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1 Front Volume 140 No. 45

Friday, January 3, 2014

The Tonica News

Single Copy Cost 50¢

New laws for 2014 Citizens be aware! By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

An often-heard saying is “forewarned is forearmed.” There are dozens of new laws going into effect to be aware of beginning Jan. 1. Some of the new laws affecting our day-to-day lives have to do with cell phones and driving, as well as voting and medical marijuana.

Public Act 98-0506 bans the use of hand-held cell phone devices behind the wheel. Bluetooth headsets, earpieces and voiceactivated commands are permitted. The only exemptions from this law apply to law enforcement officers or first responders, drivers reporting emergencies and drivers using electronic devices while parked on the shoulder of a roadway.

Motorists caught in violation of the statute will be fined a maximum of $75 for a first offense, $100 for a second offense, $125 for a third offense and $150 for a fourth or subsequent offense. Penalties for distracted drivers who injure others or cause fatal crashes by the use of a cell phone would receive a Class A misdemeanor, which could result in fines up to $2,500 and up to a year of jail time. Drivers involved in fatal accidents

could be charged with a Class 4 felony, which carries fines up to $25,000 and up to three years of jail time. “Public safety is the No. 1 priority of the Illinois State Police,” Sgt. Matt Boerwinkle of the Illinois State Police said. “Officers will continue to enforce traffic laws to enhance the safety of the motoring public. We want to remind drivers to take every precaution when getting behind the wheel

by reducing speed, buckle up and refrain from using cell phones except when permitted.” Public Act 98-0511 changes the existing legal speed limit from 65 mph to 70 mph on all rural interstates. The act also allows eight counties (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Will, McHenry, Lake, Madison and St. Clair) with heavily congested highways to opt out and maintain the current 55 mph speed limit.

To compensate, speed laws have been strengthened on all streets, highways and roads throughout Illinois, which means people with lead feet will be fined more for high speed driving. Speeding 26 miles per hour over the posted limit is now a Class B misdemeanor while driving 35 miles per hour or more over the posted limit is a Class A misdemeanor.

See Laws Page 2

Cameras in the courtroom Will a camera affect justice? By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

OTTAWA — In old black and white movies about crime, one would often see photographers in a courtroom during a sensational trial. The actual practice of allowing cameras in court was outlawed in 1965, but it’s been making coming back. On Dec. 17 after conferring with fellow judges and local media representatives, Chief Judge Michael Brandt of the 10th Circuit, which covers Peoria, Tazewell, Marshall, Stark and Putnam counties, sent a proposal to the Illinois Supreme Court requesting permission to allow cameras back into the courts. Thirty-five counties in the state already allow cameras at some court proceedings. The move is intended to give people an insight into the legal system. LaSalle County Chief Circuit Judge H. Chris Ryan said the 13th Judicial Circuit will likely follow suit shortly. “We’re considering it. We’re making arrangements for sometime in January or February to have somebody from the administration office of the Illinois courts to come and give us a presentation,” Ryan said. “We will probably move forward based on that.”

See Cameras Page 4

Tonica News photo/Ken Schroeder

Marlene Simeck holds the quilt she recently completed from her trip to Alaska. The fabric for the quilt was purchased from stores during the trip.

Making memories ... literally Capturing time on fabric By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

LOSTANT — Quilting has been around for centuries with the first known quilted garment depicted in a painting from Egypt dated around 3400 B.C. With that much history, you might think there’s nothing

new in the hobby, but you’d be wrong. Marlene Simeck has made several quilts throughout the last 10 years with the latest being a homemade souvenir of her trip to Alaska. For the basic material, she picked up a piece here and there along the way. “I picked these up at various towns we stopped at,” Simeck said. “I’d go to the fabric store in each town, so

Vol. 140 No. 45

I’d have some from the different towns in the Yukon and Alaska.” In addition to the fabric used from destinations during the trip, Simeck’s quilt also contains photos taken during the trip printed onto fabric. “You can buy it at a fabric store, but what it is it’s backed on paper, so the fabric goes through the printer just like regular paper,” Simeck

said. “Afterwards, you just heat the fabric; and that sets the ink so you can wash it.” “This design is mine. I made it in light blue and dark blue because the summer is always daytime, and the winter is night,” Simeck said. Simeck started quilting in 2003 after retiring from teaching, and her skills are mostly

See Simeck Page 2

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2 Local 2 • The Tonica News • Friday, January 3, 2014

The Tonica News P.O. Box 86, Tonica, IL 61370 (USPS 633340) Published every Friday at Tonica, IL 61370 Entered at Tonica Post Office as Periodical Mail $22 In LaSalle County $25 Outside of LaSalle County

Contact Publisher Sam Fisher sfisher@tonicanews.com Editor Terri Simon tsimon@tonicanews.com

