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On the Cover There are so many festivals and events being held to celebrate music, summertime, and fellowship. Join Showcase Magazine this month in this endless revelry.

Contents { M ay 2 0 1 4 } S h o w c a s e M a g a z i n e

f eatureS

16 24 32

Let’s Talk Festivals

s e ct i o n s

9 HE SAID SHE SAID

Also Inside

May Resolutions

By Larry Oldham & Dena Hill

10 The Money Club

Innovative Minded Banks By Todd Boaze

2014 Festival Guide

12 A Better You

If You Could See the Tears… Then You’d Understand. by Dave Gluhareff

Rooster Walk

Music & Arts Festival Grows Into Memorial Day Tradition

20 Life in the Fat Lane

6 34

From the Editor

37 29

Area Events Guide

Fun and Games

Crossword, Word Seach, & Sudoku

Paws for The Cause By Paulette Dean

The Eighth Mile: Looking Forward by Bobby Allen Roach

42 Mystified

I’ve Got the Lunchtime Madness by Misty Brooks

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F ROM T HE e d i tor Throughout history the physical strength of men is well-documented. There’s the story of Atlas and his strong shoulders. Hercules and his Twelve Labours. But more impressive than the feats of physical vigor are the examples of mental toughness and willpower exhibited by women. Cleopatra and her determination to keep the throne at any cost. Harriet Tubman and her fight for freedom and equality. History has taught us that the “picture menu” definition of strength is bulging biceps and the ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound, but the true embodiment of strength is internal. And there is no greater witness of this strength than a mother with regards to her family. In America, Mother’s Day gained recognition as an official holiday in 1914 after President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure naming the second Sunday of May a day to celebrate mothers. But the roots stem back to 1905. After the death of Anna Reeves Jarvis who helped create “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach mothers to care for their children, her daughter, Anna Jarvis, wanted find a way to honor the sacrifices mothers make for their children. In 1908, with financial backing from John Wanamaker, a Philadelphia entrepreneur, Jarvis held the first Mother’s Day celebration in Grafton, West Virginia. Growing in popularity, by 1912, Mother’s Day was recognized as an annual holiday in many states. In Ancient Greece and Rome, motherhood was honored through festivals dedicated to the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele. In early Christianity, Mothering Sunday signified the celebration of mothers. History has always understood the important role that motherhood plays in shaping the world.

But here’s the thing, mothers need to be recognized daily for their strength, love, and overall willingness to make this world a better place by protecting their children and instilling beliefs in them that will better the future. Growing up, we all had second, third, and maybe in fourth mothers. These were our friends’ mothers. There was an unwritten rule that when we visited our friends’ houses, their mothers would take us under their wing and make sure we didn’t go all degenerate without the watchful eye of our own mother. During my teen years, Wanda Willkerson was my second mother. We lost Wanda a few years ago, but I’m here to tell you Wanda wore every aspect of motherhood like a shining badge. Her internal strength to provide for and raise good kids (as well as their friends) would make Atlas question his strength. As children we see this strength in our parents every day. Over time, the human mind tends to numb to everyday occurrences—viewing them as a given. Nothing is a given. Marvel is ruling pop culture these days with movies about superheroes. It’s fun to escape to a world where a Norse god, with his mighty hammer, can save Earth from his bratty brother suffering from Jan Brady disease. But it’s all make-believe. Our true superheroes are our parents. Never forget that.

Enjoy the issue.

Paul Seiple Editor

SHOWCASE – M A G A Z I N E – May 2014 STAFF

CEO / Publisher Andrew Scott Brooks, scott@showcasemagazine.com President Larry Oldham, larry@showcasemagazine.com Editor Paul Seiple, paul@showcasemagazine.com Producer / Graphic Designer Bobby Allen Roach, bobby@showcasemagazine.com Finance Manager Cindy Astin, cindy@showcasemagazine.com Advertising 1.877.638.8685 Larry Oldham, Director of Sales and Marketing larry@showcasemagazine.com, 434.728.3713 Moriah Davis, Marketing Consultant moriah@showcasemagazine.com, 434.334.4583 Misty Brooks, Marketing Consultant misty@showcasemagazine.com, 434.728.2905 Lee Vogler, Marketing Consultant lee@showcasemagazine.com, 434.548.5335

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Don’t miss the May 2014 issue of eVince


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May is finally here and the springtime sunshine and warm weather brings me to a point I would like to make that you might appreciate. I hate pollen. It messes up my car, stops up my lungs, and gets tracked in the house. I can’t get away from it. I can’t find one redeeming feature when it comes to pollen.

She Said... Yippee!!!! A new you….I can hardly wait! Your May resolutions will probably be like your January resolutions, all empty promises.

This is the way I see it. I met you in 1964 and if I remember correctly, you were always complaining about something, even in high school. Of course, the principal complained pHOTO BY mICHELLE dALTON pHOTOGRAPHY about you and your shenanigans too. I know you can’t do anything about it. I just wanted Did I like it then? No more than I like it now. Can I to complain about something and pollen came to change you now? No more than I could change you mind. I also don’t like slow drivers, cold food or then. I just accept you—complaints and all. We all burned food. I guess I could give you a list of all the have imperfections, some more than others. It has things I don’t like, but it would be redundant of every taken me all these years to learn your peccadilloes, other column we have ever written, so I won’t do it. so please don’t add any more to the mix.You are a complex man, not too demanding, but very strongLet me just say that every day I find more and willed.You like to complain and argue. I can take more things to complain about. Normally I am complaining better than arguing so it’s easier to give not a complainer, but my patience with everyday in, keep quiet, do what I wanted to in the first place. occurrences is growing slim. Do you think it’s My philosophy is you are who you are and who because I’m getting older and more cantankerous? If you’re always going to be. It’s not my job to change it is, then by the time I’m a hundred, the world won’t you but accept you for the man you are. How is that be able to stand me. for diplomacy? My May resolution—if there is such a thing—is not to complain so much and to accept the things I cannot change (except for the slow drivers because I can push them out of the way). This summer you will be experiencing the new me and I just wanted to give you a heads up in case you thought you were going to have to spend another dull summer with me complaining all the time.

Seriously, all of your complaints usually are just you venting about something you can’t change, like slow drivers for instance. I just listen to you and pretend you are Prince Charming who just found the golden slipper and you’re trying to explain to me about how you found that shoe. In the next breath, you complain about how big my foot is since the shoe doesn’t fit and here we go again! SM

Be sure to read She Said He Said in Evince. Send comments to: Larry@showcasemagazine.com

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he said...she said...

May Resolutions

by Larry Oldham & Dena Hill

he Said...

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Innovative Minded Banks

financial

A true eye-opener is to see our great nation floundered with over $17 trillion outstanding debt, not to mention close to $100 trillion in unfunded liabilities. The current personal income growth rate is not increasing, unlike shortterm and long-term growth performed some thirty years ago. Are banks becoming so innovative minded where it leads to the next economic crisis in regards to private debt? The reason why banks are now friendlier than ever is to increase their participation rate. Historically, for many individuals, savings accounts have been the principle investment vehicle for storing liquid wealth. Passbook accounts at commercial banks, savings banks, and credit unions usually offer minimal interest rates. In most institutions, these accounts are insured up to a maximum of $100,000 by a federal agency.

