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From the Grand President

SigEp needs heroes and leaders and champions Chris Bittman is a 1985 graduate of the University of Colorado. He served SigEp as a regional director, started 21 new chapters as an expansion director and completed his time on the Headquarters staff as director of chapter services. After spending time on Wall Street with Merrill Lynch and then serving as president and CEO of a $5 billion San Francisco– area investment firm, he returned to his alma mater to become the chief investment officer of the University of Colorado Foundation. He is currently a partner and chief investment officer at Perella Weinberg Partners. A Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient and member of the Board of Governors for over 25 years, he was first elected to the National Board of Directors at our centennial Conclave in 2001 and served for 14 years as Grand Treasurer. Chris resides in Denver with his wife, Kenda, and their five children.

It’s been 36 years since I headed off to Boulder as a naive freshman — away from home for the first time — and was welcomed by the men of the Colorado Alpha Chapter at the University of Colorado. When I joined the chapter, I didn’t really understand or appreciate the full meaning of SigEp. But since then, SigEps have hired me, been my business partners, stood alongside me at my wedding, vacationed with me and my family, consoled me as we grieved the loss of a brother, and they are still my best friends. I found a home there. And though I’ve gotten older, raised a family and moved away for over 20 years, I’ve never really “left home.” I met men there who cared about me, shared their wisdom with me and helped me mature. They cheered me on in the good times, and they picked me up when I stumbled. They made me a better father, son and brother. They were, and still are, my heroes. Two years ago at Conclave, I said that SigEp needs heroes, leaders and champions. And we still do — now more than ever. We need men in our Fraternity who inspire others to action, who focus on the greater good, who make a difference. You can be one of those heroes. Whether it’s working with a brother on his studies, helping a brother who has fallen by the wayside or just being a good mentor … that’s what heroes are made of. Our brotherhood just took a bold and necessary step by putting a plan in place to make all of our chapter houses alcohol- and substance-free. And SigEp has a distinguished history of making bold moves at tough times.

We need you to take action personally — and show those men in our chapters that you care about them.

In 1959 our Fraternity rejected the prejudices of the past and eliminated all membership restrictions based on race or religion — a full five years before Selma. SigEp also saw the booming growth of agricultural, mining and teachers’ colleges after WWII. Our leaders knew that with the negative perception of fraternities as elitist, SigEp needed to go to those schools and help grow healthy Greek systems. And we did. Others followed, of course, but we blazed the trail. So it’s like SigEps to be heroes. And today SigEp needs you to be a brother’s hero and leader and champion. We need you to take action personally — and show those men in our chapters that you care about them. There are a lot of brothers on campus today who are just like I was — an 18-year-old kid, stumbling around in search of something more meaningful. And I’m so grateful that I found it in SigEp. I believe in the American college fraternity. I believe in Sigma Phi Epsilon. And I believe that together, we will keep SigEp moving ahead. Will you join me? To get involved, please email me at grand.president@sigep.net.

Fraternally,

Chris Bittman Grand President


O n the Cover

In this issue:

Dan Hicks, Arizona ’84, captures a moment for golf fans as Rory McIlroy poses with the FedExCup and TOUR Championship trophies after his 2016 TOUR Championship victory. Hicks is the go-to commentator for some of the most widely watched sporting events, and he’s known by many as the voice of NBC’s PGA coverage. See page 36. (Photo by Sam Greenwood/Getty Images)

16 features

11 chapters

10 Red Door Notes Greatest housing projects of the last two years celebrated with Cornerstone Award Illinois SigEps invest in Louisville Chapter and growth of RLC program with Pay It Forward Grant

14 Our Very Own Balanced Men Toledo brother named Fellow for push to pay it forward SigEp senior honored by North-American Interfraternity Conference Connecticut wrestler and SigEp officer receives Frank Rader Memorial Wrestling Award Drivers of Balanced Man Program legislation celebrated with Clayton-Doud Award

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Alumni success and service receive highest honors

26

Denis Dieker serves as constant force at Wichita State

28

Bert Harris builds on legacy of impact at national and local levels

30

Foundation of Drake’s resurgence rests on vision and heart of Gary Ordway

32

Former Super Bowl CEO Keith Bruce revs forward with Formula One

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Bob Hartsook’s billion-dollar fundraising career expands with new emphasis on research

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Sportscaster Dan Hicks calls the shots from ‘the best seat in the house’

16 Chapter News 2017 Buchanan Cup chapters set a paradigm of excellence SigEp returns with strength to Cleveland State through perseverance Connecticut’s SigEp story enters third act with award-winning chapter Renowned economics professor makes enduring mark on chapter, inspiring acts of brotherly love

44 Index Wondering if your chapter appears in this issue of the Journal?

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departments

4 Commentary Why substance-free housing is critical for SigEp

8 Save the Date 38 Fraternity Report Confidence in the leaders of tomorrow Conclave delegates elect National Directors

42 Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation Board of Governors Conclave giving builds memorial endowment for Shawn McKenna

46 In Memoriam

Editor’s Note: This issue of the Journal shares some of the most memorable stories from SigEp’s 55th Grand Chapter Conclave. The progress achieved and accomplishments celebrated at this biennial gathering represent years — and, in some cases, lifetimes — of hard work and devoted service.


Reader’s Guide 2017-2019 National Board of Directors

Fraternity Staff

Grand President

Chief Executive Officer

Christopher L. Bittman, Colorado ’85

grand.president@sigep.net

Fall 2017 Issue • Volume 115, Number 1 sigep.org • (804) 353-1901

Grand Treasurer

Daniel W. McVeigh, Texas Wesleyan ’90 Grand Secretary

Billy D. Maddalon, North Carolina State ’90

Editor Beaux Carriere, Charleston ’10 Associate Editor Tyya N. Turner Copy Editors Jan Brammer; Ben Ford, Arkansas Tech Renaissance; Aaron Jay Ledesma, Marquette ’14; Andrew J. Parrish, Georgia ’13 Art Direction Propolis Design Group

SigEp Stringers Journal field reporters

Steve Dorsey, American ’09 Matthew Eisen, Yale ’10 Mitch Goldich, Lehigh ’09 Joshua Gutierrez, Cal State-San Bernardino ’09 Thomas B. Jelke, Ph.D., Florida International ’90 Benjamin Y. Lowe, Columbia ’01 Kevin Lynch, Maryland-College Park ’08 Tyler Manoukian, Massachusetts ’13 Nicholas Martin, Massachusetts ’10

Michael D. McDowell, Nevada-Reno ’03 Salvatore A. Moschelli, Lawrence Tech ’00 Erin Mullally, Michigan State ’99 Michael Selby, Eastern Michigan ’02 Brian Shawn, North Dakota ’02 Matt Smith, Drake ’12 Ryan Sugden, Wisconsin ’06 Kevin Teets, Tennessee-Martin ’06 E. Scott Thompson II, Southern Mississippi ’99 David Wenzel, Cincinnati ’06 Trey Wydysh, Richmond ’07

National Directors

Charles E. Amato, Sam Houston State ’70 Bruce W. Anderson, Texas-Austin ’71 Thomas B. Jelke, Florida International ’90 Garry C. Kief, Southern California ’70 Cindi Love Bradley C. Nahrstadt, Monmouth ’89 Victor K. Wilson, Georgia Renaissance Student Directors

Kyle Clark, Loyola Marymount ’18 Benjamin Pavich, Christopher Newport ’18 Jacob West, Missouri State ’20

www.sigep.org/journal/archive

Donna B. Jarvis d.jarvis@sigep.net

Chapter Services Chapter Services Directors

Matt Huggins, Washington ’14 matt.huggins@sigep.net Paul Andersen, Northern Iowa ’16 paul.andersen@sigep.net Director of Growth

Elan Radbil, Massachusetts ’16 elan.radbil@sigep.net Database and Research Coordinator

Mindi Seidel

Membership Information Coordinator

Debbie Hunt

Marketing and Communications

Austin Chapman, Lawrence Tech ’14 austin.chapman@sigep.net

James Poole, Virginia Commonwealth ’14 james.poole@sigep.net

A full listing of all regional directors and new chapter development directors for the upcoming academic year can be found online at sigep.org.

Andrew J. Parrish, Georgia ’13

Treasurer

Stephen B. Shanklin, Murray State ’70

President

Kenneth S. Maddox, Oregon State ’75 Vice President

AJ Siccardi, Florida ’98 Secretary-Treasurer

Brian C. Warren Jr., Virginia ’04 Directors

Clark H. Byrum Sr., Indiana ’57 Kenneth G. Christianson, Washington State ’74 Timothy J. Harmon, Washington ’82 Craig S. Kaufman, Washington-St. Louis ’86 Christopher M. McCaw, Appalachian State ’03 Jerry A. Smith, Texas-Austin ’79 Jason St. John, MarylandCollege Park ’94 Daniel P. Sullivan, WPI ’12 John D. Weir, Purdue ’01 Stephen L. Young, Kansas ’80

Zac Gillman, Austin Peay State ’15 Director of Expansion

Volunteer Services Volunteer Engagement Manager

Callie Verderosa, M.A.Ed. callie.verderosa@sigep.net

Member Safety Member Safety Director

Kathy Johnston kathy.johnston@sigep.net

Programs and Events Programs and Events Director

Stacy D. Nicodemus, CMP stacy.nicodemus@sigep.net Balanced Man Program Director

Benny Nahrstadt, Indiana ’16 Career Preparedness Director

Davis A. Orr, Alabama ’14 Leadership Events Manager

VOLUNTEER Explore volunteer opportunities at sigep.org/volunteers Email callie.verderosa@sigep.net

DONATE Visit sigep.org/give Email matt.parrish@sigep.net

EVENTS Join our mailing lists to stay current on SigEp events near your city. sigep.org/update Visit sigep.org/leadershipevents

NETWORK Connect with the largest private network of SigEps on LinkedIn and join the conversation at sigep.org/socialmedia

Marketing and Communications Director

Strategic Communications Director Digital Media Director

Aaron Jay Ledesma, Marquette ’14 Communications Manager and Associate Editor

Tyya N. Turner

Communications Manager

Ben Ford, Arkansas Tech Renaissance

Finance Chief Financial Officer

Gary Huff, Central Arkansas ’91 gary.huff@sigep.net

Auxiliary Services Auxiliary Services Director

Kyle Baker, Virginia Commonwealth Renaissance kyle.baker@sigep.net

SigEp National Housing

Laura Curzi

Managing Director

Fundraising and Advancement

Asset Managers

Zachary Stull, Nebraska ’14 zach.stull@sigep.net

Director of Foundation Operations

Emily Lowry Millhiser emily.lowry@sigep.net

Alex Hendee, Fort Hays State ’13 Ben Hutto, South Carolina ’16 Conner Jackson, Nebraska ’16

Director of Advancement

SENH Controller

Matt Parrish, Georgia ’08 matt.parrish@sigep.net Associate Directors of Advancement

Jacob K. Bredstrand, Washington State ’11 Lee Stewart, Virginia Commonwealth ’10

Director of Annual Giving

Nicolaus J. Collins, San Diego ’14

sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

Information Systems and Analytics Director

1: Chris Lynch, Northeastern ’07 2: David Roman, Cornell ’73 4: Matthew W. Engelhardt, Valparaiso ’91 5: Edward E. Bishop, Virginia Tech ’73 6: Joseph W. Langella Jr., Connecticut ’83 7: Ron S. Binder, Toledo ’83 8: Josh Hodnichak, Case Western ’10 9: Steven D. Daniels, Memphis-Lambuth ’78 10: Steven B. Chaneles, Connecticut ’83 11: E. Scott Thompson II, Southern Mississippi ’99 12: Kelly L. Williams, Tennessee ’92 13: Scott Phillips Jr., Ohio State ’05 14 & 15: Brian W. Tenclinger, Louisiana State Renaissance 16: Christopher S. Dillion, Illinois ’03 17: David M. McLaughlin, Minnesota ’92 18: Matthew D. Finke, Truman State ’04 19: Luke Luttrell, Wichita State ’02 20: Glenn A. Ezell, North Texas ’87 23: Trent Morrison, Utah State ’14 24: Michael Johnson, Eastern Washington ’01 25: James M. Amen, Sacramento State ’96 26: Renato G. Villacorte, CalPoly-Pomona ’91 Vacant districts not listed

Edward H. Hammond, Emporia State ’66

CONNECT WITH SIGEP

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Information Management

President

SigEp National Housing Board of Directors

Complete Journal archive online at:

Chapter Services and Membership Manager

Kyle Sutton, Cincinnati ’12 kyle.sutton@sigep.net

New Chapter Development

The SigEp Journal is published by Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity for alumni, volunteers, undergraduate members, parents and other supporters of the Fraternity. Published continuously since 1904, the Journal is issued twice a year. To maintain your subscription, please keep your address current at www. sigep.org/update or send address changes to address.update@sigep.net.

For information on advertising, please email communications@sigep.net.

Chief Operating Officer

Joseph Toth, Maryland-College Park ’14 joe.toth@sigep.net

(by district) sigep.org/districtgovernors

Subscriptions

Advertising

Operations

Fraternity Services Director

District Governors

Richard W. Bennet III, Central Missouri ’74

The Journal welcomes all submissions sent to communications@sigep.net or to Journal Editor, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 310 South Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23220.

Fraternity Services

Educational Foundation Board of Trustees

Secretary

Submissions

Brian C. Warren Jr., Virginia ’04 ceo@sigep.net

Major Gift Officer

Kevin Knudson, Nebraska ’15

Melia H. Motley SENH Executive Assistant

Cassandra Ratti

Operations and Accounting Assistants

Lisa Nguyen Jennifer O’Donnell


6

Most loyal legionnaire has decades of Conclave memories

A SigEp earns the distinction of “loyal legionnaire” after attending his second Grand Chapter Conclave. In 1957, John Hartman, Missouri ’61, attended his first in his hometown of St. Louis. In the decades that followed, he was elected to the Fraternity’s National Board, named Grand President and inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart. In 2017, he attended his 30th consecutive Conclave, representing 60 years of uninterrupted attendance. When Hartman attended his first Conclave, gas cost 24 cents. The Cold War was just beginning, and Dwight Eisenhower was in the White House. Hartman attended Conclave as the U.S. put a man on the moon and as the Soviet Union fell. The following are some of the memorable SigEp moments from the last 60 years of Conclave history.

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1) Hartman attended his first Conclave in 1957. 2) He stands to applause as the last man standing during the 2017 Conclave stand down.

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3) SigEp’s Greek letters illuminate the Dallas skyline during the 1969 Conclave. 4) Former Merrill Lynch Chief Bill Schreyer, Pennsylvania State ’48, offers Larkin Bailey, California-Berkeley ’24, a hearty handshake at the 1989 St. Louis Conclave. Schreyer was a Citation recipient and chairman of the SigEp Educational Foundation. Both men were Order of the Golden Heart recipients; and Bailey, a Past Grand President, was one of SigEp’s most loyal Conclave attendees (see No. 7). 5) Order of the Golden Heart recipients Bruce Hasenkamp, Dartmouth ’60, and Curtis Carlson, Minnesota ’37, (right of banner) help lead the 1993 Dallas Conclave parade. Carlson, founder and chairman of the Carlson Companies, was also a Citation recipient and trustee of SigEp’s Foundation. 6) SigEp staff Darrel Brittsan, Oregon ’57, and Karl Schmidt, Lawrence ’59, entertain at a 1959 Conclave banquet. 7) Past Grand Presidents Walter G. “Babe” Fly, George Washington ’25, and Bruce Hasenkamp chat before a 1983 Chicago Conclave banquet. Fly, an Order of the Golden Heart recipient, was one of the most loyal Conclave attendees along with Larkin Bailey. The Larkin Bailey/Babe Fly Loyalty Cup, established in their honor, is presented to a brother at his 15th Conclave. 8) Colin Powell, then chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addresses Conclave attendees about leadership at the 1991 Washington, D.C., Conclave. 9) Conclave delegates vote to align all chapters under the Balanced Man Program at the 2015 Nashville Conclave.

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7

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commentary

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Commentary

Why

substance-free housing is critical for SigEp By Corey Archer, Nebraska ’18

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sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

At the 55th Grand Chapter Conclave, undergraduates and volunteers voted to remove alcohol from our chapter homes by 2020. This resolution seeks to strengthen the SigEp experience by making the Balanced Man Program and Residential Learning Community, not drinking and substance abuse, the focus of our chapter homes. In 2015, Conclave delegates submitted a resolution that charged the SigEp staff with creating a task force to explore and recommend actions regarding alcohol-related education and policies for our members. Even before the National Board of Directors presented their findings this past spring at the Carlson Leadership Academies, I was convinced about the benefits of substance-free housing. My chapter at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln lives in a facility that is substance-free, and I’ve seen my brothers thrive in that environment. Following Carlson, I was connected with other brothers who were advocating for a substance-free resolution drafted by Connor Hoffman, Montana State ’18. I was glad to be a part of an initiative that I believe in and that I believe will create positive change for our Fraternity. I know that for some of our chapters this will be a challenge. I also know that there was and is an urgency to act now. As a co-author of the resolution, I want to answer some questions about the rationale behind this move for SigEp.


How will this make chapters better and safer? Let me start with what I believe this decision and this moment will mean for SigEp. The actions we take following this resolution will make it easier for our chapters to recruit, retain and develop values-based leaders. As I dug into the issues leading to this resolution, what I came to understand is that chapters with substance-free homes are experiencing improved performance in academics, recruitment and retention when compared to chapters with homes that are not substance-free. This has certainly been my experience in my own chapter, and the data presented by supporters of the resolution showed that chapters with substance-free homes have an average GPA that is 0.17 points higher and an average chapter size that is 17 men larger. Additionally, substance-free houses are seeing higher occupancy. Our members want to live in these homes because they are clean, quiet and well-maintained. Brothers can focus on their lives as students and enjoy the company of one another without having to worry about whether they’ll be able to study or sleep over the noise of a party. By moving social events out of our homes and into third-party venues, our brothers can more effectively use common spaces for studying, conducting Balanced Man Program challenge meetings and hosting other events that will help attract and retain the kind of members and volunteers we regularly say we’re looking to engage.