Correction

In the Dec. 20 edition of the Tonica News story “The Warrior spirit,” it was incorrectly stated, “... The students now have the opportunity to attend Fieldcrest, LaSalle, Putnam County and Streator high schools.” The correct information is Tonica High School was deactivated and then annexed by LaSalle-Peru High School. All Tonica students now attend LaSalle-Peru High School. In the Dec. 13 edition of the Tonica News story, “Discontinued schoolsLostant High School” it was incorrectly stated, “... the students of Lostant in Grades 9-12 with the opportunity to choose to go to LaSallePeru, Putnam County, Streator or Fieldcrest high schools each year.” The correct information is that current Lostant students can choose to go to Fieldcrest or Putnam County high schools. They can also attend LaSalle-Peru High School, but parents must make up the difference in tuition between what Fieldcrest and Putnam County charge for tuition, compared to LPHS. The Tonica News regrets the errors.

Email to:

Tonica News photo/Ken Schroeder

Marlene Simeck looks over a Christmas quilt she made using photos of her grandchildren printed on fabric.

Simeck From Page 1 self-taught. Most of the quilts she’s made

Laws From Page 1 Illinois has also raised the fines for speeding in a work zone under House Bill 1814. Fees will be much higher when viola-

throughout the years don’t use any of the typical quilting patterns and are constructed on a machine.

“I sewed suits and clothes, so I’ve always sewed. I was probably sewing by the time I was 6,” Simeck said.

“Some of my quilts at the beginning, you can tell the corners were wrong, and I had to learn over time. Today,

I rarely do any quilts the same way. That’s the fun for me is to design each one when I sit down.”

tors are caught speeding when workers are present. Senate Bill 923 makes children riding a school bus a bit safer. All school buses will be equipped with cameras to catch

those who decide to pass a school bus when it is stopped and its lights and signs are activated. New legislation recognizes some people respond better to the medical benefits of can-

nabis than traditional medical therapies. The General Assembly passed a law allowing people with specific conditions listed in the bill to be certified by their doctor to use marijuana for medi-

cal treatment. The Illinois Department of Public Health will be in charge of setting up the implementation system. Tanning beds will become an adults-only device under House Bill 188. The new law states children under the age of 18 will no longer be able to use public tanning beds. Under previous Illinois law, children between the ages of 14 and 18 could use tanning beds with parental permission, but the new statute prohibits commercial tanning use by minors. Underage tanning in private homes is still allowed. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn said the move will reduce the chances of skin cancer among young people. A couple of new laws will make cyber-crimes aimed at children tougher to commit. House Bill 64 will not allow students to check their email or Facebook page without permission while at school, while House Bill 3038 will shield parents and guardians from lawsuits for checking their children’s cell phone texts. House Bill 226 opens up democracy to young adults. The new legislation allows individuals who will be age 18 by November of the General Election each year to vote in the Primary Election in March of the same year.

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3 Obit Records Friday, January 3, 2014 • The Tonica News • 3

The process begins with concealed carry By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

Editor’s note: This is the first segment in a two-part series.

Photo contributed

MC Contracting LLC makes donation Mark Charbonneau, (second from left) of MC Contracting LLC is shown presenting a check in the amount of $602 to Peg Gonet (left), Joanne Milby and Barbara Charbonneau of the Illinois Valley Alzheimers Group. On Halloween night, donations were accepted from trick or treaters as they enjoyed tacos, Parmesan chips and fried fish prepared by Charbonneau. The money raised was matched by MC Contracting LLC.

Meeting Minutes Illinois Valley Community College OGLESBY — Illinois Valley Community College has a new leader of its humanities, fine arts and social sciences division — Brian R. Holloway, formerly of Drury University in Springfield, Mo. Holloway, who earned his Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Illinois, was the interim assistant vice president of academic affairs for graduate studies at Drury. He also worked formerly as associate vice president for arts and sciences, among other roles at Mountain State University in Beckley, W.Va. The new dean taught at Mountain State, the College of West Virginia in Beckley, Parkland College in Champaign, the University of Illinois and the University of MissouriColumbia. Holloway’s Ph.D. dissertation was titled, “Temptation in Shakespeare’s Plays.” A prolific writer, Holloway has authored three books, many academic articles, poems and stories and delivered more than 25 academic presentations. “The breadth of Dr. Holloway‘s work in the humanities and fine arts divisions at varied colleges and universities,

