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1 Front Volume 140 No. 33

Friday, October 11, 2013

The Tonica News

Single Copy Cost 50¢

Sluder: ‘It’s falling apart’ Water/sewer lines still a problem for Tonica By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

TONICA – The Tonica Village Board held a special meeting on Oct. 7 to discuss the obstructions in the water and sewer lines in the village, especially the problems along Minnehaha Street.

A mobile camera was brought in last month, and several partial collapses were found along Minnehaha Street where the camera could not get through. There are also some sections where tree roots have grown into the pipes and a section with a fiber optic cable from

Tonica Telephone crossing through. While the clearing of the pipes is not a new problem for the village, the work is progressing slowly. “We’ve been working our way westward from the sewer plant,” said Tonica Village Board President

Illinois Jobs Now! $$$ headed to LaSalle County PERU - Gov. Pat Quinn joined local officials on Oct. 7 to announce $3.2 million in Illinois Jobs Now! capital investments to repair municipal, township and county infrastructure in Bureau, DeKalb, Grundy, Kendall and LaSalle counties. The funds are in addition to the annual Motor Fuel Tax revenues these municipalities are scheduled to receive this year. “These important investments will help municipalities in Bureau, DeKalb, Grundy, Kendall and LaSalle counties as they address their unique local transportation needs,” Quinn said. “These Illinois Jobs Now! funds, when added to the Motor Fuel Tax disbursement, mean local communities in this area will see an increase of about 17 percent in resources they need to immediately move forward and address critical needs, create jobs and support economic growth.” The $3.2 million released on Oct. 7 is part of the fourth in a series of annual grants that have come to municipalities for local transportation projects under the Illinois Jobs Now! program since its conception in

See Jobs Page 4 Vol. 140 No. 33 One Section - 8 Pages

Kevin Sluder. “Last year, we did a small section down by the school, and this year, if the funds are there, we’re going to try to do a small section, maybe a block or something like that. “There’s a small section where there are hackberries just lining the tile. They sent a camera through, and they found it was just all garbled up,” Sluder said.

“It’s falling apart; it’s collapsing; it’s choking the water and really making it hard for the water to escape fast enough. “We have to make sure the funds are there. A little bit at a time is what it’s going to be,” said Sluder. “We know we’re going to have to do this entire tile, but it’s not going to be done all at once. There’s just

‘Wood’-en it be nice!

Tonica News photos/Dixie Schroeder

Above, Gordon Carls shows his great-granddaughter’s cake topper he carved for her to use on her wedding day. Below, Carls displays a heron he carved. The Tonica man has been carving for more than 58 years.

Carls carves out his niche By Dixie Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

TONICA – Soft-spoken and skilled, retired Lutheran Pastor Gordon Carls, 85, has a hobby that has stood the test of time. Carls is a wood carver, and he’s been honing his craft for more than 58 years. Carls, originally from South Dakota and previously working in churches in Minnesota, has lived in Iowa and Illinois. Throughout the years, he has taken classes to learn a particular technique or freshen up on old ones in his craft.

“I’ve taken classes here and there,” said Carls. “As I have gotten older, I have also learned a lot on my own.” Carls is a member of the Valley Carvers, a wood carving club that meets at least monthly and sponsors events like a recent one at Starved Rock. “I think I am the oldest living member now,” he said. Much of his work has been inspired by religious or family significance. One piece is a wood carving from the book of Jonah in the Bible. Carls did a larger version of the elephant with the six blind men he gave to his daughter to use as a music educator and then did a smaller one to display in his home. He has also crafted items he has given back to the churches and organizations he

See Carls Page 3

Inside The Illinois Valley’s Dr. Doolittle See Page 2

© The Tonica News

no way. That’s too much money for us to do.” Plans are to do a section before the end of the year, hopefully before the end of October. Sluder set a target figure of $7,000 worth of work this year without being too much of a strain on village finances. “We’ll just have to see where that lands us,” he said.


2 Local 2 • The Tonica News • Friday, October 11, 2013

Seeking Sources

The Passini farm is home to a myriad of feathered and fourlegged friends, like these wild turkeys (at left) and Monty, the alpaca below. The Passinis are well known in the area for not just their pony rides but also for their petting zoo which has constantly been a treat for children of all ages.

Where in the world is The Tonica News? Are you planning a vacation or holiday trip? Don’t forget to take along a copy of the The Tonica News. Once you get to your destination, have someone snap a photo of you holding the newspaper, and then send the photo to us along with pertinent information about who is in the photo and where you are. We’ll be happy to share your photo with other Tonica News readers, your friends, family and neighbors. Email your photo and information to news@ tonicanews.com. You can also drop it by our office in Tonica.

The Tonica News P.O. Box 86, Tonica, IL 61370 (USPS 633340) Published every Friday at Tonica, IL 61370 Entered at Tonica Post Office as Periodical Mail $22 In LaSalle County $25 Outside of LaSalle County

Contact Publisher Sam Fisher sfisher@tonicanews.com Editor Terri Simon tsimon@tonicanews.com

Submit

The Tonica News encourages readers to submit news for publication in our paper. Special events, weddings, births, awards and honors, anniversaries, promotions, etc. are welcome items for the paper. Some fees may apply. Schools, businesses, organizations and groups are encouraged to send information on activities and events. If you have attended a function or event and have a photo and/or news, please submit them.

Email to:

news@tonicanews.com. Photos should be sent as an attachment.

Tonica News photos/Dixie Schroeder

The Illinois Valley’s Dr. Doolittle Passini family brings their animals to you

At left, Edith Passini takes a little one-on-one time with one of the ponies she uses to deliver pony rides to area children. C & P Pony Rides have been around the area for quite some time. Edith said there was always a long line of children waiting for a pony ride, so the idea to develop a petting zoo to keep them occupied was created.

By Dixie Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

GRANVILLE – Horses, goats and chickens ... oh, my! While you won’t find any lions, tigers and bears at the Passini farm, you will find a host of other furry friends that have become friends to many in the area. Mix those horses, goats and chickens with wild turkeys, an alpaca and more, and you have the making for a great petting zoo and some fun-filled pony rides. Edith and Adam Passini have raised a variety of animals throughout the years at their farm, and they have enjoyed the challenges it brings. “The animals eat before we do,” Edith Passini said. “This was a third generation dairy for years.” The Passini family has been known around the

area for Circle P Pony rides, and the idea of the petting zoo grew out of that first business. A friend asked them to do the pony rides at the local orchard, and they soon realized they could book their animal farm every weekend from May to November. The family not only appears at the local orchard, but it also does birthday parties and local town events. “I would watch as the kids would get antsy while waiting in long lines for the pony rides,” Edith said. “So I thought of the idea of bringing in other animals

for the kids to pet and look at while they were waiting for the rides.” With the idea of adding the petting zoo came the challenge of adding animals unique enough to become a draw for the business. The Passini family gets many of their animals as babies and has to bottle feed those who need it. Edith said she even has a video on her computer at home of her lambs inside their home. “They had to be bottle fed every two hours when they were young, so instead of going back to the barn, I just put in

