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2014 Handbook

Everything You need To know For a Successful Show

How SnowboarderS do buSineSS

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Travel Tips Trend reporTs & producT picks The laTesT sales, invenTory, and parTicipaTion daTa insighT From indusTry veTs

Danny Kass. RetallacK, Bc, canaDa. PHOTO: FrOde SandbecH

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FROM LAYING THE TRACKS 1978 / Flagship Original.

1981 / Handmade in Vermont.

1991 / Homegrown, too. JG & Brushie.

Back when we introduced P-Tex and steel edges to snowboarding, we had a vision for what a board should be. Technical, capable, and quick. That part hasn’t changed one bit.

1980 / Rope included.

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TO LEADING THE PACK... 2011 / The process never ends.

2014 / Still handmade, still homegrown.

2015 /JG and Doyle dialing it in.

Now, we’re able to push past what’s possible with Craig’s, our state-of-the-art proto shop. It’s here that hardgoods are prototyped at the rapid rate we demand. Welcome to the future.

2015 / Still the best there is. burton.com (800) 367-2951 SIA Booth # 1565 / 1965

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Letter From the editor

siasnowshow.org january 30–february 2 Sourcing Snow Colorado Convention Center, Denver, CO

photo: Courtesy sIA

january 30–february 2 Sia Snow Show Colorado Convention Center, Denver, CO february 3–4 on-Snow demo/Ski-ride feSt Copper Mountain, CO

Resources Everything You Need To Know For The Show Think of the following pages as your personal guide to the 2014 SIA Snow Show and the snowboard industry. From travel information, to trends, to buying tips, this book has your back. To start your journey to this year’s show, we’ve cooked up a personal travel guide for shreds coming to SIA. Here are some links to help get the ball rolling: regiSter now siasnowshow.com/register hoteLS & traveL siasnowshow.com/hotels on-Snow demo siasnowshow.com/onsnow

Show Schedule & Overview aSk Sia siasnowshow.com/asksia Show newS, videoS & photoS siasnowshow.com/shownews

How Snowboarders Do Business Everyone here at Transworld Business is excited to partner with SIA again to produce The Guide. In an industry that values collaboration, we look at our long-time partner as an amazing resource that has been pro-active about giving snowboarding its own identity within snowsports and helping to address the challenges facing our businesses. We’re happy to help put the valuable tools SIA provides, from research to resources, into the hands of the retailers, reps, and manufacturers we work with year-round. Our two organizations will continue sharing ideas, connections, and manpower in a focused effort to bring about healthy, sustainable growth. The most fun part about producing The Guide is the reason it gives us to reconnect

with everyone across the industry, from CEOs at the biggest brands, to small mom and pop retailers cultivating the snowboard scene in their area. This issue was a little late getting finished because almost every conversation ran longer than expected, rehashing great memories of past days on the mountain, or classic moments at the show. We’re looking forward to taking that next important step of turning all those emails and phone calls into handshakes and high-fives (depending on your personal greeting style). Can’t wait to see you in Denver, Rob Campbell Publisher/Editor-In-Chief TransWorld Business

Contents 06 Snowboarding’S future SIA Snowboard Committee’s Brad Steward leads the charge for 2014.

10 trend report What’s on the horizon for 2015.

07 denver: a LocaL’S guide Industry heads weigh in on where to eat, party, & play.

14 Sia data Lessons from the 2012/13 season.

08 emerging brandS Retailers download on what’s moving the needle.

16 on-Snow demo Copper Mountain rolls out the red carpet.

09 new on the Scene A freshman crop of brands that should be on your radar.

18 party in the back Relive SIA 2013.

04 The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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travel tips

Your Denver Travel Check List From Here To THere

AIR SIA has partnered with WorldTek to help you get the lowest rates on airfare to and from Denver. (800) 257-8343. For an easier way to preview fares, check Kayak.com GROUND Super ShuTTle: Show attendees, take

herTz: Sometimes having your own wheels

advantage of discounted rides to and from the

is the easiest option.

airport. $8 off round-trip. use “SIA14” when booking. groups.supershuttle.com/sia14.html

uber: This app connects you with a driver at the tap of a button, and is now serving the

MeTro TAxI: Serving Denver International Airport

Denver community. If you haven’t checked

24 hours a day. Ask the cab stand starter for a Metro

it out yet, it’s time:

Cab, or for the ultimate planner, save this number

www.uber.com/cities/denver

ahead of time: (303) 333-3333. Metrotaxidenver.com

The SIA planner: events At A Glance ONGOING CrAFT @ SIA: A new hub dedicated to the unsung heros of the snow sports world: the small, independent, hand-crafted snowboard and ski manufacturers. Two microbrew nights will also take place during the Show. booth #4437. SIAsnowshow.com/craft. bACKCouNTy experIeNCe: A dedicated space to educate buyers, media, and the industry. Clinics & nightly parties. booth #4565. SIAsnowshow.com/backcountry reNTAl WorlD/bACKShop & uNIForM GAllery: presented by SAM Magazine, an exclusive exhibit featuring the latest in rental, backshop and uniforms. booth #4501. SIAsnowshow.com/rental bluebIrD SoCIAl zoNe: Sponsored by Transworld Business, this is the perfect place to connect, recharge, and socialize at #SIA14. booth #278. SIAsnowshow.com/bluebird DAIly beer GrAb: 5:30 p.m. daily in the CSCuSA Center lounge at the center of show floor

WHere To STAY Now in its fourth year in Denver, the SIA Snow show is expected to fill up Denver’s hotels quickly as the 2014 show dates get close. Visit siasnowshow.com/hotels to lock in rates as low as $119 a night at one of a dozen partner hotels.

Denver DeALS VISIT DeNVer is bringing back the Denver Deals program, including seriously discounted Avalanche and Nuggets

WEDNESDAY JAN 29 SNoWboArD STATe oF The MArKeT: presented by Kelly Davis, SIA 10 a.m. in room 301. SIA/SoS hockey Shootout: hosted by Never Summer. At the pepsi Center, immediately following the Avalanche game at 7 p.m. SIAsnowshow.com/events

tickets. For more info, head to visitdenver.com/sia. The Mile high SnowFest is also making an appearance

THURSDAY JAN. 30

to welcome attendees to town with some great deals at concerts, clubs, bars, and restaurants. Get info at

SeNDoFF To SoChI opeNING CereMoNy: 8:30 a.m. atrium lobby of the Colorado Convention Center

milehighsnowfest.com. Get some extra days in on the snow. Through a partnership with Colorado Ski Country uSA, all buyer attendees get three free lift ticket vouchers, and all attendees get three 2-for-1 ticket vouchers, good to use at 22 CSuCSA resorts February 3-February 7, 2014. SIAsnowshow.com/skiride

epIC pASS The best Mountains. one epic Season pass: For the 5th year running, SIA Snow Show attendees may purchase

