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1 Front Volume 140 No. 44

Friday, December 27, 2013

The Tonica News

Single Copy Cost 50¢

Tonica business moving south Owner says village has singled him out By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

TONICA – A business is moving out of Tonica, claiming the Tonica Village Board has singled him out for persecution. Bill Tregoning told the board during its Dec. 19 meeting he would be moving Bill’s Automotive to Wenona after the new year.

“We took an option out on a property outside the area, and we’re moving out by spring,” Tregoning said. “I think there’s some turmoil that’s been generated, and we feel the village just keeps ramping it up. It’s strange that one town will donate us acreage, and the other one is chasing us out.” The dispute stems from a disagreement between

Tregoning and the village concerning the vehicles on Tregoning’s property. The village maintains several of the vehicles are junk, which is a violation of village ordinance. Tregoning said he has clear title to all of the vehicles, and all of them are functional. Village President Kevin Sluder said many of those vehicles had not moved

for some time, pointing out a Mid-States truck that has sat dormant for 10 years. Tregoning responded the truck was eventually going to be put into service but did work and would be moving with the rest of his business to Wenona. “All I’m asking for is movement. If you’re moving cars out of there that are junk, that’s all I’m asking,” Sluder said. Tregoning was told he

would still need to adhere to ordinances until he moved the business. In other action, the board: • Discussed the mowing agreement with Tonica Grade School. School Superintendent John Suarez has asked the board to work with the school to lease a mower between the two governments. Board members decided to pursue other options before making a

final decision. • Received the news from Village Engineer Jack Kusek the plans for the new sewer plant were awaiting approval from the state. Kusek believes ground-breaking will likely not be able to take place until 2015 due to state procedures. • Received the news from Kusek the Village Inn property was going

See Tonica Page 3

2013: The year in review By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series looking back at 2013. July 5 Cedar Point hosted the Cedar Point Classic, a new and expanded twoday celebration, July 13 and 14. This celebration included a 16-team, 14-inch men’s softball tournament, live music and plenty of food and drinks, with all profits going to the Cedar Point Fire Department, one of the few non-taxing fire departments left in the Illinois Valley area. A U.S. Olympic coin set, some Liberty Head gold pieces, and a Martha Washington one dollar note from 1886 were just some of the items that Illinois State Treasurer Dan Rutherford was offering in the Illinois Treasurer’s Online Unclaimed Property Auction. July 12 In April, a 100-year flood swamped Lostant and much of the Illinois Valley area. Residents, including Dallas Freeman and Tom Hoyt, were two of about a dozen people who attended the village board meeting to list their losses and to see what the board was going to do about it. At the July 8 board meeting, Lostant

See 2013 Page 4 Vol. 140 No. 44 One Section - 8 Pages

© The Tonica News

Tonica News photo/Dixie Schroeder

Tonica Grade School students enjoy holiday parties Third-grade students at Tonica Grade School play a game to the story “A Night Before Christmas” at their annual holiday party. The students will return to classes Jan. 6. See more photos on Page 2.

Lostant Grade School still having water problems By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

LOSTANT – If at first you don’t succeed ... Board member Bob Lawless told the Lostant Village Board the repairs done on the basement sump pump were not

working as hoped. Before the board meeting on Dec. 18, Lawless said he had been in the basement and had to manually start the pump to remove some standing water. It is believed the sensor array on the pump is the problem, since the pump worked per-

fectly once manually activated. Superintendent Sandra Malahy was instructed to contact the installer and to withhold payment until the problem is resolved. In other action, the board: • Gave final official approval to the 2013-14 levy with a levy

increase slightly more than 1 percent. • Discussed the effects of the pension reform bill. Malahy said a lawsuit is due against the legislation on the grounds of constitutionality.

See Lostant Page 2


2 Local 2 • The Tonica News • Friday, December 27, 2013

Seeking Sources Where in the world is The Tonica News? Are you planning a vacation or holiday trip? Don’t forget to take along a copy of the The Tonica News. Once you get to your destination, have someone snap a photo of you holding the newspaper, and then send the photo to us along with pertinent information about who is in the photo and where you are. We’ll be happy to share your photo with other Tonica News readers, your friends, family and neighbors. Email your photo and information to news@ tonicanews.com. You can also drop it by our office in Tonica.

The Tonica News

Tonica News photos/Dixie Schroeder

Tonica Grade School third graders Chase Hank, Joshua Soria and Kaylie Thomas get ready for their Christmas party gift exchange on Dec. 20. Teacher Lynn Anderson was reading “The Night Before Christmas” to the class. As the word right or left was spoken in the story, the students passed their presents around appropriately. At the end of the story they were allowed to open them.

P.O. Box 86, Tonica, IL 61370 (USPS 633340)

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Contact Publisher Sam Fisher sfisher@tonicanews.com Editor Terri Simon tsimon@tonicanews.com

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The Tonica News encourages readers to submit news for publication in our paper. Special events, weddings, births, awards and honors, anniversaries, promotions, etc. are welcome items for the paper. Some fees may apply. Schools, businesses, organizations and groups are encouraged to send information on activities and events. If you have attended a function or event and have a photo and/or news, please submit them.

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Izeah Martinson starts to eat at the annual holiday party in Tonica Grade School’s kindergarten class.

Fifth-grader Brice ‘Santa’ Fundell enjoys a snack during the annual holiday part Fourth-grader Emily Streht works on a project durat Tonica Grade School. ing the annual holiday party at Tonica Grade School.

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curriculum is being used by the Tonica Grade School District to meet the new Core Curriculum standards set by the state. However, Malahy said her experiences with the state board coordinating the standards indicated the program may not meet the new standards. • Discussed the kitchen grease trap project. Recent discoveries may impact the proposed work, but nothing has been determined at this time.


3 Obit Records Friday, December 27, 2013 • The Tonica News • 3

2013 From Page 1 Village President Hartenbower said a committee had been formed of Freeman, Hoyt and adjoining landowner Jim Gentert. The committee was chaired by Trustee Chris Dose. The Lostant Summer Fest was scheduled for July 18-21. Lostant Village President Fred Hartenbower was looking forward to a great festival. July 19 On July 9, Illinois became the last state in the nation to allow a gun owner to carry concealed weapons, after the Illinois General Assembly voted to override Gov. Pat Quinn’s amendatory veto of House Bill 183. The Senate vote was 41 yeas to 17 nays with Sen. Sue Rezin (R-Morris) voting in favor of the override. The House vote was 77 yeas to 31 nays with Rep. Frank Mautino (D-Spring Valley) also voting in favor of the override. The Illinois General Assembly passed Senate Bill 2356 to Gov. Pat Quinn’s desk, which would increase speed limits on Illinois’ rural freeways and certain highways from 65 miles per hour to 70 miles per hour. July 26 The new Affordable Care Act will cost the Tonica School District money. That message was delivered by Mary Jo Boland of Boland Insurance at the July 17 board meeting. Boland Insurance is the district’s insurance carrier through Humana. Boland was there to offer the district the opportunity to renew its health insurance in advance of the normal one-year anniversary date. The Heritage Corridor Convention and Visitors Bureau entered Starved Rock State Park into VirtualTourist.com’s quest to crown the “8th Wonder of the World.” Public voting was open at VirtualTourist.com, a leading travel research website and community that is part of TripAdvisor Media Group.  Aug. 2 Unemployment in U.S. Congressional District 16 totaled 10.7 percent, according to figures released from the U.S. Census Bureau. Of the 370,499 people in the district’s labor force, 39,599 were listed as unemployed in the 113th Congress survey. The congressional district covers LaSalle County. The Lostant Grade School Board announced earlier they would be using a sliding class schedule, which groups students in some classes according to academic ability instead of actual