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them in a pet taxi for a big animal and left them in the house,” she said. “It was so cute. The very first night I got them, just a couple days old, my little hair lambs and Oliver, who was a wool lamb ... liked each other so much they played ringaround-the-rosy around my recliner.” Traditional roles you would expect of some animals are not what happen when you visit the family farm. “I have wild turkeys that will come up and follow you like a dog would and an attack duck that chases

after you and gets you in your shoes,” Edith said. “It thinks it’s sneaky but doesn’t realize that with its webbed feet, he sounds like a herd of elephants coming.” The family also enjoys the non-traditional animals. They have frizzle chickens, whose feathers curl up. They also received an alpaca about 10 years ago they have named Monty. Monty has a unique set of blue eyes that makes him non-traditional for an alpaca, so the owner passed him along to the Passinis. However Monty is a very social animal, and his closest friends are the two woolly lambs, Oliver and Olivia, and two hair sheep, Larry and Shirley. Edith said people often stop by and bring treats or snacks for the animals. “I actually have one lady that every time she goes by my house she slows down,” said Edith. “If she’s not smiling when she slows down, she is smiling when she gets to work.”

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3 Obit Records Friday, October 11, 2013 • The Tonica News • 3

Illinois Audubon Society opens new sanctuary SPRINGFIELD/AMBOY — Amboy Marsh Wildlife Sanctuary welcome celebration begins at 1 p.m. Oct. 13. This event marks the official opening of the sanctuary’s trails for public use. Guests will gather for light refreshments at The Nest, a renewed storage barn. Information on display includes: An exhibit of the new herbarium, breathtaking photos of plant and animal species taken at the sanctuary, nature photography tips, information on restoration activities already accomplished by the local sanctuary committee and future volunteer opportunities.  At 2 p.m., Tom Clay,

executive director, Illinois Audubon Society, will lead a presentation honoring the people and partnerships of the Amboy Marsh Wildlife Sanctuary.   “We are so excited to show off the marsh,” said Deb Carey, director, Dixon Park District. “We invite everyone to join us and discover why we are so passionate about this incredible patch of land.” Immediately following the presentations, visitors may join guided tours to special points of interest along the newlycreated Blue Trail. Transportation will be available, or visitors are welcome to walk and enjoy the trail on their own.

Tour highlights on the trail will include information on the dragonflies at Orchid Wetland; a stop at Indian Ridge to learn about the Big Marsh, turtle nesting and sandhill cranes; plant identification near Fern Pond at Woodpecker Woods; and information about the six-lined racerunner lizards at Earthstar Flats. The day will conclude by 4 p.m. Illinois Audubon Society’s Amboy Marsh Wildlife Sanctuary is located at 1701 Mormon Road, Amboy. Driving information and maps are available online at www.illinoisaudubon.org or by calling the office a 217544-2473.

The mission of the Illinois Audubon Society is to promote the perpetuation and appreciation of native plants and animals and the habitats that support them.  The Illinois Audubon Society is an independent, member supported, not-for-profit, statewide organization.  Founded in 1897, the Society is Illinois’ oldest private conservation organization with over 2200 members, 21 chapters and 15 affiliate groups.   The Illinois Audubon Society has protected over 3300 acres by investing more than $6.6 million to protect land and water throughout Illinois.

Four-Hers observe national celebration

Burgoo Festival is this weekend

Four-H members in the county will join the seven million other youth currently in 4-H in celebrating National 4-H Week, Oct. 6-12. Four-H youth development programs provide hands-on learning activities for youth in Illinois and are assisted by more than 13,000 volunteer adult leaders. Last year, 4-Hers in this county were part of a survey to measure the value of the 4-H experience. Dr. Denise Legvold, state 4-H program leader, said the results showed 4-H has a positive influence on the participants. “Four-Hers said that they feel welcomed at their 4-H club meetings and feel that adult leaders care about them,” Legvold said. “And, nearly all of the members surveyed stated 4-H helped them develop independent

life skills and prepared them for their future and possible careers.” Many Four-Hers perform service projects which benefit their community, and more than 90 percent of those surveyed could list ways to make a difference in their communities, Legvold said. “Nearly all of our graduating seniors reported they learned skills through 4-H they can use in a future job,” Legvold added. Every county in Illinois has a 4-H program operated through University of Illinois Extension. Four-H club membership is open to youth ages 8 to 18. The new program year began Sept. 1, and new clubs are forming in this area now. To learn more about 4-H and how to enroll your child in a local club, one may contact  University of

Illinois Extension at 815433-0707 or visit the webpage at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/. Complete a registration under “Contact a Local 4-H club,” and you will be contacted by a local 4-H staff member. If you need a reasonable accommodation to participate, contact 815-4330707. The Mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. Visit the website at http://web.extension. illinois.edu/blmp/ If you have questions or need more information, call University of Illinois Extension, Bureau-LaSalleMarshall-Putnam Unit at 815-433-0707.

UTICA — The 44th annual Burgoo Festival is the major fundraiser for the LaSalle County Historical Society, which kicks off Oct. 12 with the Canal Market (the newest addition to the society’s Museum Campus). A car show is planned for the night of Oct. 12. On Oct. 13, Burgoo Festival event-goers can stroll through quaint and historic village of North Utica for a day of crafts, shopping, food and fun. And don’t forget to try the festival’s namesake — the burgoo, a Pioneer stew filled with all kinds of meat and vegetables.

Columbus Day hike at the Rock UTICA — A special holiday Take a Hike date has been added at Starved Rock on Oct. 14. The event begins at 11 a.m., where hikers will meet in the hotel lobby to meet their guide, pick up a lunch and a souvenir Starved Rock backpack. The guides from Starved Rock will share their knowledge of Starved Rock State Park and Starved Rock Lodge. Hikers will stop for lunch

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Carls From Page 1 has served. Carls is proud of the largest piece he ever did. “It was the biggest I ever did. It was a sculpture called ‘Oh Sarajevo,’” said Carls. “It was done in a very hard north eastern wood; it sat on a pedestal. I gave it to our ELC Lutheran Church headquarters in Chicago. It became something that could touch peoples’ hearts as to the pain and suffering in this world.” Through the years, Carls has come to realize choosing what type of wood can be a challenge. “By definition, most trees that are deciduous, that lose their leaves, have what they call hard wood. It is basically fairly heavy,” said Carls. “Conifers are more soft wood. Basswood, which is linden tree wood, is prime carving wood. It carves easily and is better to work with. Butternut wood is another of my favorite carving woods.” Carls knows having friends in the carving world can be very important. An old acquaintance from Iowa had helped him with his saw mill. Carls knew people who were donating wood to his friend and found he was the benefit of their generosity. “We were cutting and drying a lot of wood,” he said. “I must have had close to 2,000 feet of bored wood when I moved to the area. I still have some of that stock that I have had for over 30 years.” Through his career of those 58 years of woodcarving, Carls still thinks

