project possible by guaranteeing the loan. The chapter moved into the 23,000-squarefoot living space in January 2018. The house, which can sleep 34 brothers, features a large meeting room with enough space to accommodate what has become the largest fraternity on campus with 184 men. It also includes a dedicated

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alumni room, two large porches, a game room, a second-floor lounge and a formal living room. All of these improvements are a marked change from the previous chapter house, and members are eager to use the new facility as an opportunity to not only become the best fraternity on campus, but the best organization too. “We have an incredible chance here to show everyone on campus that it is okay to be different, and that being different might not be such a bad thing,” said Chapter President Alex Mazzaferro, ’19. The former chapter house was located on the north side of campus, far away from academic buildings and out of sight from many students. With that location, chapter members felt it was easy for people to write off SigEp, despite the chapter’s large size, exemplary grades and significant philanthropic work. But all that has changed with the new chapter house, they say. It will be hard to ignore such a large, and now centrally located, chapter that’s working to redefine the status quo.

The newly renovated substance-free home includes a meeting room that can seat the entire 184-man chapter.

One of the selling points of SigEp for potential new members is the chapter’s exceptional programming. Surrounded by fraternities that often focus on partying, Alabama Beta deviates from campus social norms by planning alcohol-free events. From movie nights at the house to professional development speakers at chapter meetings, there are events designed to benefit every member and


From top: The chapter’s new formal living room is one of many quiet spots where brothers can study between classes. Upstairs, a second-floor lounge includes space for more casual gatherings.

provide access to experiences they wouldn’t find elsewhere on campus. The chapter’s large size and previously small facility had forced leaders to move educational programming and chapter meetings to campus lecture halls. Their new house can accommodate all of these events, and the central location has made it convenient for members to attend. The chapter has already hosted many speakers at the new house, including representatives from various campus organizations such as the student health center, the Title IX Office, the campus police department and campus ministries. The new house is a substance-free space where members can study and socialize without distractions that are common on college campuses. Additionally, the chapter has adopted new risk management policies such as student ID readers for all events. Other fraternities have been taking cues from SigEp too. During his

term as chapter president, Mazzaferro has partnered with the university and other fraternities to make these practices commonplace across campus. He’s even met with Alabama President Stuart Bell to advocate for SigEp’s unique approach to fraternity. “Recently, I have been meeting with leaders from other chapters and talking to them about some of the new things we have been doing. Surprisingly, they have been very open to new ideas. I think it’s because people are starting to realize that the old, ‘traditional’ way of doing things just doesn’t work,” Mazzaferro said. “The university notices that we have been making changes and that other chapters are following suit. In the future, there is an expectation that we will be the ones to change the Greek culture on campus.” David Grady is the vice president for student affairs at the University of Alabama and a member of Phi Gamma

Delta. He attended SigEp’s 2017 Conclave to speak about the state of Greek life and its future on college campuses. “SigEp has always been on the leading edge of movements within the fraternity world,” Grady said. “It is in your DNA to be different.” In both academics and philanthropy, SigEp consistently outperforms other chapters and most honor societies at Alabama. For the past 16 out of 17 semesters, the chapter has achieved the highest GPA among fraternities. In fall 2017, the 184 brothers boasted a 3.48 average GPA, with 36 brothers earning a perfect 4.00. Additionally, the brothers raise thousands of dollars every year for Big Brothers Big Sisters of West Alabama. The work brothers do in the classroom and in the community doesn’t go unnoticed. Since rechartering in 2015, the chapter has earned multiple Greek excellence awards from the university. This prestige has proved to be an invaluable recruiting tool, especially when combined with the new living space. “I joined SigEp this spring, and I remember wishing that I had joined in the fall,” said Sam Stennett, ’21. “My roommate joined in the fall, and he was super-focused on his grades and was always doing cool things with other brothers. I wanted something like that in my life. Now that I’m here and we have this new house, I don’t know why I didn’t join earlier.” In its quest to become the best student organization on campus, Alabama Beta now has its sights set on becoming an accredited Residential Learning Community. Chapter leaders believe this is the next logical step in the chapter’s development. Going forward, the chapter is also looking to increase its leadership roles on campus. Chapter Counselor Larry Whitman, Alabama ’86, said that he hopes to see more brothers seeking roles in student government and other campus organizations. “So the question is, ‘What’s the next step?’ The next step, to me, is how to become the best of the best. That means greater participation on campus, greater participation nationally with the Fraternity, becoming an accredited Residential Learning Community, and earning the Buchanan Cup,” Whitman said. red door notes

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Alumni and Volunteer News NASA/Joel Kowsky

Feustel takes command at International Space Station

NASA

Feustel (bottom right) and fellow crew talk to family and friends on a video monitor hours after Feustel arrived at the International Space Station. Feustel’s wife, Indira, is also posting Instagram and Twitter updates @IndiraFeustel.

Drew Feustel, Purdue ’89, arrived at the International Space Station on March 23, 2018, two days after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Feustel’s flight crew included NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev. Feustel is now the commander of the space station and is scheduled to remain in space until October 2018. During his expedition, the crew will conduct over 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations only possible in the unique environment of space. Follow Drew’s journey on Instagram and Twitter @astro_feustel.

Dominick (fifth from left) joins NASA’s 2017 astronaut candidates for a group photo.

Alumnus among NASA’s newest astronaut class

Hurt creates opportunity through venture philanthropy

U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Dominick, San Diego ’04, was selected to join NASA’s 2017 Astronaut Candidate Class. He was one of 12 candidates chosen from a record-breaking 18,300 applicants and began a two-year training program in August 2017. Following training, he will be assigned technical duties in the Astronaut Office while awaiting a flight assignment. In college, Dominick served as vice president of finance and vice president of communications with his chapter while earning a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. He later earned a master’s degree in systems engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School and is a graduate from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

Longtime SigEp donor and volunteer Jay Hurt, Davidson ’88, committed $5 million to his alma mater to fund innovation and entrepreneurship efforts at the school. His gift will establish The Hurt Hub@Davidson, a 23,000-square-foot facility that will host local entrepreneurs and innovative companies as well as students and faculty. The gift also supports ongoing programs, operations and the start of an endowment. The project is unique for a small liberal arts college, but that’s what attracted Hurt, who has a history of launching new initiatives as a businessman and philanthropist. With SigEp, Hurt co-founded the Ruck Leadership Institute in 1998 and established the Frank Rader Memorial Wrestling Award in 2015.

Brothers replace OGH medallion after Hurricane Harvey

John Tyler (front right), SigEp’s Lamar Chapter and the family of Lamar Roach surprised Roach (front row, third from right) with a new OGH medallion. 12

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Longtime volunteer Lamar Roach, Lamar ’60, was one of millions impacted by Hurricane Harvey. Among the items he lost to the storm was his Order of the Golden Heart medallion. Roach received the award in 2001 and has become close friends with fellow recipients like John Tyler, Texas-Austin ’63. After learning about Roach’s loss, Tyler worked with Roach’s family to organize a surprise ceremony at his Lamar University Chapter in Beaumont, Texas. The brothers presented Roach with a new medallion on Oct. 12, 2017.


Daniel Beltrá/Greenpeace

Alumnus appointed VP at US Office of Investment Policy Ryan Brennan, Truman State ’95, was named vice president for the Office of Investment Policy at the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. The agency works with American businesses to facilitate private investment in emerging markets to create new jobs and promote economic development in places where access to capital is limited.

Actor rides wave of fame to Antarctica David Harbour, Dartmouth ’97, won a 2018 Critics Choice Award for his role as Chief Hopper in the Netflix series “Stranger Things.” In 2019, he’ll star in the superhero movie “Hellboy.” Harbour has had numerous roles on well-known series like “Law & Order” and HBO’s “The Newsroom,” as well as in films like “Quantum of Solace.” His long list of accolades includes a Tony nomination for his performance in the 2005 Broadway production of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” But “Stranger Things” propelled him into the national spotlight. He’s using his newfound celebrity for good and has been working with the nonprofit Greenpeace to petition for an Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary. He recently visited the continent to raise awareness and, of course, to dance with the penguins. NBC Sports Group

Hicks (left) with NBC commentator Bode Miller

Jim Barber, Grand Valley State ’95, was recently named editor of “Oracle: The Research Journal of the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors.” Barber is an associate professor of higher education at the College of William & Mary. Oracle publishes peer-reviewed articles on research topics that impact students participating in Greek life. FEMA/Jetta Disco

Clockwise from top left: Albert with women’s hockey analyst AJ Mleczko, Goldich (left) with U.S. luger Chris Mazdzer, and Hicks (left) with NBC commentator Bode Miller.

SigEp named editor of Greek research journal

Long (left) thanks first responders in Naples, Florida, on Sept. 14, 2017.

Rookie reporter joins two Olympic regulars in PyeongChang

Alumnus heads FEMA during trying year

Sports journalist Mitch Goldich, Lehigh ’09, joined reporters Dan Hicks, Arizona ’84, and Kenny Albert, NYU ’90, in covering the 2018 Winter Games in PyeongChang. Hicks, a 2017 SigEp Citation recipient, covered Alpine skiing and marked his 11th NBC Olympic broadcast with the event. Albert covered his sixth Olympic Games, his fifth as a hockey analyst. This was the first time Goldich, reporting for Sports Illustrated, has covered the Olympics from the ground. While interviewing U.S. luger Chris Mazdzer, Goldich raced the 2018 silver medalist down a mountain in an inflatable inner tube. The lighthearted coverage is characteristic of the comedic style he’s cultivated as host of Sports Illustrated’s weekly trivia show.

Brock Long, Appalachian State ’97, was confirmed in a 95-4 Senate vote to lead the Federal Emergency Management Agency in June 2017. Since then, Long has overseen the agency’s response to a series of natural disasters, including the largest wildfire in modern California history and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria.

Alumni and Volunteer News

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After several promotions, Mike Macdonald is coaching the Baltimore Ravens’ historically dominant linebackers.

Georgia’s Mike Macdonald follows his heart to the NFL By Mike McDowell, Nevada-Reno ’03

The typical pathways to an NFL coaching position would be to play college or professional football, or to be born into a football coaching pedigree. Baltimore Ravens linebacker coach Mike Macdonald, Georgia ’10, isn’t typical. When he enrolled at the University of Georgia as a finance major, he didn’t have plans to become an NFL coach. As a high school football player, Macdonald had been an obsessive student of the sport. He would bury himself in game film and scrutinize strategy. Following a career-ending injury, he found himself applying his knowledge as an unofficial member of his team’s coaching staff. But football faded into the rearview mirror of life as Macdonald went off to college to pursue a career in finance. Macdonald had initially been interested in what was known as the “athletic fraternity” at Georgia, but he couldn’t look past the culture of hazing he knew was prevalent in that chapter. When he finally arrived at college, Macdonald realized he knew a few members of a different fraternity and decided to pay them a visit. He was immediately impressed by the way he saw the SigEp brothers treat one another and their guests with respect. He also noticed that this chapter appeared to be a carefully assembled collection

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of high-achieving men. And so accepting a bid to join SigEp was an honor, he recalled. “The caliber of people around me in the Fraternity was phenomenal,” Macdonald said. “I saw everyone around me excelling, and it inspired me to be a better man.” He watched as his SigEp brothers pursued their passions, stretched themselves and achieved their goals. Ultimately, he said, it was seeing this that pushed him to follow his heart and return to football. While still in college, Macdonald decided to take an official coaching position with his old high school team. That’s when he felt his love for the game reignite. He coached the team’s lineback-

ers and running backs, and he was named Coach of the Year after his first season. Emboldened by his experience and inspired by the success of his SigEp brothers, Macdonald decided to take a chance and pursue a coaching career. There was some trepidation, though, about changing course and leaving ideas of a finance career behind. “I graduated college without a job, which was a little scary,” recalled Macdonald. “But I wouldn’t have had the courage to take this path if it weren’t for my brothers.” Macdonald was determined to work in football, and he wasn’t without a job for long. His first break came the same


According to Macdonald, culture is everything to the Baltimore Ravens. He and his fellow coaches invest considerable time in ensuring that the organization’s standards and principles are not only articulated, but enforced. And the culture is at its strongest when enforcement and accountability don’t just come from the top (coaches and staff), but when it spans across players, as well. Coaches rely on veteran players to support the culture and guide younger players the same way SigEp relies on upperclassmen to help guide younger members and vigorously defend organizational standards. When standards aren’t

month he graduated when he was asked to join the University of Georgia football team as a student assistant, helping coach and coordinate the offensive scout team. Just one season later, he helped guide Georgia’s defense to the top 10 in the nation. In 2014, the Baltimore Ravens scooped up the then-26-year-old Macdonald to serve as a coaching intern. After several promotions, he now coaches the team’s historically dominant linebackers.

The importance of culture in SigEp and the NFL

Emboldened by his experience and inspired by the success of his SigEp brothers, Macdonald decided to take a chance and pursue a coaching career. Terry College of Business, University of Georgia

Macdonald’s acute sense of observation has provided him with not only powerful football acumen, but also with insight on what makes a great NFL coach. It’s a role that often reminds him of his experience serving as chaplain for his chapter. Macdonald recalled that in his early days as chaplain he naively believed his brothers would simply listen to what he said and follow his lead. He was immediately and unexpectedly humbled, he said, when that plan didn’t pan out. Ultimately, Macdonald gained a clearer understanding of the value of building relationships first. Today, he applies this strategy in the Ravens locker room and on the field. Macdonald asks players for their ideas and input, then combines those perspectives with his own game intelligence to craft winning solutions. For example, he would often consult with five-time Pro Bowl safety Eric Weddle, asking, “What are you seeing back there? What adjustments would you make for this opponent?” Macdonald also believes transparency is paramount. Players and coaches alike prefer to work with somebody who is honest with them, he said. As a young coach (Macdonald is younger than many of his players), he often has to be conscious of not falling into the trap of trying to be liked instead of being honest. But players take comfort in knowing that they can trust what Macdonald says. “If I tell a player that working on a specific ability or technique will lead to more playing time, they can believe me,” said Macdonald. The cumulative effect is a culture based on trust and understanding and the comfort of knowing they’re all working together toward a common goal.

being met in games, practices or even in meetings, Macdonald leans on team leaders like seven-time Pro Bowl linebacker Terrell Suggs. Macdonald is a natural fit for the Ravens, a team that operates on transparency, mutual respect and a culture that puts people first. And while his meteoric rise to coaching in the NFL is a dream come true, he’s careful to not look too far ahead in his career. “There’s a lot of growth left before I’m ready to become a head coach,” he said. “I’m focused on being the best linebackers coach in the NFL right now.”

Macdonald speaks with professional football player and fellow Georgia alumnus Benjamin Watson about leadership at an event hosted by their alma mater in 2017. Both men were with the Baltimore Ravens for the 2016 and 2017 seasons, but Watson signed with the New Orleans Saints in 2018.

Alumni and Volunteer News

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Chapter News SigEp returns to Florida campus and wins back charter By Steve Shewbrooks, Florida ’66

SigEp’s Florida Alpha Chapter was established in 1925. It was the 11th fraternity on the University of Florida campus and the 63rd SigEp chapter nationwide. The chapter has historically been one of the most prominent organizations at Florida, producing many campus leaders, including student body presidents, homecoming chairmen and recipients of prestigious university awards. Six Florida alumni have been recognized with SigEp’s highest honor, the Order of the Golden Heart, and other alumni have gone on to serve in the university’s administration, the Florida state legislature, the governor’s cabinet and the Florida Supreme Court. The chapter has even produced two All-American football players. Unfortunately, the chapter experienced cultural challenges in the late 2000s. And in December 2012, it became necessary to temporarily close the chapter. Over the next three years, chapter volunteers continued producing the chapter newsletter, and regular alumni events provided opportunities for brothers to reconnect and establish a plan for the chapter’s return to campus. Bryson Ridgway, ’05, and Steve Shewbrooks, ’66, co-chaired an alumni-led committee that, starting in May 2014, laid the groundwork for the recolonization. With the help of SigEp’s new chapter development team, the recruitment process officially began in January 2016. The past two years have been marked by a wonderful series of accomplishments for Florida Alpha, and the chapter’s success was celebrated with a chartering banquet on Jan. 27, 2018. Grand Secretary Billy Maddalon, North Carolina State ’90, conferred the charter, and several members of the school’s administration attended the event. Today, the chapter has 89 undergraduate brothers and has achieved the highest GPA of all fraternities every semester since reopening. The brothers are also continuing the tradition of university involvement, with many serving as leaders in student government and other organizations. The chapter has been publicly recognized by the school for its Balanced Man Scholarship program, which has made it easier for SigEp to recruit outside of rush and find the best men on campus. And it was named Florida’s Fraternity Chapter of the Year in 2017. Florida Alpha has also received numerous SigEp awards since its return to campus. At the 2018 Carlson Leadership

Florida brothers celebrate a successful recolonization at their Jan. 27, 2018, chartering banquet.

