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SHELTERBOX USA | ANNUAL REPORT 2016

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ANNUAL REPORT


SHE L T E R B OX US A | B O AR D O F DI RECT ORS

2 0 16 B OAR D of D I R ECT OR S

TH E M IS S IO N To deliver humanitarian aid in the form of equipment and materials that provide shelter, warmth and dignity to people affected by natural or other disasters worldwide.

JOHN KEANE | CHAIR JIM CARRIERE | VICE CHAIR BRUCE HELLER | TREASURER MARK MIDYETT | SECRETARY BILL DECKER | IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

TH E V IS IO N A world where no family goes without shelter.

GREG KRAUSKA THERESA MOHAN

TH E R E S U L TS

GARY OLSEN

ShelterBox provided 29,000 families in 2016 with emergency shelter and essential supplies.

LOUIS TURPIN

As the number of people made homeless by disaster and conflict is the highest in recorded history, ShelterBox is working tirelessly to grow to meet the increasing need for lifesaving shelter and supplies.

John Keane

Board Chair & Volunteer, ShelterBox USA Cover: ShelterBox aid being delivered in Fiji in response to Cyclone Winston. Above: A family in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea inside a ShelterBox tent after being displaced by Typhoon Lionrock.


SHEL T ERBOX USA | T ABL E OF C ON T EN T S

T ABLEOFCONT ENT S

PR ESI D ENT ’ S L E TTE R A I D BY T HE N U M B E R S GL O B A L D EP L O YM E N T M A P SHEL T ER BOX A ID SHEL T ER BOX C O N TE N TS SHEL T ER K I T C O N TE N TS SHEL T ER BOX L O G IS TIC S D EPL O Y M EN T H IG H L IG H TS : F IJI D EPL O Y M EN T H IG H L IG H TS : H A ITI D EPL O Y M EN T H IG H L IG H TS : S Y R IA D EPL O Y M EN T H IG H L IG H TS : E C U A D O R SHEL T ER BOX R E S P O N S E TE A M SHEL T ER BOX IN TH E M E D IA PARTNERSHIP: SHELTERBOX + ROTARY SHEL T ER BOX + R O TA R Y IN S R I L A N K A FI NA NCI A L IN F O R M A TIO N T I M BR I D GMA N ’ S TR E K HA L L OF FA M E D ONO R HO N O R R O L L

2 5 6 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 24 25 26

Syrian families await the distribution of ShelterBox aid. . S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A NNU A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R B OX US A | PR ES ID ENT’S L ET T ER

WE’VE STARTED SOMETHING

2016

marked the beginning of an ambitious 10-year strategy to scale the organization and bring lifesaving shelter to more families than ever before in our history. The year was punctuated by the extraordinary need for the work of ShelterBox – with 85 million people around the world now homeless because of natural disaster or conflict, there are more people displaced globally than after World War II.

To realize this earnest vision, we’ve developed comprehensive plans to scale our operations. Over the past year, and continuing in the years ahead, we will add human resources in operations, logistics and supply chain management, and we’ll make strategic investments to increase awareness and mobilize more essential resources. To get there we’re employing key strategies to maximize our impact.

A large driver in the ever-increasing need for shelter has been conflict. Delivering relief to vulnerable families fleeing the war in Syria has continued to be a major focus of the work of ShelterBox. In addition to providing aid to more than 10,000 families seeking refuge from violence in Syria this past year, ShelterBox launched large-scale disaster responses to Cyclone Winston in Fiji, the earthquake in Ecuador, Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, landslides in Sri Lanka, and more.

We’re expanding our partnerships and volunteer networks.

With your generous support in 2016, we far surpassed the goals we set forth by providing shelter to more than 29,000 families devastated by disaster or conflict. But with millions more left homeless each year, we know the need for the work of ShelterBox continues to grow. This is why we’ve set out on an enthusiastic path to grow our ability to serve more families and provide shelter to one million people each year by 2025.

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S HE L T E RB O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6

In 2016, we renewed our three-year project partnership with Rotary International. ShelterBox remains Rotary’s only project partner in disaster response. We will continue to grow and leverage our vast global volunteer networks, including our ShelterBox Response Team (SRT), Ambassadors, and Rotary Liaisons. Our partners and volunteers have allowed us to scale our operations in ways that would have otherwise been unachievable over these past 17 years. We’re measuring the impact of our work. We are committed to not just financial transparency, but also to demonstrating our impact on the people and communities to which we hand-deliver aid. By developing a Theory of Change in 2016, we’ve identified the intended short, medium, and long-term outcomes of


TRANSFORMATIVE AT SHELTERBOX. our work, and mapped out the activities and resources needed to achieve our goals. We’re undertaking the monitoring and evaluation needed to help us learn, adapt, and evolve to ensure we’re as efficient and effective as possible. We’re evolving our aid. Each disaster is different, and so is every community. We continue to make assessments to provide the shelter materials and supplies that are most appropriate and best-suited to the needs of recipients. While shelter aid often comes in the form of our iconic green ShelterBoxes, or our ShelterKits, increasingly the contents may differ depending on the disaster, location, and the unique needs of each community. We’ve been applying a flexible approach to tailor our aid to each disaster or conflict to ensure efficiency and effectiveness. Although we continue to transform our organization to reach many more people in need, we won’t be able to do so without the support of you — our partners and friends. Our ability to provide critically needed shelter supplies to one million people each year is only made possible by the charitable backing upon which we entirely rely. When we deploy to the frontlines of disaster and crisis, undoubtedly the hardest part of our job at ShelterBox is not having enough aid and having to say no to a family in need of shelter. There is no

shortage of need for the work of ShelterBox and we’ve developed a unique expertise and capability to serve families on their worst day ever. More than ever before in our history, it is crucial that we grow our capacity to help more people. We are working tirelessly to see a world where no family is left without shelter after disaster. That is our mission. I hope that you’ll continue your support of ShelterBox as we embark upon this pivotal chapter in the organization’s history. We are determined to transform your generosity into hope for families all over the world – the hope and tools needed to rebuild homes, lives, and communities, and begin again. Thank you for being a part of ShelterBox. With gratitude,

Kerri Murray

President, ShelterBox USA

ShelterBox provides tents to a community in Sri Lanka following a landslide.

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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S HE L T E RB O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6


SHEL T ERBOX USA | A I D BY T HE N U MB ER S

2 0 1 6BYTH EN UM BER S FAM ILIES SER V ED

29,267

SHELTE R BOX ES

SHELTE R K I T S

1,496

10,137

S C H O OL BOX ES

T EN T S

120

4,251

SOLAR L A M P S

3,496

M OSQUIT O N ET S

2,996

A young girl in Iraq displaced by conflict. S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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GL OB A L A I D M A P

CONF LICT_ SYRIA

H U R RIC A N E _ HA IT I

CONF LICT_ N IGER

C ON FLICT_ CAM EA R T HQ U A K E _ E C U A DOR

F L O O D_P A RAGUAY

5_CO NFL I CT 2_F LOODS 2 _ 2_TYPHOONS 6

S HE L T E RB O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6


SHEL T ERBOX USA | GL OBAL A I D MA P

Since its founding in 2000, ShelterBox has responded to nearly 300 disasters and humanitarian crises in 95 countries around the world. In 2016, ShelterBox provided aid to more than 29,000 families in 13 countries.

CONFL I C T _ I R AQ TY P H OON_ DP RK C O N F L IC T _ A F GH ANISTAN E A RT HQUAK E _ NE P AL

F L O O D+ L A NDSLIDE S_SRI LANK A

M E ROON

TY P H OON_ P H ILIPPIN ES

CY CLONE_ FIJI

ZONE S _EART H Q U A K E S S 1_CY C LO N E 1 _H U R R ICANE S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R B OX US A | AID

EACH D IS AS TER IS D IF F ER ENT AND S O IS EV ERY CO MMUNITY.

E

ach disaster is different, and so is every community. Therefore, ShelterBox relies on its highly trained volunteer response teams and its on-the-ground partners to identify the most pressing and immediate needs of communities in the aftermath of disaster or during conflict. ShelterBox then tailors the aid it provides to meet the specific needs of survivors and their communities, ensuring that only what is needed most is delivered.