Why is this policy being adopted now? I’d ask, why hasn’t it already been adopted? In the past 10 years, nearly 50 SigEp chapters have closed due to risky behavior fueled by alcohol consumption. More than 1,800 college students die every year from alcohol-related injuries in the U.S., and universities are acting decisively in crisis situations to ensure their students remain safe. We are hearing calls for dissolving Greek systems on campuses across the country. In July, the faculty at Harvard voted to ban Greek organizations from their campus in four years. In March of this year, more than 120 vice presidents of student affairs met in San Antonio to discuss the future of

fraternities. A portion of this group met again in September in Washington, D.C., to launch the Reimagining Greek Life Task Force. Again, it seems leaders in higher education are calling for urgent changes in the Greek system. Meanwhile, the ability to insure ourselves is becoming more difficult each year. There is currently only one remaining insurance provider willing to do business with fraternities. SigEp has seen a 46 percent increase in insurance premiums since 2014, and we pay 900 percent more in premiums than the average sorority. These trends are urgent issues that so many of our brothers felt compelled to address as leaders in SigEp and in the Greek community. Our previous path was not sustainable.

What’s next? I understand that this will be hard. It will be hard when other fraternities are still hosting parties in their houses. It will be hard on game days when the entire campus is tailgating. And it will be harder still when friends and dates ask why they can’t come pregame at our house before an event. But it is still the right thing to do, and it can work … I’ve seen it work.

Nebraska chapter brothers and the brothers from 70 other housed chapters that have already made this work on our campuses are committed to doing everything we can to help other chapters make this work on theirs. We can’t afford to leave any chapters behind. The next 12 months will require hard work, regular conversations and a commitment to helping each other succeed. More than responding to facts and figures, this is about aligning our actions with our values. SigEp chapters tell potential new members, parents, and campus faculty and staff that we are different. We tell them about our cardinal principles, our Balanced Man Program and our Residential Learning Communities. But we’ve failed to fully separate ourselves from the drinking club brand associated with all fraternities. And for far too long we’ve done too little to align all of our actions with our expressed values. Our universities and many of our peer fraternities are looking for SigEp to lead. This new substance-free direction is a strong start. Now the work becomes making the resolution a reality and bringing all of our brothers along with us.

“Leading by making the difficult decisions and taking the road not traveled; SigEps are out in front once again.” ~ David Blau, Georgia State ’79

“BRAVO! from a Sigma Chi alumni.” ~ Craig Joyner

“Great job men! Alcohol and drugs have been dragging down our fraternity for too long. As brother Bill Tragos, Washington-St. Louis ’56, said a few years back, ‘Let alcohol be the pause that refreshes and not the main act.’ Thanks for your courage Corey; and all the brothers behind this great change.” ~ Bryan A. Harmsen, Colorado State ’01

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Alumni weigh in Brotherly love means modeling the way Our late Past Grand President Jack Wheeler, North Texas ’61, explained often that he knew of many fraternities who chose brotherhood as a core value, but only one who selected brotherly love. It is the idea of brotherly love that emphasizes the foundations of accountability within Sigma Phi Epsilon. Brotherhood within fraternities is often misunderstood to mean shielding someone from accountability, while brotherly love means holding men to their promises. Brotherly love means constantly supporting a brother who is facing hard personal choices due to his temptations. It means deflecting a brother from taking inappropriate actions with other persons, from drinking to excess and losing his ability to recognize bad risks, and helping him to develop new habits of behavior. It is this brotherly love that helps to make Sigma Phi Epsilon different in a positive and growth-inducing way. As we all reflect on what brotherly love means in our own lives, SigEp alumni must consider what we do to promote it among the undergraduate members we influence. As we work with undergraduates, it is imperative that we recognize sharing stories about our own undergraduate excesses — or coming back to campus and perpetuating the social excesses on football Saturdays — sends a dark message to our younger brothers: that excessive drinking and egregious behavior is valued as an integral part of the Fraternity experience. We, along with the undergraduates, must hold each other accountable to a higher standard. That higher standard is to conduct ourselves in front of our undergraduate mentees with greater prudence, with conscious awareness that we are constantly modeling the sort of appropriate behavior we want undergraduates to assimilate into their daily lives. Fraternally, Chuck “Doc” Eberly, Ph.D. Bowling Green State ’63 Order of the Golden Heart

>>>>>>

>>>>>>

Doc, I so agree with the need to temper the “war stories” that are often the focal point of alumni gatherings with undergraduates. The world is much different than when I was an undergraduate. Diligent research has expanded our knowledge of the rewards of moderation. The virtue of encouraging our undergraduate brothers to live better lives than we have is truly the opportunity to build a better world. … The world needs us to evolve and evoke a different expectation of what it means to be Greek. Bob Kerr Wichita State ’75 Order of the Golden Heart

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sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

Facing alcohol issues at Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity deaths involving alcohol and drugs have occurred recently at Pennsylvania State University and the University of Iowa, resulting in chapters being banned or suspended. Harvard is considering a proposal to ban all fraternities and sororities by 2018 due to similar issues. Alcohol abuse is not a new issue, but it is an issue that dominated conversation at SigEp’s 55th Conclave in Orlando this summer. The debate considered whether alcohol and drug use reflected a core value of SigEp, and whether its presence in chapter homes furthered our stated cardinal principles of Virtue, Diligence, and Brotherly Love. The answer was clear to the voting members and should resonate with our alumni. At my own chapter of Iowa Delta at Drake University, our alumni adopted the dry house concept in 2000. We believe every young man who walks through the red doors of SigEp is precious. We chose to support our cardinal principles rather than a wet house with its inherent risks. In the 17 years since, the chapter has thrived: seven Buchanan Cups, a manpower of more than 110 and the top fraternity GPA. We are also clear leaders in philanthropic activities, post-collegiate employment and graduate school placement. The hard work starts now for chapters currently operating wet houses, as well as for the alumni and Fraternity staff who will support them in this change. I urge all alumni who have seen and lived in the dry house environment to reach out to your brothers at other chapters and help them make the changes necessary for supporting a substance-free home. You may save the life of a young brother as well as the future of his chapter. Fraternally, Gary D. Ordway Drake ’66 Order of the Golden Heart


Young alumnus reflects on college years spent in a dry house Dear Brothers, When I was an undergraduate, my chapter was the only chapter on campus at Ohio State that didn’t host parties at its house and wasn’t a haven for alcohol. We had substance-free common areas. In the early going, it was frustrating to be the chapter referred to as the “boy scouts.” But before graduation, I learned there are a few things that happen when your house is free from the alcohol-induced challenges faced by most “frat houses.” Here’s a short list: 1. Girls seem to like coming to a house that doesn’t smell like stale beer. The idea that our men would be social pariahs was debunked quickly. Most days, there were as many brothers’ girlfriends hanging out at our house as there were brothers. 2. When you can invite your mom and dad into your college home, you’re very likely to keep their support. Parents — who were often helping their sons financially — loved seeing their sons join our chapter because our home supported Sound Mind and Sound Body. 3. Alumni find a nice house to be a great place for their donations. Today, our home has remodeled formal rooms, thanks to the confidence alumni have in the chapter. 4. The best men on campus aren’t looking to pay expensive membership fees just to drink in a house with their friends. The value we showed potential new members was in our Balanced Man Program and a facility that supported a positive college experience. By the time I graduated, we had six brothers living in our house that served on homecoming court, 10 chosen for class honoraries, and members of student government. Our brothers were typically in the running for just about every important award or honor at one of the largest universities in the country. I share this with you to show that substance-free housing is no doomsday for SigEp. Instead, it will be an opportunity for those who embrace it. Yes, initially you may lose the men who prioritize drinking over the value they get from the SigEp experience and the Balanced Man Program. And you may have a few vacancies that you weren’t used to having in your chapter houses ... for now. Then, as time passes, this will become the new normal and help your chapter thrive as mine has. This is an opportunity that can unlock countless possibilities for our chapters and help us stand out from other fraternities on our respective campuses as the best place to become a balanced man. Fraternally, Scott W. Phillips Jr. Ohio State ’05

From the press Author of new book on fraternities praises SigEp effort SigEp’s alcohol policy comes as welcome news amid the drinking and hazing deaths this year at Penn State, Louisiana State, Florida State and Texas State. I recommend dry chapter houses in my new book, “True Gentlemen: The Broken Pledge of America’s Fraternities.” My research suggested that restricting alcohol can save lives and help prevent injuries and sexual assaults. As so many universities suspend Greek life this fall, other fraternities should consider following your lead. Of course, enforcement will be key to the policy’s success. Colleges and Interfraternity Councils could help. A campus-wide rule against serving alcohol in all of a university’s fraternity houses would certainly make your job easier. I’m eager to learn about the impact of the policy over the next months and years. Good luck and congratulations on this important step. Best, John Hechinger

Town & Country Magazine says SigEp has ‘best vision for the future’ “Not only does Sigma Phi Epsilon’s Balanced Man Program provide undergraduate men with valuable structure, support and guidance; it also removes pledging from the fraternity altogether, meaning that all members — freshmen and seniors alike — are treated as equals.” ~ Town & Country

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Save the Date

February 2018

Southeast Carlson Leadership Academy Atlanta, Ga. ..............................................2/2-4 sigep.org/carlson

Northeast Carlson Leadership Academy Long Branch, N.J. .....................................2/9-11 sigep.org/carlson

Southwest Carlson Leadership Academy Oklahoma City, Okla. .................................2/9-11 sigep.org/carlson

April 2018

Memphis Founders Day Memphis, Tenn. ........................................... 4/7 sigepmemphisalumni.org

Sam Houston State Annual Meeting & Reunion

Pittsburgh Spring on the Green

Montgomery, Texas ................................2/16-18

chris.gassman@sigepmail.com

sigep.org/txeta-facebook

SIU-Edwardsville 45th Anniversary Banquet Collinsville, Ill. ............................................2/17 45thReunion@sigepiletaavc.com

Midwest Carlson Leadership Academy Chicago, Ill. ........................................... 2/23-25 sigep.org/carlson

March 2018

Southern California Carlson Leadership Academy Woodland Hills, Calif. ................................ 3/2-4 sigep.org/carlson

Central Missouri 50th Anniversary Warrensburg, Mo. .......................................3/9 jburk84468@aol.com

Pittsburgh, Pa. ............................................ 4/7

South Florida 50th Anniversary Reunion Tampa, Fla. .................................................. 4/7 jdigrego@hotmail.com

Trine 50th Anniversary Weekend Angola, Ind. ........................................... 4/14-16 lambdahousecommunications@gmail.com

Barton 60th Founders Day Celebration Wilson, N.C. ...........................................4/27-28 baridgway@bulldogs.barton.edu

May 2018

Oregon State 100th Anniversary Corvallis, Ore. .............................................5/19 dklick@sterling.net

Board of Governors Weekend Palm Springs, Calif. ................................5/10-13 sigep.org/palmsprings

June 2018

Ruck Leadership Institute Richmond, Va. ....................................... 6/20-24 sigep.org/ruck

Tragos Quest to Greece Greece ...................................................6/14-24 sigep.org/quest

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commentary

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Red Door Notes

The red door on SigEp chapter houses started at Syracuse University in 1928. While not the only factor in a highperforming chapter, well-appointed chapter facilities support transformative experiences created by the Balanced Man Program and Residential Learning Communities.

Greatest housing projects of the last two years celebrated with Cornerstone Award Great architecture and thoughtful design can change the way we see ourselves. These elements inspire us and elevate the expectation for achievement. The ideal SigEp chapter home does just that. With today’s college student spending 90 percent of their time outside of a formal classroom setting, the importance of an exceptional living-learning environment is even more pronounced. SigEp’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporations work to ensure that chapter homes support excellence through their design and continued maintenance. Projects vary from safety and cosmetic upgrades to major renovations and new construction. The following groups were recognized with SigEp National Housing’s biennial Cornerstone Award for their dedication to facilities that provide brothers with a superior environment in which to live, learn and prepare for the journey of life ahead. 10

sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

Colorado State rebuilds to host best-in-class Residential Learning Community Colorado State’s total home renovation and expansion is a model example of a SigEp housing project and capital campaign. The $2.7 million renovation and expansion includes new study areas, faculty office space and a marquis library that will serve as a classroom. The project was completed in the spring of 2016 and featured in the summer 2017 issue of the Journal. Alumni raised $1.18 million from 139 brothers to support the project, and skillful financial management helped volunteers grow a reserve fund from $60,000 to $450,000 over nine years. Additional funding was provided through SigEp National Housing’s loan program. The Colorado State SigEps wanted to provide a premier living-learning environment that would attract the school’s best students. Eager to be ready for their dormant chapter’s return to campus, volunteers are working to recruit faculty fellows and develop chapter-specific academic

programing before the first new member joins in the spring of 2018. Partnerships are being explored with departments like the school’s President’s Leadership Program, which would provide brothers the opportunity to take college courses in the facility and even receive a minor in leadership studies. To support this level of educational programming as well as chapter scholarships, Colorado State alumni are now working to build a $1 million endowment through annual giving over the next 10 years.

Colorado State’s renovated facility includes a house director suite, faculty fellow office and multimedia conference room as well as an 800-square-foot, dual-purpose library and classroom with vaulted ceiling and study loft. The Jenkins Family Library is pictured under construction in 2015.


New Fort Hays State home offers model for university partnership This fall, a new $7 million learning community opened its doors for SigEp at Fort Hays State. The university put forward the funds to build the facility, and a $250,000 capital campaign previously initiated by Fraternity alumni was redirected to support chapter scholarships. While the space is owned and maintained by the university, it is tailored to suit the needs of a SigEp Residential Learning Community. This innovative project embodies university partnership, as well as partnership among Greek organizations. The new learning community contains four separate units, each with their own common areas and 24 beds. In addition to SigEp, a sophomore experience program and two sororities — Tri Sigma and Delta Zeta — are operating out of the facility. It was important to Fort Hays State’s administration that each unit remain substance-free, and fraternities and sororities unprepared to adopt the policy were turned away. However, there is a footprint designated for another Greek building when other groups are ready to partner with the school. Because the emphasis of the space is residential learning, common areas were made larger, resulting in construction costs that were higher than a typical residence hall. To ensure the new facility would maintain a positive cash flow, alumni and volunteer groups provided a financial guarantee that their units would maintain 100 percent occupancy. Dozens of SigEp alumni have donated to support the sustained operation of the house as well as chapter scholarships. One donor, Steve Shields, Fort Hays State ’77, also donated the furniture for the chapter’s common spaces. The Fort Hays State brothers hope to host a semester-long course in the new facility and will sponsor a speaker series open to the campus community. To support these and other chapter programs, they’ve recruited their first resident scholar and two faculty fellows. This unique housing partnership benefited from a number of university officials familiar with SigEp and the positive impact of its programs. For 27 years, SigEp Past Grand President and member of the Order of the Golden Heart

Ed Hammond, Emporia State ’66, led Fort Hays State as president. In addition to Hammond, advocates within the administration included his immediate successor, Mirta Martin, who received SigEp’s 2016 University Partner of the Year Award for her work with the learning community. Jill Arsensdorf, chair of the school’s leadership studies department, was also influential in the project’s design. She serves as mentor with the chapter and was named a SigEp Volunteer of the Year in 2016. Other SigEp volunteers within the administration included Vice President

of Student Affairs Joey Linn, Fort Hays Renaissance, Foundation President and CEO Jason Williby, Fort Hays State ’07, Honors College Director Matt Means, Northern Colorado ’97, retired Mathematics and Computer Science Department Chair Ron Sandstrom, Fort Hays State ’64, former Assistant Director of the Memorial Union Vince Bowhay, Washburn ’08, and Registrar Craig Karlin, Fort Hays State ’88. In total, over 3,000 volunteer hours went into the planning, design and execution of Fort Hays State’s new learning community.

Clockwise from top: SigEp’s new learning community at Fort Hays State was funded and developed by the university. SigEp brothers, university administration and members of the Greek community break ground on the project on April 2, 2016. Brothers gather in their new living and conference room for a weekly chapter meeting.

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Minnesota marks 25th year in home with major renovation In 1992, Minnesota Alpha alumni purchased a large Victorian home that had recently been damaged heavily in a fire. The chapter’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation undertook an extensive remodel to make the house livable and installed a central fire alarm system. Brothers have been living there ever since, with alumni supporting the constant upkeep required by the historic property. Over the years, they’ve updated the roof, bathrooms, carpeting and kitchen. As the chapter grew, the home’s meeting and study room was enlarged to create additional space for residential learning. After 25 years of steady home improvements, alumni and volunteer leaders completed their first wide-scale renovation of the 8,800-square-foot house. The $440,000 project was made possible by gifts toward a $350,000 capital campaign and a refinanced loan through SigEp National Housing’s conduit lending program with BB&T. When Minnesota brothers returned to campus for the fall 2017 semester, they found 80 percent of their chapter home had been renovated or enhanced. The entire house received new flooring, and drywall was repaired and repainted throughout the facility. Each of the home’s 20 bedrooms received upgraded light

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fixtures, outlets and switches, as well as professionally constructed loft beds that have improved safety and maximized space. Additional safety upgrades include a new sprinkler and fire alarm system. Minnesota’s volunteers spent countless hours coordinating, planning and consulting with SigEp National Housing to create an environment capable of supporting chapter and individual success for years to come. The project was overseen by several volunteers, including AVC President Matt Beck, Iowa ’90, Treasurer Danny Czaja, Georgia Tech ’92, and Vice President of Facilities Jason Somrock, Minnesota ’02. As the AVC continues to raise funds toward its $350,000 goal, the project is being supported by major gifts from Beck; Somrock and his brother, Jeff, Minnesota ’05; as well as District Governor David McLaughlin, Minnesota ’92.

Clockwise from top: Minnesota brothers complete class projects in their chapter’s meeting and study room. New floors, repaired drywall, and upgraded sprinkler and fire alarm systems are seen upon entering the house. Eighty percent of the 8,800-square-foot historical home was renovated over the 2017 summer term.