Cameras From Page 1 However, LaSalle County District Attorney Brian Towne said there are some considerations to take into account. “I have never seen a person who doesn’t act differently in front of a camera,” Towne said. “We see these people in reality shows on TV; that’s not the way those

in combination with his experience in graduate and continuing studies impressed the selection committee,” said Vice President for Learning and Student Development Lori Scroggs. “We also appreciated his advocacy regarding the role of the humanities, fine arts and social sciences in preparing today’s students to be thoughtful and insightful citizens.” In other business, the board approved: • Adoption of an $11.2 million tax levy that will result in an estimated total tax rate of .3663, an increase of 3.6 percent over 2012. “This is due to a decrease in EAV and the higher additional tax rate levy,” said Vice President for Business Services and Finance Cheryl Roelfsema. The college anticipates an overall 2.5 percent decline in EAV. The anticipated tax extension is $117,194 higher than 2012 but $126,714 less than 2011. IVCC will submit the levy to county clerks this week. • The addition of a security officer near the reception desk inside the main entrance for the Peter Miller Community Technology Center. G4S Secure Solutions will charge the college $18.10 per hour for the contract position. • Setting its 2014 meetings at 6 p.m. the second Thursday of the month on

Jan. 9, Feb. 13, March 13, April 10, May 8, June 12, July 10, Aug. 14, Sept. 11, Oct. 9, Nov. 13 and Dec. 11. • Retaining closed session meeting minutes and destruction of verbatim audiotapes from closed sessions from June 2010 to May 2012. • Purchase of Palo Alto Networks’ PA-3020 Firewalls, annual licenses and IT consulting services by Burwood Group for $53,540. “Internet use continues to grow as more faculty utilize streaming video and other online content in their classes,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran. The board learned: • Political science instructor Amanda CookFesperman will return from sabbatical to teach this spring. • Christine Blaydes, certified nurse assistant (CNA) program coordinator, since spring 2011, will be recognized in February for having earned tenure. • There were change orders of $2,711 for the Cultural Centre stage replacement and $283 for the exterior concrete stairs project. • Illinois Supreme Court Justice Thomas L. Kilbride of Rock Island will keynote IVCC’s 48th annual commencement May 17. • Asbestos abatement of East Campus Buildings 6, 11 and 12 will begin Jan. 13 with demolition scheduled to start Feb. 3.

• Mennie Machine Co. is helping IVCC move lab equipment into the CTC. “This will save the college a substantial amount of money,” said Corcoran. “We are very appreciative of the generous support of Cheryl and Dave Mennie on this project.” • LaSalle County Regional Office of Education members recently toured the technology center. In a presentation to ROE superintendents and principals, IVCC Dean of English, Math and Education Marianne Dzik discussed the innovative fast-track math and English programs IVCC is implementing and director of institutional research Amy Smith showed the placement and performance reports IVCC can prepare for each high school when provided student names and birthdates. • Project Success, IVCC’s federally-funded TRiO program, earned a maximum 15 points in a recent assessment of students’ persistence, good academic standing, associate degrees or certificates earned and transfers to four-year institutions. This fall, the program is serving 162 low-income, disabled and first-generation students.

people act. It concerns me to the extent that my job is to seek justice. It concerns me that I can only control what I say and what I do, but there are people who are part of the criminal justice system — jurors, attorneys, even judges — that I worry if they will change behavior or the way they act just because of a camera in the room.” The state’s Supreme Court ruling on the pilot

program held that jurors could not be directly photographed, but Towne believes even the presence or the possibility of being caught in a photo could change attitudes and actions in the jury pool. There has been some experimentation with cameras in the courtroom since January 2012. The program was started by then-Illinois Chief Justice Thomas Kilbride.

The rules set forth by the Illinois Supreme Court include several conditions which must be met. In all cases, the trial judge has final say whether media may film or take photos, and cases involving minors or sensitive issues will likely be exempt. In addition, only card-carrying members of the press will be allowed to bring cameras into the courtroom.

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois State Police announced they are opening the Firearm Concealed Carry Act application process to certified firearms instructors. This will give those instructors the access to apply for their concealed carry license in advance of Jan. 5 deadline. The law requires certified firearms instructors be qualified for a concealed carry license. Currently there are nearly 2,000 certified firearms instructors listed on the Illinois State Police Concealed Carry website. State officials believe instructor applications will serve as a test of the website capabilities. With more than 400,000 applications expected during the first year, state officials want to make sure the system works properly.  Jeremiah Brown is already certified to instruct applicants for a concealed carry, but he also had a leg up. Brown and the six instructors working with him at the Buffalo Range Shooting Park in Ottawa are law enforcement officials with a total of 70 years of experience between them. They’ve been busy. “We started running classes during the final week of October,” Brown said. “We’ve been running mostly six days a week. We’ve been one of the busier locations.” All interested persons who wish to apply for a concealed carry license must take a gun training class through a certified firearms instructor. License applications will be available starting this month. Instructors will set their own prices as well as dates and times for the courses they hold. 

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“We started running classes during the final week of October. We’ve been running mostly six days a week. We’ve been one of the busier locations.” Jeremiah Brown

Classes are 16 hours long. Veterans can earn a waiver of eight hours off their course for their military service. Current certified firearm instructors who are registered with the Illinois State Police will receive instructions for accessing the site via email. Any instructors with questions can call the Firearms Service Bureau Customer Service Department at 217-782-7980. The Illinois State Police’s Concealed Carry website can be found at http://www. isp.state.il.us/.  The Illinois State Police will continue to update its frequently asked questions on the new website with information on the Illinois Concealed Carry process. 