The STATe oF DIGITAl IN ACTIVe lIFeSTyle reTAIl: 10:30 a.m., room 301, presented by Shaun Tinney. beyoND pINK: exploring Messaging & Ways to Connect with Female Consumers - 1:30 p.m., room 301. presented by Codie Costello and Kathy Norford.

season starting February 3, 2014. The SIA epic pass provides unlimited, unrestricted access to Vail, beaver Creek,

STyleSIGhT F/W15 Color AND MeGATreNDS: Noon, room 301.

breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mt brighton, Arapahoe basin and

FRIDAY JAN. 31

eldora. Available onsite with valid SIA Show credentials. Visit booth #1136 or SIAsnowshow.com/epic for more

STyleSIGhT F/W15 Color AND MeGATreNDS: 9 a.m., room 301

an epic pass for more than 60% off the original price. This pass will be valid for the remainder of the 2013-14

information. 

on-SnoW Demo AT Copper be sure to plan ahead and stay an extra day or two following the show, in order to attend SIA’s on-Snow Demo at Copper Mountain, and actually put some of the products you’ve been checking out to the test. registration is $20 and includes: 2 lift tickets, 2 free breakfasts, 2 free lunches, beers at 4 p.m. Monday, free transportation to/ from Denver to the Demo, and free rentals. onsite registration is $50. read up on everything you need to know to make the most of the on-Snow Demo on pages 16 and 17. For more, visit SIAsnowshow.com/onsnow

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hoW To leVerAGe IN-STore INVeNTory For oNlINe SAleS: 10 a.m., room 301, presented by Shopatron’s Jared Snelson reNTAl rouNDTAble SeMINAr: 11 a.m., presented by SAM Magazine. evening Cocktails at 6 p.m. booth #4501 SIA reTAIler AND rep oF The yeAr AWArDS AND SIA INDuSTry AChIeVeMeNT AWArD: 6 p.m. at the CSCuSA Center lounge

The SIA Show App

TrANSWorlD SNoWboArDING rIDerS’ poll AWArDS: Doors 7 p.m., awards show 8:30 p.m., The ogden Theatre

Apps are becoming much more sophisticated–and making our lives much easier, especilaly when

SATURDAY FEB. 1

it comes to navigating tradeshows. For 2014, the combined SIA Association and SIA Show App is

ShMoozA pAloozA INDuSTry Job FAIr: 11a.m.-4p.m. Grand Concourse of the Colorado Convention Center. SIAsnowshow.com/shmooz

even more intuitive, giving you the ability to directly book show appointments, amongst some other amazing feats, all from your smart phone: *Exhibitor listings, locations, and a member directory. *Floor plans with mapping that works on the Show floor. *Denver eats and drinks guide.

*Show and Demo info, events, and seminar schedules. *SIA social links & Industry Planner Calendar.

blog posts, &

The 4 SeCreTS To MAxIMIzING MobIle MArKeTING: 10:30 a.m., room 302, presented by David Cutler

member directory.

MONDAY FEB. 4

*SIA Newsletters,

For more information,

*SIA research reports.

or to download:

*Member and B2B Directories.

SIAsnowshow.com/showapp

uphIll/DoWNhIll ChAlleNGe AT oN-SNoW DeMo: Copper Mountain

The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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Snowboard Committee The 2013 SIA SnowboArd CommITTee Jared Bevens, Vans Global Category Director, Action Sports Footwear & Equipment eric crane, Electric Visual CEO Pat Bridges, Snowboarder Mag Editor Brian cook, ThirtyTwo Global Brand Director

Brad Steward Photo:GeorGe CroSland

SIA Announces In-depth Snowboard Market Research Initiative For 2014 Catching Up With Snowboard Committee & Bonfire Snowboarding Founder Brad Steward By Kailee Bradstreet

In light of declining snowboard participation numbers, SIA is rethinking its approach to getting riders on board and keeping them engaged. Despite snowboarding’s ever-increasing presence in the spotlight with big events like the Olympics, participation numbers have headed in a counterintutive direction. SIA is tasking a group of the industry’s top executives to get to the bottom of why the numbers are so far off the mark and what the industry can do to move the needle. “Our industry has a bad habit of placing all these initiatives into the market without clarity on who we are seeking to impact,” says SIA Snowboard Committee Member and Bonfire Snowboarding Founder Brad Steward. The result is that snowboarding has lost a significant amount of participants, he says. “On the pure consumer side, more people than ever have seen snowboarding in the last 7 years via TV, Olympics, the media—so at the peak of our visibility, participation is nosediving. I’ve put SIA on a course to understand why this is happening so we can impact it positively.” Steward helped create the SIA Snowboard committee in 1993 alongside Jake Burton, “because we felt snowboarding was underrepresented and needed SIA’s assistance to grow the sport,” he says. For the past several months, Steward has returned to the committee in a more hands-on role, because he says “Snowboarding needs evangelists deperately right now.” 6

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Working alongside SIA President David Ingemie and committee members, the industry veteran will lead the discussion around participation, and drive a consumer-focused initiative for 2014.

“Snowboarding needs evangelists deperately right now.” “What is on the table is a complete and thorough study on who the snowboard consumer is—how do we grow them, and what are the barriers to entry that the industry can mitigate.” SIA’s research department has begun outlining the program, which will include a full review of the market, various surveys, focus groups, and onsnow interviews, with a goal of helping the industry fully engage current snowboarders and attract new ones.

The study will dive deep into who today’s snowboarders are, the current perception of snowboard brands by snowboarders and non-snowboarders, the best communication strategies to reach these demographics, and long and short term solutions for what we can do as an industry to grow overall participation and sales. Steward says the committee has a packed schedule in place to conduct the consumer research necessary to complete the report, which he expects will take about a year. Once finished, the report will be the subject of advisory reviews, giving the industry a chance to provide feedback and identify the correct plan of attack to solve the issues identified. “My thinking is that once we solve the consumer strategy, the structure of how the market can and should organize around that consumer can then thoroughly be addressed,” says Steward. “No more ‘push’ thinking— lots of consumer ‘pull’ thinking.”

sasha dietschicooPer, Burton Senior VP of North American Sales edward “duke” edukas, Surfside Sports Owner kevin english, High Cascade President, Executive Director, & Co-Owner clark gundlach, Quiksilver SVP & GM of Winter Sports will howard, Dragon CEO/Founder Jeff kearl, Stance Founder dan McnaMara, Mervin Manufacturing VP of Sales Michael Marckx, Spy Optic President & CEO Blue MontgoMery, President of Capita Snowboards Jon rice, Sierra at Tahoe General Manager anthony scaturro, Flow CEO dutch shultz, Volcom Snow VP Of Merchandising & Design Brad steward, Bonfire Snowboarding Founder Mike west, Westlife Distribution Founder sia staff david ingemie, SIA President dave wray, SIA Western Sales & Marketing Manager agy ozdowski, SIA Executive Assistant to the President & Research Analyst