Illinois SigEps invest in Louisville Chapter and growth of RLC program with Pay It Forward Grant SigEp’s new Residential Learning Community at Louisville received the 2017 Pay It Forward Grant at Conclave. Recipients of the $5,000 award are selected based on the promise they show in establishing a Residential Learning Community as well as their commitment to delivering highly innovative programming in a substance-free chapter home. The grant program was developed and funded by SigEps from the University of Illinois in 2011 as a way of paying forward funding their chapter had previously received from SigEp’s Educational Foundation. In 2003 and 2009, Illinois Alpha applied for and received grants from the foundation to enhance its historical 1925 home and support a Residential Learning Community. The chapter used the funds to renovate and build out a classroom as well as a dual-purpose conference room and technology center. In recent years, the chapter and its faculty fellows have hosted guest lecturers and a series of for-credit courses within the chapter house. The chapter has also developed programming partnerships with the school’s leadership and career centers, and it covers the cost of online study tools like Course Hero and Chegg. “It is clear to us that the environment we have created within the chapter house has had an extraordinary impact on the success of our brothers,” said Ryan Hamrick, Illinois ’16, who leads the AVC’s 10-man volunteer board of advisors. “Our chapter is 165 members strong and consistently boasts one of the highest GPAs on campus. Reflecting back on all that Illinois Alpha has accomplished in the last two decades, it is impossible to ignore all of the help we’ve received from others.” Longtime Chapter Counselor Shawn Dalgleish, ’81, was a member of the Illinois Alpha Alumni and Volunteer Corporation when the board decided to invest in the success of other chapters. They felt the grants they had received were a loan that needed to be repaid, he said. “The idea was that this was not our money to keep, but to recycle, reuse and return into the developmental cycle in an appropriate way,” said Dalgleish. “Since the original grants were earmarked for

The Illinois Alpha Chapter used two matching grants from SigEp’s Educational Foundation to build out educational space in its historical home. Since 2011, the now thriving Residential Learning Community has worked to pay forward these grants by investing in new and aspiring RLCs.

RLC use, we thought we should return it for RLC use and update it with a matching focus on substance-free housing.” In addition to financial support, grant recipients receive mentoring from the Illinois Chapter’s leadership team. Undergraduate officers and chapter volunteers discuss faculty fellow recruitment and engagement as well as best practices for designing and using common space within a chapter home. Illinois volunteer Chris Dillion, ’03, has helped administer the grant since its inception and has mentored chapter volunteers supporting new and aspiring Residential Learning Communities. One of Dillion’s favorite success stories is Montana State, a 2013 recipient. The chapter’s alumni and volunteers matched the grant with an additional $5,100 and used the funding to improve the academic functionality of the chapter’s substance-free home, adding whiteboards, audio-visual equipment and library furniture. They also invested in chapter programing, including a SigEp lecture series with topics ranging from ancient Greek philosophy and music education to conflict management and critical thinking. The chapter went on to win Buchanan Cups in 2015 and 2017. Illinois brothers hope that Louisville will be the grant program’s next big success story. Louisville has already built many of the components necessary

for a successful program and received accreditation as a Residential Learning Community in May 2017. Their faculty fellow, LaMont Johnson, Louisville Renaissance, holds regular office hours at the chapter home and helps brothers navigate their academic experience. He has also facilitated partnerships with the campus faculty and community to create chapter programming that has received funding support from the university and local businesses. The chapter’s robust educational curriculum includes several speaker series and monthly forums with topics that range from current events and urban living for freshmen to mental, physical and sexual health. In the years since the Pay It Forward Grant’s inception, SigEp’s Ohio State and Nebraska Chapters have also made financial contributions to the fund. Illinois Alpha’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation has now expanded their ambition and hopes that additional chapters and individual donors will participate in the program. Currently, grant recipients receive $5,000, but additional donors would allow the amount to grow and could ultimately establish a permanent endowment.

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Our Very Own Balanced Men Toledo brother named Fellow for push to pay it forward

Top: Brad Smith, Toledo ’18, helps a student back to his feet during a basketball camp. Smith and Pay It Forward club members were partnering with S.P.O.R.T.S, a nonprofit created by 2013 Fellow recipient Tyler Kinch, Grand Valley State ’15. Above: Toledo students gather to serve meals at an area homeless shelter.

Jack Sample, Toledo ’17, became the most recent SigEp to receive the distinction of “Fellow.” The honor is reserved for undergraduate brothers who successfully design, coordinate and complete a 500-hour service learning project before graduation. When Sample arrived at Toledo in the fall of 2014, he fell in love with his new campus and city. However, he quickly realized there was a significant divide between the resources of the university and the city’s poorer areas. In his second semester, he decided to do something to help bridge the gap. With the support of his SigEp chapter, Sample founded the student organization Pay It Forward Toledo. Students were enthusiastic about the new group and worked with Sample to bring International Pay It Forward Day to campus. The group performed and promoted random acts of kindness, and the event grew into a full week of activities before Sample began looking for opportunities for students to make a year-round impact in the community.

Sample’s work led to partnerships with a local homeless shelter and an underserved elementary school. Pay It Forward members volunteered to serve meals at the shelter and ran a weekly after-school athletic program for 5th to 8th graders. In total, Sample’s group performed over 1,100 hours of service. As Pay It Forward Toledo has grown, several other SigEps have taken on leadership roles in the organization. With fellow chapter brothers involved in the program, Sample is confident in the future of its many community initiatives.

2009 Fellow Scott Dudis, Ohio State ’09, and Jay Hurt, Davidson ’88, surround Jack Sample after presenting him with the Fellow’s hourglass at the 2017 Conclave Arete Awards Luncheon.

SigEp senior honored by North-American Interfraternity Conference Eric Smith, Valparaiso ’17, is the most recent SigEp to receive the Undergraduate Award of Distinction from the North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC). The award recognizes undergraduates who have leveraged their fraternity experience to develop personally and as leaders. Of the thousands of undergraduate fraternity men around the country, Smith was one of six chosen to receive the 2017 award. He was recognized by NIC President and CEO Judson Horras at SigEp’s 2017 Conclave. As a sophomore, Smith joined the chapter’s executive board when there was a sudden vacancy, helping to provide stability for the chapter. That same year, he collaborated with a senior sorority woman to develop a

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campus-wide initiative to provide sexual misconduct and Title IX education for Valparaiso’s fraternities and sororities. Smith held several leadership roles within his chapter and served as IFC president. A 2017 SigEp Zollinger Senior, Smith maintained a 3.96 GPA while balancing a wide variety of co-curricular activities. “Eric is one of the finest young men with whom I have had the opportunity to work in my 19 years as a fraternity and sorority advisor,” said Carolyn Whittier, Valparaiso’s assistant dean of students for Greek life, leadership and volunteer programs. “His commitment to excellence is unparalleled, and he expects the best from himself and all those around him at all times.” Valparaiso SigEp Eric Smith is recognized by NIC President and CEO Judson Horras at the 2017 Grand Chapter Conclave.


Connecticut wrestler and SigEp officer receives Frank Rader Memorial Wrestling Award

Rader Award recipient George Andrews III (right) and fellow SigEp chapter brother and wrestling co-captain Steven Webb, ’19, celebrate their respective 7th and 2nd place finishes at the 2016 National Collegiate Wrestling Association National Championship.

A co-captain of the University of Connecticut club wrestling team and a 2017 SigEp Ruck Scholar, George Andrews III, ’19, is the second recipient of the Frank Rader Memorial Wrestling Award. The award recognizes undergraduates who embody the ideals of Sound Mind and Sound Body by engaging in competitive wrestling during college while demonstrating strong community leadership and academic performance. Andrews is a biomedical engineering major with a 3.85 GPA. He is the co-captain of his wrestling team and has placed in the National Collegiate Wrestling Association National Championships as well as the New England Championships. During winter breaks, Andrews volunteers as a coach for his high school team, where he won the state championship as a senior.

Andrews is also a leader within his newly rechartered chapter at Connecticut. He oversees a large committee as vice president of member development, a role that requires him to work with university faculty and staff to positively impact each member of his chapter. “The biggest challenge is managing time and finding a balance between everything that is important to me in life,” Andrews said. “I think it prepares me for the challenges and daily grind of life.” The late Frank E. Rader, Davidson ’71, was named USA Wrestling Man of the Year in 1982 and went on to serve on the Olympic wrestling staff for the 1984 and 1996 games. He was a lifelong SigEp volunteer and was known for his willingness to invest time in brothers and continually push himself and others to learn and grow. Rader was inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart in 1999. In 2015, fellow North Carolina Epsilon brother and lifelong friend Jay Hurt, ’88, established the scholarship in Rader’s memory.

Drivers of Balanced Man Program legislation celebrated with ClaytonDoud Award At the 2017 Orlando Conclave, 10 recent graduates were recognized as recipients of SigEp’s Clayton-Doud Award. The brothers were selected for their effort to help all chapters deliver on the Fraternity’s mission and founding purpose through the Balanced Man Program. In 2014, the death toll from fraternity-related incidents had reached the double digits. Many of these tragedies were hazingrelated. Universities began temporarily or permanently shutting down their fraternity systems. In response, several SigEp chapters approached the Fraternity’s National Directors and Headquarters staff wanting to lead change. Their hope was to help every SigEp chapter implement the Fraternity’s pledgingfree and nationally acclaimed Balanced Man Program. From eight schools, the coalition of 10 chapter leaders emerged. In April 2015, they met in Columbus, Ohio, along with chapter volunteers to draft Conclave legislation and discuss potential objections to their effort. They continued to meet weekly by conference calls until they had a draft of a far-reaching proposal to align all chapters behind the Balanced Man Program. To gather support for the legislation, the brothers placed calls to chapter leaders across the country. When their resolution reached the legislative floor, 140 chapters had already weighed in to voice support. The final resolution called for full adoption of the Balanced Man Program as well as additional staff support and resources — including a mobile and desktop app — required to effectively implement the program at all chapters. The August 2015 vote was decisive and made SigEp the first national fraternity to abolish pledging with an undergraduate vote.

Four Clayton-Doud Award recipients join outgoing Grand President Rick Bennet, Central Missouri ’74, onstage at the 2017 Brotherhood Luncheon. From left: Riley Shearer, Ben Hutto, Conner Jackson and Mario Squicciarini.

When SigEp Citation recipient Jim Clayton, Tennessee ’56, encountered hard times with the company he started, Clayton Homes, a SigEp and fellow Citation recipient, Wally Doud, Wisconsin ’48, came to his aid. Doud joined Clayton’s board, helping him navigate the difficult juncture and put Clayton Homes back on its successful course. In appreciation of Doud’s demonstration of Virtue, Diligence, and most importantly, Brotherly Love, Clayton established and endowed the Clayton-Doud Award. Today, this $10,000 biennial scholarship recognizes brothers who come to another’s aid, helping overcome the obstacles that accompany the pursuit of SigEp’s cardinal principles despite all odds.

2017 Clayton-Doud Award Recipients Ryan Bixler, Ohio State ’16 Conner Foster, Ohio State ’16 Max Fowler, South Carolina ’15 Garrett Hendricks, Georgia ’16 Ben Hutto, South Carolina ’16 Conner Jackson, Nebraska ’16 Kevin Madden, South Florida ’16 Brian Rosebrook, Oklahoma State ’15 Riley Shearer, Montana State ’17 Mario Squicciarini, Drexel ’17 Our very own balanced men

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Chapter News

2017 Buchanan Cup chapters set a paradigm of excellence

Northern Iowa brothers and volunteers celebrate their Buchanan Cup win onstage after the Balanced Man Celebration at the Hard Rock Live Orlando.

By Ben Ford, Arkansas Tech Renaissance

At the 2017 Grand Chapter Conclave in Orlando, 27 chapters were awarded SigEp’s Buchanan Outstanding Chapter Award. Chapters that receive the “Buchanan Cup” are among the top fraternity chapters in the country and excel in every area of operations. Ten of the 27 chapters received Gold Buchanan Cups for winning the award at five or more consecutive Conclaves — representing at least a decade of sustained excellence. In the pages that follow, we share some of the accomplishments of each of these 2017 Buchanan Cup-winning chapters. California Chi RLC

D.C. Gamma

Illinois Alpha RLC

Recruiting through the Balanced Man Scholarship, California Chi has the highest manpower on campus and a 95 percent retention rate. The chapter operates as a Residential Learning Community despite not having a chapter facility and hosts university-accredited courses designed by faculty members. The brothers also boast the highest GPA on campus with a 3.51 average.

D.C. Gamma has used an unstructured Greek culture as an opportunity to create something truly different on its campus. It has a well-devel-

The largest chapter on its campus, Illinois Alpha has won 17 campus awards over the past two years, including Fraternity of the Year. The chapter regularly updates its Balanced Man Program and has a robust Brother Mentor Challenge. The brothers have recruited three faculty fellows to support their Residential Learning Community and host academic presentations inside the chapter house. New members are involved in leadership positions as soon as they join, and individual academic success is recognized and rewarded.

Loyola Marymount

2017 Gold Buchanan Cup recipients

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Georgetown*

oped Balanced Man Program

that incorporates mentorship as well as six service-learning hours in each development challenge. The chapter also utilizes its BMP and sound mind programming to organize discussions about pressing societal issues, and it is one of the largest fundraisers in the country for Relay for Life.

Illinois


Maine Alpha RLC

Maine*

Maine Alpha is the largest fraternity on its campus and recruits a significant portion of its membership through the Balanced Man Scholarship. The chapter organizes meaningful dialogues with university officials in its substancefree house, and its resident scholar is active in assisting with academic standards. Sigma Challenge participants receive a campus tour with their fraternity and sorority life adviser, and the chapter supports SigEp’s national philanthropic and servicelearning partner, Big Brothers Big Sisters, through a charity basketball game between Maine’s varsity team and a Greek all-stars team.

Nebraska Alpha RLC

Nebraska

Organized by their faculty fellow, members of Nebraska Alpha’s Residential Learning Community take servicelearning trips to Uganda and Ecuador. Brothers are required to participate in at least two other campus organizations, and several university classes are taught in the chapter’s substance-free house. The chapter is the largest on its campus, and it has strong academic programming and standards.

New Jersey Alpha RLC

Stevens*

New Jersey Alpha was one of only five fraternity chapters across the country to receive the North-American Interfraternity Conference’s Chapter Award of Distinction in 2016. The brothers are also recipients of several campus awards. The chapter has

an average GPA of 3.60 and utilizes chapter and university resources to support brothers academically. It has multiple faculty fellows and a resident scholar who host Residential Learning Community events within the chapter’s substancefree house.

Ohio Gamma RLC

Ohio State

A strong Balanced Man Scholarship has helped Ohio Gamma become the largest fraternity on its campus with an average member GPA that is 0.25 points higher than the all-campus average. Its robust Balanced Man Program is updated regularly, and an academic support program and 3.00 minimum GPA standard helps keep brothers focused. The chapter regularly hosts speakers — including high-ranking members of the university administration — in its facility, which is substancefree in all common areas.

Ohio Iota RLC

Toledo

Ohio Iota consistently has the top GPA and manpower on its campus. From 2015 to 2017, brothers in the chapter were leaders in 20 other campus organizations and founded six others. It has a strong Balanced Man Program with deadlines for challenge completion, and many of its members were recruited through the Balanced Man Scholarship. The chapter operates its Residential Learning Community in a substancefree home that has contributed to success in both programming and academics.

Ohio Theta RLC

Cincinnati** Ohio Theta has an exceptional Balanced Man Program with clear expectations and timelines for each challenge. Its mentoring program includes new-member, chapter and professional mentors. The chapter has four faculty fellows and two resident scholars who lead academic programming and university courses in the chapter home.

Oregon Alpha RLC

Oregon State

Oregon Alpha has the highest GPA and manpower on its campus and has been named Oregon State’s top fraternity nine years in a row. Its Epsilon Challenge includes 50 hours of service learning, and it has substance-free common spaces within its facility. The chapter’s faculty fellow attends lunches weekly at its Residential Learning Community to meet with members. It has a minimum GPA standard of 3.00 and organizes academic competitions among teams within the chapter. * Chapters that earned their first Gold Buchanan Cup ** Ohio Theta RLC received its 15th Buchanan Cup in a row, continuing its streak as the chapter with the most consecutive Buc Cup wins ever.

From top: Oregon State SigEps depart for class from their Residential Learning Community. A SigEp intramural team at Stevens makes time for sound body and friendly competition. Maine brothers Devin Scherer, ’19, (left) and Zac Goulette, ’18, share their excitement about taking home a Talent Power Award from the 2017 Carlson Leadership Academy.

Chapter news

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Georgia Alpha RLC

Louisiana Beta

Georgia Alpha practices yearround recruitment and has recruited over 90 percent of its new members through the Balanced Man Scholarship. For the last four semesters, the chapter’s average member GPA has been at least 0.20 points higher than the all-campus average. Their Residential Learning Community programming includes a “Brothers Teaching Brothers” peer-learning experience, and many chapter members are leaders on campus.

Louisiana Beta recovered as an even stronger chapter after a recent membership review. The brothers expanded their Balanced Man Program by utilizing campus staff to educate brothers on personal finance, health, fitness and academic success. The chapter holds the top GPA on campus and recruits a significant proportion of its new members through the Balanced Man Scholarship.

Georgia Tech

2017 Silver Buchanan Cup recipients

Iowa Delta RLC

Drake

Iowa Delta excels in both Balanced Man Program and Residential Learning Community programming. The brothers host a monthly lecture series in their substance-free house. Supported by a faculty fellow, the chapter’s academic support program has helped increase its average GPA every semester during the Buc Cup application period. The chapter has logged 1,200 hours of service with its local chapter of Big Brothers Big Sisters and is the largest fraternity on its campus.

Indiana Zeta RLC

Valparaiso

Indiana Zeta has recruited over 40 percent of its recent members through the Balanced Man Scholarship, and this Residential Learning Community has received numerous accolades from the university. Epsilon Challenge participants find a campus mentor who helps facilitate post-collegiate success, and the chapter’s sound body programming includes mentorship on physical health and performance that has been facilitated by a brother on the track team and eight other NCAA Division I athletes.

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Iowa Theta RLC

Northern Iowa A recently accredited Residential Learning Community, Iowa Theta utilizes chapter and university space to host academic programming and holds the highest GPA among fraternities. Areas of the chapter home are substance-free, and two faculty fellows advise the chapter. Brothers are in leadership positions throughout campus, and they consistently recruit half of their members through the Balanced Man Scholarship.