Academy, Patrick Goodrich, ’18, received the Zollinger Outstanding Senior Award, and Steve Shewbrooks received the Exemplary Service Award. Among the many volunteers serving as mentors to undergraduate leaders, Bob Durham, Morehead State ’69, has played a key role in supporting the chapter’s growth as chapter counselor. The brothers also work closely with the university’s administration, including Jack Causseaux, director of sorority and fraternity affairs. Causseaux and members of his department have been avid supporters of the chapter throughout the recolonization process. More recently, Florida President Kent Fuchs engaged the chapter in a conversation about the future of fraternity and recognized the brothers for their Balanced Man Program. Several other members of Florida’s faculty and staff serve as chapter volunteers and mentors. John Gresley, Valparaiso ’01, assistant dean and director of Florida’s MBA program, is helping the brothers refine their Balanced Man Program as balanced man steward, and the chapter is actively working to involve campus faculty in its programming. “We currently have two faculty fellows who offer guidance to our brothers on a regular basis,” reported Chapter President Graham Boone, ’20. Alumni leaders Durham, Shewbrooks and Ridgway all spoke at the chartering banquet. Each emphasized the amount of hard work required to make the recolonization a success. “Above all, we were able to glean from these speeches that our experience in SigEp is about more than just ourselves,” said Boone. “There were many who came before us, and there will be many that follow. We are responsible for representing this great Fraternity accordingly.”

Toledo SigEps bring home conference championship

Weiss (left) and Smith pose with their 2017 MAC Championship trophy. 16

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Two brothers from SigEp’s Gold Buchanan Cup-winning Toledo Chapter helped the school’s football team secure a 2017 Mid-American Conference Championship. Running back Brad Smith, ’18, was also named to the all-conference academic team and served as vice president of finance for his chapter during the championship season. After graduation, he plans to run his roofing business while attending medical school. Offensive lineman Brant Weiss, ’17, was selected by the Mid-American Conference for the 2017 allconference first-team as well as the academic all-conference team for his exemplary grades and significant playing time. He is currently pursuing an MBA at Toledo.


From left: Iowa brothers gather with their centennial proclamation on Oct. 7, 2017. Brothers and guests mingle at a banquet celebrating the occasion.

Stanford Chapter has Rhodes and Schwarzman Scholars

Iowa brothers mark 100 years By Matt Beck, Iowa ’90

SigEp’s chapter at the University of Iowa was established when Founding Father William “Uncle Billy” Phillips, Richmond 1903, traveled to the university to form the state’s third chapter. There, he met the men of the Cosmos Club, a group of academic standouts who were highly respected by the faculty. On April 28, 1917, they became the founding members of Iowa Gamma. More than 100 alumni, spouses and guests gathered in Iowa City on Oct. 6-8, 2017, to celebrate the chapter’s centennial anniversary. Packed with activities, the weekend included tours of the chapter house, an evening social and a homecoming football game. Among the notable alumni in attendance were LaMar Popp, Iowa ’53, Channing Nixon, ’58, and Arena Football League founder Jim Foster, ’72. Also in attendance was SigEp Director of Advancement Matt Parrish, Georgia ’08. At the centennial celebration banquet, a proclamation honoring the chapter’s first 100 years was presented by Order of the Golden Heart recipient and SigEp Educational Foundation Trustee Steve Shanklin, Murray State ’70. Another highlight of the evening was a presentation by Matt Beck, Iowa ’90, on the chapter’s history and its accomplished alumni. In particular, Beck noted Fred Steiner, ’23, a World War II veteran whose bravery helped U.S. forces secure a victory during the D-Day invasion. Steiner was killed in action and posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and Silver Star for his heroism. The late Dave Armbruster, Iowa Wesleyan 1917, was also among the alumni remembered at the banquet. Armbruster helped initiate Iowa Gamma’s founding fathers in 1917 and went on to have a successful, 40-year career as head coach of the University of Iowa’s swim team. He even innovated competitive swimming through the design of the all-rubber swimsuit and various

swimming pool enhancements. His son, David Armbruster Jr., Iowa ’43, joined the Iowa Gamma Chapter in 1941. Other presenters included Exemplary Service Award recipient and Life Trustee Tom Barton, Loras ’89, and former Chapter President Evan Raasch, Iowa ’19. After overcoming a recent period of cultural challenges, the former Buchanan Cup-winning chapter once again has a future that looks bright. In the last year, the chapter has grown from three to 34 undergraduate brothers. The group is focused on recruiting the best undergraduate men and defying Greek stereotypes, despite a challenging campus environment. “We have many opportunities for growth and will be revamping our recruitment schedule to cater for year-round recruitment,” Raasch shared. In addition to these recruitment efforts, the chapter is building out its Balanced Man Program, and brothers look forward to increasing their philanthropic and servicelearning efforts with groups like Big Brothers Big Sisters. Meanwhile, ongoing renovations to the chapter’s historical home are helping SigEp’s Iowa Chapter remain a competitive housing option for students interested in a unique Greek experience. As alumni continue to support the chapter’s growth, they are taking pride in the progress made so far. “I am confident that our chapter will continue to grow, as we have already passed the hardest obstacle,” said former Alumni and Volunteer Corporation President Jim Wachendorf, Iowa ’75. “Our collegiate brothers are doing their part representing SigEp to their best ability; and, as alumni, it is our job to support the chapter to the best of our ability as well.” Wachendorf has volunteered with the Iowa Chapter for more than three decades.

Two brothers from SigEp’s Stanford Chapter were selected for prestigious international fellowships this year. In fall 2018, Jelani Munroe, ’16, and Daniel Kilimnik, ’16, will begin their stints as Rhodes and Schwarzman Scholars, respectively. Munroe, originally from Jamaica, studied economics and public policy at Stanford. He is currently working as the financial manager of the Associated Students of Stanford University and as chief executive officer of Stanford Student Munroe Enterprises, which provides grants to more than 600 student organizations on the campus. His honors thesis examined the impact of economic austerity on election Kilimnik strategy during Jamaica’s 2016 general elections. He will pursue a master’s in development studies at Oxford. Kilimnik, who earned bachelor’s degrees in economics and history, is working as a business analyst with McKinsey & Company in New York. He is a U.S. and German citizen and wrote his honors thesis on the evolving role of the armed forces in German security policy. At Tsinghua University in Beijing, he intends to study the future of European, U.S. and Chinese relations. Chapter news

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Chapter News SigEp returns to Florida campus and wins back charter By Steve Shewbrooks, Florida ’66

SigEp’s Florida Alpha Chapter was established in 1925. It was the 11th fraternity on the University of Florida campus and the 63rd SigEp chapter nationwide. The chapter has historically been one of the most prominent organizations at Florida, producing many campus leaders, including student body presidents, homecoming chairmen and recipients of prestigious university awards. Six Florida alumni have been recognized with SigEp’s highest honor, the Order of the Golden Heart, and other alumni have gone on to serve in the university’s administration, the Florida state legislature, the governor’s cabinet and the Florida Supreme Court. The chapter has even produced two All-American football players. Unfortunately, the chapter experienced cultural challenges in the late 2000s. And in December 2012, it became necessary to temporarily close the chapter. Over the next three years, chapter volunteers continued producing the chapter newsletter, and regular alumni events provided opportunities for brothers to reconnect and establish a plan for the chapter’s return to campus. Bryson Ridgway, ’05, and Steve Shewbrooks, ’66, co-chaired an alumni-led committee that, starting in May 2014, laid the groundwork for the recolonization. With the help of SigEp’s new chapter development team, the recruitment process officially began in January 2016. The past two years have been marked by a wonderful series of accomplishments for Florida Alpha, and the chapter’s success was celebrated with a chartering banquet on Jan. 27, 2018. Grand Secretary Billy Maddalon, North Carolina State ’90, conferred the charter, and several members of the school’s administration attended the event. Today, the chapter has 89 undergraduate brothers and has achieved the highest GPA of all fraternities every semester since reopening. The brothers are also continuing the tradition of university involvement, with many serving as leaders in student government and other organizations. The chapter has been publicly recognized by the school for its Balanced Man Scholarship program, which has made it easier for SigEp to recruit outside of rush and find the best men on campus. And it was named Florida’s Fraternity Chapter of the Year in 2017. Florida Alpha has also received numerous SigEp awards since its return to campus. At the 2018 Carlson Leadership

Florida brothers celebrate a successful recolonization at their Jan. 27, 2018, chartering banquet.

Academy, Patrick Goodrich, ’18, received the Zollinger Outstanding Senior Award, and Steve Shewbrooks received the Exemplary Service Award. Among the many volunteers serving as mentors to undergraduate leaders, Bob Durham, Morehead State ’69, has played a key role in supporting the chapter’s growth as chapter counselor. The brothers also work closely with the university’s administration, including Jack Causseaux, director of sorority and fraternity affairs. Causseaux and members of his department have been avid supporters of the chapter throughout the recolonization process. More recently, Florida President Kent Fuchs engaged the chapter in a conversation about the future of fraternity and recognized the brothers for their Balanced Man Program. Several other members of Florida’s faculty and staff serve as chapter volunteers and mentors. John Gresley, Valparaiso ’01, assistant dean and director of Florida’s MBA program, is helping the brothers refine their Balanced Man Program as balanced man steward, and the chapter is actively working to involve campus faculty in its programming. “We currently have two faculty fellows who offer guidance to our brothers on a regular basis,” reported Chapter President Graham Boone, ’20. Alumni leaders Durham, Shewbrooks and Ridgway all spoke at the chartering banquet. Each emphasized the amount of hard work required to make the recolonization a success. “Above all, we were able to glean from these speeches that our experience in SigEp is about more than just ourselves,” said Boone. “There were many who came before us, and there will be many that follow. We are responsible for representing this great Fraternity accordingly.”

Toledo SigEps bring home conference championship

Weiss (left) and Smith pose with their 2017 MAC Championship trophy. 16

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Two brothers from SigEp’s Gold Buchanan Cup-winning Toledo Chapter helped the school’s football team secure a 2017 Mid-American Conference Championship. Running back Brad Smith, ’18, was also named to the all-conference academic team and served as vice president of finance for his chapter during the championship season. After graduation, he plans to run his roofing business while attending medical school. Offensive lineman Brant Weiss, ’17, was selected by the Mid-American Conference for the 2017 allconference first-team as well as the academic all-conference team for his exemplary grades and significant playing time. He is currently pursuing an MBA at Toledo.


J. Edward Zollinger Outstanding Senior Award This award is presented annually to outstanding seniors based on scholastic achievement, Fraternity and campus leadership, and community involvement. William Armstrong, Southern Methodist ’18 Walker Barnum, Elon ’18 Vincent Cardamone, Cleveland State ’18 Tony Fakhouri, Lawrence Tech ’18 Hunter Flesch, Northern Iowa ’18 Patrick Githens, West Chester ’18 Zachary Goldstein, Loyola Marymount ’18 Patrick Goodrich, Florida ’18 Evan Grosch, Missouri State ’18 Jake Guhy, Louisville ’17

Rohan Iyer, Georgia Tech ’17 Luke Jansen, SIU-Edwardsville ’18 Maxwell Kuhn, Kansas State ’18 Nicholas Lajoie, Maine ’18 Colter Merritt, Utah ’17 Ryan Pitzer, Washington State ’17 Daniel Rivera, Arkansas Tech ’18 Matthew Rowe, Virginia Tech ’18 Mitchell Schellenger, CaliforniaBerkeley ’18 Justin Vann, Central Missouri ’17

Talent Power Award Good recruitment is about more than numbers and manpower; it’s about recruiting talent. These chapters demonstrate a strong ability to identify, assess and recruit the highest caliber of men. They seek out men who live SigEp’s cardinal principles, incorporate Sound Mind and Sound Body into their lives, and actively contribute to their campuses and communities. Maine RLC Missouri S&T North Carolina State Ohio State RLC

San Diego State RLC Washington State RLC Washington-St. Louis SEC

Tragos Quest to Greece Scholars Tragos Quest to Greece Scholars are selected from hundreds of applicants each year for an unmatched studyabroad experience. Guided by alumni mentors and university faculty, scholars explore Greek culture and contemplate the origins of SigEp’s values and the Balanced Man Ideal. The Tragos Quest to Greece changes the way brothers view the world, their Fraternity and themselves. The program is named for and made possible by a generous gift from Past Grand President William G. Tragos, Washington-St. Louis ’56, and his wife, Lilli. Tragos Scholars are leaders within their chapters, on their campuses and in their communities. For full bios, visit sigep.org/2018TragosScholars.

Jerome Andres, California-Berkeley ’18 Jake Bension, Louisville ’20 Joshua Cadorette, Elon ’19 Cristian Collado, Stevens ’19 Matthew Dutcher, Nevada-Reno ’19 John Fetchet, Toledo ’19 Lorenzo Guidi, Miami (Ohio) ’19 Ali Harb, Drexel ’19 Ben Hirdler, Northern Iowa ’19 Connor Hoffmann, Montana State ’18 Austin Jacobsen, Nebraska-Kearney ’20 Connor Kreider, Maine ’19 Jason Littman, Ohio State ’19 Justin Ottino, Indiana State ’19 Matheus Moreira Sanches Peraci, Bowling Green State ’19 Matthew Siegel, West Chester ’19 Pearson Van Horn, Georgia Tech ’19

From top: Connecticut brothers, winners of the Donald C. McCleary Excellence in Member Development Award, host a “Milk and Cookies Late Night” event with Alpha Phi to raise funds for Hurricane Irma relief on Oct. 12, 2017. New members from SigEp’s Excelsior Award-winning Oklahoma State Chapter gather for a group photo in June 2017. Ben French, ’19, is recognized at the Washington-St. Louis Chapter’s 2017 Balanced Man Scholarship Banquet, an event that helped the brothers earn a 2018 Talent Power Award. Brothers at SigEp’s Toledo Chapter celebrate winning a charity hockey tournament in 2017. The chapter’s robust Balanced Man Program earned it a McCleary Excellence in Member Development Award.

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SigEp recognizes alumni and volunteer service

District Governor Matt Beck, Iowa ’90, center right, congratulates Volunteer of the Year Award recipient Jamiil Gaston, Lawrence Tech ’12, at the 2018 Chicago Carlson. District Governors Chris Dillion, Illinois ’03, left, and Matt Finke, Truman State ’04, also helped recognize recipients of volunteer awards at the program.

SigEp volunteers provide critical mentorship and support for undergraduates. Our volunteers offer new perspectives, insight and consistency. They serve as role models. And they help undergraduates overcome obstacles, avoid life-altering mistakes and accomplish goals that might otherwise seem out of reach. Their involvement contributes to the stability of our chapters and the success of our brothers. The following alumni and volunteer awards were presented at the 2018 Carlson Leadership Academies.

Alumni and Volunteer Corporation Distinguished Alumnus and Operational Excellence Award Distinguished Volunteer Awards

Outstanding New Volunteer Award recognizes new volunteers across

recognizes outstanding service by an AVC in leading a chapter to success in the areas of recruitment, member development and fiscal health.

the country whose service has made a significant impact on either the AVC or the undergraduate chapter with which they volunteer (listed in parentheses if not their home chapter).