ShelterKits arrive by boat in Haiti following Hurricane Matthew.

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ShelterBox aid most commonly comes in the form of ShelterBoxes and ShelterKits. Sturdy green ShelterBoxes typically contain family-sized tents specifically designed to withstand the elements and provide people with temporary shelter until they can start the process of rebuilding a home. Customized ShelterKits contain all the essential materials and tools families need to start repairing and rebuilding homes right away, including items such as tarpaulins, hammers, nails and rope. Because a home means much more than bricks and mortar, or tarpaulin and tent pegs, ShelterBoxes and ShelterKits often contain the items that help transform shelter into a home, such as cooking sets, solar lights, thermal blankets, and activity sets for children. The need for classroom supplies and educational materials is often unmet following disaster or conflict. In certain circumstances, ShelterBox SchoolBoxes containing classroom supplies for 50 children are sometimes included in aid shipments.


Damage in Ecuador following a 7.8 magnitude earthquake.

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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S H E L T E R BO X | CO NTENTS

1

3 2

6

5

4

8

7

10

11

SH E L TE R B OX CO NTENTS

9

12

1_FAMILY RELIEF TENT (ASSEMBLED) 2_FAMILY RELIEF TENT (PACKED) 3_DURABLE PLASTIC BOX 4_THERMAL FLEECE BLANKETS 5_TOOL KIT 6_COOKING SET 7_WATERPROOF GROUND MATS 8_WATER PURIFICATION KIT 9_HAT, GLOVES & SCARF 10_MOSQUITO NETS 11_LUMINAID SOLAR LIGHT 12_CHILDREN’S ACTIVITY PACK C o nt e nt s m a y d i f f e r d e pe nd i ng o n t he d i sa st e r, bu t c o m m o nl y i nc l u d e t he m a t e r ia ls p ict ur e d.

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S H E L T E R B O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6


SHEL T ERKI T |C ON T EN T S

1 2

3 4 5

8 6

7

9

SH E L TE R K I T CO N TENTS 1_CONTENTS BAG 2_TARPAULINS 6_HAMMER

7_PLIERS

11

10

3_SHOVEL & HANDLE

8_HAND SAW

9_NAILS

4_ROPE

5_HOE & HANDLE

10_WIRE

11_INSTRUCTIONS

C o nt e nt s m a y d i f f e r d e pe nd i ng o n t he d i sa st e r, bu t c o m m o nl y i nc l u d e t he m a t e r ia ls p ict ur e d. S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R BO X US A | LO G IS TICS

Military officials assist with aid distribution in Sri Lanka.

PR E- POSI T I O N E D A ID + R A P ID R E S P ONSE ShelterBox is preparing every day for the worst day ever by prepositioning aid in strategic locations around the globe, ensuring fast and efficient deployment of aid when and where it is needed most. The ShelterBox Operations Team is constantly monitoring global disasters and conflict. Assessments and aid delivery are carried out by the highly trained ShelterBox Response Team (SRT).

L O GI ST I CS ShelterBox is committed to transporting and distributing ShelterBoxes, ShelterKits, and other essential aid into disaster zones in the safest and most efficient way possible, whether it be by road, sea, or air. Pre-positioned aid in strategic locations around the world helps ShelterBox to rapidly mobilize needed resources. Once in-country, SRT members work with community leaders, local authorities, relief agencies, and other partners in the field to deliver aid to those who need it most.

D I ST R I B UT IN G A ID ShelterBoxes have been delivered by helicopters, trucks, donkey trains, camels, and even on the backs of volunteers. SRT members make on-the-ground assessments to gather information about those most affected and ensure that emergency aid can be channeled according to the greatest need. ShelterBox works with local communities to identify and prioritize the most vulnerable.

M ONI T O R I N G + E V A L U A TIO N ShelterBox is committed to measuring and evaluating the impact of its work and to improving the quality and effectiveness of the aid it provides. The monitoring and evaluation process includes post-deployment data collection and feedback from aid recipients.  

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S HE L T E RB O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6


2 0 1 6 DEPL OYMEN T HI GHL I G H T S | F I J I

H O W PART NERS H IPS TA K E US T HE EXT RA M I L E Responding to Cyclone Winston in Fiji

C

yclone Winston was the strongest storm ever recorded to make landfall in the Southern Hemisphere. It slammed into the island nation of Fiji on February 20, 2016, bringing Category 5 winds and causing widespread destruction. The superstorm left an estimated 120,000 people without shelter and roughly forty percent of Fiji’s population was affected by the storm. In the immediate aftermath, a ShelterBox Response Team deployed to the region to assess shelter needs and identify the most vulnerable communities. Fiji is comprised of more than 320 islands, many of which are inhabited but are largely inaccessible, often making it difficult to reach communities and provide aid. To overcome these challenges, ShelterBox partnered with Sea Mercy, a charity that provides volunteer fleets of vessels and yachts stationed in the South Pacific. The vessels transported ShelterBox Response Team members island to island to conduct assessments and deliver emergency aid to the affected communities. Local Rotary Clubs were also instrumental in response efforts. Ultimately, ShelterBox was able to provide 1,505 families with shelter. This aid included tents, water purification units, ground sheets, mosquito nets, tools, and other essential supplies in the form of 442 ShelterBoxes and 500 ShelterKits.

Mother Diane and Baby Yokimi receive a ShelterBox Family Relief Tent.

A HO M E O F TH E IR O W N :

DIA N E + B A B Y Y O KI M I Baby Yokimi and mother Diane call the Fiji island of Ovalau home. They were left homeless and without any belongings when Cyclone Winston struck. When ShelterBox Response Teams reached Ovalau, they found massive trees on their sides, stripped clean of leaves and branches, and tattered belongings lay scattered among the rubble. Families left homeless by the storm sheltered in a community center on the island. As they waited for the storm to pass, they saw roofs ripped apart and homes reduced to

their foundations. Then a storm surge hit so hard that even the community center was no longer safe. As water came rushing in up to people’s chests, families had to hold their children up in the air just to keep them safe. Mother Diane was terrified. ShelterBox was able provide Diane and her family with a ShelterBox, containing a tent and the shelter supplies needed to make it feel like home, including blankets, ground sheets, and cooking utensils. For Diane, a ShelterBox meant relief: “I’m so happy to have a tent – to have a safe place of our own to sleep.”

I’m so happy to have a tent – to have a safe place of our own to sleep. Diane, mother of Yokimi, in Ovalau, Fiji

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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2 0 1 6 D E P L O Y MENT HIG HLIG HTS | HAI T I

TA IL O R IN G S H E L TE R B O X A ID TO P R O V ID E F L E XI BL E S H E L TE R S O L U TIO N S Providing ShelterKits in Haiti after Hurricane Matthew

H

urricane Matthew led to the greatest humanitarian crisis in Haiti since the 2010 earthquake, with 2.1 million people impacted by damaged infrastructure. ShelterBox immediately deployed a response team to Haiti in the aftermath of the hurricane’s landfall. The team assessed damages and coordinated efforts to reach the hardest hit and most vulnerable communities.

SHE L T E R F R OM THE S TO R M

M A R C EL’ S STORY

M

arcel is an elderly man in his seventies who is completely blind. He used to be a mason until he lost his sight. He lives in a small one-room house with five others, including four children. When Hurricane Matthew hit, his house was flooded with two feet of water and all his possessions were gone or destroyed. His family gathered what corrugated iron they could find from other houses that had blown into their area for a makeshift roof. When they received a ShelterKit they were able to rebuild and make their roof watertight. He said: “It is nice to think that when a disaster strikes other people far away think of them.”