Meeting Calendar Jan. 8 – 7 p.m., Tonica School Board, Tonica Grade School

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4 Biz Ag 4 • The Tonica News • Friday, January 3, 2014

“I am an indoor person I guess. Right now we are doing a lot of sports with my child so we are doing basketball.” Julie Prostko, Tonica

“Usually I am an indoor person. We either watch movies, we like to go to museums or antique malls.” Linda Does, Tonica

“I like indoors best. We watch movies and drink hot chocolate when indoors.” Sydney Rothchild, Lostant

“I like to read. I like mysteries and suspense books best.” Karla Mentgn, Tonica

“I am a little of each, indoors and out. However most of the time of late I’m outside shoveling snow. While inside I help the wife with her housework and whatever I can get into. I also fix things.” Gus Sons, Tonica

Safe and cost-efficient ways to winterize your home Each winter, consumers are looking for ways to save money on home heating. The Better Business Bureau (BBB) suggests ways for homeowners to safely winterize their homes and save money in the process. “High heating costs are a problem each winter when money is tight,” says Steve J. Bernas, president/CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “Winterizing a home is economical because a small up-front investment is worthwhile for months. It increases the energy efficiency of a house and lowers overall heating costs.” According to the Energy Information Administration, more than 90 percent of the 116 million homes in the United States are expected to have higher heating costs than the previous winter. Homes heated primarily with propane are expected to spend an average of 9 percent more than last winter, and homes heated with electric heat are expected to spend 2 percent more. Fortunately, homeowners can reduce some of the costs by winterizing their home. The BBB offers the following tips for winterizing homes: Caulking and weather stripping To prevent air leaks, homeowners should inspect the caulking around windows and doors to check for cracking and

peeling. In addition, ensure doors and windows are shut tightly and no cold air is coming in due to worn down weather stripping. Ceiling fans By reversing the direction of your ceiling fan so the blades turn clockwise, you push warm air down and force it around the room. Furnace Furnaces older than 15 years might be due for a replacement. For newer furnaces, make sure the filter is clean and the thermostat is working properly. Heating ducts Ducts should be cleaned once every two years. Homeowners should also consider adding insulation to any exposed ductwork in order to prevent losing heated air.

Emergency kit When a winter storm strikes, an emergency kit should have all essential materials in one handy place. An emergency kit should include flashlights, candles and matches, a first aid kit, bottled water, non-perishable food and a battery-powered radio. Create the same emergency kit for the car as well, including a couple blankets. Smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detectors Test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and install fresh batteries. Homeowners should consider replacing smoke alarms older than 10 years.

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Gutters and ridge vents Gutters should be cleaned to prevent any clogs that would cause rainwater to back up and freeze, making the gutters expand and crack. The ridge vents need to be cleaned as well in order to help prevent stagnate air. Windows Window screens should be taken down and replaced with storm windows; they provide an extra layer of protection and keep the house warmer. Investing in a window insulator kit is an inexpensive option to keep out drafts. For more advice you can trust and free referrals on home maintenance and saving money this winter, visit BBB online at www. bbb.org.

Don’t wait too long to return that gift! CHICAGO — The days after Christmas brings another rush to the stores — the return of unwanted Christmas gifts. But consumers need to be aware the return policies for some retailers have changed and may not necessarily be to the benefit of the consumer. A number of big named retailers have shortened the amount of time they give for returns and have made specific changes to their policies that effect different types of merchandise. Impacted most will be returns of electronics and appliances. The number of days allowed for these returns have been shortened considerably compared to previous years. “Many retailers can change policies to place restrictions on returning items this year,” said Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “Where consumers have been used to having as many as 45 days to return their unwanted gifts, in some cases, that has been reduced to 30 days but can be as few as nine days” These changes mean consumers must take extra care in understanding the return policies of the stores where they shop and should not rely only on what they may be told by a sales clerk. They should look for and read the store’s written policy, which by law must be displayed. Bernas added, “Shoppers need to keep in mind that returns are a customer service and are not required by law unless the merchandise is defective.” For the giver and receiver alike, if you must return an item be prepared: • Know the store’s return policy: Ask what specific return policy applies to the item you

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are purchasing. Do not assume the regular return policy applies to sales or clearance items. Some merchants consider sales items to be final. • Save your receipts: They are usually needed for returns, and ask for a gift receipt. • Keep the original packaging: Don’t remove electronics or similar products from their boxes before wrapping as the original packaging may be required for a return. • Know the online return policy: If you are shopping online, read the posted return policy before buying. If returns are permitted, be sure to print a copy of what procedures and time frame need to be followed, along with complete contact information for the business from which you are ordering. • Returns are a courtesy: If you are the giftrecipient, do not assume you have the right to return or exchange an unwanted present. Like the shopper, you are bound by the merchant’s return policy. • Understand unusual policies: As an example, health regulations, which can prohibit the return of certain items like hats and intimate apparel. Consumers should be aware that retailers are reacting to yearly losses in the billions of dollars that are due to return fraud, and some have taken the additional step of using a computer database to track customer returns and catch fraudulent or excessive returns. Those retailers that use “The Return Exchange” to monitor returns will ask customers for a driver’s license or some other government issued identification when he or she returns an item. For additional information on Christmas returns go to www.bbb. org.

