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Official Publication of the 2012 SIA Snow show

Family Tree Celebrating fresh lines, good times and new designs at the Burton booth with Jake Burton, Donna Carpenter and colleagues.

Published by SNEWS friday, JanUARY 27, 2012

Women Rule

Four female execs tell their stories (p. 26); OIWC illuminates the cause (p. 2); plus new women’s skis (p. 45).

Snowboard Apparel Simple and utilitarian with an eye on value, fit and function (p. 8).

Frontside Rocker

A little bit of bend in narrow skis goes a long way on groomers (p. 14).

Heard in the Aisles > “Splitboarding?! I’m sure my son will explain it to me…”

—Unidentified retailer at the Venture Snowboards booth (p. 60) SIA Snow Show App

Also available on the iTunes App Store or at www.SIAshowapp.com.


TOC

/ Day 2

Contents 6 Transworld Business

Snowboard news, notes from the floor.

12 Snowboard Boots

Diversity in lacing options evolves.

18 Gloves Gadget-friendly in big intro crop. 20 Nordic

Positive signs on the country’s trails.

30 Dining Your walk-to cuisine guide. 40 Retailers, reps honored

Trollhaugen Ski & Board Shop, Brad Decker.

42 New Exhibitors

Mammut, Soul Poles, Footbalance.

ON THE COVER: From left to right, Jake Burton, Donna Carpenter, Dave Downing, Greg Dacyshyn, Phillipe Gouzes and John Lacy. Photo by Ben Fullerton

Published by SNEWS and snewsnet.com Editor & Publisher Andy Bigford managing editor Peter Kray Art Director Jacqueline McCaffrey On-Floor Writers Eugene Buchanan, Cindy Hirschfeld, Courtney Holden, Mike Horn, Doug Schnitzpahn Contributor Krista Crabtree Photographers Ben Fullerton, Morgan Varon

Cover Photo by ben fullerton

Advertising Sales Sharon Burson, Andy Bigford Group Production Director Barb Van Sickle Production Hillary Kerrick Distribution Jarrod Gustin Read the digital version of the Snow Show Daily at snewsnet.com or snowsports.org Snow Show Daily is part of Active Interest Media’s Outdoor Group Jon Dorn, Vice President, Outdoor Group Michael Hodgson, President, SNEWS Matthew Bates, Design Director, Outdoor Group Active Interest Media 2520 55th St, Suite 210, Boulder, CO 80301 303.625.1600 Chairman & CeO Efrem Zimbalist III Group Publisher & COO Andrew W. Clurman Senior Vice President & CFO Brian J. Sellstrom Senior Vice President, Operations Patricia B. Fox Copyright 2012 by Snow Show Daily

snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2

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At the show

/ Top news

Don’t Miss

Must-see events and exhibits at the Show TODAY Shmoozapalooza industry job fair and networking event The Shmoozapalooza job fair returns, courtesy of SIA and Malakye. Job seekers can meet with the snow sports industry’s leading employers from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today on the Colorado Convention Center’s Grand Concourse.

After a moment of silence to pay tribute to the late Sarah Burke, ski, government and tourism officials—including (from left to right) SIA president David Ingemie, Colorado Ski Country USA President Melanie Mills, Visit Denver CEO Richard Scharf, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, Winter Park Resort president Gary DeFrange, and SIA Board Chairman Tim Petrick—rang cowbells to officially welcome more than 20,000 attendees and kick-off the 2012 SIA Show at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center on Thursday morning. The four-day show is expected to generate $35 million of spending in the metro area, and according to the Mayor, “provides our region with a significant economic boost, and it also gives us the opportunity to showcase all of the great outdoor activities in Denver and throughout Colorado.”

Two Minutes for Roughing SIA/SOS Shootout Sees Reps and Retailers Tackle the Ice While buyers and sellers might be reporting back to their boards with news from the Show, another group of attendees went into a different kind of boards Wednesday night. Sponsored by Never Summer, 686, Snowboard Colorado, PBR and Monster Energy, the third annual SIA/ SOS Hockey Shootout saw reps, retailers and manufacturers battle it out for bragging rights at the Foothills Ice Arena in an event that raised $2,450 for youth outdoor group SOS Outreach. “It’s a great cause,” says avid snowboarder and former Colorado Avalanche enforcer Scott Parker, one of several stars on hand to participate. “Any time we can help kids get out on the slopes is a great thing—especially when it means playing hockey.” In the end, even Parker’s prowess on the ice wasn’t enough to stop his White team from losing to the Black team 12-8, no thanks to event organizer Mike Gagliardi scoring on his own team. “The puck went tender, post, Gags,” says Parker, who rides a Never Summer Legacy 169. —Eugene Buchanan

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Tonight Winter On the Rocks It’s history in the making tonight as Icelantic Skis partners with Subaru, Discrete, Never Summer and 686 to present the first ever winter concert at Red Rocks. Bands such as Atmosphere, Common and Grieves will rock the legendary amphitheater. Check out www.icelanticwinterontherocks.com for more information.

SATURDAY OIWC SIA Breakfast & Awards Presentation The Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition Breakfast will feature Gwen Manto, who most recently served as Sports Authority’s executive vice president and chief merchant, giving a keynote speech on “Choosing your Success: Why Gender Doesn’t Matter.” The OIWC will also honor Amy Purdy, co-founder of Adaptive Action Sports, with the Pioneering Woman Award, and Clarissa Finks, Burton Snowboard boot product manager, with the First Ascent Award. Registration is not required for the event, but you still may want to get there early to find a seat for breakfast. Mile High Ballroom #4, 7 to 9 a.m.

Stylesight seminar looks into fashion’s future Where snow sports styles are headed in the coming years. Style trends for Fall/Winter 13 will cover the spectrum, with both simplicity and opulence in fashion, according to Jeanine Pesce, senior editor for trend-forecaster Stylesight, who presented an info-packed seminar here at the Show. Referencing influences within and outside the snow sports industry, Pesce categorized future looks by four themes. ›› The nature-inspired “Migration” theme takes its cues from the outdoor market, rugged activities like logging and even the lifestyle trends popping up at multiday outdoor music festivals. Materials include natural-hued textural tweeds, canvas and mohair, with accents like blanket stitching or wooden toggles. Pesce mentioned Burton’s Family Tree backcountry boards and Quiksilver’s new Mountain DiSpyder’s custom Audi reflects a move vision apparel line as corollaries of the Migration theme. toward luxe, says one trendspotter ›› In contrast, “Outré,” which Pesce describes as “very theatrical, luxurious and audacious,” mashes up elements of military regalia, amped-up boudoir styles and even bondage. Look for precious metals, exotic skins and deep colors, plus luxe fabrics like velvet, laser-cut leather and glossy satins. An aura of privilege, what Pesce calls “taking VIP to a new level,” personifies the theme. ›› The “Just” theme reflects a strong ethical stance and minimalist design approach, using clean lines neutral colors and straightforward fabrics like denim and corduroy. As influences, Pesce cited trends like repurposed building materials, upcycling, the popularity of artisans and handmade products and a renewed appreciation for analog technology. ›› “Marvel” embodies a youthful, fantasy-influenced and “very loud” aesthetic, says Pesce, drawing from video games, oversized artwork and augmented reality experiences. In style, this translates into playful, bright colors, exaggerated shapes and volumes, and edgy details like circular baffles on insulated apparel or powdery pastels that intentionally clash with more saturated colors. —Cindy Hirschfeld

Photos by ben fullerton

Ringing in the New Gear

Rep, Retailer and Industry Achievement Awards Come celebrate the 2011 Rep and Retailer of the Year Award winners tonight at 6 p.m. in the CSCUSA Central Food Court Lounge, as well as this year’s Industry Achievement Award winner Ned Hamilton, founder of the chain of Peter Glenn specialty outdoor shops.

Transworld SNOWBOARDING Riders’ Poll Awards The 13th Annual Transworld SNOWboarding Riders’ Poll Awards, presented by New Era, will pack Denver’s Fillmore Auditorium tonight with the snowboard industry’s elite. While honoring the sport’s top riders, Transworld will also celebrate the 25th anniversary of Transworld SNOWboarding.


The most breathable waterproof fabric ever. Polartec NeoShell. Created with and for athletes like Janet Bergman, it liberates outdoor enthusiasts from sweat, saturation and chilling. NeoShell is lab-tested, fieldproven and industry-acclaimed. Find more on Janet’s story and Polartec NeoShell at NEOSHELL.COM. ®

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Hey, Your Outdoor Is in My Alpine!

Win Win

“Working with the team helps fuel our aspirations as well,” says High Sierra President and CEO Hank Bernbaum in accepting the Doc DesRoches Award on Thursday. The honor is presented annually by the USSA and SIA, represented here by President David Ingemie, and recognizes a supplier who’s excelled in marketing the team’s athletes and brands.

Greening-up Ski Gear SIA’s Snow Sports Recycling Program Gaining Steam Ever wonder what a jar of ski equipment looks like? You can see for yourself at the Snow Sports Recycling Program booth (# LL-20), where recycled boot, binding and ski grinds reside in bottles waiting to be re-used. At yesterday’s Waste-Not Recycling seminar, led by project manager Greg Schneider, SIA unveiled a revamped recycling program aimed at making ski gear green. “Ski gear belongs on the mountain, not in landfills,” says Schneider, who has collected 300 tons of used ski equipment in the last three years. “People tend to throw boots away, but not skis. There’s a lot of equipment still waiting to go into landfills.” Recently entering into a strategic partnership with Waste-Not Recycling, the program just received a $420,000 Colorado grant to purchase its own processing line, including a four-shaft shredder and magnetic separation device, which it houses in Loveland. It’s also working with Washington State University’s composites lab to explore reuse options, which include composite lumber, store fixtures, decking, landscape materials and, hopefully, even recycled ski products. So far, 68 retailers have signed up for the program, collecting old gear from consumers before giving it to a local consolidator. The program benefits stores, Schneider says, by reducing secondhand sales of old equipment and by getting customers in the door. “Sixty-seven percent of consumers who drop off equipment make purchases in those same stores,” he says. The long-term plan, he adds, is to take the program nationwide. “We want to have processing stations throughout the country,” he says. “The Holy Grail is to close the loop by reusing all this gear for other products in snow sports.” —Eugene Buchanan

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As skiing and snowboarding culture has evolved out the gates, backcountry is charming its way into the alpine hierarchy. The proof? More and more traditional ski brands (think Salomon and Marker) are embracing styles and products that have traditionally been “outdoors.” And more and more traditional outdoor brands want to exhibit at SIA. “In general, the ski industry is taking a lot of outdoor design and development and fabrics into the basic ski business,” says Greg Thomsen, managing director at adidas Outdoor, which is exhibiting at the Show as part a concerted launch into the U.S. market. And Thomsen thinks that adidas can bridge the gap between the high performance of outdoor brands and the specific needs of skiers and snowboarders. Chris Sword, president of Dynafit, which positions itself as a manufacturer that makes gear only for the backcountry, sees his presence at the show as a way not just to court business but to alter the entire snow sports industry. “Our role here is to be disruptive. We want to push the envelope and make the industry think differently,” he says, pointing to Dynafit’s new Vulcan boot, a freestyle touring boot with features such as a walk/ski mode. The ballooning side- and slackcountry interest in the skiing and snowboarding milieu is making it essential that snow safety brands hawk their wares here in Denver. “We need to be here because they need our equipment,” says Marcus Peterson, CEO of Ortovox USA, which is launching a new three-antennae avalanche transceiver that is less expensive and simpler to use than similar models. Still other traditional backcountry brands find themselves at SIA for the snowboarders. For example, Scott Duer, global sales manager at G3, says he needs to be here to sell splitboard skins to an audience he can’t get in front of otherwise. Outdoor Research, which began as a brand known best for gaiters, is showcasing its technical apparel innovations in backcountry skiing as well as traditional mountaineering pursuits. “When we look to the snow sports industry, we are seeing a beautiful blending of outdoor and snow,” says Dave Mahoney, Outdoor Research director of sales. “Go into core alpine shops across the nation and you see people carrying backpacks, probes, transceivers. So it was a natural evolution of the brand to be here.” That need to legitimize snow sports lines is what brings Rab, a British company that has solidified its name as a highGreg Thomsen, Diane Kay end alpine climbing manufacturer, to the Show, looking to reach a wider audience when it comes to convincing ski and snowboard buyers of its brand credibility. “We are a climbing brand,” says Samantha Kilgore, who champions Rab’s use of techy fabrics like Pertex and Polartec NeoShell, which are known well at this point in the outdoor world but less so in snow sports. “But we can use this Show to introduce ourselves to a much larger market.” —Doug Schnitzspahn

Photos by (from left) ben fullerton; morgam varon

Outdoor brands sell backcountry ethos to SIA buyers.


The Guide

/ powered by

Anti-Outerwear Invasion

Outerwear was once considered an essential part of a rider’s kit. Now, however, more and more riders are abandoning jackets in favor of streetwear. These riders are “shopping at thrift stores, wearing streetwear as outerwear, and getting all wet while doing it,” explains Airblaster Cofounder Jesse Grandkoski. To better meet the needs of these riders, many brands are offering collections that blend street style with technical features like moisture wicking fabrics and water-repellant finishes. The resulting collections often include technical hoodies, flannels, and lightweight shells. “The main goal is to create pieces that don’t quite look like typical snowboard outerwear,” explains Grandkoski. Bonfire’s BSC Collection, for example, aims to bridge the gap between the streets and the mountains. According

Four on the Floor

What’s the best product or collection you’ve seen on the floor?

to Bonfire Global Marketing Manager Amy Eichner, the collection addresses “the biggest trend happening in snowboarding.” It does this, in part, by featuring “Rider-specific functions such as DWR coatings, audio pockets, thumb loops, and adjustable hoods and hems, but with streetwear finishes like antiqued trims and slimmed down silhouettes.” Such features ensure technical streetwear is capable of looking as good as it performs. Brands offering this new apparel are careful to stay true to the aesthetics of the streets. As Mike Thienes, co-owner of The Youth Shelter Supply, explains, “Some customers want tech outerwear, but many just want something less tech and something that they don’t look like a kook in.” Grandkoski notes that inspiration for technical streetwear often comes from skating and street fashion. “In the skateboard world,” he offers, “looking like a futuristic, robot space traveler is not really a huge goal like it is in, say, mainstream mountain biking.” “Technical streetwear is a big focus for us—it’s an area we want to grow quite a bit. The cross over of use is very important for us and our customer,” adds Airblaster Cofounder Paul Miller. According to CandyGrind Creative Director Austin Paik, technical streetwear is also gaining momentum because “It’s a style based in comfort and simplicity.” Fortunately for riders, they can enjoy this comfort wherever their adventures take them—be it trips around town, rail sessions, or backcountry missions. —Michael Sudmeier

“I haven’t been here that long, but so far the coolest thing I’ve seen would have to be the new Anon [M1] goggle with the magnetic changeable lens.” —Duke Edukas, Co-owner, Surfside Sports, Costa Mesa, CA “The Women’s Forum Spinster 143 board graphic of this cute little deer blowing bubble gum out his bum. Great to see some brands cater to female humor instead of your basic pink swirls and flowers.” —Karen Craig, Merchandise Division Manager—Softgoods, Dogfunk.com “I’m definitely seeing some nice, new backcountry gear. I’m super stoked to see the splitboard side of things growing . . it’s certainly not going away. —Matt Gotthainer, Owner, Polar Opposites, Silverton, CO “The Burton Family Tree—it’s cool stuff. Burton’s getting back to its roots with new freeride and backcountry gear.” —Warren Currie, Owner, The Easy Rider, Edmonton, AB

The Time is NOW For over six years, snowboarding legend J.F. Pelchat has been testing and developing binding designs. Today, he debuted the culmination of his efforts— NOW bindings. Inspired by skate trucks, NOW uses a series of interfacing, pivoting parts to transfer energy and minimize vibrations. “Because the design is essentially baseless, the flex and feel of the board

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are uninterrupted,” says Pelchat. Pelchat recruited Alex Warburton to serve as the brand’s product director. With a strong background in industrial design, Warburton helped bring NOW to market. Warburton offers that the initial response to NOW has been “Phenomenal. It’s exceeded even our most optimistic expectations.” He gives a lot of

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2 For additional show coverage visit twsbiz.com

credit to Pelchat for getting the word out. Over the past few months, Pelchat has been leaking videos and testimonies from riders rocking the brand’s new bindings. These videos have been catching people’s eyes, especially since they feature living legends Jeremy Jones and Devun Walsh. Although the videos and testimonies have increased awareness of NOW’s bind-

ings, Warburton feels innovation is at the heart of NOW’s success. He has seen this innovation secure smiles on “even the most jaded buyers.” He and Pelchat have already spent much of their winter hitting the road to put retailers in touch with the brand and get them strapped into NOW’s bindings on the slopes. “It’s been a blast to interact with retailers--it’s something I’ve never

done in the past,” Pelchat explains. For Warburton, seeing the reaction of these retailers “gave us the confidence to step into the trade shows and feel comfortable” debuting NOW. He adds, “People are interested because this is legit. J.F. has created a binding that turns a snowboard better.” So far, it looks like these turns are going to make a lot of riders smile. —M.S.