Todd Boaze

todd@showcasemagazine.com

Money management tips, small business strategies and a variety of other financial concepts. Facts and information contained is not intended to provide specific legal, financial or tax advice, or any other advice for any individual or company and should not be relied upon in that regard.

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As a practical matter, funds can be deposited or withdrawn at any time, either at the offices of the financial institution or by using an ATM. In choosing among institutions, look for convenience, the best rate (including any gifts or premiums), and no loss of interest if there are unscheduled withdrawals. ATM fees, debit card fees, and out with free checking, to name a few, appear to change or increase every year. And by the way it looks, consumers are likely to remain constrained in the foreseeable future. Many checking accounts today yield interest like a savings account and cost you nothing if you keep a minimum balance in the account, or in another account in the same institution. The interest rate may be lower than on a savings account, but it is certainly better than the zero interest earned on a traditional checking account. Interest accrues from the day of deposit to the day of withdrawal. So, even when a check is written, the funds continue to earn interest until it clears. However, free checking is on its way out. Many U.S. banks called the end to free checking more than three years ago. Realistically, there is a fee that retailers pay to the banks that issue credit and debit cards called interchange. This fee was typically in the range of about two percent of the purchase.

| May 2014 | www.showcasemagazine.com

The reason behind its madness is that when someone fraudulently used a credit or debit card at a merchant, if the merchant did everything right, and then it is the bank’s responsibility to cover the loss. This means it costs money to process credit or debit transactions. Interchange covered those costs, while banks were required to cover a portion of the loss. To make banking matters attractive, banks soon realized they were making enough on debit interchange that they were able to offer free checking. And, so they did. Critical to the competencies for which they stand for, many large retailers, led by WalMart, began lobbying Congress to lower the interchange rate. By doing so, retailers could then pass the savings on to the consumer. On October 1, 2012 the Durbin Amendment went into effect. The Federal Reserve ruled it was time to limit the amount of interchange banks could collect on debit cards. What this actually meant was those one-cent fraud prevention fees were added to merchants, in addition to another 0.7 percent for fraud prevention already included in the interchange fee. For example, if someone stole your debit card and purchased a $1,000 stereo system, the bank would have to make up that $1,000 loss on roughly $0.25 from all the other purchases. Clearly not enough room to make its money back. Now here we are in 2014 and retailers have not lowered their prices. Additionally, since the banks cannot make money or are losing money on debit cards, they are now taking away free checking. Many credit union customers may ask why their credit union can still offer free checking, while other standard banks do not. What followed was a philosophical proposition. Enough small banks complained about this, whereby the amendment was changed so that banks under $10 Billion in assets would be exempt. In the end, all the amendment did was pass profits from the banks to retailers. The consumer is the one who lost out in free checking services and other increased fees for services associated with banking methods. SM


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health

A Better You

If You Could See the Tears… Then You’d Understand.

Be One of a Kind…Not Part of the Crowd.

From Fitness Professional Dave Gluhareff of Train With Dave: The following piece came about one Saturday morning as I was researching for this column. After a few minutes of putting onto paper feelings of prior discussions with people struggling to get healthy, the following evolved. This was meant to be part of a larger article, but after rereading it, I felt the need to let this stand on its own.

If you could… See who comes to me crying, sad, depressed, and asking for help… See the emails of frustrated people pouring their hearts out at 3am while breaking down… See grown men who can’t walk up 5 stairs without being out of breath and sweating profusely… See women, heavily medicated on anti-depressants, cholesterol meds, and high-blood pressure meds, sad about how they’ve let themselves go… Pete Jones Photography

See parents who secretly bring their young son or daughter with diabetes and weight problems to ask for help … See parents too out of shape and ashamed to get outside and play with their kids… Hear the stories no one wants you to hear… Feel the shame they truly feel…

Dave Gluhareff Suzanne Stowe

Understand the effects of one extra doughnut, that extra dessert, extra soda…

In the late 1990s David Gluhareff lost over 100 pounds. Dave then became a certified personal trainer with the International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA) and began his career as a personal trainer. In May of 2009 David earned the elite status of Master of Fitness Sciences (MFS) by the ISSA, their highest level of personal training qualifications. As a personal trainer, Dave has been helping people take charge of their physiques to help them feel, look, and move better through life. Visit www. VirginiaBootcamp. com for more information.

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Understand the effects inactivity… Understand the effects of forgoing exercise… Understand the effects of not making time for your health…

If you could see the tears, then you would understand. If you’ve seen the heartbreak of obesity that I have (and do every day)…then you’d understand why I take health so seriously. I feel blessed to be in the position I am. Stop enabling yourself or others around you. Stop making excuses that cause more sadness. Stop buying larger clothes to mask your pain. Start taking control of your health.

| May 2014 | www.showcasemagazine.com

From Fitness Professional Suzanne Stowe of Train With Suzanne: I recently met two of my children and their prom dates to take pictures at the fountain, the newest addition to our downtown area. The fountain made a beautiful background. Although there were numerous couples and groups posing for similar shots, with the same background, there was not one dress, one pair of strappy heels, or dangling earrings that were the same. Each one was glamorous and original. Even the guys added unique touches to their tuxedos with colorful ties or a fun pair of sunglasses. If on certain occasions we go out of our way to find that dress or accessory that no one else will be wearing, then why do we compare ourselves and our bodies and want to be like someone else? Choosing to eat healthy or beginning an exercise plan is a great way to achieve results that will enhance body image in addition to overall better physical condition, but it isn’t healthy to compare our best efforts or results against anyone else. The prom dresses are back in the closet. The tuxes have been returned. But that is no reason to go back to being part of the crowd. Let’s encourage an attitude that we are each unique and that fact should be celebrated. Be one of a kind. “For we are God’s masterpiece. He has created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the good things he planned for us long ago.” Ephesians 2:10 SM

For more detailed Exercise, Nutrition, and Rest tips, plus sample meal plans from Dave visit showcasemagazine.com/category/healthfitness/ abetteryou/.

www.TrainWithDave.com


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Let’s Talk Festivals

feature Paul Seiple

Festivals are abundant during spring and summer months. Crowds gather to enjoy good music, great food, and magnificent art. Festival goers start planning for their favorite events months ahead of time, but when the big day arrives many aren’t as prepared as they once thought.