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5 Perspective Friday, January 3, 2014 • The Tonica News • 5

The Editorial Page The Tonica News Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

Heartfelt resolutions It’s the end of the year ... I’m really not ready to jump into 2014 yet. Our Christmas was wonderful, and quite frankly, I’m just not ready to let it go. Rather than think about new beginnings, I’d rather linger in the past few days/ weeks, when the Christmas holiday brought so much more than just gifts under our tree. But time keeps marching on, and in just a few days, 2014 will be a reality. There’s some excitement, anticipation as a brand new year stretches out before me — a year hopefully filled with opportunities, heartfelt moments and time, which along with good health is more valuable than I have Terri ever realized. Simon Along with the start of a new year, the underlying issue of New Year’s resolutions plagues me like a winter cold that just won’t go away. I try to tell myself to be realistic; don’t bite off more than I can chew. On the flip side of that New Year’s coin, though, there are those nagging thoughts of what I can do to be a better person in the upcoming year. Yes, perhaps it’s time to seriously re-evaluate life in general. OK, there are the same regular resolutions that will inevitably make it to my list — eat healthier, get more exercise, blah, blah, blah ... I don’t know about you, but from a personal perspective, I need to be healthier. But from a more heartfelt perspective, I’ve got a few other things I want to work on; things that ultimately tug on my heartstrings over and over again. These are the things I want to incorporate into my 2014 resolutions this year ... • I can’t tell you how many leftover items get thrown out of my refrigerator every week. When garbage day rolls around, I clean out my refrigerator and pantry, and what I throw away is awful. Living in a neighborhood of older folks, there’s no reason I can’t share my culinary creations with those around me. I’d like to share a hot meal with some of my older neighbors every week before we dish up our own plates, • On Christmas Day evening, I had a delightful telephone conversation with my great friend, Cathy, from Nashville, Tenn. We chatted for more than an hour about this and that, and I don’t mind telling you, I hung up the phone feeling great and so blessed to still have my dear friend after all these years (40 years!). Those telephone conversations with Cathy and other faraway friends/relatives are too infrequent. Yes, we text and email, but a voice-to-voice conversation doesn’t happen too often. In 2014, I’m going to try to have a real telephone conversation with my dear friends and faraway family members at least once a month. I’d also like to send a real, hand-written letter to someone at least once a month too. • And last but clearly not least, I’m going to make a concerted effort to be kinder to people — not just those I love but to everyone I meet. We live in a place in time where kindness doesn’t always come easily. I am very blessed, and to share a smile, a kind word, a handshake, a brief conversation is easy, yet often elusive. What if we all tried to be kinder? I know it sounds like a pipe dream, but it has to start somewhere. Why not with me? There are more matters of the heart I want to focus on, but that gives you an idea of what I want 2014 to hold for me. While it’s doubtful I will actually start an exercise routine where I walk a couple of miles a day and it’s just as doubtful I’ll give up chocolate and potatoes ... I can make these heartfelt resolutions work. Maybe that’s the key to a successful 2014. May each of you head into 2014 with thoughts (and resolutions) that come from your heart. And may 2014 be a healthy, happy journey into a kinder existence for us all. Tonica News Editor Terri Simon can be reached at tsimon@tonicanews.com.