Alabama California-Berkeley Cornell Davidson Drake Florida Loyola Marymount Missouri S&T Morehead State Northwestern Southeast Missouri State Southern Methodist Thiel Toledo

These two awards recognize devoted and productive service at the chapter, district, regional and/or national level for a minimum of 10 years. The recipients of these awards have produced positive, tangible and sustainable results for the betterment of SigEp. Members of the Fraternity are awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award, and nonmember volunteers are awarded the Distinguished Volunteer Award. Distinguished Alumnus Donald Burgio, Rensselaer ’89 Joseph Burke, Central Missouri ’69 Adam Fowler, Arkansas Tech ’03 Christopher Hester, Louisiana State ’05 Matt Hillerud, North Dakota ’04 Edward Kaplan, Connecticut ’88 John Kolinofsky, North Texas ’04 Kevin Maguire, Michigan Tech ’83 James Reeves, Central Missouri ’80 Alexander Straatmann, Nebraska-Kearney ’00 John Waggoner, Ohio State ’70

Vicki Blakeman (Morehead State) Kevin Connelly, Delaware ’15 (Johns Hopkins) John Fritz, Wyoming ’16 Ryan Hamrick, Illinois ’16 Patrick Andrew Kelly, Arkansas ’00 Holly Lovern (Duke) Sean McDavitt, Massachusetts ’12 Forrest Meade, Radford ’16 Brian Michalka, Rensselaer ’16 David Newman, Oklahoma ’85 Jeffrey Nolz, South Dakota State ’03 (Oregon) Tyler Olsen, Truman State ’10 (Washington-St. Louis) Rocky Radeff, Westminster ’14 Joaquin Razo, Sacramento State ’09 Shannon Taylor (Loyola Marymount) Chloe Webb (West Chester)

Volunteer of the Year Award recognizes volunteers who have given outstanding volunteer service that had a significant impact on either the AVC or undergraduate chapter over the past year (listed in parentheses if not their home chapter). Matthew Blecke, Cincinnati ’95 (Toledo) Steven Caloiaro, Nevada-Reno ’08 Steve Dimirsky, Muhlenberg ’01 Jamiil Gaston, Lawrence Tech ’12 Robert Gibbs, San Diego State ’63 Carlton Gover, Radford ’16 (Wyoming) Christopher Janson, Truman State ’92 Eric Janson, Truman State ’96

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Mark Kieslor, Tampa ’09 (Florida Atlantic) Andrew King, Wichita State ’01 David Mangian, Illinois ’06 Eleanor Oi (Rochester) Greg Pestinger, Kansas State ’86 (Louisville) Cody Rapp, Clarion ’12 J. Michael Reddout, Oklahoma State ’85 Allen Robie, Colorado ’82

Chris Sacra, Jacksonville ’98 (Old Dominion) Mark Salmon, Alabama ’87 Michael Schmidt, Missouri S&T ’75 Matthew Stack, Truman State ’98 Daniel J. Sullivan, Quinnipiac ’13 Tony Whalen, Rider ’97 David Woods, Truman State ’96


U niversit y P artners of the Year The University Partner of the Year Award recognizes faculty and staff who have gone above and beyond to create a meaningful partnership with SigEp on their campus. Award recipients connect SigEp undergraduates with faculty to enhance academic development. They act as mentors and advisors. And they work to support the implementation of critical, life-changing experiences through the Balanced Man Program and Residential Learning Communities. Byron Hughes, Ph.D. Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life, Virginia Tech

For the past five years, Byron Hughes has brought commitment and caring to his role as director of fraternity and sorority life at Virginia Tech. Since SigEp’s return to campus, he’s reached out to chapter leaders, offering advice and encouragement. He continually challenges brothers to think about their reasons for joining the Fraternity and to build a chapter that reflects those ideals. His interest in students’ development goes beyond his role as a Greek life advisor. More than once, Hughes has encouraged a brother to pursue a particular career after noticing a talent the brother hadn’t even seen in himself. Hughes has also facilitated at the NorthAmerican Interfraternity Conference’s Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute and conducted leadership training with SigEps at Carlson and the regional directors’ Kenneth S. Maddox Summer Development Program.

LaMont Johnson

Student Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, University of Louisville

Several years ago, LaMont Johnson developed a series of seminars to help members of the SigEp chapter at the University of Louisville prepare for challenging situations they might face during college. This concern for helping our brothers — and all students — make smart decisions is in keeping with his work helping the university prevent and respond to incidents involving sexual assault, harassment and bias.

Johnson, now a Renaissance brother, was actively involved in helping the chapter earn accreditation as a Residential Learning Community. In his role as faculty fellow, he mentors the RLC director and holds office hours at the chapter home each week so brothers can come by to talk about personal or academic challenges. Johnson is also talking with university officials about conducting a forcredit class through the RLC.

Doug Garrard, Ed.D.

Associate Vice President for Campus Life and Senior Associate Dean of Students, University of Texas at Austin

Within his portfolio, Doug Garrard supports fraternity and sorority life for over 70 organizations on a campus of more than 51,000 students. Additionally, he serves as a lecturer instructing future higher education professionals. Despite his busy schedule, he makes time to meet with SigEp undergraduates and volunteers to answer their questions, offer support and provide guidance. His advice has helped chapter leaders develop best practices and make well-informed decisions. It has also enabled the chapter to develop as a well-rounded organization and set high, but achievable, goals. Garrard has been equally gracious to Headquarters staff. When several members of SigEp’s staff went to Austin for a visit, he set aside time to meet with them and discuss his role in the chapter’s development.

Lori McDonald, Ph.D.

Dean of Students, University of Utah

Lori McDonald sets the bar high for students at Utah, but also helps them recover if they fall short. When cultural misalignment within SigEp’s Utah Beta Chapter led to a membership review, she

was disappointed, but continued to provide support and encouragement. She met frequently with chapter leaders to discuss their goals and the steps they should take to make SigEp a leader in the Greek community and campus-wide. The chapter has since rebounded, maintaining a GPA above 3.0 and earning an Excelsior Award at Carlson last year. The chapter’s efforts also didn’t go unnoticed by McDonald, who selected Utah Beta to receive the Dean’s Award for Chapter Excellence. The chapter was one of only two organizations to receive the distinction this year.

Simon Ruchti, Ph.D.

Department Chair and Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, West Chester University

In his classes, Simon Ruchti explores the many ways gender is viewed and shaped by our society. While serving as faculty fellow, he developed a seminar series for SigEp’s West Chester Chapter that challenged brothers to understand and discuss their values, how they define manhood, and how they interact with each other and with women. His impact was so deeply felt that fellow volunteers elected him AVC president. In this role, he led efforts to shore up the AVC’s finances and oversaw renovations to the chapter home. With the AVC now financially stable and the chapter living in a renovated, substance-free home, Ruchti is again serving as faculty fellow, and will no doubt, continue to challenge our brothers to be better men.

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Exemplary

Service Award The Exemplary Service Award’s red and purple rosette is worn by recipients on the left lapel.

Ray Ackerman Past Grand President Phillip A. Cox, Indiana ’84, told us often, “Behind every great chapter is a group of dedicated volunteers.” These men and women make a difference in our chapters and campus communities every day. And they don’t do it for the recognition. They do it because they love SigEp and believe in the Fraternity’s ability to bring out the best in young men. Among the thousands of dedicated SigEp volunteers, a select few stand out as truly exemplary. The Exemplary Service Award recognizes SigEp volunteers who have tirelessly served the Fraternity and modeled the way for others for more than 20 years. The following alumni received their awards at the culmination of the 2018 Carlson Leadership Academies.

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Oklahoma ’77 For more than four decades, Father Ray Ackerman has played a major role in furthering the Fraternity’s mission to develop valuesbased leaders. His leadership of SigEp’s national Ritual and Values Task Force has yielded invaluable insight on staying true to the Fraternity’s ideals while keeping pace with cultural shifts. Since 1997, Ackerman has also served as the Fraternity’s national chaplain, creating moving tributes to brothers who have passed away and presiding over the Grand Chapter Conclave Necrology. After graduating, Ackerman spent a year on SigEp’s staff as a regional director. Upon returning to the midwest, he served as chapter counselor with the Oklahoma and Oklahoma State Chapters. Today, many consider his commitment to helping new members become better men key to the development of the Balanced Man Program. Since joining the priesthood, Ackerman has served on several ad hoc alumni committees and is an at-large member of the Oklahoma Chapter’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation (AVC). Upon accepting his award, Ackerman spoke and concluded with this challenge: “Let us all choose to make a difference. This is the nature of our brotherhood. This is what it means to be a SigEp.”


Mike Ellis Purdue ’84 Mike Ellis has pretty much done it all, having amassed a broad range of experience as a national and chapter volunteer. His time as a Student Director on SigEp’s National Board made Ellis eager to continue volunteering as an alumnus. Just a year out of college, he was tapped to chair the national Alumni Development Committee. During this time, he also began a 10-year stint as chapter counselor for the Northern Illinois Chapter and later served as a district governor. A Distinguished Alumnus recipient, Ellis chaired the national Technology Task Force and has been instrumental in helping the Fraternity adapt to changes in technology. He’s also trained alumni who don’t live near a chapter to use technology to serve as mentors and participate in meetings remotely. Ellis has perfected remote volunteering: He currently serves on the AVC of his home chapter, as well as two others — all while traveling for his job as a technology consultant. At the awards ceremony, Ellis shared why he volunteers, saying, “For me, volunteering has been the outward expression of my oath and of virtue and diligence. It has been the bedrock of brotherly love in my whole adult life.”

Rick Slimmer Muhlenberg ’75 Rick Slimmer has long been the heart and soul of his chapter. For more than 40 years, Slimmer has led Muhlenberg’s AVC and served as its treasurer. His service, however, goes far beyond managing finances. Chapter volunteers consider him a mentor and say they volunteer, in part, for the opportunity to work with him.

To undergraduates, he’s been a mentor, advisor and, sometimes, even a surrogate parent. Slimmer recently helped to oversee a major upgrade project at the chapter home that included a renovated, hightech library and the installation of a sprinkler system. His dedication is apparent in everything he does, including the many times he checks on the house during the summer and holidays when brothers are away. Previously recognized by the Fraternity as a Distinguished Alumnus, the chapter renamed a scholarship in his honor at its 75th anniversary celebration in 2013. The lounge in the chapter house also bears Slimmer’s name. “My experiences with the Fraternity, both as an active brother and later as part of the AVC, have really become a deep part of me in my mind and in my heart,” Slimmer said, explaining how much his years of volunteering have meant to him.

Steve Shewbrooks Florida ’66 As co-chair of the Florida Alpha recolonization committee, Steve Shewbrooks helped lay the groundwork for the chapter’s successful return to the University of Florida. Shewbrooks also led the AVC’s recent $3 million capital campaign, bringing alumni from several decades together to build a modern living-learning center that will serve undergraduates today and for generations to come. Currently, he’s advising brothers on implementing the new substance-free policy and including safe, fun activities in game-day programming. Other volunteers say what makes him special is that he’s never been one to say, “That’s not my job.” Whenever he sees a need, he steps in and does his best to fill it, whether it’s mentoring individual members, leading a project or serving on a committee.

When he accepted his award, Shewbrooks spoke about the many friends he’s made since college and shared a special message with undergraduate brothers. “Cherish the friends you make in chapter during your time in school,” he said. “But look forward with anxious anticipation to the lifelong friends you’ll make in SigEp after you get your diploma and on the long and winding journey of the rest of your life.”

Ron Smith San Diego State ’69 Ron Smith’s visionary leadership paved the way for the San Diego State Chapter’s current success. As AVC president, Smith worked tirelessly with university officials and volunteers to bring the chapter back to campus. Some brothers struggled academically at first, but by the time the chapter received its charter in 2004, its GPA was above 3.0. A year later — inspired by Smith’s focus on academic achievement — members voted to make 3.0 the chapter’s standard GPA, and Smith was honored with SigEp’s Distinguished Alumnus award. In 2008, Smith also became chapter counselor and co-chaired the capital campaign for what would become the chapter’s state-of-the-art Residential Learning Community. After 15 years as AVC president, he handed over the reins to focus on serving as chapter counselor. In 2015, Smith organized a steak dinner to recognize brothers who finished the year with a 3.5 GPA or better. Earning an invitation to this annual event is now a point of pride among brothers and has added another element to their friendly academic competition. A retired educator, Smith encouraged undergraduates to make the most of the Balanced Man Program. “Go through all the challenge levels,” he said. “Earn that Brother Mentor status. Come back to your chapter as junior and senior leaders and help those younger guys find their way so that they can be not as good as you, but — like we know you’d want them to be — better than you. You can show them how.” Chapter news

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With a string of successful companies to his name, the insatiably curious entrepreneur continues to seek out new problems to solve.

Square co-founder Jim McKelvey won’t quit By Beaux Carriere, Charleston ’10

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Serial entrepreneur Jim McKelvey, WashingtonSt. Louis ’87, thinks you shouldn’t focus too much on money. “The advice I give and have always personally followed is do something you care about,” McKelvey said. “If you look at money as a motivator, it is really not that powerful. But if you care about a problem, that problem can pull you out of bed at five in the morning every day.”

McKelvey is best known for solving the problem of mobile payments. He co-founded Square in 2009 along with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey. Their company is responsible for the ubiquity of small credit card readers that connect to cell phones and other mobile devices through an audio jack. Despite the fame and attention McKelvey has received because of Square, his career has included a series of startups — seven in total, with six still in operation. McKelvey’s businesses range from a venture capital firm to a glass blowing studio to a nonprofit working to transform the economy in his hometown of St. Louis. His most recent company, Invisibly, is attempting to save the publishing industry by making quality journalism and online content profitable for its creators, not just the middlemen who aggregate and distribute it.

The education of an entrepreneur

McKelvey sits amid newly delivered office chairs at his newest startup’s St. Louis headquarters, then under construction, in October 2017.

McKelvey was likely destined to be a creator of things, intent on solving problems. His father, James McKelvey Sr., provided plenty of inspiration. He was a pioneer in the field of polymer processing for DuPont and later became a chemical engineering professor and dean at Washington University in St. Louis. When the younger McKelvey enrolled at his father’s university in 1983, he started out studying economics. However, his wide-ranging interests meant that his freshman course load included a computer science class. McKelvey says the textbook — written by his professor — was so terrible he decided he could write a better one himself. His attempt, “The Debugger’s Handbook: UCSD and Apple Pascal,” was published when McKelvey was just 19. For the rest of his college career, McKelvey’s reputation often preceded him, especially in the engineering school. His solution to a bad textbook was seen as an advanced demonstration of the problemsolving mentality the school encouraged. In his second semester, McKelvey found SigEp. “The people who were in the Fraternity were extremely high-achieving, super guys,” he said. “It was just a group you wanted to be part of.” To this day, many of McKelvey’s close friends are men he met in the chapter. He says they keep him grounded and remind him not to take himself too seriously — an ability that McKelvey believes is critical to success. McKelvey decided to live in the chapter house his sophomore year, and he remained busy with a heavy course load. He ended up pursuing degrees in both economics and computer science.

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Ultimately, the polymath found his way into a glass blowing class. The course fulfilled a degree requirement, but a casual interest quickly turned into a passion and later a way to earn money. Nearly two decades after graduating, McKelvey published a textbook for glassblowers, “The Art of Fire: Beginning Glassblowing.” The book, now in its second edition, is the leading textbook on the subject. “He doesn’t do anything poorly,” chapter brother and fellow entrepreneur Howard Lerner, ’87, told St. Louis Magazine. “I’ve sat next to him while he’s flown a plane, I’ve been in a Bikram yoga studio with him, I’ve sat with him while he’s done math — and the guy doesn’t do anything wrong.”

A series of startups Early in his career, McKelvey used his glass blowing skills — creating works like bowls and bathroom faucets — as an extra source of income and a way to offset lean years common to bootstrapped startups. In addition to supplementing his income, McKelvey’s glass blowing business provided the inspiration for Square. In 2008, McKelvey was brainstorming business ideas with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey. At 15, Dorsey had interned for McKelvey’s second startup, Mira. The company, still in operation today, began as a seller of PC software in 1989, but it had to survive several pivots as the internet expanded and people’s technology needs changed. Despite his young age at the time, Dorsey had been instrumental in helping McKelvey navigate one of those important transitions. “The first project I gave to him came back perfect. The second project I gave to him came back perfect. By the third project, I started noticing the trend. And my immediate thought was, ‘I wonder how much this guy is capable of,’” McKelvey recalled. “By his second year, he was running a team of 30-year-olds. And he was, I think, 16 at the time.” 26

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McKelvey designed Square’s hardware and has started seven companies, including a glass arts studio and education center. In 2017, he keynoted his chapter’s Balanced Man Scholarship banquet.