Prepare Yourself In 2013, 90,000 people bought three-day passes to the Coachella Valley Music and Arts festival. If you’re a rookie, you’ll learn early on that patience gets you a long way when maneuvering through the sea of congestion. Any time large crowds of people congregate in the same area there will be heated moments. There will be inconsiderate people. It’s easy to concentrate on the fun times to be had at festivals, but there are a few steps you should take to make sure your fun isn’t lost in the long port-a-potty lines. Don’t wait until the last minute to buy tickets. Festivals are known for being able to house large crowds, so you may feel no rush to purchase tickets. This could be trouble. Warm weather festivals are growing in popularity and tend to sell out faster these days. Buy tickets from reputable sources. If you choose online ticket resellers, be sure there is a policy in place to protect you from scams. Avoid ticket scalpers; the only reassurance that the ticket is genuine is the smile on the scalper’s face. Don’t trust it. Treat the event like a final exam. Tests aren’t always fun, neither is failing. Knowing the policies of the festival, the sources of food and water, and restroom locations gives you a leg up in the game. Research the festival online to learn tricks and past grievances, if any, from festival goers to equip yourself for the fun times ahead. A good online source is Last.fm— search: festivals in the United States. Also, when you arrive at the festival grab a brochure. It will

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have all important information plus onstage times for all performers. Pack a Bag. Many festivals, especially music festivals, are multi-day events, stocking a backpack with the essentials is a necessity. Pick a pack that is rugged yet comfortable, you’ll be attached to this thing through the whole festival. If not, chances are it will get stolen. Petty theft just isn’t the name of a band on the second stage. When packing, make a checklist—personal hygiene products, energy bars, hand sanitizer, toilet paper, prescription medicine, aspirin, first aid kit, etc. When researching the festival be sure to check for anything that is prohibited. If it’s on your checklist, scratch it off or risk confiscation.

Protect Yourself The first thing you should do when entering a festival is to locate the medical station. Chances are you will not assistance, but on the rare instance that you do, it’s good to know where to go ahead of time. If you have a preexisting medical condition, be sure to wear a medical id bracelet. Give friends advance notice of what to do in case of an emergency. An ounce of prevention could save your life. Festivals are oftentimes held in locations notorious for bad cell phone reception. Don’t bank on having signal. Set up a meeting place and time to catch up with your friends in case you get separated.

Skin Sunscreen is something you should never leave home without when heading to a festival. Even on cloudy days, eighty percent of sunshine can still break through, bombarding you with harmful UVA and UVB rays. Look for sunscreen that contains zinc oxide as it shields against the entire spectrum of UVA and UVB rays. Bring lip protection, sunglasses, and a hat as well for defense against the sun.


Hydrate As the sun can be your nemesis, so can dehydration. It’s crucial to stay hydrated. Some festivals have free water stations. Find them and fill up your water bottle. If you feel that you are becoming dehydrated seek help immediately.

Early Signs of Dehydration • • • • • • • • •

Increased Thirst Dry Mouth Weakness Dizziness Confusion Heart Palpitations Lack of Sweat Production Decreased Urine Fainting

It’s also important to be very cautious when accepting beverages from strangers. The simple rule is don’t do it.

Nutrition Don’t forget to eat. It’s important to keep your blood sugar levels even. Bring foods such as energy bars, apples, dried fruit, and nuts. Avoid food that will succumb to the heat —cheese, meat, etc.

Ears Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) will go on long after the band strums its last chord. Ringing in the ears will continue long after your camping buddy falls asleep after screaming, “Play Freebird,” all day. To ensure that you will be able to enjoy the music for years to come, play it safe and wear ear plugs. It doesn’t make you any less cool.

Feet With warm weather you may be tempted to wear sandals. Ignore the temptation. Closed-toe shoes will protect your feet from rhythmically-challenged festival goers around you. Closed-toe shoes also give you an added protection against the sun. Feet are often neglected when applying sunscreen.

Clothing The afternoon heat may mock you for bringing a hoodie to a summer festival, but your body will curse you at night if the temperatures dip.You have limited space when it comes to packing for a festival, but it’s important to never forget that Mother Nature has a mind of her own. Arm yourself for one of her tantrums. Bring a rain poncho too.

Have an Open Mind Getting a large group of people together and mixing in hot weather, long lines for food and restrooms, tight spaces in front of the stage can be a recipe for disaster. Understand that even with all of the planning, something will not go right. The people around you are at the festival for the same reasons as you—to have a good time. They are not your enemies. Don’t be a buzzkill. Enjoy the time, make new friends, and create positive memories. SM

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The Eighth Mile: Looking Forward

life in the fat lane

“Slow and steady” bores me. I hate this scoreboard. But it reminds me that progress is happening, no matter the orbital pace.

It’s difficult to imagine what my life will be like when I have achieved my wellness goals. During the past month, I have noticed bad eating habits and decisions naturally becoming less and less difficult to avoid. I know I am changing and becoming myself, finally.

Bobby Allen Roach twitter.com/Bobby_Roach

As the bad habits slip away, I am drawn to spend more time working on productive things like my new website, www.bobbyroach.com, or practicing playing the piano. I feel my life entering a phase of cultural and self-enrichment. There is such a large world open to me and I want to learn more about it and see more of it.

I’m speaking metaphorically, of course. Or am I? Reflecting on the gradual changes I have made over the past several months, I can say that I feel a way that I never have—I feel like I can do anything and make anything happen for myself. I feel like maybe—just maybe—I can be happy. Truly happy for the first time in a very long time.

I think I’m going to become an adventurer.

The road ahead is a long one, but I know now that I have what it takes to reach the finish line.

Who am I kidding? Every day of my life is an adventure—a roll of the proverbial dice.

I have taken full responsibility for myself and whatever happens next is part of a well-laid plan.

What s or your h t of vitamins ealth? I do you tak ta per day to main e two capsule ke to improve system s of cin . Tweet tain a healthy namon cir me at @ supplem Bobby_ culatory ental s tories. Roach with yo ur

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I run in so many circles, I don’t know who is going to need what on a given day and I have to leave home prepared to save the world at a moment’s notice.

| May 2014 | www.showcasemagazine.com

How is your weight-loss effort coming along? Write me on Twitter at twitter.com/Bobby_Roach and tell me about what has worked to help you get your life on track. SM


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2014 Festival Guide

feature

Battle of Martinsville Reenactment

Plan a day trip or overnight excursion to these buzz worthy events

Jennifer Doss

Director of Tourism Martinsville-Henry County, Virginia Economic Development

Courtesy of Martinsville Tourism

Spring is here and that also means the kickoff to festival season! My family and I love attending festivals throughout Southern Virginia to sightsee, eat fun foods, shop and enjoy spending quality time together. Festivals are a good way to discover new businesses in your community that you might not know about and meet others that share the same interests as you. Here is a rundown of some upcoming Southern and Southwestern Virginia Festivals not to miss this year.

Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival

May 22-25 (Gates open Thursday at 11 a.m. to VIP ticket holders and on Friday at noon for General Admission)

Driving out to the countryside on the outskirts of Martinsville,Virginia you’ll pass residential areas, forests and farms before stumbling upon a little piece of heaven in Southern Virginia. Blue Mountain Festival Grounds, the current home to Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival, is nestled among rolling hills making a perfect amphitheater for the event’s three stages. In the middle of it all, a shaded oasis and a cool mountain creek provides space for relaxation and dining. Upon arrival you can turn off your mobile devices and truly unplug because there’s no cell phone reception in this peaceful valley. Each Memorial Day weekend more than 3,000 people make a pilgrimage to this location to spend time enjoying an impressive lineup of musicians and bands, musical performances, storytellers, artists and demonstrations. This year is no exception as the lineup of performers includes more than 30 musicians and bands including Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe,The Infamous Stringdusters,Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott, Anders Osborne,The Pimps of Joytime, Particle,The Lee Boys,Yarn and many more! The festival was named the #1 up-and-coming festival in the mid-Atlantic and Southeast U.S. by Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine last year.