grade level. The board found out at its July 24 meeting that decision was not appreciated by every parent in the district. Aug. 9 It was a double celebration for Tonica Fest 2013. The annual townwide celebration included the village’s 160th birthday. Tonica was officially settled in 1853. The event was extended to four days, Aug. 22-25. In a move designed to add another way to bring more people to the polls, Illinois became the 18th state to allow online voter registration. A priority for Gov. Pat Quinn in 2013, the new legislation allows potential voters to register to vote and take part in the democratic process online. Aug. 16 Residents are seeing more coyotes. The coyotes were becoming more adventurous, going into residents’ yards with a little more frequency, LaSalle County Animal Control Officer Gary Wind said. A representative from Valley Petroleum was seen on a bulldozer beginning the process of tearing down the Village Inn on the northwest side of Tonica after months of communication between the company and Tonica officials. Aug. 23 A Tonica man was in a Quad Cities jail after being apprehended in connection with a late night shooting on Aug. 18 outside Leonore. Richard Felton, 28, was held on two Class X felonies — attempted murder and aggravated battery with a firearm. Both crimes carry a sentence of 6-30 years in prison with no parole. The Lostant Grade School Board tentatively accepted a bid to fix their basement water problems. The board agreed to the base price of $28,889 from John’s Service and Sales Inc. in Oglesby to install a larger sump and a pump to alleviate the flooding issues. Aug. 30 Richard M. Felton II, 28, charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery, appeared before LaSalle County Circuit Judge Cynthia Raccuglia on Aug. 21, but his attorney was unable to make it to the hearing. Felton is being held in the LaSalle County Jail in lieu of $300,000 cash bond with his next appearance in LaSalle County Court set for Sept. 16. Felton is accused of allegedly shooting Jeremy Wade of Grand Ridge in the face with the bullet entering between Wade’s nose and mouth. Wade then fell 40 feet into the river and broke a hip. He was able to crawl from the

water and walk to a nearby house where he used a phone to call for help. The latest news from the U.S. Department of Labor placed Illinois unemployment at 9.1 percent. LaSalle County was in worse shape with a jobless rate of 11.3 percent. Sept. 6 During the Tonica School District’s August meeting, the board heard the results of the 201213 audit. The audit was presented by Joel Hopkins of Hopkins and Associates and showed the state owed the school district $50,665 as of June 30. Tonica ended up with a deficit balance of $193,657 for the 2012-13 school year. About 40 farmers from Central and South America came to the United States to learn about American farming techniques and operations. They visited the Ford farm south of Tonica on Aug. 29 to see the differences between their operations and those in the United States. Sept. 13 The main topic at the Lostant Village Board meeting on Sept. 9 was flooding. Four residents of Second Street were in attendance looking for answers to the flooding problems that have plagued the street for some time. Run-off from the field to the east of the village caused water to pool in the neighborhood, causing property damage during the last couple of years, and the heavy April rains this year only heightened the problem. IVCC Director of Community Relations and Development Fran Brolley said Illinois Valley Community College’s enrollment slipped 6 percent in head count from 2012. Brolley also said there was a 6 percent in credit hours taken. Sept. 20 Richard Felton had two more charges added onto his list for his upcoming trial date. Felton was previously indicted on charges of attempted murder and aggravated battery stemming from the Aug. 18 shooting of a Grand Ridge man. In a hearing before Circuit Judge H. Chris Ryan on Sept. 16, LaSalle County State’s Attorney Brian Towne added the charges of home invasion and residential burglary. Water and sewer lines in Tonica have obstructions and collapses needing to be fixed soon. Water and Sewer Supervisor Marc Lemrise told the Tonica Village Board during its meeting on Sept. 16 a mobile camera was brought in to check lines along Minnehaha Street, and several partial collapses were found along the line where the camera could not get through.

Sept. 27 After some last minute cuts, the Tonica Grade School Board approved the 2013-14 budget, which still included more than $40,000 in deficit spending The board approved the budget at a special budget meeting on Sept. 23. Cuts included eliminating attendance at a superintendent/board member seminar and a cutback on available overtime for the maintenance staff. The board determined they could not make any other cuts without affecting the students or the community. The U.S. Census Bureau reported 22 percent of households have felt one or more possible hardships in fulfilling their families’ basic needs in the past year. The hardships included trouble in meeting basic expenses: Rent or mortgage, utilities, phone service cut off, being unable to see a doctor or dentist when needed and not having enough food. Oct. 4 Gov. Pat Quinn launched Get Covered Illinois, the state’s comprehensive education and enrollment online platform for uninsured residents to sign up for health coverage under the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA). GetCoveredIllinois.gov is the official website marketplace where individuals, families and small business owners can get connected to their new health insurance options with coverage starting Jan. 1. A LaSalle man was taken to St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley following a twovehicle accident. Cedar Point firefighters and other area emergency personnel were called to the scene just before 2:30 p.m. on Sept. 27 at the intersection of Route 71 and Meridian Road. The LaSalle County Sheriff’s office reported Gregory T. McAdams, 57, was southbound on Meridian Road along the LaSalle-Putnam County line when he failed to stop at the intersection and drove into the path of a westbound semi. Oct. 11 The Tonica Village Board held a special meeting on Oct. 7 to discuss the obstructions in the water and sewer lines in the village, especially the problems along Minnehaha Street. A mobile camera was brought in during September and several partial collapses were found along Minnehaha Street where the camera could not get through. There are also some sections where tree roots had grown into the pipes and a section with a fiber optic cable from Tonica Telephone crossing through.