Tonica News photo/Dixie Schroeder

A recent piece Carls has been working on is a display of the hometowns where he and his wife grew up. of a couple pieces as his favorites. “One has got to be the bigger version of the six blind men and the elephant,” he said. “Another favorite was my “Book of Jonah” all carved in one piece. It was 27 inches high. I gave that to my home church at the time of the 50th anniversary of my own ordination.” Family has also been a constant theme throughout his life, and Carls has remembered his family in his woodcarving work. He is currently working on a side by side piece of important moments and places in his wife’s hometown of Tonica and his own hometown. He also has carved beautiful bride and groom cake toppers for each of his three unmarried greatgranddaughters for their future wedding cakes. “That way they know I will be with them in spirit; whether I am here or not, they will have something that Grandpa did for them,” Carls said.

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4 Biz Ag 4 • The Tonica News • Friday, October 11, 2013

Tonica News photo/Dixie Schroeder

Shoring up the shoulders A workman (center) waves to cars passing by as work is done on the shoulders of Route 251 south of Tonica.

Police need help with vehicle burglary OGLESBY — Oglesby Police are asking the public for any information they might have on a burglary to a vehicle that occurred Sunday evening. Police report the burglary happened in the 100 block of North Lewis Avenue

shortly before 6:30 p.m. A window was broken in the vehicle and personal items contained in a red bag were taken. According to the police report, witnesses saw two potential suspects fleeing the scene in a dull blue minivan. The

van had damage on the driver’s side of the vehicle. It was believed to be headed to Interstate 39. Anyone with information about the alleged crime is asked to call the Oglesby Police at 815-883-8404.

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Red Cross blood drive is Oct. 18 PERU — Illinois Valley Community Hospital will host an American Red Cross blood drive from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Oct. 18, in Conference Room A. Blood donors who have not given in the eight-

week period before Oct. 18 will be eligible to donate at the IVCH drive. The Red Cross says blood donors need to be at least 17 years old, in good health, and weigh at least 110 pounds. Double red cell donors can give

at the IVCH blood drive. Appointments to give blood can be made by calling Jackie Barr at IVCH at 815-780-3387 or by emailing a message to Jackie.Barr@ivch.org. Walk-in donors will also be welcome.

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Photographing fall colors is Oct. 19 UTICA — The Starved Rock Photography Club has moved its fall shoot to Oct. 19 to better capture fall colors. The club usually meets on the fourth Saturday of the month, but since fall colors weekend falls on Oct.

Jobs From Page 1 2010. The projects will be selected and managed locally; and the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) will oversee the projects. “This installment of capital funds for local transportation projects demonstrates our continued commitment to local governments,” IDOT Secretary Ann Schneider said. “These local projects will improve the quality of life for residents, stimulate the economy, and address immediate infrastructure needs.” Also, the five counties will collectively receive about $18.5 million in Motor Fuel Tax Funds this year. Following are the disbursements for the five counties: Bureau, $457,631; DeKalb County, $779,207; Grundy County, $393,091; Kendall County, $639,243; and LaSalle County, $955,010.

19-20, the decision was made to opt for one week earlier. Membership is open to photographers at all skill levels. Each month, the photographers explore a different area of Starved Rock or

Matthiessen State Park. The group meets in the lobby of Starved Rock Lodge and departs from there at 9 a.m. Annual membership dues are $25. For more information, contact Jacki Pienta at 815-220-7354.

Following are the disbursements of the Illinois Jobs Now! funds for LaSalle County: LaSalle County $284,667 Townships Adams................ $12,069 Allen.................... $11,949 Brookfield.......... $10,021 Bruce................... $5,288 Dayton.................$4,797 Deer Park.............$6,103 Dimmick.............. $8,154 Eagle....................$9,776 Earl...................... $11,063 Eden......................$12,191 Fall River............. $5,108 Farm Ridge....... $10,278 Freedom..............$8,225 Grand Rapids... $13,302 Groveland......... $12,783 Hope...................$10,083 LaSalle..................$1,647 Manlius.................$5,431 Mendota............. $10,159 Meriden.............. $10,261 Miller................... $11,058 Mission.................$7,254 Northville........... $9,269 Ophir................... $11,552 Osage.................$14,208 Ottawa................ $3,664 Otter Creek....... $12,815 Peru...................... $1,409 Richland..............$7,426

Rutland................ $8,641 Serena............... $10,947 South Ottawa.......$4,711 Troy Grove......... $11,018 Utica.....................$2,553 Vermillion.......... $6,894 Wallace............... $8,559 Waltham............ $10,325 Municipalities Cedar Point..........$1,138 Dana........................ $743 Earlville................. $7,721 Grand Ridge........ $2,371 Kangley................$1,246 LaSalle$.............. 42,541 Leland...................$4,212 Leonore..................$478 Lostant................... $2,111 Marseilles.......... $20,215 Mendota............ $31,580 Naplate................. $2,271 North Utica.........$4,243 Oglesby............. $15,838 Ottawa................ $81,312 Peru.................... $42,710 Ransom................ $1,776 Rutland................. $1,537 Seneca................. $8,916 Sheridan............$10,470 Streator............. $61,623 Tonica..................$2,975 Troy Grove..........$1,325

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5 Perspective Friday, October 11, 2013 • The Tonica News • 5

The Editorial Page The Tonica News Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