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On-site camping is available and activities go on around the clock ranging from early morning yoga and nature programs to musical workshops, a charity duck race in the creek and late night silent discos. If camping is not your cup of tea, several area hotels and B&B’s are available just 15 minutes away. Two complementary shuttle buses sponsored by VisitMartinsville.com run on a constant loop from Blue Mountain to several stops in town from one hour before the first band begins to half an hour after the last band ends. Throughout the three-day event, bands alternate between the venue’s two main stages so that there is little to no delay in music between sets. A third smaller stage offers a performance venue for local bands. There are plenty of vendors to browse and great food to eat. On Sunday morning, Rooster Walk hosts the Tuff Stutter 5K, billed as one of the toughest trail runs in the Blue Ridge. Rooster Walk is a very family-friendly event. A children’s area offers a stage dedicated to youth programming plus a safe play space for kids to enjoy crafts, bubbles and hula hooping while parents can still hear the music. A sheltered area with rocking chairs is even provided for parents of smaller children. There are always lots of surprises in store like magician acts, fire twirlers, hoop dancers and even spontaneous parades for young music enthusiasts to join in. Blue Mountain Festival Grounds, Martinsville; roosterwalk.com; single day tickets start at $30

Fieldale Heritage Festival May 17 (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.)

If you were born in the 70s or 80s then chances are good that you had Fieldcrest-Cannon bed sheets or bath towels in your home. Growing up in rural Georgia, I recall my mother purchasing this American-made brand for our home.Years later after moving to Virginia, it was a real treat to finally see the Village of Fieldale where this product was manufactured. While Fieldcrest Mills is no longer in operation as a textiles manufacturer, the iconic brick smokestack bearing the painted name “Fieldale,” still stands watch over the quiet village of Fieldale,Virginia. In 2007 Fieldale was named to the State Historic Register and in 2008 it was added to the National Register. Today the village is known for its serene hiking and biking trails, paddling opportunities,


world class fly fishing and weekly jam sessions. Each May the village comes alive with a daylong celebration of the mill town that was established in 1917 by Marshall Field and Co. The Fieldale Heritage Festival honors the history of the textile industry that built this community and the dedicated residents that have shaped its future. The event, which serves as a homecoming for residents that grew up in Fieldale, kicks off early in the morning with a Pancake Breakfast at 7 a.m. Soon vendors fill up the lawns and streets of the town square with delicious foods, gifts to purchase, local crafts and informative displays.

Witness the Battle of Martinsville, a Civil War reenactment, encampment and living history weekend spread out over 60 rolling acres of land.You’ll have the opportunity to see sutlers, artillery, horses and more. Meet General Keith Cornelius, commander of the Confederate Forces and Colonel Lance Dawson, commander of the Federal Forces. Battles will be held both days with full size guns, artillery, infantry and cavalry. Smith River Sports Complex; Axton,VA; smithriversportscomplex.com; $5 admission, children 12 and under free

Smith River Fest

August 15 (4 p.m. - 10 p.m.)

The Virginia State Peach Festival began in 1988 to recognize and promote the peach harvest of Patrick County. This year the Festival will not only be held at a new location, Wayside Park, but for the first time ever camping will be available through the Park. The Friday night concert event will feature music by Evan and Dana and The Worx. Also fresh local peaches, food, crafters and business exhibitors and much more! Wayside Park; Stuart,VA; patrickchamber.com

August 9 (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.)

Martinsville Culture Crawl

Exhibits showcase what the village looked like in the early 1900s and highlight the many community leaders and interesting people that have lived in the village. Festive music, antique cars and children’s activities are offered throughout the day. Costumed soldiers representing local residents that participated in the revolutionary war parade through the festival grounds and even have an encampment set up from which they demonstrate campfire cooking and the firing of muskets and cannons. Miss Virginia will also make a special appearance at the festival this year. Festival participants can travel nearby to The Virginia Home Inn for guided tours of the historic B&B which was constructed as a dormitory for female employees of the mill. A short walk down to the Smith River will lead festival goers to the Historic Fieldale Iron Bridge Memorial, an icon of the community, and the Textile Heritage Trail which details the story of textiles throughout the community of Martinsville-Henry County. Plan for a full day of activity during your visit! Fieldale Village; visitmartinsville.com; free admission

Virginia State Peach Festival

September 6 (4 p.m. – 9 p.m.)

A celebration of arts and culture in Uptown Martinsville. Join the fun by visiting Martinsville’s many participating museums, art studios, shops and restaurants. Special events, including live music, community theatre and cocktail parties, will take place at different venues. Tickets can be purchased online or at participating venues. Uptown Martinsville; piedmontarts.org; $10 admission

Bassett Heritage Festival Pony Rides at the Smith River Fest

Run, paddle and bike your way to fun at Smith River Fest- an event celebrating all things associated with the Smith River. Paddle the river, participate in the 4.8 mile long river race and 5K Helgramite Hustle Mud Run, browse hundreds of vendor booths, enjoy children’s activities, compete in the duck race, watch live demonstrations and much more. Smith River Sports Complex; Axton,VA; smithriverfest.com; free admission

September 13

Centered around the world headquarters of Bassett Furniture Industries, this event offers vendors with food, crafts and gifts, a pancake breakfast, classic car show, music, free rides and a parade. The Historic Bassett Train Depot houses displays on Native-American artifacts, photography, historic displays and more during the festival. Bassett,VA; visitmartinsville.com; free admission

Coming Up Later…

June German Festival & Street Dance

June 7 (Festival: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.; Dance: 7:30 p.m. – 12:30 a.m.)

This celebration offers great food, historical research, oral history, interviews, exhibits, cultural sharing, motivational speakers and more. In the evening, a street dance will be hosted that emulates the well-remembered June German Ball from the 1930’s to the early 1960’s. Uptown Martinsville; fahimuseum.org; free admission to festival, dance $15

Battle of Martinsville June 7-8 (9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.)

Smith River Fest Mud Run www.showcasemagazine.com

| May 2014 | Showcase Magazine 25


delicious bratwurst. The Broad Street stage will showcase an assortment of talent as well. Uptown Martinsville; martinsvilleuptown.net; free admission

Reptile Family Day Festival

October 18 (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.)

Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest International Arts & Culture Festival October 4 (11 a.m. – 4 p.m.)

More than 10,000 visitors pack the streets of Uptown Martinsville each year for this festival.