Dorsey went on to co-found Twitter and lead the company as CEO. He reconnected with McKelvey in 2008 after the onset of the global financial crisis and the end of his first term as Twitter CEO. (Today, Dorsey is CEO of both Twitter and Square.) McKelvey recalled that Dorsey had to explain to him what Twitter was at the time. One day, McKelvey was venting to Dorsey about a $2,500 sale he lost because he was unable to accept an American Express card at his glass blowing studio. He was trying to sell a glass bathroom faucet to a woman in Panama, but he didn’t have the ability to accept payments other than cash, check, Visa and MasterCard. It was a breakthrough moment for the pair, who recognized that all of the technology required to streamline payments for small businesses already existed. The parts had simply not been arranged correctly. McKelvey tackled the hardware, and Dorsey developed the software. By the end of 2009, Square was launched. McKelvey said he got his first hint at how successful Square would become when a cab driver in New Orleans pitched him on his own product. The driver, unaware of McKelvey’s connection to Square, was enthusiastically telling him about the mobile payment system. “That was the day that I thought, ‘Oh boy, this thing is going to go big,’” recalled McKelvey. In 2017, Square — now a publicly traded company — reported $984 million in adjusted revenue. The company projects it will break past $1 billion in 2018. Despite the massive success McKelvey has seen with Square and his record of starting successful companies, he’s

quick to note that he doesn’t have all the answers. “I’m almost always the co-founder,” he said, emphasizing the “co-.” “I’m always part of a team.” McKelvey looks for business partners he can trust, whose skill sets compliment his. When there is a disagreement about the direction of the company, McKelvey says he’ll explain his position but relies on the judgment of those he’s chosen to do business with. He acknowledges that there are often situations where he could mandate his will. “But that would be stupid,” he said. “I typically let them make the call. I generally don’t override the people I’m working with.” There is one area, however, where McKelvey can come across as inflexible: quitting. It is something he says he won’t consider, and he has been willing to make the sacrifices required to keep pushing his businesses forward. “Failure with a startup is really a question of the entrepreneur giving up,” he said. “Now you can say, ‘Well if we don’t have funding, we have to let everybody go.’ But in many times, I’ve had my company reduced to me. It doesn’t die until you quit, and I just never quit.”

Solving problems that matter McKelvey may be more persistent and even more skilled than his competitors in the business sector, but it is the “why” behind his ventures that continues to propel him forward. In addition to developing highly profitable solutions for small businesses, McKelvey has approached larger societal problems with the same entrepreneurial focus. After an acquaintance’s son was murdered while delivering pizzas in north St. Louis, McKelvey became resolute about addressing high rates of


People said, ‘Oh, it is impossible

to do that.’ No, it’s not! And I know it’s not impossible because I know how interested in entrepreneurship. to do it.” “The greatest thing you can have as an unemployment and poverty in the area, issues he sees as drivers of violent crime. In 2013, he co-founded LaunchCode, a nonprofit that helps people retrain as computer programmers and land higherpaying tech jobs. In addition to reducing unemployment and helping St. Louis residents train for better jobs, LaunchCode is making it easier for businesses to remain in the area. When McKelvey and Dorsey started Square, they had to move to California in order to find the talent they needed to grow the company. That’s a problem he thinks LaunchCode will solve. “I believe that we’ll actually create a talent surplus, then you’ll start to see companies moving to this region to take advantage of that surplus,” McKelvey told business and economics radio show “Marketplace” in 2013. So far, LaunchCode has helped more than 1,000 people land technology jobs and apprenticeships. Fifty-two percent of them were previously unemployed. LaunchCode is now partnering with more than 500 companies to place newly trained computer programmers, and it has extended its footprint into Kansas City, South Florida and the Tampa Bay area. In addition to helping people retrain for better careers, McKelvey is investing in higher education at his alma mater. In 2016, he pledged $15 million to build the school a new computer science and engineering building that will be named after his father. McKelvey is passionate about education and advises others to learn how to build things, especially if they are

entrepreneur is control of the product,” McKelvey said. Even McKelvey’s wife, Anna, a former attorney who speaks six languages, has retrained as a coder. She’s now a selfproclaimed “digital media arts geek,” and it is likely that the couple’s 7-year-old son, Jimmy, inherited the “maker gene” himself. A true digital native, he benefits from having parents who can teach him how to use technology as a creative tool. He also spends time making things the old-fashioned way with his father at Third Degree Glass Factory, the glass arts studio and education center McKelvey co-founded in 2002. Reflecting on how design, computer science and engineering skills have been important in his own career, McKelvey offered Square as an example. “People said, ‘Oh, it is impossible to do that.’ No, it’s not! And I know it’s not impossible because I know how to do it, because I’ve been trained as an engineer and I know how to do math and I know how to build things. And Jack knew what was possible,” McKelvey said. “You put those skills in your own hands, you’ll be much better as an entrepreneur.”

The next chapter McKelvey has now turned his attention to another problem; and, as he’s said, it’s a big one: saving journalism. His new company, Invisibly, is working to fix the broken business model that currently supports the online publishing industry. If he’s successful, the for-profit business has the chance to make a profound impact on the world and especially on Western democracies where quality journalism is an essential component of an open and free society. “The problem is how we create and sell content online. And if you look at

the world right now, the people who make the things that we watch and read are not earning most of the money,” McKelvey said. “Most of the money is earned by middle men, this intermediary group that doesn’t actually produce anything.” Two of the biggest middlemen are Google and Facebook, companies that often win the lion’s share of advertising revenue generated from a user’s engagement with online content — content that these companies aggregate but do not create. “It is as if the realtors make all the money and homebuilders don’t get paid,” McKelvey said. “And if you don’t pay homebuilders, and all the money is in just selling the house, well eventually you’re not going to have any houses. So what I’m concerned with right now is that as a society we will be really in trouble if we don’t figure out a way to get the people who build more money.” Invisibly will automatically track the content people view online and offer them a chance to pay for ad-free content or to select ads that are more relevant to their interests. Either way, he has promised publishers 100 percent of the revenue created by their content. And to advertisers, he’s promising the opportunity to be more strategic about their audience, as well as the ability to engage in two-way conversations with potential customers who are likely a better fit for their product or service. More than 1,500 publishers have already signed up as early adopters. Big names include Warner Brothers; newspaper companies McClatchy and Lee Enterprises; and Hearst, a media conglomerate that owns dozens of newspapers, magazines and television channels. It is too early to know what will become of Invisibly. But it’s clear that McKelvey is now 100 percent focused on solving this problem — and he’s unlikely to give up. If McKelvey’s past businesses are any indication, the company has a good chance at succeeding, even if it means numerous pivots to address what has been a constant and growing problem for the publishing industry. Features

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Doing well by doing good Jake Orville blends business savvy with desire to help others. By Ty ya N. Turner

Jake Orville, Massachusetts ’95, is on a mission to solve a health crisis that affects millions of Americans annually. He describes cardiac-related illness as an epidemic and notes that more people in America die from heart disease than from all forms of cancer combined. According to the Centers for Disease Control, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of both men and women. However, the disease is often treatable if detected. And that’s created a unique business opportunity for Orville, as well as an opportunity to help people lead longer, healthier lives. After holding senior management positions with two publicly traded medical technology companies and helping to start two others, Orville co-founded Cleveland HeartLab with eight employees in 2009. The company — a spin-off of the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic — develops and markets tests that can better predict the likelihood of a patient having a heart attack or stroke. The tests work by identifying the presence of inflammation in the coronary arteries. What makes this such a valuable weapon in the war on heart disease is that it can actually warn doctors about problems before traditional diagnostic methods such as stress tests and choles-

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terol monitoring. High cholesterol is a known risk factor for heart attacks, but it’s not uncommon for someone to have a heart attack before their cholesterol reaches what’s considered a dangerous level, Orville explained. “Half the people that have a heart attack or stroke now have normal cholesterol levels,” he stated. “But when we all go to the doctor — even undergrads and, especially, our alums — what do we get tested for? Typically only cholesterol.” Dr. Louis Malinow, Delaware ’90, is a specialist in preventing disorders that lead to cardiovascular disease. He is among the physicians who recognized

Orville walks the floor of the Cleveland HeartLab in February 2018 after successfully navigating an acquisition by industry leader Quest Diagnostics.


Half the people that have a heart attack or stroke now have normal cholesterol levels,” he stated. “But when we all go to the doctor — even undergrads and, especially, our alums — what do we get tested for? Typically only cholesterol.”

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the value of working with Cleveland HeartLab early on. “The standard tests — routine cholesterol profiles and stress tests — are what people are used to, which is why we’ve seen little reduction in cardiovascular death and it remains the No. 1 killer.” Malinow noted that stress tests, for instance, only detect blockages over 70 percent. Ironically, it’s less severe blockages that frequently cause heart attacks because those arteries tend to be more inflamed and prone to rupture. “Cleveland HeartLab offers the tests that identify this inflammation; and if we find it, we can squelch it with the proper lifestyle, supplements and medication.” With early detection comes the chance to make lifestyle changes and receive preventive treatments that can stave off a medical crisis or even death. The company has already assessed hundreds of thousands of patients, including a number of SigEps Orville knows personally. SigEp National Director Tom Jelke, Florida International ’90, is one of the many close friends whom Orville has convinced to get tested. “I got my results and was alarmed and made lifestyle changes to become healthier for me and my family,” Jelke shared. Now, he eats less processed food and engages in some form of high-intensity exercise at least three times a week. Jelke says that not only has he lost weight, he now sleeps better and has increased strength. He later retook the tests and saw a dramatic improvement. Much of Orville’s success has come from serving a huge potential market, and he’s most excited about helping people like Jelke who don’t realize they’re at risk. “As a business guy, you look for opportunities,” he stated. “This one happens to be in health care, which is great because you can do good and do well.” Orville’s experience, combined with innovative diagnostic technology, made for Cleveland HeartLab’s meteoric rise. Thanks to buy-in from physicians who recognized the benefits early on, the company eventually grew to over 200 30

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Orville chats with a lab technician at the Cleveland HeartLab. His company started with eight employees in 2009 and grew to more than 200 by 2017.

employees and reached revenue greater than $50 million in sales by 2017. Although the company was performing well, Orville was bothered by the fact that its tests were still only available to a small percentage of the patients who needed them. He decided the best way to quickly expand the company’s reach was through a merger with or acquisition by a company with larger sales and distribution channels. In October 2017, a year’s worth of negotiations culminated in the announcement that Cleveland HeartLab would be acquired by industry leader Quest Diagnostics, a New Jersey-based medical testing laboratory with locations around the world. Orville’s team is now able to serve more patients through Quest’s nationwide network of more than 2,200 patient service centers. Cleveland HeartLab is operating as the company’s national Cardiometabolic Center of Excellence, and Orville is leading its

entire cardiometabolic franchise — a division responsible for over $1.6 billion in annual of revenue. As part of the deal, Quest is also collaborating with Cleveland Clinic to further study the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease and other illnesses. As new tests are developed, Orville’s division will work to make them available to doctors and their patients.

A leader is born Seeing how passionate Orville is about Cleveland HeartLab, it’s surprising to discover that he once had a completely different career path in mind. “I was bound for law school,” Orville said. His journey to become one of the leading executives in the diagnostic industry was filled with surprise turns as Orville was regularly willing to take chances on unexpected opportunities. As a college freshman, Orville found himself on a campus with more than


Orville can’t say enough good things about the regional director program. In addition to expanding his network beyond his own chapter, he says his year on the Fraternity’s staff helped him learn how to take risks and how to rebound when things didn’t go as planned. The SigEp connection

15,000 undergraduates — a very different environment from the small high school he attended. One day, without even planning it, he ended up on the porch of the SigEp house during a recruitment event. And just like that, Orville found the friends and community that made the large campus feel like home for the next four years. The Fraternity also provided an outlet for Orville to develop new skills and develop as a leader. “I didn’t show up at the University of Massachusetts thinking I was a leader,” Orville said. “That’s not necessarily what my personality type was.” But his new brothers had seen in Orville an ability he would soon come to recognize himself. Orville was elected to various leadership roles in his chapter and spent a year on the road as a member of SigEp’s professional staff after graduation. The time he spent establishing, building, and — unfortunately — sometimes closing chapters taught him a lot about what it takes to build something from the ground up. While traveling the Southwest as a regional director, Orville also spent time with Mark Beran, Chapman ’83, who was then a SigEp district governor for Southern California. Beran owned a medical device company and introduced Orville to the industry. He was hooked, and law school soon became a distant memory.

In addition to getting his first exposure to the diagnostic industry through a fellow SigEp, Orville credits the Fraternity’s network with helping him at pivotal moments in his career. When market demand led to a period of rapid expansion for Cleveland HeartLab, he turned to strategy consultant Scott Edinger, Florida State ’92, to help develop a framework for growth. Later, his connection with Ryan Brennan, Truman State ’95, led to meetings with venture firm Advantage Capital Partners, where Brennan was a managing partner. Orville eventually secured a round of funding from the group. Orville can’t say enough good things about the regional director program. In addition to expanding his network beyond his own chapter, he says his year on the Fraternity’s staff helped him learn how to take risks and how to rebound when things didn’t go as planned. Those are important lessons that every leader needs to learn, he advised. But taking risks requires a willingness to be vulnerable. The best way undergraduates can learn to do that, he said, is to practice making decisions in their chapters and in other campus organizations. Orville believes leading an organization or planning an event provides an opportunity to make decisions, observe the results, and make better decisions the next time. Being vulnerable can also lead to a more balanced life. Orville shared that early in his career, he was hesitant to speak with co-workers about outside interests out of concern that he might seem less dedicated to his job. Now that

Orville and his wife, Stacey, have three children, he’s come to feel differently. He says the best teams have members who are supportive of each other on a personal level and that this often leads to a more successful business. Orville also noted the importance of being exposed to decision-makers early in one’s career. He said that recent graduates, who often face a mound of student debt, tend to be focused on making as much money as they can right out of school. While this seems logical, Orville believes it’s more important to take a position that allows you to interact with as many leaders as possible because it helps you build a network and see decision-making in action. Orville regularly shares that he’s followed the advice of Ken Maddox, Oregon State ’75, who said it’s best to spend the first 10 to 15 years of your career learning, the next 10 to 15 years earning and the last 10 to 15 years giving back. Even though he’s still in his peak earning years, Orville is already giving back to his SigEp brothers. He and his wife, Stacey, recently established a scholarship with the SigEp Educational Foundation to kick-start new health and wellness programming. Starting in the fall of 2018, five chapters will receive $1,000 each year for the next three years. The funds will support programming that helps chapter members become healthier and raise awareness about healthy living in their communities. In the end, the goal is to create a health-focused culture that will live on well beyond the three-year period. Orville also has the unique opportunity to continue giving back through his work with the Cleveland HeartLab. “That’s what makes the story of Cleveland HeartLab so wonderful for me,” Orville said. “It’s not just the success story we’ve had, but also the hundreds of thousands of lives that we’ve probably saved along the way. That’s a great feeling.”

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Hollywood, Netflix and emerging markets

Nate Bolotin is at the forefront of a new, global film industry with XYZ Films. By Erin Mullally, Michigan State ’99

A major shift is occurring in the way people watch films and television shows, not to mention the way that they are produced and financed. Nate Bolotin, California-Santa Barbara ’05, is on the cusp of these changes with his film production and sales company, XYZ Films. Since co-founding the company a decade ago, Bolotin has helped to finance, produce and license over 250 films. The magazine Variety recently listed him and his two co-founders as part of its “Hollywood’s New Leaders” list. “I always loved movies growing up, but I never thought I would make it my career,” explained Bolotin. “It wasn’t until I took a few college film classes — really nothing to do with actual film production, but rather focused on film history and philosophy — that I began to realize my passion.” This passion led Bolotin to his next step: completing his MFA at UCLA’s prestigious Producers Program. Shortly afterward, he found himself working as an executive at The Collective, a Beverly Hills-based management production company, where he focused on structuring film finance agreements and sales. “I was looking for ideas to develop as film projects. At the time, my future XYZ co-founder Nick Spicer shared a Sports Illustrated article that he read about former Ultimate Fighting Championship competitor Lee Murray. He had this incredible story where, following his fighting career, he masterminded one of the largest cash robberies in history.” Bolotin, Spicer and another UCLA film graduate, Aram Tertzakian, worked to raise money to win the rights to the story. This eventually led to an exclusive one-year partnership with Time Inc. to not only develop articles from Sports Illustrated into film projects, but also those from the media company’s other publications, including Time, Fortune, People and Life. “The development partnership with Time Inc. was the impetus to form XYZ Films,” said Bolotin, who officially established the company with Spicer and Tertzakian in 2008. The trio continued to raise money for new projects, and they eventually built a seven-figure development fund. The fund allowed them to

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Bolotin (right) and Jason Lubin, Southern California ’09, prepare for a panel discussion hosted by the Sigma Phi Epsilon Hollywood Alumni group in February 2018 at LA River Studios, an event space owned and managed by Shawn Sedlacek, Southern California ’93.