See 2013 Page 4

Obituary Robert V. Hardy PERU — Robert “Bob” V. Hardy, 78, of Peru passed away Sunday, Dec. 22, 2013, at his home. He was born Sept. 20, 1935, in LaSalle to Thomas and Wilma (Gingerich) Hardy. He married Dolores Huffines Feb. 14, 1970. He worked at Caterpillar and then Sundstrand until he and his wife started Country Catering in 1980 which they operated Robert until 2001 when they retired and sold the Hardy business. He was a member of Oglesby Elks Club. He is survived by his wife, Dolores of Peru; two daughters, Debra (Larry) Brown of Hennepin and Patricia Hardy Liles of LaSalle; three sons, Mark Hardy of LaSalle, Robert Hardy Jr. of LaSalle and Patrick (Janet) Hardy of Colorado; five stepchildren, Doug (Josie) Burcar of Leonore, Brian (Cindy) Burcar of Lostant, Michael Burcar of LaSalle, Barbara (Mark) Woycik of Colorado and Kathleen (Bill) Mercer of Lostant; 16 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; one brother, Thomas E. (Laurie) Hardy of Texas; and one sister, Mary Lou (Clarence) Smith of Granville. He was preceded in death by his parents; one brother, William Hardy; and one sister, Leona Clark. Funeral services will be 10:30 a.m. Dec. 27 at the Mueller Funeral Home in Peru with the Rev. Robert Spilman of Nativity of Our Lord Church in Spring Valley officiating.  Visitation will be from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Dec. 27 at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be directed to IV Food Pantry or IV Pads. The online guestbook may be viewed and remembrances shared at www.MuellerFH.com.

Quick night for Tonica School Board By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

TONICA – It was a quick night for the Tonica Grade School Board on Dec. 18, as the board members wasted little time approving the tax levy for the 2013-14 fiscal year, with no major changes from the current levy. School Superintendent John Suarez reported to the board on the pension reform bill passed by the state. He told the members lawsuits from state teachers’ organizations would be filed shortly, challenging the constitutionality of the bill. The legislation signed by Gov. Pat Quinn on Dec. 5 reduces the amount of money the state will pay out in pensions. In most cases, that money was sent to the government

Tonica From Page 1 to be subdivided by the owners of the property, and there was already an agreement made for the northern portion of the lot. • Discussed sending aid to Washington to assist in clean-up and work on the town’s water and sewer problems resulting from the November tornado that swept through the town. • Looked at possible options for a pillow tax in the village in preparation for potential hotel or motel construction. Board members will look

in the form of wage taxes and Teacher Retirement System payments, meaning money paid in will not be coming out. In other action, the board: • Heard a report from Suarez on a proposal made to the village of Tonica regarding mowing. Suarez approached Village President Kevin Sluder with the possibility of splitting the cost to lease a mower for both the village and the school. Suarez is hoping the move can save the school district and the village money for other projects. • Mapped out a plan for school evacuation in the case of an anhydrous ammonia leak. • Agreed to hold a holiday party for the staff and faculty. The festivity will take place after the new year.

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4 Biz Ag 4 • The Tonica News • Friday, December 27, 2013

2013 From Page 3 Gov. Pat Quinn joined local officials on Oct. 7 to announce $3.2 million in Illinois Jobs Now! capital investments to repair municipal, township and county infrastructure in Bureau, DeKalb, Grundy, Kendall and LaSalle counties. LaSalle County’s share amounted to $955,010. Oct. 18 A DNA test was ordered for Richard M. Felton, 28, of 163 S. Mayfield St., Chicago (who also holds a Tonica address), who appeared in court on Oct. 10. Felton was asked to submit to a saliva test as well as to give his palm prints to add to current fingerprint samples. Felton’s lawyer, Myron Goldstein of Chicago, consented to the motion as it is routinely filed in violent felony cases. Felton has been charged with allegedly shooting Jeremy Wade, 28 of Grand Ridge, on Aug. 18 on the Sandy Ford Bridge over the Vermilion River. Utica’s annual Burgoo Festival was enjoyed by thousands on Oct. 12 and 13. Several festival-goers enjoyed the famous burgoo — a Pioneer stew made from meat and vegetables and cooked over an open fire throughout the night. The event, sponsored by the LaSalle County Historical Society, is the organization’s largest fundraiser of the year and includes food, vendors, entertainment and more. Oct. 25 Joel Hopkins of Hopkins and Associates brought some depressing news to the Tonica Village Board during its meeting on Oct. 21. The village ended its Fiscal Year 2013 with a deficit of approximately $29,000. The figure was driven by losses in the capital projects fund and the water, sewer and garbage fund of $66,000 and $60,000 respectively. Village President Fred Hartenbower presented the results of a meeting with local residents to the Lostant Village Board on Oct. 14. The meeting was aimed at finding solutions to alleviate the flooding problems on Second Street and was attended by many residents, including John Gentert, the farmer whose property abuts the area. Several possible solutions were presented, but the main problem is funding any projects. Nov. 1 Lostant Grade School Superintendent Sandra Malahy told the school board the basement proj-

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ect is almost completed at the monthly board meeting Oct. 24. “We’re waiting for the two pumps. They’re back ordered, and they’re not here yet,” Malahy said. “The workers capped off and drained the old pit. They moved the old pump into the new pit to take care of business until we get the new pumps.” Local author Ron Bluemer had written and published his 12th book. “Connecting Links” picked up where his 2005 book “Here Comes the Boat” left off, expanding on the history of the Illinois Michigan Canal and adding more details of the Hennepin Canal and the Illinois Waterway. This book included the impact of the April flooding, including the damage in Marseilles when seven barges struck the Marseilles dam. Nov. 8 American Legion Post of Ottawa and other area veterans participated in the honor guard event at the War Memorial in Washington Park in Ottawa. This was the fifth year of a vigil program where area veterans sign up to take 15 minute shifts as honor guards. The event started on Nov. 1 with an opening ceremony and ended 24 hours later on Nov. 2. On Nov. 2, Illinois Valley Community College unveiled the Peter Miller Community Technology Center. IVCC President Jerry Corcoran credited State Rep. Frank Mautino (D-Spring Valley) and former State Sen. Gary Dahl (R-Granville) for helping to secure 75 percent of the project’s construction funding from the state. Nov. 15 LaSalle County Sheriff Tom Templeton said violent crime was not a major problem in LaSalle County and property crimes were down. “Between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2012, the rural areas of LaSalle County reported 148 burglaries and 255 thefts,” Templeton said. “This year, from Jan. 1 to Nov. 5, we’ve had only 84 burglaries and 180 thefts. Unless we have a major crime wave, our numbers will be way down from last year.”