2013 — The Year in Review We have come to that time of year when we a recollect on what has transpired over the past 12 months and think ahead to what we would like our lives to become in the future. It also gives me the ability to fill column inches without having to think up anything new. As I look back at the columns I’ve written over the past year, it feels as if I’m gazing down upon a hacked-up, old, fungus-covered, rotten tree stump embedded in a dewy cow pasture. Just as the concentric rings of the stump combine to tell its’ life story, the columns remind me of the stuff that made up my 2013. The year started out with a realization that if Kevin Bacon showed up at my house, wearing those torn-up blue jeans, doing that same dance that he did on top of the Volkswagen in the movie “Footloose,” my wife would have absolutely no use for me whatsoever. From there I proclaimed my steadfast support of sportscaster Brent Musburger being allowed to say that a good-looking woman is good-looking during a nationallytelevised college football bowl game. He just needs to control his drooling while he does it. It was a bad year for animals. In the middle of January, a deer hit me. Most people would say that they hit a deer, but most people don’t have the finely-tuned driving skills I possess. The deer definitely hit me. He sprang off into the wilderness afterwards, but I’m pretty sure he was a little sore the next morning. In October, our family said a good-bye to our beloved family pet Bubble Eye Goldfish that my daughter named Sandy Cheeks. It was as beloved as any pet can possibly be when they only live four days in your ownership. I’m still waiting for Sandy’s ghost to arise from the toilet bowl. But don’t feel too bad for the animal world because it got it’s revenge on me. In June, the interior of my Jeep was attacked by a crazed sparrow in what can only be described as a blitzkrieg-style, fecal assault. Oh, the humanity! One of these days I’m going to have to clean it up. I reminisced about several things during the year. I informed you about my vast collection of records that I cut out of the back of cereal boxes. I think I had two, one by The Archies and the other by the bear on the Super Sugar Crisp box. I brought up the fact that due to a foolish NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament wager placed in the mid-1990s, my wife became the smartest woman in the world. This haunts me to this very day. The year of 2013 was a personal milestone. In April, my dad turned 80 years old. I wrote about how he taught me to respect women, root for the Chicago Cubs and to never ever pee into the wind.

Greg Wallace FROM THE SKETCHBOOK The biggest milestone noted in my household this year was that my wife no longer needs me to open her pickle jars. She now goes straight to my healthy, athletic, 20-year-old son, (or Kevin Bacon if he happens to be around.) In an intervention-style column, I came clean about breaking my first pair of eyeglasses back in fourth grade after only owning them for less than 120 hours. (That’s still longer than we had Sandy Cheeks.) I must admit that it hurt me deeply to publicly proclaim to my parents that after all these years of hiding the facts from them, the broken spectacles were in no way my fault. I felt kind of bad for throwing my friend, Rob, under the bus on this one, but since he doesn’t live around here anymore, I bounced back rather quickly. It was a year of challenges. In July, my family barely survived a whirlwind “vacation” to Chicago. The whole time that we were in the city, we were surrounded by strange smells, cut-throat thieves, malicious marauders and the most sinister characters of all — American Girl dolls. In August, my wife claimed I was using big words, not knowing what they meant and completely out of context. I told her that she was vaudevillianly wrong, and that she should spend her opulent time telling me something I don’t already know. (Take that, Kevin Bacon!) It was a year of unspeakable trials and tribulations. Ones I spoke about. On a cold, dark morning back in March, I experienced an alarm clock malfunction. I overslept by five full minutes. To this day, I have never caught up. Just recently, elves ransacked my house — again. In September, I watched a coworker suffer from a fascinating bout of the hiccups. Sometimes it’s amazing how hilarious someone else’s misfortune can be. In October, I misplaced a banana. That’s all I have to say about that. But fear not: 2013 was also a year of victory. After a brief exit from the world stage, the Hostess Twinkie returned in all of its caloric splendor. At the end of June, my daughter placed in the Top 7 cars at a Girl Scout pinewood derby erasing 40 years of my own personal shame and embarrassment amongst the pinewood-derbying elite. And if a Top 7 finish doesn’t seem like a big deal to you, well … you’re just a jerk.

The year of 2013 was also one of dreams. Some fulfilled, others … not so much. I told you about my plans to get a tattoo. I’m still trying to find the right one. Those rubon tattoos and back hair just don’t work well together. This summer, I let you in on my intentions of joining the professional badminton circuit. With the arrival of cold weather and possible hamstring injuries, I have let that dream go by the wayside. But in November, I replaced that dream with one of becoming a professional beard-grower. I’m happy to report that my unconditional laziness involving anything that has to do with personal grooming has served me well over these past two months and the beard still exists. I believe that it lends an air of suave sophistication to my persona, you know, kind of like Sigmund Freud or Colonel Sanders. My wife claims that it has more of a Unabomber look to it. As we stand at the precipice of 2014, it’s almost impossible to not take a little peek into what the future might have in store for us. Back in April, I discussed the upcoming zombie apocalypse and how I plan to seamlessly fit in to their ranks. My wife thinks the beard might help. Recently, I talked about watching a group of fourth-grade boys emerging from school like the cast of “Braveheart” screaming “FREEDOM!” at the top of their lungs. I would have been right there with them, but I just don’t have the gams to wear a kilt anymore. And back in March, I brought up the age-old question that we all have to answer sooner or later: Who would win a fight between 100 duck-sized horses and one horsesized duck? The obvious answer is the horse-sized duck, even though my wife thinks that I’m a fool for saying that. (Honestly, I don’t get what Kevin Bacon sees in her.) These are just a few of the things I wrote about in 2013. It’s a wonder I even survived. As I peer into the crystal ball and look at the coming months of 2014, I see I have jotted down some positively scintillating ideas for future columns. Among the topics I might possibly expound my thoughts upon are my superior abilities to use bread-wrapper twistties properly; the realization that I may or may not be blinking more often than I used to; why coffee is icky; and I evidently have a column simply titled. “An Ode to Armpits.” It looks like 2014 is going to be a stellar year. You can contact Wallace at gwallace@bcrnews.com. You can follow him on his blog at http://gregwallaceink.blogspot.com.