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Top Trends

/ Snowboard Apparel

Durability, classic styles, eco-wear define 2013 snowboard apparel Value, fit and functionality key to new outerwear offerings. Streetwear, workwear, military uniforms—it sounds like the inventory of an army surplus store. But these are all a reflection of the urban-influenced styles that make up the biggest trend story in snowboard apparel. From park and pipe specialists to all mountain riders, there’s technical streetwear designed to meet the needs of every segment of the market. What’s the reason behind this salt-of-the-earth influence seen in many 2012-13 lines? “In snowboarding, whether it’s workwear or military silhouettes, it’s about being simple and utilitarian,” says Greg Dacyshyn, chief creative officer for Burton. “When the economy is tough, people want dependable styles that will work—like Carhartt or Filson jackets that last 20 years. An M65 classic four pocket military jacket is one of the most copied in the world—because it works.” This sentiment of functionality plays into another trend in snowboard apparel: a push for higher quality and better value. For manufactures and retailers, the marketplace has been challenging as weather, rising production prices and economics play a heavy hand. But consumers are asking for two things: better quality in value pieces and über-quality high-end pieces. In response, many brands are offering value-based price points with some trickle down features, while also offering higher-end technical outerwear. For example, Nomis has typically focused on mid-market price points, but reaches for both ends of the spectrum with the Foundation collection (mid $100s price range) and the higher priced Technician line. DAKINE, in business since 1979, introduces an entirely new apparel line, with design help from snowboarders like Shayne Pospisil. The new line features Teflon DWR surface finish, 100 percent recycled polyester and Primaloft insulation. Companies are also reducing SKUs and increasing forecasting to meet the demands of Asian suppliers who require early orders. And of course, all are hoping for more snowy help from Mother Nature. Another trend of note in snowboard apparel is a changing of guards in terms of fit. “The ultra baggy look is definitely out, particularly for women,” says Dakota Franklin, softgoods buyer for Wave Rave Snowboard Shop in Mammoth Lakes, Calif. “Women are going back to a more tailored fit because they don’t want to look

▲ CAPP3L Cherry-bomb

▲ Burton 2L Gore-Tex Highland

Dakine launches its new apparel line, shown off by Serene Pelletier, marketing manager.

like boys anymore on the hill. Men are starting to steer away from the baggy look to a looser, comfortable, more relaxed fit.” On the coattails of this trend comes the addition of increased mobility into some apparel. “4-way stretch is hot,” adds Franklin. “Whether it’s boardshorts for surfing, jeans when skating or snowboard jackets and pants, the more stretch the better because you’re moving all the time.”

Here are some top snowboard apparel trends at the 2012 SIA Snow Show: Many companies increase their fit options for pants for 2012-13. Ride, for example, adds a new boyfriend fit for women, which is a roomier, skinny

›› Less baggy, more fitted:

“Women are going back to a more tailored fit because they don’t want to look like boys anymore on the hill. Men are starting to steer away from the baggy look to a looser, comfortable, more relaxed fit.” 8

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▲ Ride Sodo

pant, and Bonfire’s Tailored Fit system works with many different body shapes. Baggy is not completely passé for men: The relaxed fit remains, like Special Blend’s oversized fit, but for 2012-13, some tailored, slimmer fit styles are mixed in as well. TREW’s Pow Funk features a proprietary 3-layer durable, waterproof breathable membrane, and a longer, freeride cut, since TREW focuses on streamlining fit, lengthening cuts and including combining a range of pop colors with mechanic overall blue and olive green. ›› Hot pants, toned-down jacket: “People want to stand out on the hill and are getting more risque with colors on the bottom, but staying traditional on top,” says Franklin. Color palettes consist of earth tones and natural hues, mirroring the street and workwear look, but in the case of Volcom, retain some bold, fun colors for a little pop. Roxy unveils some progressive photoprints and a move away from the fluorescent brights. ›› Old-time fabric, new feel: “For fabrics, simplicity is key,” comments Burton’s Dacyshyn. “Fabrics with a cotton handfeel and matte-look prevail. Wool-like performance


fabrics and waxed fabrics also dominate. Simple throwback fabrics like rip-stops, nylon oxfords and taffeta are also making a comeback.” Bonfire’s twist on fabric comes from laminating waxed cotton canvas and integrating it with Pendleton wool. Volcom’s new washed canvas technology applies a DWR treatment for a distressed, vintage feel on a mature fabric. Special Blend introduces wool and denim-twill fabrics that incorporate satin, flannel or printed nylon taffeta linings and Foursquare adds waterproof/breathable MicroShield to waxed fabrics and denims. Holden’s Genuines Snow Denim is a waterproof breathable denim, with a true denim wash for a “worn” look. ›› New focus on 4-way stretch: Popularized in alpine wear, snowboard apparel manufacturers such as Volcom, 686 and Rossignol Apparel add 4-way stretch material to both pants and jackets to increase mobility and accommodate movement. ›› Rise of the soft shell: Soft shells are popular at SIA for all snow sports, and Ride launches a dozen new styles for men and women, while Betty Rides also adds new soft shells to the line. ›› Geek out on this: Technology stories abound with new features such as 686’s “Death Grip” system, an ergonomic cuff tab system that keeps sleeves in place, and The North Face’s lifesaving ABS airbag system, incorporated into a vest, which propels the wearer to the surface within two seconds in the event of an avalanche.

TNF also introduces FlashDry, a naturally derived fabric additive that improves evaporation and dry times. Quiksilver and Roxy’s new Cypher Heating Layer uses FAR infrared technology for increased warmth. Grenade offers technology-friendly gear, with iPhone pockets and headphone loops in jackets. ›› Creature-comfort collaborations: Bonfire and Pendleton Woolen Mills collaborate on jackets that feature laminated wool with a “backyard” look. Oakley unveils a Limited EXP Edition Jacket, developed with Gore-Tex, and also partners with Polartec on new layering pieces. Armada and Burton continue working with Gore-Tex, and Burton also partners with mainstream brands such as Carhartt, Filson and Red Wing. ›› Eco-improvements: Snowboard apparel manufacturers steadily implement small sustainable stories into their production process for 2012-13. For example, most of the insulation in Airblaster’s outerwear and insulated mid layers comes from 100 percent recycled plastic bottles, called E-CO2y. Burton’s GMP collection uses recycled Mt. Dew bottles as well as a new Nano-Tex DWR, which is fluorocarbon-free. Homeschool uses Cocona technology, made from activated carbon particles created from coconut shells to improve breathablity. SCOTT uses an Eco DWR that breaks down safely in the environment, as well as Primaloft Eco insulation, made from post-consumer material. —Krista Crabtree

▲ Roxy Torah Bluff

▲ Grenade Astro

▲ Homeschool Anvil Crater

▲ Trew Powfunk

GORE WELCOMES ARMADA Gore would like to welcome Armada as a new garments partner. Together as leaders in the mountain sports industry we look forward to building high performing products that deliver comfortable protection. Trusted brands choose GORE-TEX ® product technology, and we thank Armada for choosing the GORE-TEX ® brand for Fall 2012. Experience more DURABLY WATERPROOF, WINDPROOF, BREATHABLE COMFORT & PROTECTION

© 2012 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GORE-TEX®, GORE®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY® and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates. All other trademarks and designs are property of their respective owners.

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Over the last decade, Arc'teryx and Gore have earned numerous awards from leading Outdoor and Snow publications and Industry Exhibitions for developing innovative products that enhance comfort for climbers and skiers.

Trusted brands choose GORE-TEX® product technology. © 2012 W. L. Gore & Associates Inc. GORE-TEX, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY, GORE and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates


Top Trends

/ Snowboard Boots

Lacing systems tie up top snowboard boot innovations New dials, dual-lace offerings and pro models are hot for 2013. The hybrid lacing trend in boots is similar to the mixing of rocker and camber in snowboards. Riders want the performance of these new lacing systems as well as the feel of a traditional lace boot, just like they want to have the loose, playful feel of rocker but still with the pop and response of camber. That kind of demand is driving companies to mix speed-lacing systems like Boa Technology with traditional lacing or to refine closure systems to mimic the lacedup fit. Van’s debuts a Hybrid Boa configuration at the SIA Snow Show in the Infuse, Revere Boa and women’s Ferra, combining traditional laces and a Boa closure that is focused primarily on the critical instep area of the boot. Boa itself is releasing two new reel platforms here at the Show, including the new top of the line H3, which has a smaller size and more power than the previous reel, and a new mid-powered reel named the M3, to match up with the brand’s Dual Reel offerings. “Our customers are looking for more bang for the buck with performance-oriented focus and multiple reel boot options,” says Vincent Connolly, Global Category Manager for BOA. “Our new reel platform was specifically designed with this customer in mind and you’ll see a much broader price range for these products.” Flow Snowboard’s features the new H3 Boa in its HyLite ZipFit boot. According to Flow’s Boots Product Manager Alex Zhao, “We continue to embrace BOA technology in a way that seamlessly ties our boots with the technology to create a visually stunning boot that is also very functional.” New for 2013, Burton introduces Speed Dial in models including the Jet and Chloe. The new lacing system can also be tightened or loosened with the twist of a dial. And Salomon’s new Sure Lock lacing features four different lace profiles for cinching down your boots; each designed to integrate with specific boot models in the line. For example, the new F3.0 features Wrap Lock— a kind of enveloping system with the foot wrapped in a boot-liner tortilla versus pinched in a taco shell. Rome Snowboard’s Libertine and women’s Bastille feature their PureFlex lacing, which individually tightens four independent zones to maximize comfort and maintain a natural feel, all customized to each rider’s specifications. Traditional lacing is still alive and well though—for some riders all these new-fangled closures “just don’t feel the same”—so lace-ups can be found industry-wide from Forum’s flagship Forumula to Van’s V66 to select Burton models. For 2013, Torstein Horgmo is rocking DC’s full-grain leather Terrain boot, which ties down with a Boa/lace

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▲ Ride Triad

▲ ThirtyTwo JP

▲ Burton Ion

▲ Rome Libertine

▲ Forum Forumula

hybrid closure. New pro models also help fill out several brands’ top-ofthe-line offerings. ThirtyTwo’s Maven is design-inspired by Joe Sexton, and the JP Walker Light is a collab with none other than…JP Walker. Freestyle phenom Seb Toutant recently signed with Ride, resulting in the new Triad

▲ Salomon F3.0

Speed Lace Boot. K2’s Contour, Gretchen Bleiler’s boot of choice, returns with Double Boa lacing and fine-tuned liners for optimal heelfit and warmth. Other unique partnerships include the Burton Ion x Pirelli Collab, which yields a new snow-tire inspired tread and outsole. —Mike Horn

“Our customers are looking for more bang for the buck with performance-oriented focus and multiple reel boot options.”


Top Trends

/ Skis

Frontside ski innovation hits the passing lane Manufacturers race to incorporate rocker into on-piste product. So far, it’s been a good year for hardpack. Challenging snow conditions across the country have meant that most of the people who are skiing are carving groomers, gates or well-packed bumps. Not that it’s slowed down reverse camber ski sales, as SIA reports that 55,000 pairs were sold through November of 2011. That’s almost double the number sold the previous year. But those figures also increasingly include frontside product. Ski manufacturers are adding some level of rocker to almost every ski in their line these days, and as if on cue with the country’s predominantly corduroy conditions, here at the SIA Snow Show they are also offering loads of new technology in their recreational and all-mountain skis, easing the level of turn initiation without sacrificing grip. “A little bit of rocker goes a long way,” says Tait

Wardlaw, Rossignol vice president of marketing and communications, explaining how the use of Power Turn Rocker pairs subtle tip rocker with traditional camber in the new Pursuit Series, designed “to bring excitement back to the hardpack.” In particular, the Pursuit HP Ti (125/81/111) also features a new Diamond Tip for more precision in carving. Salomon also focuses on the meat of the market by adding more firepower to the construction of the Enduro XT 800 (125/80/108), with a full wood core with a Double Ti Laminate for reinforcement, and the brand’s All Mountain Rocker for ease of arc. Atomic raises the ante to the World Cup level by adding 10 percent Piste Rocker to the tips of its Redster Double Deck GS and Redster Doubledeck SL Red, as well as 15 to 20 percent All Mountain Rocker in its new

“A little bit of rocker goes a long way.”

▲ HEAD Rev 85

▲ Rossignol Pursuit

▲ Volkl V-Werks Code

▲ K2 Bolt

▲ Atomic Redster

▲ Salomon Enduro XT 800

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Vantage Series. K2 hits the Show with a big frontside story in the new Bolt (125/72/99), the vector ski in the All-Mountain Performance (A.M.P.) line, which introduces RoX Technology, a mix of Speed Rocker initiation, MOD shape, and a Carbon Web placement for unshakeable grip. “Just like you need a powder ski in your quiver for soft snow, you need an extra pair of skis for those hard snow days, and we saw an opportunity to introduce a narrower-waisted ski for those skiers who want to carve turns all day on it,” says Mike Gutt, K2 global marketing manager. Also riding the on-piste innovation wave, Elan offers three new frontside friendly skis in its Amphibio line, mixing rocker and camber in the shovels of the Amphibio 88XTi, 78XTi and 78. And as Marker Völkl USA VP of marketing Geoff Curtis says, “Völkl is one of the only suppliers that continues to address the needs of the frontside/all-mountain skier with two distinct series,” including RTM and Code. Both get the V-Werks treatment for next season, featuring a new construction of MetalTex titanal and carbon inlay, a Motion iPT Hollow Tech binding and Xtra-Light Wood Core in the V-Werks RTM 84 and V-Werks Code (122/76/104). Blizzard takes its well-received Flipcore Technology, introduced this season in the Free Mountain line into its Magnum Series, offering the “Natural Rocker” design in all-mountain skis that are 80 and 85mm underfoot. HEAD offers up a whole new collection in the Rev, offering skis with a wide-range of waist widths from 70 to 105mm. Product manager Andrew Couperthwait says the entire series features ERA 3.0 Technology, a combination of Allride Rocker, Progressive Radius and Intellirise Rebound to “deliver the ease of turning and better flotation of rocker, but add in full tip-to-tail edge contact and decreased vibrations.” Nordica’s new Transfire line of skis, combined with six new boots, features an extended Transfer Zone in the shovel for more efficient edge hold, as well as a new wider Evo plate in the Transfire 78Ti, Transfire 78Ca, Transfire 74 and Transfire 75. Fischer unveils the Hybrid, offering an adjustable tip for rocker or no rocker depending on the skier’s preference. Dynastar’s Outland 87 (132/87/114) is an allmountain ski designed to still deliver on-piste edge grip. And even Line joins the skinny ski party, with new skis like the Prophet 85 and Celebrity 85 for everything from hitting the slopes to riding rails at the local park. —Peter Kray


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Top Trends

/ GLOVES

Glove designers go gaga for digital capability Gadget-friendly models dominate in monster year for handwear intros. Gloves continue to be a hands-down front-runner in accessory sales, with mittens jumping 10 percent in units last season and gloves 12 percent. Leading the charge are new technologies melding fabrics and improving touch-screen capabilities for electronic use. Here are the highlights: New technology comes to the forefront with 180s’ (180s. com) QuantumHeat gloves, highlighted by the Contender ($75). The technology actually generates heat during activity, increasing skin temperature up to 3 percent. Black Diamond (blackdiamondequipment.com) gears up its glove line with 28 new offerings, including the Punisher Pro in its Ice Series, Pilot and Torque in its Ultralight Series, and Super Light Mitt in its Ascent series. Burton’s (burton.com) RPM Leather Glove/Mitt ($74.95) is a team-requested mitt option with GnarGuard leather and waterproof Dryride Insane Membrane 2.0. On the women’s front, the new Golden Glove/Mitt ($79.95), was inspired by team rider Kelly Clark with a palm optimized for touchscreen devices. Focusing on a blend of synthetic and natural materials, DAKINE (dakine.com) showcases the new Ranger ($110), a gauntlet-style glove with water repellant drumdyed leather, and a Gore Tex insert. Drop’s (dropmfg.com) new OG Deuce Mitt ($50-$55) is made from three-layer laminated softshell/DP storm guard shell and a waterproof/windproof Aquabloc insert with optional patent-pending SmartThumb technology. Dynafit’s (dynafit.com) New Radical glove ($64.95) is a minimalist offering for the handwarming world, with 100 percent Wind Stopper, tech-touch fingertips, and articulated positioning for touring or racing. Banking on warmth and toughness in a price-point model is Flylow (flylowgear.com), whose new Mitten ($40) is an extension of its triple-baked glove line. Gordini (gordini.com) introduces its new patentpending Smart Thumb on three new models, featuring a water-resistant thumb zipper for your cell phone/touch screen use. The new Sensor Zip ($75) melds a heavy-denier outer with a goatskin palm and thumb. Grenade (grenadegloves.com) launches a new screenprinted-graphic, Pro Model Danny Kass ($46.95) glove, featuring a Primaloft insulation, a latter-stretch body, neoprene knuckle and Lorica suede palms. Helly Hansen’s (hellyhansen.com) Enigma ($155) is its first-ever smartphone-applicable ski glove with PrimaLoft insulation, On Tip smartphone technology and

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▲ Scott Teton

▲ Grenade Pro Model Danny Kass

a protective gaiter. Celebrating 75 years, HESTRA (hestragloves.com) unveils the Seth Morrison 3-Finger Pro, a water and windproof offering made from durable leather and Thermolite insulation. Also new is the Army Leather Heli Ski Mitt, featuring a longer cuff for powder days. Kombi (kombiltd.com) offers more than 70 new styles, including the gauntlet-style Prime ($105) with a goatskin leather shell, Gore-Tex and Primaloft insulation. Level’s (levelgloves.com) gladiator-like Gore-tex/ WarmMax SuperPipe XCR mitten features a Biomex Protection Pad and Kevlar weave for protection, removable lining, powder cuff, and goggle cleaner. Manzella’s (booth # 24027) new TouchTip product family debuts a special material pad on the index finger and thumb allowing touch screen use. It’s applied the technology to its Power Stretch ($30), which comes with a Polartec Power Stretch shell, and Tahoe ($20). Oakley (oakley.com) showcases the All Time ($110), a Gore-Tex/leather offering with padded knuckles and stretch softshell chassis for breathability. Its Winter Mitt ($90) is a leather/Gore-Tex offering with a Gretchen Bleiler-endorsed Cognac colorway. Obermeyer (obermeyer.com) showcases Cocona—a recycled coconut shell-based material—throughout its new performance handwear, including the Men’s Python and Women’s Radiator ($69.50-$74.50). Outdoor Research (outdoorresearch.com) has grown its handwear line 35 percent with 23 new styles, including eight in the touch-screen compatible category. Top-