The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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Doing Denver

A Local’s Guide to Navigating The City, Mountains, & Beyond By Michael Sudmeier

We tapped a handful of Front Range locals for their insights on getting the most out of the Mile High City. From recommendations on where to snag breakfast to advice on nursing a hangover, their tips provide a solid foundation for diving into Denver.

keep it Mellow Abandon the trade floor and treat yourself to a low-key morning. Kick things of with breakfast at Snooze or Pete’s Kitchen, and then head over to Twist & Shout to browse their music archives and the Tattered Cover for some light reading. Once you’ve snagged some new vinyl and a tome, hit up the Denver Art Museum. eMbRace YouR inneR neRd Stuf your pockets with quarters and make your way to the 1-Up. From Pac-Man to pinball, this video arcade and bar ofers hours of entertainment. According to Never Summer’s Gagliardi, “It’s got so many old school games, a fun atmosphere, and many inexpensive beer choices.” And as icing on the cake, the 1-Up also has skeeball.

Photo: Courtesy Visit DenVer

catch a GaMe You don’t need to be a die-hard fan to embrace some game. When in Denver, be sure to score tickets to an Avalanche or Nuggets game. If you’re on a budget, saddle up to the Cutthroats for some raw minor league hockey.

Roll up to Red Rocks Head to the hills and explore Red Rocks, located just outside the small town of Morrison. In addition to being an iconic landmark, the venue is arguably “the best concert venue in the country,” according to Never Summer Snow Sales Manager Mike “Gags” Gagliardi, but you need not snag a show to appreciate this spot. Denver local and Big Fish Media Group’s Chelsea Lawson is quick to recommend that you “take a hike above Red Rocks.” Either way, escaping the city for a day or two before or after SIA will do you good. snaRf a sandwich Although your eyes can feast on next year’s products once the Snow Show gets started, your stomach will need something more substantial. Listen to Adam

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“Denver is like Portland without the pretension, Chicago without the accent, and California without the trafc.” –Joe Prebich, Zeal Optics Director of Marketing Schmidt, the founder of Snowboard Colorado magazine and Snowboard on the Block, and take a break by snagging a sandwich. “Since everyone will be staying by the Convention Center,” he explains, “I have to suggest grabbing a sandwich at Snarf’s on 14th Street.” catch a show When it’s time to treat your ears, Denver has no shortage of venues. “The Bluebird Theater on Colfax is a great, small venue for seeing live music,” ofers Marc Vitelli, Sims brand manager and director of product design. “It’s up close and personal.” Other

notable venues include the Summit Music Hall, the Paramount Theater, Larimer Lounge, and the Gothic Theater. If DJs and dance clubs are more your thing, consider heading to Beta or Norad. eat at steuben’s When tapping Denver locals for their recommendations, Steuben’s serves as a common denominator. “It’s the best place to eat by far,” ofers Nic Drago, who heads up the snow team development at Icon Industry Management. “You just can’t go wrong there.” This is especially true if you order a Moscow Mule, one of Steuben’s signature drinks.

dRop in The Denver Skatepark boasts 60,000 square feet of concrete. And although there’s no shortage of features, you’ll need to bring your own skills. wet YouR whistle Denver is practically synonymous with craft beer. Consider snagging a pint—or three—at one of Denver’s microbreweries. Locals are likely to point you towards Black Shirt Brewing Company, Great Divide, Wynkoop Brewery, or the Denver Beer Co. If you’re looking for something beyond beer, hit up one of Denver’s distilleries such as Mile High Spirits or Stranahan’s. To channel your inner outlaw, check out Williams & Graham for great cocktails and a Prohibition-inspired atmosphere, according to Lawson, who also suggests The Grizzly Rose, “for a laugh and a bull ride.” To sum it up, there’s no shortage of fun to be had. And if in doubt, just ask a local. The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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EmErging Brands

Jake Olson-Elm is part of Stance’s “Punks and Poets.” PhOtO: Quang Le

Snowboarding’s Emerging Roster Retailers Pull Back the Curtain on Their Top Brands and Rising Stars By Michael Sudmeier

Since its inception, the shred industry has been plagued with somewhat unreliable relationships. After all, Mother Nature is a fickle mistress, which only compounds the challenges resorts, retailers, and riders face each year. Despite these potential setbacks, retailers are finding reasons to be optimistic thanks to a handful of brands. We tapped some of the industry’s top shops for their insights on brands that are turning heads, driving sales at the register, and snagging greater market share. Regardless of a brand’s size, the relationship formed with retailers is crucial to ensuring it thrives. “A brand’s success at the retail level is directly proportionate to strong relationships with shops and their employees,” explains Jon Easdon, the owner of Blindside in Colorado Springs. Consequently, Easdon and other retailers are focusing on brands that focus on them. And although the resulting relationships are built around selling products, they are also heavily based in sharing stories. To be compelling, these stories need not come from established players. “I am watching people gravitate more and more towards smaller brands that tell a story,” offers Darkside Buyer and Stowe Store Manager Michael Toohey. In addition, shops are quick to note that customers are backing fresh brands rooted in new technology. This technology includes everything from binding designs to new fabrics. Many retailers emphasize that curating a collection of new and emerging brands is essential in retaining and engaging customers. “We have a pretty savvy customer base that is usually looking for the next new thing, so we regularly take risks on new brands and products,” explains Scott Oreschnick, the owner of Minneapolis’ Cal Surf. At The Easy Rider in Edmonton, Alberta, Owner Warren Currie finds that his customers often supplement major purchases with up-and-coming brands. “We are seeing our core customer who comes to us for hardgoods pick up on these smaller brands,” he explains. Additional brands that are ringing include Howl, Ashbury, iNi Cooperative, and Dinosaurs Will Die. These smaller brands have been especially success8