It wasn’t until I took a few college film classes — really nothing to do with actual film production, but rather focused on film history and philosophy — that I began to realize my passion.”

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option magazine articles with potential for movie development, bring in screenwriters and attach big-name actors to film production packages that could then be pitched to studios and key financial backers. Bolotin and his co-founders were only 25 years old at the time. “It was a major risk for us, particularly as we were taking on a lot of personal debt at such a young age,” he said. “But we felt we had a good strategy to start off strong in the industry — concentrating our time on development in the idea stage, acquiring rights to stories, and developing them into finished screenplays. “We really had to grind as we were starting out. We had a strong ‘startup culture’ via a lot of couch surfing and living on ramen noodles.” The strategy and hard work paid off as XYZ connected with up-andcoming Welsh director Gareth Evans, developing his action film “The Raid: Redemption,” which featured the traditional Indonesian martial artform Pencak Silat. “‘The Raid’ became a cult hit and helped put us on the map,” said Bolotin. Combined with other early XYZ successes, “The Raid” allowed Bolotin and his co-founders to take steps such as acquiring film review website TwitchFilm.com (now ScreenAnarchy.com) to identify emerging talent and films. “We are always searching for filmmakers with a unique perspective. More often than not we are stumbling across brilliant new voices in hidden corners around the world in places that have spawned film fans from childhood via access to global cinema,” he said. In recent years, XYZ has become proficient at arranging financing for film projects that are yet to be made, as well as representing completed films as they search for worldwide sales and distribution deals. Bolotin is concentrating on international distribution and sales while his co-founders focus on development, content and financing from their Culver City, California, offices.

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“I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore” is one of XYZ Films’ recent hits and won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Below: An action still from the company’s first hit, “The Raid: Redemption.”

Some of XYZ’s recent hits include “Brawl in Cell Block 99” starring Vince Vaughn, Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize winner and Netflix original “I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore” with Elijah Wood, and an adaptation of the graphic novel “I Kill Giants” with Zoe Saldana. Meanwhile, “Mandy” starring Nicolas Cage had a strong premiere at Sundance in January and will also play as part of the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes Film

Festival this year. “We have always worked hard to provide our filmmakers and partners every possible tool to make movies the way they want to make them,” said Bolotin. “And we love to work with rising directors who we feel make movies with global appeal.” An international focus has become critical for XYZ’s many productions. “Shooting internationally has enabled us to work with talent we wouldn’t otherwise have access to,” Bolotin shared. “We’ve also been able to access new sources of financial support, including government support, that give us the ability to reduce costs and ensure better financial models for investor recoupment. “On the other hand, film licensing and sales abroad is usually pretty inefficient. Different countries have different rules and regulations around distribution agreements, market collections, viewing platforms, piracy risk and enforcement — all of these are constant issues.”


Bolotin and his team have become skilled at navigating these unique challenges as well as more common ones. They’ve learned to remain equally focused on the creative and business elements of every project. “Moneywise, it is always a tricky balance between supporting a filmmaker’s vision and working towards financial profitability,” Bolotin said. “We have to find that equilibrium that ensures that the film’s essence isn’t compromised strictly to yield ROI. The difference between filming one big scene or even a few more days of production could be the difference between investor loss or gain, so we have a really challenging role to manage both sides of the creative-business equation.” As XYZ has expanded, Bolotin and his team have kept a sharp eye on content delivery platforms such as Netflix. “The industry is changing so rapidly. We have always tried to remain a few steps ahead for the sole purpose of ensuring that our business model is meeting the changing times,” he explained. “Aligning with services like Netflix has been pretty organic as it was clear that they had a big vision for the future of content. We wanted to be a part of it, to experiment at the very least.” XYZ has produced seven Netflix original films in recent years, including reuniting with Gareth Evans for his upcoming thriller “Apostle” starring Dan Stevens, Michael Sheen and Lucy Boynton. “We’re hopeful that global streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and other emerging platforms will be able to help break down international borders and create a more globally accessible delivery system,” Bolotin reflected.

Actress Madison Wolfe is pictured in a still from “I Kill Giants,” an XYZ Films adaptation from the popular graphic novel of the same name.

The work of staying balanced Bolotin joined SigEp after applying for the California-Santa Barbara Chapter’s Balanced Man Scholarship. Chapter brothers interviewed Bolotin over breakfast in his hometown of Las Vegas, and he ended up winning second place. “My chapter experience helped me to learn to balance my studies, work

When people say passion makes movies happen, they really mean commitment. Passion ebbs and flows. Making movies is arduous, and you need commitment to go the distance. Staying balanced helps in a huge way.”

and social life all at the same time. It also helped me to realize that I really enjoyed ‘the arts.’ Brothers would help me put together my film productions and attended our local premieres,” he said. “Plus I’ve had the privilege of working professionally with other SigEps, particularly attorneys Scott Carr (California-Santa Barbara ’86) and Aaron Lavine (California-Santa Barbara ’05), both of whom have been instrumental in supporting XYZ.” In addition to relationships, Bolotin has also carried SigEp values like the Balanced Man Ideal into his career, and

he works hard at managing his stress levels. “In the film industry, one day you are on a project, the next day you are not,” he explained. “Since I travel nearly six months a year, I try to stick to a consistent weekly workout schedule. And most importantly, I make sleep a priority during the week. I’ve learned from my Spanish clients and friends to take a short siesta after lunch — even though I have to lock my door and close my blinds so my colleagues don’t interrupt me!” “When people say passion makes movies happen, they really mean commitment. Passion ebbs and flows. Making movies is arduous, and you need commitment to go the distance. Staying balanced helps in a huge way,” concluded Bolotin.

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Fraternity Report

How SigEp can meet the demand for a better fraternity experience Dear Brothers and Friends, We should be proud of our undergraduate brothers. In the past two years they’ve made bold decisions. They shunned pledging and hazing by embracing the Balanced Man Program and took it a step further by resolving to make all of our chapter homes academically supportive environments free from alcohol and other drugs. Both decisions are a clear rejection of the high-risk, stereotypical fraternity experience that has become a much too common reality within Greek life today. Our young brothers have embraced an experience rooted in academic excellence, strengthening of character, healthy relationships and preparation for life after college. Our undergraduates have defined the SigEp experience of the future, and now it is our job to support them. We must ensure that their chapters have more volunteers to provide counsel and mentoring. We must provide them with relevant learning opportunities that will help them successfully transition from college to the workplace. And we need to raise the funds necessary to make this experience accessible and impactful for our current and future brothers. Because of these priorities, we’ve focused our efforts on the following three areas:

Virginia Tech SigEps pose for a group photo after their May 11, 2018, graduation. The Balanced Man Program, supported by the BMP App, prepares brothers to succeed in college and beyond.

Delivering invaluable education (not provided in the classroom) Students today spend 90 percent of their time outside of a classroom. It’s in this part of their college experience — the unplanned, unstructured hours — that they discover their passions and plan their futures. For our brothers, much of this time is spent with their chapters — it’s where they build close bonds of friendship and learn how to communicate and work with others, to lead, and to speak in front of a crowd. Our brothers accomplish all of this and more through the Balanced Man Program. In a digital age where students rely on technology to manage their academic, professional and social lives, our new BMP App helps brothers and chapters plan and implement life-changing experiences.

The BMP App will help

guide members through their SigEp experience as they develop knowledge and skills in the following areas:

> Academic excellence > Physical health > Mental wellness > Leadership > Professional preparedness

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• Eliminates administrative tasks so chapter leaders and volunteers can spend more time creating transformational experiences for brothers. • Empowers brothers to personalize and track their own development. • Reminds brothers of upcoming programs and events tied to their personal goals. • Illustrates every brother’s progress, making it easy to share and celebrate accomplishments with chapter brothers, alumni, volunteers and parents.


Engaging more alumni as volunteers SigEp volunteers are critical to any great chapter experience, and today there is an urgent need for more volunteer support at our chapters. SigEp’s 200,000 living alumni provide an incredible source of potential volunteers, but our Alumni and Volunteer Corporations (AVCs), district Tennessee Alpha SigEps from the 1990s governors, and staff are reunite for a hike on the Appalachian Trail Citation recipient Keith Bruce, Illinois ’87, facilitates at the inaugural Shawn McKenna constantly challenged by in June 2017. New online tools will make it Presidents Academy during the 2018 Carlson Leadership Academy. SigEp’s new Chapter easier to connect with chapter alumni. Leadership Endowments help more brothers attend life-changing programs like Carlson. outdated contact information, which limits their ability to effectively communicate with alumni and engage them in Investing in the next generation of leaders the important work we do for young men. Students are investing a lot in education, and tuition keeps SigEp’s new AVC going up. Over the last 10 years, the average tuition amount has Management Community and increased almost 28 percent.1 Still, students are willing to take on alarming levels of debt to get their degree. Roughly 68 percent Chapter Sites are designed to help our chapters, alumni and of the 2015 graduating class left campus with some form of debt, AVCs overcome those fundamental challenges. and the average debt amount was close to $35,000.2 Despite this investment of time and money, business leaders • Change your mailing address from your parents’ house — finally! are expressing concern about how unprepared recent graduates • Promote your chapter with a beautiful, professional website that are for the workplace, especially when it comes to “soft skills” doesn’t have to be recreated from scratch every few years. like communication, presentation, relationship building, and • Stay informed with the latest news about and from your chapter. sales … some of the same skills our leadership programs exist to develop. • Sign up to volunteer and support our undergraduate brothers. Today, only 11 percent of the funding for SigEp’s leadership • Discover easy ways to support chapter scholarships and programs is provided by endowments. The rest is coming from programs. annual, unrestricted contributions to SigEp’s Educational Foundation and undergraduate registration fees. • Reconnect with brothers you haven’t seen in years. Our young brothers need our help. They need access to our We must follow the trail that our undergraduates have blazed programs without fear of further financial burden. as so many SigEps have before them. Our young men have SigEp’s National Advancement Council and Educational defined what the future of SigEp will be … and I hope you will Foundation Trustees have worked with the staff to establish join me in helping them make it a reality. Leadership Endowments for each chapter. Fraternally, • Equip the next generation of leaders with the skills and abilities that allow them to address challenging situations with courage and confidence. • Help young leaders identify their personal leadership styles and strengths. • Provide more young men the opportunity to attend life-changing programs like Carlson Leadership Academy, Ruck Leadership Institute, Life After College, Grand Chapter Conclave, and our newest program for rising leaders. • Decrease your chapter’s annual dues to Headquarters when certain program funds are endowed.

Brian C. Warren Jr. Virginia ’04 Chief Executive Officer PS: SigEp needs your help. If you’d like to get involved with a chapter near you or support any of these efforts, please email me at ceo@sigep.net for more information.

1. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2016). Digest of Education Statistics, 2015 (NCES 2016-014), Chapter 3. 2. Sparshott, J. (2015, May 08). Congratulations, Class of 2015. You’re the Most Indebted Ever (For Now). Retrieved from https://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2015/05/08/congratulations-class-of-2015-youre-the-most-indebted-ever-for-now/ Fraternit y Report

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Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation

Carlson helps pave the way for Indiana State’s newfound success Indiana State Chapter President Chevy Elliott, ’20, (ninth from left) was one of 37 men from his chapter to attend the 2018 Carlson Leadership Academy. He participated in the recently endowed Shawn McKenna President’s Academy, a part of the Carlson experience.

By Ty ya N. Turner

In 2006, SigEp’s Indiana State Chapter was on the brink of closure. The chapter had fewer than 30 members and a GPA below 2.4. In the years since, the chapter has made an astounding turnaround. Manpower has surged to 80 brothers, and the chapter boasts a 3.19 GPA. With 23 brothers currently living in the chapter house, occupancy has nearly doubled and member safety and risk management have become top priorities. One key factor in the chapter’s recent success is SigEp’s Carlson Leadership Academy. Alumni have found Carlson to be so important to their chapter’s performance that they are raising thousands of dollars each year to send as many brothers to the annual program as possible. Typically, only current and rising leaders attend Carlson, but thanks to alumni giving, Indiana State sent 37 brothers in 2018.

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“We’ve topped 30 members at Carlson several times now,” said Chapter Counselor Brian Delaney, Indiana State ’90. “We had no idea that we’d get to a point where we were sending up to 40 percent of the chapter.” Indiana State’s Carlson fundraising initiative started in 2010 as part of an alumni-led effort to turn the then struggling chapter around. Between 2006 and 2010, challenges in recruitment, retention and academics had led to a membership review and ultimately the temporary loss of the chapter’s home. “Our engaged alumni group knew that getting a fresh look at fraternity away from the culture that existed on our host campus was paramount,” explained Delaney. They believed it was equally important to have as many brothers as possible participate in Carlson’s extensive training in strategic planning, goal setting and leadership. So in 2010, volunteers appealed to alumni on Facebook and by email with a simple challenge: Help send a brother to Carlson. Chapter fees and SigEp’s annual fund help cover the Carlson registration costs of five executive officers from each chapter, but additional attendees cover their own costs. That first year, Indiana State alumni raised $1,000 and helped five additional brothers attend Carlson. Former Carlson attendees, in particular, were excited to

help brothers take part in a program that had been a valuable part of their own SigEp experience. Along with Delaney, chapter volunteers Mike Goodin, ’89, Jeff Davidson, ’91, and Craig Williams, ’93, have played a vital role in growing the annual fundraising initiative.

A broader perspective Carlson brings undergraduates, volunteers and Headquarters staff together to share ideas and best practices. Everyone attending is actively involved in the process, regardless of whether they hold an officer position. Perhaps most importantly, Carlson provides a lens through which undergraduates can evaluate their experiences and chapter operations in comparison to other SigEp chapters rather than measuring themselves against the varying standards of Greek communities on their individual campuses. Delaney recalled that Indiana State brothers experiencing Carlson for the first time were particularly impressed by the recipients of SigEp’s Zollinger Outstanding Senior Award. Hearing the Zollinger Senior bios at a Carlson banquet gave them a new perspective on how much they could accomplish during their college careers. And it inspired them to do more than the other fraternities and organizations on their campus. As Delaney puts it, seeing what other SigEp chapters had achieved led Indiana


State brothers to conclude, “We’re no longer satisfied being No. 10 out of 17 in everything. We want to be better than that.” Prior to interacting with SigEps from other chapters, most of the Indiana State brothers thought their chapter was doing OK, said Delaney. The opportunity to meet and have meaningful conversations with undergraduates from other schools provided new insights. It helped them recognize and fix weaknesses in their Balanced Man Program and other areas of chapter operations. And hearing alumni from high-performing chapters echo the same advice brothers had heard from their own volunteers reinforced that the chapter was taking steps in the right direction. “Working alongside alumni leaders and more experienced SigEp undergraduates, I was able to really collaborate and find how I could best help lead my chapter at home,” said former Chapter President Garrett Ferrel, ’12. “The connections and experiences made at Carlson are something I carry with me in the workforce and everyday life today.” Other brothers have also observed that Carlson gave them more than just the tools to lead their chapter in a new direction. “Carlson completely changed my perspective of SigEp,” explained Jason Marshall, ’13. “It helped me develop invaluable leadership skills as well as social skills. You are challenged to think about situations in a complex and detailed way. Carlson will help you grow as a person while developing friendships that will last a lifetime.” The long-lasting value of Carlson has compelled many Indiana State undergraduates to return for a second or even a third year. This repeat attendance has helped create momentum for the chapter as brothers develop a stronger sense of SigEp and what’s possible for their chapter. The impact can be seen in more than just historically high grades and chapter size. The overall SigEp experience at Indiana State is more robust than ever. The chapter now boasts 15 alumni mentors, compared to just one in 2006. And alumni-supported scholarships have helped the chapter recruit and retain high-performing students. In 2018, the chapter will award more than $22,000 in scholarships.

From top: Indiana State brothers gather for a group photo at Carlson. Chapter Counselor Brian Delaney attends a session with chapter leaders Xavier Batty, ’18, and Justin Ottino, ’19. The Carlson experience has helped drive their chapter’s recent success.