▲ Swany TS30

▲ Gordini Sensor Zip

▲ Swix Leather Dog

ping its other offerings is the Luminary ($99), made from Gore-Tex Windstopper and a removable fleece liner. POW (powgloves.com) debuts the Sniper GTX Trigger and Tanto Trigger. The Sniper ($75) employs a GoreTex waterproof liner, with a lower-profile. It also redesigned the Assault GTX ($110) thanks to feedback from team riders like Matt Cummins. Scott (scottusa.com) touts its new Teton glove ($150) for big mountain skiers high on style. A Gore-Tex insert keeps them dry while a leather and softshell outer provide warmth and dexterity. The new Seirus (seirus.com) HeatTouch line ($199.99$374.99) features six heated gloves with three settings and wafer-thin batteries. The proprietary technology is utilized in the FormFit Xtreme, as well as the all-leather Inferno, and fashion-oriented Fiero. Spyder’s (spyderco.com) Gore-Tex Conduct line ($100) is designed for touchscreen devices, with sheep leather in the fingers and thumb. A men’s three-layer microfleece and leather model is also available (Facer, $50). Swany’s (swany.com) TS-30 ($99), developed for a U.S. Navy expedition to Antarctica, has a mitt shell with zipper side access, and an inner glove with a touchscreen thumb and first finger for accessing digital equipment, and a heat pack compartment. Swix (swixsport.com) unveils a new alpine glove style called the Leather Dog ($159.99), featuring a smooth grain leather outershell with SWIX aqua-SHIELD for water repellency and a Gore-Tex insert —Eugene Buchanan


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Top Trends

/ Cross-Country Skis

Nordic market hits the Show with growth in several categories

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2 snewsnet.com

loaded with BC features for more durability that “offers greater versatility to the user.” Versatility is the name of the game this year, according to Rick Halling, Atomic’s Nordic product director, who says that, “the fastest growing category in the Nordic market is high-end waxless classic skis. There are too many days every winter when it is extremely difficult to select the right kick wax. People want performance, but they don’t want to be bothered with waxing.” Atomic’s new Worldcup Classic SDS skis focus on

▲ Rossignol X5 OT

▲ Alpina XCSport ASK

▲ Atomic Worldcup Classic

From the SIA Snow Show floor here in Denver, to the Nordic Demo taking place at Devil’s Thumb Ranch on Jan. 30-31 as part of the On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest, the Nordic ski community has plenty to be excited about this year, particularly in terms of growth across several key cross-country ski categories. According to SIA, 739,000 kids participated in cross-country skiing last year, establishing a baseline for future growth, while 34 percent of the women who cross-country ski report annual household incomes of $100,000-plus, which is good news for retailers. And, manufacturers report strong demand in everything from top-end race gear to touring equipment for the general consumer. “Nordic skiing has shown three years of participation growth, and the message of fun, lower cost winter recreation continues to resonate well with consumers,” says Graham Gephart, global brand manager for K2 Outdoor, which is exhibiting its Madshus cross-country ski line here at the Show. Gephart says the variety of skiing styles in Nordic is creating opportunities for World Cup level boots and skis like the new Nanosonic Carbon Skate boots and Nanosonic Carbon Skate R-Soft skis, as well as skis for recreational skiers. “We continue to see growth in metal-edged touring and Nordic backcountry skiing,” he adds. It’s the same sentiment at Fischer Skis, where new introductions in both the backcountry and the racing category are being unveiled here at the Show. Fischer’s progressive Offtrack base pattern, which the brand touts as the perfect marriage between grip and glide, will be added to the E99 Crown and E89 Crown skis, as well as in new boot models. “The Offtrack ski category is doing very well for Fischer so there will be some additional boots to complement the skis,” says Peter Ashley, vice president of Fischer Skis U.S. Nordic division. The 5 and 3 BC My Style boots, both lasted for women, feature NNN BC soles and an integrated gaiter. Also new for women are the RCS Carbonlite Skating WS and RCS Carbonlite Classic WS boots for racing. At Rossignol, much of the ski line stays the same “as we try to have a longer life cycle in touring and backcountry in order to assist the retailer with inventory management,” says Nordic division manager Ryan Green. Rossi is, however, introducing a new classic race ski in the X-ium Classic WC, promising better and more consistent camber regulation, as well as new soles for better kick, plus new cuffs and graphics on the X-ium skate and classic boots. Green says he’s especially bullish about the introduction of the X5 OT, a touring boot

▼ Atomic Worldcup Classic

Kids, touring, and race all showing positive signs for 2013.

“There are too many days every winter when it is extremely difficult to select the right kick wax. People want performance, but they don’t want to be bothered with waxing.”


michi.lerjen & denise.wenger, furggen ridge, matterhorn michael.meisl

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providing a strong kick via a carbon laminate construction that Halling says will be appealing to top-level skiers and “citizen racers.” The brand is also unveiling its own brand new Worldcup Skate and Classic boots here at the Show. Alpina looks to ramp up the fun meter in the Nordic category, adding bright new tropical hues to its ACTION Group of classic, skate and touring offerings of boot-binding and ski combinations. “The re-‘action’ has been very favorable thus far,” Alpina sports project manager Jason Stadler says of the new designs. He says the idea is to have fun with some of the more conservative aspects of the category, and also “help customers and retailers strike up a conversation as the product ‘pops’ off the shelf.” Making the retailer’s job easier is also the focus at Salomon, which according to Nordic product manager Isaac Wilson has been working behind the scenes to ramp up the current line “by creating smaller tolerances and making the skis easier to select by creating a much cleaner and easier to understand selection process.” That includes a chart and sticker that retailers can use to more quickly narrow down the ski selection process for the consumer, as well as something that Salomon didn’t bring to the Show floor—a new 500,000 Euro ski press that Wilson says “allows for much smaller tolerances for camber adjustments.” —Peter Kray

Nordic Demo provides perfect opportunity to product test.

The Nordic Demo taking place at Devil’s Thumb Ranch on Jan. 30-31 as part of the On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest, is the perfect place to test drive all of the new cross-country skis and snowshoes. With 100km of beautifully groomed trails and stunning scenery, it’s also one of the best places to reconnect with both the fun and the community at the heart of the sport. “As a retailer, the Nordic Demo is a critical event for making the best decisions on specific brands and models to carry for your customers,” says Reese Brown, SIA Nordic Director. “Retailers will get to try out the product as well as ski and socialize with key principals from all the manufacturing companies.” —Peter Kray

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Top News

/ Industry Achievement Award

Ned Hamilton honored tonight for 50 years of retail excellence Specialty shop innovator set standards from Florida to Vermont. Peter Glenn founder Ned Hamilton will be honored with the 2012 Industry Achievement Award this evening at 6 p.m. as part of the SIA SnowSports Awards in the CSCUSA Central Lounge and Food Court. After more than half a century in snow sports retail, successfully uniting business and family in a chain of specialty shops that counts 13 locations from Florida to Virginia, Hamilton says he’s still surprised to be singled out for the recognition. “I feel very humble and honored to receive this award on behalf of my personal family, my Peter Glenn family of associates, and all my ski industry friends who have been so instrumental in any success that we have had over 53 years,” Hamilton says. “I feel that from the very beginning, the most important ingredients in our recipe have been to select and maintain superior staff, and to establish long

and loyal relationships with our suppliers and supplier representatives.” It was 1958 when Hamilton opened his first ski shop in the basement of the A.D. Farwell Co., a men’s clothing store in Montpelier, Vt. He named it after his one-yearold son, Peter Glenn Hamilton, and watched as it thrived in the ski-crazed community. By 1970, he added locations at Mad River Glen, Stowe and Sugarbush, and moved his original location to the Barre-Montpelier Road. At the age of 37, it was also the year that he nearly lost his life. After experiencing sharp pains in his chest, Hamilton was rushed to the hospital where doctors diagnosed a pulmonary embolism. They thought the blood clot in his lung was more than likely the result of one of the two broken legs he had previously suffered in ski accidents. He was told to give up skiing, as well as his passion for flying his own planes, and decided to spend time at a condo he had in Florida as he decided what to do next. But by 1975 he was opening a new ski shop, in Boca Raton of all places. “We learned the hard way that there is a significant dif-

ference in the way you do snow sports retailing in Vermont and South Florida,” Hamilton says. “When we first came to Florida, we had to completely change our product mix, sell the sport before we could sell the apparel and equipment, and help grow the ski clubs, which were so important to us during the early years.” He now has 10 locations in Florida, as well as two in Georgia and one in Virginia. But even more than proving that snow sports retail could succeed somewhere like Florida, Hamilton says he is proudest of the way he has been able to involve his family with his professional life. “We are very fortunate to have two children, Peter and Lori, that grew up with a passion for skiing and the business,” Hamilton says. “I can’t begin to tell you how I beam with pride when I am told how they have earned the respect of our industry, not for who they are, but for what they have done. My wife Carolyn has been a pillar of support and an incredible partner and copilot through all the turbulence that we encountered on this flight.” —Peter Kray

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Cover Story

/ Women in the Industry

Female execs show that diversity is good for the bottom line From overseeing hardgoods to high fashion, these four are leaving their mark. Since the birth of the U.S. snow sports industry, women have been the minority, even though they’ve consistently distinguished themselves on the mountain (from Gretchen Fraser to Gretchen Bleiler) and at the cash register, where they are acknowledged to be the No. 1 sales driver in snow sports through their spending and influence. Now, in increasing numbers, women like these four and organizations such as the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition are proving that when women are in leadership roles in the snow sports industry, everyone benefits. With women making roughly 90 percent of the purchasing decisions for their families, having women in the boardroom and the marketing department to help guide those decisions is just good business, says Amy Luther, OIWC’s program director. “Even though we’ve made great strides, the longevity and the success of our industry needs to be based on diversity at all levels,” she adds.

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Melanie Mills spent 14 years as Colorado Ski Country’s executive vice president, working closely with the board of trustees and learning from four previous Ski Country presidents, before becoming the first woman to hold the top position. She thrives on dealing with unforeseen circumstances, solving problems and never knowing what’s going to cross her desk next. “There’s something unexpected just about every day— whether for me or for one of the members of our team here at Ski Country,” she says. “We do quite a bit of troubleshooting for our members here, and I especially enjoy the variety of things they ask us to help them with.” “(I) felt I was ready for the challenges presented,” she says. Or at least as ready as she could be. Mills believes that the obstacles she tackles on a daily basis are not gender-specific, but rather require tact and experience to manage the competing interests of her members. “This is a highly political job—both with respect to internal trade association politics and the world of politics in which our industry is involved,” she says. “I happen to love that aspect of the job!” She advises other women looking to get into the industry to go after their passion. “Do what you love. Develop an area of expertise. Work hard,” she says. But don’t forget, “Enjoy getting out on the snow.”

Photos by (from let) courtesy; Pinnacol Assurance Photo/ Jack Dempsey; Jeff Caven; courtesy

Donna Carpenter, the co-owner and recently named president of snowboarding giant Burton, got an early start in the snow sports industry. After falling for a compelling man with a dream (Jake Burton), the recent Columbia University graduate found herself in Vermont. Since then, Carpenter has helped steer Burton. Because the snowboarding company grew so quickly and drew so heavily from the male-dominated industries of skateboarding and surfing, Carpenter says that in the beginning even Burton was guilty of considering women as an afterthought. “We would take the men’s jackets and pink them and shrink them,” she says. But not anymore. “It didn’t take me very long (to realize) that without women sitting at the table making decisions about women’s product and women’s marketing, that we weren’t going to succeed there.” Led by Carpenter, Burton is working to ensure that women view the company not just as a brand of choice, but as an employer of choice as well. “There’s really strong evidence (showing) that companies with diverse leadership are better managed and more profitable,” she says. Carpenter recognizes the barriers women must navigate to find their place, and notes that many instinctively feel as if they are being judged by male counterparts. Yet she’s optimistic about the change she sees in the snow sports industry. “Women are starting to say, ‘We’ll define what we think is cool and core,’” she says. “I think (it’s) very healthy for our company and for our industry that the women are deciding what’s culturally relevant for them.” One of those decisions might be opting to have children. Carpenter had her second child while serving as Burton’s CFO. Motherhood (and fatherhood) has changed how both she and her husband consider maternity and post-maternity benefits. “You don’t want to invest so much in someone, and they’ve invested so much in you, to lose them at the height of their career because you can’t work out a way to do both,” she says of having children and maintaining a career. “It’s really a matter of retaining talents.”


OIWC supports equality

The Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition seeks respect, inclusion and gender equality in the snow sports, outdoor and bike industry workplaces through its advocacy, education and the providing of resources. Members are encouraged to network, submit news, attend events, post resumes and sound off on important issues of the day. Individual memberships are $45, while corporate memberships range from $500 to $6,000. The OIWC website is packed with ideas, events, resources and news. Go to oiwc.org.

Tracy Gibbons, part owner of the 16,000-square-foot flagship Sturtevant’s in Bellevue, Wash., remembers her first year on the sales floor, back when K2’s top end slalom ski was draped in pink. Dismissed by a male customer who saw her only as young and female, she watched as the customer sought help from the store manager, who sent him grudgingly back to Gibbons. When the man asked Gibbons what she knew about the K2s, she decided to play the stereotype before defying it. “Well, they’re pretty and they’re pink,” she said, before launching into a technical dissection of the ski’s construction and its resulting on-hill attributes. In the end, the customer bought the skis. “But it was pretty evident that he didn’t want—or didn’t expect—a gal to have the answers for him,” Gibbons says. She credits her mechanically inclined father for piquing her interest in the technical side of the ski industry, recalling how he bought her a car soon after she turned 16. The caveat: She had to fix the engine. Gibbons got her start in retail through ski

racing friendships with the sons of Duncan Campbell, who was the owner of Sturtevant’s at the time. “I was at the ripe age of 14 when he asked my parents if I’d be interested in working at the store,” she says. “I thought that seemed like a pretty cool thing.” It wasn’t that cool: Her first duties included taking out the garbage and completing other cleanup odd jobs. As her roles at the store expanded, she also spent four years on the U.S. Ski Team and picked up a business degree from Seattle University. She is now chief operating officer and part owner for Sturtevant’s. When working the retail floor, Gibbons finds that women respond “more naturally” to her without feeling as if “they have to prove anything to me,” she says. And although the rudeness shown to her in the early days is now rare, she admits that it is not uncommon for her to be the only female hardgoods retailer in a meeting. “It’s sort of a boys club to be around. On the other hand, they’re a bunch of great gentlemen.”

Diane Boyer’s upward trajectory through the snow sports industry was natural, considering her familiarity with all things ski (and SKEA). After repping for the family clothing brand SKEA—a company that “embraces the mountain lifestyle,” she says—throughout college, Boyer took the reins in 1991. Six years later, Boyer joined the SIA board of directors. “I always like to say that I made the boys club coed, whether they liked it or not,” she says. In 2005, Boyer became their leader. As the first chairwoman of the SIA board, she played an integral role in moving the SIA Snow Show to Denver. “I really felt that, at the time, Las Vegas was super expensive,” she says, adding, “It just makes sense to have an international ski show in the middle of ski country.” With nearly 40 years of experience in the snow sports industry, Boyer has seen companies grow, merge and die. She’s worked toward SIA’s goal to educate people about the old and new players in the industry, primarily through the running of the SIA Show, what Boyer calls “the premiere event for companies to showcase their products.” She guesses that the lack of estrogen in the industry stems from years’ past, when women were largely absent from sports in general. “It was a traditional industry, and most traditional industries were run by men,” Boyer says. So what’s the secret for anyone, male or female, to make it in the industry? Boyer takes a guess. “Anyone can do it if you have the passion for what you do,” she says. —Courtney Holden

“I think (it’s) very healthy for our company and for our industry that the women are deciding what’s culturally relevant for them.” snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2

27


By the Numbers

/

The Deciders

Women are King! Through influence and their own spending, women rule snow sports.

Want to know why women are such an important consumer market to understand in the snow sports industry? For starters, they are responsible for 80 percent of overall consumer spending, and have strong influences on all family purchases, which means that even if they aren’t participating in snow sports they are still driving family decisions on whether to ski or ride. Women influence 92 percent of vacation spending and 80 percent of the money made from sporting goods and apparel, which translates directly into the profits in the snow sports industry. (SIA Women’s Intelligence Report) Women’s specific equipment, apparel and accessories sales trends from 2010-11: Women’s snow sports products sold over $940 million in the 2010-11 season. ›› $202 million in equipment ›› $501 million in apparel ›› $239 million in accessories Women’s DOllar Sales in all Snow sports Shops 2007/008 - 2010/2011

$1,000,000,000 $800,000,000 $600,000,000 $400,000,000 $200,000,000

Female Alpine Skier Age Demographics

$0 2008/2009

2009/2010

Accessories

1400

All products

2010/2011

Specialty stores handled the majority of women’s sales, bringing in over $569 million for equipment, apparel and accessories.