Kentucky Zeta

Morehead State Kentucky Zeta implemented the Balanced Man Program several years ago and is working toward accreditation as a Residential Learning Community. It has the highest average GPA of any fraternity on campus and utilizes university resources as well as its faculty fellow to support BMP challenges and Sound Mind and Sound Body programming. Half of their membership has been recruited through the Balanced Man Scholarship.

Louisiana State

Michigan Beta RLC

Western Michigan Michigan Beta is the largest chapter on its campus and set a record for recruiting the most men in the school’s history. It maintains a culture of academic excellence with a required minimum GPA of 2.95. The brothers collaborate with their faculty fellow, who helps them select courses that align with their interests and presents from his own research on alcohol and drug abuse. The chapter has well-developed Balanced Man Program challenges that utilize university resources, and it recruits over 30 percent of its members through the Balanced Man Scholarship.

Michigan Theta RLC

Lawrence Tech

Michigan Theta has the highest GPA on campus and a strong Balanced Man Program with 20 brothers completing the Brother Mentor Challenge during the Buchanan Cup review period. The chapter’s Residential Learning Community benefits from two engaged faculty fellows, and members receive support through structured academic improvement plans. Nearly half of all brothers attended the Carlson Leadership Academy in the last two years.


North Carolina Mu RLC

South Dakota Alpha

Washington Alpha RLC

North Carolina Mu has the highest manpower among Elon fraternities and has received SigEp’s Donald C. McCleary Award for member development for the past two years. The chapter has consistent involvement with a local community organization and won organization of the year on its campus. Part of the chapter’s prominence is due to its Residential Learning Community events, which are open to the whole campus.

South Dakota Alpha has a

Washington Alpha operates a strong 365-day recruitment program and recruits over half of its membership through the Balanced Man Scholarship. It has two faculty fellows and a resident scholar who provide academic programming and support in the chapter’s substance-free Residential Learning Community. The chapter has had the top GPA among 26 fraternities for the last two years, and it awards nine scholarships to highperforming brothers. The chapter has hosted a “Man Talk” series, with speakers including the men’s basketball coach, diversity office staff members, athletic director, a local attorney and police department staff.

Elon

Missouri Eta RLC

Missouri State Missouri Eta has recently completed a new substancefree facility to support their Residential Learning Community. The chapter was named organization of the year by Missouri State, and faculty fellows advise brothers on each of the Balanced Man Program’s challenges. Rising leaders are invited to officer retreats, and service learning with the chapter’s community partner is built into its BMP.

Montana Beta RLC

Montana State Montana Beta has the highest GPA and boasts the largest membership of all fraternities on campus. Brothers host faculty lectures in their substance-free facility and have an extensive academic support program. Their faculty fellow leads a monthly dinner where brothers can share personal struggles and support one another. More than 75 percent of chapter members are recruited through the Balanced Man Scholarship.

Oklahoma Alpha RLC

South Dakota State robust Balanced Man Program and a well-executed recruitment plan. The chapter has an engaged faculty fellow and is breaking ground on a new chapter home. Each month, a different brother facilitates a discussion on a relevant topic at its “Saturday Night Club.” Four volunteer mentors advise the chapter on each of the BMP’s challenges.

Texas Alpha

Texas-Austin

Oklahoma State

Texas Alpha retained 95 percent of its seniors over

Oklahoma Alpha has excelled in its Balanced Man Program implementation with strong objectives and clear timelines in all four challenges. The chapter has a high overall GPA with a minimum standard of 3.00 and frequently hosts academic programming for members through its

the last two years and has achieved academic success on campus. The chapter reimburses members for half of their expenses at a nearby tutoring center, and the brothers are pursuing Residential Learning Community accreditation. They have an engaged faculty fellow as well as designated substance-free spaces. After implementing the Balanced Man Program several years ago, the chapter built a Brother Mentor Challenge that includes a lecture series, a senior experience trip and an AVC networking dinner.

Residential Learning Community. The chapter has also helped other organizations improve sexual assault awareness and education, and many brothers are in leadership positions across campus.

Pennsylvania Tau

West Chester

Pennsylvania Tau has the

highest GPA and manpower on its campus. Its brothers consistently apply for and are accepted into the Ruck Leadership Institute and the Tragos Quest to Greece, and one member recently received SigEp’s highly selective Ruck Leadership Award. The chapter’s GPA is 0.20 higher than the campus average, and the group was recognized as the school’s Fraternity of the Year in 2015.

From top: Washington State brothers relax between classes in their Residential Learning Community. Drake volunteer Larry Martindale, ’63, shares some encouragement with Cade Martin, ’19. Georgia Tech’s Dejan Tojcic, ’19, adds a star to the chapter’s 2016 Christmas Tree. Northern Iowa SigEps introduce potential members to their chapter’s homegrown sport, Theta Ball, during a fall 2015 recruitment event.

Washington State

“Let him who would move the world first move himself.” ~ Socrates

Virginia Pi RLC

Christopher Newport Virginia Pi runs a robust Balanced Man Program that includes a Brother Mentor Challenge partly responsible for an 89 percent retention rate. It is the largest chapter on its campus and has the highest GPA as well as a substance-free chapter home. The Residential Learning Community is supported by three faculty fellows, and 95 percent of chapter members hold leadership roles in other campus organizations. Chapter news

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SigEp returns with strength to Cleveland State through perseverance By Martin Barnard, Cleveland State ’20

SigEp’s Ohio Nu Chapter was first chartered in 1964. The founding group was made up of 41 members of a local fraternity, Lambda Tau Delta, on a campus that had expanded and was changing its name from Fenn College to Cleveland State University that same year. In the 1980s, Cleveland State experienced another transition as it developed into a commuter campus. With fewer students living on campus, interest in Greek life declined; and the struggling Ohio Nu Chapter closed in the spring of 1990. During the chapter’s dormant years, Cleveland State alumni, most notably Dave Huiett, ’66 — chapter president of the founding 1964 group — and Bill Schutte, ’71, remained active in their efforts to return SigEp to their alma mater. Their Alumni and Volunteer Corporation petitioned SigEp and Cleveland State for their chapter’s return and committed to mentoring and supporting a new chapter on the campus. In the fall of 2013, their diligence paid off when an initial group of nine students was recruited by SigEp’s new chapter development team. Early chapter presidents Andrew Holland, ’15, and Parker Keating, ’17, helped build a foundation for the chapter and kept brothers focused on SigEp’s chartering criteria. By fall of 2016, the chapter had grown to include 39 brothers, and the men completed a successful chartering petition with Chapter President Paul All II, ’17, at the helm. After receiving news that their petition had been approved by SigEp’s National Board, the chapter went on to receive an Excelsior Award for recruitment and had a brother win the Zollinger Senior Award at the Carlson Leadership Academy. A chartering banquet was held on Cleveland State’s campus on April 8, 2017, with nearly 200 people in attendance. Brothers and guests were welcomed by Chapter Counselor Brian Breittholz, who serves as the school’s assistant vice president for alumni relations and

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Cleveland State SigEps gather around their new charter following a successful chartering banquet.

the executive director of its alumni association. Other speakers included Vice President of Student Affairs Boyd Yarbrough and alumnus Dave Huiett. Yarbrough spoke about the academic and professional opportunities provided by SigEp, and Huiett presented a proclamation signed by Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson. The mayor had designated the weekend “The Official SigEp Weekend of Cleveland.” The evening’s keynote speaker was District Governor Scott Phillips Jr., Ohio State ’05. Phillips addressed the importance of remaining humble when dealing with great success and SigEp pride. National Director Daniel McVeigh, Texas Wesleyan ’90, installed the chapter’s officers and, along with SigEp Volunteer Services Director Archie Messersmith, Samford ’99, presented the Cleveland State brothers with their charter. The evening closed with final remarks from Chapter President Constantine Kiriakou, ’18, and Chapter Counselor Breittholz. Since the chapter’s chartering, Ohio Nu has been recognized by Cleveland State with several awards, including Outstanding New Member, Greek Man of the Year, Fraternity of the Year, Greek Week Champions, Top Academics and Top Recruitment.

The mayor had designated the weekend “The Official SigEp Weekend of Cleveland.”

Cleveland State alumni Bill Schutte (center) and Dave Huiett receive a standing ovation at their chapter’s chartering banquet. They were encouraged in their decades-long effort by volunteers from nearby chapters, including three who attended the banquet: John Abraham, Cincinnati ’77, Marcus Robinson, Dayton ’99, and Keith C. Ruffner II, Miami (Ohio) ’74.


Connecticut’s SigEp story enters third act with award-winning chapter By Ed Kaplan, Connecticut ’88, and Jake Rudolph, Connecticut ’19

The Connecticut Alpha Chapter received its original charter in 1956 when Iota Nu Delta, a local fraternity at the University of Connecticut, petitioned to become SigEp’s 51st chapter. The group initiated 323 brothers before the Vietnam era ushered in challenges for the chapter that ultimately led to a temporary closure in 1972. SigEp returned to campus in 1980 and enjoyed great success for decades, earning four Buchanan Cups and producing many local and national volunteers for the Fraternity. When underperformance led to a second period of dormancy in 2008, alumni from the chapter’s strongest eras committed to breathing new life into Connecticut Alpha. In the fall of 2014, Connecticut alumni resurrected their chapter with the support of SigEp’s new chapter development team. In just one semester, they interviewed over 600 men for the Balanced Man Scholarship and recruited 61 students to help reestablish SigEp at Connecticut. Within two years, the group grew to 92 men with an average GPA of 3.33, well above the all-campus and all-Greek averages. The brothers worked to perfect their Balanced Man Program and, with the support of an active alumni and volunteer base, moved into the school’s Greek housing complex, Husky Village. After two years of continuous growth, the chapter submitted a successful chartering appliConnecticut Chapter leaders Enri Duka, ’18, cation in the fall of 2016. (left) and Kyle Cipriano, ’17, visit with Bill A chartering banquet Cutler, ’56, a founding father of the original 1956 Connecticut Alpha Chapter, at the April was held for the chapter in 2017 banquet. Hartford on April 1, 2017. Over 280 brothers and guests attended the event, including members of the school’s administration, SigEp staff and alumni from every decade of the chapter’s history. The chapter’s 1980 president spoke about the chapter’s return to campus, and five other founding members from 1980 also attended the event. Joe Langella, Connecticut ’83, District Governor for Eastern Pennsylvania and an inaugural recipient of SigEp’s Exemplary Service Award, delivered a moving and heartfelt speech about his SigEp experience and the value of service. To promote the continued success of the chapter, several new scholarships were announced. The Gildhouse Brotherly Love Scholarship Fund was unveiled by its sponsor, Vern Gildhouse, Connecticut Renaissance. The first award from the fund was given to Collin Neaton, ’16. The fund was established to recognize altruistic members who promote brotherly love within the chapter, with additional grants going to support chapterwide activities that foster fellowship. Additionally, the Alumni

From top: A celebratory Connecticut Chapter takes a break from their chartering banquet’s festivities for a group photo. Bob Wein, Connecticut ’83, views an old chapter composite and photo with Dan Carnein, ’16 (left), Danish Kidwai, ’18, and Luke Maloney, ’18.

and Volunteer Corporation presented its Outstanding Sophomore Scholarship to Ryan Jarnutowski, ’19, and Florida District Governor Steven Chaneles, Connecticut ’83, announced that five Conclave scholarships had been established for the 2017 gathering. After a brief address to the chapter, Order of the Golden Heart recipient and Past Grand President Mike Williams, Memphis ’69, installed the chapter’s officers. The chapter was presented with its charter, official chapter flag and seal before the evening concluded with brothers from every era gathering in song. Today, the chapter continues to boast a GPA above the campus and Greek averages. Brothers participate in varsity, club, and intramural teams and are active across the university community. The school’s administration has honored the chapter with awards recognizing their Balanced Man Program, recruitment and retention efforts, and faculty involvement. The Connecticut Chapter is also a recipient of several SigEp awards, including the Talent Power Award for recruitment and Excelsior Awards for finance and member development. The chapter produced a 2017 Zollinger Outstanding Senior, six Ruck Leadership Institute scholars, two Tragos Quest to Greece finalists and one Tragos scholar.

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Renowned economics professor makes enduring mark on chapter, inspiring acts of brotherly love By Ty ya N. Turner

A chapter unites behind a Fred Gottheil, Illinois Renaissance, was a popular and mentor and his charity nationally respected economics professor at the University of Illinois, where he taught for more than 50 years. He enjoyed As the SigEps spent time with the Gottheils, they learned more about telling stories in class and frequently peppered his lectures their late son. Josh had been a budding with anecdotes to bring real-world significance to abstract musician and entrepreneur. He played economic concepts. Occasionally, he even talked about his the drums throughout junior high and high school and learned the art of late son, Josh, who died of cancer at the age of 19. Many years after his son’s death, Gottheil accepted an invitation to have dinner with a group of young men who weren’t much older than Josh had been. A few SigEp brothers from the Illinois Chapter were enrolled in Gottheil’s Introduction to Economics course and invited him to their chapter house for dinner. That first evening went so well that more invitations quickly followed, and Gottheil eventually became the chapter’s faculty adviser. A bond formed between Gottheil and the brothers that went beyond that of the typical teacher-student relationship. He wasn’t just passionate about helping students grow intellectually, he also wanted to make sure that when they graduated, they had the tools to succeed in life.

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Although Gottheil hadn’t had the opportunity to help his own son navigate the years between adolescence and adulthood, he did everything he could to help the young SigEps at Illinois. He often encouraged the men to think about their goals and spoke with them about planning for the future. Brothers say Gottheil would always tell them that in order to figure out what they wanted in life, they had to connect with their dreams. Gottheil’s wife, Diane, also played an active role in supporting the young men. They both attended chapter events and often took time to speak with individual brothers about their career aspirations. Many times, these conversations ended with one of the Gottheils connecting a brother with professionals in his field for more career advice or research opportunities.

concert promotion at a young age. He brought bands from around the world to Champaign-Urbana and formed his own production company. In 1987, after graduating high school, Josh was diagnosed with lymphoma, a type of blood cancer. A year later, his life was cut short a few months before his 20th birthday. To cope with their grief and express appreciation for the nurses who had cared for Josh when he was in the hospital, his parents and sister founded the Josh Gottheil Memorial Fund for Lymphoma Research. Since 1994, the nonprofit, better known as Josh’s Fund, has awarded grants to oncology nurses so they can pursue additional training. After learning what the family had gone through, the chapter was inspired by the Gottheils’ resilience and efforts to comfort others fighting cancer. In 2000, the Illinois brothers organized a charity Monopoly tournament and donated the proceeds to

Brothers and volunteers from the Illinois Chapter gather with Diane Gottheil around the Honor of Philias award after the 2017 Conclave’s Brotherhood Luncheon. The honor and an accompanying grant program were established and endowed in 1989 by Past Grand President and Order of the Golden Heart recipient Jack D. Wheeler, North Texas ’61, and his wife, Kate.


Left: Josh Gottheil stands in front of the Channing-Murray Foundation during his days of promoting concerts for teens at area churches and community centers. Right: SigEps and fellow Greeks raise money for Josh’s Fund during the 2006 “Jog for Josh” 5K.

Josh’s Fund. This modest event became the first of many held by the chapter to benefit the organization. Since 2002, the Illinois Chapter has drawn support from the campus community by hosting a wide range of events each year, including pancake breakfasts and spaghetti dinners, and taking up collections at home football games. In addition to these campus-wide events, the brothers have planned a major fundraiser every year, often inviting other Greek organizations to participate as partners in order to bring even more awareness to the cause that has become the chapter’s sole philanthropy. For 10 years, the chapter held a “Jog for Josh” 5K in partnership with various sororities. Most recently, the chapter established a charity hockey tournament in honor of Fred Gottheil’s favorite sport. The event, which pits Illinois Alpha against other fraternities in a friendly, but competitive tournament, was first held in 2015. In 2017, the third annual Gottheil Cup exceeded its fundraising goal, bringing the chapter’s total donations to Josh’s Fund to more than $51,000 since it began contributing.

instrumental in launching the program at Illinois. After receiving funding from the SigEp Educational Foundation, the Illinois Alpha Alumni and Volunteer Corporation constructed a classroom in the chapter house where Gottheil, now the chapter’s faculty fellow, became the first professor at Illinois to teach a university-accredited course in a fraternity house. Each spring for eight years, he taught a new economics course created specifically for the chapter. The bond between Gottheil and the SigEp brothers grew stronger each year. In 2013, the chapter invited him to officially join their Fraternity, initiating him through the Renaissance of Brotherhood. When Gottheil lost his own brief battle with cancer in 2016, SigEp undergraduates and alumni were devastated. Gottheil’s absence was profoundly felt after his death. It only seemed fitting that

The Gottheil legacy at Illinois

his wife would pick up the mantle and become a faculty fellow herself. Diane Gottheil, a retired professor and former associate director of Illinois’ Medical Scholars Program, now teaches in the SigEp chapter home. The classroom in which her late husband mentored so many young SigEps has been named Gottheil Hall in their honor. At SigEp’s 2017 Orlando Conclave, the Illinois Chapter’s ongoing commitment to their late mentor, his family and their charity was recognized with the Honor of Philias. The biennial award celebrates preeminent expressions of the Fraternity’s cardinal principle of brotherly love. Diane Gottheil traveled to the Orlando Conclave with the Illinois Chapter. Visibly moved by the award and the celebration of the enduring bond between her late husband and the young men she’s come to call family, she expressed admiration for the Fraternity and its brothers. “I’m so happy to be part of this amazing group of people. Meeting the young men of Sigma Phi Epsilon and Illinois Alpha makes me feel that we have great hope for the world, for our country, for our communities,” she said. “What an amazing, wonderful group of people you are, and I will sing your praises forever.”

Shortly after Fred Gottheil became Illinois Alpha’s faculty adviser, SigEp’s Headquarters staff began working with chapters and their universities to establish the Fraternity’s first Residential Learning Communities. Gottheil’s input proved Diane and Fred Gottheil pose for a photo after his 2013 initiation into the Fraternity.