The Indiana State brothers are also continuing to strengthen their Balanced Man Program. They’re designing unique learning experiences that add value for members and help the chapter stand out on campus. In March 2018, with the guidance of chapter volunteer Jeff Davidson, the brothers launched the Stroud Talks. Named in honor of alumnus and Order of the Golden Heart recipient Jerry Stroud, ’60, the event brought brothers together to discuss ideas of personal interest and fine tune their public speaking skills. The weekend concluded with the chapter’s first-ever Brother Mentor Rites of Passage ceremony. Their efforts have attracted the attention of university officials like Brooks Moore, associate vice president of student

affairs. Moore congratulated the chapter on the Stroud Talks, noting, “I would like to recognize and thank you all for this initiative. The men of Indiana Delta are modeling the way — not only for our campus — but for fraternal life.” Based on Carlson’s outsized impact on his chapter, Delaney encourages alumni and volunteers from other chapters to make a similar investment. “I’d challenge every group that has had their own positive Carlson experience to think about a campaign to include more than just the executive board at your Carlson,” Delaney said. He thinks this is especially important for struggling chapters. “Send as many as possible so the undergrads come up with the solutions and create their own paradigm shift,” he said. “I guarantee it’s possible.” Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation

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Lifetime Giving The following brothers and friends have shown tremendous generosity over the course of their lifetime in support of SigEp undergraduates. This list includes all living donors who have contributed at least $5,000 to the Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation through Dec. 31, 2017. This list also includes documented planned gifts.*

Thomas Temple Wright Society | $100,000-$249,999 Duke ’72 fire

Gregory J. Pusinelli

Clark H. Byrum, Sr.

J. Gregory Keller Missouri ’86 law

Lamar A. Roach, Sr.

Indiana ’57 fire law

Roger C. Chapman

Richard H. Kimball Dartmouth ’78

Marcus P. Robinson

Texas-Austin ’49

Christopher M. Coleman

Frank T. Ko

Thomas W. Russell

Timothy P. Lambert

Bruce W. Schnitzer

Kansas State ’01

John M. Corby

Pepperdine ’97 fire law

Arizona State ’74 fire

Cal State-Long Beach ’90 fire

C. Dean Davis

Michael S. McConnell

Carter Ashton Jenkens Society | $2,000,000-$2,999,999

North Texas ’52 fire law

Oklahoma ’82

D. Travis Engen

James L. Clayton

MIT ’65

Lt. Commander Christopher K. Mercer

Tennessee ’57 fire

Jere D. Fluno

Benjamin Donald Gaw Society | $1,000,000-$1,999,999 Mark W. Davis Nebraska ’90 fire

John V. Hanson Iowa State ’65

Donald W. Hudler

Ohio Wesleyan ’56 fire law

Garry C. Kief

Southern California ’70 fire law

Gregory A. & Donna Pestinger

A. J. Scribante

Kansas State ’56 fire law

William G. Tragos Washington-St. Louis ’56 fire law

Wichita State ’77 fire law

Donald D. Duryee

Buffalo State ’84

Fort Hays State ’71 fire

W. H. Clark

Carey E. Heckman

North Carolina State ’56 fire law Dartmouth Renaissance

Phillip A. & Jane Cox

Thomas O. Hicks

Indiana ’84 fire law plus

Texas-Austin ’68

Wallace C. Doud

H. Lorenz Horn

Wisconsin ’48 fire law

Florida ’56 fire law

R. Scott Dudis, DVM

Michael D. Hurst

Ohio State ’09 fire law

Truman State ’94 law

Rex E. Garrelts Kansas State ’68

Melvin H. Haas Cincinnati ’62 law

Colorado ’61 fire law

A. Jay Hurt, III Davidson ’88 fire

Thomas B. Jelke, Ph.D.

Florida International ’90 law

Steven A. Nienke

Wichita State Renaissance

Lee M. Reeve Kansas State ’71

Missouri S&T ’74 law

L ife time G i v ing L e v els $3,000,000+.................................................Reserved for first $3M+ donor $2,000,000-$2,999,999..............................Carter Ashton Jenkens Society $1,000,000-$1,999,999................................Benjamin Donald Gaw Society $500,000-$999,999.....................................William Hugh Carter Society $250,000-$499,999.....................................William Andrew Wallace Society $100,000-$249,999......................................Thomas Temple Wright Society $50,000-$99,999.........................................William Lazell Phillips Society $25,000-$49,999.........................................Lucian Baum Cox Society $10,000-$24,999..........................................Richard Spurgeon Owens Society $5,000-$9,999..............................................Edgar Lee Allen Society $2,500-$4,999..............................................Robert Alfred McFarland Society $1,000-$2,499..............................................Frank Webb Kerfoot Society $0-$999.........................................................Thomas Vaden McCaul Society SigEp’s lifetime giving levels have changed over time as brothers and friends have continued to give more in support of our youngest brothers. These new levels were established in 2014 to create clarity and consistency moving forward. law denotes Board of Governors as of Dec. 31, 2017 fire denotes legacy gifts plus denotes deceased * To learn more about planned giving, visit sigep.org/legacy sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Harold C. Hodson, Jr.

UNC-Wilmington ’91 fire law

Thomas A. Morley, Jr.

Oklahoma State ’87

Kevin A. O’Connor Loras ’88 fire

Mark J. Owens Wichita State ’86

James C. Park Michigan ’59

Indiana ’80 law Lamar ’60

Dayton ’99 fire law

Columbia ’99 fire

Texas-Austin ’66

George E. Smith Ohio State ’64

Timothy R. Smith

North Carolina State ’71

Michael R. Steffenson Iowa State ’59

Charles G. Therkildsen Iowa State ’59

John G. W. Underwood

Washington State ’58

Robert O. Wetzel Dartmouth ’76

Michael C. Williams Memphis ’69 fire law

Ohio Northern ’49 fire

Kent B. Hickman

William Andrew Wallace Society | $250,000-$499,999 Scott A. Baxter

Patrick J. Fontana

Dartmouth ’70 law

Christopher L. Bittman Denis H. Dieker, Jr. Colorado ’85 fire law

Wisconsin ’63

Charles E. Haldeman

Kansas State ’86 fire law

William Hugh Carter Society | $500,000-$999,999

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Tom H. Barrett

John R. Hoehl, Jr.

Kansas State ’53

William Lazell Phillips Society | $50,000-$99,999 Thomas G. Allardyce Lamar ’70 law

David G. Allen

Dr. J. Grant Buttram, Jr.

North Carolina State ’93

A. G. Atwater, Jr.

Kenneth G. Christianson

Drake ’64

Washington State ’74 law

Mark A. Augustine

Dr. Gary M. Coyne

Kansas State ’87

Texas Christian ’04 fire

Andrew C. Baker

The Honorable Mitchell G. Crane

Michigan ’06

Elon ’06 fire law

Thomas A. Barton Loras ’89 law

Richard W. Bennet, III

Central Missouri ’74 law

Scott H. Bice

Southern California ’65

J. Tim Biddle

Colorado State ’73

Michael R. Borkan SUNY-Binghamton ’86

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Michael G. Cowgill Oregon State ’75

Chad J. Ellsworth Northern Iowa ’95

David A. Gingras Philadelphia ’69

Thomas C. Hendrick Southeast Missouri State ’68

George J. Kausler Michigan ’63

Daniel K. Liu Southern Methodist ’08 law

Thomas Dana Cramer Michigan ’49 plus

Robert A. Elrod Missouri S&T ’60

John A. Goesling Oregon State ’67

Frederick C. K. Herberich Johns Hopkins ’91 law

Ronald R. Kefgen Michigan ’69

Thomas C. Livingston Colorado State ’79

William Gail Cross Carroll ’49 plus

Calvin L. Emig Kansas State ’69

Mitchell E. Goldich Lehigh ’09 law

R. Steven Hicks Texas-Austin ’72

Jeff T. Keltner Stanford ’02

Jay F. Lombardo North Texas ’86 law

Nathaniel N. Crow Wichita State ’04

Christopher M. Evans Oklahoma State ’97

Michael D. Gooden, M.D. North Carolina ’69

Matthew M. Hillerud North Dakota ’04 law

David M. Kennedy North Texas ’80

Louis L. Louizides Rutgers ’70

James G. Crump Lamar ’62

Dr. Robert H. Ewalt Oregon State ’56

Joseph M. Gordon North Carolina ’79

Randall M. Hinshaw Central Missouri ’75

Robert J. Kerr Wichita State ’75

David E. Lourie, P.E., D.GE IIT ’79

Nathan B. Custodio Florida Atlantic ’05 law

Scott P. Fabere Iowa State ’77

Brett A. Gough Wisconsin-Platteville ’03 law

M. Hugh Hinton, Jr. North Carolina Renaissance

Mark A. Kiester Texas-Austin ’71

Kenneth H. Lowman Oregon State ’87

Thomas H. Cutsforth Oregon State ’08

Patrick E. Farrell SUNY-Fredonia ’86

Larry L. Graves Michigan ’66

Joshua D. Hodnichak Case Western ’10 law

Allan A. Kilkka Michigan ’71

Michael Lubin Michigan ’14

D. Shawn Dalgleish Illinois ’81

Alfred J. Fatica Michigan ’80

Daniel A. Greef Wichita State ’72

William L. Hoke, Jr. Arizona ’73

Curtis R. Kimball Duke ’72 law

Matthew D. Luetke Truman State ’95

John W. Dameron Southern California ’80

Marc D. Ferguson Bradley ’84 law

Robert B. Green, Jr. San Diego State ’92

Don R. Holloway Texas-Austin ’76

Andrew D. King Wichita State ’01

Joseph D. Luna Tennessee ’67

Matthew D. Daniels Tennessee ’00

Matthew D. Finke Truman State ’04 law

Dodd S. Griffith Dartmouth ’87

John S. Hollyfield Texas-Austin ’62

William P. Kirkpatrick Mississippi State ’92

William D. Lusk Southern California ’51

Austin A. Davis Michigan ’13

Robert E. Flaharty Wichita State ’82

James J. Griswold Pennsylvania State ’90

Herbert J. Hoppe, Jr. Indiana ’50

Michael J. Klein Iowa State ’62

Christopher P. Lynch Northeastern ’07 law

Brian W. Davis William & Mary ’07

Kevin J. Fleming, Ph.D., MBA Loyola Marymount ’00 law

Captain Robert H. Grose, USN Missouri ’54

Lt. Col. John D. Hopson Jacksonville State ’90

Mitchell Klein Washington ’15

Dorothy Mackie Friend of SigEp

Rocky J. Flick Kansas State ’82

Myron J. Grubaugh Missouri S&T ’78

Jeffrey T. Horan North Carolina State ’11 law

John R. Kloes Southern California ’57

Jonathan R. Mandell Wisconsin ’07

Thomas J. Flomer Oregon State ’82

I. Barry Guerke, Esq. Delaware ’70

Michael J. Houtonen Montana ’72

W. Russell Koerwer Muhlenberg ’68

Kelly L. Mankin Western Michigan ’82 law

Richard W. Flowers Texas-Austin ’73

Ashok Gujral Friend of SigEp

Ronald J. Howard Oregon State ’72

David J. Kohl Miami (Florida) ’87 law

Paul J. Marcus Lawrence Tech ’87

Paul W. Forbes Delaware ’75

Gary M. Gulick Missouri S&T ’69

Gayland H. Howell North Texas ’60

Fredrick M. Koontz Oregon State ’70

Bryan B. Marsh, III North Texas ’81 law

Chris D. Foster Indiana ’84

Carl D. Gutermann Southern California ’61

Richard S. Howell Baker ’74

Ron L. Koos Oregon State ’74

Robert L. Martin Oklahoma ’80

James C. Foster Morehead State Renaissance

Jerome O. Guyant Wisconsin-Stevens Point ’65 law

Richard D. Huether, Sr. Thiel ’74

George J. Koperna, Jr. West Virginia ’91 law

Dr. Nidal Masri Indiana ’86 law

R. Craig Foster Texas Tech ’79

Jacob W. Haas Michigan ’71

The Honorable Robert C. Hunter North Carolina ’66 fire

Stuart W. Kramer Marshall ’63

Dwane A. Mattmuller Missouri S&T ’87

John A. Fraley North Carolina ’73

Brandan A. Haines Indiana Tech ’99

William S. Hydrick Loyola ’85

RADM Charles R. Kubic, CEC, USN Lehigh ’72 law

Wayne C. Mattson Sacramento State ’82

Vance L. Fraley Illinois ’56

Joseph R. Hand Wichita State ’00

Douglas H. Ilgenfritz Michigan ’83

Donald J. Landzettel Dartmouth ’60

Michael L. Davis Purdue ’77 Bradley W. Day Arkansas ’87 law Michael H. DeGrenier Loras ’84 Michael A. Del Favero Cincinnati ’03 Ryan T. Denny Stanford ’06 law Joseph W. Dickey, Jr. Georgia Tech ’90 Joseph DiGregorio, Esq. South Florida ’98 Peter B. Dirlam Cornell ’56 Dr. Theodore G. Dodenhoff Michigan ’57 T. Wayne Dodgen MIT ’79 44

Colonel Robert W. Lanham, USMC Indiana ’77

Lois M. Carron Friend of SigEp

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Steven D. Giles Oklahoma State ’87 Charles K. Gillespie Washington-St. Louis ’57

Arthur H. Larsson Davis & Elkins ’69 Jon L. Larue Cincinnati ’79 Joseph O. Lavoie, Jr. Massachusetts ’08 law James R. Laycock, II Tennessee Tech ’70 fire John J. Lee George Mason ’86 Scott E. Lembitz Michigan ’14 Andrew P. Lemens Drake ’08 Stephen O. Leonard North Carolina ’76 F. Whitaker Leonhardt Georgetown ’07 law Joseph Levi, II Bucknell ’48 Michael Levin Friend of SigEp David Liddle Michigan ’67 Timothy C. Lin California-Irvine ’97