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ful in creating excitement within their niches, and are reaping the benefits. “Our open-to-buy dollars are shifting to more unique brands that don’t overproduce and don’t find themselves in a situation of needing to dump a warehouse of product into an already flooded market,” explains Salty Peaks Owner Dennis Nazari. Arguably, one of the strongest stories on the sales floor can be found underfoot. “Stance socks has killed it for us in the snow department,” offers Edward “Duke” Edukas, owner of Surfside in Costa Mesa, California. “Those guys seem to do everything so well and we sell tons of them in all departments.” Will Ingram, co-founder of Anchorage, Alaska’s zAKs Boardroom, is quick to agree. “With the crazy attention this brand has gotten over the past few months, we’re seeing people from all walks of life coming into the shop and specifically looking for Stance.” Although these customers come in searching only for socks, notes Ingram, they often leave with a complete kit. Like Stance, a number of companies are finding success in building a strong following in the shred industry while also cultivating an audience beyond it. “Brands that seem to be doing well are those that market to bigger audiences than just skate and snow, while still having a huge presence in them,” says Mike Thienes, cofounder of The Youth Shelter Supply in Waite Park, Minneapolis. He cites Volcom as an especially strong example. While emerging brands are moving into the spotlight, there is something to be said for furthering relationships with established accounts. “With the changing economic environment and a few seasons of marginal snowfall, now is the time to go deeper in staple brands,” says Easdon. Retailers are quick to list Mervin, Burton, and Never Summer as continuing to fuel sales. For specialty retailers, success often revolves around tight distribution and limited edition products, such as Lib Tech’s FundaMentals, Gnu’s Club Collection, and Burton’s Restricted line. “Right now we seem to have customers returning to higher-end products,” offers Empire Men’s Buyer Kris Lee. Burton’s AK line has nearly tripled its sales at Empire in the last two years. “I think this is due to the fact that the product is tried and tested,” offers Lee. Whether a brand is established or emerging, at the end of the day, a dynamic shop environment is still crucial to moving the needle. “Retail is evolving,” Thienes offers. “Retailers must continue to evolve and get in front of their customers. Service and a great experience go a long way.”

Jamie Lynn with Lib tech‘s 2014/15 Phoenix Series. Photo: Lib tech

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New BraNds

SIA’s Rookie Class of 2014

Brands New to the Scene—but not the Game—Debut at SIA By Michael Sudmeier

For brands and retailers returning to SIA, the show often serves as a makeshift class reunion. Yet for those making their debut, the show tends to be something slightly different. For these first timers, SIA is more like a strange mixture of speed dating and freshmen orientation. And despite this new terrain, SIA’s crop of rookie exhibitors is eager for new opportunities. Marhar From Grand Rapids, Michigan, Marhar has been quietly crafting decks since 2008. Fresh out of college, Josh Skiles and Nate Morse had already lost enthusiasm for their jobs and decided to begin making boards. “We spent a good part of a year buying saws, drill presses, tools, and our first snowboard press,” explains Skiles. “We researched different materials, cut some old snowboards in half, and basically reverse engineered our way to what is now Marhar Snowboards.” The brand is currently available in nearly twenty shops throughout the Midwest. Marhar makes its debut at SIA, in part, through the show’s Craft @ SIA exhibit, which aims to showcase small, artisan brands. Through showing its boards and having them available to demo during SIA, Marhar aims to expand its footprint beyond the Midwest. Kitten Factory For the friends behind Kitten Factory, SIA provides a chance to increase the brand’s visibility and to get people on its products. From its headquarters in Salt Lake City, the brand has gained a reputation for crafting burly carbon fiber decks and skis. “Having all of our building processes in house allows us to quickly prototype new products to make sure all of the necessary tweaks are made before bringing them to market,” offers Jeff Scott, the brand’s marketing director.

model and the company’s small size enable it to readily refine its products and be at the forefront of progression.

raMP SPortS As part of a growing network of domestic brands, RAMP makes its boards and skis in Park City, Utah. “RAMP was founded to bring a new approach to selling and producing snowboards and skis,” explains RAMP President and CEO Mike Kilchenstein. “The company uses a consumer direct business model which provides better access and value.” According to Kilchenstein, this

notice SnowboardS Similarly, Montana-based Notice Snowboards works directly with consumers to offer a line of stock decks as well as custom builds. “We’re crafting boards completely matched to the rider and their terrain,” explains Founder Brittan Ellingson. For him, small brands like Notice offer “a willingness to take risks and the ability to completely change the program.”

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Clockwise from top: Mahar team rider Ezra Heethuis. PHoto: Jake anderson | Notice Favorite Day board. PHoto: Parker nitoPi | Leatherman Hail tool. PHoto: Courtesy signal snowboards

L2r Upon learning that a good friend was struggling with cancer, Justin Moore made the leap from making napkin sketches to creating products designed to make a difference. Initially, Moore created shirts and hoodies to raise funds to combat cancer. When his friend, Luke Dorsey, ultimately passed away, Moore launched L2R Snowboards as a means to pay homage to Dorsey and continue working for a greater good. The Seattle-based company now crafts a collection of decks

domestically and donates a portion of its proceeds to a number of organizations that fight cancer and aim to strengthen communities. According to L2R Marketing Director Britton Lorentzen, “We want to show the importance of giving back to the community and helping support causes that hold true to our hearts.”

GraSSrootS caLiFornia Grassroots California is also committed to using its products as a means for sparking a movement. Based in Denver, the company collaborates with a host of organizations, artists, and brands to create limited edition clothing collections. “Grassroots is the art of the collab,” explains Founder Ryan Connolly. “We really believe that art can make a difference, and we are doing it one product at a time.” And through each product, the brand donates a portion of its proceeds to charities or organizations that its partners select. This year the brand even collaborated with Smokin to make a limited edition Grassroots deck. LeatherMan For over thirty years, Leatherman has been crafting multi-tools for life’s adventures. Thanks to a partnership with Signal Snowboards and a stacked team that includes Brian Fox, Austin Smith, Jake Olson-Elm, and Danimals—the brand is now releasing a collection of snowboard specific tools, which feature everything from scrapers to screwdrivers to wrenches for adjusting bindings. “We used to joke that if we gave a tool to our testers in the Marines and they couldn’t break it, then we had a winner,” offers Leatherman Product Manager Blair Barnes. “Now if we can give it to our snowboard team and friends who skate and they start to use it for everything, we’ve succeeded.” Despite keeping busy gearing up for SIA, these rookie exhibitors are finding time to reflect on their evolution. At Kitten Factory, Scott explains, “We have learned that after being sleep deprived for months, coffee and other forms of caffeine lose their effectiveness. But thanks to the past six years of mistakes, we’ve established processes that are tried and true.” For Kitten Factory and other brands, these lessons have led them right to SIA. And this new chapter provides a means to step into the spotlight, connect with kindred spirits, and—for some—forge new relationships with retailers. The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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Trend nd r reporT rT

Innovative Shapes Drive Design Movement Camber Making a Comeback, Splitboards Continue Growth By Rob Campbell

Brands are unanimous in their increased optimism for next season, driven largely by a renewed and genuine excitement about the craft of building snowboards. Board lines are still robust, yet more streamlined and easier to understand. Inventories have been reduced, rider-influenced development remains a key staple of K2 Happy Hour This high-end, all-mountain model not only has a distinct shape, but also a strong legacy of winning awards like Transworld Snowboarding’s Good Wood board test.

production strategies, and ecological initiatives are infused throughout most companies’ entire production process. There is also a growing movement toward experimentation with new shapes and ideas that is expanding consumers’ perception of the traditional snowboard.

“It’s a lot more fun to push shape design than it is to push material innovation.” –Peter Wurster, Unity

Shape domInateS the deSIGn Story Although most designers will agree that a board’s performance depends on a combination of shape, flex, base profile, and materials, it’s clear that shape is getting most of the attention right now. Much like the recent revolution in surfboard shaping, snowboard designers are experimenting with unique and innovative board shapes that stand out. “The past few years have been really fun and creative for snowboard shape design, says Unity’s peter wurster.