Morning commute My grandfather was a farmer. By today’s standards, he was a very small farmer — only 100 acres or so and the typical livestock which many farmers owned years ago — cattle, hogs, ponies, sheep, chickens. We also had a berry patch, an orchard, a huge garden, etc., and all the out buildings farmers needed — a corn crib, barn complete with a haymow, a granary, a windmill/pump and structures for the animals to get out of the weather. Terri It was a family farm, and every memSimon ber of the family helped to work it. Each one of us had farm chores to do every day of our lives. While we often didn’t like to do those chores, we didn’t question it either. It was just a part of being a farm family, and quite frankly, we didn’t know there were families who didn’t have a daily agenda of chores to do. Likewise, as kids, we would have never ever dreamed of asking to be paid for chores; even at that young age, we knew our chores around the farm were just an element of being part of the family unit. They were good lessons. As an adult, I reflect on that farm with cherished memories. I learned so much — not just about farm life and animals but also about values, morals, hard work, people and love. There were plenty of opportunities to learn, and my family had an uncanny ability to turn everyday life into a lesson. I am forever grateful. And so it was the other day when I found myself behind a farmer driving a large piece of machinery (I’m ashamed to say I don’t even know what that piece of machinery was) down the road. He was going fairly slow. No. He was going really slow, and the clock in my vehicle was telling me I was probably going to be late to work ... again. I wanted to pass this mammoth piece of equipment, but the hills between the office and I were relentless. Somewhat annoyed, I resigned myself to being late, settled back in the seat and inched along Routes 6/34 like the farmer before me was. They say most everything happens for a reason, and that morning jaunt with the farmer before me was no exception. Before long, I found myself thinking about many memories of long ago — days from yesteryear when I spent every day attached to a farm and the operations that ensued there. They were days filled with long hours, sweaty moments, good times and not-so-great times, which brought lessons of life and death, marvels and normalcy, laughter and tears. While money was always tight and our budget was inevitably lean, it was a good life, a wholesome one, and to this day, I’m proud to have been one of those farm kids. I found myself studying the farmer in the cab of this machinery trudging slowly along the pavement, and I couldn’t help but think of my grandfather. I remember him most in the barnyard, the fields, the corncrib, wearing a straw-brimmed hat, a pair of overalls with a couple of frayed holes in the knees, calloused hands and dirt under his nails. He was truly a man of the earth — simple, proud, unassuming — traits I usually assign to all farmers; whether it’s true or not, I don’t know. Grandpa loved the land, and as I’ve grown older, it’s one of the things I respect most about him. Finally ... the turn signal was activated, and while there was no hope for me to get to work on time, I was a bit sad to see my morning farmer leave my path. Late or not, I needed that farmer on that day. While he didn’t realize it, he made me slow down and remember a place in time when life was different, simple and not so hurried. It’s harvest time in LaSalle County. Be safe and watch out for our local farmers. Better yet ... appreciate them, give ‘em a wave, and if you have the opportunity to get behind them on your way to work, don’t get in such a hurry. It all happens for a reason. Tonica News Editor Terri Simon can be reached at tsimon@tonicanews.com.

The power of friendship Sometimes having a best friend who truly knows who you are and where you came from is one of the best treasures in life. While sometimes it’s easy to take these types of friendships for granted, it’s important to cherish and recognize them as you grow older and your friendship continues to progress and become something so meaningful. My best friend and I met when we were sixth-graders. From what I remember, we bonded over having to take the awful required gym class that year. As if junior high wasn’t awkward enough, we were forced to dress in a locker room for class and participate in madeup games we could have cared less for. The bittersweet experience, however, is one I would never take back. It was the first step in a friendship that would continue to grow even until this day. I’m coming to a realization of how important this certain friendship is in my life. Looking back, my best friend and I have made it through so much more than just that killer gym class. We continued to stay friends though middle school as we defeated the tough homework assignments, the overly-enthusiastic teachers and usual awkward experiences every junior high kid must go through. When we made it to high school, we continued life adventures together. We again faced “the

Goldie Currie COMMENTARY worst homework assignments ever;” we always discussed who got cute and who didn’t over summer vacation; we made appearances together at school dances; and we spent long hours discussing what we want to do when we “grew up” and where we would attend college after graduation. When you are a senior in high school you go through a phase where going to college seems like it’s going to be the biggest deal ever, and you most likely will never communicate with people from high school again. While we both had the uneasy feeling that our friendship might pull away after college, we were determined to do whatever it took to make it last. Of course, we were ignorant to even think that way. When we got to college, we actually grew closer than ever. Although we attended colleges at opposite ends of the state, we continued to call each other and even started communicating on the new social website at the time called Facebook. We bonded over how tough exams were, how crazy a professor’s lecture could get and talked about our first encounters with college parties, of course.

On the street

When we made it through our college careers, our bond grew even closer as we prepped to dip our toes into the real world. We weren’t sure what we were getting into at the time, but together we focused together on resumes and job interviews until we both landed our first “big girl” jobs. I can’t say it was the jobs we both were hoping for right out of college, but at that time in our lives, it was great to just be out of the college life routine and having the option to “dress up” for work everyday sounded awesome. Now that we are about three years into what you might call “adult life,” we continue to defeat the usual life challenges. Today our challenges revolve around not having any money, the regular, naggy hardships of living on our own, and the awful task of having to take our vehicles into the shop for regular oil changes. This most likely could be our least favorite thing to do in life right now. But as days march on and new life hurdles come into sight, I can say for certain it is so fantastic to have my best friend by my side reminding me that the life challenges are totally normal, and that no matter what, we are on the right track of where we’re supposed to be. Shaw Media Staff Writer Goldie Curried can be reached at gcurrie@bcrnews.com.

Which football team is your favorite, and how are they doing so far this season?

“I love the Bears. We always watch the Bears. It’s fun. It’s the only team we go for in my family. Every Sunday we have a huge get together. We have the Cubs and the Bears. We have a huge party on Sundays. We have huge amounts of food. All the guys sit in the living room, and we usually cook in the kitchen.” Cassie Schmidtt, Streator

“I follow the Green Bay Packers. I like them because my dad raised us up watching the Packers. He took me to my first game when I was 8 years old or so. One of my favorite players is Clay Matthews; he is a linebacker. They are actually doing pretty good; they could probably be having a little better season, but they won yesterday.” John Goskusky, Tonica

“My favorite team is the San Francisco 49ers. They are 3-2 already. They have a little work to do on the wide receiver front, but other than that they are doing fine. I follow them because I am from Sacramento, Calif., originally.” Steve Elwell, Lostant

“My dad roots for the Steelers, and I root for the Ravens. I just like the Ravens. I like the players on the team, and I like they keep their players. My dad likes the Steelers because they have only had three coaches in the franchise’s history.” James Finney, Tonica

“All in all, it would have to be the Chicago Bears. This is only because we are originally from the Chicagoland area. Watched the game yesterday; the one guy got hurt.” Jenny Lawrence, Lostant


6 Life 6 • The Tonica News • Friday, October 11, 2013

Community Immanuel Lutheran to host spaghetti supper PERU — Immanuel Lutheran Church will have its spaghetti supper from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 12 at the church, located on County Line Road, Peru. Cost for the dinner is $6 for adults, $4 for chil-

dren ages 3-10 and free for children under 3. The menu includes spaghetti, salad, bread, dessert and beverage. Tickets will be available at the door, and carryouts will also be available.

Pancake and sausage breakfast on Nov. 10 GRANVILLE — Pancakes and homemade sausage will be served from 7 a.m. to noon Nov. 10 at Sacred Heart Church in Granville. Holy Names sponsors this annual breakfast and uses the profits for

church and community purposes. Take-home sausage is available. Sausage will be available after 2 p.m. Nov. 7 at the church hall. To order, call Bob at 815993-6118 or Doug at 815339-2631.

Reddick Mansion to host photo event OTTAWA — The Reddick Mansion will host a juried photography show and sale from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 19. In May, several local and regional photographers submitted samples of their work. After review by a group of judges, approximately six photographers were selected for inclusion in the show.