Having provided roughly one-third of all emergency shelter to Haiti following the 2010 earthquake, ShelterBox is no stranger to the shipment and distribution challenges posed by Haiti’s fragile infrastructure. Working in coordination with government authorities, it was identified that ShelterBoxes were not the most appropriate form of aid that could be provided. In response, customized ShelterKits containing tarpaulins, plastic sheeting, and basic tools that enabled families to rapidly provide their own shelter, or make repairs to their damaged houses, were assembled and distributed. In the days following the storm, many families were able to construct temporary shelters or crudely repair existing buildings using items salvaged from storm debris or locally available materials including palm leaves, timber, and rocks. By providing households with a ShelterKit, beneficiaries were able to weatherproof temporary structures or make repairs to existing structures so that they could move out of temporary shelters. ShelterBox partnered with five organizations to aid distribution efforts. These partners helped distribute 2,805 ShelterKits and 2,805 household packs to the most vulnerable and hardest to reach communities. Household packs included critically needed resources such as water filters, water carriers, and mosquito nets to protect against water and vectorborne diseases, including cholera, typhoid, and malaria.

It is nice to think that when a   disaster strikes other people far away think of them. Marcel, Hurricane Matthew survivor, Haiti

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S H E L T E R B O X US A | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 6


2 0 1 6 DEPL OYM ENT HI GHL I GHT S | S Y R I A A family in Syria receives shelter supplies.

RESP O N D I N G T O MO R E THAN JUS T NA TUR A L D I S A S TER S _ HELP IN G F A M I L IES D IS PLACED B Y TH E SYR I A N CO N F LICT Perhaps lesser known than the lifesaving work of ShelterBox during natural disasters, is the work that is carried out to help refugees and internally displaced people.

T

he Syrian conflict has displaced more people than the earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, and Hurricane Katrina combined. Since there are only a few aid agencies with experience operating within Syria who can manage such a complex security environment, support is extremely limited, yet the need continues to grow.

Now in its seventh year, this remains the worst humanitarian crisis of our time. ShelterBox has provided tents, tools and educational supplies, both inside Aleppo and in displacement camps within Syria and in neighboring countries. Assistance has been ongoing, with ShelterBox delivering more than $5 million in humanitarian aid to families in Syria since 2012.

Since 2012, ShelterBox has continuously provided emergency aid to those affected by the Syrian Refugee Crisis.

In 2016, ShelterBox worked with trusted non-profit distribution partners to deliver customized ShelterKits, which

contained a variety of essential items, including mattresses, tarps, solar lights, mosquito nets, kitchen sets, and water purification equipment and storage containers. At year-end, 2,000 winterized kits were assembled and distributed. These customized kits provided protection from the harsh winter elements and included hats, gloves, and scarves for adults and children, as well as kerosene heaters. In total, 10,598 families in Syria received lifesaving shelter supplies in 2016.  

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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2 0 1 6 D E P L O Y MENT HIG HLIG HTS | ECUADOR

G LOBAL RE COGNIT I ON F O R TH E WO R K O F SH ELT ER B OX Coordinating with Aid Groups in Response to the Ecuador Earthquake

T

he 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck Ecuador on April 16, 2016 resulted in hundreds of deaths and left thousands injured or homeless. A ShelterBox Response Team deployed immediately to Ecuador after the earthquake and began to conduct assessments in the hardest hit areas. One of these areas was the city of Portoviejo, which despite being among the worst hit, had seen little in the way of international aid or help from the government or military. As it does in times of disaster, ShelterBox engaged with the Global Shelter Cluster, the international disaster coordination mechanism implemented by the United Nations. The Shelter Cluster enables better coordination among all shelter actors to enable people who need assistance get help faster and receive the right kind of support. Working in coordination with the Shelter Cluster, ShelterBox partnered with Progad, a local organization specializing in urban and social development projects, and with Habitat for Humanity, a charity that ShelterBox previously partnered with in Chile and Panama. Through a well-coordinated effort, 3,290 ShelterKits and 300 boxes containing water filters, water carriers, solar lights, kitchen sets,

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S HE L T E RB O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6

Families in Ecuador receive ShelterKits after the 7.8 magnitude earthquake.

and mosquito nets were handdelivered to families in need of shelter and lifesaving supplies after the Ecuador earthquake. While the massive distribution of aid following a disaster is

“

not unusual, the feedback that ShelterBox received from the Global Shelter Cluster in Ecuador speaks to its expertise in disaster response is rare. See below:

Just a quick note to congratulate you and the rest of your Shelter Box, PROGAD, HFH [Habitat for Humanity] team on one of the best distributions of humanitarian assistance I have ever seen. Text book example of good practice. Anna Pont, Coordinator of the Shelter Cluster Americas


SHEL T ERBOX | RESPONS E T EA M

S HE LT E R B O X RE S PO N S E TEA M [S R T ]

A ShelterBox Response Team member demonstrates use of shelter equipment in Sri Lanka.

HOW HIGH L Y T R A I NED V O L U N TE E R S C A R R Y O UT T H E MIS SION OF SHEL TE R B O X ShelterBox is made up of people who believe that shelter is a human right and is vital in the chaos of disaster and conflict. ShelterBox delivers aid to the four corners of the earth, reaching people in need by standing on strong shoulders. The organization is fortunate to have the help of an amazing group of dedicated and highly trained volunteers that make up the ShelterBox Response Team (SRT). Volunteer response teams undertake a crucial element of ShelterBox’s work by going the extra mile to find the people left most vulnerable after a disaster. For this role, ShelterBox recruits volunteers who can commit long-term. Volunteers must be available to help ShelterBox for a period of at least five years and deploy twice each year for up to 3 weeks at a time. The selection process is highly competitive – about

1 in 30 applicants make it through training to become response team members. The assessment process can span up to nine months and includes both a four-day and a nineday residential pre-deployment training. The role is mentally and physically demanding. Team members are relied on to be excellent team workers, capable of making good decisions under pressure, able to develop and maintain good relationships with partners and community members, and able to work in locations with damaged infrastructure, few available resources, and vulnerable people that are often experiencing severe trauma. The diverse group of volunteers come from a range of backgrounds and many countries, but what they share in common is their passion for the work of ShelterBox. S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SH E L T E R B OX US A | IN THE MED IA

Oct. 5, 2016 | ShelterBox USA President Kerri Murray Interviewed about Haiti.

Sept. 2016 | Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle blog goop recommends ShelterBox as an organization to support in its online feature “How to Help in Syria.”

Dec. 15, 2016 | Model Gigi Hadid

Dec. 16, 2016 | Singer Zayn Malik Actress and humanitarian activist Gwyneth Paltrow with Kerri Murray, President of ShelterBox USA.

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S HE L T E R BO X US A | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 6


SHEL T ERBOX USA | I N T H E MED I A

June 24, 2016 | Chris Warham, CEO of ShelterBox International speaks at IBM and WIRED Magazine’s Cognitive Building Forum in London. The forum was moderated by Guy Raz, host of NPR’s TED Radio Hour.

November 8, 2016 | Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and ShelterBox International President, visit Dubai’s International Humanitarian City where ShelterBox aid is prepositioned.

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R B OX US A | R O TAR Y PART N ERSHI P

PARTN E R S HI P : SHE LTE R B OX + R O TAR Y

I

Global support from the Rotary International network is the cornerstone upon which ShelterBox is built.

n April 2000, the Rotary Club of Helston-Lizard in Cornwall, England adopted ShelterBox as its millennium project. Little did they know that it would become the largest Rotary Club project in the world, growing to provide emergency shelter to over one million people since its founding. Rotary has been instrumental to the growth of ShelterBox and ShelterBox is Rotary International’s only Project Partner in disaster relief. By working together with Rotary, ShelterBox leverages collective resources to ensure that it can provide relief to more communities in desperate need of shelter. Rotarians across the world support ShelterBox in many ways – from raising funds to assisting on the ground during disasters. The partnership enables ShelterBox to cross boundaries and cut through red tape to reach even the most remote communities. In 2016, the two organizations renewed their unique Project

Pictured left to right: John Hewko, General Secretary of Rotary International; Ian H.S. Riseley, President of Rotary International; Chris Warham, CEO of ShelterBox International; and Kerri Murray, President of ShelterBox USA.

Partnership. Chris Warham, ShelterBox International CEO, says, “Rotary and ShelterBox will always stand side by side to help those less fortunate. This Project Partnership renewal simply

indicates the strength of our long friendship, and recognizes the immense practical and funding support provided by Rotary members worldwide to enable us to reach out to families in distress.”