1200

›› Women snow sports participants spend

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2 snewsnet.com

1000 774

800

640

773 585

600 400

199

200 0

74 Under 17

18-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

Over 65

Source: 2011 SIA Participation Study, data produced by the Physical Activity Council (SIA is a founding member)

Female Snowboarder Age Demographics 1400 1200 Number of Females

the majority of their money on winter apparel, which accounts for 53 percent of their spending. ›› Apparel tops hold the top spot in women’s apparel sales—selling over $368 million, the highest dollar sales in the category. ›› Women’s snowboard apparel increased 6 percent in dollar sales, reaching close to $62 million. ›› Alpine equipment still dominates the women’s equipment category, making up 68 percent of their equipment purchases; second to alpine is snowboard with 27 percent of equipment sales. Women’s ski sales increased 20 percent in units and 26 percent in dollars for 2010-11. ›› Apparel accessories dominate the sales of women’s accessories, making up 82 percent vs. 18 percent in equipment accessories. ›› Snowshoeing has the highest percentage of women participants with 46 percent to men’s percent 54 percent. Cross country is second, with 45 percent women and 55 percent men.

1213

1000 800 600

689 583

600

400 200 0

Under 17

18-24

25-34

136

106

35-44

45-54

28 55-64

0 Over 65

Source: 2011 SIA Participation Study, data produced by the Physical Activity Council (SIA is a founding member)

Photos by Jack Affleck/vail resorts

2007/2008

Apparel

Number of Females

Equipment


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At the show

/ Dining

Work hard, eat well From casual to upscale, walk-to dining options are diverse and delicious.

Denver may be best known to SIA Snow Show attendees as the gateway to the country’s best 12. Avenue Grill skiing and riding. No longer just a steakhouse town, Denver’s re-energized dining scene offers 630 E. 17th Ave. diverse tables to close that big deal or just relax after a long day on the show floor. Here are 25 303-861-2820; avenuegrill.com top restaurants from which to choose, all within walking distance of the Convention Center. Traditional San Francisco-style grill specializing in fresh

seafood, grill cuisine, pasta and delicious salads. Private room available. Serving until 11 p.m. weekdays, and to midnight Sat., Sun. 5-10 p.m.

1. Euclid Hall

303-296-3525; panzano-denver.com

13. ChoLon Bistro

1317 14th St. 303-595-4255; euclidhall.com

Located near the 16th Street Mall, the award-winning Panzano has become a true local favorite. Exceptional Northern Italian cuisine matches the warm and inviting setting.

1555 Blake St., Ste. 101 303-353-5223

From the owners of Rioja and Bistro Vendôme, this American tavern is focused on high quality and innovative pub food from around the world, including housemade sausages, po’ boys, poutine and schnitzels.

2. Ocean Prime 1465 Larimer St. 303-825-3663; oceanprimedenver.com Ocean Prime, the Modern American supper club located at Larimer Square, features Prime steaks and seafood, award-winning handcrafted cocktails, world-class wines and red carpet hospitality.

3. Bistro Vendôme 1420 Larimer Square, Suite 200 303-825-3232; bistrovendome.com Bringing some serious Parisian flair to the already tres chic Larimer Square, Bistro Vendôme is a Denver foodie favorite. The restaurant’s mouthwatering menu makes prodigious use of local, seasonal ingredients to create updates on classic French bistro fare.

4. Kevin Taylor’s at the Opera House 1106 14th St. 303-640-1012; ktrg.net A fixture on the Denver cuisine scene for more than 20 years, Kevin Taylor has dedicated his life to creating refined French-style cuisine, with a distinctive Colorado twist; located at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts.

5. Osteria Marco 1453 Larimer St. 303-534-5855; osteriamarco.com Spectacular Italian dishes are on display at Osteria Marco, a commodious Larimer Square basement establishment that exposes the high priest talents of cutting-edge kitchen magician Frank Bonanno.

6. Panzano 909 17th Street at Champa

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7. Vesta Dipping Grill 1822 Blake St. Ste. D 303-296-1970; vestagrill.com World grill cuisine. Ethnic entrees and exotic dipping sauces served in a relaxed urban environment in the heart of LoDo.

8. TAG Restaurant 1441 Larimer St. 303-996-9985; tag-restaurant.com Troy Guard’s home to continental social food offers urban progressive dining in an intimate 125-seat setting right in the heart of Downtown’s Larimer Square.

9. Rioja 1431 Larimer Street 303-820-2282; riojadenver.com Chef Jennifer Jasinski’s much acclaimed Mediterraneaninfluenced eatery in Historic Larimer Square.

10. Appaloosa Grill 535 16th St. 720-932-1700; appaloosagrill.com This employee-owned neighborhood favorite offers highquality cuisine, a great atmosphere and live entertainment nightly. Kitchen open until 1 a.m. seven days a week.

11. 1876 Restaurant at the Grand Hyatt Denver 1750 Welton St. 303-296-1876; granddenver.hyatt.com Located in the heart of downtown Denver’s entertainment and business district, Grand Hyatt Denver’s 1876 Restaurant serves three meals daily. Weekday buffets for breakfast and lunch as well as a la carte dining. In the evening choose from a selection of contemporary dishes or from a prix fixe menu at just $52.80 per couple.

ChoLon, which translates to “big market,” is named after the largest Chinese-influenced market in Saigon, Vietnam. Executive Chef Lon Symensma, formerly of Buddakan and Spice Market in New York City, showcases his passion for Asian ingredients and French cooking techniques in a striking and eco-friendly environment.

14. Cook’s Fresh Market 1600 Glenarm Pl., Ste. 120 303-893-2277; cooksfreshmarket.com A treasure-filled store packed with good things to taste and eat: fantastic breads, pastries, oils, vinegar, imported cheeses, innovative prepared foods, delicious sandwiches, gift baskets and much more!

15. Corridor 44 1433 Larimer St. 303-893-0044; corridor44.com A stylish new Larimer Square establishment featuring a menu of small plates, sparkling wines by the glass and bottle along with a full bar and complete still wine list.

16. Cru - A Wine Bar 1442 Larimer St. 303-893-9463; cruawinebar.com Experience and explore the fascinating world of wine, with over 350 selections, 60 premium wines by the glass as well as taster pairings and wine flights. Eclectic, wine-friendly cuisine including shared appetizers, gourmet pizzas and entrees.

17. Earls Restaurant Downtown Denver 1600 Glenarm Place. Ste. 140 303-595-3275; earls.ca Offering an award-winning international cuisine with two outdoor patios, a private dining room and a full bar and lounge retreat with a west-coast atmosphere.

18. EDGE Restaurant & Bar 1111 14th Street 303-389-3000; edgerestaurantdenver.com

map Courtesy of Visit Denver

Thanks to Visit Denver for the reviews.


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At the show

/ Dining & Nightlife

Dining, Clubbing, Brewing Destination dining, hot nightspots and local suds round out the experience. Looking to spend a night off the SIA Snow Show campus to savor a special meal? Seeking of a historic downtown warehouse has what sports enthuthe best nightspots? Want to take advantage of being in the real Brewtown USA (Denver siasts crave—and a few gratuitous yet thoughtful extras for everyone else. brews more beer than any other U.S. city)? Here’s your guide to restaurants that are worth the drive; the hottest local nightclubs; and the best winter offerings from Colorado brewers. The Funky Buddha Thanks to Visit Denver for the reviews.

Root Down

1600 W. 33rd Ave. 303-993-4200; rootdowndenver.com Globally inspired seasonal cuisine with high-level service and a funky casual atmosphere. The menu incorporates fresh ingredients from local growers as well as sustainable meats and fish.

Olivea 719 E. 17th Ave. 303-861-5050; olivearestaurant.com Serving Mediterranean food inspired by the cuisines of Spain, Italy and Southern France, with an emphasis on utilizing local ingredients.

Sushi Den 1487 S. Pearl St. 303-777-0826; sushiden.net

Steuben’s 523 E. 17th Ave. 303-830-1001; steubens.com Created by the team behind Vesta Dipping Grill, Steuben’s is an everyday neighborhood restaurant serving regional American food. Signature items include the lobster roll, deviled eggs, the Cubano, fried chicken, and green chili cheeseburger.

Duo 2413 W. 32nd Ave. 303-477-4141; duodenver.com A hidden treasure for those seeking a special dining experience tucked in one of Denver’s hippest neighborhoods—Highlands—featuring an unassuming style and a seasonably changing menu.

One of the premiere sushi and Japanese restaurants in the United States for 25 years. Owned and operated by the Kizaki brothers, Sushi Den is truly a family affair.

Lola Coastal Mexican Cuisine 1575 Boulder St. 720-570-8686; loladenver.com Named one of the Top 5 places to drink tequila in the country by Food and Wine Magazine, Lola is one of Denver’s most acclaimed dining destinations. 5280’s Chef of the Year Jamey Fader’s menu is inspired by Mexico’s coastal regions.

The Night Is Young Green Russell

1422 Larimer St. 303-893-6505; greenrussell.com A chef-driven cocktail bar with the old school spirit of a prohibition-era speakeasy. The menu illustrates that philosophy: fresh ingredients, at the peak of their flavor profile.

The Cruise Room at the Oxford Hotel 1600 17th St. 303-825-1107; theoxfordhotel.com The award-winning cocktail lounge located in The Oxford Hotel appears frozen in time since its Art Deco facelift in 1933. The Cruise Room was fashioned after a lounge on the Queen Mary.

The Downtown Tavern 1949 Market St. 303-299-0100; tavernhg.com/downtown Beer? You’re in the right town.

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The best part about the Tavern Downtown is that it’s just what it sounds like: A tavern downtown. The bar inside

Quirky clubs, music venues and lounges make up SoCo, or South of Colfax, which is another flourishing nightlife community in Denver. The Funky Buddha has a multilevel rooftop on which body-painted go-go dancers just may be the night’s entertainment.

Lannie’s Clocktower Cabaret 1601 Arapahoe Street 303-293-0075; lannies.com For a little old-fashioned entertainment, hit Lannie’s Clocktower Cabaret, located on the 16th Street Mall in the basement of the landmark D&F Tower: big bands, sultry singers, comedy and all kinds of after hours fun.

Brewtown USA

Christmas Ale: Breckenridge Brewery At more than 7 percent alcohol, with a sturdy texture and rich flavors of caramel and chocolate, this holiday seasonal is the fermented equivalent of a good fire. ›› Visit the Breckenridge Ball Park Brew at 2220 Blake St.

Hibernation Ale: Great Divide Brewing Co. A robust, dry-hopped ale, the Hibernation has a malty richness balanced with a complex hop profile and hearty, warming character. ›› Visit the Great Divide Brewery Tap Room at 2201

Arapahoe St.

Belgorado: Wynkoop Brewing Co. A hoppy Belgian-style IPA made with fresh Colorado hops and Colorado malts. ›› Visit Denver’s first brew pub at 1634 18th St.

Snow Day Ale: New Belgium Brewing Co. Pleasantly hoppy, Snow Day carries the subtle chocolate and caramel flavors of a new brewing malt known as Midnight Wheat. Old Jubilation Ale: Avery Brewing Co. Gorgeous mahogany hue, a hint of hazelnuts, and a finish reminiscent of mocha and toffee.

Photo Courtesy of Visit Denver

Dining Worth the Drive

776 Lincoln St 303-832-8628; coclubs.com


Supplier insight

/ Q&A

Nico Serena Of KJUS After mastering fit and function, Serena says Quix Down is what’s next In just over a decade since the inception of the brand, KJUS has become one of the most popular apparel brands for resort skiing. Swiss-born Nico Serena heads up design and development for the company that has revolutionized freedom of movement and functionality. —Krista Crabtree Snow Show Daily: How did you end up as head of design and development at KJUS? Nico Serena: I grew up in the mountains in the St. Moritz-Engadin Valley so my passion for skiing and the mountains started early. My father was working in the sport textile industries since 1979, so I knew I would follow him in this profession. After my first years in sales, I realized I wanted want to work more in the creative field. Since 2008, I have been the head of the design and development department at KJUS. SSD: KJUS set a trend with the use of 4-way stretch fabric in high-end designs. How did this idea come about? NS: When we started the brand in 2000, the main goal was to develop the most technical and advanced skiwear line. At that time, most jackets where very heavy and stiff, which had nothing to do with comfort. We developed our jackets and pants to be more fitted, however we wanted maximum freedom of movement at the same time. It was therefore very clear from the beginning that the success had to be in the use of stretch fabrics. SSD: What overall trends do you see for 2013 in terms of fabrics, fit profiles and color palettes? What inspires you when you are choosing fabric colors? NS: Fabrics are getting lighter and better in performance. We think it’s important to have material mixes in the line, like matte and shiny fabrics. Also, structured fabrics are very important for 2013. Our ladies silhouettes are getting even more fitted, particularly the pants, which have Nico Serena of KJUS brings European style to the North American market.

to look sexy but never lose performance. Our new color palette is full of clear, fresh, bright colors. Our key colors are bright red and orange with white, as well as bright blue with a lighter brown and strong blue with yellow. Another trend we see is an interest in natural colors like military olive and browns. We get inspiration from the catwalks, but for us, the colors have to be sporty. I personally find inspiration by traveling around the world, keeping my eyes open and looking at art, people and nature. SSD: What is Quix Down and what makes it unique from materials used in other insulated jackets? NS: Quix Down is a newly developed DWR down from Toray in Japan. That means this down doesn’t take up moisture and can’t get wet. This increases the cloe (insulation) value in active ski phases. This jacket will dry much faster compared to a normal down jacket with this new innovative down. SSD: You’ve said that the fabrics you use are getting stronger, yet more lightweight and breathable. What technology has allowed fabric to be this way? NS: We are working very close with our partner Toray. One of the results is the new Dermizax NX membrane, one of the most breathable membranes on the market. Dermizax NX is completely water and windproof, can be stretched by up to 200 percent, and is highly breathable. The heart of the development is a non-porous polyurethane membrane. Toray’s researchers have found a way to control the links between the hydrophilic molecules, aligning them to create a smooth and well-balanced three-dimensional structure. This molecular structure aids the diffusion of water molecules through the membrane and increases the transmission rate and therefore the breathability. SSD: What is unique about your new Special Edition line? NS: This year our Special Edition is developed under the theme “Handcrafted in Switzerland.” We developed two new fabrics with Schoeller Textil AG in Switzerland. One is made out of 100 percent wool and the other a lightweight nylon spandex fabric. The design is more casual-oriented, loaded with a ton of performance and function. SSD: You have some top athletes wearing your apparel such as Bode Miller, Lara Gut, Dario Cologna, and of course Lasse Kjus. What kind of input do they have in terms of design? NS: From a design point of view they give us input for some special styles but where we see a huge benefit from our athletes is in the development phase. Bode Miller is just great to work with and he pushes us to set our limits even higher from year to year. SSD: If you could see into the future, what do you see happening with resort ski apparel in the next three to five years? NS: The look and design is getting more and more important without forgetting performance and comfort. Jackets are getting more multi-functional. This means high tech and good-looking ski jackets are used on the slopes as well as for shopping in the city on cold rainy days.

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Supplier insight

/ Q&A

Josh Reid Of Rome Snowboards Ten years in, Rome co-founder talks art, the Olympics and Hurricane Irene. It’s been a little more than 10 years since Rome Snowboards officially launched in Waterbury, Vt. Co-founded by Josh Reid and Paul Maravetz, who were soon joined by head of sales Dan “Sully” Sullivan, the brand has blossomed into one of the stalwarts in snowboarding, with a reputation for equipment innovation, 25 employees, and an office for European operations in Munich. We caught up with Reid to talk about everything from Hurricane Irene to snowboarding and the Olympics. —Mike Horn

Hang-Ups kills contradictions and delivers high levels of finesse and playfulness, while at the same time delivering power and directional stability. A major reason why pro riders still predominantly prefer positive camber over rocker designs is because of the excessive looseness that many riders experience with rocker. A major reason why rocker is so successful is that positive camber feels too precise and responsive for many riders. With NoHang-Ups, we create boards that have strong ollie pop and butter effortlessly; we create boards that have precise directional control and have a less catchy feel.

Snow Show Daily: How has the snowboard market and industry changed since you made your first snowboard? Josh Reid: The players are very different—when we started, the two French ski companies still were some of the largest board brands. Now the top 10 board companies are very different. After the popping of the economic bubble of the 2000s, many specialty retailers have unfortunately faded out of the picture. The strong guys are still there, thankfully, but many of the people we worked with in 2006 are no longer in snowboarding. At the same time, online sales have grown markedly as everyone knows—people are becoming more and more accustomed to buying some of their gear online. Whereas people were limited mainly to locally available choices in 2001, in 2012 people can find pretty much anything they want. So that changes how we and our retail partners need to approach the market.

SSD: How was Rome affected by Hurricane Irene? JR: Our first floor was flooded when Hurricane Irene rolled into town on Sunday, Aug. 28. When the power returned on Tuesday evening, our server was back on line and we were back in business. With all of our inventory off-site and the critical things out of the way, the building was substantially damaged, but we got off with only a couple thousand dollars of lost items and the inconvenience of having everyone crowded upstairs for a few months while the landlord rebuilt the downstairs. Overall, we got very lucky.