“Everyone is really trying new ideas. It’s a lot more fun to push shape design than it is to push material innovation.” Although traditional shapes still drive the majority of sales, this recent experimental push is being credited with creating some much-needed excitement within the sport. “We want to create unique, memorable and functional shapes that help get the customer’s attention from across the room,” says ride’s michael Chilton.

GraphICS Most conversations about next year’s board graphics involve the phrase “muted colors.” There also seems to be a general trend toward “cleaner”design, although some brands are taking shots here and there with more poppy hits. Other recurring themes include nature-inspired photography, artist and music collaborations, and clear, or see-through topsheets that showcase the board’s inner technology. tHe Jamie lynn fun Damn mental C3 BtX DireCtional BoarD is part of the Jamie Lynn 20 year anniversary collection. Jamie’s original artwork will be featured on several boards within the lib tech fundaMENTALS line.

“Our business is up in both gross sales and gross profit and our inventory is tighter, cleaner and down. We are in a better spot after a lot of hard times and hard work.” –Jay Moore, World Boards

Burton pile Driver A clear example of how designers are experimenting with unique and innovative shapes, the pile Driver is a pow surfer that can be ridden with or without bindings.

10

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Camber ComebaCk Although rocker and mixed camber boards are still selling well for a lot of retailers, the return of traditional camber is receiving a lot of attention. “I will say that camber is making somewhat of a comeback in snowboards,” says Surfside’s duke edukas. Over in the Midwest, Cal-Surf’s Scott oreschnick agrees that, “rocker-camber combinations are still hot, but a lot of the early adopter rocker riders are moving back to camber boards.”

Growth In SplItboardS 60% of brands surveyed reported that they now have at least one splitbord in their line. Brands that have been in the splitboard game for a while, like Jones and burton, are expanding their lines to include more sizes and less expensive models. “We heard from consumers and retailers that they wanted a cheaper splitboard. Mountain town parents also suggested we make a splitboard for kids,” Jones’s Seth lightcap says about the motivation behind some recent additions to his company’s board line. about the motivation behind some recent additions to his company’s board line.

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COMFORT AnD CuSTOMIzATIOn KEy SEll FOR BOOTS AnD BInDIngS Price Barriers Breaking For High End Products

“Binding technology is going through an evolution… flex, connection and a wider range of functions and feels.” –Hunter Waldron, K2 global brand director

fluX collaborated with original Dogtown artist Wes Humpston for a binding in its Heritage ColleCtion.

teChnICal evolUtIon Brands continue to incorporate new materials and construction techniques into their bindings on a quest to create the most seamless connection between rider and board. “Binding technology is going through an evolution… flex, connection and a wider range of functions and feels,” says k2 global brand director hunter waldron. The importance of flex is being talked about more and more, especially as it relates to baseplates with increased lateral flex to provide a “surfy feel,” so riders can roll their foot more while still getting plenty of drive and support. The idea of “feeling” the board, the same way a skater or surfer would, continues to be an important theme.

K2’s lien fs BinDing focused on biomechanical design to account for how the human foot flexes and moves.

Brands are quick to list new composites and materials that they’re integrating in an effort to help shave weight and add strength. A lot of designers also said they’re revamping or improving their vibration absorption systems by adding more dampening. In addition to high-tech materials, construction techniques continue to evolve as customization becomes a bigger priority for riders who want the ability to rotate highbacks, dial-in sizing, and even tweak cants.

CompatIbIlIty IS kInG Retailers and consumers alike are gravitating toward bindings that are compatible with any board or boot. When asked what sales stories are working best with his customers right now, bC Surf & Sport owner bruce Cromartie says, “bindings that interface with any insert pattern.” Cromartie adds that burton and Union are doing especially well in his stores. Burton’s Re:Flex system makes its bindings compatible with all mounting systems, and Flux, which has been manufacturing bindings exclusively for over 20 years, has released a new multi-disc that allows it’s entire line to be mounted on any board.

CUStomIzed ComFort While boots are more comfortable than ever straight out of the box, consumers are still looking for a customized fit, and willing to pay more to get it. “Heat moldability in boots is important,” says SnoCon’s co-owner adam Gerken, who adds that burton’s Imperial Boot with Speed zone lacing is doing particularly well. SnoCon also sells a lot of after-market footbeds like Superfeet. Customization continues to be a huge priority for vans. “We’re constantly looking at ways to enhance the rider’s ability to customize his/her fit, function and flex,” says product line manager eddie lee. The new vans infuse Boot will include a Flex Control System that uses removable tongue stiffeners to customize flex.

“Design-wise, there’s been a major influence on styling from athletic footwear. It’s the same shift we’ve been seeing in skate shoes. Clean, low profile designs are populating more and more shelves on shop floors.” –Burton VP of hardgoods and anon Scott Barbieri alwayS be CloSInG boa continues to show strong growth and will appear on even more models next season, gaining traction in hybrid systems in addition to showing up solo on more women’s, youth, and rental models. new closure systems, as well as more high-tech boots in general, are

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the result of many brands reporting increased sales in higher-end boot models. “Price barriers are being toppled by retailers selling higher-end boots with more technical liners and more technical materials,” says rome Snowboards’ Sullivan.

Burton X frye Burton includes its new Boa Coiler Closure System in this women’s boot collaboration with frye.

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Trend reporT porT

Technical Materials and layering Systems Push Sales Streetwear’s Design Influence Holds Strong By Rob Campbell

After a second consecutive season of lower-than-normal snowfall in most regions, there’s still a lot of uncertainty in the outerwear market. Overall sales were down 4% and retailers seem to be taking a cautious approach, focusing on brands that maintain margin. Consensus is that things have gotten tougher, with manufacturing costs on the rise and little room for error. In the face of ongoing challenges, brands are working harder than ever to streamline their production processes, diferentiate themselves, and work with retailers to drive sell-though and maintain high customer value.

roXy free spirit 3n1 JaCKet (MSRP $299.95) is a high-end, technical, system version of the best-selling Jetty (with 20K waterproofing and a zip-out puffy jacket). It’s being offered to address what the company sees as a growing demand for system jackets.