Rotary and ShelterBox will always stand side by side to help those less fortunate. This Project Partnership renewal simply indicates the strength of our long friendship, and recognizes the immense practical and funding support provided by Rotary members worldwide to enable us to reach out to families in distress. Chris Warham, CEO, Shelterbox International

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S H E L T E R B O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6


SHE LTE R B OX + R O TAR Y R ES PO ND IN SR I L A N KA Torrential rainfall brought devastating landslides and flooding to the island nation of Sri Lanka in May 2016.

Women in Sri Lanka stand among rubble caused by landslides

Immediately after, ShelterBox was in contact with the Rotary Club of Capital City in Sri Lanka to begin relief efforts. The Rotary Club played a central role in the disaster response following the devastating landslides – from outsourcing boats to rescue people cut off by the floods, to setting up medical treatment camps, organizing dry ration collection centers, and helping with general cleanup operations. Logistically, the Rotary Club of Capital City assisted the ShelterBox Response Team by helping to find accommodations, transportation, translation services, and by liaising with the Ministry of Disaster Management, the military, and local authorities. In addition, the Rotary Club launched a project to provide education packs to students in schools in Aranayake. The Club packed and distributed education packs to 6,000 students in 54 schools. The project provided basic materials for education to help students without access to educational resources. The response demonstrated the strong and impactful partnership between ShelterBox and Rotary — a Project Partnership in true form.

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R B OX US A | F INANCIAL I N FORM A T I ON

82%

PROGRAM SE R V I C ES

12%

M A N A GEMEN T /G EN ER A L

6%

FUNDRA I SI N G EXP EN S ES

SHELTERBOX EXPENSES ST A T E M E N T O F ACTIVITIES & C HA N GES I N N ET A SSET S Revenue volatility is a fact of life for disaster relief organizations. ShelterBox USA is proud to have maintained a distribution rate of 82% of overall revenue despite revenue uncertainty. Grants were awarded to purchase ShelterBoxes, ShelterKits, individual equipment, and to subsidize deployment costs.

REVENUES 2016 PUBLIC SUPPORT

$3,895,258

OTHER REVENUE Investment Income

265

Other Income

3,309

Total Other Revenue

3,574

Total Revenue excluding Gifts-in-Kind

3,737,009

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

Gifts-in-Kind

161,823

ASSETS 2016

Total Revenue & Gifts-in-Kind

$3,898,832

Cash & Equivalents

2,135,154

Receivables

108,821

Other Assets

28,894

Total Assets

$2,272,869

EXPENSES 2016 PROGRAM SERVICES

3,432,303

SUPPORTING SERVICES

769,624

Total Expenses excluding Gifts-in-Kind 4,040,104 Gifts-in-Kind

161,823

Total Expenses & Gifts-in-Kind

$4,201,927

Decrease in Net Assets

$(303,095)

NET ASSETS 2016

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS 2016 Payables & Accrued Expenses

79,275

Deferred Revenue

278,430

Total Liabilities $357,705 Unrestricted Net Assets

1,660,770

Net Assets beginning of the year

2,218,259

Temp Restricted Net Assets

254,394

Decrease in Net Assets

(303,095)

Total Net Assets

$1,915,164

$1,915,164

Total Liabilities & Net Assets

Net Assets at the year end

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ShelterBox USA is the recipient of Charity Navigator’s highest rating (“4-Stars”) for its financial health, accountability, and transparency and is a GuideStar Gold Participant, committed to donor transparency and financial and operational efficiency.

S HE L T E RB O X US A | ANNUA L REPORT 2 0 1 6

$2,272,869


S HELTERBOX USA | 2 0 1 6 GI VI N G T YPE BREAK D OWN

2016 GIVING BY CONSTITUENT TYPE

5%

O THER

8 % CO R PO R ATI ON S 2 2 % F O UND ATIO N S 28% R O TAR Y D IS TR I CT S, 37%

CL UBS, ROT ARACT

IND IVID UAL D O NORS View audited financial statements and Forms 990 at ShelterBoxUSA.org SHELTERBOX USA IS A 501(C)(3) NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND REGISTERED IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA: EIN 20-0471604. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELPFLA OR WWW.800HELPFLA.COM). REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. GIFTS ARE TAX-DEDUCTIBLE TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW. S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SH E L T E R BO X US A | TIM B R ID G MAN

TIM B R I D G M A N ’ S TR EK FOR SH E L T E R BO X

Sharon and Tim Bridgman at the start of their journey in 2012.

A JOURNEY OF H OP E , L OS S + FORTITUDE

On June 4, 2012 Sharon and Tim Bridgman set off from the North Cape of Norway to cycle unsupported and self-funded around the world.

T

he husband and wife team from Devon, England were riding to raise awareness and support of ShelterBox, hoping to raise $18,000 for their favorite nonprofit. They covered nearly 21,000 miles, cycling through 26 countries.

He took several months off, and in February 2015 he returned to the Andes to resume training. He traveled to the place where Sharon had died and brought with him a box of letters from the many people who had written to him and Sharon after her death.

On April 26, 2014 in a remote area in Bolivia, Sharon was hit by a 4x4 vehicle and was killed instantly. Tim was devastated by the loss of his wife and best friend. After Sharon’s death, he returned home, but left his bike in Bolivia because he knew he would be back.

He buried the box of letters there and began his journey again. Tim ultimately made his way up through British Columbia to finish his journey in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on July 16, 2016. In total, he cycled through 39 countries and covered 37,000 miles.

What compelled us around ShelterBox was that it didn’t matter who you were, where you came from — the organization helps people who have lost everything in an instant. Tim Bridgman

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S H E L T E R B O X US A | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 6

When asked what it was about ShelterBox that motivated he and Sharon to dedicate years of their lives to raise awareness and support, Tim said, “What compelled us around ShelterBox was that it didn’t matter who you were, where you came from — the organization helps people who have lost everything in an

instant. ShelterBox is amazing in how it uses the goodwill of people to fulfill the mission. So many charities waste money and resources, and you never really know where the donations are going. But with ShelterBox, you see so many people around the world who have lost everything in crisis, benefiting from the work of the organization.” “People go through life and when disaster happens in an entire area there is no one to turn to. ShelterBox gives help and hope often when governments and armies can’t. ShelterBox gives people dignity and basic supplies, providing a stepping stone to the rebuilding process.” Tim Bridgman has been an inspiration to countless people along his journey of hope, loss, and fortitude.  


SHEL T ERBOX USA | HAL L OF F A ME

HALLOFFA M E AS OF DEC. 31, 2016 The Hall of Fame is reserved for volunteers who have raised more than $100,000 to support the mission of ShelterBox. JI M P IC K ET T AL L A N S YP HER S JACK YO U N G D ONN A G U L L EY M AR K & S U E DYER JAM E S C A R R IER E D I CK IS A C K S O N L O UI S T U R P IN GAR Y O L S EN

PET ER & S U S AN KLO C K W AYN E C HI LES PET ER G RI F F I T H N AN C Y & J AC K F ADDEG ON LARRY PALANT GREG KRAUSKA ERI C REI S E W AYN E RO BI N S O N YI S HU N LAI

ShelterBox wishes to recognize the Crystal Springs Foundation for its transformative gifts in 2016 that brought shelter to thousands of vulnerable people devastated by the war in Syria and Hurricane Matthew in Haiti.

ShelterBox tents arrive in Fiji following Cyclone Winstone.