Among the photography on display will be work by local professional photographers Paula Guittla and Lori Nicoli, as well as photos from students in Annette Barr’s summer classes. All the photographs in the show will be available for purchase with a portion of all sales going toward the restoration and

preservation of the mansion. The Reddick Mansion, built in 1858, is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites and is open to the public for tours. The Reddick Mansion, 100 W. Lafayette Street, Ottawa, also has meeting and reception rooms available to rent for special events.

Red Cross to hold blood, platelet drives The American Red Cross will hold seven blood and platelet donations in the LaSalle County area during October. Upcoming blood donation opportunities are: Oct. 16 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Woodland High School, 5800 E. 3000 North Road in Streator; Oct. 17 from 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the American Red Cross, 204 S. Bloomington in Streator; Oct. 18 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Streator High School, 600 N. Jefferson in Streator; Oct. 18 from

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Illinois Valley Community Hospital Office Building, 1305 Sixth St. in Peru; and Oct. 31 from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. at VFW, 1501 LaSalle St. in Ottawa. Upcoming platelet donation opportunities are: Oct. 19 from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Illinois Valley Chapter Donation Center, 1530 Fourth St. in Peru; and Oct. 22 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Moose Lodge, Route 34 in Mendota. Platelet donations are taken by appointment only.

To donate, call 800-733-2767 or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age, weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

for Nathan fundraiser set for Oct. 12 Blood drive on Oct. 18 Wheels LOSTANT – Wheels for Nathan, his ever changing needs. Ant, Country Catering, Blue Collar

PERU — Illinois Valley Community Hospital will host an American Red Cross blood drive from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 18 in Conference Room “A.” Blood donors who have not given in the eightweek period before Oct. 18 will be eligible to donate at the IVCH drive. Donors need to be

at least 17 years old, in good health and weigh at least 110 pounds. Double red cell donors can give at the IVCH blood drive. Appointments can be made by calling Jackie Barr at IVCH at 815-7803387 or by emailing a message to Jackie.Barr@ ivch.org. Walk-in donors are also welcome.

Bridges Senior Center announces activities OTTAWA — The Bridges Senior Center is located at 221 W. Etna Road, Ottawa. All events are held at the center unless noted otherwise. Questions may be directed to 815-431-8034. Oct. 14 — 9 a.m., Tai Chi, Eastside Park; 11 a.m., sewing circle; 12:45 p.m., bingo; 1:30 p.m., open cards. Oct. 15 — 5 p.m., “Grandparents Raising Grandchildren” program. Oct. 16 — Bridges satellite office open at

Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living, 18 Gunia Drive, LaSalle. Call 815-431-8034 for appointment. Register for Bridges Senior Center intermediate computer class by Oct. 23. Call 815-4318034. Class dates are Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 13 and 20. Bridges is a congregate meal site, serving meals Monday through Friday 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. A 24-hour reservation is required.

a fundraiser for Nathan Burcar, will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Oct. 12 at Dave’s Lost-Ant, Route 251, south of Lostant. Nathan is the son of Doug Burcar and Josie Lutz and Kyla and Chuck Vanlandegan. He has been diagnosed with Duchenne’s, a rare and debilitating form of Muscular Dystrophy. All proceeds from the event will go to purchase a new power wheelchair and ramps so he can adjust to

Tickets to win a 1985 Harley Davidson Sportster XLX 1000, 17,000 miles, donated by Nathan’s father Doug Burcar are on sale now and will be sold at the event. There will be additional raffles, a silent auction, a bake sale, live entertainment, face painting, a bouncy house, balloon art and a hog roast with an assortment of sides. A bags tournament will begin at noon. Sponsors include Dave’s Lost-

Starved Rock Lodge hosts Oktoberfest UTICA — Starved Rock Lodge at Starved Rock State Park in Utica will host its annual Oktoberfest dinner celebrations at 5 p.m. Oct. 12, 13, 19 and 20. Oktoberfest includes a Ger-

man buffet, beer and wine tastings along with entertainment by the Doodledorfers Band. Tickets for the buffet, tastings and commemorative beer stein are $40.00 per person. Tickets for the buffet

by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

815-339-6278 • Open 7 Days a Week

www.paganolearys.net 304 S. McCoy St. • Granville, IL

only are $25 per person. Tickets for children under 10 years of age are $12 each. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, call 815-2207386.

Experience makes a difference! Five-Star Quality Rated

MOn. Chicken Wings sun. FREE Food Sunday Tues. All You Can Eat Tacos $5.00 DrINK SPECIALS WeD. Meatloaf Dinner MOn. $2 Well Drinks Thur. Tenderloin Club Tues. $2.50 Dos Equis Draft or Chicken Club WeD. $5 Martini w/ Matty Illman Thur. $3 Pint Captains FrI. All You Can FrI. $3 Jager Bombs Eat Pollock saT. $3 Buckly Or Patron Shots saT. Quarter Dark or sun. $2 Quarter Light $5.00 Bottles

Bikes, Hi-Hart, Uncle Stewy’s Roadhouse, S & N Boardwalk, Quaker Lane Enterprises and Stone Seed Group. For more information, call Dave’s at 815-368-9090, Burcar at 815481-3274 or Lutz at 815-876-0307. In case of rain, the event will be held at the Lostant Fire Station, 101 E. First St. An account has been opened at Illini State Bank for anyone wishing to donate.

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7 Life/classifieds Friday, October 11, 2013 • The Tonica News • 7

Menus Oct. 17 — Pasta, salad, Putnam County carrots, mandarin orangbreak and butter, Community Center es, milk.

Oct. 14 — PCCC congregate meal – site closed Oct. 15 — Chicken tenders, mashed potatoes and gravy, rolls and butter, dessert. Oct. 16 — Baked chicken breast, garlic roasted potatoes, steamed zucchini, apricot halves, peanut butter cookies. Oct. 17 — Baked spaghetti, salad, bread and butter, dessert. Oct. 18 — Pork roast with gravy, German potato salad, red cabbage, cinnamon apples, bread pudding, Bavarian rye bread.

Lostant Grade School Breakfast Oct. 14 — No school. Oct. 15 — Breakfast sausage biscuit, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Oct. 16 — Omelet, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Oct. 17 — Donuts, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Oct. 18 — Eggs and bacon, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Lunch Oct. 14 — No school. Oct. 15 — Hot dog on bun, chips, baked beans, pears, milk. Oct. 16 — Turkey wraps, rice, corn, pears, milk.

Oct. 18 — Pizza, salad, mixed fruit, corn, milk.