“We’ll be going deeper in gore-Tex if pricing remains lower. Customers see that Gore-Tex label and grab them up.” –Ryan Robertson, Royal Board Shop

Streetwear InFlUenCe Streetwear continues to have a huge impact on the market and overall design trends. “Snow outerwear is being influenced by what is happening in streetwear and youth culture more than ever before,” says 686 Director of Marketing brent Sandor. “Ideas are bubbling up from the streets and being adopted in the mountains.” Most larger brands have heavily street-inspired pieces throughout their line, or entire collections dedicated to it. layerInG and SyStemS There’s also continued movement toward educating consumers about layering, and providing outerwear with integrated layering systems. Brands are supporting the opportunity for retailers and doing their part to create complete layering initiatives. “Smart layering is a critical first step for a successful day in the mountains. Our aim is to educate the rider on how to layer up for optimum comfort and performance,” says patagonia Snow Business unit Director tyler lamotte, whose brand is introducing a new mid-layer collection for next season. “The market for systems jackets has grown exponentially,” adds roxy’s global Snow Marketing Manager amber Stackhouse. Roxy is offering a system version of its best selling jacket, The Jetty, for next season. 686 will be incorporating its well-known Smarty system throughout its entire line. “We have made a major step forward and evolved our Smarty collection into Smarty technology.” says 686’s Sandor. “Smarty removable 3-in-1 layering is now in the pinnacle jacket in each collection.” 12

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hIGh-teCh FabrICS Brands seem to be embracing the consumer’s willingness to invest in technical outerwear in a lot of regions, and are meeting demand by reinforcing the story behind technical fabrics, along with offering technical pieces at relatively lower price points. “Gore-tex is doing well, especially at lower price points,” says royal’s ryan robertson, who specifically mentions volcom’s l Gore-tex jacket, which has an MSRP of $290) as one that’s moving consistently. “We’ll be going deeper in Gore-tex if pricing remains lower.” empire in Quebec and Seattle’s iconic SnoCon report success even at higher pricepoints with burton’s [AK] line. Despite being located at the beach in Encinitas, Calif., hansen’s also moves a lot of expensive outerwear. “We don’t have a problem selling high-end technical stuff,” says Snow Buyer patty bolton. “Our customers like the tech story and our employees are good at telling it.”

patagonia snowsHot ConveriBle BiBs (MSRP $279) This new piece from Patagonia lets riders quickly switch from pants to bibs, helping it capitalize on the continued buzz surrounding bibs and technical outerwear under $300.

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“Snowboarding outerwear in general is so much more mature than it was just a couple years ago. If it’s not an object of desire, it has a hard time selling, no matter what price point.” –Volcom Men’s Outerwear Senior Designer Pat Field

Zeal optiCs HD Camera goggle fits into the growing market for high-end goggles with integrated technology. This model connects wirelessly to a phone to transfer photos and video.

QUICk ChanGe lenS SyStemS continue to be the biggest technological story for goggles. Regardless of which proprietary system they choose, consumers are understanding that different lenses are ideal for different conditions , and that’s it’s necessary to own more than one. overSIzed GoGGleS with little or no frame have become a popular style, showing up in most brands’ lines. helmet FIt and CompatIbIlIty remains a strong story, with plenty of styles that claim to be “helmet-friendly.” Brands are making a particularly strong push to perfect the integration between their helmets and goggles, so consumers will be compelled to purchase both together, or show brand loyalty when adding the second item. hIGh-end GoGGleS wIth InteGrated teChnoloGy continue to gain momentum. More consumers are willing to pay for technologies like gPS, heads-up displays, or video cameras that can send footage directly to their phones. At the lower end of the price point range, SImplIStIC CylIndrICal StyleS with pop colors and classic graphics have carved out a solid niche.

volCom l gore-teX JaCKet (MSRP $290) Volcom will offer an updated version of its popular sub-$300 Gore-Tex jacket for 2014/15.

FUnCtIonal Streetwear It’s still a segmented market and not all shops are able to move expensive, technical outerwear. On the opposite end of the spectrum, brands are also having success in the hybrid crossover category. “Repel treated non-technical pieces from thirty-two have been selling … hoodies and flannels,” says Cal Surf’s Scott oreschnik. “Minneapolis/St. Paul is primarily a park and street snowboard scene, so most of the technical features in outerwear are not needed.” thirty-two outerwear designer Joey Jorgensen says his brand’s new line will continue to “pull from streetwear as much as possible with dry, matte finishes that have a more casual, less tech look.” vans is also making a strong push in the hybrid crossover category, beefing up more traditional streetwear looks with increased functionality in the $99-$149 price range.

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helmetS “Awareness of helmet safety is at an all-time high,” according to brendan murphey, snow brand manager for Giro, which has introduced soft shell construction more suited to the repeated, low-grade impacts that progressive riders experience. In addition to protecting themselves, consumers are generally looking for a helmet that is lightweight, lowprofile, and can be custom fit with a goggle. Key additions in the market include boa fit systems, audio integration, and active venting. Optimizing fit between their goggles and helmets remains a top priority for companies like anon. a2 ColleCtion: m2 goggle anD roDan Helmet.

The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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Snow InduStry data

By The Numbers: 2012/13 Snowboard Season Summary

Total Sales

The 2012/2013 season marked the second consecutive year in which snowfall began later and was lighter than average in December across the country. With consumer confidence riding on early season snow conditions and playing a critical role in holiday season sales, the significant change in weather patterns have become a signal for the snow sports market to adapt—and quickly. Despite a slow start, the pessimism that tarnished early season and holiday sales was mitigated by excellent conditions through April in many regions. And while overall snowboard participation saw a 3% dip, time spent on the snow rose to an average of 11 days, versus 8 days in 2012-13. SIA’s research department spent considerable time compiling this year’s data, gouging sales and inventories numbers to use as as a stepping stone as we leave last season behind and head into the next. The rapidly changing landscape shouldn’t jar retailers, but instead offer them a sense of comfort. Change is constant and, while weather patterns, consumer confidence, and the economic conditions are out of our hands, getting a good read on what will impact next season’s sales is the best place to start making a difference.

ALL CHANNELS

$500M $506,470,983

9.1% 7.3%

$460,139,303

$400M

$426,388,481

SPECIALTY

$300M

10.1%

$305,165,250

By Kailee Bradstreet

% CHANGE

11.5%

$274,430,922

$242,754,725

$200M $102,460,772 INTERNET $100M CHAIN

$98,844,961

$109,955,363

$117,705,080

7.3%

7%

23.4%

13.0%

$75,753,018

2010/2011

$65,928,676

2011/2012

2012/2013

While sales were down across specialty and chain retail channels, internet sales were a highlight for the second consecutive year,

$ 3.4

Billion

Total Snowsports Sales in 2012/2013 %12.5

spiking 7%. The sliver lining is that the percentage of snowboard sales has held strong this season, compared to 2011/12. Although total product sales took a hit, the bottoms category sales remained steady.