The event’s vendors offer everything from free balloons to fine art, plus lots of kidfriendly activities including inflatable bounce houses and a petting zoo. “Little Germany” will also offer a beer garden selling craft beer as well as traditional German foods like

Slither your way into the Virginia Museum of Natural History to witness some of the most exciting coldblooded creatures around! Marvel at over 200 live snakes and other reptiles. Take part in reptilethemed games and crafts throughout the day. Cobras, rattlesnakes, alligators and much more await you at the Reptile Day Family Festival. Virginia Museum of Natural History; Martinsville,VA; vmnh.net; Admission free to museum members and $3-5 for guests SM

May 22-25 • Martinsville, va. An Awesome little non-profit music festivAl music • Art • cAmping • food • Beer • trAil rAce COLOR GUIDELINE Martinsville DuPont Credit Union

PANTONE 3015

Karl Denson’s tiny Universe • the infaMoUs stringDUsters C:100 M:31 Y:5 K:20

tiM o’Brien & Darrell scott • anDers osBorne • PiMPs of JoytiMe Particle • yarn • anD Many, Many More! www.roosterwalK.coM BLACK/WHITE

proudly sponsored By 26 Showcase Magazine

| May 2014 | www.showcasemagazine.com


Star-rated childcare programs provide higher quality care for your child! Preschool programs participating in the Virginia Star Quality Initiative receive a quality rating of one to five stars. The star rating is based on:

• Teacher education and training • Learning environment • Quality of adult and child interactions Star ratings give you the power to make an informed choice about your child’s earliest learning experience.

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of a child’s critical thinking skills are developed by age 5.

Star-Rated Preschool Programs in Danville & Pittsylvania County CHILD CARE CENTERS

FAMILY HOMES

Children First Learning Center Children’s House at Mt. Vernon United Methodist Church CIC Head Start DRMC Child Development Center, FFI Faith Christian Academy Families First Children’s Center at DCC Little Blessings Childcare, Inc. Pittsylvania County Head Start Play-n-Pretend Small World Childcare Center Tot Spot

GabDan’s Christian Day Care Howard’s Day Care Little Prince and Princess Family Day Care

COMING SOON Danville Public Schools/ VA Preschool Initiative The Harvest Corner Sacred Heart School

www.SmartBeginningsDP.org | 434•797• 8887

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| May 2014 | Showcase Magazine 27


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| May 2014 | www.showcasemagazine.com


Desperately Seeking Simplicity

How much is on your “to do” list right now? Do you need more hours in the day? When it comes to your time, have you ever considered your return on investment? Every day you are investing your time in something. By nature, we complicate things, take on too many tasks and do a lot of things the hard way. The result is stressed out, burned out people, frantically functioning through life, without really living it. Henry Thoreau said, “Our life is frittered away by detail...Simplify, simplify.” If you really desire more time for what’s important, it’s up to you to simplify. Here are some suggestions: Start by identifying what is most important to you. Boil it down to two or three main things you do with your time that you feel will have the most lasting impact. Put those at the top of your list.....and keep them there. Eliminate or delegate things of lesser importance. Scan the list for things you don’t really have to do, but you do anyway. Determine if it’s time to eliminate some of these things, or if someone else could do them just as well. Consider email lists to which you can unsubscribe to eliminate clutter,

magazine subscriptions you can cancel because you never read them, and chores you can assign to others in your household - especially if they’re just as “qualified” as you are to do them! Automate as much as possible. Consider using direct deposit to save a trip to the bank, automatic bill pay to avoid missing critical due dates, creating grocery lists and appointments in your phone so they’re always handy, and letting calls go to voicemail if you know you don’t have time to talk to the caller. Don’t overcomplicate tasks by requiring perfection. There are cases where perfection is the only option, but for the majority of things, good enough is good enough. The house will eventually get dusty again, but your children won’t grow smaller. Determine what can function just as well with good enough right now and save perfection for the things that really matter. Consider your time a precious commodity. Invest it wisely. Kristina R. Barkhouser, CPLP Direct: 434.797.6770 Mobile: 434.489.1309 kbarkhouser@ExcelenPerformance.com Kristina R. Barkhouser is the founder and President of Excelen Performance, Inc. She has over 20 years of experience in technical and interpersonal skills development.

www.showcasemagazine.com

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TIME FOR A CHANGE OUT?

ENERGY STAR Clothes Washer (Rebate of $50 per unit) ENERGY STAR Refrigerator (Rebate of $30 per unit) ENERGY STAR Room Air Conditioner (Rebate of $25 per unit) Rebates on additional products and services are available.

For more information visit danvillehomesave.com or call 888-599-0450. Are you thinking about changing out your home’s clothes washer or refrigerator? Are you worried about enduring another hot summer with an old window AC unit that doesn’t cool you down? Maybe it’s time for a change out for an ENERGY STAR model! The Home$ave program makes it easy for Danville Utilities customers to receive money back when you change out or replace older qualifying equipment for newer, more energy efficient models. Simply purchase a qualifying product or service, fill out the Home$ave rebate application, and send in the application along with required proof of purchase documentation to us by mail, fax or email. Your rebate check will arrive by mail in just a few weeks!

See application for full list of qualifying equipment, services and applicability details. For more information and to download the rebate application visit, www.danvillehomesave.com or scan the QR code with your smartphone to visit the mobile website.


www.showcasemagazine.com

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Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival Grows Into Memorial Day Tradition

feature

Lisa Snedeker

Photo by Josh King/Kingdom Photography Six years ago, a few hundred people gathered to hear 10 bands and remember two fallen friends, and Rooster Walk was born. In 2013, the fifth annual Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival drew an estimated 3,500 attendees and dozens of acts including headliners Leftover Salmon, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk and Yarn. This year’s crowds for Rooster Walk 6, scheduled for May 22-25, are expected to exceed 4,000 thanks to acts like Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, the Infamous Stringdusters, Tim O’Brien and Darrell Scott, Anders Osborne, the Pimps of Joytime, Particle and Yarn, just to name a few. The festival takes place just north of Martinsville, Virginia at Blue Mountain Festival Grounds,

located just off U.S. 220 in the heart of the Piedmont foothills. “We’re really proud of this year’s band lineup,” says co-founder and organizer Johnny Buck. “Most of the headliners are playing twohour sets. We’ve sold out of VIP tickets for the first time. Rooster Walk 6 is going to be an amazing little music festival.” Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine has dubbed Rooster Walk the best 32 Showcase Magazine

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“Underground Festival” in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, beating out festivals in Georgia, Ohio and North Carolina. The magazine described “Underground Festivals” as events that “may fly under the radar, but not for long.” Blue Ridge Outdoors wrote, “If you find huge crowds to be a drag, consider this low-key weekend that features an impressive lineup of roots music held in the scenic foothills of Martinsville—a former furniture mecca making a comeback through arts and outdoor recreation.” Other acts Buck and William Baptist, co-founder of Rooster Walk, have put together for RW6 include the Lee Boys, Stephane Wrembel & His Band, James Justin & Co., the Kings of Belmont, Sanctum Sully, After Jack, the Jon Stickley Trio, Hotel de Ville, Urth, Mason Via & Friends, and many more. Jay Franck, who plays mandolin and Photo by Marc Millman co-founded the Asheville, North Carolina band Sanctum Sully stated his band, which played the first Roster Walk, has grown with the festival. “For me, a large part of Rooster Walk is that it’s a homecoming,” said Franck, who is a 2001 Martinsville High graduate. “I enjoy the smaller festivals because you don’t have to miss anything, and you don’t have to walk forever to see music or play. It’s an easier experience. I feel like the crowd is similar that goes to Rooster Walk and FloydFest.” The family-friendly Rooster Walk, which features on-site camping, the Tuff Strutter 5K trail race, food vendors, music workshops, and kids’ activities, is like a backyard cookout with your friends and a soundtrack of great music.