Reginald M. Maynigo IIT ’05 law Christopher M. McCaw Appalachian State ’03 law


Timothy J. McCormick Sacramento State ’84

Kenneth J. Nicholson Montana ’89

William L. Phelps Morehead State Renaissance

Robert G. Scheibe Washington-St. Louis ’60

B. Andrew Speed Arkansas ’81 law

Christopher S. Vale Dartmouth ’95

Dr. Brian P. McCune Oregon State ’72

David E. Nielson Utah ’76

W. Michael Phemister South Carolina ’86

Bradley A. Schick Oklahoma ’87

James P. Spellman, II Texas Tech ’90 law

Edward M. Valenta Clarkson ’02

Jason J. McGill Vanderbilt ’08 law

Daniel Nikolai Friend of SigEp law

Charles P. Pinto Delaware ’69

Steven E. Schlueter Missouri S&T ’73

Richard E. Spoon Southwest Texas State ’86

Robert D. Van de Vuurst East Tennessee State ’83 law

J. Phillip McKnight Arkansas ’81 law

James C. Nissen Oregon State ’74

Christopher R. Plaut Duke ’84

Robert W. Schmidt, P.E. Texas-Arlington ’84

Dr. Richard A. St. John Toledo ’63

Jacques L. Vauclain, III Davidson ’90

William V. Medbery Georgia ’75 law

Kirby J. Noel Tufts ’91

Brad D. Polzar Wisconsin-Platteville ’07 law

Scott A. Schmidt Nebraska ’82 law

John H. Stanley, Jr. Arkansas ’64 law

William F. Via, Jr. Virginia Commonwealth ’74

Reineiro L. Medina, III Cincinnati ’99

Steven E. Noll Southern California ’86

Jonathan G. Poole, Jr. Georgia ’14

Michael T. Schrampf Truman State ’92

Richard H. Stanley Iowa State ’54

George W. Vie, III Missouri ’83

James K. Meneely Dartmouth ’91

Barry A. Norem Wisconsin-Stevens Point ’68

Linda A. Powers Friend of SigEp

J. Bryan Schulhoff Oklahoma ’08

Roger A. Stateczny Cincinnati ’92

John-Conrad G. Villacorte Cal State-Fullerton ’01

Thomas F. Mengel Missouri S&T ’76

Henry Z. Norton Stetson ’62

W. Clifford Price, III North Texas ’88

John A. Schuyler Western Michigan ’00 law

Jeffery G. Steed Oregon State ’88

Lynn K. Vorbrich Iowa State ’60

Gregory N. Mezey Cornell ’09

Douglas D. Nosik Westminster ’69

Christopher S. Purdum Wichita State ’07 law

David E. Schwartz Friend of SigEp

Thomas K. Stempel, M.D. Thiel ’69

Troy E. Vosseller Wisconsin ’06

Riley S. Mieth Missouri S&T ’08 law

Brent A. Noyes Southern California ’74 law

Kenneth V. Pyle Southern California ’02

Raymond D. Schwichtenberg Iowa State ’76

J. Russell Stephens Georgia ’00 law

Edward J. Walsh West Virginia Tech ’69

Gregory O. Miles Cincinnati ’84

Howard L. Nycum East Texas State ’69

William J. Quinn North Texas ’87

John A. Sciuchetti Washington State ’87

Adam B. Stoltz Washington-St. Louis ’99

Christopher C. Walters Pepperdine ’03

Eric S. Miller North Texas ’91

John P. Oakes Indiana ’86

Edwin B. Ramey Texas-Arlington ’75

Gerard C. Scott Wichita State ’81

Nicholas A. Stone Wichita State ’02 law

Bruce A. Ward Wichita State ’72

James B. Miller, Jr. Florida State ’61

William K. Oetting Wichita State ’63

William J. Rendleman, Jr. North Carolina ’73

Alex K. Scull Westminster ’12 law

David M. Strachan Iowa State ’68

Michael A. Wasylik Northwestern ’92

Jay Miller Dartmouth ’82

Bill M. Ohland North Texas ’72

Michael D. Repasky Ohio State ’08

Ronald J. Sebonia Illinois ’84

Michael D. Watford Florida ’75

Lance M. Miller Oklahoma State ’95

Herbert R. Ohrt, Jr. Iowa State ’63

Kenneth E. Rhines George Washington ’89 law

John A. Secrist, III, Ph.D. Michigan ’68

The Honorable Scott W. Stucky Wichita State ’70 law

Christopher T. Minnis Truman State ’00

Matthew B. Ontell UCLA ’05

Shawn G. Rice Creighton ’90

Gerald L. Seizert Toledo ’74

Brett A. Misse Washburn ’93

Gary D. Ordway Drake ’66

Murl R. Richardson, Jr. Texas A&M ’76

Jonathan H. Shanklin Valparaiso ’08 law

Victor S. Mitchell San Diego State ’88

Brent J. Osborn Ohio State ’09 law

Michael W. Rishell Wichita State ’86

Harold L. Shellabarger Iowa State ’56

Brian S. Mock North Texas ’87

Kevin A. Otero New Mexico ’87 law

Bruce B. Ritchie South Carolina ’83

Arik A. Sherk Michigan ’81

Norman M. Monack Pennsylvania State ’81

Winona C. Owens Friend of SigEp

Jay J. A. Rivera Babson ’99 law

Jonathan D. Shoemaker WPI ’09 law

John B. Monaghan Michigan ’65

Joshua A. Paine Cal State-San Bernardino ’12 law

James N. Roach Connecticut ’99

Gary M. Shultz North Texas ’65

J. Russell Monroe North Texas ’85

Major Russell J. Pantsari, Retired South Carolina ’70

M. Priscilla Robb Friend of SigEp

Kevin E. Shumaker Georgia ’84

Trent N. Roberts Indiana State ’98

Arthur J. Siccardi Florida ’98 law

William M. Rochfort, Jr. San Diego ’04 law

Matthew W. Sides Wisconsin-Platteville ’02

Robert C. Rodert Iowa State ’60

K. Zack Sigler Wichita State ’73

Matthew C. Rodrigue Maine ’04 law

Freddie Simmons Texas-Austin Renaissance

Ivan Rodriguez St. John’s ’98

Albert V. Siniscal Washington-St. Louis ’63

Robert D. Rogers Indiana ’91

Cecil W. Sink Michigan ’44

Gary M. Romoff San Diego State ’90

J. Richard Sipes Memphis ’68

Kacy R. Rozelle Virginia Tech ’86 law

Richard D. Skinner Missouri S&T ’64

Samuel D. Ruble Morehead State ’80 law

Benjamin F. Sloat Michigan ’49

Donald B. Ruthenberg Baldwin Wallace ’52

Brian D. Smith Wake Forest ’77

Archie B. Ryan, D.V.M. Arkansas ’83 law

Cory L. Smith Missouri S&T ’70

Ryan M. Rybolt Cincinnati ’97

Donald K. Smith Maryland-College Park ’54

Christopher J. Sacra Jacksonville ’98 law

Durrell P. Smith North Texas ’91

George W. Sanders Friend of SigEp

Jerry A. Smith, Jr. Texas-Austin ’79 law

Eric D. Scales Evansville ’00

Thomas C. Smith Nebraska ’68

Thomas R. Schaefer Iowa State ’72

Minyoung Sohn Dartmouth ’98

Douglas D. Scheibe Kansas State ’87

J. Gregory South Texas-Austin ’69

G. Michael Moon North Texas ’77 Samuel S. Moon North Texas ’89 Robert A. Morris New Mexico State ’94 law Theodore Mosch Friend of SigEp William E. Mulvihill, Jr. Northwood ’79 Kirk L. Munson Kansas State ’81 Larry S. Murphy San Diego State ’65 Patrick T. Murphy Northeastern ’10 law Jordan Musoff Stevens ’15 John Nagy, III San Diego State ’68 Admiral David J. Nash, USN Indiana Tech ’65 Christopher P. Nations Central Arkansas ’94 James F. Nealon Pennsylvania State ’81 Joseph R. Neky Cincinnati ’77 Oscar O. Nelson, Jr. Texas-Arlington ’85 law Stephen K. Nelson Montana ’69 Matthew Ngo Texas Christian ’12 law

Charles S. Pappas Syracuse ’50 Thomas L. Parker Texas A&M ’82 Matthew S. Parrish Georgia ’07 law W. Daniel Pate North Carolina ’71 Hirenkumar Patel Friend of SigEp Christian T. Patterson Rensselaer ’95 David J. Patterson Massachusetts ’93 Gayda M. Patterson Friend of SigEp Douglas J. Pavese San Jose State ’63 Dr. Richard E. Pear Michigan ’48 Robert A. Pedersen Nebraska-Omaha ’71 law David R. Persa Iowa ’03 Robert W. Petersen, Jr. Montana ’67 Robert S. Peteuil Evansville ’91 Benjamin R. Pfister Wichita State ’99 Kurt T. Phares Nebraska ’79 law

Michael J. Stuhley San Diego State ’91 John D. Stumpf Evansville ’71 law Joseph E. Sullivan San Diego State ’66 Seth B. Surnamer Pennsylvania State ’88 Gregory C. Swain Central Missouri ’85 law Prof. Ric W. Sweeney Cincinnati Renaissance law Timothy R. Swift Babson ’96 Mark R. Swim Iowa State ’96 Brian P. Tahmoush Miami (Florida) ’90 law James W. Tait Iowa State ’66 Arthur R.Tatera Washburn ’81 David W. Tauber Texas Christian ’71 Kevin W. Teets, Jr. Tennessee-Martin ’06 J. David Teitelman, MPA American ’07 law Jack E. Thomas Oregon State ’54 John T. Thomas Michigan ’57 E. Scott Thompson, II Southern Mississippi ’99 fire law Jace A. Thompson Texas Christian ’08 John C. Thornton Tennessee Wesleyan ’75 William R. Tiernay California-Santa Barbara ’52 Joseph W. Tomlinson Western Michigan ’66 Brandon Townsley Florida State ’91 Brandon Tsubaki CalPoly-Pomona ’06 law

R. Kent Watkins Iowa State ’78 W. Grant Watkinson Oregon State ’64 R. Alan Watson Friend of SigEp Ryan T. Webb North Dakota ’00 law Gregory W. Welch Indiana ’85 Mark D. Wenrick Oregon ’96 law Byron L. West Michigan ’56 Monte J. White North Texas ’88 Gerald R. Whitt, Esq. Duke ’72 law Joseph R. Whittinghill Montana ’89 Richard L. Wilkey Wisconsin ’59 Curt J. Williams Missouri S&T ’04 E. Wayne Williams, Jr. Virginia Tech ’72 Michael G. Williams Georgia ’77 Vincel W. Williams Missouri S&T ’80 Delbert L. Williamson Kansas ’60 Billy J. Wilson Tennessee Wesleyan ’54 John D. Wilson New Mexico ’86 Michael A. Windus, Jr. South Carolina ’58 Hiram B. Wooton Cincinnati ’08 Clinton M. Young Arkansas State ’84 Douglas J. Young Northern Arizona ’81 F. Stansbury Young Lawrence ’36

Mary Beth Tyler Friend of SigEp

Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation

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In Memoriam SigEp loses Citation recipient SigEp Citation recipient Barney Ebsworth, Washington-St. Louis ’57, was a highly successful entrepreneur and worldrenowned art collector. He began college at the University of Missouri on an athletic scholarship. After two years as a sprinter on the school’s track team, he earned an academic scholarship to attend Washington University in St. Louis and transferred to the school. He majored in business and continued to excel academically. In 1956, he took a break from his studies to join the Army. For two and a half years, he was stationed in France and, there, became educated in art. After returning to St. Louis, Ebsworth was briefly employed at an insurance company before founding the luxury travel and cruise ship business, INTRAV. Ebsworth went on to found Royal Cruise Line and Clipper Cruise Line. He also founded Windsor, Inc., to finance investments, including venture capital and real estate. He was the original, lead investor behind the company Build-A-Bear Workshop.

Brother killed in line of duty

Barney Alec Ebsworth, Washington-St. Louis ’57 July 14, 1934 - April 9, 2018

Ebsworth built a prized collection of art by American modernists like Georgia O’Keeffe and Edward Hopper, and he helped guide the collections of several museums. Among other board roles, Ebsworth served as a trustee of the St. Louis Art Museum, the Seattle Art Museum, and the Honolulu Museum of Art. He was a former commissioner of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and co-chairman of the collectors committee for the National Gallery of Art.

Multiple generations of SigEps attended a celebration of Hennis’ life in Chapel Hill. “I am confident that Sterling enjoyed watching us make this photo and smiled as it was done,” said J.T. Atwell Jr., North Carolina ’87. “I think we all know what an impact he had on NC Delta and our lives. He was a great man!”

Distinguished Alumnus leaves legacy with chapter R. Sterling Hennis Jr., North Carolina ’52, earned his undergraduate, master’s and doctorate degrees at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He served briefly in the Army’s military police corps and guarded the atomic bomb at the Sandia Base in New Mexico. His teaching career began in Winston-Salem, but he quickly returned to his alma mater. He taught English education at the university and served as chair of the Division of Curriculum and Instruction from 1975 to 1981. For 42 years, he served as his chapter’s faculty advisor. Sterling and his wife, Anita, generously shared their hospitality 46

sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

and affection with brothers throughout those R. Sterling Hennis Jr., four decades. He North Carolina ’52 Jan. 27, 1930 - Feb. 14, 2018 also served as president of the group’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation and assisted neighboring chapters as a district governor. In 1987, he earned SigEp’s Distinguished Alumnus Award, and his chapter renamed its home, Sterling Hennis House, in his honor after completing a successful capital campaign — also in his honor — in 2010.

Ken Copeland, Sam Houston State Renaissance, was a 19-year veteran of the San Marcos, Texas, Police Department. Copeland, who was the first officer killed in the line of duty in the history Kenneth Copeland, Sam of the department, Houston State Renaissance Nov. 26, 1959 - Dec. 4, 2017 was also an activeduty member of the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve at the time of his passing and had previously served as a deputy sheriff in Los Angeles and a corrections officer in California and Texas. Known for constantly placing the needs of others above his own, Copeland was highly respected by the community. He often gave away bottles of his favorite mineral water to friends as well as to homeless people he encountered while on duty. He also helped launch a Cub Scout pack at a local elementary school and served as a leader of the group. Copeland was well loved by his coworkers, many of whom kept photos of him on display at the police department. While pursuing his master’s degree, he got to know several members of SigEp’s Sam Houston State Chapter, and they came to see the older Copeland both as a friend and a mentor. “We all loved him and felt he totally embodied all our core values. Everybody just thought so highly of him,” recalled fellow officer Joe Fratangelo, Sam Houston State ’84. In 1987, Copeland became a Renaissance brother. Copeland was shot on Dec. 4, 2018, when he and other officers attempted to serve a warrant and passed away later that day. He was scheduled to be off duty the day he died, but came in to work overtime. This was a common practice for Copeland, who frequently worked extra hours to support his family and to help his small department better serve the community.


The following is a partial listing of SigEp brothers who have passed away in recent months, organized by the member’s home chapter’s state. Names in red are national volunteers or those who have received national recognition for their service, such as the Order of the Golden Heart, Exemplary Service Award, Volunteer of the Year, Distinguished Alumnus or Citation.

Alabama James M. Adams Alabama ’58 James H. Bedingfield Alabama ’61 George H. Nash Auburn ’61

Robert D. Huff Delaware ’78

Florida Claudio P. Finazzo Florida International ’93 Haskell R. Fulmer Florida State ’57 Wayne A. Hartnup Stetson ’57 William E. Counts Georgia Tech ’43 Raymond A. Logan Valdosta State ’71 Robert A. Rushton Georgia ’67 Ronald G. Smith Valdosta State ’68

Illinois

Louisiana

Georgia

Robert L. McIntyre Bradley ’50 Richard L. Merrick Jr. IIT ’64 Allan C. Steer Bradley ’56

Indiana

Arkansas Matthew H. Capell Henderson State ’64

Iowa

Mark R. Isaacson Alaska-Fairbanks ’05

Arizona William S. Franklin Arizona ’56 Theodore L. Marsella Arizona State ’67

California Calvin W. Dunbar California-Berkeley ’43 Frank H. Klahn California-Davis ’85 William C. McBride California-Santa Barbara ’63 Jeffrey J. Von Essen San Diego State ’82 Albert A. Wright Southern California ’49

Colorado Kent O. Davis Colorado State ’59 Robert L. Grisenti Denver ’52 Phillip E. Myers Colorado ’66

Delaware Arthur M. Butler Jr. Delaware ’53 Richard A. Diver Delaware ’51

Kentucky Harold R. Black Kentucky ’51 John H. Freer M.D. Kentucky Wesleyan ’60 Aubrey M. Hill Western Kentucky ’09 William C. Jacobs Kentucky ’58 Donald E. Slone Kentucky ’53 William E. Slone Kentucky ’51 John T. Wettig Jr. Morehead State ’77

Richard A. Carter Ball State ’73 Ronald A. Hachet Ball State ’61 Thomas S. Landis Indiana ’49 Dr. Randall L. Mauck Ball State ’56 Joseph D. Morrow Indiana State ’61 John L. Tanke Indiana ’76 Richard T. Wharton Valparaiso ’86

Alaska

Raymond E. Meyn, Jr. Kansas ’64 Albert S. Moore Washburn ’61

Richard C. Bauerle Iowa ’53 Robert V. Dentel Iowa ’50 John L. Giovanini Drake ’75 Paul F. Morrison Drake ’39 Arno A. Sindelar Iowa State ’52

Kansas William D. Akright Kansas ’50 Harlan L. Berland Fort Hays State ’59 William E. Garrelts Kansas State ’56 James R. Grandfield Kansas State ’51 Theodore E. Hischke Washburn ’64 Robert H. Hoover Jr. Emporia State ’71 Thomas L. McDonough Baker ’56

Brian J. McKenna Tulane ’07

Maryland Robert R. Holland Johns Hopkins ’51 Chad E. McCruden Maryland-Baltimore ’97 Zachary J. Steinberg Johns Hopkins ’20

Michigan Robert H. Bush Ferris State ’64 Christopher E. Martens Michigan Tech ’92 Robert E. Moorhouse Ferris State ’64 Joseph F. Naylor Michigan ’56 Andrew C. Woofter Jr. Michigan ’61

Minnesota Brennan K. Gaeth Minnesota ’14

Mississippi Zach Flores Mississippi ’16

Missouri H. Walker Crouch Missouri ’56 David C. Hannegan Missouri S&T ’85 Charles J. Hartmann Jr. Washington-St. Louis ’59 (Past Staff) Vincent P. Lukowski Truman State ’87 James C. McDowell Jr. Southeast Missouri State ’75 Larry R. Niedergerke WashingtonSt. Louis ’61 Daniel L. Tullmann Missouri ’87

Julian R. Wyatt Missouri ’62

Nebraska Jeffrey J. Drake Nebraska-Omaha ’88 William P. Gregg Creighton ’87 Joseph T. McCartney Jr. Nebraska-Omaha ’59

New York Wayne D’Amico NYU ’89 Paul H. MacClennan Syracuse ’47 Ronald H. Wuichner Buffalo State ’88

North Carolina

Billy J. Stephenson Oklahoma ’56 E. Ben Webster Oklahoma State ’57 John J. Webster Oklahoma State ’53 Madison B. Withers Oklahoma ’08

Oregon Brian J. Dunlap Oregon ’81 Charles L. Meadows Oregon State ’61 David S. Todd Oregon ’54 John E. Toevs Lewis & Clark ’67