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Alumni success and service receive highest honors 24

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At the 2017 Orlando Conclave, members of the Order of the Golden Heart gathered to welcome and congratulate three new inductees. Front row, left to right: John Stanley, Arkansas ’64; Steve Shanklin, Murray State ’70; Bill Tragos, Washington-St. Louis ’56; Wally Doud, Wisconsin ’48; Bobby Bennett, Barton ’67; David Roman, Cornell ’73; Jack Witemeyer, Rutgers ’55; Vance Fraley, Illinois ’56; John Hartman, Missouri ’61; Gary Ordway, Drake ’66; Denis Dieker, Wichita State ’77; Norm Nabhan, Purdue ’71; Gene Schurg, Davis & Elkins ’77 Back row, left to right: Ken Maddox, Oregon State ’75; Bert Harris, Florida ’74; Rod Smart, Sacramento State ’77; Mike Williams, Memphis ’69; Bob Trovaten, San Diego State ’67; John Allen, Louisiana State ’65; Ed Hammond, Emporia State ’66; Jeff Prouty, Iowa State ’79; Gary Griffith, Texas-Austin ’70; John Abraham, Cincinnati ’77; Edward “Skip” Dahlkamp, San Diego State ’63; John Tyler, Texas-Austin ’63; Michael Green, California-Berkeley ’62; Archie Yeatts, Richmond ’64; Garry Kief, Southern California ’70; Tom Gray, Kansas ’77

The Order of the Golden Heart and the Sigma Phi Epsilon Citation are the two highest awards presented to Fraternity alumni. The pages that follow share the stories of six men honored with these awards at the 55th Grand Chapter Conclave. The Order of the Golden Heart is the Fraternity’s highest honor. Its members have made a unique and measurable impact on the SigEp experience through a lifetime of service, often at great personal sacrifice. The gold medallion was first awarded at the 1959 Conclave. Only 160 SigEp alumni have received this great honor, and members join a lineage of inductees that begins with Founder William “Uncle Billy” Phillips, Richmond 1903. The Citation is bestowed upon alumni who have achieved extraordinary success and stature in their chosen professions. Since the award was first presented in 1965, only 248 have received the honor. Among them are world leaders, titans of industry and commerce, renowned authors and artists, civil servants and military heroes, award-winning actors and all-star athletes.

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Tom Barnhart Photography

Denis Dieker serves as constant force at Wichita State

Denis Dieker, Wichita State ’77, has long been viewed as the glue that holds his chapter together. In addition to bringing executive leadership experience to the Alumni and Volunteer Corporation, he led the group’s $2.4 million capital campaign and mentored the chapter to five Buchanan Cup wins. Dieker began volunteering with SigEp soon after graduation while completing an MBA program at his alma mater. He served as treasurer of his chapter’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation and was such an influential contributor that he was asked to advise other volunteer boards as a district governor. “I enjoy helping others unlock the potential within them, and I believe that is a primary role of Sigma Phi Epsilon,” Dieker said. “This in turn, helps unlock the potential of our country and the

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world. Selfishly, it gives me some perspective on my own life and my decisions.” Dieker returned to his home chapter’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation after three years as district governor. When he was elected board president in 1999, he made volunteer recruitment his top priority and set out to improve the overall volunteer experience at Wichita State. As the volunteer ranks grew, so too did overall volunteer engagement. To bring new energy to the board and prevent burn out, Dieker implemented term limits for key positions. This made it easier for volunteers to try new things, transition into new roles and increase their understanding of the board’s many areas of operations. With a larger contingent of volunteers on hand, undergraduate brothers

enjoyed more frequent and higher quality interactions with alumni. More volunteers served as mentors to chapter leaders, and the chapter went on to win three consecutive Buchanan Cups between 2001 and 2005. Before concluding his term as president, Dieker kick-started efforts to raise funds for a new chapter home. His expertise as a financial professional proved invaluable as he worked with committee members to raise funds, set budgets and develop plans for the new home. This vision and persistence resulted in the successful $2.4 million campaign. The chapter’s spectacular living-learning center, which features a library named in Dieker’s honor, has made SigEp’s Wichita State Chapter the envy of every Greek organization on campus.


Denis Dieker gathers with Wichita State SigEps on the front steps of the chapter’s house. Right: Outgoing Grand President Rick Bennet presents Dieker with the Order of the Golden Heart’s gold medallion.

I enjoy helping others unlock the potential within them, and I believe that is a primary role of Sigma Phi Epsilon.”

Following the campaign and another successful term as treasurer, Dieker retired from the board’s leadership ranks in 2013 to devote more time to his passion of mentoring. He was eager to help the chapter break past a period of stagnant growth and develop a culture that matched the new facility. After a decade since the chapter’s last Buchanan Cup win, the Wichita State SigEps returned from the 2015 Conclave with the biennial award. Although Dieker no longer leads the Alumni and Volunteer Corporation, his drive to get more alumni involved continues to make a significant impact. He has played a key role in keeping alumni connected as a longtime contributor to the chapter’s newsletter. And today, thanks in large part to the

seeds Dieker planted, there are SigEps from every decade since the chapter’s founding serving as volunteers. When Dieker was inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart at the 2017 Conclave, he expressed his deep appreciation for those who have made his work with the chapter possible. “This award is not really about me,” he said. “It’s about the people that support me, people that I work with and people that push me out in front of them: Jeff Gates (Wichita State ’89) and Joe Poston (’73); my family — my wife, Shirley, and my children — and my partner in business, Steve Nienke (Renaissance).”

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Bert Harris builds on legacy of impact at national and local levels Bert Harris, Florida ’74, has mentored countless SigEps and led multiple housing projects as a chapter volunteer, including a $3 million capital campaign. As a member and president of two SigEp boards with national reach, he’s guided housing projects for several dozen other chapters and was behind the recent resurgence of SigEp’s Balanced Man Program. Harris started volunteering with his University of Florida Chapter immediately after graduation. When he relocated to Tallahassee for law school, he enlisted as a chapter counselor with the Florida State Chapter too. As a young attorney, he continued to mentor SigEps from both chapters and even served as president of Florida’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation, endearing himself to fellow volunteers because of his dedication and positive attitude.

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When the Florida State brothers outgrew their chapter home in the 1970s, Harris worked with SigEp National Housing Trustee Shawn McKenna, Maine ’77, to sell the home and purchase a new one. Harris impressed McKenna and the other trustees and was asked to serve with them on the board in 1993. Just two years later, he was elected president and continued in that role for the next 15 years. At the helm of the Fraternity’s national housing board, Harris oversaw a significant expansion in the services SigEp provided to local chapters. When he joined the board, the best financing options for chapters hoping to purchase, build or remodel homes were local bank loans. However, favorable lending terms were rare, as many banks weren’t used to working with fraternities.

To provide chapters with better loans, Harris and the board established a large line of credit through SigEp National Housing. This new lending program significantly increased the Fraternity’s ability to fund local housing projects and allowed the housing board and its staff to play a larger consulting role in the financing, design, construction and operation of chapter homes. Harris also wanted to help volunteers spend more time mentoring and less time managing properties. He helped launch a property management program through which SigEp’s professional staff would manage the accounting, rent collection, repairs and maintenance of chapter homes. Today, the program has grown to include 30 properties across the country. In 2003, undergraduates interviewing alumni for SigEp’s National Board of Directors asked Harris to serve


SPM Photography

Harris has mentored young brothers on how to create a culture built on the principles of the Balanced Man Program.

the Grand Chapter in an even larger capacity. He was elected to the National Board at that year’s Conclave and was later named Grand Secretary before being elected Grand President in 2011. As Grand President, Harris set out to refocus support and resources to SigEp’s Balanced Man Program. He formed a focus group of undergraduates to evaluate the program and later established a task force to rethink and reinvigorate SigEp’s member development process. He oversaw the launch of new resources to help chapters implement the Balanced Man Program, and the momentum continued to build through 2015 when the Grand Chapter voted to make it SigEp’s only member development program. During his final year as Grand President, Harris helped alumni and volunteers from his home chapter navigate a difficult period in their history and ultimately rebuild as a stronger organization. When cultural decline within the undergraduate chapter forced a closure in 2013, he responded by communicating constantly with alumni to keep them involved and excited about the chapter’s 2015 return.

After concluding his term as Grand President, Harris immediately returned to his chapter’s volunteer ranks. He assumed leadership of the Florida Alpha Educational Foundation and oversaw its $3 million capital campaign. In August 2017, the chapter completed a full renovation of its living-learning community. The new facility can house 46 brothers and has meeting space for a chapter of 100 or more. Since the chapter’s return to campus, Harris has mentored young brothers on how to create a culture built on the principles of the Balanced Man Program. Upon being inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart, Harris acknowledged the many close friendships he has enjoyed over the years and mentioned two late brothers in particular who had deeply influenced him, David Hendon, Florida ’50, and Shawn McKenna. He concluded, “The entire journey has been absolutely wonderful. And I am so grateful for the men that have helped along the way. In the words of Brother Maddox (Ken, Oregon State ’75), ‘At the end of the day, it is all about friendship.’”

Clockwise from top left: Bert Harris addresses Florida SigEps during the grand opening of his chapter’s renovated home on Oct. 14, 2017. Harris chats with Florida undergraduates Cameron Shannon, ’21, (left) and Hugh Chin, ’19, in one of the learning community’s meeting rooms. Harris reflects on his time with SigEp after receiving the Order of the Golden Heart. Features

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Foundation of Drake’s resurgence rests on vision and heart of Gary Ordway

Gary Ordway, Drake ’66, brought his chapter back from dormancy — a feat that had never been accomplished at Drake — and led it to become a model organization for Greek chapters across the country. Ordway has been the guiding force behind the chapter’s dry house environment and helped lead a capital campaign to make the group’s Residential Learning Community an ideal place to live and study. Today, the impact of his vision and mentorship can be seen in more than a decade of Buchanan Cup wins. Ordway began advising SigEp’s Drake Chapter more than 40 years ago. He was a young attorney and noticed that many of the risks students faced in college concerned alcohol. He organized seminars for the chapter to help brothers better understand the physical dangers of alcohol abuse as well as the potential liability faced by the chapter and its members. Ordway’s honest and frank conversations began in the 1970s, well before alcohol awareness programs achieved their current national prominence. 30

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When a young man walks in the door of Iowa Delta, he’s precious. And we want to do everything we can to help him succeed.”

In the 1990s, the Drake Chapter experienced a cultural backslide as some members lost focus and their sense of what made SigEp different. Ordway attempted to reverse the situation. He took on the role of Alumni and Volunteer Corporation treasurer, and then president, working to provide brothers with added mentorship and stability. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough to turn back the tide of a negative culture, and the chapter was closed in 1996. Though no Greek organization had ever returned to Drake after a closure, Ordway refused to become disheartened. He worked with university

officials and the national Fraternity to negotiate a time frame for the chapter’s return. Ordway knew he also had to build a strong base of support among alumni. He got them excited about rebuilding a chapter that embodied true SigEp values and kept them informed about plans for the recolonization. Bill Crawford, ’63; John Mertz, ’52; Rod Rhoads, ’57; and Gary Wistrom, ’62, joined Ordway on the Alumni and Volunteer Corporation as the group worked to restore their chapter. Following his instincts about the negative effects of substance abuse within Greek culture, Ordway insisted the chapter return with an alcohol-free facility. In 2000, SigEp recolonized at Drake and soon found a chapter home by renting a former Chi Omega sorority house. Since that time, the chapter has been able to create a culture focused on academics and having fun without the pressure to drink.


Cole Horton, Drake ’19

As he was inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart at the 2017 Orlando Conclave, Ordway shared the simple philosophy behind his chapter’s substance-free housing policy. “When a young man walks in the door of Iowa Delta, he’s precious,” said Ordway. “And we want to do everything we can to help him succeed.” In 2001, Ordway was re-elected president of the chapter’s Alumni and Volunteer Corporation and began to champion SigEp’s Residential Learning Community program. He helped the chapter develop academic programming and volunteer requirements needed for accreditation. He also set out to improve the chapter’s physical environment and provide brothers with a home that exemplified the ideal living-learning community. In 2005, Ordway, along with fellow volunteer Andy Wright, ’69, led an $800,000 capital campaign and successfully facilitated the purchase and renovation of the former sorority house.

When SigEp returned to Drake, it had started small with just 15 men; but Ordway’s influence provided fertile ground for a chapter to grow and thrive. Membership quickly grew to 60 and, eventually, 110 brothers. The chapter received its new charter in 2002 and earned its first Buchanan Cup in 2003. The brothers received the biennial award again in 2005 and at the next two Conclaves, eventually earning a Gold Buchanan Cup in 2011 in recognition of a decade of sustained excellence. When the chapter was surprised and disappointed at not receiving the award in 2013, Ordway was there to offer encouragement and help the young men regroup. He established a mentor committee to help them refocus on their goals. The results were impressive, and Iowa Delta went on to earn Buchanan Cups in both 2015 and 2017.

From top: Gary Ordway (left) and Drake volunteers Larry Martindale, ’63, and Bill Jackson, ’67, visit with Jacob Simon, ’19, and Matthew Kratz, ’19, at the chapter house. Ordway addresses the 2017 Conclave audience about substance-free housing after being inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart.

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Former Super Bowl CEO Keith Bruce revs forward with Formula One Keith Bruce, Illinois ’87, has spent more than three decades promoting some of the world’s best-known brands through sporting events. He’s worked with the Olympic Games and FIFA World Cup, and he recently completed a three-year term as CEO of Super Bowl 50. Now, he’s leading the fan experience for Formula One as the recently acquired racing series sets its sights on transformational growth and a wider audience base. When Bruce accepted SigEp’s Citation award at its 2017 Conclave, he reflected on how his college years with the Fraternity had influenced his life and career. “It taught me how to live, learn, love and lead,” Bruce said. “To aspire to do more, do more for others, not always for yourself, and to never settle — to work as a team and realize it is all about people and getting the most out of every relationship you have.” After graduating with a degree in marketing, Bruce entered the management trainee program at the Leo Burnett advertising agency, one of the industry’s most highly coveted programs among recent graduates. His big break came just a few years into his career when he was tapped to promote national events such as the Virginia Slims tennis tour and Marlboro’s Formula One auto racing. The assignment was his introduction to building a client’s brand through a sporting event. Bruce eventually moved on to advertising agency BBV, where he was made

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a vice president. There, he oversaw Gatorade’s iconic ads featuring basketball star Michael Jordan and managed the brand’s professional and collegiate sports partnerships. The experience with BBV solidified his love of sports marketing, and he convinced his next firm, Foote, Cone & Belding, to launch a department focused on sports. As one of the top professionals in a rapidly growing sector, Bruce was a natural choice when Omnicom, the world’s largest advertising and marketing agency, needed a global head of sports marketing. In 2006, he was named president of the company’s SportsMark unit. At the time, SportsMark primarily worked with clients on promotions related to the Olympic Games. Under Bruce, the firm quadrupled its business by expanding to other events, including the PGA tour, FIFA World Cup, NCAA Final Four and the Super Bowl. Bruce’s experience working with clients on sponsorships for multiple Super Bowls and Olympic Games made him the perfect candidate to serve as CEO of the Super Bowl 50 host commit-

Keith Bruce poses with his Citation award at Conclave. He was joined on stage by his wife, Kimberly, and two daughters, Madeleine and Mason.

tee. When he was chosen for the job in 2014, none of the details for hosting the event had been planned. Bruce got to work developing budgets, selecting vendors, and managing all the hotel, security and transportation logistics needed to accommodate the influx of fans that would descend on the San Francisco Bay Area. His keen attention to detail resulted in a hiccup-free game day.


With a vision to take the event to a new level, Bruce also set out to extend the Super Bowl 50 experience beyond the game itself. Super Bowl City gave fans the opportunity to celebrate their love of football through various exhibits and activities against the backdrop of San Francisco’s famed Market Street. The free, nine-day festival was enjoyed by more than a million visitors. It wasn’t just about fun and games, though. Using the theme “Big Game Bigger Impact,” Bruce also worked with his team to bring social relevance to the event. The 50 Fund provided more than $13 million in grants to area nonprofits to ensure that Super Bowl 50 would benefit Bay Area residents of all backgrounds. Today, Bruce has followed up his Super Bowl success with a new role as president of QuintEvents International and its joint venture with Formula

One, F1 Experiences. Formula One changed ownership in 2017, and the new management firm, Liberty Media, is eager to see the sport grow. Bruce is running the official ticket and travel package programs as well as the on-site programming and hospitality products for the global racing series. Bruce believes Formula One — which has 20 races this season on every continent except Africa and Antarctica — is entering a transformational period in its history. “That’s one of the magic words that attracted me to this opportunity … the transformational aspect,” Bruce said. “I’m a growth-oriented type of CEO, and joining a company that’s poised for transformational growth was a major goal on my checklist.”

Following his success with Super Bowl 50, Keith Bruce is bringing his talents to Formula One. He began his new role as president of QuintEvents International and its joint venture with the global racing series in August 2017.

I’m a growthoriented type of CEO, and joining a company that’s poised for transformational growth was a major goal on my checklist.”

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Bob Hartsook’s billion-dollar fundraising career expands with new emphasis on research

At the time, it was just one of a handful of fundraising campaigns to hit the $100 million mark. Bob Hartsook embraces fellow Citation recipient and Emporia State chapter brother Ed Hammond, ’66, on stage after receiving SigEp’s Citation award.