Water and sewage issues dominated the meeting of the Lostant Village Board Nov. 11. With some minor equipment problems reported and a needed repainting of both the interior and exterior of the water tower, water and sewer supervisor Dave Mertes told the board it needed to consider the possibility of a rate hike. Nov. 22 Village attorney Bob Steele presented the proposed tax levy for the 2014 fiscal year to the Tonica Village Board on Nov. 18. The levy called for a $2,000 increase over the current $90,000 levy. Steele said it was a reasonable amount and thought it was a conservative levy. Accused gunman Richard Felton spent his holiday season in the LaSalle County Jail. Felton waived his right to a speedy trial when his lawyer, Chicago attorney Myron Goldstein, asked for a continuance during his Nov. 15 court appearance. Opening arguments in Felton’s case were scheduled to start on Nov. 18. With the continuance granted by Raccuglia, his next court appearance will be a status hearing on Jan. 23. Felton is charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery in the Aug. 18 shooting of Jeremy Wade, 28 of Grand Ridge. Nov. 29 Starting in June 2014, same-sex couples will be able to obtain marriage licenses in Illinois due to legislation signed by Gov. Pat Quinn. Once the law takes effect, many county clerks did not expect any additional paperwork or expense to their office, although LaSalle County Clerk JoAnn Carretto was operating on a wait-and-see basis. The hiring and rearrangement of office and cafeteria staff was the main focus during the Lostant Grade School board meeting on Nov. 19. The board accepted the resignation of Gerilynn Smith as bookkeeper and Jennifer Tooley surrendered her position as part-time assistant cook to increase her current assignment as part-time administrative assistant to full-time

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effective Dec. 2. Physical education instructor Stephanie Ziel added the position of part-time assistant cook to her duties. Dec. 6 The state of Illinois was attempting to save money by requiring the Illinois State Board of Education to redraw the map of the state’s Regional Offices of Education. The purpose of these offices is to provide support and teacher training for various programs throughout the state. The new map took the former 44 regions and merged them into 35. LaSalle County’s office absorbed Putnam and Marshall counties from the former regional office of Putnam/Marshall/Woodford counties. Hunters in Illinois harvested a preliminary total of 55,708 deer during the opening weekend of the 2013 Illinois Firearm Deer Season on Nov. 22-24, according to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR). The preliminary harvest total of 55,708 for the first three days of the 2013 firearm season was down from the first weekend harvest of 72,111 deer during the 2012 season. Dec. 13 The ink was barely dry on the pension reform legislation signed into law by Gov. Quinn on Dec. 5, and those affected made it known they believed the legislation was unconstitutional. The new law counts on saving $160 billion over the next 30 years, largely by sharply curbing cost-ofliving increases to retirees and requiring many current workers to skip up to five annual cost of living bumps when they retire. It also will boost the retirement age for current workers by up to five years, depending on their current age. It was a successful blood drive at the Tonica United Methodist Church on Dec. 9 with several people showing up to give the gift of life. Unfortunately, this may have been the last one. Tonican Mary Kay Keutzer organizing the blood drive at the church every eight weeks for the last 17 years, but she retired from the duty after this drive.

Quinn announces $500,000 for LaSalle County bridge project OTTAWA – Gov. Pat Quinn announced capital investments of more than $500,000 for a bridge replacement project in LaSalle County, part of his Illinois Jobs Now! capital construction program. The project will be overseen by the Illinois Department of Transportation. The bridge carrying Illinois Route 71 over a tributary of the Fox River will be replaced for $567,905 by Stark Excavating Inc. of Bloomington, the lowest of three bidders. “I want to commend Gov. Quinn for the release of the funds to upgrade these bridges. It is because of Gov.

Quinn’s leadership that we were able to get the capital bill that provides funding for these bridges,” State Representative Don Moffitt (R-Gilson) said. “These projects continue in our efforts to make Illinois a safer place to live and travel. Repair of these bridges shows the importance of having a capital bill for Illinois. It also shows why we will need additional capital building programs in the future as there are even more bridges in need of repair.” These projects are part of Quinn’s $31 billion Illinois Jobs Now! program, which is projected to support more than 439,000 jobs over six years.

Pesticide applicator test-only session at LaSalle County Extension OTTAWA – The University of Illinois Extension – Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam Unit is offering a test-only session for private pesticide applicators. The test-only session will be held from 10 a.m. to noon on Jan. 14 at the LaSalle County Extension Office located at 1689 N. 31st Road, Suite 2, in Ottawa. Testing will begin at 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by Jan. 13. Call University of Illinois ExtensionLaSalle County Office at 815-433-0707 to register. If you need a reasonable accommodation to participate, please indicate when calling/registering.

There is no charge for the testing session. The Illinois Department of Agriculture will administer the test. Participants may bring a calculator. New Private Applicator Training Manuals came out in 2011-12. The manual and workbook can be purchased online or at local Extension offices. The University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. Visit their website at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/ If you have questions or need more information call University of Illinois Extension – Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam Unit at 815-875-2878.

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5 Perspective Friday, December 27, 2013 • The Tonica News • 5

The Editorial Page The Tonica News Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

‘It’s the most glorious time of the year ...’ It’s that time of year again! The lights glimmer on every street corner. The kitchens burst with heavenly smells. The trees shelter a pile of wrapped presents ... Yes, Christmas is coming, but I’m actually referring to the beloved final exams. Just when I am ready for winter break after a long semester, school puts a damper on the excitement with a load of weighty tests. In my case, when the teacher suggested on the first day of class that studying a little bit every day would be a good idea, I casually scoffed at the remark and came home from school to do whatever pleased me that day. All too soon, COMMENTARY though, Christmas break is just around the corner, and along with it comes some pretty big tests coming up that I haven’t studied for one bit yet. One thing that I can’t stand, though, is failure. I’m a sore loser, and I hate disappointing myself and others, so alas, the studying must begin. Fortunately, I’ve completed two tests already that were not cumulative (just testing over the last chapters covered), but the rest are. I now have to go back and try to reinvent my studying habits, so that I can cover a semester’s worth of notes glaring up at me. To put it mildly, this rarely works. First off, I am already sick of studying from my first two tests, and I dread the hours of staring at pages of notes that are still to come. It is just too much to expect anyone to be able to sit and study for hours when they are not used to it, and then to expect them to instantly remember all they have crammed into their brains for the last several hours on the test is utterly impossible! Unless they happen to have a photographic memory. And to anyone who does; I am sorely jealous … Since most people do not enjoy and are not practiced at studying for hours on end, memorizing hundreds of notes, it burns them out quickly. To me, this sounds eerily like some other things popular in the coming weeks, say maybe like New Year’s resolutions? I already hear radio stations chattering about the list of changes people wish to make to their lives that will instantly be implemented when January first strikes. Honestly, I am all for fixing up areas in my life where I am lacking, but it is the way that people go about it that doesn’t quite work out. Typically, people will attack their resolutions with gusto the first couple weeks of January, and there are even those determined, driven people who stick with them all year (for whom I hold great respect), but the majority lose interest or get tired of the work all too quickly. And I’m sad to say that I have been one of those people. The problem doesn’t lie in the resolution. I truly do think everyone needs to examine their lives and try to make themselves the best they can be in order to live life to its fullest. In my opinion, though,the issue is that we force ourselves all at once to take on a new habit or lifestyle that burns us out because we are not used to it. Just like trying to sit and study for hours on end because I haven’t been going over my notes all along, I usually find myself far more interested in the pretty landscape outside my window or the peppy Christmas jingle playing in the next room. Next thing I know, I’m up cleaning my room or attending to some other task I would never normally be so willing to do. Ironically I seem to know how it goes all too well … The only answer I can gather from my limited experience is that I need to bite off smaller pieces at a time. All through the year I need to spend a

Danae Ross

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On the street

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions?