SSD: How do you remain competitive and core—or are they one in the same for Rome? JR: We don’t spend a lot of time thinking about remaining “core.” There are some key values that we hold dear that may or may not be associated with someone’s idea of “core.” We like first chairs. We like jump lines. We like backcountry lines. We like carving corduroy. We like rail progression. Our headquarters is 30 minutes from a lift that opens at 8:00 for these reasons. It would make zero sense for Rome to be located 1.5 hours or more from a lift and maybe ride on weekends. SSD: Rome is renowned for its killer graphics—what inspires the art found throughout your lines? JR: We’ve always placed a high priority on snowboard art in general—from T-shirts to posters to bindings to boards. Art has almost always been a key element of snowboarding, so when we launched we felt strongly about doing unique and powerful stuff on product. Through the 10 years of Rome, we’ve had a few very talented art directors for the boards, including the current one, Mike Paddock, who has been doing some Rome art for eight or nine years. The creative drive starts with him. Paddock then brings in outside artists to go with his internally created art. The inspiration comes from snowboarding, skateboarding (which pre-dates snowboarding in having an amazing art history), what is happening in art, and what fits with the different riders that exist in the world. SSD: What’s your take on snowboarding having a heavier Olympic presence with the addition of slopestyle? JR: As for having slopestyle, if snowboarding is going to be in the Olympics, it should have had slopestyle from the start. It should have slopestyle before anything else because slopestyle is the dominant type of progressive snowboarding that you see on mountains all over the world. It, more than anything, is representative of what snowboarding is. So it’s about time for slopestyle. The fact that it has taken so long shows how clueless and inept the FIS and IOC are at running snowboarding in the Olympics. SSD: What will be the “Next Big Thing” in snowboard? JR: As you’ll see in our 2013 line, we think the next big thing in snowboard design is our NoHang-Ups 3D camber profiling. More than any other camber out there, No-

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Rome co-founder Josh Reid at the home offices in Waterbury, Vt.


Top Trends

/ Snowboard Rental

Rental offerings staying the course with rocker, hybrid constructions Burton promotes Progression, new graphics, longevity. Like the sport of snowboarding itself, snowboard rental product goes through periods of rapid change and evolution, and then tends to steady out for a few years as consumers and rental operators adopt and test out new technologies. We’re still currently in the midst of such a plateau today, as rocker-construction and hybrid-rocker construction snowboards dominate manufacturer product lines, and rental operators continue to integrate the new boards into their fleets. New board products this year include the replacement of the Cruzer rental board with the Progression in the Burton line, as well as a new graphics theme for the line. Flow is adding more kids sizes in its rental board line, and a new company, Contract snowboards, is entering the market as a performance-oriented demo/ rental option. Bindings also remain largely still at status quo, although we’re starting to see incremental changes. Five to eight years ago, most manufacturers were pouring R&D dollars into quick-change binding technology and introducing it to market as part of fully revamped rental lines. Today, many of those manufacturers are still running the same binding tech with minor upgrades, content to let board tech steal the spotlight for a few years. Salomon, however, has introduced a new SP binding to its line, to offer dual price points. And Flow has upgraded its patented strap and updated the look of its Pi rental binding to better match its board graphics. And in boots, the story has also stayed consistent: quick lace or no-lace (BOA) technology is fully deployed across all brands, with most operators reporting satisfaction, and customer satisfaction, with the no-lace trend. Salomon, however, reports increased demand for traditional laces, and as such, is offering a new “Faction Fatlace” boot into the rental line. Meanwhile, Atomic and Nidecker are exiting the snowboard rental biz.

What’s New Most significantly, on the R&D side, Burton is set to premiere a new board feature that has been almost eight years in the making, reports longtime Burton resort program manager Shaun Cattanach. Appropriately, the tech is aimed at longevity: it replaces the base material and sidewall at the four main contact points of the boards with urethane. This is designed to prevent catastrophic damage when a board is dropped or falls over when leaned up against the wall; the urethane can absorb the impact of a jarring fall without reverberating through the board’s construction. It’s invisible to the naked eye, and allows the edge to microscopically shift when impact oc-

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▲ Burton Progression

▲ Contract Women’s Citizen Shred

curs, absorbing the shock, Cattanach explains. “It was a long hard road to get here. We’ve been testing different theories and construction methods for at least eight years, probably closer to 10,” he says.

Trends The concept of high-end demos and in-line retail tech in rental product remains strong. “Riders who have typically purchased their snowboard product are now starting to look to the resorts for not only the basic rental product but also a better ‘step up’ snowboard solution,” says Mike Poole, national sales manager, rental, HEAD Snowboards, which features the Tribute R Rocka in its line for adults looking for a bit more tech in their rental gear. The current market environment has also spurred a new entrant into the rental snowboard space. Contract Snowboards, distributed by Utah-based Snow Distributors, is targeted at demo or performance rental packages. The boards feature a proprietary tech, called 3D Snake Transition, which creates a torsionally stiff, but still responsive board, designed to provide grip and pop at the same time. “The idea is to offer a board loaded with technology for experienced riders to try before they buy,” explains Mike Von Lunen, U.S. sales manager for Snow Distributors. The trend is one that Rossi is also paying attention to, with its inline retail board technology integrated into its Trick Stick Amp Tech rental snowboards, featuring the same hybrid rocker-camber construction used in its full retail line.

▲ Flow Revolve Yellow Stock

Both Burton and Flow echo the trend in regard to rental board graphics, taking the stand that despite theft concerns for resort operators, customers want retail-inspired graphics. “Retail driven graphic products enhance customer pride in their gear [and] encourages the feeling that they became a snowboarder,” Flow says in its brand value proposition. —Katie Bailey

From SAM’s Rental Buyer’s Guide

Read more stories like this—covering new products, systems and technology--in SAM’s Rental Buyer’s Guide at saminfo.com/marketplace. And at the SIA Snow Show, attend the 1 p.m., Friday, Jan. 27, discussion on “How Rocker Technology is Rocking the Rental World” at the Rental World booth.


www.1Love.org


Spotlight

/ TOp Retailers and Reps

America’s Top Retailers & Reps Every year, SIA honors reps and retailers who stand out from the crowd with its SnowSports Rep and Retailer of the Year Awards, recognizing those on the front line who go beyond the call of duty in increasing snow sports sales and growing participation. Rep accolades are culled from more than 800 nominations from leading retailers across North America, while retailer awards are selected by suppliers and reps and chosen for their contribution to the growth of snow sports, promotional and marketing techniques, and overall success. Each day of the SIA Snow Show, Snow Show Daily takes a closer look at four of this year’s winners in each category. Retailer of the Year:

Trollhaugen Ski & Board Shop Since 1950, the Trollhaugen Ski & Board Shop at Trollhaugen Ski Resort in Dresser, Wis., has provided the Minneapolis/St. Paul region with a full-service facility offering equipment, clothing and accessories at competitive prices. While all that nearly changed in May 2008 when a fire gutted the facility, now it’s back and better than ever, with a high enough focus on service to earn SIA’s Retailer of the Year award. “Our job is simple,” says manager John Wright. “It’s to make everyone who walks through our door feel like they’re the most important person on the planet.” That tactic has resulted in robust sales, especially in a

down economy. Sales last year were up 30 percent over the year before, and Wright says that with an early Oct. 29 opening, they’re on track to see sales increase even more. Wright took over managing the 2,000-square-foot store right after the fire. That’s also when the resort took back the store’s ownership from an independent operator. Six months after flames tore through the facility it reopened in December 2008 selling only accessories. The next year it offered hard and softgoods. Now, with seven employees, all of whom average 20 years of ski industry experience, Trollhaugen offers a complete line of goods and services, including such brands as Descente, DNA, Atomic, Ripzone, Powder Room, Volkl, Marker, Salo-

mon, Burton, Ride, 5150, Smith, Scott, Giro and more. With a strong social push from the resort, Trollhaugen also uses the Internet to help market to its customers, with Wright planning to launch an e-commerce portal sometime in the near future. Such dovetailing with the resort works well for the operation. While the resort handles bulk rentals, the ski shop offers high-end rentals and demos. It also piggybacks on such specials as the resort’s All Night Skiing program, staying open longer to facilitate guests; hosts an employee ski exchange with Aspen, taking trips out to the Rockies twice a year; and is active in local youth programs like its Junior Development team. Located at the front line of blisters, the store also prides itself on its boot-fitting. “I’m the first person people see when they have sore feet,” says Wright. “They come to us right off the mountain. We specialize in making people’s feet feel better.” But it all boils down to value and service. “It’s just a question of offering world-class product and great service,” Wright says. “We don’t see the level of price resistance that you might expect. Because we’re at a resort most people expect us to be expensive, but we’re not. People are willing to spend if they see good value.”


ReP of the Year:

Brad Decker

Brands: Nordica, Tecnica, Helly Hansen, Never Summer and adidas

Brad Decker

Trollhaugen Ski & Board Shop

Brad Decker has been in snow sports since the days of Jetsticks and Lange Banshees. Skiing since age 3, where he started at Virginia’s Homestead Ski Resort, he got his start repping six years ago, after first serving as a buyer and manager for Virginia’s Ski World. “I was always a huge fan of Nordica and when I heard it was open in my zone I went after it hard,” he says. “I fought for the line and they gave me a shot.” Decker’s tenacity in pursuing what he feels will work in his market continues today. “Later, I called Never Summer and begged for the line,” he says. “At first they laughed at me, but I was persistent and they gave me a shot, too.” All this has resulted in a lifestyle that suits him to a T. “I love not having to sit in an office or cubicle and getting to wear denim and a tee every day,” he says. “I also love working with great retailers and shop employees, and innovative brands and gear.” Still, he’s noticed changes in the business. “Ten years ago a rep had one brand as an independent rep,” he says. “Now that dynamic has changed.” Decker adds that he also thinks retailers need to continue to communicate better with reps to make both of their lives easier. Most importantly, he says, retailers need to bring

energy and creativity into their stores. “Retailers need to be proud of their store, keep it modern and make consumers want to shop there,” he says. “The key is to keep it fresh and upbeat and make it a fun enviThe SIA Awards ronment—invest in and update fixtures, lighting honor theand industry’s POP.” An example of a retailer doing a goodbest. job at this, he adds, is Peter Glenn in Delray, Fla. “That store is always hopping,” he says. “Music is jamming, videos are playing, and they have an upbeat staff and awesome merchandising.” Another is Knoxville, Tenn.’s Board Room. “Nathan (Phillips) is another great example,” he says. “He keeps his store fun and upbeat. The store looks amazing and is always freshly merchandised.” He also gives a nod to the ski boot merchandising practices of Charlottesville, Va.’s Freestyle. “They use eye-level glass cubes and showcase how $750 boots ought to be seen,” he says. He adds that the retailer to rep relationship is a two-way street, with reps needing to support retailers as well. The most important thing is to return emails and phone calls promptly, he says, no matter how trivial. “Show up on time, keep your head down and work hard,” he says. Still, he feels the whole rep/retailer/manufacturer relationship is as solid as ever. “Our industry is very serviceoriented and I don’t see much changing,” he says. “The model works...why mess it up?” —Eugene Buchanan

1800-770-8750 - Johna@rocesusa.com - SIA Denver Show - Booth # 4174 Untitled-2 1

1/14/10 1:54:34 PM


Top trends

/ new exhibitors

Mammut, Soul Poles, Footbalance

About 100 brands, from emerging to established, hit the SIA Snow Show floor this week as New Exhibitors. Here are three of the newcomers and their stories. Mammut: Big on backcountry From farming roots to avalanche gear Not many SIA Snow Show exhibitors have roots in the agriculture industry. Mammut does. Founded in 1862, it has evolved from farming to sailing, mountaineering and skiing. Most now know Mammut for its alpine climbing gear. Gribbin Loring, the company’s marketing services coordinator, points out that climbing and mountaineering go hand in hand, as can mountaineering and backcountry skiing. “We’ve had avalanche gear as far as shovels, probes and beacons for a while,” he says. “We’ve just been gradually adding products to that line.” And the recent spike in backcountry popularity has encouraged Mammut’s ski endeavors all the more. Mammut has made avalanche beacons for many years, launching the Pulse Barryvox back in 2006. Highly technical with numerous advanced features—digital/ analog beacon with three antennas, processor to handle multiple burials, fleet management tools, and other advanced functions for the pros—critics call the Pulse a bit too much beacon for casual users. In response, the company unleashed a simpler and easierto-use product last fall, the Element Barryvox. With only a single button, “it’s taking many of the real benefits of the Pulse, but making it into a package that is extremely simple and easy to use,” Loring says. The Element Barryvox’s simplicity also makes it more buyer-friendly at $350, compared to the Pulse’s $490. Fresh to SIA are five new styles of Mammut’s R.A.S. Removable Airbag System, which Loring says is “one of the lightest, if not the lightest” airbag on the market. Unlike others in the industry, Mammut modified the bag to fit on an already popular backpack, Loring says. Bonus: the bag is removable, able to fit on any of Mammut’s R.A.S.-ready packs ranging from 18-45L. mammut.ch; Booth #3368

It’s all about Soul (Poles) Retro brand races back to the future Soul Poles, the creation of two former U.S. Ski Team members and their coach, is bringing bamboo back. “It feels really good to have a piece of bamboo in your hand versus a piece of aluminum and metal,” says Bryon Friedman, the ex-U.S. Ski Team member, former Dartmouth student and current Soul Poles’ sales, marketing and branding specialist. “The connection is there.” A renewable resource, bamboo can grow to its peak height of 60 feet in just 90 days, and it needs only minimal water and no pesticides to grow. Friedman cites the snow industry’s considerable use of metals, plastics and aluminum as the inspiration for Soul Poles. “We thought it’d be really interesting ... to offer something different, something

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more eco-friendly,” Friedman says. Soul Poles use “as many renewable resources as we can,” Friedman says. The grips and baskets are fashioned from recycled plastic, the insert tips are made from 80 percent recycled aluminum, and the straps come from a hemp/recycled poly fabric. An artist uses low VOC water-based paints to provide a splash of color, and the poles are ready to go. How does bamboo compare to metal in durability? After a third-party strength test comparing the bamboo shafts to an aluminum variety, “We came back 25 percent stronger,” he says. Friedman sat down last October with former teammate Erik Schlopy and their exU.S. Ski Team head coach Phil McNichol and “decided to embark on this together,” Friedman says. They sifted through hundreds of species of bamboo to find one that performed well in a cold climate, maintaining its stiffness, but allowing some flex. Since the prototype’s debut last March, Friedman says the concept has “been gaining steam, taking on a life of its own.” soulpoles.com; Booth #4574

Footbalance forward Company expands from running base Footbalance customizable insoles are ready to head from the street to the snow. Having planted its flag in the running industry back in 2003 when the brand was based in Finland, the company’s new president, Matt Kaplan, saw the ski and snowboard industry as its next market. Unlike some custom orthotics, there’s no significant lag-time and the price tag, at $79.99, is palatable. Retailers must invest in the Footbalance system, a $1,500 initial purchase that includes a laptop with the Footbalance software, the insole heater, a platform and webcam that allow the retailer to determine key fit issues (like arch height and supination/pronation), foot cushions that enable the molding process and 43 pairs of moldable insoles. The process takes only 10 minutes, during which time the insoles are heated to 200 degrees—which makes them pliable, but not burn inducing—and the customer rocks forward and backward on the insoles while the retailer holds the insole in place. After another minute or two when the insoles have fully cooled, the customer is all set. “It’s quick, easy and simple, which is something a retailer would adopt,” sales operations manager Karen Smith says. footbalance.com; Booth #223


HELMETBANDITS_DAY1.pdf

Top Trends

/ Snowshoes

Snowshoe sales making strong tracks at the specialty sports cash register Lighter weight shoes meet needs of more discerning customers.