Over the last 30 years, Bob Hartsook, Emporia State ’70, has established one of the country’s most successful fundraising consulting firms and helped more than 6,000 clients raise $231 billion. Though it was clear from the start that his career would be defined by leadership, it was only after successful stints in higher education and nonprofit management that he discovered the unique way he’d help organizations realize their potential. After completing a bachelor’s and master’s program at Emporia State, Hartsook was hired to serve as dean of 34

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students at Colby Community College in Colby, Kansas. He was just 23 at the time. Less than two years later, he was named vice president of the college. The appointment made him the youngest person in the country to hold an executive position at an institution of higher education. After a few years at Colby, Hartsook was ready to pursue a new challenge and enrolled in law school at Washburn. He was named executive editor of the law journal and refined his skills as a writer, a natural strength that would later serve him well as a fundraiser. Following law school, Hartsook was called back to a full-time leadership role. The Kansas Engineering Society offered him a job as its executive vice president, and he helped the cashstrapped organization conduct a small, $100,000 capital campaign. The experi-


Hartsook speaks with other fundraising professionals during Hartsook Institutes’ 2013 International Growing Philanthropy Summit in Washington, D.C.

ence was a tipping point for Hartsook, who found his life’s calling through the project. After the campaign, he returned to Washburn, this time as a vice president. There, he spearheaded a $21 million fundraising campaign that the dean of the law school credited with saving the institution. As remarkable as Hartsook’s Washburn campaign was, he was just beginning. While serving as vice president of development, alumni and university relations at Wichita State

in the mid-1980s, he led an even larger campaign, raising $100 million. At the time, it was just one of a handful of fundraising campaigns to hit the $100 million mark. Building on the momentum of these early fundraising campaigns, Hartsook launched his own consulting firm, Hartsook Companies, in 1987. In the beginning, it was just him and two employees. The company now has 100 employees and is one of the top fundraising firms in the country. Their

clients include organizations like Iowa State University, the Kansas City Zoo and the National World War I Museum. After receiving SigEp’s 2017 Citation award, Hartsook emphasized the similarities between his company’s focus and SigEp’s mission of Building Balanced Men. “Our ultimate goal, which I believe is also Sigma Phi Epsilon’s ultimate goal, is to create good citizens,” he said, adding, “I’m frankly dedicating this phase of my life to studying that and creating accountability in the nonprofit world.” In 2005, Hartsook sold his company to his employees while continuing to serve as president and CEO of the firm. Today, he retains the role of company chairman and is more focused than ever on advancing the science and art of fundraising. Hartsook has authored seven books on the subject, and he frequently attends industry events to share strategies with other professionals in his field. The year after he sold his company, Hartsook created the nation’s first endowed chair in fundraising. The post, established at Indiana University, furthers academic research on donor psychology and the ethics of fundraising. Hartsook also partnered with Avila University, a private, liberal arts institution in Kansas City, Missouri, to create a master’s program in management with an emphasis in fundraising. Hartsook’s commitment to research ultimately led to a third partnership with England’s Plymouth University in 2014. Through the Hartsook Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy, Plymouth students can now pursue a Ph.D. in fundraising, donor behavior or philanthropic psychology under the guidance of leading researchers in their field.

Features

35


NBC Sports Group

Sportscaster Dan Hicks calls the shots from ‘the best seat in the house’ Dan Hicks, Arizona ’84, has experienced a phenomenal rise from local radio announcer to one of network television’s most respected sports journalists. His first professional reporting job in his hometown of Tucson was part time and paid just $5 an hour. Today, he’s recognized by many as the voice of NBC’s PGA coverage. He’s called everything from NFL and NBA games to the French Open to the Ironman Triathlon. And as one of NBC’s lead Olympic analysts, he’s become a poolside fixture along with Michael Phelps. Focus and determination have been key factors in Hicks’ meteoric reporting career. He landed his first amateur gig thanks to a SigEp brother’s tip that the Arizona Wildcats were looking for a new announcer at the women’s basket-

36

sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

ball games. He was hooked. Despite seeing his chapter brothers pursue more immediately lucrative careers, Hicks was set on sports journalism. “I had more than a couple of people say, ‘You’re going to be a sports announcer? You’re really going to do this?’” Hicks shared with a 2017 Conclave audience after receiving SigEp’s Citation award. “I said, ‘Yeah, I really do believe — and I don’t necessarily care what level I get to — that this is going to satisfy the passion that I have for sports.’ “Once I realized I wasn’t going to be shortstop for the New York Yankees, I had to find another way to get involved with sports and have the best seat in the house,” Hicks said. “I feel like I’ve never truly worked a day in my life.”

When he landed his first professional gig reporting at a couple of Tucson radio stations, they only covered news. However, it wasn’t long before a determined Hicks convinced his managers to cover sports. When an on-camera, weekend sportscaster position opened up at Tucson’s NBC affiliate, Hicks jumped at the opportunity. Though the station’s news director wasn’t immediately convinced Hicks was ready for the role, Hicks’ talent and powers of persuasion won him the job. A few years later, at just 26, Hicks was tapped to join the team covering sports at CNN. For the next three years, he served as the weekend host of “CNN Sports Tonight” while also hosting the cable network’s college football and basketball preview shows. His professionalism, wit and ease on camera got Hicks noticed by NBC Sports. When he was hired by the network as a play-by-play announcer in 1992, Hicks fulfilled one of his biggest childhood dreams.


In his 25 years with NBC, Hicks has called just about every televised sport and established himself as the go-to commentator for some of the most widely watched events. He has been part of 11 Olympic broadcasts and has called some of the most memorable moments in U.S. Olympic swimming. At the winter games, he’s covered speed skating and alpine skiing. Still, Hicks will probably always be most widely recognized for his work as a golf analyst. Since first hosting the U.S. Open in 1992, his insightful commentary and analysis of player strategy have made him a favorite of golf fans. His most prominent role has been co-hosting NBC’s PGA coverage with former U.S. Open and British Open champ Johnny Miller. From their perch in the tower on the 18th hole, Hicks and Miller have spent 18 seasons developing one of the best-loved announcing partnerships in sports. For four years, Hicks also successfully balanced the green with the gridiron. During his early years with

NBC, he called more than 50 NFL matchups, and he had missed the thrill of the game ever since. Hicks realized his goal to return to the sport when he was named the new voice of Notre Dame football in 2013. Today, Hicks is a member of an elite class of sports journalists. His prolific body of work has garnered many accolades, including two Emmy nominations. But at his heart, he’s still the same guy who enjoyed participating in intramurals and socializing with his SigEp brothers. As an undergraduate at Arizona, Hicks served on several chapter committees and led as a recruitment chairman. Now his accomplishments are inspiring a new generation of SigEps. That’s an honor that holds special meaning for him. “As I go on in my career since SigEp, one of my lifetime missions is to always have time for young people,” Hicks said. “We call it reaching down the ladder and bringing them up.”

NBC Sports Group

I had more than a couple of people say, ‘You’re going to be a sports announcer? You’re really going to do this?’”

Clockwise from top left: Longtime cohosts Johnny Miller (left) and Dan Hicks are joined by sportscaster Mike Tirico for NBC’s 2016 British Open coverage. Hicks receives SigEp’s Citation award at the 2017 Conclave. Hicks and three-time Olympic gold medalist Rowdy Gaines are seen from their poolside booth at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Features

37


Fraternity Report

Square co-founder and serial entrepreneur Jim McKelvey, Washington-St. Louis ’87, congratulates a scholarship finalist at his chapter’s Balanced Man Scholarship banquet. McKelvey was the keynote speaker at the event.

Confidence in the leaders of tomorrow Dear Brothers and Friends,

Fraternity today is at a crossroads. This is something you may have heard before. But I hope you’ve also heard me say that SigEp has a solution that should give our brothers confidence in our future. Our Fraternity is aiming high. Our chapters are recruiting motivated, high-potential students and bringing them into a Fraternity experience that is far removed from the stereotypes we see on television. Thanks to SigEp, our over 14,000 brothers are strengthening their character, developing healthy relationships, and building the leadership and interpersonal skills critical for successful careers and happy lives.

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sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org


Recruiting for our future At a time when SigEp needs more heroes and leaders, we must place emphasis on supporting chapter recruitment in order to attract more students who want a different type of fraternity experience. Fraternity recruitment has for decades relied on a rush process that limits the ability of chapters to promote the unique benefits of a SigEp experience, practice communication and sales skills, and recruit from a large, talent-rich pool of potential members. The Balanced Man Scholarship and yearround recruitment practices enable chapters to cast a wide net, reaching students who are interested in the values-based development that SigEp offers. Your Headquarters staff is vastly increasing our support for the Balanced Man Scholarship around the country. The staff has hired a director of growth who is currently working with more than 20 chapters to test Balanced Man Scholarship and recruitment resources and services that will soon be launched on a larger scale. These chapters were provided with digital marketing support to help drive applications from incoming students as well as training and support for scholarship interviews. Early results show these efforts have been incredibly successful, with seven chapters receiving a combined 1,553 applications. In most cases, chapters were doubling and even tripling previous totals for applications. This means these chapters have a larger pool from which they can recruit high-quality members. Chapters were also provided scholarship banquet materials that help create an impressive environment for potential new members, their parents and university faculty who attend their banquet. To improve the new member experience and help retain our newest brothers, we’ve created personalized boxes that now mail immediately after members register with SigEp. The boxes contain a welcome letter from Grand President Chris Bittman, their membership certificate, membership card, Balanced Man pin, and SigEp membership guide “The Lifetime Responsibility of Brotherhood.” With stronger recruitment and a personalized introduction to SigEp, our newest brothers will be better equipped to begin their Sigma Challenge and participate in the SigEp experience.

Brothers from the Gold Buchanan Cup-winning Oregon State Chapter study in their Residential Learning Community.

Outgoing Grand President Rick Bennet speaks to the importance of SigEp’s leadership with substance-free housing at the 2017 Conclave.

Two huge steps forward The Balanced Man Program is the hallmark of the SigEp experience. New members immediately begin a program that equips them with time management skills, speaking opportunities and leadership experiences that will prepare them for success in college and beyond. These crucial and practical lessons are a strong motivator for brothers to stay involved through graduation. Many fraternity men leave their chapter

Fraternit y Report

39


or scale back their involvement in their junior and senior years to prepare for their post-college years. SigEp, however, is designed to keep brothers involved because our experience actively prepares them for their future. Because of the Balanced Man Program, talented and promising young men are receiving structured programming and mentoring that aren’t often found in a classroom environment. To help keep the Balanced Man Program at the center of our brothers’ day-to-day experience, SigEp launched the BMP App in 2017 after a careful development process. Today, each one of our members is able to carry their own customized Balanced Man Program experience in their pocket. The app guides brothers through each of the program’s four challenges on an easy-to-use app where they can track their progress, interBrothers can access act with chapter brothers and the new celebrate accomplishments. BMP App on computers Unfortunately, fraternities and mobile devices. today have earned a reputation of being organizations that exist to promote alcohol consumption. They’re known in the media and on campus communities as havens for drinking. This summer, SigEp undergraduates took a bold step toward bringing that reputation to an end by voting to remove alcohol and illicit substances from our chapter facilities. This policy shift for many of our chapters will focus our collective experience on things that truly matter for collegiate and lifelong success: academic achievement, professional growth and leadership development. The Fraternity’s Grand Chapter — a voting body made up almost entirely of undergraduates — adopted this substancefree facilities policy at SigEp’s Conclave this summer. The resolution states, “By August 1, 2018, all chapters adopt a transitional substance-free facilities policy restricting the presence, consumption and use of alcohol to private rooms of members of the legal drinking age,” and “By August 1, 2020, all SigEp chapters shall implement a substance-free facility policy.”

Conclave delegates vote to adopt a substance-free facilities policy for all chapters on Aug. 4, 2017.

I am proud of our undergraduates for having the foresight and confidence to make such a bold decision. Removing alcohol from our chapter facilities sends a clear message about who we are and what we value.

Our future is bright This is a trying time for young men on our campuses today, but I believe in the power of SigEp to change the lives of these men for the better. We must recruit quality men and provide them with a safe and healthy environment to grow and learn. With the hard work of our young chapter leaders and the constant support of our volunteer heroes, SigEp’s future is bright. Fraternally,

Brian C. Warren Jr. Virginia ’04 Chief Executive Officer

SigEp Chapters Adopt Substance-Free Facilities Policy

40

Aug. 4, 2017

Aug. 1, 2018

Aug. 1, 2020

SigEp’s voting body passed a substance-free facilities policy at Conclave.

Deadline for chapters to make all common areas 100% substance free, restricting alcohol to private rooms of members of legal drinking age.

Deadline for chapters to fully implement the 100% substance-free facilities policy.

sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org


Conclave delegates elect National Directors

Charles E. Amato

Sam Houston State ’70 Chairman and Co-founder of SWBC

Bradley C. Nahrstadt

Monmouth ’89

President and Managing Partner, Lipe Lyons Murphy Nahrstadt & Pontikis Ltd.

Grand President

Grand Treasurer

Christopher L. Bittman

Daniel W. McVeigh Billy D. Maddalon Texas Wesleyan ’90

Colorado ’85

Senior Vice President, Investments and Wealth Management Advisor, Merrill Lynch

Bruce W. Anderson

Thomas B. Jelke

Garry C. Kief President and CEO, Stiletto Entertainment

Partner and Chief Investment Officer, Perella Weinberg Partners

North Carolina State ’90

Managing Owner, Unique Southern Estates

Cindi Love

Executive Director, ACPA — College Student Educators International

Texas-Austin ’71

Florida International ’90

General Counsel, Texas National Guard

President and CEO, t.jelke solutions

Victor K. Wilson

Student Director

Student Director

Student Director

Vice President for Student Affairs, University of Georgia

Kyle Clark

Loyola Marymount ’18

Benjamin Pavich

Jacob West

Georgia Renaissance

Southern California ’70

Grand Secretary

Christopher Newport ’18

2017-2019 National Board of Directors

Former SigEp Grand Treasurer Chris Bittman, Colorado ’85, was elected to lead the Fraternity as Grand President at the 2017 Conclave. Bittman has a 16-year tenure on the Fraternity’s board, and his full bio is included on the inside front cover of this issue. Other board changes include the addition of two new alumni directors: 2015 Citation recipient Charlie Amato, Sam Houston State ’70, and Bruce Anderson, Texas-Austin ’71, former district governor of south Texas. Three new student directors, each serving a two-year term, were also elected to the board at Conclave.

Missouri State ’20

Fraternit y Report

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Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation

Board of Governors No group of donors shows more loyalty to SigEp’s Annual Fund than the Board of Governors. The leadership demonstrated by these donors through their gifts allows SigEp to expand the quality and reach of chapter programs, regional and national leadership events, and academic scholarships each year. The following alumni, spouses, parents, volunteers, staff and friends contributed $1,200 or more during SigEp’s 2016-2017 fiscal year. Also recognized are undergraduates and donors under 30 who contribute $600 or more through the Beacon Society.

Texas-Austin ’68

Denis H. Dieker, Jr. Wichita State ’77

Donald W. Hudler

William L. Monroe

Gary L. Huff

Matthew Ngo

James R. Huffines

William T. Oliver, Jr.

Christopher R. Jarvis

Gregory A. Pestinger

California-Santa Barbara ’86

Steven B. Jason

Dr. Barry Z. Posner

W. H. Clark

Todd E. Johns

Lehigh ’73

Hoyt R. Barnett

Florida Southern ’65

Edward E. Bishop, Jr. Virginia Tech ’74

Scott H. Carr

North Carolina State ’56

Wallace C. Doud Wisconsin ’48

John C. Durrant Stetson ’96

Larry D. Eastepp Lamar ’80

Melvin H. Haas Cincinnati ’62

Louisiana State ’10

Clayton Funk

Joshua D. Lee

Washburn ’93

David B. Deniger

Thomas A. Andruskevich

Zachary P. Barilleau

President’s Circle | $5,000 - $9,999

North Texas ’52

John F. McMillan

Ohio Wesleyan ’56

Central Arkansas ’91 Texas-Austin ’73

Rhode Island ’92 Connecticut ’83 Minnesota ’98

Jeffery L. Johnson

Bucknell ’78

Western Michigan ’63 Texas Christian ’12 Texas A&M ’91

Kansas State ’86 California-Santa Barbara ’70

Gregory J. Pusinelli Indiana University ’80

Fred E. Karlinsky

The Honorable David J. Roman

Kevin A. Maguire

Todd A. Stewart

J. Phillip McKnight

Timothy W. Williams

Colorado ’89

Miami (Florida) ’89 Michigan Tech ’83 Arkansas ’81

Cornell ’73

Morehead State ’87 North Texas ’91

David M. McLaughlin Minnesota ’92

1901 Society | $1,901 - $2,499

Florida International ’90

C. Dean Davis

Colorado ’61

Emporia State ’66

Thomas B. Jelke, Ph.D.

Loras ’89

Thomas G. Allardyce

Kent B. Hickman

Lamar ’70

Dr. Edward H. Hammond

Chairman’s Circle | $10,000+

Thomas A. Barton

Sponsor Level | $2,500 - $4,999

Valparaiso ’98

Jeffrey O. Henley

Derek L. Pardee

California-Santa Barbara ’66

SUNY-Buffalo ’83

J. Darren Rodgers

Garry C. Kief

Georgia ’84

Southern California ’70

Daniel J. Kraninger Villanova ’93

Zariel J. Toolan Columbia ’01

Peter M. Varney Davidson ’96

Matthew D. Beck Iowa ’90

Richard W. Bennet, III

Central Missouri ’74

Brian A. Boron

Western Michigan ’89

Donald A. Burgio Rensselaer ’89

Nathan B. Custodio

Bradley W. Day

G. Wayne Knupp, Jr.

D. Craig Dewey

Kreth J. Koehler

John M. Eber

John R. Lawson, II

George R. Follis, Jr.

Bradley C. Nahrstadt

Michael D. Hurst

Douglas S. Roberts

Bryan J. Kaminski

Dale A. Werts

Arkansas ’87

Washington State ’72 Bradley ’73

East Texas State ’81 Missouri S&T ’74

Johns Hopkins ’06

Florida Atlantic ’05

Huntingdon ’95

Central Arkansas ’92 Virginia Tech ’75 Monmouth ’89

Pennsylvania ’83 Baker ’84

Kelly L. Williams Tennessee ’92

Member Level | $1,200 - $1,900

B OA RD OF G OV ERNORS A NNUAL G iving L evels

John A. Abraham Cincinnati ’77

$10,000+...............................................Chairman’s Circle $5,000 - $9,999...................................President’s Circle $2,500 - $4,999...................................Sponsor Level $1,901 - $2,499.....................................1901 Society $1,200 - $1,900.....................................Member Level $600 - $1,199........................................Beacon Society (brothers under age 30)

Rev. Raymond K. Ackerman Oklahoma ’77

T. Bryan Altheide Evansville ’85

Charles E. Amato

Sam Houston State ’70

James M. Amen

Sacramento State ’96 plus

denotes deceased

Bruce W. Anderson Texas-Austin ’71

Kyle W. Arganbright Nebraska ’04 42

sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

Paul E. Ashley

Gregory P. Barra

Adam R. Baggett

Richard E. Batten

Joseph M. Baird

William E. Becker

Andrew C. Baker

Theodore R. Behnken

Anthony C. Balestrieri

Harry L. Belton

Ball State ’99

Northern Iowa ’07

Florida Atlantic ’07 Elon ’06

George Washington ’03

Robert Barile, Jr. Connecticut ’84

Kenneth J. Barker CalPoly-Pomona ’91

Texas-Austin ’03

James Madison ’83

Indiana University ’72 Toledo ’82

Louisiana State ’81

Dr. Ron S. Binder Toledo ’83


Member Level | $1,200-$1,900 Stephen E. Bishop

Austin C. Dickson

Charles E. Haldeman

Adam C. Biskner

Christopher S. Dillion

Troy D. Hanson

West Virginia ’91

Christopher L. Bittman

Jack N. Donohew, III

Bert J. Harris, III

Northern Kentucky ’84

Michael P. Doss

John W. Hartman

RADM Charles R. Kubic, CEC, USN

Missouri ’61

Lehigh ’72

R. Scott Dudis, DVM

Jamar M. Hawkins

Jonathan J. Kucera

Lynchburg ’04

Virginia ’69

Jonathan D. Hayes CalPoly-Pomona ’93

Joseph W. Langella, Jr.