Total Snowboard

Product Sales

All data provided by:

SIA provides the most reliable, relevant, and current

ProducT/SAleS

% chAnGe From 2011/12

information possible about the snow sports market. SIA collects data directly from consumers, suppliers, retailers,

SnowboardS / $115,411,560

-11%

Snowboard TopS / $102,318,111

-9%

$ 426,388,481

and independent research firms. SIA triangulates data from multiple sources to provide members and research subscribers with a robust view of the snow sports marketplace that includes aggregate results along with the ability to drill down to granular detail. For example, Retail

Snowboard boTTomS / $73,864,421 0%

Audit subscribers can see top line data, drill down to the SKU level, and examine various measures at the product level. Intelligence Report readers get participation data,

Snowboard booTS / $72,652,797

-6%

Total Snowboard Product Sales in 2012/2013

retail sales, economic impact, retail store distribution, and detailed analysis by snow sport category. For more

Snowboard bindingS / $62,141,592 -7%

information on research, membership, or to purchase reports, visit snowsports.org or contact SIA Director of Resarch Kelly Davis at kdavis@snowsports.org.

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Snow InduStry data

By The Numbers: 2012/13 Snowboard Season Summary

Total Sales

The 2012/2013 season marked the second consecutive year in which snowfall began later and was lighter than average in December across the country. With consumer confidence riding on early season snow conditions and playing a critical role in holiday season sales, the significant change in weather patterns have become a signal for the snow sports market to adapt—and quickly. Despite a slow start, the pessimism that tarnished early season and holiday sales was mitigated by excellent conditions through April in many regions. And while overall snowboard participation saw a 3% dip, time spent on the snow rose to an average of 11 days, versus 8 days in 2012-13. SIA’s research department spent considerable time compiling this year’s data, gouging sales and inventories numbers to use as as a stepping stone as we leave last season behind and head into the next. The rapidly changing landscape shouldn’t jar retailers, but instead offer them a sense of comfort. Change is constant and, while weather patterns, consumer confidence, and the economic conditions are out of our hands, getting a good read on what will impact next season’s sales is the best place to start making a difference.

ALL CHANNELS

$500M $506,470,983

9.1% 7.3%

$460,139,303

$400M

$426,388,481

SPECIALTY

$300M

10.1%

$305,165,250

By Kailee Bradstreet

% CHANGE

11.5%

$274,430,922

$242,754,725

$200M $102,460,772 INTERNET $100M CHAIN

$98,844,961

$109,955,363

$117,705,080

7.3%

7%

23.4%

13.0%

$75,753,018

2010/2011

$65,928,676

2011/2012

2012/2013

While sales were down across specialty and chain retail channels, internet sales were a highlight for the second consecutive year,

$ 3.4

Billion

Total Snowsports Sales in 2012/2013 %12.5

spiking 7%. The sliver lining is that the percentage of snowboard sales has held strong this season, compared to 2011/12. Although total product sales took a hit, the bottoms category sales remained steady.

Total Snowboard

Product Sales

All data provided by:

SIA provides the most reliable, relevant, and current

ProducT/SAleS

% chAnGe From 2011/12

information possible about the snow sports market. SIA collects data directly from consumers, suppliers, retailers,

SnowboardS / $115,411,560

-11%

Snowboard TopS / $102,318,111

-9%

$ 426,388,481

and independent research firms. SIA triangulates data from multiple sources to provide members and research subscribers with a robust view of the snow sports marketplace that includes aggregate results along with the ability to drill down to granular detail. For example, Retail

Snowboard boTTomS / $73,864,421 0%

Audit subscribers can see top line data, drill down to the SKU level, and examine various measures at the product level. Intelligence Report readers get participation data,

Snowboard booTS / $72,652,797

-6%

Total Snowboard Product Sales in 2012/2013

retail sales, economic impact, retail store distribution, and detailed analysis by snow sport category. For more

Snowboard bindingS / $62,141,592 -7%

information on research, membership, or to purchase reports, visit snowsports.org or contact SIA Director of Resarch Kelly Davis at kdavis@snowsports.org.

14

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Snowboard Participation

WOMEN 29.7% OVERALL 7,159,000

MINORITIES 23%

OVERALL 8,196,000

& Change From

WOMEN 34%

OVERALL 7,351,000

MINORITIES 33%

WOMEN 33%

WOMEN 34%

MINORITIES 33%

MINORITIES 33%

WOMEN 28.1%

OVERALL 6,841,000

7M

OVERALL 7,579,000

OVERALL 7,421,000

8M

Average Prices

WOMEN 26.4%

2007/2008

2008/2009

2009/2010

2010/2011

2011/2012

2012/2013

2011/12 to 2012/2013

SnowboardS

$282.77

2.57%

Snowboard bootS

$141.68

3.24%

Snowboard bindingS

$139.62

1.85%

Snowboard topS

$116.11

6.63%

Snowboard bottomS

$100.84

7.63%

goggleS

$65.58

6.26%

HelmetS

$84.91

1.20%

Handwear

$37.28

3.88%

baSe layer

$40.25

7.46%

Headwear

$21.98

4.30%

Specialty Shop Total Sales by Region

Snowboard Margins

3%

2012/13 SALES % CHANGE

From 2011/12

$91,950,804

margins saw a slight dip— a decline that

$149,579,752

1.3%

can be chalked up to offprice gear, and an increase in carryover inventory from 2011-12

5.7%

$236,450,735

4.0%

29.4% 38.5% 32%

$103,370,149

4.5%

While specialty shops continued to see a drop in sales across the u.S., the good news is that trend appears to be evening out. The

31.6%

44.6%

hARdgoodS

oUTeRweAR

ToTAl

ToTAl

31% 41.5%

12%

Snowboard EquipmEnt invEntory

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From 2011/12

midwest was only off by 1.3% and the West down 4%, compared to last year’s 11% plunge, respectively.

Skis vs. Boards

(UniTS Sold in All ChAnnelS) Sales of snowboards dipped compared to last year while skis were up slightly.

2008/09 2009/10 2010/11

Snowboarders are 67% male, out-numbering female riders 2-1.

2011/12 2012/13 400,000

500,000

600,000 The Guide: 2014 SIA Snow SHow

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On SnOw DemO

SIA’s On-Snow Demo

DrOpS IntO COpper February 3-4, 2014 By Michael Sudmeier

Photo: Louie Vito Courtesy CoPPer MouNtAiN

Don’t be fooled when Sunday afternoon rolls around at the Denver Convention Center. As brands tear down booths and janitors sweep up abandoned beer cups and catalogs, it’s easy to think that SIA is winding down. In truth, however, the show—and the party—has simply migrated up to the mountains for the On-Snow Demo. This demo plays an essential role in helping retailers better understand next year’s products and make informed purchases. And new host Copper Mountain welcomes the industry this year with 2,465 acres of rideable terrain and an average annual snowfall of over 22 feet.

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“The demo is a one-stop shop for retailers who make it to SIA to combine their buying efforts into a single trip,” explains Johan Malkoski, C3 worldwide sales manager and SIA On-Snow Demo task force member. “There is no regional demo that happens with the depth of product that is available at Copper—every deck, every binding, and plenty of sizes.” According to Stephen Craig, the general manager of Royal Board Shop in Calgary, this is essential for retailers. “The On-Snow demo is a great opportunity for retailers to get new technology under their feet for a firsthand experience,” he explains. “This is not only valuable during the purchase process but also when selling to customers. Customers can see the confidence we have in the product, and that comes from on-snow demos.”