If snowshoe sales are any indication, snow sports aren’t all about gliding down. According to SnowSports Industries America (SIA), snowshoe sales are up 21 percent in units and 20 percent in dollars market wide, and up nearly 25 percent in dollars at the specialty shop level to $7.1 million, representing 6 percent of all accessory sales. Leading the charge in several years of double-digit participation increases are new designs making them lighter and more versatile than ever. “The message that snowshoeing is easy to do, affordable, and keeps you active all winter is increasingly relevant to the winter sports consumer,” says Graham Gephart, global brand manager for K2 Outdoor, whose snowshoe brands include Tubbs and Atlas. “There is no single snowshoe customer type out there, and the category is generating more momentum across each type of customer.” Keeping cryptic about its newest offering, Crescent Moon Snowshoes (crescentmoonsnowshoes.com) says, “the weight is over.” At just 2 lbs. per pair, the brand’s newest, and still-to-be-named model at press time, takes weight savings to new heights and has “the potential for adding a new approach to the snowshoe category,” says president Jake Thamm. Thamm knows a thing or two about lighter weights, as Crescent Moon recently received the 2011 IQ (Innovation Quotient) award in the outdoors and sporting category from the Boulder Country Business Report for its lightweight SPL binding. Its focus: single pull loop bindings that secure your foot in all directions; a tear drop platform shape for natural stride and optimal flotation; and three claw traction for control from toe to ball to heel. Tubbs (tubbs.snowshoes.com) debuts its Mountaineer here at the SIA Snow Show, with the new Pro-Step Frame ($259.95) combining a continuous frame bend with longer, lower rise for improved ergonomics and flotation without sacrificing packability. The lower height nose packs easily, the tail bend reduces joint impact, and gender-specific frame shapes accommodate men and women’s gaits. It also comes with the R2 Revolution Response Pivot System ActiveLift 19º heel lift and binding, as well as the brand’s Anaconda/Python crampon system and SoftTec decking. Atlas advocates its new Run ($209.95) snowshoe here at the Show, featuring new LightSpeed bindings which shave weight, and also provide precise foot placement on technical

“The message that snowshoeing is easy to do, affordable, and keeps you active all winter is increasingly relevant to the winter sports consumer.” snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2

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trails and maintain foot circulation for warmth. Durable Speed V-Frames allow for all-out stride while maximizing flotation, lightweight aluminum Twin-Trac toe crampons and heel cleats offer traction on ice, and spring-loaded suspension keeps shoers light and fleet of foot. As Gephart says, “Just like with running shoes, lighter weights and new performance features continue to resonate with many consumers in this category.” It’s the same kind of thinking that propelled Redfeather (redfeather.com) to introduce its new Trek ($169.95) snowshow here at the Show. Marketing an aggressive approach to fitness, hiking, running and backpacking, the Trek features a powder-coated, 6000 Series Aluminum V-Tail frame design for mobility and speed; a Live-Action hinge that lifts the tail; stainless steel Hawk crampon system with an aggressive toe and heel design for stability; TX 35 Rip Stop decking for puncture and abrasion resistance; and injection-molded, threestrap Summit bindings with a “stand up” design for easy egress and molded sides for lateral stability. The Trek 25 weighs 4 lbs. and the slightly larger Trek 30 weighs 4.3 lbs. —Eugene Buchanan

Crescent Moon Snowshoes

Come see the new 2012 collection of beautiful Nordic sweaters, weatherproof jackets, classic ski hats and skinsoft baselayer. Authentic quality from Norway Since 1879 SIA Booth: 773 www.daleofnorway.com Customer service: (800) 441-3253

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▲ Redfeather Trek

▲ Tubbs Mountaineer ▲ Atlas 1213 Run

Meet Olympic skier, National Champion and television commentator Kaylin Richardson Booth 773


Women’s Skis

/ Top Trends

Banner Snow Show for women’s ski introductions Wider waistlines continue to help the cash register ring. Last season, manufacturers took a breather in introducing new women’s models, but they’ve come charging out of the gates for 2012-13. As well they should: According to SIA market research, women’s ski sales exceeded $70 million this past season. Almost a third of all units sold were women-specific skis (the numbers were the same in 2009-10), roughly in line with participation levels, and pre-season sales show that two of the top 10 best-selling skis are women’s models. Breaking down models by waist width shows where the true new trend lies: Between 80-95 mm, preseason sales of women’s skis are up 154 percent, and up 125 percent between 95-110 mm. “The trend in the market everywhere is towards wider skis and wider-waisted skis for women, and it’s an area we feel has great opportunity,” says Jed Duke, director of product and promotions for Blizzard/ Tecnica. “Traditionally, really wide skis have been difficult to ski, but with new technology they’re easier to use both in powder and in harder and variable snow.” In step with that trend, Atomic introduces a new powder ski called the Millennium (130-110-122), with Atomic’s Pop Rocker 10 profile and Full Step-down sidewall construction. An updated Cloud collection includes wider waists and all-mountain rocker profiles. Blizzard’s new line of women’s Free Mountain skis includes three new waist widths between 88-108 mm, and all feature Blizzard’s Flipcore technology, such as in the Dakota (134-108-122) and Samba (131-98-116). Dynastar lightens the weight of established models by up to 20 percent in the Exclusive line with the Xpress integrated ski/binding system, designed to reduce the ski’s weight by 20 percent, such as in the Exclusive Paradise (132-98-120), which returns with Rossi’s Exclusive Rocker. Elan adds the new Amphibio Inspire (127-78107), while the New Wavelight technology expands on Waveflex with sidewalls that provide extra heel support, thinned out cores and an early rise rocker profile. Fischer launches a new women’s freeride powder twin called the KOA 110 (139-110-124), with freeski rocker technology. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the KOA 78 (12-78-107) features all mountain rocker. HEAD introduces a new line of women-specific models, lead by the MYA 8 (130-84-112), which feature the brand’s new ERA 3.0 technology, as well as women’s specific construction that places denser wood over the edges and lighter wood in the core’s center. K2 shifts its organization of skis into three different categories based on rocker types and waist widths into all-

▲ Völkl Essenza Charisma

▲ Atomic Millennium

▲ Nordica Hell’s Belles

▲ Rossignol S7

▲ Elan Amphibio Inspire Fusion

▲ Salomon Rockette

“The trend in the market everywhere is towards wider skis and widerwaisted skis for women is an area we feel has great opportunity.” mountain, adventure and twin tip. The new SuperGlide (127-80-109) has K2’s All-Terrain rocker and a women-specific Bioflex core. The Empress (113-85-104)—a women’s park ski—has Jib Rocker and a lightweight Bioflex 2 Core. Nordica’s new women’s collection contains five new models, four favoring sidecountry usage. The Hell’s Belles (132-90-118) has early rise camROCK technology and wii-Core technology, which reduces the ski’s weight by 25 percent. As a sister to the Patron, the new La Nina (143-113-132) has high-rise camROCK technology that combines a rockered tip and tail with camber underfoot. Rossignol’s Temptation line continues with vector model the 88 (135-88-124), designed with Rossi’s AutoTurn rocker and Extended Sidecut. The S-series freeride

skis return with the S7W (140-110-118) and narrower S3W, both with Powder Turn Rocker, Centered Sidecut and wood cores. As the widest of four in Salomon’s first fully rockered women’s skis, the Rockette (128-108-121) features a full woodcore and Salomon’s Twin Rocker. The all mountain unique BBR line includes new women’s models such as the Sunlite (133-79-98), with the recognizable V-shape, semi-twin tip tail and light density core. Volkl’s new Essenza series expands on Bio-Logic—a women’s specific construction that reduces stress on the leg and knee—by adding tip rocker for more maneuverability. The frontside-oriented Charisma (127-79-100) features XtraLight wood core and Extended Double Grip construction. —Krista Crabtree

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In today’s economic environment, everyone needs an edge. As your partner, it’s our job at SIA to help the industry find and maintain that edge. SIA Research offers an incredible range of reports and data designed to give you industry insights that will help you make smarter decisions to grow your business. Take a look at some of our top reports. RETAILTRAK™ & CROSS-INDUSTRY RETAILTRAK™ SIA and the Leisure Trends Group have worked together for over 30 years, providing the snow sports industry with exclusive retail market data detailed down to the model level for virtually all apparel, accessories and equipment sold in the snow sports market. SIA Members get free access to the RetailTRAK™ and Cross-Industry RetailTrak™ Dynamic Portals offering Topline Data and significantly reduced member rates for Brand Share Data for the many business situations that call for a deeper level of market data that measures sales at the brand and model level. SIA’s RetailTRAK™ Brand Share Reports subscription provides this level of data for six categories including: Alpine, Snowboard, Nordic, Apparel, Equipment Accessories, Apparel Accessories and a total of 36 product segments. The Cross-Industry RetailTRAK™ Topline Reports and Dynamic Portal in addition to snow sports data, provide access to monthly data in the Snow Sports*, Outdoor*, Running*, Paddle Sports* and Athletic Apparel* outdoor/leisure market segments. (*regional sales available)

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SNOW SPORTS MARKET INTELLIGENCE REPORTS The Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report is the most comprehensive report on snow sports sales, participation, and overall trends available in the snow sports market. It gives an unprecedented quantitative review of the most recent snow sports season. Three Report Versions Are Available: Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report – Total Market, Women’s and Kids.

SNOW SPORTS PARTICIPATION REPORT This report measures participation and participant demographics in the following winter sport disciplines: Alpine Skiing, Telemark Skiing, Freestyle Skiing, Snowboarding, Snowshoeing and Nordic Skiing.

SIA SALES AND ORDERS SURVEYS SIA Sales and Orders Surveys are conducted by Sports Marketing Surveys USA, with data submitted by participating SIA Member companies. Information is collected/coded by a CPA firm and is strictly confidential. These Surveys are only available to SIA companies that submit data.

SNOW SPORTS INSIDERS Snow Sports Insiders is an online consumer research survey system that enables SIA to examine, changing consumer behaviors, attitudes and perceptions. Hosted on www. snowsportsinsiders.com, Snow Sports Insiders panel members are pre-recruited U.S. residents, 16 years or older, that participate in snow sports. Snow Sports Insiders panel studies can be customized to meet your needs.

UNIFORM SURVEY Released each November, the results allow SIA to measure trends in uniform purchases and provide uniform suppliers and their sales reps with individual buyers at resorts.

RENTAL EQUIPMENT SURVEY Released each November, it also contains a list of more than 150 qualified rental equipment leads with full contact information.

Contact SIA Research at 703.556.9020 for information on other SIA Research products including: ››

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EASTERN | ED WRAY c: 401.743.8089 e: EWray@snowsports.org

EXPERT 2012


At the Show

/ Who & Where

Exhibitor List Company

Booth #

10th Mountain Division Foundation, Inc.................. LL 180s LLC...............................1555 1Love.org.............................. 206 241.......................................... 319 32 Degrees LLC................... 658 3point5.com.........................2529 4FRNT Skis, LLC.................4233 5150 Snowboards.............3914 540 Snowboards.................. 702 686..........................................3213 AAS - Anomaly Action Sports Inc.........................3935 ACADEMY Snowboard Co................3713 Active Helmets...................3166 Active Youth Alliance.......4503 adidas Outdoor.................1166 Advanced Racking Systems.............................4346 Aerial 7.................................. 912 AFRC-Outdoor Gear, Inc............................2755 Airblaster..............................3912 Alpina Sports Corp............2774 Alpine Valet™....................3358 AMATERRACE Inc.............. 333 Ambler..................................... 747 American Paper and Plastic Co................. 573 Anakie Outerwear............. 419 Analog Clothing.................2913 Anarchy Eyewear..............1311 Anon Optics.........................1918 Apex Sports Group LLC...3890 Arbor......................................1619 Arc’teryx Equipment Inc...1339 Arctix......................................2468 Armada..................................4229 Arnette................................3607 ARVA...................................4579 Ashbury Eyewear................ 517 Aspire Brands LLC............... 745 Astis Mittens.......................2566 Athalon Sportgear, Inc.....4261 Atlas Snow-Shoe Co.........3832 Atomic USA, Inc....4055/4155 Auclair Sports, Inc.............1355 AYG-All Year Gear...........2347 Backcountry Access, Inc........................3378 Backcountry Experience.......................4506 Backshop + Rental + Uniform...........4677 Backside Clothing Company........................4308 Bailo.....................................1361 Banshee Bungee.................. 510 Bataleon................................2208 Bearded Apparel................ 421 BEARPAW............................1032 Bergans of Norway............. 758 Bern Unlimited Inc............2119 Betty Rides............................. 317 Billabong USA.....................3619 Black Diamond Equipment Ltd................3428 Black Diamond Sportswear........................ 742 Blizzard Sport.....................3778 Bluebird Social Zone.......... 303 Board Retailers Association (BRA).........1714 Boardkor...............................1816 Bogs Footwear...................... 948 Bolle’......................................... 528 Bon Hiver Inc.....................2107 Bonfire Snowboarding Company..........................2902 Bonnier Mountain Group.................................3751 Booster Strap......................3472 Boulder Gear.......................2755 Bounceboards, LLC............ 214 brandbase Inc........................ 328 Brandwise.............................3745 Bridgedale............................3365 Briko.......................................3560 Buff Inc.................................... 311 BULA......................................1028 Burnstreet............................ 305 Burton Snowboards.......1913/2513 Buzrun Snowboards........... 702 C3.............................................2919

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Company

Booth #

Camtrol.................................... 316 Canada Goose....................... 536 CandyGrind ........................1108 CAPiTA Snowboarding....3219 Capix.......................................3702 Carrera..................................4274 Causwell................................3837 Celerant Technology Corporation....................... 938 CelsiusSnow USA, Inc......1715 CenterStone Technologies, Inc...........1964 CEP Compression Sportswear...................... 664 Chaos......................................2456 Cheetah Factory Racing (CFR)..................1908 Chill.................................... UL-25 Chuckbuddies...................2921 COAL Headwear................2919 ColdDist LLC.......................2319 COLDPRUF Base Layer.... 746 Colorado Ski & Snowboard Museum/Hall of Fame......LL Colorado Ski Country USA...................1747 Colorado Ski Country USA Central Lounge & Food Court.......................2132 Concrete Wave.................1810 Contour.................................4528 Contract Snowboards...... 314 COREUPT.COM.................4231 CoVelo Clothing Inc..........1163 Crash Pads............................2156 crazeeHeads inc................... 946 Crescent Moon Snowshoes.......................3733 Croakies................................1136 CSA - Leggett & Platt.......4135 CTR (Chaos Thermal Regulation)......................2456 Cushe Footwear...............1350 CW-X, Wacoal Sports Science Corp...................2941 DAKINE.................................2519 Dalbello Sports LLC..........4177 Dale of Norway, Inc............. 773 Darn Tough Vermont......2290 DC Shoes, Inc......................2102 Deeluxe...............................3920 Demon Snow.......................2209 Dermatone...........................3174 Descente North America, Inc....................... 345 Devils Thumb Ranch.......... 371 Dinosaurs Will Die Snowboards..................... 910 Discrete Headwear...........3267 DNA.......................................... 345 Dot Dash.............................1110 Double Diamond Sportswear........................ 742 DownUnders Footbeds...4240 DPS SKIS...............................2962 Dragon Alliance..................1519 Drake......................................3202 Dregs Distribution/ Indoboard........................2219 Drop MFG............................3034 DRYGUY LLC......................2453 Dye Precision...................... 515 Dynafit and Salewa...........3164 Dynastar Skis......................3770 EC3D Sports........................ 950 Echelon Snowboards......4207 Eggbar-Vise, LLC................3948 Eider........................................1039 EIRA........................................4624 Eisbar USA.............................. 947 Elan Blanc.............................1749 Elan Skis................................2774 Electric Visual....................... 619 ELM CO.................................1511 EMSCO Group....................2150 Endeavor/Air Hole............. 908 Entity Tall Tees..................4211 EORA - Eastern Outdoor Reps Assn....UL-20 Epic Pass.................................. 766 Erica Molinari...................... 564 Erik SportsWhiteWoods..................3576 Erin Snow..............................1263 Eurosocks International... 934 EVEREST AMERICA........... 669

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2 snewsnet.com

Company

*Subject to change

Booth #

EWSRA - Eastern Winter Sports Reps Assn.........UL-20 Expand A Sign USA...........4210 Faction Skis..........................4237 Fast Strap..............................3266 FATE Clothing....................... 969 Fat-ypus Skis.......................3361 FedEx/FedEx Office..........4619 Fera International Corp....1168 Firehouse LLC....................... 513 Fischer Skis US...................4568 Fits Sock Co.........................2464 Five Seasons........................1735 Flow Sport Inc/ Flow Snowboarding.....2921 Flux Binding Systems.......3716 FlyLow Gear........................3169 Footbalance System Inc........................ 223 Forum....................................... 919 Foursquare............................. 919 Fox 40 International Inc............3471 Fox River Mills, Inc............2564 Frends....................................1717 FTWO Snowboards........... 702 Fuel Clothing.......................1312 Full Tilt Boots......................3858 Function..............................4576 Fuse Optics.......................... 215 G3 Genuine Guide Gear Inc...............3565 Gabel Sports Group (North America) Inc.....3560 Garmont NA, Inc................3365 Geiger of Austria Inc........1775 GES Service Desk...................UL GHEEK...................................2940 Girl Powder, Inc................1608 Giro Sport Design..............3728 Glowboardz, LLC................ 512 GNU........................................1307 Goldwin.................................1733 GOODE Ski Technologies...................3356 GoPro....................................... 319 Gordini USA, Inc.................2834 Gorski Group.....................1258 Grabber Inc..........................4161 Grace Folly........................... 558 Grandoe................................2836 Grangers...............................3567 Grateful Outdoor Service (G.O.S.)............... 213 Grenade Inc.........................3907 G-Shock................................. 511 H2O Outdoor Gear..........4313 Halti Oy................................. 565 Happy Goat Lucky.............1558 Hart Ski Corporation.......2971 Head Wintersports...........3155 Heat Factory Inc................2791 Hell is for Heroes...............1564 Helly Hansen (US) Inc......1755 Helmet Band-ITS..............2451 HESTRA GLOVES, LLC..................2160 High Sierra Sport Co........3747 High Society Freeride Company LLC.................3917 Highgear................................3567 Highland Trading Company/Sportube......2890 Holden...................................3419 Holmenkol.US.....................4357 hOme Swiss Watches.....3015 Homeschool Snowboarding................3211 HootieBrown Designs, LLC..................1466 Horizon Agency, Inc Outdoor Sports Insurance..........................2790 Hot Chillys............................3350 Hotfingers Gloves.............1776 Hotronic USA, Inc..............3355 House of Marley................. 703 i.N.i. Cooperative............... 206 Icebreaker USA.................... 542 Icelandic Design................... 559 Icelantic Skis........................3368 Impact Canopies USA......1962 Implus Corporation..........3567 INA International, Ltd..........................3502/3702 Information Booth..............LL-2