Tonica Grade School Breakfast Oct. 14 — No school. Oct. 15 — Pancakes, cereal or yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Oct. 16 — Scrambled eggs, cereal or yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Oct. 17 — French toast sticks, cereal or yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Oct. 18 — Mini cinnamon rolls, cereal or yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch Oct. 14 — No school. Oct. 15 — Hamburger or cheese burger on bun, baked beans, carrots, peaches, pickles, ranch, ketchup, mustard, milk. Oct. 16 — Hot ham and cheese on bun, celery, cauliflower, apple sauce, pretzels, ranch, mayonnaise, mustard, milk. Oct. 17 — Popcorn chicken, green beans, pears, chocolate pudding, ranch, ketchup, milk. Oct. 18 — Cheese or pepperoni pizza, Romaine lettuce, carrots, apple slices, salad dressings, milk.

Library Corner LaSalle Oct. 12 – Peter Fletcher, classical guitarist, 1:30 p.m. Fletcher will perform selections from his new CD, an allGrieg album in which he wrote the guitar transcriptions. Major works for the concert program will include Bach’s “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” and the “Suite Compostelana” by the Catalan composer Federico Mompou, to celebrate the 115th anniversary of the composer’s birth. This program is made possible with funding from the Alwin C. Carus Trust.  It is free and open to the public. Oct. 15, 22 and 29 — Storytime Express is an interactive mix of stories complemented with a variety of engaging activities like crafts, flannel boards, rhymes, songs and puppets. It is formatted to introduce children to the library and early literacy skills. The shorter, 30-minute length and fast pace make it perfect for active children with shorter attention spans, and the express is a great way for busy parents to share special times with their children. A bit of program time will be set aside to help families find just the right books to check-out. Dinosaurs, pirates,

princesses, ponies, trucks, bugs, ballerinas, rockets … thousands of books for sharing at home. Fun and educational, Storytime Express is a free program, open to the public. Storytime Express will be offered on Tuesdays from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. For more information, call 815223-2341. Oct. 17 — Sensational Science with Steve Belliveau is at 6:30 p.m. Steve Belliveau’s Sensational Science program is an entertaining and lively show featuring large props, music, humor, audience participation, and fun ...and all the while, attendees will be learning sensational science. Be prepared to be amazed and engaged. Belliveau is a member of the National Science Teacher’s Association. He has appeared on TV, radio, Worlds of Wonder Children’s Museum, Kenosha Public Museum, Midland Center for the Arts, Richmond Science Center, Illinois Science Teacher Association Conference, DuPage Department of Education and at Argonne National Laboratory. He has presented science shows in 11 states. This is a free program, open

Starved Rock Lodge offers fall colors tours UTICA — Starved Rock Lodge at Starved Rock State Park in Utica is offering fall colors tours through the month of October. Tours are offered on Mondays

and Saturdays and include lunch in the Lodge’s historic main dining room along with a trolley tour and guided hike. The cost for the tour is $30 for

–––––––––– Classifieds ––––––––– General Terms and Policies The Tonica News reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. CLASSIFIED LINE AD & LEGAL DEADLINES: • Friday Paper deadline Friday before by 3pm We Accept Call 815-875-4461 classified@bcrnews.com

You Never Know What You Might Find Right Here! The Tonica News Classifieds 815-875-4461

- 200 Employment 232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Tonica News Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Tonica News Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

PROMOTE JOB OPENINGs Call us to find out how we can help. 815-875-4461

- 400 Merchandise 450 • Under $1000 Amana gas range and mounted microwave, used 14 years, $150; Maytag dishwasher, $50. Call 815-481-2800

to the public. Registration is not required but always appreciated. This program is made possibility through funding from the Alwin C. Carus Trust. For more information or to register, please call the Library at 815-223-2341. Lostant Families First – a state funded early childhood grant-is a program for families with children birth-three will take place every Tuesday from 10 to 10:45 a.m. It is sponsored by the Oglesby Early Childhood Programs. Children will read stories, sing songs, learn finger plays, do an easy art project and have a snack. The program also includes field trips and parent education meetings. Lostant Library time is every Tuesday at 10 a.m. when school is in session For children birth through school age and a caregiver. Enjoy story time with Miss Sue as well as a craft, music and dance, a snack and various fun activities like puppet play, games, rhythm band and more. For more information, call the library at 815368-3530.

450 • Under $1000 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 time. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls!

YOU’LL FIND IT right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

460 • Garage Sales MCNABB Railroad Street (storage unit). Saturday, October 12, 8am-3pm. Holiday decorations, TVs, bookshelves, lawn mower decks, snow blade, laminate flooring, misc. items

460 • Garage Sales PRINCETON 1427 South Euclid Avenue. Thursday, October 10, 3pm-?; Friday, Saturday, October 11, 12, 8am-?. MULTI-FAMILY SALE. Some furniture, lots of holiday decorations, clothes, household, some MAN stuff. Lot of misc. PRINCETON 23 South Fairground Road. Thursday, October 10, 3pm6pm; Friday, October 11, 8am-4pm; Saturday, October 12, 8am-12pm. MULTI-FAMILY SALE. Great selection of kitchen household & Christmas items; toys; Mikey size 6 costume; dolls & accessories; and much more PRINCETON 326 Park Avenue West (Morton building behind house). Thursday, Friday, October 10, 11, 8am-4pm; Saturday, October 12, 8am-12pm. Toys, Halloween costumes, coffee table, end tables, bikes, TV, lots of boys' clothes 2T-10, misc. household items, dishes, baby items, old windows, & much more

PRINCETON 110 South Church Street. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, October 9, 10, 11; 8am5:30pm. Toddler bed with mattress, boy's/girl's nb3t clothes, step 2 easel, bounce horse, step 2 desk, ride on toys, potty chair, toys, entertainment center for flat screen tv, coffee table & 2 end tables and other misc stuff

PRINCETON 521 Park Avenue West. Thursday, October 10, 2pm-6pm; Friday, October 11, 9am5pm; Saturday, October 12, 9am-Noon. MULTI-FAMILY Fall & Winter Sale. Wall mount range hood microwave, metal shelves, Christmas items, adult bikes, women's clothing M-XL, books, fabric & crafts, household, misc. NO EARLY SALES. Rain date: October 24-26

PRINCETON 1205 West Central Avenue. Thursday, October 10, 3pm-7pm; Friday, October 11, 8am12pm. Girl's clothes (7/8-10/12); boy's clothes (10-16); boy's husky jeans/pants: kid's shoes; misc.

ADVERTIsE GARAGE sALEs OR YARD sALEs! The Bureau County Republican can promote your garage sale or yard sale Just call 815-8754461.

- 700 Real Estate For Sale 767 • Mobile Home Sales **************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO sELL? The Tonica News Classified can help you find the right person to move in. DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO RENT? The Tonica News Classified can help you find the right person to move in.

adults and $25 for children under 10. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, call 815-2207386.