“I’m terrible about New Year resolutions. I’ve made them before, and they don’t stick.” Shauna Breckenridge, Lostant

“I haven’t made any, but I do believe in them.” Rick Hildebrand,Tonica

“Nope, I haven’t really thought of any. I don’t really do them. I never really have done them.” Brandy Iverson, Tonica

“I believe in them, but usually I don’t do well at keeping them when I make them. I haven’t got any planned for next year yet.” Susan Siemers, Tonica

“I haven’t really thought about it yet. Yes I tried it once, and it didn’t work. I know a lot of people that it has worked for. Like my uncle, he quits drinking until Lent every year. He sticks to his guns. I never really have thought about it yet this year.” Dave Cate, Tonica

Considerations by Nedda Families are defined differently than when we were young. Modern families can consist of two women or two men with adopted children or mixed families of different races and religions, and of course, the traditional man and wife marriage we are more accustomed to knowing. Sometimes people live together for years, and never marry or wait for years before they do. There can be no wedding ceremony or very elaborate ones. Whatever the arrangement, these people see themselves as a family. I guess I’m here to say, “Whatever the package, it is a family, and I want it to be as strong and safe as it can be.” I came from a family that was as dopey as any. I feel fortunate I always felt safe, secure and loved, and I know that isn’t the case with many of you all. Maybe I was drawn to the work that gave me so much joy because I wanted the same things for others. I have one living sibling, and I talk to her several times a week on the phone. She helps me remember things that are precious

Nedda Simon COMMENTARY to me from my past family, and in her wisdom, she urges me on as I try to age as gracefully as she has. I traveled to see her last year, and I am so happy I did. Make time to visit each other even though they live far away. At least email, call and have someone set up an Internet visit, so you can see each other. There is no excuse not to communicate with others in this new age. Sometimes we feel challenged by what is going on in the family, and as the `elder statesmen,” perhaps we can help members get along better. First, we need to get rid of our own resentments and the idea of never forgiving a slight by somebody. This just feeds the fire and keeps the feud going. Resentments diminish us in many, many ways. Next we should reach out to any siblings estranged from the rest. It

little time going over what I am learning, so that when the final exam comes, I can just fine tune my knowledge and breeze through it. Instead of trying to change our lives instantly at the NewYear, it would work better to examine them regularly, trying constantly to improve our minds, bodies, careers, families or whatever it might be that needs some attention. I want to be in tip top shape all year round, not just in January! And if I am constantly working at it all year, then I will be practiced and more likely to stick with whatever I am trying to

may not work, but maybe it will, and the reward is new life for all. “I’m sorry” goes a long way. And even if you think you are right, give it up and move on. Our days are too precious to miss out on seeing members that are disconnected or distant. If family gatherings are tense, perhaps smaller groups could work or not being so rigid about how the holidays are celebrated. We all don’t have to go to the same place at the same time and eat the same meal every single year! We need to be mindful of our children’s traditions they have established and be flexible toward their plans and schedules. Be sure you consider their in-laws’ plans and ask about how to accommodate everybody. Plan gatherings together to get closer and make the larger family more bonded. We might even learn some new rituals and traditions that will expand our world and enhance our lives.  Just think, we all can help the expanding world become a better family by starting with our own. Nedda Simon can be reached at neddasimon@ymail.com.

achieve. So, here it comes … I hear the carols jingling all around town. I see the glittering snow covering the ground. I feel the New Year barreling its way in. And thus, I want to make a fresh start, but not like last year. This year I will take it one step at a time, and with any luck, next year at this time, I will still be reaping the benefits. How about you? Danae Ross is a freshman at Illinois Valley Community College. She can be reached at diamondspride30@yahoo.com.


6 Life 6 • The Tonica News • Friday, December 27, 2013

Community Stage 212 prepares to open 2014 season LASALLE — Stage 212 opens its 2014 season with “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” the memorable musical comedy by William Finn and Rachel Sheinkin that showcases six quirky students, played by adults, as they compete in a spelling bee run by three equally quirky adults. Included in the cast are Megan Cullinan as Rona Lisa Peretti, Andy Decker as Douglas Panch, Doug Bartelt as Mitch Mahoney, Emily Brodzik as Olive Ostrovsky, Phil Grant as William Barfee, Christin Chamberlain as Logainne Schwartz and Grubenierre, Becky Martin as Marcy Park, Tom Bailey as Leaf Coneybear and Derek Zinke as Chip Tolentino. Production staff includes Director Scot Smigel, producer Ellen Marincic, assistant Director Kyle Foley, music Director Megan Cullinan, choreographer Deana

Brown, light operator Matt Boehm, sound operator Andrew Paden and spotlight operators Jessica Gray and Yvette Lucas. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be presented Jan. 24-26 and Jan. 31-Feb. 2 at Stage 212, 700 First St., LaSalle. Friday and Saturday performances begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday matinees begin at 2 p.m. Tickets will be available to the general public for $20 each beginning Jan. 6. Box office hours are 4 to 6 p.m. Monday, 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. Tickets may also be purchased online by visiting the Stage 212 website at www.stage212.org or reserved over the phone with Visa, MasterCard or Discover. Call 815-2243025 for details. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” is presented by special arrangement with Music Theater International.

‘Gypsy’ auditions set for Jan. 22 and 23 OGLESBY — Children’s auditions for the Illinois Valley Community College theatre department production of the musical “Gypsy” will be Jan. 22 with a second round of auditions for adults and teenagers Jan. 23. The director and choreographer will be Don Grant Zellmer. Children 13 and under will audition at 4 p.m. Jan. 22 in the Cultural Centre followed by auditions for adults and teenagers 14 and older at 4 p.m. Jan. 23. Roles are open to all members of the community. Zellmer emphasized “Gypsy” is a large cast show with opportunities for performers of many ages, including mature performers. Technical (sound and

lighting) as well as crew and backstage opportunities are also available. Participants should prepare a song and bring sheet music (accompanist provided) or CD accompaniment. Additional music will be taught, as well as choreography. Registration in advance of auditions is not necessary but audition forms can be filled out in advance under the Auditions link at www.ivcc.edu/theatre. For information, email Don_ Zellmer@ivcc.edu. “Gypsy” will be produced by David A. Kuester with music direction by Norman Engstrom and technical direction by Jenna Stinson. The musical plays April 10-13.