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R BO X US A | D O NO R HO NOR ROL L Thank you to our partners who have made our work possible. $500,000+ Crystal Springs Foundation $100,00 - $499,999 Centerline Digital $50,000 - $99,999 Anonymous Charina Endowment Fund, Inc. $25,000 - $49,999 Beazley USA Services, Inc. DEW Foundation Fred Durham $10,000 - $24,999 Baccash Family Foundation, Inc. Gary Burke Laura Ciel Bill and Julie Decker John P. Densmore Steve Handy Mostyn Foundation, Inc. Neall Family Charitable Foundation Bill Poett Karen Ramus Red Hat, Inc. Rotary Club of Mid-Bay Patricia G. Steele The Ohrstrom Foundation Vijay Singh Foundation Mark Wainwright $5,000 - $9,999 Abby’s Lane, Inc. Claire H. Blatchford Roger Bower Victor G. Bucher Ron G. Cornelius Covenant Foundation Floyd Dillman Bruce Dunbar General Reinsurance Corporation Alyisen P. Gisleson Bettie J. Grant Jeffrey Harger Bruce and Cindy Heller Lynn Hunt Invest in Others Charitable Foundation Brian M. Kawamoto Andrew Morse Myron Parr Aaron Pelto, VTAIL Julia W. Powell QAD Inc. Paul Rizza Rotary Club of Blue Bell Rotary Club of Coral Gables Rotary Club of Eden Prairie Noon Rotary Club of Glenwood Springs Rotary Club of Hanalei Bay Rotary Club of Maumee Rotary Club of Parker Rotary Club of Patterson Rotary Club of San Rafael Harbor Rotary Club of Woodland Hills Rotary EClub of Southwest USA Rotary International District 5110 TAG Charitable Foundation, Inc John E. Temple The Rotary Foundation Donor Advised Fund William H. Cilker Family Foundation

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$1,000 - $4,999 1948 Arliss M. Abbott Muniba Adil American Riviera Bank American Women of the Eastern Province (AWEP) Ameriprise Financial Daniel Anderson Gregory Anderson Annapolis Rotaract Club Anonymous Ellen Anthony Linda J. Anthony Apple Matching Gifts Program Albert Archer Ark Angel Animal Hospital Penelope Attwell David Auffenberg Carsten Avenhaus Azimuth Wealth Management James H. Babcock Maria Babula Julie Backas Yong Bai Vaughn Baker Hank Ballerstedt Marcia Balzereit William Barnes Betsy D. Barringer Steven J. Basile Mark Bassily Lauren Bergerson William Berry Chris Bertelson Rajeev Bhaman Slaven Bilac Aaron Bills Michael Binns Ronald D. Blanchette John Bledsoe Steven Bliss Wayne M. Bloom Thomas Bloss Bluffton High School Interact BMO Harris Bank N.A. Joan Bohls Ralph Bowen Maggi Ruth P. Boyer Nancy R. Boyle Joan Brausch Steven Briggs Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation David Brown John Brown Michael Bunce Allan Burdick Ann H. Bush Aaron Byers Jim and Nancy Carriere Marilyn Carson Ralph Carter Carter Properties, LLC Paula Casaccia Robert W. Case Riksene Cavanaugh John Celestin Cellular Advantage, Inc Louis Chan Ramesh Chaudhari Janice F. Chow Sandra Christenson Cinnaminson High School Interact Barry Clark Gary M. Cole Zorus P. Colglazier

S H E L T E R B O X US A | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 6

Contributors to ShelterBox from January 1, 2016 – December 31, 2016

Russel Cook Cooper Family Foundation, Inc. Coudersport Interact Club Chad Council Baldemar Covarrubias CR962 Management LLC Gavin Craddock Jessie Crain CRC Insurance Services, Inc. Crescent Dental LLC Crown Point Winery Larry Curtis Terry Cussen Timothy K. Dahlstrand Matt Dall Dekalb High School Interact Club Dillon Foundation Kirk Doerger Mark A. Dorsey Judith Douglass William M. Dowd Brad Downey Dryden Family Foundation Keri Duree Gregory W. Dyson Pamela L. Edwards E. Dale Elifrits Kathleen Elim Elm Lake Cranberry Co., Inc. Epic, Inc. Bruce S. Erath Tim Erhart Kathleen Erickson Marie Erlhoff Michael Ertel Estudio Legal Ferraiuoli Eureka! Engineering Pamela Farr Suzanne Ferrio FHS Interact Club of Fredericksburg,Texas Katherine J. Fick Warren Fisher Read T. Fleming Charles F. Foote Caroline A. Forgason Richard D. Franklin Karen Frazier Robin Friedman Jacque F. Fuller Jonathan Funtowicz Debra Gammon Leo Gaten Michael Gemma Jason George Louis Gibson Marjorie F. Gifford GIX Logistics, Inc Linda T. Glass Barbara Godard Lillian Gola Roni Goldberg Google Matching Gifts Program Martin & Kerrilee Gore Grady & Grady PC Richard N. Graham Grand Island Express Graphic Communications, Inc Brenda Gray Patsy Gredvig David J. Greenwood Welles Guilmartin Barbara Gutzwiller Jeffrey and Lucia Hagander Eva Hainer Nicholas R. Hall Hallberg Family Foundation

Halprin Finkler Investment Group David Hammer Robert B. Hanna Happylucky Paul Harman Judith Harrington Marvin R. Hass Hayes Family Foundation Ruth W. Heaton Chad Heese Helen and Jeffrey Mattox Family Passthrough Fund Mary A. Hensinger Hermsmeyer Family Fund Billy Herrington Billy D. Herrington Hershey High School Interact Club Doug Hoffman William Hogan Elaine Holder Dianne Holmgren Cynthia Hosick William Howden Susan Hoyt Paul Hubel Gregory E. Hudson Jerald Humble Philip S. Hunter John Hyatt Maxine Hyrkas Jonathan Ingersoll Interact Club at Marblehead High School Interact Club of Branford Interact Club of Butte Interact Club of Chimacum High School Interact Club of Edison High School Interact Club of Green Valley High School Interact Club of Red Hook, NY Interact Club of South Caldwell International Monetary Fund Richard Isham Gregory Jackson Marshall Jacobowitz John Jendras JLL Glenn Johnson Barbara Jones Beverly F. Jones Donald G. Jorgensen John Kaiser Konrad C. Kaltenborn John and Jeni Keane Renee Keelan Mary P. Keels F. Joseph Kehoe Charles K. Kelley David Kelly Dorothy Kendig KenMar Instrumentation. Inc. John P. Kent Julia Kern Howard J. Kestenberg Amina Khan Robert O. Kimball Mike King Virginia King Martin Klest John A. Knepper Denise Koblitz Charles W. Koenig John Koeppel Julia Kollar Sandra Koness Nancy E. Koster Alan Krabill Anna Kramer


SHEL T ERBOX USA | DONOR HON OR R OL L Greg Krauska and Cindy Skack Michael Kress Frank Kunc L & M Charitable Fund Avis La Grone Romina Lamberti LAN Family Foundation Justilien Landry Heide Lankeit Bonnie Laube Jason Laughman Kathryn Layne Kjersten Lazar Evan M. Lebson Leechburg High School Interact Club Beverly Len Stefan Lessard Sylvia Levin Robert Levy David E. Lewis David J. Lewis Miriam Lezak Xiaoxia Li Jeff Lichty Don Liddycoat Tom Lloyd Stephen Lounsberry LuminAID Angie Lundin M Dryden Consulting Services, Inc. Patricia MacEnroe Anne Magoun Kathryn Mahaffy John Mansfield Sharon Marek Marsh & McLennan Companies Linda Martin Joseph Masington Robert W. Mason Mary B. Matejczyk John S. Mayo Janice B. McCabe Linda McCarthy Michael F. McCormack Donald L. McDowell John E. McGovern Marie McInnes David M. McKenney Norbert Melnick Mary Kay Melton Joan M. Melville Thomas Meyer MHBT, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC Miami Heat Limited Partnership Microsoft Matching Gifts Program Mark and Linda Midyett Thomas G. Milinovich Jim Miller David Miller Stephen Mitchell Theresa Mohan and Peter Moskowitz Mark R. Montgomery Larry G. Morgan Kathleen Moriarity Anthony Morris Mosaix Group Patricia Moseman Paul Muck Muskal Family Charitable Trust Nick Myrhorod National Philanthropic Trust Ellen Nemec Ursula Neuburger Nevada Union High School Interact Club Niceville High School Interact Club Carol S. Nichols