Pennsylvania

North Dakota

Marvin E. Berger Muhlenberg ’51 Henry T. Cocain Thiel ’57 The Rev. Herbert D. Dubler Thiel ’61 William R. Emery Bucknell ’61 Stanley M. Lourimore Pennsylvania State ’49 James E. Rosborough Indiana of Pennsylvania ’55 George L. Wiley Pennsylvania ’48

Erik K. Valente North Dakota ’08

South Carolina

Paul S. Carr North Carolina State ’84 Matt C. Harris East Carolina ’93 Dr. R. Sterling Hennis Jr. North Carolina ’52 (Distinguished Alumnus) John P. Rankin Jr. North Carolina ’61 Robert N. Waggoner Wake Forest ’56 James F. Wood Davidson ’78

Ohio John E. Baumann Bowling Green State ’64 Richard L. Brannaman Sr. Cincinnati ’59 Robert M. Dickson Ohio Wesleyan ’57 Robert J. Feltz Cincinnati ’64 Paul J. Ferland Defiance ’76 Paul R. Freshwater Ohio State ’64 Reginald T. Goolsby Bowling Green State ’87 Robert D. Kerscher Ohio Northern ’71 Thomas J. Millikin Miami (Ohio) ’55 Ronald G. Molnar Wright State ’75 Jesse B. Pogue Cincinnati ’52 Ronald A. Straka Cincinnati ’61 Garry H. Taft Ohio Northern ’63 Ronald A. Vanke Ohio State ’68

Oklahoma James R. Nowlin Oklahoma ’52

Timothy W. Raxter Winthrop ’80 Daniel C. Stone South Carolina ’85

Tennessee Jon E. Bell East Tennessee State ’61 Allen R. Elkins Tennessee ’57 Robert J. Palmer Tennessee ’54 John T. Reese Tennessee ’54 Erik A. Stephens East Tennessee State ’00 Lee J. Tuttle East Tennessee State ’72 James H. Wauford Tennessee ’79 Irving R. Wright East Tennessee State ’72 Raymond J. Yonkus Jr. East Tennessee State ’67

Texas Michael T. Bailey Sam Houston State ’65

Jerry D. Beck North Texas ’67 Brian J. Bengston Texas Tech ’12 Billy W. Burton Sam Houston State ’63 Frank M. Christian North Texas ’54 Kenneth M. Copeland Sam Houston State Renaissance Phil J. Goeken Texas-San Antonio ’87 Robert E. Hays East Texas State ’69 Thomas J. Insall Jr. North Texas ’52 Jack W. Kile North Texas ’61 Ray Piner Jr. North Texas ’53 Young P. Rowan Baylor ’82 Kenneth W. Strahan Lamar ’63 Tommy A. Tilley North Texas ’54 Doud J. Wible Jr. Sam Houston State ’63 William T. Woods Houston ’66

Vermont Leon I. Patten Jr. Vermont ’51

Virginia Timothy S. Amrhein James Madison ’81 Thomas H. Hicks William & Mary ’90 Dr. Richard D. Marks Jr. Virginia ’54 H. Scott Wagner Richmond ’59

West Virginia Robert A. Glover West Virginia Tech ’64 Rev. Robert E. Hullstrung Davis & Elkins ’57 Cleayton J. Mills West Virginia ’58 William R. Seymour West Virginia ’53 Aristotle L. Svingos Marshall ’76

Wisconsin Calvin C. Chamberlain Lawrence ’50

Email obituary notices to communications@ sigep.net or send to: In Memoriam, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 310 South Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23220.

In Memoriam

47


Wondering if your chapter appears in this issue of the Journal? See all chapters mentioned in the magazine listed alphabetically by school below. Alabama................................................................. 2, 10, 11, 20, 47 Alaska-Fairbanks.........................................................................47 American......................................................................................45 Appalachian State.................................................................13, 44 Arizona.......................................................... 13, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 Arizona State.............................................................. 6, 40, 41, 47 Arkansas................................................................... 20, 41, 43, 45 Arkansas State..................................................................... 43, 45 Arkansas Tech....................................................................2, 19, 20 Auburn................................................................................... 40, 47 Austin Peay State..............................................................2, 18, 44 Babson..........................................................................................45 Baker................................................................................43, 44, 47 Baldwin Wallace............................................................. 41, 44, 45 Ball State.....................................................................6, 42, 43, 47 Baylor..................................................................................... 42, 47 Belmont Abbey............................................................................ 41 Boston University........................................................................43 Bowling Green State....................................... 6, 18, 19, 41, 42, 47 Bradley............................................................................42, 44, 47 Bucknell................................................................................. 44, 47 Buffalo State...................................................................40, 42, 47 Cal State-Fullerton......................................................................45 Cal State-Long Beach................................................................ 40 Cal State-Northridge................................................................... 18 Cal State-San Bernardino...........................................................45 California-Berkeley.............................................19, 20, 41, 42, 47 California-Davis.......................................................................6, 47 California-Irvine......................................................................... 44 California-Riverside.................................................................... 18 California-San Diego................................................................... 18 California-Santa Barbara.........32, 33, 34, 35, 41, 42, 44, 45, 47 CalPoly-Pomona........................................................ 2, 42, 43, 45 Carnegie Mellon..........................................................................42 Carroll.......................................................................................... 44 Case Western....................................................................2, 42, 44 Central Arkansas........................................................ 2, 41, 42, 45 Central Michigan........................................................................ 44 Central Missouri......................................2, 18, 20, 40, 42, 44, 45 Chapman................................................................................31, 43 Charleston............................................................................... 2, 24 Christopher Newport.............................................................. 2, 18 Cincinnati.................................... 2, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Clarion..........................................................................................20 Clarkson.......................................................................................45 Clemson........................................................................................43 Cleveland State........................................................................... 19 Colorado..................Inside cover, 2, 6, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 Colorado School of Mines.......................................................... 44 Colorado State............................................. 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 Columbia......................................................................... 40, 41, 42 Connecticut.................................. 2, 18, 19, 20, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 Cornell..................................................................2, 20, 43, 44, 45 Creighton.................................................................... 18, 41, 45, 47 Dartmouth.............................................. 13, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 Davidson..................................................12, 20, 40, 41, 43, 45, 47 Davis & Elkins..................................................................41, 44, 47 Dayton......................................................................................... 40 Defiance.......................................................................................47 Delaware..................................................... 20, 28, 42, 44, 45, 47 Denver..........................................................................................47 Drake..................................... 2, 18, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Drexel.......................................................................................18, 19 Duke..............................................................18, 20, 40, 43, 44, 45 East Carolina................................................................................47 East Tennessee State............................................... 41, 44, 45, 47 East Texas State.............................................................42, 45, 47 Eastern Michigan..................................................................41, 43 Eastern Washington............................................................... 2, 44 Elon.............................................................................. 6, 19, 40, 41 Emory............................................................................................ 18 Emporia State............................................................. 2, 41, 42, 47 Evansville........................................................................42, 43, 45 Fairleigh Dickinson.....................................................................42 Ferris State..................................................................................47 Florida.......................2, 8, 9, 16, 18, 19, 20, 23, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45 Florida Atlantic...............................................................20, 43, 44 Florida Gulf Coast..........................................................................6 Florida International........................................... 2, 30, 40, 42, 47 Florida Southern..........................................................................42 Florida State..................................... 5, 31, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Fort Hays State........................................................... 2, 18, 40, 47 George Mason................................................................. 41, 42, 44 George Washington.............................................................. 42, 45 Georgetown............................................................................18, 44 Georgia............................................2, 14, 15, 17, 18, 41, 43, 45, 47 Georgia Southern........................................................................42 Georgia Tech...........................................19, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 Grand Valley State....................................................................... 13

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sigep journal Spring 2018 | sigep.org

Henderson State..........................................................................47 Houston................................................................................. 42, 47 Huntingdon............................................................................18, 42 IIT.............................................................................. 42, 43, 44, 47 Illinois.................................................2, 20, 37, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 Illinois State................................................................................ 44 Indiana.....................................2, 6, 22, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Indiana of Pennsylvania.............................................................47 Indiana State.....................................6, 19, 38, 39, 42, 44, 45, 47 Indiana Tech.............................................................. 41, 42, 44, 45 Iowa........................................................... 2, 17, 20, 41, 43, 45, 47 Iowa State.................................................... 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 47 Iowa Wesleyan............................................................................. 17 Jacksonville....................................................................20, 43, 45 Jacksonville State...................................................................... 44 James Madison................................................................ 6, 43, 47 Johns Hopkins....................................................20, 41, 42, 44, 47 Kansas.............................................................2, 41, 42, 43, 45, 47 Kansas State..............................19, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Kent State................................................................................... 44 Kentucky......................................................................................47 Kentucky Wesleyan.....................................................................47 Lamar...................................................... 12, 18, 40, 42, 43, 44, 47 Lawrence............................................................................... 45, 47 Lawrence Tech................................................ 2, 18, 19, 20, 42, 44 Lehigh.............................................................................. 13, 43, 44 Lewis & Clark...............................................................................47 Loras.................................................................................17, 40, 44 Louisiana State................................................2, 6, 20, 42, 43, 44 Louisville.................................................................... 18, 19, 20, 21 Loyola ......................................................................................... 44 Loyola Marymount...................................................... 2, 19, 20, 44 Lynchburg.................................................................................... 44 Maine............................................................2, 4, 18, 19, 41, 43, 45 Marquette......................................................................................2 Marshall..........................................................................42, 44, 47 Maryland-Baltimore....................................................................47 Maryland-College Park................................................2, 4, 43, 45 Massachusetts................................. 2, 20, 28, 29, 30, 31, 44, 45 Memphis.............................................................40, 42, 43, 44, 45 Memphis-Lambuth................................................................. 2, 42 Miami (Florida)......................................................... 41, 42, 44, 45 Miami (Ohio).............................................................. 19, 41, 43, 47 Michigan.................................................40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Michigan State....................................................................... 2, 32 Michigan Tech..................................................................20, 41, 47 Middle Tennessee State.............................................................43 Minnesota................................................................. 41, 42, 43, 47 Mississippi.......................................................................41, 44, 47 Mississippi State............................................................ 41, 42, 44 Missouri........................................................ 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 Missouri S&T........................18, 19, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Missouri State...................................................................2, 19, 42 MIT............................................................................ 40, 42, 43, 44 Monmouth................................................................................ 2, 41 Montana....................................................................18, 40, 44, 45 Montana State........................................................................18, 19 Moravian..................................................................................... 44 Morehead State.......................................6, 16, 20, 43, 44, 45, 47 Muhlenberg.............................................................. 20, 23, 44, 47 Murray State...........................................................2, 17, 18, 41, 43 Nebraska.................................................................... 2, 40, 43, 45 Nebraska-Kearney.................................................................19, 20 Nebraska-Omaha.............................................................18, 45, 47 Nevada-Reno....................................Inside cover, 2, 14, 18, 19, 20 New Mexico..................................................................................45 New Mexico State.......................................................................45 North Carolina......................................................... 44, 45, 46, 47 North Carolina State..............2, 16, 18, 19, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 North Dakota......................................................20, 43, 44, 45, 47 North Texas................................. 2, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Northeastern.....................................................................2, 44, 45 Northern Arizona.................................................................. 42, 45 Northern Illinois..........................................................................42 Northern Iowa.......................... Inside cover, 2, 18, 19, 42, 43, 44 Northern Kentucky................................................................18, 42 Northwest Missouri.............................................................. 42, 43 Northwestern........................................................... 20, 42, 44, 45 Northwood...................................................................................45 NYU.......................................................................13, 41, 42, 43, 47 Old Dominion...............................................................................20 Ohio Northern....................................................................... 40, 47 Ohio State....................................2, 18, 19, 20, 40, 42, 44, 45, 47 Ohio Wesleyan...................................................................... 40, 47 Oklahoma..................................20, 22, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Oklahoma State...................18, 19, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Oregon...................................................................... 20, 43, 45, 47 Oregon State................................2, 31, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Pennsylvania............................................................. 41, 42, 43, 47

Pennsylvania State...............................40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Pepperdine...................................................................... 18, 40, 45 Philadelphia.......................................................................... 43, 44 Purdue.......................................................2, 12, 23, 41, 42, 43, 44 Quinnipiac....................................................................................20 Radford.........................................................................................20 Randolph-Macon.........................................................................42 Rensselaer................................................6, 18, 20, 40, 41, 43, 45 Rhode Island............................................................................... 44 Richmond................................................................... 17, 41, 43, 47 Rider....................................................................................... 20, 41 Rochester.....................................................................................20 Rutgers............................................................... 40, 41, 42, 43, 44 Sacramento State.................................................2, 20, 41, 42, 45 Saint Louis.................................................................................. 44 Sam Houston State.................................. 2, 6, 40, 42, 43, 46, 47 San Diego........................................................................ 12, 42, 45 San Diego State.........................19, 20, 23, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 San Jose State...................................................................... 42, 45 SIU-Edwardsville............................................................ 19, 42, 43 South Carolina......................................... 2, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 South Dakota State................................................................ 6, 20 South Florida.......................................................................... 6, 44 Southeast Missouri State..............................................20, 44, 47 Southern California.................... 2, 33, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47 Southern Methodist........................................... 18, 19, 20, 42, 44 Southern Mississippi........................................................2, 18, 45 Southwest Texas State........................................................ 43, 45 St. John’s.............................................................................. 42, 45 Stanford................................................................................. 17, 44 Stetson...................................................................... 41, 42, 45, 47 Stevens........................................................................18, 19, 41, 45 SUNY-Binghamton...................................................................... 40 SUNY-Buffalo............................................................................... 41 SUNY-Fredonia....................................................................... 6, 44 Syracuse......................................................................8, 42, 45, 47 Tampa.....................................................................................18, 20 Temple..........................................................................................42 Tennessee..........................................2, 40, 41, 42, 43, 37, 44, 47 Tennessee-Martin................................................................ 43, 45 Tennessee Tech.....................................................................41, 44 Tennessee Wesleyan............................................................ 43, 45 Texas A&M............................................................................ 42, 45 Texas-Arlington...............................................................42, 43, 45 Texas-Austin................................ 2, 12, 21, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 Texas Christian...............................................................40, 43, 45 Texas-San Antonio.......................................................................47 Texas Tech................................................................ 42, 44, 45, 47 Texas Wesleyan....................................................................... 2, 41 Thiel.............................................................. 20, 41, 43, 44, 45, 47 Toledo....................................... 2, 6, 16, 18, 19, 20, 42, 43, 44, 45 Trine......................................................................................... 6, 40 Truman State................................2, 13, 20, 31, 41, 43, 44, 45, 47 Tufts..............................................................................................45 Tulane.................................................................................... 43, 47 Tulsa.............................................................................................. 41 UCLA......................................................................Inside cover, 45 UNC-Wilmington......................................................................... 40 Utah............................................................................19, 21, 43, 45 Utah State..........................................................................2, 18, 42 Valdosta State.............................................................................47 Valparaiso............................................. 2, 6, 16, 18, 41, 42, 45, 47 Vanderbilt.....................................................................................45 Vermont................................................................................. 43, 47 Villanova.................................................................................41, 43 Virginia..................................................................2, 37, 42, 43, 47 Virginia Commonwealth..................................................2, 43, 45 Virginia Tech................................ 2, 18, 19, 21, 36, 42, 43, 44, 45 Wake Forest.......................................................................... 45, 47 Washburn............................................................41, 42, 44, 45, 47 Washington.......................................................................2, 43, 44 Washington State............................ 2, 4, 6, 18, 19, 40, 42, 44, 45 Washington-St. Louis........................2, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, ..................................................................... 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47 West Chester...................................................6, 18, 19, 20, 21, 40 West Virginia...................................................................18, 44, 47 West Virginia Tech.........................................................42, 45, 47 Western Carolina........................................................................ 40 Western Kentucky................................................................. 18, 47 Western Michigan.................................................... 41, 42, 44, 45 Westminster................................................................... 18, 20, 45 Wichita State..............Inside cover, 2, 20, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 William & Mary..................................................................... 44, 47 Winthrop......................................................................................47 Wisconsin...........................................................40, 42, 43, 44, 45 Wisconsin-Platteville..................................................... 18, 44, 45 Wisconsin-Stevens Point..................................................... 44, 45 WPI......................................................................................2, 18, 45 Wright State........................................................................... 41, 47 Wyoming............................................................................... 20, 43


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