“The On-Snow demo is a great opportunity for retailers to get new technology under their feet for a firsthand experience,” Johan Malkoski, C3 worldwide sales manager and SIA On-Snow Demo task force member. After spending the past four years at Winter Park, the demo kicks off a new chapter by transitioning to Copper. According to SIA President David Ingemie, the move to Copper will help further the demo’s success. He cites an abundance of hotel rooms, a convention center that will serve as SIA’s boot fitting area, and the mountain’s diverse terrain as especially enticing. Ingemie notes that the On-Snow Demo is crucial in ensuring that retailers and their staff “understand what is happening with the product [they’re testing] and how to relay that to their customers.” Yet equally important, he emphasizes that the demo is “an opportunity to embrace what we are actually involved in the industry for—to get on the snow.” Brands and retailers are quick to point out that Copper’s terrain is especially appealing for testing products—and the resort is quick to agree. “We’re excited to show off our mountain,” offers Stephanie Sweeney, Copper’s public relations coordinator. “Copper Mountain is the ideal venue because the mountain is naturally-divided by difficulty and offers a wide variety of terrain ranging from beginner to expert.” Further adding to Copper’s appeal, its world-class parks and pipe are readily accessible from the demo area. Thanks to perfect transitions, manicured kickers, and an abundance of rails, riders will have plenty of opportunities to test the latest gear. Yet Copper’s natural terrain is equally inviting. Its back bowls offer cliff drops, deep snow, and no crowds. Making things even better, Copper offers free snowcat rides to access additional terrain and untracked snow on Tucker Mountain. And while Copper’s terrain is a topic of conversation, the county that contains it is a cornerstone of shredding’s history. Through the years, Summit County has been home to legendary riders, iconic snowboard brands, marquee contests, and parks praised across the globe. And behind this progression is an abundance of passion. As Suta offers, “It’s a hub for snowboarders, gypsies, wanderers, travelers, and anyone else who finds satisfaction in piles of snow.

Top Three Tips For Making The Most Of On-Snow Demos Bring The righT PeoPle To TesT ProduCTs ACross All ABiliTy levels “Always bring a female to demo the women-specific models. Ski shops, bring a snowboarder to try the snowboards. This can be overlooked when booking your group travel. Also, don’t forget to pack properly including lotion, lip blam, and sunscreen. The Colorado elevation and dry air will take a crack at your face, fast. I also like to recommend testing out pricepoint models, too. You should know how well they ride for all ability levels—your customers.” Nichole Nemmmers, Sales Rep, Mervin Manufacturing, Quiksilver, & Sun Bum dAy 1=BoArds, dAy 2=Bindings “My strategy for demoing new product is trying all boards one day and all bindings the next. Since a lot of time can be spent waiting in line at the On-Snow

Demo, [this] really cuts set-up time and allows for more time riding.” Steve Reaves, Owner, Bird’s Eye Board Shop, Brooklyn, NY don’T TrusT your MeMory—MAke A lisT “You should have a list of what is critical to check out and stick to it. Make notes so you have some kind of memory cutting through the end-of-day PBRs. If there’s any time at the end of the day, check out something not on your list that you’ve been hearing buzz about or a brand you’ve been thinking about giving a shot. It’s always good to check out something that isn’t a shop constant, even if it’s not on the buy list. You might find a new stick that ends up being in high demand.” Mike Gagliardi, Sales Manager, Never Summer Snowboards

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Pray For Snow

Denver, we’re headed your way once again. As the snow industry braces itself for another season and prays for snow, SIA is on everyone’s mind. Here’s to 2014, and what is shaping up to be another action-packed Denver trip for everyone who calls the snow industry their life.

01. Electric CEO Eric Crane and Electric co-founder and former President and CEO Bruce Beach. 02. Groundswell Founder Dax Kelm shows off the Jones Ultracraft Splitboard. 03. Electric Snow Team Manager Cyle “Creeps” Cadam, PR Manager Lorena Kops, and none other than Red Man.

01

03

04. The Sector 9 crew, BBQ-ing, supporting the cause, and being generally awesome. Founders Steve Lake and E.G. Fratantaro, with Sales Director Rob Molt, front and center. 05. Quiksilver Senior Vice President of Sales John Mills, with Tom Holbrooke, Sun Diego President & CEO Dave Nash, and VP Of Marketing & Operations Pete Censoplano.

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06. Mervin Manufacturing Founders Mike Olson and Pete Saari. 07. Arnette’s Brent “Beandip” Bearden, Robert “Sticky” Shaw, and Bill Byrne. 08. Sole Tech Sales Rep Carter Katz, Master Plan Communications Founder Ashton Maxfield, and Sole Tech Senior VP of Marketing Don Brown.

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09. Dragon Founder Will Howard and Global Marketing Manager Alex Pashley. 10. Danielle Hambleton, former Burton Brand director, with Burton’s Director of Team Marketing/Media Bryan Knox and Oakley’s Global Sports Marketing Manager Zack Dalton. 11. Apo Founder and shred legend Regis Rolland made the trip over to SIA from France.

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12. Burton’s Anne-Marie Dacyshyn, Donna Carpenter, Abby Young and Melody Pfeiffer. 13. Chris Faronea shot last season’s cover photo for The Guide. 14. Rome’s Dan Sullivan shows us the back room inside the brand’s booth. 11

15. TransWorld SNOWboarding’s Jason “Hondo” Newman getting the scoop from Danny Kass on his Oakley signature goggle.

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16. Eero Ettala and his doppleganger. 17. Eddie Wall, Saori Wall, and Peter Line at the TransWorld SNOWboarding Riders’ Poll Awards. submit your event photos: kailee.bradstreet@transworld.net

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The Guide: 2013 SIA Snow SHow

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THE BEST MOUNTAINS. SEASON PASS. ONE PRICED EXCLUSIVELY FOR SIA ATTENDEES

ONLY AVAILABLE AT THE SHOW

Stop by the Epic Pass booth #1136 to get your exclusive SIA Epic Pass for over 60% off the regular price! Plus, $10 of your purchase goes to Winter Feels Good— providing outreach tools that introduce youth to snowsports.

PASS $

279

ADULT *

Unlimited access for the 2013/14 winter season to Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mt. Brighton, Arapahoe Basin and Eldora starting February 3, 2014. NO BLACKOUT DATES.

* SIA Epic Pass only available to show attendees, exhibitors and buyers with valid show credentials. Must be present to purchase. Adult passes only. SIA Epic Pass valid for the remainder of the 2013/14 ski season, starting February 3, 2014. Does not include summer 2014 or international partner resort access. © 2013 Vail Resorts Management Company. Trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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2014 SIA/TWB The Guide