Bruce Nicholson James Noonan Northwestern Interact Club Heather Norton Occupational Health Associates Thomas E. O’Connor Alan Okun Steve Oliver Oliver B. Merlyn Foundation Gregg E. Olson Kevin O’Rourke Karen Ostertag Michael O’Toole Bill Paige Larry Papike Surekha Parekh Paris Interact Club Parkland High School Interact Club Margaret Parrish Tushar Patel Dave Patel Pasqualino Pecoraro Donna J. Petrocco JC Pfeiffer Robert Phillips Michael Plitkins William Pommering Christine Porter Frances Posel George Power Premier Healthcare Solutions, Inc. Stuart Price Daniel J. Pritchett Terry Quinn Alex Radovan Renaissance Charitable Foundation Rhinebeck Interact Club Stuart Rich Larry Ridley Amy Ringwald James Rintoul Ken A. Robinson Roseburg High School Interact Club Rotaract of St Petersburg College Tarpon Springs Rotary Club of Abingdon Rotary Club of Addison Rotary Club of Ala Moana Rotary Club of Allentown West Rotary Club of Altoona Sunrise Rotary Club of Anacortes Rotary Club of Anaheim Hills Rotary Club of Anchorage South Rotary Club of Anna Maria Island Rotary Club of Annandale Rotary Club of Aransas Pass Rotary Club of Arcola Rotary Club of Ardmore Rotary Club of Arlington Rotary Club of Arlington Heights Rotary Club of Arlington Heights Charitable Foundation Rotary Club of Asbury Foundation Rotary Club of Atascadero Rotary Club of Athens Rotary Club of Atlantic City Rotary Club of Auburn Daybreak Rotary Club of Auburn Gold Country Rotary Club of Augusta West Rotary Club of Aurora Rotary Club of Aurora Fitzsimons Foundation Rotary Club of Austin-Westlake Rotary Club of Avon Rotary Club of Ballston Spa Rotary Club of Barboursville Rotary Club of Bardstown

Rotary Club of Bath Sunrise Rotary Club of Battle Ground Rotary Club of Bay St. Louis Rotary Club of Bedford Sunrise Rotary Club of Belmont Foundation Rotary Club of Berea Rotary Club of Bergen Highlands/Ramsey Rotary Club of Bethlehem Rotary Club of Bethlehem Morning Star Rotary Club of Bixby Rotary Club of Blacksburg Foundation Rotary Club of Bloomington North Rotary Club of Blowing Rock Rotary Club of Blue Ridge Mountains Rotary Club of Boerne Rotary Club of Boiling Springs Area Rotary Club of Bonita Springs Rotary Club of Bonsall Rotary Club of Boothbay Harbor Rotary Club of Bordentown Rotary Club of Bordentown Charities Rotary Club of Bowling Green AM Rotary Club of Bradley-Bourbonnais Rotary Club of Brandywine Hundred Rotary Club of Branford Rotary Club of Brattleboro Sunrise Rotary Club of Brewster Rotary Club of Brighton Rotary Club of Broadway-Timberville Rotary Club of Broomfield Crossing Rotary Club of Brown County Rotary Club of Brunswick Rotary Club of Buffalo Grove Rotary Club of Burnsville Rotary Club of Butler AM Rotary Club of Cambria Rotary Club of Cambridge Rotary Club of Cape Coral Rotary Club of Cape Coral Goldcoast Rotary Club of Cape Coral Sunset Rotary Club of Capital City Sunrise Rotary Club of Carlsbad Hi-Noon Rotary Club of Carmel Rotary Club of Carol Stream Rotary Club of Carterville Area Rotary Club of Cedar Park Rotary Club of Central Bucks Rotary Club of Central Citrus Rotary Club of Central Perkiomen Rotary Club of Central Pinellas Rotary Club of Centreville Rotary Club of Centreville and Chantilly Rotary Club of Chagrin Highlands Rotary Club of Chagrin Valley Rotary Club of Chandler Horizon Rotary Club of Chanhassen Rotary Club of Chanhassen Foundation Rotary Club of Chardon Rotary Club of Charleston Rotary Club of Chateaugay Rotary Club of Chatham Rotary Club of Chelmsford Rotary Club of Chelsea Rotary Club of Cherry Hill Rotary Club of Chicago O-Hare Rotary Club of Clackamas Foundation Rotary Club of Claremont Sunrise Rotary Club of Claremont Sunrise Foundation Rotary Club of Clarkston Rotary Club of Clawson Rotary Club of Clayton Rotary Club of Clayton Valley/Concord Sunrise Rotary Club of Clover Park Rotary Club of Coal Creek

Rotary Club of Colleyville Rotary Club of Colonie-Guilderland Rotary Club of Colorado Springs Rotary Club of Columbus Indiana Rotary Club of Connellsville Rotary Club of Cookeville Breakfast Rotary Club of Coos Bay - North Bend Rotary Club of Corning Rotary Club of Coronado Rotary Club of Coronado Foundation Rotary Club of Corpus Christi Rotary Club of Corvallis Rotary Club of Cranberry Township Sunrise Rotary Club of Cresskill-Demarest Rotary Club of Crystal Lake Dawnbreakers Rotary Club of Dallas North Rotary Club of Danielson Foundation Rotary Club of Danville Rotary Club of Davisburg Rotary Club of Dearborn Heights Rotary Club of Decatur Rotary Club of Deerfield Rotary Club of Deerfield Valley Rotary Club of Denton Rotary Club of Denver-Cherry Creek Rotary Club of Des Moines Rotary Club of Detroit Lakes Breakfast Rotary Club of Dexter Rotary Club of Dickson High Noon Rotary Club of Dixie County Rotary Club of Douglas International Rotary Club of Doylestown Rotary Club of Dulles Rotary Club of Dunn Loring-Merrifield Advised Fund Rotary Club of Durant Rotary Club of Eagle River Rotary Club of East Bremerton Rotary Club of East Cobb Rotary Club of East Fishkill Rotary Club of East Greenwich Rotary Club of East Hartford Rotary Club of East Longmeadow Rotary Club of East Los Angeles Rotary Club of Edina Rotary Club of El Paso Rotary Club of Elk Grove Rotary Club of Elk Grove Village Rotary Club of Elkhorn Foundation Rotary Club of Emmaus Rotary Club of Encinitas Rotary Club of Erie Rotary Club of Essex Rotary Club of Essex Foundation, Inc. Rotary Club of Estero Rotary Club of Eugene Delta Rotary Club of Eureka Rotary Club of Excelsior Rotary Club of Fair Oaks Ranch Foundation Rotary Club of Fairbanks Rotary Club of Fairfax Rotary Club of Fairfield Glade Rotary Club of Fairlawn Rotary Club of Fairmont Rotary Club of Fernandina Beach Rotary Club of Fishers Rotary Club of Flagler County Rotary Club of Flatonia Rotary Club of Fleetwood Rotary Club of Folsom Rotary Club of Forked River Rotary Club of Forsyth County Inc Rotary Club of Fort Myers South Foundation Rotary Club of Fort Myers-Sunrise Rotary Club of Fox Valley Sunset Charity Fund, Inc