Thanks Neighbor Brighter holidays for area seniors To the Editor, On behalf of the staff at Home Instead Senior Care, I would like to thank everyone who helped with this year’s very successful Be a Santa to a Senior Program. With support from generous shoppers, non-profit agencies that work with seniors, and our retail partners that hosted the Christmas trees, we were able to collect more than 500 gifts for local seniors who otherwise might have been overlooked this holiday season. We also would like to thank the many volunteers, who shared their time to collect, wrap and deliver the gifts to 525 area seniors, many of whom struggle to make ends meet. Thanks to all those who helped us brighten the holidays for our local seniors and truly making a difference in our community. Gail Gander, program coordinator of Home Instead Senior Care Peru

Panthers top Tri-County foe Chargers By Dixie Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

GRANVILLE — The Putnam County Panthers took on Tri-County nemesis, the Peoria Christian Chargers in R.M. Germano Gymnasium on Dec. 20. In a heart pounding game in which the lead changed hands and was close the entire time, the Panthers came out of the fight on top with a final score of 75 to 61. The game started off with the referees assessing the Chargers a technical foul for dunking the ball during warm-ups. Harold Fay was sent to the line and made both shots to send the Panthers to an early 2 to 0 lead. The first quarter then set the pace for the contest. While the score ended in the Panthers favor 19 to 18, rebounds were tight with the Panthers getting the edge seven to six. Each team had a blocked shot and the home team edged out the visitors in assists four to three. Turnovers were in the Chargers’ favor with four assessed to them while the Panthers only had two. The Panthers’ Evan Kreiser led the scorers with eight points in the quarter while Fay had seven. PC coach Josh Nauman noted that the Chargers had some difficulty with the Panthers’ defense in the first quarter. “They were attacking our press a little different. They looked like they were a little lost to begin with and they were making a lot of mistakes,” Nauman said. “We have that happen with a lot of

teams and our press.” The action really heated up in the second quarter. The score went back and forth with the Panthers being on the losing end by two to three points each time. However Austin Biagini’s last second two point shot tied the game up at the half 32 to 32. Rebounds again were close in the quarter nine to eight in the Panthers’ favor. Each team upped the pressure on defense, causing four turnovers to their opponents game in the second quarter. Putnam County had two blocked shots and one steal as well. Sophomore phenom Alec Veverka got into foul trouble early and saw limited action in the second half of the game. Senior Andrew Gavin of the Chargers took the main bulk of scoring responsibility with 13 points in the quarter. “We didn’t shoot real well in that quarter,” Nauman said. “We luckily starting shooting good again after that.” The third quarter again was quite the nail biter with both teams tied at the end 49 all. The Panthers outrebounded the Chargers by one and each team had a blocked shot in the quarter. Fay continued to shoot the hot hand at the free throw line upping his total point output at the end of the third quarter to 15 while Kreiser added 12. Crowd favorite Michael Weide went to the net and added seven of his 10 points in this quarter. Shots were flying for the Panthers in the fourth quarter as they outscored the Chargers

Tonica News photo/Ken Schroeder

Evan Kreiser (33) shots over the heads of three Peoria Christian defenders during the game on Dec. 20. 26 to 12. A lot of this came in the first six minutes of the quarter as eventual game leading scorer Fay made 14 of his total 29 points in this quarter. Rebounding was again slightly tilted toward the Panthers’ favor by three. The Panthers’ defense upped the ante on the Chargers as they committed six turnovers in this quarter. Fay had his third straight 28 point or more game on the season. Following Fay for overall scoring for the Panthers was Kreiser with 14 and Weide with 12. The Panthers’ biggest support was their 74 percent free

throw shooting rate. Nauman was pleased with his team’s shooting abilities in the game. “We played a lot better than last Friday (in the loss at RoanokeBenson).” he said. “Made some free throws tonight instead of last Friday when we should have hit them.” For the Chargers, Gavin again came through for his team with a total of 22 points while Dakota Bennington tossed in 12 points. The Panthers’ regular scheduled play will start again on Jan. 10 with an away game at Streator Woodland.

PCHS junior varsity drop game By Dixie Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

GRANVILLE — The Putnam County High School Junior Varsity Panthers lost a tough game at home Dec. 20 against the Peoria Christian Junior Varsity Chargers. The Panthers tried to play catch up the entire game with a final score in the Chargers’ favor 61-50. The first quarter had the Panthers starting slow and having to come from behind 20 to 6. However, in the second quarter the Panthers outscored the Chargers 13-12, making the halftime score 32 to 19. In the third quarter the action really picked up with the Panthers again outscoring the Chargers 15 to 13, so the opposition was taking a thinner lead 45 to 34 into the fourth and final quarter. However the team could not just pull it off in the fourth quarter and the game ended at 61 to 50. The Panthers were led by the potent combination of Christian Harris with 16 points and Joe Berg who followed him with 15 points. Harris led all scorers for the game. Berg’s points were all from the three-point circle. Mike

Tonica News photo/Ken Schroeder

Christian Harris (4) drives in for a shot around a Peoria Christian defender on Dec. 20. Miller followed with eight points and Jordan Hatton chipped in six points. For the Chargers, their team was led by Anthony Riley with 15 points and Derek Schaffner with

11 points. The head coach of the JV Panthers is Jim Vipond. The Junior Varsity Panthers will be back in action on Jan. 10 in an away game at Streator Woodland.


7 Life Friday, December 27, 2013 • The Tonica News • 7

PC-Hall junior varsity wrestling squad wins By Dixie Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

PEOTONE — The PC/Hall Wrestling co-op brought their ‘A’ game to the Peotone Junior Varsity wrestling tournament on Dec. 21. The team took first place out of 12 teams that participated on the day, scoring over all points. The meet started at the 126pound weight class with Nat Diaz taking third place. Tyler Taber stepped up to take a first place in

the 145-pound weight class while Luke McCook took second overall in the 160-pound weight class. The second first place finish on the day was earned by Josh McConnell at the 170-pound weight class. In the same division, Nick Bouxsein took fourth. In the 182pound weight division, Josh Hall took a second place. PC/Hall scored a double placement when teammates Matt Briddick and Evan Kiphart took first and second place respectively

after wrestling each other in the finals. This feat was repeated at the 220-pound level with Trevor Case and Isaac Marquez taking third and fourth place respectively. The last meet of the day where PC/ Hall placed on the day was the heavyweight division where Shane Khounnha placed fourth. The next meet for the PC/Hall Wrestling co-op will be on Jan. 4 at Kewanee with Ashton Franklin Center, Farmington and Kewanee.