Photo by Russ Helgren “There is so much more,” Selma Smith of Averett University in Danville wrote on Facebook. “Every aspect of Rooster Walk is so well run. Those who have not been should go.You’ll be glad you did!” Rooster Walk was started to celebrate the lives of two close friends who died too young — Martinsville natives Edwin “The Rooster” Penn and Walker Shank. “Ever since elementary school, we were a tight knight group,” Buck said of his and Baptist’s friendship with Penn and Shank. “When we lost Edwin and Walker, we wanted to do something in their memory that they would’ve loved. Something that brings people together for a good cause and something that can serve as showcase for the Martinsville area.” A portion of

the festival’s proceeds goes to a scholarship fund for Martinsville High School seniors. More than $30,000 has been donated to the Penn Shank Memorial Scholarship Fund since 2009. With each year Rooster Walk grows

Photo by Russ Helgren

in popularity. Rooster Walk 6 is sure to be the biggest yet. “We just want to keep this thing rolling,” said Baptist. “Make it better every year, remember our friends with the scholarships, and show off this part of the state to visitors who might want to come back again sometime.”

Single-day tickets, multi-day passes and camping passes are available. For more information, including ticket prices, visit www.roosterwalk.com. Lisa Snedeker is a freelance entertainment writer who lives in Madison, North Carolina. Learn more about area music events at https://musicreporterblog.wordpress.com/. SM

Photo by Russ Helgren www.showcasemagazine.com

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S M T W T F S

Photo by Russ Helgren

1 2 3

DANVILLE

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

5 - Let’s Dance - This event occurs on Mondays. Instructor Donna Robbins will be teaching the East Coast Swing. Ages 18+. 7-8:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Martinsville

2 - Book Swap - This event occurs on Fridays. Bring or book or two to leave and take a book or two to read. Ages 50+. 9AM-5PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 2 - Singing at Ballou - Join us for karaoke – sing or just listen and enjoy. Ages 50+. 2-3:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 2 - Friday Night Dances - This event occurs on Fridays. Live music, dancing and refreshments. Sponsored by the Ballou Council on Aging. Ages 50+. 7:3010:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

Arts/Exhibits/ Entertainment

5 - Bingo at IHOP, Teal Court Donations accepted for prizes. Ages 50+. 1-3PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

8 - Medicare Seminar - This seminar is presented by Shelley Paschal of Humana to help you make the right choices regarding your Medicare plan. Ages 50+. 11AM-12:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 9 - Age of Champions Movie Screening - Free movie screening compliments of Shelley Paschal of Humana and AARP. 2-3:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. www.showcasemagazine.com

L ifestyle / L ecture

5 - Let’s Dance - This event occurs on Mondays. Instructor Donna Robbins will be teaching the East Coast Swing.

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1 - Ballou Jammers - This event occurs on Thursdays. An acoustic musical

5 - Caswell Book Club: Drew Perry, “This Is Just Exactly Like You” Caswell Book Club: Drew Perry, “This Is Just Exactly Like You” - Join us for an evening of literary discussions.After the book discussion, we will be dining at Hush Puppies with the author. Time: 6 PM – 7:45 PM Caswell Book Club is sponsored by Gunn Memorial Library and CaryPress. 6-7:45PM. Gunn Memorial Library. 336-388-0248.

8 - Mystery Trip - It’s a surprise where we go! Wear comfortable shoes! Trip limited to ten participants. 11AM12:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

May 2014

1 - Stained Glass Classes - Using the Copper Foil Method, you will learn how to score and break glass, foil, grind, clean and assemble a light catcher project and much more. Materials and tools are furnished. Taught one day and/or night per week for 2 hours for a 5 week session. Times and dates determined upon interest. This class is taught by local craftsman, Steven Holley, who has 25 years’ experience in this craft. 8AM. Ballou Recreation Center. $150. 434799-5216.

7 - Technology Woes Lifeline - This event occurs on Wednesdays 1-4:30pm and Thursdays 3-4pm. Bring your tech woes to these thirty-minute, one-onone trouble shooting sessions with a computer savvy technician. Ages 50+. 1PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434799-5216.

K ids

5 - Tai Chi - This event occurs on Mondays. Tai Chi increases strength, balance, flexibility and allows you to explore your inner self. Instructor Paul Schwarz. All ages. 12:15PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

7 - Burial and Cremation Seminar Preplanning can give you the peace of mind to enjoy life! Ages 50+. Light refreshments served. Presented by Norris Funeral Services. 1-2PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

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3 - Reptile and Amphibian Bio Blitz - Join Jason Gibson on a search for reptiles and amphibians in creeks and wetlands. Ages 10-adult. Register by April 25th. 1-4PM. Anglers Park. 434-799-5215.

7 - Bingo at Hardees on Riverside Drive - Donations accepted for prizes. Ages 50+. 1-3PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

H obbies / S ports

5 - Meet the Mouse and Keyboard Class - An introduction to the mouse and computer keyboard. Ages 50 and up. 11AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195.

7 - Wednesday Friends - This event occurs on Wednesdays. Bring your lunch and we will provide a special speaker or activity. Second Wednesday is shopping day. Ages 60+. 11AM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

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3 - Artfelt Expressions of Bob Ross Instructor Ed Gowen guides you to the completion of a Cooper Winter portrait. Ages 18+. Bring lunch! 10:30AM-3:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

7 - Basic MS 2010 Class - Learn how to use the basic features of Microsoft Wrod. Prerequisite: Meet the Mouse/ Keyboard or comparable knowledge of using the mouse and keyboard. Ages 50 and up. 11AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195.

H elping H ands

3 - Spring River Clean Up - Help clean up the Dan River while you “Make Danville Shine”. Gloves, litter-getter and trash bags will be provided. Ages 12-adult. Registration by April 25 is appreciated, but not required. 9-11AM. Meet on the front steps of the train station at the Crossing of the Dan. 434799-5215.

Lifestyle/Lectures

Ages 18+. 7-8:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

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3 - Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia Walk For Wishes - Powered by wish families, volunteers, donors and friends, Walk For Wishes is a nationwide Make-A-Wish® signature fundraiser that celebrates the thousands of wishes that have already been granted, while raising funds for future wishes. Greater Richmond Walk For Wishes is a community-wide event. 8AM. Dorey Park. 804-217-9474.

jamboree. Bring a stringed instrument or just sit and listen. Ages 50+. 3-5PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

entertainment

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DANVILLE

arts

MISS!