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N N U A L RE P O RT 2016

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SHE L T E R BO X US A | D O NO R HO NOR ROL L Rotary Club of Fredericksburg Morning Rotary Club of Front Royal Rotary Club of Ft. Myers South Rotary Club of Gainesville Rotary Club of Garden City Rotary Club of Genesee Valley Michigan Rotary Club of Georgetown Rotary Club of Gillette Rotary Club of Gilroy Rotary Club of Glenview Sunrise Rotary Club of Glenville Rotary Club of Glenville New York Foundation, Inc. Rotary Club of Gloucester Point Rotary Club of Golden Isles - Glynn County Rotary Club of Goldsboro Three Eagles Rotary Club of Goleta Rotary Club of Goleta Noontime Rotary Club of Goodland Rotary Club of Granada Hills Rotary Club of Grand Prairie Rotary Club of Grayslake Foundation Rotary Club of Greater Clark County Rotary Club of Greater Long Branch Rotary Club of Greencastle Rotary Club of Greene Rotary Club of Greenville Rotary Club of Grover Beach Rotary Club of Gulf Breeze Rotary Club of Gwinnett County Rotary Club of Hagerstown Downtown Rotary Club of Hagerstown Sunrise Rotary Club of Hall County Rotary Club of Hampton Rotary Club of Hanover Rotary Club of Harbor Heights Peace River Rotary Club of Harrisonburg Charitable Foundation, Inc. Rotary Club of Hatboro Rotary Club of Hays Rotary Club of Hendersonville Rotary Club of Hermitage Rotary Club of Hickory Rotary Club of Highland Rotary Club of Highlands Ranch Rotary Club of Highlands Ranch Foundation Rotary Club of Hillcrest Foundation Rotary Club of Hillside Sunrise Rotary Club of Holland Rotary Club of Holland Charities Rotary Club of Hollis-Brookline Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs Rotary Club of Honesdale Rotary Club of Horsham Rotary Club of Hudson Daybreak Rotary Club of Huntingdon Rotary Club of Huntington Beach SunriseSurf City Rotary Club of Huntley Rotary Club of Hyde Park Rotary Club of Indian Rocks Beach Rotary Club of Indio Rotary Club of Jackson Hole Supper Foundation Rotary Club of Jeffersonville Rotary Club of Juneau Rotary Club of Juneau Glacier Valley Rotary Club of Kansas City Plaza Rotary Club of Kaukauna Rotary Club of Keller Rotary Club of Kelso Rotary Club of Kenton County Rotary Club of Kettle Falls Rotary Club of Kewaunee Rotary Club of Kinderhook Tri-Village

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Rotary Club of King of Prussia Rotary Club of Kingman Route 66 Rotary Club of Kingston Rotary Club of Kinsman Area Rotary Club of Kona Mauka Rotary Club of Kutztown Rotary Club of La Jolla Rotary Club of La Jolla Foundation Rotary Club of La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary Club of La Mesa Sunrise Rotary Club of La Mesa Sunrise Foundation Rotary Club of Lafayette Rotary Club of LaGrange-Sunrise Rotary Club of Lake Chelan Rotary Club of Lake Mahopac Foundation Rotary Club of Lake Mary Rotary Club of Lake Oswego Rotary Club of Lakeland South Rotary Club of Lakes Area Foundation Rotary Club of Lakewood Foothills Rotary Club of Laramie Rotary Club of Largo Rotary Club of Las Vegas Summerlin Rotary Club of Lawrence Central Rotary Club of Lawrenceville Rotary Club of Lehigh Acres Rotary Club of Lemont-Homer Glen Rotary Club of Lewis River Rotary Club of Lewistown Rotary Club of Linden Rotary Club of Lisle Rotary Club of Litchfield Foundation Rotary Club of Littleton Rotary Club of Livingston Manor Rotary Club of Lockport Rotary Club of Long Beach Island Foundation Rotary Club of Long Grove, Hawthorn Woods and Kildeer Rotary Club of Longview Early Edition Rotary Club of Loomis Sunset Rotary Club of Los Gatos Rotary Club of Los Olivos Rotary Club of Louisburg Rotary Club of Ludington Rotary Club of Lyons Rotary Club of Madison Rotary Club of Madison County Rotary Club of Madison Foundation, Inc. Rotary Club of Madison West TowneMiddleton Rotary Club of Malta Sunrise Rotary Club of Manassas Rotary Club of Mansfield Rotary Club of Maple Shade Rotary Club of Marana Foundation, Inc Rotary Club of Marathon Rotary Club of Marble Falls Rotary Club of Marco Island Foundation Rotary Club of Marco Island Sunrise Rotary Club of Marin Sunrise Rotary Club of Marlton Rotary Club of Marshfield Sunrise Rotary Club of Maywood Rotary Club of McKinney Sunrise Rotary Club of McMinnville Rotary Club of Mecklenburg-County South Rotary Club of Medford Sunrise Foundation Rotary Club of Media Rotary Club of Media Foundation Rotary Club of Medina Sunrise Rotary Club of Menomonee Falls Rotary Club of Mentor Rotary Club of Mercersburg Rotary Club of Meriden Rotary Club of Merrimack

S H E L T E R B O X US A | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 6

Rotary Club of Mesquite Sunrise Foundation Rotary Club of Metairie Rotary Club of Metroport Rotary Club of Michigan City Rotary Club of Middletown Rotary Club of Midland West Rotary Club of Milford Rotary Club of Minerva Rotary Club of Mission Valley Sunset Rotary Club of Mitchell Field Rotary Club of Montecito Rotary Club of Montgomery Village Rotary Club of Montgomery/Rocky Hill Foundation Rotary Club of Monticello Rotary Club of Moraga Rotary Club of Moraga Foundation Rotary Club of Moravia Rotary Club of Morgan Hill Rotary Club of Morrison Rotary Club of Morrisville Rotary Club of Mount Kisco Rotary Club of Mount Pleasant Rotary Club of Mt. Bachelor Rotary Club of Mt. Horeb Rotary Club of Mt. Vernon Rotary Club of Mundelein-Vernon Hills Rotary Club of Murrysville Export Rotary Club of Myrtle Point Rotary Club of Nanuet-West Nyack Rotary Club of Naperville Rotary Club of Naperville Sunrise Rotary Club of Naples Charitable Foundation Rotary Club of Nashua West Rotary Club of Natchez Rotary Club of New Albany Rotary Club of New Braunfels Rotary Club of New City Rotary Club of New Market Rotary Club of New Paltz Rotary Club of New Port Richey Rotary Club of New Richmond Rotary Club of Newark-Mornings Rotary Club of Newburgh Rotary Club of Niwot Rotary Club of Nome Rotary Club of Norman-Sooner Rotary Club of Norristown Rotary Club of North Central San Antonio Rotary Club of North Conway Rotary Club of North Little Rock Rotary Club of North Mason Rotary Club of North Rockland Rotary Club of Northbrook Rotary Club of Northlake Rotary Club of Northlake-Mandeville Rotary Club of Norwich Rotary Club of Novato Rotary Club of Novato Sunrise Foundation Rotary Club of Novi Rotary Club of Nyack Foundation Rotary Club of Oberlin Rotary Club of Ocala Rotary Club of Oconee County Rotary Club of Old Mission Foundation Rotary Club of Oneida Rotary Club of Orangevale Rotary Club of Oregon City Rotary Club of Ormond Beach Rotary Club of Orrville Rotary Club of Oshkosh Southwest Rotary Club of Pace Rotary Club of Palm Desert Rotary Club of Palmyra-Macedon

Rotary Club of Palmyra-RivertonCinnaminson Rotary Club of Park City Sunrise Rotary Club of Parker-Cherry Creek Valley Rotary Club of Pennridge-Perkasie Rotary Club of Petaluma Rotary Club of Phillipsburg Rotary Club of Pigeon Forge Rotary Club of Plano West Rotary Club of Plattsburgh Sunrise Rotary Club of Pleasant Hill Rotary Club of Plymouth Rotary Club of Point Loma Rotary Club of Point Pleasant Beach Rotary Club of Point Pleasant Boro Rotary Club of Point West Foundation Rotary Club of Pomona Rotary Club of Pompano Beach Rotary Club of Port Jervis Rotary Club of Port Townsend Rotary Club of Port Townsend Sunrise Rotary Club of Portage Rotary Club of Portland Rotary Club of Portland Pearl Rotary Club of Potsdam Rotary Club of Prior Lake Rotary Club of Pueblo No. 43 Rotary Club of Punta Gorda Rotary Club of Putnam Rotary Club of Rancho Bernardo Foundation Rotary Club of Rancho Bernardo Sunrise Rotary Club of Ravenna Rotary Club of Reno South Rotary Club of Reston Rotary Club of Rhinebeck Rotary Club of Richmond Rotary Club of Rockaway Rotary Club of Rocky Point Rotary Club of Roseburg Rotary Club of Route 78 Foundation Rotary Club of Saco Bay Foundation Rotary Club of Saddlebrook Foundation Rotary Club of Salem Rotary Club of Salinas Steinbeck Foundation Rotary Club of Salisbury Sunrise Rotary Club of San Felipe Foundation Rotary Club of San Francisco Chinatown Rotary Club of San Luis Obispo Daybreak Rotary Club of San Luis Obispo De Tolosa Rotary Club of San Marino Rotary Club of San Rafael Evening Rotary Club of Sandpoint Rotary Club of Santa Monica Rotary Club of Santa Rosa Rotary Club of Sarasota Southside Rotary Club of Saratoga Springs Rotary Club of Sausalito Rotary Club of Savannah Rotary Club of Scotia Rotary Club of Seattle Queen Anne Rotary Club of Sebastpol Sunrise Rotary Club of Sedona Rotary Club of Sedona Red Rocks Rotary Club of Seguin Rotary Club of Selinsgrove Rotary Club of Sequim Sunrise Rotary Club of Shepherdstown Rotary Club of Sherwood Rotary Club of Silverdale Rotary Club of Sioux Falls Downtown Rotary Club of Slidell Rotary Club of Snow Hill Rotary Club of Solana Beach Foundation Rotary Club of Somers Rotary Club of Somers Point