Company

Booth #

ISHA - International Skiing History Assn............LL Itasca Footwear by C.O. Lynch Enterprises........... 734 Jacob Ash/Schuessler........ 750 Jambu.................................... 593 Jones Snowboards............2910 Joshua Tree Skin Care...... 591 Joystick..................................3837 K2 Skis......................3929/3933 K2 Snowboarding..............3922 Kali Protectives................4213 Kamik div of Genfoot America............. 570 Karbon..................................... 175 Karvena Helmets and Goggles..................... 314 Kastle GmbH.......................3775 KD Kanopy, Inc.................4164 Khombu.................................1373 Killtec NA Inc......................2168 Killy.........................................1042 Kiss My Face LLC...............1490 KJUS USA............................... 576 KLINT.....................................4339 KneeBinding, Inc................3570 Kombi Ltd.............................3050 Komperdell..........................3773 Krimson Klover..................1348 Kuhl Clothing......................2164 Kulkea, LLC........................3675 KUUsport Mfg. Ltd...........4163 KVZ Sports, LLC.................1035 Kwik Tek, Inc........................3847 La Sportiva N.A. Inc...........4246 Lamar........................................ 506 LandYachtz........................1707 Lange Ski Boots..................3770 Launch Pad.........................3739 Launch Snowboards........4513 Laundromat.........................1161 Lazer Sport.........................4516 L-Bow Mittens...................... 952 Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month......UL-24 Leisure Trends Group......1750 LEKI USA, Inc......................3160 Lib Tech..................................1507 Lib Tech NAS (Skis!)..........4235 Liberty Mountain...............2970 Liberty Skis...........................3855 Life-Link................................3365 Line Skis.................................3655 Liquid Boardwear..............4107 Liquid Image Co, LLC........2421 Little Hotties Warmers.... 3567 LODGESOXX™.................... 673 Loki..........................................1364 Long Advance International Co, Ltd...1368 Lorpen North America Inc......................1764 LTD Snowboards.................. 506 Lucky Bums Inc...................2770 M. Miller.................................. 962 Madshus..............................3732 Majesty Skis......................... 314 Mammut Sports Group USA.....................3563 Manzella Products............3134 Mariner Business Solutions............................. 764 Marker Ltd............................. 255 Marker Sport and Travel Bags.......................4165 Marker USA.........................4557 Marmot Mountain, LLC................1446 MasterFit Enterprises.....3742 MeCo Designs.....................1464 Megaphone US.................1559 Mental....................................1774 Mervin Manufacturing..1307/1507 MFD........................................4238 Millennium Three (M3)...3502 Mitchie’s Matchings........... 373 Molehill Mt. Equipment, Inc.......2090 Moment Skis........................4239 Montana Sport North America Inc........3942 Moon Boot...........................3678 Moon Shadow.....................2456 Morrow Snowboards.......3922 Mount Tec Gloves..............2364

Note: New Exhibitors are in bold

Company

Booth #

Mountain Hardwear, Inc...1046 Mountain Shades...............3434 Mountain Uniforms............ 632 MRA - Midwestern Reps Assn.......................UL-20 MTN Approach...................3921 MWSRA - Midwest Winter Sports Reps Assn..................................UL-20 Mystery Ranch...................4311 NARGEAR............................ 216 NSSRA - National Ski & Snowboard Retailers Assn ...................................4577 NSAA - National Ski Areas Assn.....................UL-23 NSP - National Ski Patrol........................UL-22 NBS - Nation’s Best Sports........................ 267 Native Eyewear..................3142 NEFF.......................................3206 Neve Designs......................1746 Never Summer Industries.........................1513 New Wave Enviro Products...........................4355 NEWSR - New England Winter Sports Reps, Inc..........................UL-20 Niche Snowboards............1607 Nidecker USA, Inc.............2910 Nike.........................................3622 Nikita Clothing USA.........3107 NILS............................1736-1742 Nirvanna Designs................ 762 Nitro Snowboards............... 907 Nobis......................................2809 Nomis....................................... 328 Nordica USA........................4169 North Star Fur & Trading.... 590 Northside by Triple T Trading Ltd...................1669 Northwave...........................3202 NOW Snowboarding......2910 NXTZ......................................2423 Oakley Inc................1132/1328 ON3P Skis..........................4305 Oneballjay............................1512 O’Neill....................................1522 OnTheSnow.com..............4578 Optic Nerve.........................3434 ORAGE..................................1728 O-range USA.....................1367 Ortovox USA Inc................3167 OSBE USA Inc.....................3245 Outdoor Research............... 739 Outdoor Technology.......... 623 Outer Edge Industries....4515 OZ Snowboards.................. 211 Pajar........................................1468 Panda Hats.........................4500 Parajumpers........................1564 Patagonia Inc.......................1823 Pepper’s Performance Eyeware, Inc....................3424 Peter Grimm Headwear.........................2915 Pieps ......................................2970 Pinnacle Designs................2568 PISTIL.....................................2254 Planet Earth Clothing......4120 POC USA LLC......................1023 Pocket Disc.......................... 306 Point Zero Canada............. 332 point6 LLC............................1451 Poivre Blanc.........................3042 POLARMAX.........................2347 POW Gloves........................1907 Powderhorn.........................1751 Precision Mountainwear/ Helix Snowboardwear......748 Press Room..........C Mezzanine Promotive.com...................2529 ProRider..............................1713 Pro-Tec...................................3408 PSIA-AASI.............................3974 PTL Enterprises.................. 569 Pull-In..................................1346 Pulse.......................................1223 Pyour Performance Sport Tights.....................2452 Quickpoles, LLC.................3737 Quiksilver Inc......................1202 R.E.D.......................................1919 Rab..........................................3571

Company

Booth #

Rawik......................................2755 RC Products......................... 315 Recco Systems Ltd.............UL-1 Reclaim Project..................3317 Recon Instruments Inc...... 423 Redfeather Snowshoes...3580 Regina Imports LLC..........1573 Registration Desk................LL-1 Rep The Zip.......................... 422 reusch SnowSports.........2250 Ride Snowboards.......3715/3914 Ripzone / Powder Room.4216 Roces USA, Inc....................4174 Rocky Mountain Sunscreen........................2528 Rocky Mountain Underground RMU.....4356 Rome Snowboard Design Syndicate............. 915 Rossignol..................3665/3765 Rossignol Apparel.............3861 Roxa North America.........2960 Roxy........................................1502 Ruffolo Enterprises, Inc... 2527 S4® Optics...........................1313 Sabine Sommeregger........ 566 SABRE....................................2310 Salomon Snowboards......2502 Salomon USA..........4047/4147 Santana Canada...............1373 SCARPA North America, Inc.....................3171 Schure Sports U.S.A., Inc............................ 175 Scott Sports............3037/3337 Screamer................................. 755 Sector 9...............................3406 Seirus Innovation...............2844 Serengeti Eyewear.............. 528 Sessions LLC........................2507 Shenzhen Pengyifa Industrial Co LTD........... 331 Shifty...................................... 592 Show Management Office................A Mezzanine Shred Optics........................3935 Shred Ready Inc.................. 312 Sidas.....................................4572 SKEA, LTD.............................2469 Ski Kare, Inc.......................3578 Ski Retriever......................3666 Ski Tops/Chaos/Moon Shadow/CTR...................2456 SKIHOOKUPS Inc............3579 SKILOGIK.............................3468 SkiMetrix, Ltd......................3472 SkiSkootys............................3390 Skullcandy, Inc....................2202 SkyTech Sport, Inc............. 769 Slide-On..............................3472 Slytech Protection............3935 SmartWool Corporation.....................2763 Smith Optics...........2828/3128 Smokin’ Snowboards........2907 Snapdry.................................3355 Sno Life, LLC......................... 738 Sno Skins Inc.......................... 966 Snow Angel............................ 942 Snow Dragons.....................2755 Snow Show Daily................. 264 Snow Sports Recycling Program...........................LL-20 Snowjam LLC......................... 702 SOS-Sportswear of Sweden..............................1737 Soul Poles...........................4574 Spacecraft.............................2807 Spark R&D............................1807 Special Blend......................... 919 Spice Snowboards............... 702 SpiritHoods........................1657 Sport Obermeyer Ltd.......2173 Sportcaster Company, Inc..................1223 Sports Accessories America Inc......................2760 Sportube...............................2890 Spy Optic, Inc......................3707 Spyder Active Sports, Inc.”......................1175 Spyderco...............................4162 STANCE.................................1813 Steez Gear LLC..................... 222 Stepchild Snowboards.....3902

Company

Booth #

Stockli Ski USA...................3363 Storm Creek Apparel.......1569 Strap Pad LLC......................2908 Stylesight.............................. 193 Subaru of America, Inc..... 531 Sun Valley Ski Tools Inc.....................3844 Sunbelt® Optic..................2125 Suncloud Polarized Optics................................2827 Sunice.....................................1766 Superfeet Worldwide Inc................2560 Surface Skis..........................3837 Swany.....................................1777 Sweet Turns LLC................1659 Swix Sport USA, Inc..........3174 SWRA - Southeastern Winter Reps Assn.......UL-20 Tailfish Sports...................... 212 Technine..............................2309 Tecnica USA.........................3778 Terramar Sports Inc............ 723 The North Face...................4219 The Program.......................... 919 The Soze Group..................4572 Therm-IC...............................4572 Thirty-Two Boots...............1909 Thorlo Inc..............................1561 Thule Inc................................3374 TOKO.....................................3190 Tomahawk International................... 420 Toyota Tsusho Corporation....................... 630 Transpack..............................3146 TransWorld Media.............. 302 Trespass USA......................... 261 TREW.....................................1611 Tubbs Snowshoes..............3833 Turbine Boardwear............. 706 Turtle Fur Group................1155 UCLEAR..............................4674 Ugg Australia.......................1051 Under Armour - MTN........ 728 Union Binding.....................3016 Unity Snowboard Manufacturing LLC......2916 USRA - United States Reps Assn.........UL-20 Uvex........................................3174 Vail Resorts Inc..................... 766 Vans.........................................3612 Venture Snowboards.......1711 VestPac................................. 310 Vew-Do Balance Boards................................. 307 Vintage Winter...................2490 VIRUS Action Sport Performance................... 313 VIST North America.........1361 Vittoria Industries North America...............3202 Voile Splitboards..............1710 Voile-USA...........................3269 Volcom..................................... 710 Volkl........................................4557 Volkl Performance Wear..................................4566 VonZipper.............................1012 VR2 Distribution Inc........1733 W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc..........RM 202 White Sierra.......................... 555 Wigwam Mills, Inc.............2460 Wind X-treme America, LLC...................4218 Winter Park Resort...........2366 Winter Trails......................UL-21 Wintersteiger Inc..............3342 Wrong Gear Inc.................... 603 WWSRA - Western Winter Sports Reps Assn .................................UL-20 Yaktrax...................................3567 Yeah For It Distribution.....................2208 YES Now Board..................2910 YRC........................................... 668 Zanheadgear & Bobster Eyewear............. 911 ZDAR Boot USA................. 567 Zeal Optics...........................3223 Zeon Corporation............2108 Zero/The Fairfield Line...1351 Ziener.....................................1733


Top News

/ Bootfitting

MasterFit Enterprises hits stride with dedication to bootfitting Training, testing help produce products designed to enhance fit, performance. Stop by the MasterFit Enterprises booth (#3739) and you’re likely to see Steve Cohen smiling. The company he and orthotic guru Jeff Rich started some 15 years ago— with the goal of improving the fit and thus performance of ski boots—is now a global entity whose programs and products reach into many corners of the boot world, including training, testing MasterFit and providing bootfitEnterprises’ ting aids. Steve Cohen says better MFE’s educational bootfitting arm, MasterFit Univermeans more sity, saw more than 500 boot sales. shop employees matriculate this past fall, drawing a record 120 attendees, including a dozen women, at its Mt. Snow, Vt., classes. MFU has been teaching courses in Australia for seven

years, and this fall 55 European retailers attended a firstever course in Kitzbuehel, Austria. Sponsored by SIA, MFU is supported by every major boot supplier, and this past fall it invited companies to display their products and send reps to the courses. The faculty reads like a “Who’s Who” of the country’s best bootfitters, including Jim Shaffner, Bob Gleason, Jack Rafferty, Greg Hoffman, Nick Blaylock and Bob Egeland, who also serves as MFE’s national sales manager. The curriculum’s five tracks are overseen by Mark Elling, who has taken the system Rich first developed and evolved it each year. Cohen immersed himself in the boot world while serving as an editor at SKI Magazine in the late 1980s, when he developed an on-hill boot testing program and called on Rich to assist. That grassroots involvement continues today. Led by Elling, MFE oversees the America’s Best Bootfitters/SKI-Skiing Magazine Boot Test in the spring at Mt. Bachelor, Ore. From all this boot work comes new ideas for products from visionary Rich’s “skunkwerks,” the U.S. Orthotics

Center in midtown Manhattan. The aids not only help fit boots, but make money for retailers, Cohen says. It began with the Instaprint BioGel Molding System and now includes the Instaprint insoles and posting shells that are integral to the system. MFE also offers Zapz, billed as the world’s only microwavable custom insole (plus the patented InstaForm Gel that’s inside); The Eliminator automoldable tongue; and EZ Fit, a new auto-adaptable scissor-fit insole. “This will be the first SIA Show where we have everything dialed in for EZ Fit,” Cohen says. Shops that commit to a comprehensive MFE program become members of its top-tier marketing group, America’s Best Bootfitters, which now includes more than 50 members. Cohen’s says MFE’s unflagging focus on boots and bottfitting is paying off. “Our feedback to major manufacturers has helped spur interest in designing boots for improved fit, balance and comfort,” says Cohen, who was gratified to see strong boot sales and energy in the fall at retail. “I think,” says Cohen, “that the industry is selling more boots because of better bootfitting.”

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Show News Jillian Miranda

Sew ready! RECLAIM competitors build snowboard jacket design At the SIA Snow Show’s version of “Project Runway,” three young designers are busily fashioning leftover fabric and trim—the stuff that’s otherwise landfill bound— into a men’s snowboard jacket at the RECLAIM Project (#3317). A panel of industry judges will select the winner Saturday, based on creativity, functionality, sales appeal and best recycling use. Watch Snow Show Daily for more information on this event sponsored by SIA, 686 and Malakye.com (not pictured, Jonathan Aguon). —Cindy Hirschfeld

Photos by morgan varon

Mervin Mfg. Spawns Waterboarding Division Little known fact: Mervin (makers of Lib Tech, Gnu, and Roxy snowboards) started as a surf company, according to co-founder Mike Olson. “We actually started by selling surfboards before snowboards in the early 1980s,” Olson recalls. “Surf shaping paid the bills in the beginning.” Three-plus decades later they’re returning to those roots by launching the Lib Tech Waterboarding Division, featuring three series and 14-plus shapes. According to Olson, “The line-up is very simple for retailers and surfers to understand.” Lib Tech surfboards are made in the U.S. just minutes from world-class surf, and Olson says they’ve focused on creating unique shapes and a durable product while setting a new standard for environmental responsibility. “We have completely redesigned the surfboard manufacturing process from the bottom up,” he explains. “Our new process shares nothing in common with contemporary surfboards or snowboard manufacturing. Over 30 intricate pieces go into each board, yet only the 10/24 stainless fin screws are status quo to the surf world.” —Mike Horn

Paul Fronckowiak

/ At the Show


Socks step up sales strategies More rack appeal with colors, eye-catching styles. A new breed of bright colors, fun prints and improved fit offer retailers a number of new sales strategies for selling socks next winter. For Fall 12, Point6 widely releases a compression sock that was available this year only through a co-branded style with bootfitter Surefoot. The company also innovated a method of whitening wool without bleach—which impacts durability—to introduce the first truly white wool for socks. A new flat-knit process allows Point6 to incorporate patterns on its ultralight ski socks without affecting the precision fit. SIA Snow Show rookie Darn Tough has jazzed up its entire line with well-received fresh prints and colors courtesy of designer Poppy Gall (co-founder of women’s apparel company Isis). “We had good socks, but until now they weren’t sexy,” says Mark Comcowich, director of sales and marketing. The Starry Night pattern, for example, was an instant hit, becoming one of the company’s top-5 sellers in just a year. Lorpen brings a pair of premium cold-weather socks that sold well in Europe to this side of the pond. The Ski Polartec Light incorporates areas of Polartec Power Stretch, while the Ultralight adds Power Dry, too.

FITS stakes it claim on what it calls full contact fit, which relies on a patented toe cup with four-way stretch, a patented heel-lock design and a wide cuff with extra compression for non-slippage. The Pro Ski style includes cushioning in the ankle, heel and shin areas, while the Light Ski style adds a toe cushion. SmartWool completely redesigned its popular PhD line—a two-year project—thanks to new knitting machines and extensive testing. The new socks have a virtually seamless toe and use patented ReliaWool, which incorporates additional merino for extra durability, in the ball of the foot and heel areas. A new compression-inspired fit system holds the sock in place, with two knit bands criss-crossing the top of the foot, another band underneath the arch and one around the ankle. SmartWool also introduces several ski-specific, actual compression socks. At Bridgedale, the zero-cushion Ultrafit continues to have strong sell-through, while Wigwam resurrects the Ultimax name to distinguish its parented moisturemanagement technology, included in new styles like the Snow Moto Pro. Fox River expands its merino/silk blend into more women’s styles, like the VVS MV Ski. —Cindy Hirschfeld

A rainbow of colors at the Darn Tough booth

Photos by morgan varon

Tk caption

Lighting the lamp at FITS

Patty Duke at Point6


No Longer Niche boutique brands buck the status quo

Phil Herbert, Online Brand Manager 4FRNT Skis. Holding the Cody Ski

There may not be an Occupy SIA movement (that we know of) but you will find a strong contingent of small independent ski brands shedding their image as small-scale, counterculture manufacturers and following the trends at the soul of the sport. First and foremost, that means responding to the needs of their athletes. At Faction, French ripper Candide Thovex wanted a green ski, so the brand developed D120 (142/112/132), a core material made from recycled PET plastic and flax fibers that is 20 percent lighter than the old wood core. “We are not building skis just to sell units. We are more concerned with quality and durability,” says Rex Wehrman, U.S. sales and marketing manager. Liberty skis has long touted the green factor of it’s bamboo cores but the material is strong and durable as well—and check out the brand’s new carbon/bamboo poles ($118). Liberty added titanal along the edges of its new Variant (145/113/132), which it hopes will appeal to the touring and sidecountry market segment. “It’s all about branching out,” says Liberty President and CEO Dan Chalfant about the evolution of boutique brands. “We wanted to appeal to a wider audience.” Core brand 4FRNT has gone full force after the back-

country market at the request of its athletes like Cody Barnhill who is also sponsored by Backcountry.com and helped design new skis like his Cody (129/102/124) and the touringminded Hoji (132/112/122). 4FRNT is also introducing skins to match the boards and debuting a 4FRNT-branded Tyrolia AT binding, the Adrenalin, and adjustable pole. Klint, in its second year at the Show, is likewise not trying to simply fill a trendy niche but instead to provide a full line including rentals and thin, rockered skis like the White Noise. That ability to adapt to the market pays off in creating retail partnerships and a solid business beyond the boutique-ness. “Rather than splattering the map with your product, you can take the time to develop a real partnership with your dealers,” says sales manager Alex Stegall. But the key to the success of boutique brands has been their ability to buck the traditional way of doing things. “We used to come to the Show as buyers,” says Reggie Charles, co-founder of High Society, which builds both skis and snowboards. “We wanted to find something new and different. Something that represented more of who we are—we bike, surf, kayak too. So now we make it in a way that gives out dealers margins and the consumers the product we know they want.” —Doug Schnitzspahn

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Around the Show

/ IMAGES Training Time

Alex Golunou of Sky Tech Sport gets a workout.