Starved Rock State Park happenings UTICA – The year is almost finished, but there is still lots to see and do at Starved Rock State Park. Art in the Park is a collection of more than 30 pieces of art (mostly woodcarvings and several bronze sculptures) at Starved Rock Lodge and State Park. The newest sculpture is a 12-foot totem of manufactured steel by sculptor Michael Jones. The new steel totem is located in front of the hotel entrance. Self-guided tours take 30-45 minutes. A brochure, with a map of the “Art in the Park” collection, is available in the Starved Rock Visitor Center. The first piece of “public art” in the collection at Starved Rock Lodge is also the largest. Chief Walks with the Wind stands 12 feet tall and was created by sculptor Peter “Wolf” Toth in 1989. Lodge President/CEO Terry Cross has added more than 30 other works of art to the collection, which includes the bronze “Eagle in Flight,” “Crow Medicine Man” and the Foxes at Fox Ridge. Many of the chainsaw sculptors were commissioned to take dead trees on the property and transform them into replicas of wildlife and significant figures.

The collection is wheelchair and stroller friendly and is free to the public. Most of the sculptures are outside, but several are located within the Lodge. If you’ve taken a great photo at Starved Rock in the past year, enter it in the Nature In Focus Photo Contest. Photos must be submitted before Feb. 17. Entries will be judged, and winners will be announced at the annual Photo Show on Feb. 23. An exhibit of all the photos entered will be in the Great Hall from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Themes this year are Special Effects, Humorous, Wildlife, Canyon/Landscape, People/Hikers and Macro. There are also new categories this year which include the General category and Youth under age 18. There is a limit of two photos per person and a CD containing images for entry must be submitted along with the photos. Entered photos must have been taken in the past calendar year, and all photos must be unframed and at least 5-inches-by-7-inches up to 9-inches-by12-inches. A completed, signed entry form must be attached to the back of each photo entered in the contest, and the name of the

photographer, title, or other text must not appear on the front of any entry. All entries remain the property of photographer, but Starved Rock Lodge reserves the right to use them in future publications. Any photos determined to have been taken off the marked trails at Starved Rock State Park will be disqualified. Prizes must be claimed within 30 days of notification, or the prizes will be forfeited. Winning entries will be those that best reflect Starved Rock Lodge, Starved Rock State Park. Decisions by the judges are final. Each winner must agree in writing that their name, likeness, city, winning photo may be used by Starved Rock Lodge for promotional and publication purposes without additional compensation. Prior to receiving prizes, each winner will be required to sign a release provided by Starved Rock Lodge to this effect and obtain a release or permission from anyone without proprietary rights in their winning photograph. Refusal to provide such releases or permissions will signify entrant’s disqualification in this photo contest, and any prizes will be forfeited.

Putnam County Community Center 24 hours in advance Menus by calling 815-339-2711.

Dec. 30 – Chili with beans, corn, tropical fruit, juice cup, cornbread. Dec. 31 – PCCC closed — Happy New Year! Jan. 1 – PCCC closed — Happy New Year! Putnam County Community Center serves lunch every day, Monday through Friday. Reservations are required

Suggested donations for Monday, Wednesday, Friday is $3. Suggested donations for Tuesday, Thursday is $5.

Activities Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 — PCCC closed — Happy Holidays! Jan. 2 — PCCC reopens.

Library Corner LaSalle — Jan. 7 and 14 — Storytime Express is an interactive mix of stories complemented with a variety of engaging activities like crafts, flannel boards, rhymes, songs and puppets. It is formatted to introduce children to the library and early literacy skills. The shorter, 30-minute length and fast pace make it perfect for active children with shorter attention spans, and the express is a great way for busy parents to share special times with their children. A bit of the program time will be set aside to help families find just the right books to check-out. Fun and educational, Storytime Express is a free program, open to the public. Storytime Express will be offered from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more information, call 815-223-2341. Lostant — Jan. 7 and 14 — Families First, a state funded early childhood grant, is a program for families with children ages birth to 3. It is sponsored by the Oglesby Early Childhood Programs. Children will read stories, sing songs, learn finger plays, do an easy art project and have a snack. The program also includes field trips and parent education meetings. Families First meets every Tuesday from 10 to 10:45 a.m. Library Time begins at 10 a.m. every Tuesday when school is in session For children birth through school age and a caregiver. Enjoy story time with Miss Sue as well as a craft, music and dance, a snack and various fun activities like puppet play, games, rhythm band and more. For more information, call the library at 815368-3530.

Girl Scout cookie time comes early; pre-orders now being accepted Girl Scouts of Central Illinois (GSCI) for the first time will take preorders for cookie sales. Starting Dec. 20, the girls began taking pre-orders using the traditional order card format. Direct sale of cookies will then begin on Feb. 3, 2014. By introducing the opportunity to take preorders, cookie customers are able to ensure supply of their favorite Girl Scout cookies, and troops get a solid base of how many boxes they need to order to fulfill the demand in their areas. Troops will then place their pre-orders as well as order extra cases they will use for direct customer sales. “Last year was the first year Girl Scouts of Central Illinois used the direct sale format, and the troops were very successful. By using this format, troop profits increased by 25 to 35 percent; more girls earned free membership; participants earned 26 percent more Cookie Dough; and we had over 110 percent more girls reach the 250- and 500box level. But the suc-

cess did not come without a few growing pains,” Pam Kovacevich, CEO of GSCI, said. “The preorder approach will allow Girl Scouts to set higher and more accurate goals, as well as carry the right supply for their buyers.” The new cookie on the sheet this year is Cranberry Citrus Crisp. Cookie lovers can also place their orders early for all their traditional favorites, including Thin Mints, Shortbread, Peanut Butter Patties, Peanut Butter Sandwiches, Caramel deLites, Lemonades, and Thanks-A-Lots. Girl Scouts of Central Illinois will also once again participate in Operation Cookie Share. The effort to provide cookies to military troops domestically and overseas started in 2010. Since then, GSCI has provided more than $825,000 worth of Girl Scout cookies to the women and men in our armed forces at home and abroad. In fact, Girl Scouts of Central Illinois were so successful that this achievement is entered in the Illinois Congressional Records.

“The cookie program is something our girls and the communities look forward to every year. Not only is it fun and exciting for the Girl Scouts, it teaches them a number of skills – both social and academic – that will help them grow as students and future business leaders,” Kovacevich added. The Girl Scout Cookie Program has grown into a leading business and financial literacy program that is run by and for girls. The program provides an important ingredient for leadership by

helping girls develop five key skills: • Goal setting • Decision making • Money management • People skills • Business ethics The financial literacy skills taught through Girl Scouts have proven to be a key factor in shaping financial and personal success for alumnae. An impact study about the value of Girl Scouting reveals that Girl Scout alumnae have a higher income/socioeconomic status, a greater level of civic engagement, and are

overall more successful than their non-Girl Scout peers (published by the Girl Scout Research Institute, 2012). Founded in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA is the world’s pre-eminent leadership development organization for girls with 8.2 million girl and adult members worldwide.  Girl Scouts builds girls

of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place. Girl Scouts of Central Illinois serves 21,000 girls and 5,000 adult members annually in 38 counties throughout central Illinois. For more information, visit www.GetYourGirlPower.org or call your local Girl Scout Service Center at 877-231-1446.