999 • Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY - OTTAWA, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY ) MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,) LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS ) SERVICING, LP ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) ERIC KOSMOSKI A/K/A ERIC JON KOSMOSKI) A/K/A ERIC J KOSMOSKI; HEATHER A ) KOSMOSKI; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC ) REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS ) NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK N.A.; ) UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD ) CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 09 CH 693 108 ARBOR STREET OGLESBY, IL 61348 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on September 12, 2012, Sheriff (eff. 1/11/12) in LASALLE County, Illinois, will on November 12, 2013, in LaSalle County Courthouse707 East Etna Rd (North Door) Ottawa, IL 61350, at 11:30 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of LASALLE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: LOT 2 OF HICKORY HILLS ESTATES THIRD ADDITION TO THE CITY OF OGLESBY, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DECEMBER 4, 1987 AS DOCUMENT #87-13322, IN LA SALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 18-26-213-004 18-26-213-004 (16- COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 108 ARBOR STREET OGLESBY, IL 61348 Description of Improvements: TWO-STORY, SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSE WITH ATTACHED, TWO-CAR GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $232,840.98. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against Continued on page 8

We’re Taking

Free

Classified Advertising for all items valued under $1,000! • Up to 5 lines of copy • 3 items maximum in ad • 1 ad per week, per household • Private party sales only • Excludes services, firearms & animal sales E-mail items for sale to: classified@ bcrnews.com


8 Classifieds 8 • The Tonica News • Friday, October 11, 2013 999 • Legal Notices Continued from page 7 said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA0917491 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I562829 Published in the Tonica News Oct. 4, 11 and 18, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ILLINOIS VALLEY CREDIT UNION, ) Plaintiff, ) v. ) WENDY CHAMBERS, UNKNOWN ) OWNERS and NON RECORD CLAIMANTS,) Defendants. ) NO. 13 CH 47 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 11, 2013, the Sheriff of LaSalle County has transferred the following described property to Plaintiff, ILLINOIS VALLEY CREDIT UNION: THAT PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 1 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 21; THEN NORTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 21 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1,352.83 FEET; THENCE DUE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 21 FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.00 FEET, SAID LINE BEING MARKED BY A LONG ESTABLISHED LINEN FENCE; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 341.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 131.05 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 115.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 21 FOR A DISTANCE OF 351.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING ACCORDING TO A PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED ON 11 SEPTEMBER, 1991 AS DOCUMENT NO. 91-12297, IN THE RECORDER’S OFFICE OF LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. SITUATED IN LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS P.I.N.: 30-21-303-000 Common Address: 231 N. 14th Road, Lostant, Illinois 61334 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Any person interested in purchasing the above described property should contact the Plaintiff at the following address: Illinois Valley Credit Union 2107 Marquette Rd. Peru, IL 61354 815 224-2667 Joseph Frederick president@ivcu.com Aplington, Kaufman, McClintock, Steele & Barry, Ltd. 160 Marquette Street LaSalle, IL 61301 Phone: (815)224-3200 Fax: (815)224-3205 Published in the Tonica News Oct. 11, 2013.

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

DELINQUENT TAX LIST LASALLE COUNTY (Note - Because tax payments may have been received by this office after copy was forwarded to the newspapers, names of certain people who have paid their taxes will appear on this list.) AMOUNTS SHOWN ARE THE AMOUNT FOR TAX ONLY. AN ADDITIONAL AMOUNT WILL BE ADDED FOR THE DELINQUENT COSTS. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) ss. COUNTY OF LASALLE ) Public notice is hereby given that I, Donald J. Lamps, Treasurer Collector of LaSalle County, in the State of Illinois, aforesaid, will apply to the Circuit Court for the 13th Judicial Circuit, LaSalle County, Illinois on October 29, 2013 for judgement against the lands, lots and mobile homes mentioned and described in the following list for taxes, special assessment, interest and cost due severally thereon, for the year 2012 and previous back taxes for real estate; the year 2013 for mobile homes and for an order to sell said lands, lots and mobile homes for the satisfaction thereof and for a judgement fixing the correct amount of an-y tax paid under protest. Also, that on the 2nd Wednesday in November 2013 all the lands and lots, for the sale of which an order shall be made, will be exposed at public sale at the LaSalle County Office Building, in said County, in Ottawa, Illinois, for the amount of taxes, and special assessments and cost due thereon. Said tax sale will commence at the hour of 9:00 o’clock on the said 13th day of November, 2013, and continue until all lands and lots are sold or offered for sale. /s/Donald J. Lamps LaSalle County Treasurer and Ex-Officio County Collector

Parcel Number Tax Payer Name Amount Due –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 30-24-128-008 FORREST, PATRICK/DENA 623.66 30-24-205-006 DOSE, ROBERT 144.09 30-24-205-007 DOSE, ROBERT 144.09 30-24-205-008 DOSE, ROBERT-HELEN 144.09 30-24-205-009 DOSE, ROBERT-HELEN 144.09 30-24-205-010 DOSE, RONALD/SHERRY 3,562.72 30-24-206-010 LYONS, CODY J 1,167.69 30-24-304-005 DESPINIS, JOHNNY G / ANGELA M 686.29 30-24-306-009 DOSE, RONALD / SHERRY 457.25 30-24-312-008 PLAINVIEW INC 1,723.06 30-24-312-019 PLAINVIEW INC 200.50 30-24-315-011 DOSE, RONALD W / CHRISTOPHER W 1,215.96 30-25-104-000 DOSE, CHRISTOPHER W 74.72 30-25-108-000 DOSE, RONALD 121.47 30-30-107-000 FRAWLEY, ROSEMARY - JOHNSON, M 2,797.27 30-34-201-000 STASELL, MARK W/LAURIE J 2,892.61 richlAND 31-06-402-000 GUYCO INVESTMENTS LLC 808.58 31-15-209-000 SHAWBACK, JASON L 1,048.48 31-19-207-000 KANNBERG, LOUISA 614.22 31-27-203-000 ELLEK, DEBRA ANN/ CONNESS,MICH 1,279.82 31-29-408-000 STASELL, JON-DENISE 7,070.29 Published in the Tonica News Oct. 11, 2013.