SHEL T ERBOX USA | DON OR HONOR R OL L Rotary Club of Somerset Rotary Club of Souderton-Telford Rotary Club of South Austin Rotary Club of South Burlington Rotary Club of South Gwinnett Inc Rotary Club of South Hilo Rotary Club of South Jeffco Rotary Club of South Miami Rotary Club of South Orangetown Rotary Club of South Portland-Cape Elizabeth Rotary Club of South Puget Sound Rotary Club of South Ukiah Rotary Club of Southern Rensselaer County Rotary Club of Southern Ulster Rotary Club of Southington Rotary Club of Spokane Rotary Club of Spring Valley Rotary Club of Springfield Rotary Club of Springfield Rotary Club of St Petersburg Sunrise Rotary Club of St. Bernard Rotary Club of St. Clairsville Rotary Club of St. Petersburg Rotary Club of Stillwater Sunrise Rotary Club of Stoningtons Rotary Club of Stowe Rotary Club of Strongsville Rotary Club of Suffern Rotary Club of Sugar House Rotary Club of Sumner Rotary Club of Sun City West Foundation Rotary Club of Sycamore Rotary Club of Tacoma South Rotary Club of Tallahassee Rotary Club of Tampa Westchase Rotary Club of Telluride Rotary Club of Telluride Foundation Rotary Club of Temple Terrace Rotary Club of Terra Linda Rotary Club of The Mad River Valley Rotary Club of The Valley Rotary Club of The Villages Rotary Club of the Villages-Noon Rotary Club of Titusville Rotary Club of Toms River Charitable Foundation, Inc. Rotary Club of Trumansburg Rotary Club of Tualatin Rotary Club of Tysons Corner Rotary Club of University Hills Rotary Club of Vandalia Rotary Club of Vashon Island Foundation Rotary Club of Venice Sunrise Rotary Club of Venice-Nokomis Rotary Club of Vienna Rotary Club of Vincennes Rotary Club of Vineland Rotary Club of Visalia Breakfast

Rotary Club of Wadsworth Rotary Club of Waikiki Rotary Club of Walden Rotary Club of Wappingers Falls Rotary Club of Warren Rotary Club of Warwick Valley Rotary Club of Washington Township Rotary Club of Watchung-Warren Rotary Club of Waterbury Rotary Club of Waterford Rotary Club of Watertown Rotary Club of Watertown Rotary Club of Watertown Sunrise Rotary Club of Waynesburg Rotary Club of Webster Rotary Club of West Allis Foundation Rotary Club of West Bend Sunrise Rotary Club of West Bend Sunrise Foundation Rotary Club of West Orange Rotary Club of West Springfield Rotary Club of Westerville Sunrise Rotary Club of Wheat Ridge Rotary Club of Williamsport Rotary Club of Williamsville Rotary Club of Willingboro Rotary Club of Willmar Rotary Club of Willow Grove Rotary Club of Wilton Rotary Club of Wolfeboro Charities Rotary Club of Woodside/Portola Valley Rotary Club of Yadkinville Rotary Club of York Charitable Foundation Rotary Club of Yuma Rotary Club of Zelienople Rotary Club of Zephyrhills Daybreak Rotary EClub of District 5010, Alaska-Yukon Rotary EClub of Southeast USA Rotary EClub of the Carolinas Rotary EClub of the State of Jefferson Rotary International District 5440 Rotary International District 5750 Rotary International District 6220 Rotary International District 7360 Rotary International District 7410 Fred Rowe Royal Oak Interact Club Richard Rush Mark Rusnak Maryalice Russell Teresa Russo James Rust Dottie Rutledge James Rybak Samira Saleh Karen F. Saltiel Norman Samuel Mary Jo Sanders Jeffrey Scales Thomas Schaafsma

Alex L. Scherer Margaret Schmatz Mike Schmoker Paul I. Schneiderman Jeannine Schoenecker Clifford Scholz Craig Schroeder Richard Schuster Tracy Scott Verne Seehausen Dixie A. Senestraro Shawn Sites LLC Sheboygan Interact Club Mary T. Sheehan Aaron Shewman Barrett Sides Carolyn Siebe Jared Siegel Mary Singer Pradeep Singh Marlise C. Skinner John P. Smith Steven W. Smith Pierce Smith Suzanne Snijder van Wissenkerke Skip Sockell Lotte Sonnenschein Van R. Spaulding Ross Spencer Hans B. Spiegel Stephen B. Hard Foundation Ralph L. Stevens Parker Storey Philip Stutzman Katrina Sullivan Tom Svoboda Carol A. Swank Richard K. Swetits Sycamore Depository, First Midwest Bank The Arthur J. Gallagher Foundation The Callisto Fund The Math Works, Inc The Religious Council of Greater West Chester The Rust Foundation The Secant Group The Wilding Family Foundation Ellen M. Thompson James Thompson Mark Thompson Victoria Thompson Brynne Tillman Paul Tomasino Toms River High School South Interact Club Margarita Tonkinson Arwa Toulan Jennifer Traub Triad Foundation Coleman Tuggle

Andrew R. Turner Louis and Julie Turpin Unalam Universal North America Insurance Co. URI Rotaract Club Zoë Van der Meulen Robert van Dongen Nancie Vanderbeke Teri Vershel Virginia Tech Rotaract Club VMware Charitable Fund Anne Vollmer Denise Wadsworth T. Urling Walker Alisha A. Waller Scott Walters Christine Warren David P. Warshaw Wavelet Investments Carol Weber John F. Weeks Roland Weimer Robert Weldon West Allis Central Interact Club Barbara Whitcraft Barbara A. White Edward White Roger Wickham Sonja Wilder Richard B. Wilke Jack Willard Frederick Williams Michael Wilson Wilson Foundation Winnisquam Regional High School Interact Club Chris Winterhalter Joel Winterton Burton O. Witthuhn Edward Wolcott Patty Wolfe Adrienne Wootters WR Advisors Vanguard A Angelito Yango Carolyne Young Ellen G. Young Luke Young Joyce M. Zacarchuk Tracy Zafian Jack Zalaha Vance Zavela Eric Zawilski Carl Zimmerman

ShelterBox tents provide protection from the elements in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

S H EL T ER B OX U S A | A N NU A L RE P O RT 2016

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ShelterBox provides aid to children affected by 2016’s Typhoon Meranti in the Philippines.

ShelterBoxUSA.org ShelterBox USA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit registered in the state of Florida (EIN 20-0471604). Florida Office 7359 Merchant Court Lakewood Ranch, FL 34240

California Office 101 Innovation Place Santa Barbara, CA 93108

ShelterBox USA earns Charity Navigator’s highest “4-Star” rating for its financial health and accountability, and is a GuideStar Gold Participant, affirming its commitment to donor transparency and financial and operational efficiency. ShelterBox is the disaster relief project partner of Rotary International. The partnership with Rotary enables ShelterBox to scale it operations through the support of Rotary’s vast global networks that assist with the distribution of humanitarian aid in times of emergency.

Profile for ShelterBox USA

2016 ShelterBox USA Annual Report  

A comprehensive report on ShelterBox USA's activities throughout 2015, including financials and a disaster response overview. Learn more at...

2016 ShelterBox USA Annual Report  

A comprehensive report on ShelterBox USA's activities throughout 2015, including financials and a disaster response overview. Learn more at...

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