AREAEventsGuide

DON’T

May‘14

22-25 - Rooster Walk - An awesome little non-profit music festival with music, art, camping, food, beer, and a trail race. Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, The Infamous Stringdusters, Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott, Anders Osborne, Pimps of Joytime, Particle,Yarn, and many, many more will perform! More information: www.roosterwalk.com.

| May 2014 | Showcase Magazine 37


Continued from Page 37

AREAEventsGuide

9 - Flip Flop Friday - Join us for a relaxing evening of music, yummy food from ChathaMooCa, and delicious wines! 6-10PM. The Homeplace Vineyard. 434-432-9463. 9 - Kayaking by Moonlight - Enjoy a guided river tour by twilight. Ages 12-adult $15 CR/$18 NCR Register by May 1. 7-9:30PM. Unnamed Venue. 434-799-5215. 10 - Caching in on Scenery: The Sixth Annual Amazing County Treasure Hunt - Whether you’re an experienced geocacher or new to this fun sport, you’re invited to join us for a unique adventure. Two classes will compete this year: Novice geocachers will search in Explore Park, while Experts will travel to a variety of sites in the county, all using a handheld GPS for guidance. This FREE event will begin and end at Roanoke County’s Explore Park as it is being held this year in conjunction with the Explore Park Open House. 10AM. Roanoke County’s Explore Park. 540-777-6326. 12 - Beginner Internet Class - Learn how to navigate the Internet. Perform basic Internet searches. Ages 50 and up. 11AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195. 12 - AARP Smart Drivers Class - May 12-13 12:30-5:30pm each day – must attend both days. Make checks payable to AARP. Class designed for ages 50+ to refresh driving skills. 12:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-7995216. 12 - Senior Bowling Tournament - to regidHave fun bowling and have your blood pressure and body mass index checked free while you wait! $5 includes shoes -and two games. Ages 50+. Call Riverside Lanes (434)791-2695 to register. 1-3PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-7995216. 13 - Sarah Duke Gardens Trip with Seniors on the Move! - Trip to Durham, NC to tour the gardens, etc. Call Deloris Crews (434) 7995216 for prices and details. 7AM-7PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

13 - Introduction to Genealogical Research Part I - An introduction to online family research. 11AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195. 13 - Bingo at Emeritus at Danville, Hermitage Drive - Donations accepted for prizes. Ages 50+. 2-3:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434799-5216. 14 - Library Online Catalog and Resources Class - Instruction on how to use the online catalog and databased. Ages 50 and up. 11AM1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195. 14 - Stand Up and Be Strong - This seminar is presented by the physical therapist of Riverside Health and Rehabilitation to teach you to recognize fall dangers in your home and exercises to prevent falls. Ages 50+. 12-1PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 15 - Senior Citizens Club - Meeting and covered dish luncheon. Ages 50+. 12-1:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 15 - Introduction to Genealogical Research Part II - An introduction to online family research. Prerequisite: Introduction to Genealogical Research Part I. 8AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195. 15 - Bingo at Danville Public Library, Patton Street - Donations accepted for prizes. Ages 50+. 11AM-12PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 15 - Enchanted Evenings Concert at Ballou Stage - Ray Martin band performs. Bring a chair or blanket and enjoy this free concert. 8PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 16 - National Bike to Work and School Day Use a green form of transportation to travel to work, school, or to your favorite places. Register by May 13th to be recognized. All-day event. Unnamed Venue. 434-799-5215. 17 - Dog Wash - Small dogs – $10; medium dogs -$12; large dogs – $14; nail trim – $5. 9AM-12PM. Danville Community Market. 434793-4636.

17 - Danville Symphony Orchestra “Spring Pops Concert – Power Pops, Tribute to John Williams” - From Jaws to Jurassic Park and Superman to Schindler’s List, we pay tribute to America’s greatest film composer! 8-9:30PM. George Washington High School Auditorium. 19 - Basic Email Computer Classes - Learn the basics of email and set up your own email account at a free website. Practice receiving and sending emails as well as composing and replying to email. Ages 50 and up. 11AM-1PM. Danville’s Community Market. 877-638-8685. 19 - Caswell Book Club: Dr. Stephanie Helms Pickett, “Her Name is SHE” - Join us for an evening of literary discussions from 6 PM to 7:45 PM. After the book discussion, we will be dining at a local restaurant with the author. 6-7:45PM. Gunn Memorial Library. 336-3880248. 20 - Bingo at Abingdon Place, Executive Drive - Donations accepted for prizes. Ages 50+. 10:30AM-12PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 20 - Court Records for Genealogical Research: Part I - Learn how to utilize court records to research your family history. 11AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-799-5195. 22 - Court Records for Genealogical Research: Part II - Learn how to utilize court records to research your family history. Prerequisite: Court Records for Genealogical Research Part I. 11AM-1PM. Danville Public Library. 434-7995195. 22 - Kayak-Newton’s Landing - Paddle your stress away as you move through class II rapids. $15 CR/$18 NCR Ages 12-adult Register by May 15th. 6-8PM. Meet at Newton’s Landing. 434-799-5215. 23 - Zip Express - Enjoy a Friday night zip lining through the trees! Ages 8-adult. Register by May 16th. 6-7:30PM. Philip Wyatt Memorial Skate Park Shelter. 434-799-5215. 24 - Creeks, Streams and Squiggly Things - Find squiggly amphibians swimming in the creeks

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AREAEventsGuide

of Anglers Park. $5 CR/$6 NCR Ages 6-12. Register by May 14th. 10-11:30AM. Meet at Anglers Park Shelter No. 21. 434-799-5215. 31 - Boating Demo Clinic - Drop by and try your hand at kayaking, canoeing, or stand up paddle boarding for $5. Ages 8-adult. Under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. 2-5PM. Camilla Williams Park. 434-799-5215. 31 - Senior Prom - “A Dance Down Memory Lane” is the theme to Ballou’s ‘senior prom’ for ages 50+. Music by the Bullet Band, heavy refreshments, photos and lots of prom fun! 6-10PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-7995216.

Hobbies/Sports

1 - Pickleball - Pickleball is a combination of the elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis. Practice and play at Ballou Park Tennis Courts. Mondays-Wednesdays-Fridays 9am12pm; Tuesdays-Thursdays starts at 5pm all month. 9AM - 12PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 6 - Walk Fit - This event occurs on Tuesdays and Fridays. This new exercise class is designed for ages 50+. Get fit with walking and low impact exercises in the climate controlled recreation center. 7:30AM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 6 - Ballou Choir Rehearsal - Bring your singing talents and join the choir! Monthly performances throughout the city. Ages 50+. 11:15AM-12:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

showing Disney’s FROZEN Bring blankets & chairs Popcorn & drinks for sale movie starts at dusk for more information call 434575-4209 or visit info@downtownsobo.com. 8-10:30PM. Constitution Square. 434-575-4209.

6 - African Violet Club - Meeting and covered dish luncheon. Ages 50+. 12-1:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216. 6 - Hand and Foot Social - This event occurs on Tuesdays. join the hottest card game in town. Snacks provided. 2PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

30 - The Summer Concert Series in Constitution Square - Great food, Music & Beverages for the Entire Family! Friday, May 30 in Downtown South Boston VA Featuring the tribute band Appetite for Destruction Admission $10 Gates open at 7:30pm Show 8:00pm for more information call 434-5754209 or visit www.downtownsobo.com. 7:3011:30PM. Constitution Square. 343-575-4209.

6 - Bingo at Hairston & Johnston, Beavers Mill Road - Donations accepted for prizes. Ages 50+. 2:30-3:30PM. Ballou Recreation Center. 434-799-5216.

South Boston

Martinsville

26 - Earth Day Extravaganza - Eco Demonstrations, Tutorials, Children’s Crafts, Games, Scavenger Hunt, Poster Contest, and more! 10AM. Halifax Farmer’s Market. 434-

1 - Lacework - Register today for our lacework class where students will learn to create a beautiful shawl! Class starts Thursdays, May 1-29 from 5:30-8:30 pm. $89. The Artisan Center. 276-656-5461.