Parcel Number Tax Payer Name Amount Due –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– eDeN 25-01-107-000 RUBIO, RODNEY/KIMBERLY 2,969.86 25-03-406-000 PLOCH, GEORGE V/MARY 1,613.22 25-04-407-000 BIGGS, JOHN W-CAROL A 1,808.41 25-05-218-000 TONDI, MARK/PAMELA 1,547.32 25-08-203-005 JONES, STANLEY W 1,680.99 25-08-204-004 REASKA, TODD A 2,362.88 25-08-205-001 REASKA, TODD 78.98 25-08-205-002 REASKA, TODD 68.30 25-08-205-003 REASKA, TODD 467.29 25-08-210-009 TURCZYN, JUSTIN M 148.65 25-08-210-019 SPRINGER, STEVEN J 1,122.49 25-09-103-013 HAMLIN, WALTER F JR 4,359.55 25-09-103-014 HAMLIN JR, WALTER F 755.49 25-09-105-008 SCHLESINGER, TODD & GUYNN, T 1,994.75 25-09-108-002 OSENKARSKI, CARRIE A/TROY A 631.54 25-09-108-003 OSENKARSKI, CARRIE 123.38 25-09-108-005 AMERMAN, RHONDA 413.70 25-09-119-000 SALKE, DENNIS D / LEONARD W 930.02 25-09-125-000 PIECHA, ANTHONY 1,235.70 25-09-300-001 STRADER, RICHARD L JR 1,901.21 25-11-402-000 YANUSH, PETER JR 2,466.99 25-23-431-000 TONICA ACQUISITIONS LTD 6,573.22 25-25-106-001 PERKINS, RUSSELL 637.94 25-25-109-006 PEREZ, ELVIA/RAFAEL 1,841.89 25-25-115-007 HAMMERS, SHEILA 1,637.80 25-25-119-018 YERUSKI, ANDREA S 1,405.57 25-25-202-000 BROOKER, DAVID-KALINA 1,317.40 25-25-203-000 BROOKER, DAVID-KALINA 107.01 25-25-302-014 OBERRMILLER, SCOTT W/ KELLY S 927.34 25-26-204-017 SPANGLER, RICHARD/BILLHORN, M 1,346.57 25-26-206-022 HICKS, WILLIAM / MELISSA A 1,772.30 25-26-206-023 HICKS, WILLIAM / MELISSA A 70.33 25-26-402-011 WILLIS, DAVID ETAL 2,017.02 25-26-407-007 COONS, JOHN A/ JOYLENE L 2,383.06 25-26-408-000 KERRY, MARGIE F 2,266.45 25-29-303-000 TURNER, T / SWISKOSKI, D 1,727.58 25-31-201-000 HENKEL, WILLIAM C 1,447.46 25-31-402-000 HENKEL, WILLIAM C 1,382.87 25-36-100-000 COONS, JOHN A / JOY L 490.9 VermillioN 26-09-306-000 BROOKER, DAVID E / KALINA M 4,634.16 26-09-310-006 BROOKER, JED W 424.64 26-09-310-007 BROOKER, JED W 421.20 26-09-310-008 BROOKER, JED W 402.24 26-17-207-000 STARKS, KAREN L 684.91 26-17-208-000 STARKS, KAREN L 35.16 26-17-303-000 BRIDDICK, ALAN A 1,310.92 26-18-109-000 STRONG CAPITAL V LP 108.29 26-25-407-000 DIMMIG, JACQUELINE/TROY 362.55 26-25-408-000 DIMMIG, JACQUELINE/TROY 300.96 26-26-305-000 BORNEMAN FAMILY TRUST #1 1,489.61 26-33-104-000 QUAKA, CHRISTOPHER L 761.88 26-38-106-000 DIMMIG, TODD A 2,661.90 26-38-107-000 DIMMIG, TROY A 27.47 26-39-101-000 CRAWFORD, JOHN-SUSAN 6,341.84 26-39-318-000 DUNNING, JONAH 826.37 hoPe 30-05-406-000 WOODLAND WATER COMPANY 1,508.24 30-09-403-000 SELL, JACOB 530.31 30-11-202-000 DUVALL, RICHARD/JAMES 95.01 30-11-402-000 WILLIAMSON, TIMOTHY-LINDA 1,645.91 30-12-301-000 WHITMORE, WALTER E TRUST 1,285.39 30-13-303-000 RICHARD, ALAN J 3,389.73 30-15-404-000 THEBUS, WILLIAM G/LAVONNE A 1,561.76 30-16-101-000 WOODLAND WATER CO 1,392.93 30-16-105-000 KERRY, MARGIE ESTATE 783.00 30-20-101-000 DOSE, RONALD 419.80 30-20-102-000 DOSE, RONALD 1,028.53 30-24-107-008 CURTIS, BRETT C 2,249.12 30-24-109-004 MUNCEY, CHRISTOPHER M 632.09 30-24-110-003 DOSE, HELEN E 377.22 30-24-117-015 SWAN, MATTHEW J 371.61 30-24-118-007 VIETTI, ANTHONY-SANDRA 983.29 30-24-120-019 MRAVEC, ANNA B 401.58 30-24-121-001 FREEMAN, DALLAS 1,327.18 30-24-121-008 FORREST, CHERYL 1,046.91 30-24-122-013 KRYGOWSKI, MICHAEL E 200.62

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That on November 25, 2013, a sale will be held at 620 E. Rt. 6, LaSalle, IL, to sell the following articles to enforce a lien existing under the laws of the State of Illinois against such articles for labor, services, skill or material expended upon and storage furnished for such articles at the request of the following designated persons, unless such articles are redeemed within thirty days of the publication of this notice. Name of Person: Nick Brown, Patelco Credit Union. Description of Article: 2004 Dodge Ram 3500 Pickup. Vin# 3D7MU48C54G195290. Amount of lien: $35,000. Name and Address of lien claimant: Steve Summers, 620 E. Rt. 6, LaSalle, IL 61301. Published in the Tonica News Oct. 11, 18 and 25, 2013. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON BUDGET AND APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE The Lostant Fire Protection District Board of Trustees will hold its annual hearing on its 2013-2014 Budget and Appropriation Ordinance on Saturday, October 26th, 2013 at 7:00 a.m. at the Lostant Fire House, 101 East First Street, Lostant, Illinois. Copies of the proposed Budget and Appropriation Ordinance are available for inspection at the Lostant Firehouse, the Illini State Bank of Lostant, and the Lostant Post Office. Published in the Tonica News Sept. 27, Oct. 4 and 11, 2013.

Buy It! Sell It! See It Right Here!

The Tonica News Classifieds 815-875-4461

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY - OTTAWA, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY ) MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, ) LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS ) SERVICING, LP ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) ERIC KOSMOSKI A/K/A ERIC JON KOSMOSKI ) A/K/A ERIC J KOSMOSKI; HEATHER A ) KOSMOSKI; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC ) REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS ) NOMINEE) FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK N.A.; ) UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD ) CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 09 CH 693 108 ARBOR STREET OGLESBY, IL 61348 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on September 12, 2012, Sheriff (eff. 1/11/12) in LASALLE County, Illinois, will on November 12, 2013, in LaSalle County Courthouse707 East Etna Rd (North Door) Ottawa, IL 61350, at 11:30 a.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of LASALLE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 18-26-213-004 18-26-213-004 (16- COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 108 ARBOR STREET OGLESBY, IL 61348 Description of Improvements: TWO-STORY, SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSE WITH ATTACHED, TWO-CAR GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $232,840.98. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA0917491 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I562829 Published in the Tonica News Oct. 4, 11 and 18, 2013.


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