6 Life 6 • The Tonica News • Friday, January 3, 2014

Community Library Corner LaSalle — Jan. 7 and 14 — Storytime Express is an interactive mix of stories complemented with a variety of engaging activities like crafts, flannel boards, rhymes, songs and puppets. It is formatted to introduce children to the library and early literacy skills. The shorter, 30-minute length and fast pace make it perfect for active children with shorter attention spans, and the express is a great way for busy parents to share special times with their children. Time will be set aside to help families find just the right books to check-out. Fun and educational, Storytime Express is a free program, open to the public. Storytime Express will be offered from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more information, call 815-223-2341. Lostant — Jan. 7 and 14 — Families First, a state funded early childhood grant, is a program for families with children ages birth to 3. It is sponsored by the Oglesby Early Childhood Programs. Children will read stories, sing songs, learn finger plays, do an easy art project and have a snack. The program also includes field trips and parent education meetings. Families First meets from 10 to 10:45 a.m. every Tuesday.

Menus Lostant Grade School Breakfast Jan. 6 — Omelets, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Jan. 7— Biscuits and gravy, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Jan. 8 — Sausage biscuit, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Jan. 9 — Eggs and bacon, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Jan. 10 — Breakfast pizza, cereal, milk, juice, yogurt. Lunch Jan. 6 — Barbeque rib, rice, corn, peaches, milk. Jan. 7 — Chicken, green beans, pears, hash brown casserole, milk. Jan. 8 — Hot dog, chips, baked beans, mixed fruit, milk. Jan. 9 — Pizza, salad, applesause, carrots, milk. Jan. 10 — No lunch, early out.

Panthers win three in holiday tournament Michael Weide had three assists each. The Panthers specifically lit the basket up in the second and third quarters scoring a combined 53 points. Coach Josh Nauman was pleased with his team’s play. “We have played really good so far. Michael (Weide) has given us some huge lifts,” Nauman said. “He has had 10 points, then 21 points. He has never hit double digits in his career then he has had three games in a week so he is playing really well which is great for us. Harold (Fay) has had a good tournament as usual and Evan (Kreiser) has been tremendous. I think the first night Evan made all ten shots he took. He’s shooting 78 percent the whole tournament. He has also made like nine out of 10 free throws. He’s been playing great. We’ve been doing a real good job. Hopefully this will go on for one more

By Dixie Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

MARSEILLES — The Putnam County boys varsity basketball squad raised their record to 14-1 with three days of wins in the Marseilles Holiday Tournament. On Dec. 28, the Panthers played in the quarterfinals of the tournament against the Hall High School Red Devils. The Panthers handled the Red Devils with dispatch, knocking them out of the winner’s bracket with a 76-47 victory. Leading the Panthers’ scoring attack was Harold Fay with 21 points. Alex Veverka added 16 points while Evan Kreiser chipped in 15 points. Returning to the court, Sam Garland showed why he is one of the area’s strongest centers with grabbing six rebounds and blocking six shots by the Red Devils. Veverka also had two steals while Garland and

game. (The championship game will be Dec. 30.) The Panthers made the second half of their game count on Dec. 27 against the Marquette Crusaders to win 66-57. While trailing in each of the first two quarters, the Panthers came out strong in the second half. Garland tied the game early in the second quarter and Weide added two three-point shots to have the Panthers take the lead 34-31 and they never looked back. The Panther’s took a 42-36 lead into the final quarter, but Weide again hit a three point shot and another two point shot to push the lead to 51-43. Fay drove to the basket and drew a foul to put the lead at 54-43. The Panthers then finished the game, with a 66-57 win. Weide led all scorers with 21 points while Fay had 18 and Kreiser had 16 points.

Leland-Earlville were on the Panthers’ plate in the first game of the tournament on Dec. 26 and lost 66-51. While the game started slow, in the third and fourth quarters, it again took off for the Panthers. Kreiser started his tournament shooting record with a perfect 10 for 10 baskets from the field and went 2 for 2 at the free throw line. He also was busy in other areas with a six rebound, one assist, steal and blocked shot on the game. The Panther defense also kicked into gear in the second half and created turnover city for Leland-Earlville. The Panthers completed the game with 19 steals, which was lead by Austin Biagini with five. Fay added 12 points in the game, Veverka and Biagini scored 10 and nine points each. LelandEarlville was led by Colin Bomstad’s 21 points and Nolan Baumbach had 15.