▲ Refreshing Company SIA’s Bob Orbacz reaches for a cold one at the Pre-Show VIP Media Party at the Opera House.

▲ Reclaim Project Jonathan Aguon aims to be the last designer drawing.

56

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2 snewsnet.com

▲ Clothing Time Cheri Overton and Joanne Galko of the National Ski Patrol ogling at the Patagonia booth.

▲ Tower of Power Mike Hattrup (right) shows off K2’s product—and new digs--to retailers.

Photos by (clockwise from top left) morgan varon (2); ben fullerton; morgan varon (2); ben fullerton

▲ After Hours Oakley skier Jake Blauvelt and date Kristin Herbert at Strata Bar, Hyatt


At the Show

/ Calendar

Events

What’s happening at the 2012 SIA Snow Show.

Daily Events 7:00AM-9:15AM | Room 103 | Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship Note: not available on Thursday

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #223 | Footbalance System Inc

whether private equity, bank financing, or an acquisition partner, the key to success is having a plan to attract the right kind of capital and structure. This commercial banker and transactional lawyer, who focus on outdoor industry companies will talk about funding options, structuring a deal, and mistakes to avoid. Chris Hazlitt, Gary Gomulinski

wallets and Generating Moohla from the Millennials This seminar provides an in depth look at the consumers of today. Dealing with critically important factors on why and how consumers spend money is the key for your business as it seeks generate revenue from the shopping public. Lynn Switanowski

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #755 | Screamer Coffee and Pastries for Retailers Screamer will be offering retailers complimentary coffee and pastries on Friday January 27th

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

FREE Foot Analysis and 100% Custom Footbeds Start your show with Fresh Feet! Show us your retailer badge and receive a FREE Foot Analysis and FREE pair of 100% custom made footbeds. Walking the show has never felt so good!

GLEN PLAKE SIGNING AUTOGRAPHS Glen Plake will be in the Screamer booth #755 for company photos and signing autographs for retailers!

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #4619 | FedEX

10:00AM-6:00PM | Booth #3739 | Launch Pad

Get Your Morning Jolt with Us at FedEx Stop By for a Free Cup of Java to Give Your Day a Jump Start. 9:00AM-5:00PM | Room 206 | SIA International Lounge Note: 9:00AM-1:00PM, Sunday

10:00AM-5:00PM | Booth #3742 | Masterfit Daily Instaprint Grinding & Ski Boot Evaluation Masterfit is passionate about making outdoor footwear fit better. Don’t miss this opportunity to fit your AT, Telemark, and Snowboard boots with Masterfit. Note: not available on Sunday 10:00AM-4:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Daily beacon searches with Tailgate Alaska and Tailgate BC crew Winner awarded at 6pm each day at BCE booth Note: not available on Sunday

10:00AM-5:00PM | Booth #2528 | Rocky Mountain Sunscreen

Free Skin Cancer Screening from the Colorado Skin Cancer Task Force Stop by Rocky Mountain Sunscreen Booth #2528 to sign up for this service as space is limited. Note: 9:00AM-3:00PM, Saturday. Not available on Sunday

10:00AM-5:00PM | Room 204 | SIA

Supporting Member Lounge Note: 10:00AM-1:00PM, Sunday

12:00PM-12:30PM | Booth #4162 | Spyder Co

DAILY PRODUCT GIVEAWAY Register to win a free Spyderco! We will draw a winner each day at 12 pm - does not need to be present to win. Complete registration card at booth 3860.

4:00PM-4:30PM | Booth #2451 | Helmet Band-Its

Daily Helmet Band-Its Giveaway “Play Safe! Look Great! For your chance to win Helmet Band-Its, the new fashion accessory for helmets, answer our daily safety trivia throughout the day @helmetbandits and Facebook. The first to answer correctly, wins! Stop by booth #2451 for official demos.

5:00PM-6:00PM | #Booth 2132 | SIA

SIA Daily Happy Hour Stop by grab a beer, catch up with old and new friends and enjoy the X Games. Sponsored by SIA, Aspen and Bud Light. Note: not available on Sunday

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience Happy Hour kegs arrive!! Note: not available on Sunday

6:00PM-7:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Daily beacon search winner awarded Note: not available on Sunday

All day | Winter X-Games

The Aspen/Snowmass Winter X Games viewing lounge will feature live action from Winter X Games in Aspen, CO throughout the week. The action will be featured live from the ESPN family of networks on large screen TVs in the center of the show floor. When there are no live events taking place replays from the previous action will be shown. Note: not available on Sunday

Friday, January 27, 2012 7:30AM-9:00AM | Mile High Ballroom | SIA

Growing Snow Sports Participation from a Woman’s Perspective What does the industry need to do to tap into the women’s powerful influence to get more people on snow. A panel discussion moderated by Kelly Davis, SIA. Breakfast served. 9:00AM-10:00AM | Room 302 Keys to Successful Fundraising If your company is seeking capital,

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2 snewsnet.com

10:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #755 | Screamer

Picabo Street Endorses Launch Pad Products Picabo Street will visiting the SIA show on Friday, January 27th to promote Launch Pad products, Hookease and Wedgease. She will be available throughout the day to speak with buyers and media about her endorsement of Launch Pad products.

10:00AM-4:00PM | “Grand Concourse, CCC” | Malakye.com

Snow Sports Industry Job Fair & Networking Event

10:30AM-11:30AM | Room 302 Get Paid Faster! All companies would like to know the secrets of how to get paid. We will review the easiest ways for you to better leverage your receivables and get paid faster! Debbie Golbach Samanta Allma 11:00AM-12:00PM | Room 301 Is your Retail Business Social? More than 63% of all US consumers spend time every day using social media, yet nearly 1 in 5 retailers surveyed said they do not see the value in social media. The gap comes from the lack of performance results that retailers are seeing with their social media efforts. Lynn Switanowski 12:00PM-1:00PM | Room 302 I’ve got a Facebook (Twitter/YouTube/Google+) Audience...Now What? You’ve invested in social media. You’ve laid a foundation, set up pages and accounts on all the key platforms where your potential customers Jessica Hamel 12:30PM-1:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience From Sidecountry to Backcountry with Mike Hattrup (lunch provided) 1:00PM-2:00PM | Room 301 Managing your business in the Google Cloud Tools to help your retail business flourish. Lynn Switanowski 1:00PM-2:00PM | Booth #4677 | BACKSHOP + RENTAL + UNIFORM

How Rocker Technology is Rocking the Rental World. The past, present, and future of rocker technology in rental business, and how it is transforming the experience for beginners and enthusiasts alike.

1:30PM-2:30PM | Room 302

Business to Business eCommerce for Suppliers, Reps And Retailers. New tools for quick and easy work flow. Using an iPad or PC? Want to place or track an order at 10:00 PM from a shop or mountain hideaway? Maybe you’d like auto-replenishment without doing a thing. The newest Web tools for B2B work flow connect reps, retailers and suppliers 24/7/365. Learn what’s available now and what is just on the horizon. Whit Johnson

3:00PM-4:00PM | Room 302 How Technology Can Enable Success in the SnowSports Marketplace NetSuite focuses on helping businesses like yours run better in the cloud integrating suppliers, customers and inventory without headaches and inefficiencies of disconnected and costly – in-house IT systems for finance, order and inventory management, ecommerce and more. Join us for an interactive discussion about how cloud technology from NetSuite can further enable your entire SnowSports business enabling you to run more profitably, faster, efficiently and manage ever-changing seasonal demand. Ranga Bodla, Scott Winborne 4:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #2464

FITS Socks Sells Socks to Benefit the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition Join FITS all day for this special sale! FITS Socks Co. is proud to announce their sponsorship of the Outdoor Industries Women¹s Coalition (OIWC) in conjunction with the launch of their new women¹s ski sock line. To celebrate both, FITS, the maker of the best fitting socks available, will sell discount premier ski socks, with Full Contact Fit TM. Justin Lichter

5:00PM-6:00PM | Room 301

Multi Generational Marketing- Getting Boomers to Bust out their

Further teaser screening http://www.tetongravity.com/further/

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #3434 | Optic Nerve

Beer/Goggle Fundraiser for SOS Outreach Buy a pair of fresh out of the oven 2012 goggles from Optic Nerve for $20, stick around for a beer, feel good knowing all proceeds will benefit SOS Outreach. (While they last).

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #1046 | Mountain Hardwear and MSP Films

Mountain Hardwear/MSP Films Partnership Launch Join the Mountain Hardwear and MSP Films crews to celebrate the latest and greatest partnership in the world of snow sports. Come raise a glass to incredible athletes and awe-inspiring skiing!

5:00PM-6:30PM | Booth #565 | Diamond Head Sports Inc. - HALTI

Arctic Journey with Halti Make a stop at booth 565 to take a deep breath, a sip of drink and reminisce the journey of Halti Ski Wear from Finland.

5:00PM-7:00PM | Booth #2921 | Flow Sports

Flow Fusion Join Flow Sports Friday January 27th, 5pm at booth 2921 as we introduce the world to the Future of Snowboarding Technology. Flow Fusion will include; Free Beer, Live Music by “The Misfritz” (a Misfits cover band) and free goodies for everyone. Snowboarding will change forever at SIA 2012 once the Flow Fusion is introduced to the masses. Flow has been “Sick Since ‘96” and will continue giving back to snowboarding into the future. Mike Basich

5:00PM-7:00PM | Room #401 | Christy Sports Rental Network

Grow Your Rental Business through Worldwide Exposure! Retailers and rental shops face ever growing financial challenges with competition, being heard in the market, and increasing rental revenues by acquiring new customers. The Christy Sports Rental Network (CSRN) provides a solution for all these obstacles. Helping qualified shops, wholesalers, agents and groups generate new rental business at no additional cost, while gaining exposure through established worldwide marketing initiatives. Come by and meet with the CSRN team, current affiliates and other prospective affiliates to get a better understanding of this program and the many benefits it has for you and your customers. Free form open house with complimentary beer, cocktails and appetizers

5:30PM-6:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Q&A with Jeremy Jones on backcountry travel and splitboarding

6:00PM | Central Food Court and Lounge on the Show Floor (booth number 2132) | SIA

SIA Awards Ceremony SnowSports Industries America will be presenting the Industry Achievement Award, the 2011 SIA SnowSports US Retailer and Rep of the Year Awards, and the Canadian SnowSports Rep of the Year Awards. We will also have a few kegs on hand to help celebrate!

6:00PM-7:00PM | Room 102 | Sports Industry Credit Association

NSCA Website Demo/Presentation Website launch event featuring a live demonstration and presentation

6:30PM-11:00PM | Red Rocks Amphitheatre, $39.50 | Icelantic and AEG

Icelantic’s Winter on the Rocks Icelantic and AEG Live Rocky Mountains are teaming up to produce the first winter concert at Red Rocks, including bands such as Atmosphere, Common, Grieves, Budo and Get Critchy.

7:00PM-10:00PM | Pepsi Center, $18 - $70

Denver Nuggets Discounted Tickets Come out with your co-workers, friends and clients to watch the Denver Nuggets take on the Toronto Raptors on a Friday night at Pepsi Center. Tickets available for anyone associated with the SIA Snow Show.

9:00PM-1:00AM | Suite 200 on Larimer Street in LODO |

Fischer Skis US Fischer Hybrid Launch Event Launch event for new, innovative ski line. VIP attendees by invite only. All attendees at SIA Snow Show are welcome. Venue is Suite 200 on Larimer Street in LODO. Venue will be open to the public during event.

9:00PM-2:00AM | THE HALL: 3545 Larimer st. | Ink Monstr and Smith Optics

FREE 4 ALL Vol. 2 - REDMAN Come enjoy a visual light experience like you have never seen before. Headlining performance by Redman plus BrikAbrak, Whygee, Gydahip. Free entry, free drinks. Located in Exdo’s new space, across the alley.


Question of the Day

/ At the show

“Who is your female snow sports icon and why?” Sarah Burke, Freestyle skier

“She brought everything to the world of skiing. She embraced all of us. She was a beautiful soul who left too early.” —Jesse “WetRat” Johnson, Co-founder of i.N.i. Cooperative

A good riding buddy, Christine, Snowboarder “She will charge hard and ride anything. And I think that’s what snowboarding is all about.”

—Lisa Branner, Co-owner of Venture Snowboards

Picabo Street, Alpine ski racer

“She was one of the first female skiers I knew of. Before then, there were no women that I could even think of. And she just went out there and kicked ass, and it was awesome!” —Alyx Keith, Assistant developer for Icelantic Design

Jen Wilkinson, visual merchandizing director with SmartWool

“Smartwool is customizing their fit for normal-size women, not mannequinsize women.”

Photos by Morgan Varon

—Jenny Mesdag, Marketing manager for Outdoor Research

Kim Reichhelm

“She was one of the first women to go all over the world bringing women to the sport.” —Mike Rosen, Sales rep for K2

snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 2

59


/ Heard in the aisles

Rep Rule of the Road No. 2

“Never park in the prime parking spot when visiting a shop.” —Andrew Shaw, SIA Rep of the Year

Sunday, Bloody Sunday What’s the secret to staging the first ever winter concert at iconic Red Rocks, which is sold out for tonight’s show? “Lots of shoveling,” says Annelise Loevlie of Icelantic, which organized the event. “We went down there every Sunday morning for the past month,” she says of an effort that started with company employees. “Word spread and pretty soon we had groups of 50 people showing up.” Shoveling snow instead of going to church—or skiing? “Red Rocks is pretty spiritual,” she says.

It Takes a Village Leading contender for best new booth in the alpine hardgoods category: Atomic, whose previous setup dated back to the Las Vegas convention center era. Sales and marketing director Jordan Judd went back to the homeland for inspiration: the booth is actually seven Alpine-esque huts housing each of the brand’s categories, from big mountain to backcountry to race, with its new helmet line appropriately merchandized in each. After writing a big check to make it happen, Judd was relegated to stenciling the Atomic logo onto the booth in the 11th hour of setup. Meanwhile, K2 resurrected its

MARCH 11114 ASPENFASHIONWEEK .COM For travel inclusive packages and event tickets, please visit aspenfashionweek.com

legendary Chew K2 barn and a water tower to raise the bar a little higher.

Good Deeds, Warm Feet, Ears Chaos Hats is selling discount hip, cool beanies in its booth (#2456) today to benefit both the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition (OIWC) and Colorado-based SOS Outreach, while FITS (#2464), in celebration of the launch of its new women’s ski sock line, will sell discount premier ski socks to benefit the OIWC.

Isn’t that the point? “You know, we are always looking for more retailers.” —Overheard outside an apparel booth.

Playah, Man “Dude, is this place just a big room full of ex-girlfriends for you?” —Overheard outside of the Halti booth.

Lost in the food court The lines going into the Colorado Ski Country USA food court were so long that they spilled into the aisles, where this exchange was overheard. “Hey, no texting in line.” “I’m in line? For what?”

Not, this is the point! “We’re all living this dream together.” —Jeremy Jones, on living a life of snow.

“Snow is to Denver what oranges are to Florida and cars are to Detroit.” —Denver Mayor Michael “Airdog” Hancock

Photo by ben fullerton

At the show


SALOMONFREESKI.COM

BBR SUNLITE “Trying the BBR shape will forever change your perceptions about ski design. Already, the success of this shape allows us to offer a size and shape for every skier. We dare you to test it against your favorite one-ski-quiver in all snow conditions.” - Bertrand Krafft (aka BBR) Salomon alpine ski developer and Shaper of the BBR

SIA BOOTH #4147

COPYRIGHT© SALOMON SAS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PHOTOGRAPHER: SCOTT MARKEWITZ.


bluebird doesn’t mean dry. Flashdry™ is the fastest drying baselayer—period. Designed to keep athletes at their peak, this revolutionary new technology removes moisture faster than any other performance fabric on the market. learn aBout the science BehinD our inDustry-leaDing Baselayer at Booth 4219.

baselayer

Booth 4219

2012 SIA Snow Show Daily Day 2  

Day 2 of the SIA Snow Show kicks off, find the latest.

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