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8 History/Classified 8 • The Tonica News • Friday, December 27, 2013

– Classifieds – General Terms and Policies

- 700 Real Estate For Sale

The Tonica News reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion.

767 • Mobile Home Sales

CLASSIFIED LINE AD & LEGAL DEADLINES: • Friday Paper deadline Friday before by 3pm We Accept Call 815-875-4461 classified@bcrnews.com

- 200 Employment 232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Tonica News Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Tonica News Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 400 Merchandise 450 • Under $1000 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 time. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls!

**************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

999 • Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, OTTAWA, ILLINOIS PROBATE DIVISION IN THE MATTER OF) THE ESTATE OF ) JUNE M. DIXON ) DECEASED ) NO. 13-P-212 Notice is given to Creditors of the death of JUNE M. DIXON of 205 W. First St., Streator, Illinois, who died on October 21, 2013. Letters of Office were issued to NELLIE M. DIXON of 205 W. First St., Streator, Illinois 61364 and WILLIAM J. DIXON of 43 East 20th, Floor 2, New York, NY 10003 and JOHN W. DIXON of W. 304 N. 7180 County Rd. E., Hartland, WI 53029 all of whose attorney is HELMIG & HELMIG, 1824 Fourth Street, Peru, Illinois, 61354. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk, Circuit Court, in the LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois 61350, or with the representatives, or both, on or before June 30th, 2014, which date is not less than 6 months from date of first publication, or, if mailing or delivery of a notice from the representative is required by section 18-3

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

of the Probate Act of 2000, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before said date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. GIVEN this 19th day of November, 2013. NELLIE M. DIXON, WILLIAM J. DIXON, and JOHN W. DIXON Executors of the Estate of JUNE M. DIXON, DECEASED Published in the Tonica News Dec. 20, 27, 2013 and Jan. 3, 2014.

30th, 2014, which date is not less than 6 months from date of first publication, or, if mailing or delivery of a notice from the representative is required by section 18-3 of the Probate Act of 2000, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before said date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. GIVEN this 19th day of November, 2013. ROSE MARIE LUND EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY M. DANIEL, DECEASED Published in the Tonica News Dec. 20, 27, 2013 and Jan. 3, 2014.

office of the Circuit Clerk, Probate Division, LaSalle County Courthouse, Downtown Courthouse, Ottawa, IL 61350, or with the representative, or both, within 6 months from the date of issuance of letters, or if a claim notice is mailed or delivered personally to a creditor of the decedent, on or before the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed within the time allowed is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it has been filed. Andrew Skoog Clerk of the 13th Judicial Circuit Court Ottawa, Illinois Published in the Tonica News Dec. 27, 2013, Jan. 3 and 10, 2013.

765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1310406 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I579284 Published in the Tonica News Dec. 27, 2013, Jan. 3 and 10, 2014.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, OTTAWA, ILLINOIS PROBATE DIVISION IN THE MATTER OF) THE ESTATE OF ) DOROTHY M. ) DANIEL, ) DECEASED ) NO. 13-P-059 Notice is given to Creditors of the death of DOROTHY M. DANIEL of 140 N. 6th St., Princeton, Illinois, who died on March 20th, 2013. Letters of Office were issued to ROSE MARIE LUND of 12570 2100 North Ave., Princeton, Illinois 61356, of whose attorney is HELMIG & HELMIG, 1824 Fourth Street, Peru, Illinois, 61354. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk, Circuit Court, in the LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois 61350, or with the representatives, or both, on or before June

NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given on December 13, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of LaSalle County, Illinois concerning the business known as CNJ STYLE located at 11 Bailey Creek Dr., Tonica, IL 61370 which certificate sets forth the following changes in the operation thereof: the following person ceased doing business under the above assumed name and have no further connection with or financial interest in the business carried on under such assumed name, Christine N. Eimer. Dated December 13, 2013. /s/Christine N. Eimer Applicant Published in the Tonica News Dec. 20, 27, 2013 and Jan. 3, 2014.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF ) LETITIA GRUBAR, ) DECEASED. ) 2013-P-232 NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS AND HEIRS AND LEGATEES WHOSE NAMES OR ADDRESSES ARE UNKNOWN AND CLAIM NOTICE Estate of LETITIA GRUBAR, Deceased. Notice is given of the death of LETITIA GRUBAR, of Lostant, Illinois. Letters of office were issued on December 13, 2013, to GERALD M. HUNTER, 129 W. Walnut Street, Oglesby, IL 61348, who is the attorney for the estate. Notice is given to any heirs or legatees whose names or addresses are not stated in the Petition for Letters of Office, that an order entered by the Court on December 13, 2013, admitting the decedent’s will to probate. Within 42 days after the date of the order of admission you may file a petition with the Court to require proof of the will by testimony of the witnesses to the will in open court or other evidence, as provided in 755 ILCS 5/6-21. You also have the right under 755 ILCS 5/8-1 to contest the validity of the will by filing a petition with the Court within 6 months after admission of the will to probate. Claims against the estate may be filed with the

We’re Taking Free Classified Advertising

for all items valued under $1,000!

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY - OTTAWA, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) TOSHA J DOTY; WILLIAM E DOTY; ) DEFENDANTS ) 13 CH 224 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on October 9, 2013, Sheriff (eff. 1/11/12) in LASALLE County, Illinois, will on February 4, 2014, in LaSalle County Courthouse707 East Etna Rd (North Door) Ottawa, IL 61350, at 11:30 a.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of LASALLE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: THE EAST 3 FEET OF LOT 18 AND ALL OF LOT 19 IN BLOCK 10 IN MARSEILLES LAND AND WATER POWER COMPANY ADDITION TO MARSEILLES, SITUATED IN THE CITY OF MARSEILLES; ALL SITUATED IN LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 15-49-118-009 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 Description of Improvements: SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH DETACHED 2 CAR GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $84,496.29. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act,

For SALE

In TonIca, ILLInoIs No reasonable offer will be refused!

all or Part of 4,500 sq. Feet

815-488-8456

Bob Folty • Box 41, Tonica, IL 61370

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY OTTAWA, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) TOSHA J DOTY; WILLIAM E DOTY; ) DEFENDANTS ) 13 CH 224 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on October 9, 2013, Sheriff (eff. 1/11/12) in LASALLE County, Illinois, will on February 4, 2014, in LaSalle County Courthouse707 East Etna Rd (North Door) Ottawa, IL 61350, at 11:30 a.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of LASALLE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 15-49-118-009 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 Description of Improvements: SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH DETACHED 2 CAR GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $84,496.29. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1310406 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I579284 Published in the Tonica News Dec. 27, 2013, Jan. 3 and 10, 2014.

E-mail items • Up to 5 lines of copy for sale to: classified@ • 3 items maximum in ad bcrnews.com • 1 ad per week, per household • Private party sales only • Excludes services, firearms & animal sales


TON-12-27-2013