Kids/Family

Lifestyle/Lectures

470-1602.

3 - Spring Craft Fair - Join us for our first outdoor craft fair! Come shop handcrafted items made by local and regional artisans. 10AM-3PM. The Artisan Center. 276-656-0343.

Arts/Entertainment

2 - Halifax County Heritage and Antique Machinery Festival - 3-Day festival highlighting rural and agricultural heritage in Halifax County,VA. More information available online at www.halifaxcountyheritagefestival.org. Halifax County Fairgrounds. 12PM. 434-5726879.

3 - Martinsville Mini Maker Faire - Join us for the first ever Martinsville Mini Maker Faire, it’s “The greatest show and tell on earth!” Check out the inventions and tour the first ever Fab Lab in Virginia! 10AM-3PM. The Artisan Center. 276-656-5474.

16 - Movies on Main - Movies on Main in Downtown South Boston VA FREE TO THE PUBLIC Friday, May 16 in Constitution Square

fun & games solutions

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by Paulette Dean Executive Director, Danville Humane Society

Although mothers (the good, honorable, decent ones) should be honored every day for the wonderful service they provide to their children, and thus to society, they are especially celebrated in May on Mother’s Day. I know I am grateful for my mother, and love her. She provided such a strong, sure foundation for my sister and me. Mother’s Day, admittedly, can be difficult for the women who have never had children through differing circumstances, although they yearn for them. These women still can have a far-reaching positive effect on children. Animals can teach us about this. Elephants, bless their hearts, are pregnant for 22 months. They then deliver the world’s largest babies; elephant babies are about 250 pounds at birth. Baby elephants are blind at birth, and are completely dependent on their mothers. Their mothers, however, receive a lot of help from the female elephants in the herd. These elephants that support the mother are actually called “allmothers.” They provide care for the babies when the mothers are working to eat as much as possible so she can make lots of milk for her large baby. Cows are very maternal, even though they may not have given birth to a calf. One witness saw a newborn calf sliding down a slope. Six cows answered the mother’s cry for help, and stood in line to keep the calf from sliding. They even stayed to lick the calf clean. Animal mothers can teach us wonderful lessons about how to raise our young, but we can also learn additional lessons of nurturing from those animals that nurture and protect other mothers’ babies. SM

Joker

Joker is a five year-old, neutered and declawed (front paws only) cat. He came to us when his beloved owner passed away. He currently resides in our Camp Meow Meow. Joker will do well in a home where he receives lots of attention.

Danville Humane Society, 434.799.0843 www.showcasemagazine.com

| May 2014 | Showcase Magazine 41


I’ve Got the Lunchtime Madness

mystified

Welcome to my world. Maybe you’ll find something entertaining, or maybe you’ll find something to relate to. Maybe you’ll find both. Sometimes this page won’t even make sense to you. Sometimes it won’t apply to you. And sometimes you’ll think I stalked you and wrote a story about what I saw. My world consists of five children, two dogs, two cats, and a husband. Jason is 21, Corey is 14, Spencer is 12, Tucker is 11, and Kendall is 10. Scott, my husband of three years, is still trying to figure us all out. Every day is a winding road.

YESSSSS! It’s May! Who’s happy that school is almost out? With only a few short weeks left in the 2013-14 school year, I can’t help but look forward to and create a perfect mirage of smooth, delightful summer outings, adventures, sibling rivalry, wait....how’d that get in there? I guess even my imagination can’t be fooled.

Misty Brooks

This year Corey, Spencer, Tucker, and Kendall attended new schools. At the beginning, I saw resistance in the way of bad grades, tantrums, and faked illnesses. But it wasn’t too long before I started seeing smiles, hearing stories about new friends made, and witnessing great efforts put forth. Whew— it was a roller coaster. It still is some weeks. I’d like to say that the thing I’ll be most glad to see end is getting up at 5:30am to put Tucker on the bus at 6:30, but even that doesn’t compare to the annoyance, inconvenience, and sheer strife brought on by a little detail of the day called “What’s for lunch?”

14th COREY!

Day in and day out, I honestly dread— not packing lunches—but packing something that they like and will eat at school. Let me tell you, just because your

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child likes it at home does not mean he will eat it at school. One-hundredeighty lunches—scariest phrase I know. I bet you’re thinking, it’s only a few lunches, how hard can that be? And actually, it’s only three lunches because Tucker’s school day ends before lunchtime. My children aren’t necessarily picky eaters (except Corey who is a tiny bit), but when it comes to what they are taking to school to eat in front of other children, they turn into very peculiar creatures. Spencer and Kendall go to a school where lunch isn’t provided, unless I purchase what is delivered there on certain days, but Kendall can’t eat any of it because there are no gluten-free choices (except a salad on one day, but that won’t happen!), and Spencer wants everything that’s delivered but I can’t spend $20 a week on his lunch. So I send their lunch every day. Kendall is good about taking leftovers when it’s something she really likes. Corey, who has the option of school lunch, but prefers something from home, and Spencer, only wants to take the “trendy” lunches that are full of “food opiates”! There aren’t a lot of healthy choices out there that they will actually take to school—that don’t cost $6 per day per child. Ugh. I can fix a really healthy supper the night before, which they all love, but let me try to send it with them for lunch the next day and they think it’s the lamest thing ever. OK, I get that. No one wants to be the kid who pulls out a Tupperware plate with grilled salmon and roasted potatoes on a bed of rice. They all have access to a microwave at lunchtime so I thought it was the perfect plan! Not so much. I give in to the Lunchables a lot because I think eating something is better than nothing, right? So when school is out, I’ll be feeding

all the children at home and the dilemmas will be over. Or will they? As I recall, getting lunch “right” for home is sometimes as tricky as sending it to school. Besides the fact that leftovers will actually be eaten from time to time, I’m really not seeing any perks, now that I think of it. They know that some people only get one meal a day, if that. They know that some people have no choices at all over what they get to eat. So why have lunches become so complicated and maddening at my house? Breakfast and supper aren’t like this. Why lunch? I’ll tell you why...lunch at home is associated with lunch at school. That’s a shame. I remember really enjoying lunchtime. It was the one part of the day that no work was involved! Today, children pick on other children for what they bring to eat. It happens. My children have told me it happens to them. Why can’t a child just eat!? Tucker can’t even eat at school anymore because of it. Eating is an intimate act. To be ridiculed while eating is really damaging to a child. Consuming food is necessary to live. Who do these children think they are? Sitting there eating their school lunch, making fun of the child eating something different, something healthier. I will end this article here. When I began this article, it was going to be funny and upbeat. Along with the lunches at school issue, I was going to complain about how much the children eat while they are home during the summer. I didn’t make the association to lunch with school until I got to the end. I do not believe in belittling children for any reason. So for that reason, I will leave it here. I’d like to hear from you. Email me with your child’s school, grade and what they eat for lunch at school. Misty@ showcasemagazine.com. SM


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44 Showcase Magazine

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Showcase May 2014  

Festival Season Has Arrived!

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