Frederick C. K. Herberich

Eric W. Lauterbach

Indiana University ’76 Iowa ’02

Colorado ’85

Ryan P. Blanck

Western Michigan ’02

Kenneth R. Blankenship

Tennessee-Martin ’00

Gary H. Bonas, Jr. Villanova ’68

Anthony Bond

Tennessee-Martin ’13

Joseph Brejda Georgia Tech ’12

Keith T. Bruce Illinois ’87

Stephen J. Buce Stevens ’86

Brigadier General John W. Bullard Virginia Tech ’82

Bryan M. Burke Oklahoma ’94

Clark H. Byrum, Sr. Indiana University ’57

David R. Calderon CalPoly-Pomona ’88

Chad H. Carlson, CFP Baylor ’95

Texas Christian ’02 Illinois ’03

Purdue ’95

Western Michigan ’89 Ohio State ’09

Kurt A. Ebert

Southeast Missouri State ’81 plus

Robert A. Eckert Arizona ’76

Scott K. Edinger Florida State ’92

Michael Elliott

East Tennessee State ’81

Michael G. Ellis Purdue ’84

Matthew W. Engelhardt Valparaiso ’91

Dare Pugh Estok Friend of SigEp

Joseph H. Etter Miami (Ohio) ’73

Glenn A. Ezell North Texas ’87

Mark R. Fabere Iowa State ’80

Marc D. Ferguson

Kevin J. Carnevali

Bradley ’84

Scott T. Carr

Roger R. Festa, Ph.D., FAIC

Washington ’95

Bowling Green State ’97

Truman State Renaissance

Mark A. Cassata

Matthew D. Finke

Illinois State ’08

Truman State ’04

D. Craig Casselberry

Johnson L. Garrett, Jr.

Texas-Austin ’86

Steven B. Chaneles, Esq.

Syracuse ’88

Connecticut ’83

Wichita State ’89

Kenneth G. Christianson

Peter P. Gencarelli

Washington State ’74

Patrick J. Clark

Tennessee-Martin ’11

Raymond P. Clarke West Virginia ’84

Brian J. Corvino Moravian ’02

The Honorable Mitchell G. Crane

West Chester Renaissance

Daniel J. Czaja, Jr. Georgia Tech ’92

Edward E. Dahlkamp San Diego State ’63

Ryan T. Denny Stanford ’06

Jeffrey C. Gates

Central Missouri ’75

C. Bryce Giesler Tennessee ’82

Glenn T. Gnirrep Rutgers ’82

John B. Golson

Louisiana State ’05

Brett A. Gough

Wisconsin-Platteville ’03

Gregg R. Gowanloch Georgia Southern ’96

Dr. Michael A. Green California-Berkeley ’62

David F. Greenberg Philadelphia ’84

Gary E. Griffith Texas-Austin ’70

Dartmouth ’70 Valparaiso ’02 Florida ’74

Johns Hopkins ’91

Conrad W. Hewitt Illinois ’58

Matthew M. Hillerud North Dakota ’04

Les M. Hinmon

Northwest Missouri ’84

Steve I. Hofstetter Columbia ’02

Jonathan A. Holland

George J. Koperna, Jr. Mark S. Krzywonos

Connecticut ’83

California-Santa Barbara ’89

Joseph O. Lavoie, Jr. Massachusetts ’08

Betty LeDoux Friend of SigEp

F. Whitaker Leonhardt Georgetown ’07

Michael R. Lincoln

George Washington ’02

Southeast Missouri State ’84

H. Lorenz Horn

Paul H. Litcher

Florida ’56

James N. Horst, D.O. Florida International ’92

Ryan P. Jacobsen San Diego ’00

Brent E. Johnson

Northwest Missouri ’84

Columbus L. Johnson, Jr.

Sacramento State ’85

Michael A. Johnson Eastern Washington ’01

Gregory A. Jorgensen

Southern California ’79

David A. Kacsur Purdue ’94

Craig S. Kaufman

Washington-St. Louis ’86

Curtis R. Kimball Duke ’72

Michael L. Kimmel Dartmouth ’94

Clifford A. Kinnunen, Jr.

SIU-Edwardsville ’81

Frank T. Ko

Pepperdine ’97

Kevin J. Koerner Wisconsin ’84

David J. Kohl

Miami (Florida) ’87

William K. Komperda Monmouth ’81

Indiana Tech ’88

Jay F. Lombardo North Texas ’86

Richard G. Long, Jr. Colorado State ’79

Christopher S. Loveless Texas Tech ’92

Christopher P. Lynch Northeastern ’07

Thomas H. Lynch

Pennsylvania State ’90

Billy D. Maddalon

North Carolina State ’90

Kenneth S. Maddox Oregon State ’75

Phillip N. Maisano Belmont Abbey ’69

Roy A. J. Malatesta, Jr.

San Francisco State ’93

Kelly L. Mankin

Western Michigan ’82

Bryan B. Marsh, III North Texas ’81

Dr. Nidal Masri

Indiana University ’86

Reginald M. Maynigo IIT ’05

Thomas C. Mays, III Lamar ’76

Jason S. McCann Houston ’92

Christopher M. McCaw

Jason J. McGill

Wendell G. Rakosky

J. Robert McLendon

Richard S. Rankin

Daniel W. McVeigh

Brian P. Ratcliff

William V. Medbery

Kenneth B. Rector

Lt. Commander Christopher K. Mercer

Kenneth E. Rhines

Frank E. Morreale

Tulsa ’52

Vanderbilt ’08 Lamar ’64

Texas Wesleyan ’90 Georgia ’75

UNC-Wilmington ’91 Stetson ’93

Robert A. Morris

New Mexico State ’94

Salvatore A. Moschelli

Lawrence Tech ’00

Douglas M. Nabhan Purdue ’77

Norman E. Nabhan, CIMA Purdue ’71

Michael J. Neary, CFA Northern Illinois ’90

Kent C. Nelson Ball State ’59

Brent A. Noyes

Southern California ’74

Brent J. Osborn Ohio State ’09

Duffy S. Oyster North Texas ’69

Joshua A. Paine Cal State-San Bernardino ’12

Matthew J. Papa South Florida ’07

Matthew S. Parrish Georgia ’07

Robert A. Pedersen Nebraska-Omaha ’71

Kurt T. Phares Nebraska ’79

Scott W. Phillips, Jr. Ohio State ’05

Herbert F. Philpott Dartmouth ’85

John A. Porreca Philadelphia ’71

Kristopher A. Powell Southern Mississippi ’01

Jeffrey R. Prather Ball State ’99

Jeffrey D. Prouty Iowa State ’79

Christopher S. Purdum Wichita State ’07

Baldwin Wallace ’78 Texas-Austin ’77

Stephen F. Austin ’93 Mississippi ’74

George Washington ’89

Maurice L. Richards, Jr. Jay J. A. Rivera Babson ’99

Teddi I. Robeson Friend of SigEp

Marcus P. Robinson Dayton ’99

William M. Rochfort, Jr. San Diego ’04

Matthew C. Rodrigue Maine ’04

Ari M. Rosenbaum Pennsylvania State ’91

Kacy R. Rozelle Virginia Tech ’86

Todd A. Ruberg Oregon ’82

Samuel D. Ruble Morehead State ’80

Christopher J. Sacra Jacksonville ’98

Jeffrey L. Saltiel Stevens ’88

Keith L. Sapp Wyoming ’03

Devon P. Scheible Toledo ’05

Dr. William J. Schell, IV

Montana State ’97

Scott A. Schmidt Nebraska ’82

Eric H. Schoenstein Oregon State ’88

John A. Schuyler

Western Michigan ’00

Shawn T. Sedlacek Southern California ’93

Michael T. Selby

Eastern Michigan ’02

Jonathan H. Shanklin Valparaiso ’08

Stephen B. Shanklin, Ph.D. Murray State ’70

Matthew E. Shireman Indiana State ’94

Appalachian State ’03 Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation

43


Member Level | $1,200-$1,900

Beacon Society | $600 - $1,199

Arthur J. Siccardi

Maj. G. Gary Thiel

Barak S. Alon

Ryan S. Kearns

Alex Stepanek

Colonel William G. Sikes, Jr.

Richard B. Thompson, M.D.

Paul Andersen

Dylan S. Ketcham

Lee W. Stewart

Joel C. Anderson

Bryan W. Kirschbaum

Zachary W. Stull

Florida ’98

East Tennessee State ’57

William W. Simmons Louisville ’14

Jerry A. Smith, Jr. Texas-Austin ’79

Southern Mississippi ’96

Pennsylvania ’94

William G. Tragos

Washington-St. Louis ’56

Robert L. Trovaten San Diego State ’67

Ronald D. Smith

August M. Trupiano

Ronald E. Smith

Brandon Tsubaki

San Diego State ’69

East Tennessee State ‘82

Jason C. Somrock Minnesota ’02

Jeffrey J. Somrock Minnesota ’05

B. Andrew Speed

East Tennessee State ’82 CalPoly-Pomona ’06

John K. Tyler Texas-Austin ’63

Stephen C. Valente Middle Tennessee State ’96

James P. Spellman, II

Robert D. Van de Vuurst

Ehren J. Stanhope

Roger H. VanHoozer

Paul T. Steffens, Jr.

Renato G. Villacorte

Charles A. Stegman

Brian C. Warren, Jr.

Dave R. Steinbraker

Mark D. Wenrick

Stephen T. Steiner

Michael C. Williams

J. Russell Stephens

Victor K. Wilson

Nicholas A. Stone

Michael A. Wolbert

The Honorable Scott W. Stucky

The Honorable Archer L. Yeatts, III

Arkansas ’81

Texas Tech ’90 Tulane ’05 Thiel ’70

Colorado ’81

Illinois State ’98 Nebraska ’81 Georgia ’00

Wichita State ’02

Wichita State ’70

John D. Stumpf Evansville ’71

Steven H. Sutow, Esq.

East Tennessee State ’83 Washburn ’72

CalPoly-Pomona ’91 Virginia ’04 Oregon ’96

Memphis ’69

Georgia Renaissance Northwest Missouri ’94

Richmond ’64

Stephen L. Young Kansas ’80

San Diego State ’13 Northern Iowa ’16 Northern Iowa ’12

Elon ’11

Matthew Barton

Wisconsin-Platteville ’11

Thomas A. Beckett

Nebraska ’15

Cameron M. Blaydes

IIT ’10

Tyler R. Boggess

San Diego State ’11

Jacob K. Bredstrand

Southern Methodist ’08

Jace W. Cairns

Friend of SigEp

Jonathan B. Catanzarita

Missouri S&T ’08

Nicolaus J. Collins

Northern Iowa ’21 Stetson ’14 Illinois ’12 Drake ’10

Washington State ’11 Utah State ’13

Clarion ’11

San Diego ’14

Kevin J. Knudson Kevin C. Krupp Kevin M. Kwoka Daniel K. Liu

William McLaughlin

Loras ’13

Sean A. Mittelman

Mitchell E. Goldich

Shawn T. Mullen

Cal State-Fullerton ’12

Bret M. Harrell

Nebraska-Omaha ’12

Alexander S. Hendee Fort Hays State ’13

Joshua D. Hodnichak Case Western ’10

Gregory C. Swain

Jeffrey T. Horan

Central Missouri ’85

North Carolina State ’11

Ric W. Sweeney

Matthew Huggins

Cincinnati Renaissance

Washington ’14

Scott R. Swisher

Andrew G. Hughes

Purdue ’79

Vermont ’11

Brian P. Tahmoush

Jordan C. Hunt

Miami (Florida) ’90

Utah State ’13

Dr. Stephen J. Taylor

Nathan J. Irby

Tennessee Wesleyan ’76

Louisiana State ’14

Kirk L. Tebo

Seth D. Irby

Ball State ’97

Louisiana State ’11

J. David Teitelman, MPA

David W. Jelke Dartmouth ’19

Julian Jelke

Friend of SigEp

Parker Jelke Friend of SigEp

Valparaiso ’16

Rhode Island ’13

Patrick T. Murphy Northeastern ’10

Benjamin Nahrstadt Indiana ’16

Davis R. Orr Alabama ’14

Daniel B. Overheim Memphis-Lambuth ’13

Andrew J. Parrish Georgia ’13

Trent A. Patterson Wichita State ’10

Nathan Peters

Eastern Washington ’16

Mark D. Reiter Drake ’15

Caleb S. Roberts

Austin Peay State ’10

Dustin R. Robinson Northern Kentucky ’12

John Rumbelow Arkansas ’16

Alex K. Scull

Westminster ’12

Jonathan D. Shoemaker WPI ’09

Matthew B. Sloan Florida ’09

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Cincinnati ’12

Matthew Swan

Washington State ’11

Scott S. Swedberg Elon ’11

Roy J. Sye

Monmouth ’13

Washington ’14

Maryland-College Park ’14 Drake ’09

Jeffrey D. Wray Georgetown ’11

Daniel E. Moore Thomas A. Morrison

Alex D. Grieve

Kyle F. Sutton

Brady D. Wolfe

Texas A&M-Corpus Christi ’15

Dayton ’12

WPI ’12

Christopher C. Mitchell

Michael A. Gandara

Kyle G. Graves

Daniel P. Sullivan

Joseph M. Toth

Tulane ’11

Ohio State ’09

Lehigh ’09

Nebraska ’14

Gregory A. Miller

Patrick J. Gallagher San Diego State ’14

Virginia Commonwealth ’10

Kenneth M. Thompson

Washington State ’09

Arizona ’17

Northern Iowa ’16

Riley S. Mieth

John L. Emery

Rider ’00

American ’07

South Florida ’10

“Remember the close bond between yourself and the rest of mankind and that we came into the world for the sake of one another.” ~ Marcus Aurelius


Conclave giving builds memorial endowment for Shawn McKenna By Andrew Parrish, Georgia ’13

At the 2017 Orlando Conclave, SigEp brothers and friends committed more than $250,000 to establish and endow the Shawn McKenna Presidents Academy. The program — named for late National Director and Order of the Golden Heart recipient Shawn McKenna, Maine ’77 — will provide education and support to new chapter presidents attending SigEp’s annual Carlson Leadership Academy. McKenna, who lost a prolonged battle with cancer in June 2017, was a lifelong advocate of leadership education. He was the author of a course in leadership and taught part time at the University of Maine. The Shawn McKenna Presidents Academy will be based on the same leadership philosophy that influenced his university curriculum, a successful career in business and years of volunteer leadership in SigEp. The Carlson Leadership Academy ensures chapter officers have the skills needed to manage a committee and follow through on their goals. The program also helps executive board members work together and ensure their goals are consistent with a unified vision for the chapter. More than 2,800 SigEp leaders enrolled in the 2017 academies. Speaking at the second biennial Conclave gala, National Director Garry Kief, Southern California ’70, announced the plan to endow the presidents’ program in McKenna’s memory. “The Shawn McKenna Presidents Academy will teach the young men charged with leading our chapters how to make tough decisions and how to think critically to achieve their goals,” Kief said. “They’ll learn to be the men

our society needs — men like Shawn.” McKenna’s wife, Deb, joined Foundation President Ed Hammond, Emporia State ’66, and Grand President Rick Bennet, Central Missouri ’74, onstage at Hard Rock Live in Orlando to accept a commemorative proclamation establishing the academy. Reflecting on the emotions of the night, gala attendee and 2017 Citation recipient Dan Hicks, Arizona ’84, said, “I never knew Shawn McKenna, but just being at that gala last night and being in that room and feeling the respect and the love for him, I felt like I knew him.” The proceeds from the gala’s live auction provided a substantial portion of the academy’s endowment. The remaining funds were raised the following evening during the Alumni Awards Dinner when the official Conclave banner was auctioned off in support of the program. An emotional series of bids included one from Steve Hofstetter, Columbia ’02, who spoke of the kindness McKenna and his family had shown him during Hofstetter’s year traveling the Northeast as a regional director. The winning bid was placed by Tom Jelke, Florida International ’90, who immediately donated the banner to McKenna’s home chapter at Maine.

Clockwise from left: Tom Jelke embraces Deb McKenna after pledging $25,000 toward the Shawn McKenna Presidents Academy, established in her husband’s memory. Shawn McKenna addresses Conclave attendees in 2007 after being inducted into the Order of the Golden Heart. Steve Hofstetter makes a bid for the 2017 Conclave banner in McKenna’s memory.

Hofstetter

An emotional series of bids included one from Steve Hofstetter, Columbia ’02.

Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation

45


In Memoriam Order of the Golden Heart recipient Shawn McKenna leaves legacy of leadership By Rev. Ray Ackerman, Oklahoma ’77, SigEp National Chaplain

Shawn McKenna, Maine ’77, was a successful entrepreneur, lifelong SigEp volunteer and devoted family man. After earning a degree in business administration from the University of Maine, he joined SigEp’s professional staff in Richmond. From 1977 to 1982, McKenna served in a series of staff roles, including regional director, director of chapter services and managing director of SigEp National Housing, then known as the National Housing Corporation. After leaving the Fraternity’s staff, he went to work for Procter & Gamble and authored a book on marketing. McKenna was an avid motorcycle enthusiast whose penchant for adventure led to him to relocate his family to Moscow after the fall of the Soviet Union. He was among the first western entrepreneurs to bring new businesses to Russia and found success in ventures such as the Moscow Beach Club, a western-style gym and health club, and Uncle Guilly’s, an American-style steak house. One of his most successful busi-

nesses was a series of 1950s-style diners with locations throughout Moscow and other emerging markets like Cypress and South Africa. Though McKenna left the Fraternity’s professional staff in 1982, he continued to serve in volunteer roles throughout his life. He volunteered with several chapters and served as a mentor for undergraduate leaders and fellow volunteers. He was a director on the board of SigEp National Housing for over 30 years and served as its president from 1988 to 1990. In 2007, he received SigEp’s highest honor, the Order of the Golden Heart. In 2009, he was elected to the Fraternity’s National Board of Directors. McKenna was a fervent supporter of his alma mater. He was a member of the Maine Foundation Board and the business school’s board of advisors. He also taught students as an adjunct professor, lecturer and executive-in-residence. McKenna’s leadership curriculum became the basis of Maine’s first minor in leadership.

Shawn McKenna, Maine ’77 July 15, 1955 - June 1, 2017

McKenna leaves behind his wife, Debra, their three children and two grandchildren. His sons Ryan, ’03, and Riley, ’09, both joined SigEp at Purdue, leading Shawn to remark, “I am touched to be able to call my sons my brothers — in the best fraternity on the planet, Sigma Phi Epsilon.”

Below are some words from the friends and brothers who knew him best. “Shawn was a superb friend, brother and family man. He was a true man of sterling character who mastered himself to live a life well-lived. Even in dying, we could observe the lessons of strength, grace, humor, humility and love. He was always willing to lend a hand and help. I will surely miss him.” ~ Col. Bob Lanham, Indiana ’77

“Shawn had the unique ability to see over the horizon to the destination our Fraternity should strive for. His passion was SigEp National Housing. When Shawn was on staff, he established the Equity Management Fund, which is now used by 49 chapters with an investment of $3,100,023. With his leadership, our housing loan portfolio grew from a couple million to nearly $30 million. He helped develop and implement our Residential Learning Communities to make our houses safer and more consistent with the universities we support.” ~ Bert Harris, Florida ’74

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“Shawn was the core of our staff. He was always bigger than life. He was intense, but loving. He embraced Jack Wheeler’s notion of brotherly love. If you loved him, you loved him deeply.” ~ Doug Nabhan, Purdue ’77

“Shawn was the consummate businessman, executive, leader, friend and brother. His presence came with a combination of keen intellectual analysis and puckish wit. … Shawn was a standout among other exceptional volunteers, and he will be dearly missed.” ~ Jon Kucera, Virginia ’69

“Shawn was the type of husband, father, role model and friend we all strive to be. He had a true gift for making everyone he knew feel better about themselves. I would be remiss if I did not share what a blue collar fighter he was. He fought off two bouts of cancer before succumbing to the third. When my family visited with him on Sunday, he had a Muhammad Ali poster hanging over his bed to remind himself not to give up and to keep on fighting.” ~ Tim Bryant, Massachusetts ’89


James Madison campus serves as monument to late Citation recipient Ronald Carrier Few have made as remarkable an impact on higher education as Ronald Carrier, East Tennessee State ’55. A 1973 SigEp Citation recipient, Carrier began his career as an economics professor before rising to become the youngest college president in the country at the age of 38. When he arrived in Harrisonburg, Virginia, in 1971, the 4,000-student Madison College was coed but still widely perceived as a women’s-only school. By the time Carrier retired in 1998, the school — renamed James Madison University — boasted more than 14,000 students, a budding reputation as one of the best universities in the South, and an NCAA Division I athletic program.

The following is a partial listing of SigEp brothers who have passed away in recent months, organized by the member’s home chapter’s state. Names in red are national volunteers or those who have received national recognition for their service, such as the Order of the Golden Heart, Exemplary Service Award, Volunteer of the Year, Distinguished Alumnus or Citation.

Email obituary notices to communications@ sigep.net or send to: In Memoriam, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 310 South Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23220.

Undergraduates Mark Palmarella Maryland-College Park ’18 Harrison S. Smith Texas Christian ’17

Alabama H. Stuart Leach Jr. Auburn ’53 Joel S. Whitman Alabama ’62

California Kenneth J. Arrow Stanford Renaissance Donald R. Booher San Jose State ’62 Sean E. Elliott California-Davis ’09 Joseph R. Neumen Southern California ’52

Colorado John R. Newell Colorado ’45

Delaware James J. Greco Delaware ’64

Florida James P. Hentz Florida State ’90 Loyd S. Lyle Florida ’50

During his 27 years as president, Carrier added new academic programs for undergraduates, as well as new graduate programs. To accommodate this growth, he added 100 acres to the campus and oversaw construction of 40 new buildings. He was well regarded for his ability to talk to anyone, from students, who called him “Uncle Ron,” to the state lawmakers he often charmed and cajoled into helping fund the university’s expansion initiatives. Carrier is survived by his wife, Edith; daughters, Linda and Jennine; and five grandchildren. Ronald Carrier, East Tennessee State ’55 Aug. 18, 1932 - Sept. 18, 2017

R. Terry Lyle Florida ’48 Larry D. Sutton Central Florida Renaissance

Indiana

Maine Shawn McKenna Maine ’77 (Order of the Golden Heart) Frank M. Tillou Jr. Maine ’51

Zsolt I. Hertelendy Purdue ’89 David T. Shorter Indiana State ’74

Michigan

Iowa

Charles Farris Jr. Mississippi ’47

Bill L. Grother Drake ’56 William R. James Drake ’72 Donald J. Jefferson Drake ’52 Delano T. Skaff Morningside ’64 Lyle A. Sprout Morningside ’57 Gregory D. Van Etten Morningside ’83

Kansas Michael R. Mongeau Washburn ’77 Ivan C. Smith Emporia State ’56

Kentucky R. Scott Cain Kentucky ’63

Edwin R. Annatoyn Michigan ’50

Mississippi Montana Jeffrey E. Lenci Montana ’63 (Distinguished Alumnus)

Ronald D. Joos Sr. Belmont Abbey

Rudolph G. Patterson Tennessee Tech ’72

Ohio

Texas

Howard A. Bender Jr. Ohio State ’55 John G. Kort II Baldwin Wallace ’55 Anthony A. Miele Ohio State ’45 Thomas L. Moore Bowling Green State ’68

Gary W. Bozeman Texas-Arlington ’77 Phillip C. Hambrick North Texas ’69 Justin B. Hollis Texas Tech ’71 Steven G. Rackley Texas-Arlington ’83 Stephen B. Towne Texas Christian ’70

Oregon Merton L. Meeker Jr. Oregon ’51

Pennsylvania

Thomas R. Grady New Mexico ’54

Robert M. Black Pennsylvania State ’70 Michael A. Goodrich Bucknell ’55 Richard P. Muny Westminster ’62 Harry M. Sampson Westminster ’53

New York

Rhode Island

Peter G. Osgood Syracuse ’65

Ernest L. Gaines Jr. Rhode Island ’86

North Carolina

Tennessee

James C. Bunn Jr. Appalachian State ’82 C. Douglas Grimes Jr. North Carolina State ’54

Ronald E. Carrier East Tennessee State ’55 (Citation) Bernard F. Cooper Memphis ’63

Nebraska Charles F. Hamsa Nebraska-Omaha ’65

New Mexico

Virginia James W. Crowl Longwood Renaissance Russell S. Peck Washington & Lee ’87 Romey C. Williams Jr. Randolph-Macon ’59

Washington David W. Hoff Washington ’66 Gregory G. Morrison Washington ’70

Wisconsin Charles A. Zahn Wisconsin ’54

In Memoriam

47


Wondering if your chapter appears in this issue of the Journal? See all chapters mentioned in the magazine listed alphabetically by school below. Alabama....................................................................2, 44, 47 American.........................................................................2, 44 Appalachian State....................................................2, 43, 47 Arizona...................................Front cover, 36, 37, 43, 44, 45 Arkansas................................................................ 25, 42, 44 Arkansas Tech..................................................................2, 16 Auburn................................................................................. 47 Austin Peay State...........................................................2, 44 Babson................................................................................. 43 Ball State................................................................ 42, 43, 44 Baker.................................................................................... 42 Baldwin Wallace........................................................... 43, 47 Barton.............................................................................. 8, 25 Baylor................................................................................... 43 Belmont Abbey............................................................. 43, 47 Bowling Green State................................................6, 43, 47 Bradley...........................................................................42, 43 Bucknell......................................................................... 42, 47 Cal State-Fullerton............................................................. 44 Cal State-San Bernardino.............................................. 2, 43 California-Berkeley...................................................3, 25, 43 California-Davis.................................................................. 47 California-Santa Barbara.............................................42, 43 CalPoly-Pomona................................................. 2, 42, 43, 44 Case Western..................................................................2, 44 Central Arkansas............................................................ 2, 42 Central Florida.................................................................... 47 Central Missouri................................2, 8, 15, 42, 43, 44, 45 Cincinnati............................................... 2, 17, 20, 25, 42, 44 Charleston............................................................................. 2 Clarion................................................................................. 44 Christopher Newport................................................. 2, 19, 41 Cleveland State.................................................................. 20 Colorado...........................Inside cover, 2, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 Colorado State.......................................................... 5, 10, 43 Columbia....................................... 2, 42, 43, 45, Back cover Connecticut................................................... 2, 15, 21, 42, 43 Cornell.......................................................................2, 25, 42 Davis & Elkins..................................................................... 25 Dartmouth................................................................ 3, 43, 44 Davidson................................................................... 14, 15, 42 Dayton.................................................................... 20, 43, 44 Delaware............................................................................. 47 Drake........................................2, 6, 18, 19, 25, 30, 31, 44, 47 Drexel.................................................................................... 15 Duke..................................................................................... 43 East Tennessee State............................................ 43, 44, 47 East Texas State................................................................. 42 Eastern Michigan............................................................ 2, 43 Eastern Washington................................................ 2, 43, 44 Elon..................................................... 19, 42, 44, Back cover Emporia State...................................2, 11, 25, 34, 42, 45, 47 Evansville......................................................................42, 44 Florida........................................2, 25, 28, 29, 43, 44, 46, 47 Florida Atlantic................................................................... 42 Florida International................................... 2, 41, 42, 43, 45 Florida Southern................................................................. 42 Florida State...........................................................28, 43, 47 Fort Hays State.......................................................... 2, 11, 44 Georgetown............................................................. 16, 43, 44 George Washington..................................................3, 42, 43 Georgia............................................. 2, 15, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 Georgia Southern............................................................... 43 Georgia State.........................................................................5 Georgia Tech...................................................... 12, 18, 19, 43 Grand Valley State............................................................... 14 Houston............................................................................... 43 Huntingdon......................................................................... 42 IIT...................................................................................43, 44 Illinois.................................. 2, 13, 16, 22, 23, 25, 32, 43, 44 Illinois State..................................................................43, 44 Indiana..........................................................2, 42, 43, 44, 46 Indiana State................................................................. 43, 47 Indiana Tech........................................................................ 43 Iowa......................................................................... 12, 42, 43 Iowa State.....................................................................25, 43 Jacksonville........................................................................ 43 James Madison.................................................................. 42 Johns Hopkins..............................................................42, 43 Kansas.......................................................................2, 25, 44 Kansas State....................................................................... 42 Kentucky.............................................................................. 47 Lamar.............................................................................42, 43 48

sigep journal Fall 2017 | sigep.org

Lawrence............................................................................... 3 Lawrence Tech.......................................................... 2, 18, 43 Lehigh................................................................. 2, 42, 43, 44 Longwood............................................................................ 47 Loras..............................................................................42, 44 Louisiana State......................................2, 18, 25, 42, 43, 44 Louisville........................................................................13, 44 Loyola Marymount..................................................... 2, 16, 41 Lynchburg............................................................................ 43 Maine.................................................... 17, 28, 43, 45, 46, 47 Marquette............................................................................. 2 Maryland-College Park............................................2, 44, 47 Massachusetts........................................................ 2, 43, 46 Memphis........................................................8, 21, 25, 44, 47 Memphis-Lambuth.........................................................2, 44 Miami (Florida)...................................................... 42, 43, 44 Miami (Ohio).................................................................20, 43 Michigan.............................................................................. 47 Michigan State..................................................................... 2 Michigan Tech..................................................................... 42 Middle Tennessee State.................................................... 44 Minnesota.......................................................2, 3, 12, 42, 44 Mississippi.................................................................... 43, 47 Missouri.....................................................................3, 25, 43 Missouri S&T.................................................................42, 44 Missouri State........................................................... 2, 19, 41 Monmouth.................................................... 2, 41, 42, 43, 44 Montana.............................................................................. 47 Montana State............................................... 4, 13, 15, 19, 43 Moravian............................................................................. 43 Morehead State...................................................... 18, 42, 43 Morningside........................................................................ 47 Murray State.............................................................2, 25, 43 Nebraska................................... 2, 4, 5, 13, 15, 17, 42, 43, 44 Nebraska-Omaha................................................... 43, 44, 47 Nevada-Reno......................................................................... 2 New Mexico......................................................................... 47 New Mexico State............................................................... 43 North Carolina State............................. 2, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47 North Dakota................................................................... 2, 43 North Texas..............................................2, 6, 22, 42, 43, 47 Northeastern............................................................ 2, 43, 44 Northern Colorado................................................................11 Northern Illinois.................................................................. 43 Northern Iowa..........................................2, 16, 18, 19, 42, 44 Northern Kentucky.......................................................43, 44 Northwest Missouri......................................................43, 44 Ohio State...... 2, 7, 13, 14, 15, 17, 20, 43, 44, 47, Back cover Ohio Wesleyan.................................................................... 42 Oklahoma......................................................................42, 43 Oklahoma State............................................................. 15, 19 Oregon................................................................ 3, 43, 44, 47 Oregon State...................................... 2, 8, 17, 25, 29, 39, 43 Pennsylvania.................................................................42, 44 Pennsylvania State...................................................3, 43, 47 Pepperdine.......................................................................... 43 Philadelphia........................................................................ 43 Pittsburgh............................................................................. 8 Purdue................................................... 2, 25, 43, 44, 46, 47 Randolph-Macon................................................................ 47 Rensselaer........................................................................... 42 Richmond..................................................................2, 25, 44 Rider..................................................................................... 44 Rhode Island...........................................................42, 44, 47 Rutgers..........................................................................25, 43 Sacramento State.............................................. 2, 25, 42, 43 Samford............................................................................... 20 Sam Houston State.............................................. 2, 8, 41, 42 San Diego................................................................. 2, 43, 44 San Diego State..................................................... 25, 43, 44 San Francisco State........................................................... 43 San Jose State.................................................................... 47 SIU-Edwardsville............................................................ 8, 43 South Carolina.................................................................2, 15 South Dakota State............................................................. 19 South Florida.......................................................8, 15, 43, 44 Southeast Missouri State.................................................. 43 Southern California.........................2, 25, 41, 42, 43, 45, 47 Southern Methodist........................................................... 44 Southern Mississippi.............................................. 2, 43, 44 Stanford........................................................................ 43, 47 Stephen F. Austin............................................................... 43 Stetson................................................................... 42, 43, 44

Stevens...........................................................................17, 43 SUNY-Buffalo...................................................................... 42 Syracuse.................................................................. 10, 43, 47 Tennessee...........................................................2, 15, 42, 43 Tennessee-Martin........................................................... 2, 43 Tennessee Tech................................................................... 47 Tennessee Wesleyan.......................................................... 44 Texas A&M.......................................................................... 42 Texas A&M-Corpus Christi................................................ 44 Texas-Arlington................................................................... 47 Texas-Austin..................................... 2, 19, 25, 41, 42, 43, 44 Texas Christian.......................................................42, 43, 47 Texas Tech.............................................................. 43, 44, 47 Texas Wesleyan..................................................2, 20, 41, 43 Thiel..................................................................................... 44 Toledo.............................................................2, 14, 17, 42, 43 Trine....................................................................................... 8 Truman State................................................................... 2, 43 Tulane.................................................................................. 44 Tulsa..................................................................................... 43 UNC-Wilmington................................................................. 43 Utah State.......................................................................2, 44 Valparaiso...............................................2, 14, 18, 42, 43, 44 Vanderbilt............................................................................ 43 Vermont............................................................................... 44 Villanova........................................................................42, 43 Virginia........................................................ 2, 40, 43, 44, 46 Virginia Commonwealth................................................2, 44 Virginia Tech.............................................................2, 42, 43 Washburn...........................................................11, 42, 44, 47 Washington........................................................ 2, 43, 44, 47 Washington & Lee.............................................................. 47 Washington State........................................ 2, 19, 42, 43, 44 Washington-St. Louis............................. 2, 5, 25, 38, 43, 44 West Chester.................................................................19, 43 West Virginia...................................................................... 43 Western Michigan.................................................. 18, 42, 43 Westminster.................................................................. 44, 47 Wichita State.............................. 2, 6, 25, 26, 27, 42, 43, 44 Wisconsin............................................... 2, 15, 25, 42, 43, 47 Wisconsin-Platteville...................................................43, 44 WPI...................................................................................2, 44 Wyoming............................................................................. 43 Yale........................................................................................ 2


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Andy, Elon ’06, and Alison Baker

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Include SigEp in your estate plan, and you’ll JOIN our effort to “Build balanced men” for generations to come. It only takes a few minutes to name the Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation as a beneficiary of an IRA, 401(k), or life insurance policy. You can also make a bequest in your will or estate. The Foundation is a 501(c)(3), and planned gifts offer many tax benefits to donors. For more information, please visit sigep.org/legacy. We want to recognize your generosity now, so please let us know if you have included the Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation in your estate planning. Questions about estate planning? Contact Director of Foundation Operations Emily Millhiser at 804.624.9382 or emily.lowry@sigep.net.

SigEp Journal - Fall 2017  

This issue of the Journal shares some of the most memorable stories from SigEp’s 55th Grand Chapter Conclave. The progress achieved and acco...

SigEp Journal - Fall 2017  

This issue of the Journal shares some of the most memorable stories from SigEp’s 55th Grand Chapter Conclave. The progress achieved and acco...