Tonica Grade School Breakfast Jan. 6 — Oatmeal with dried fruit, choc. chips, brown sugar, cereal, yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Jan. 7 — Mini pancakes, cereal, yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Jan. 8 — Scrambled eggs, cereal, yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Jan. 9 — Muffin, cereal, yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Jan. 10 — Mini cinnamon rolls, cereal, yogurt, toast, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch Jan. 6 — Barbeque rib patty on bun, corn apple sauce, pretzels, pickles, milk. Jan. 7 — Roasted chicken, mashed potatoes, green beans, peaches, margarine, barbecue sauce, milk. Jan. 8 — No lunch 11:45 dismissal. Jan. 9 — Cheese bosco sticks, marinara sauce, steamed broccoli, carrots, pears, graham crackers, ranch, milk. Jan. 10 — Taco-in-bag, taco meat, shredded cheese, refried beans, shredded lettuce, diced tomatoes and onions, salsa, sour cream, nacho corn chips, fresh pear, milk.

Births Announced Jones Delroy and Theresa (Hose) Jones of Lostant are the parents of a son born Dec. 27 at Illinois Valley Community Hospital in Peru.

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Students hold food drive LOSTANT — The Student Council at Lostant School completed its yearly food drive for the LaSalle Food Pantry on Dec. 20, and the food was delivered by Jill Newbold on Christmas Eve. The drive started on Dec. 9. Collectively, the stu-

dents at Lostant School were able to collect and donate 483 pounds of food this year. The fourth grade won the contest of which class could collect the most food to donate. For more photos of the drive, go to www. lostantcomets.org.

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7 Life Friday, January 3, 2014 • The Tonica News • 7

Tonica News photo/Dixie Schroeder

Ready for Kewanee Invite Ben Garland (front) and Putnam County/Hall’s cocaptain Nathan Tonozzi wrestle with each other during practice over the holidays. The PC/Hall co-op will next compete with 12 other teams at the Kewanee Invitational on Jan. 4.

Belt test held at Lostant School

Tonica News photo/Dixie Schroeder

Panthers practice for 2014 Evan Kreiser (left in air) shoots the ball against defenders Noah DeBates (center) and Jeff Baker (right) during practice over the holidays. Their next contest will be in an away game Jan. 10 against Streator Woodland.

Girl Scouts taking pre-orders for cookies PERU — Girl Scouts of Central Illinois (GSCI) for the first time are taking pre-orders for cookie sales. Girls are beginning to take pre-orders using the traditional order card format. Direct sale of cookies will then begin Feb. 3. By introducing the opportunity to take preorders, cookie customers are able to ensure supply of their favorite Girl Scout cookies, and troops get a solid base of how many boxes they need to order to fulfill the demand in their areas. Troops will then place their pre-orders as well as order extra cases they will use for direct customer sales. “Last year was the first year Girl Scouts of Central Illinois used the direct sale format, and the troops were very successful. By using this format, troop profits increased by 25 to 35 percent, more girls earned free membership, participants earned 26 percent more Cookie Dough, and we had over 110 percent more girls reach the 250- and 500box level. But the success

did not come without a few growing pains,” said Pam Kovacevich, CEO of GSCI. “The pre-order approach will allow Girl Scouts to set higher and more accurate goals, as well as carry the right supply for their buyers.” The new cookie on the sheet this year is Cranberry Citrus Crisp. Cookie lovers can also place their orders early for all their traditional favorites, including Thin Mints, Shortbread, Peanut Butter Patties, Peanut Butter Sandwiches, Caramel deLites, Lemonades, and Thanks-A-Lots. Girl Scouts of Central Illinois will also once again participate in Operation Cookie Share. The effort to provide cookies to military troops domestically and overseas started in 2010. Since then, GSCI has provided more than $825,000 worth of Girl Scout cookies to the women and men in the U.S. armed forces at home and abroad. In fact, Girl Scouts of Central Illinois were so successful this achievement is entered in the Illinois Congressional Records. 

LOSTANT — Monti’s Martial Arts, located in Wenona, held its belt test at Lostant School in December. Students ranging from preschool through adult were able to test to advance to the next belt. Students who attend Monti’s Martial Arts come from Wenona, Lostant, Tonica and the surrounding area. Tiny Tigers is for ages 3 to 5, and four Tiny Tigers were advanced to the yellow stripe belt on test day. Lostant native Timmber Skinner was among the ones who advanced. Class A Taekwondo is for ages 6 and up, and eight students advanced to yellow belt, including

Lostant’s Paityn Skinner. Class B Taekwondo is also for ages 6 and up, and seven students advanced to their yellow belt, including James Smith and Ayden Lawless from Lostant. Katie Monti from Class B advanced to orange and one other student advanced to green. Four students advanced their belts in the advanced class — three to yellow and one to blue. The Hapkido class also tested that day, and four of the students advanced to yellow belt, including Dawn Monti and Lostant School Board member Bob Lawless. For more pictures of the belt test, visit www. lostantcomets.org.

Paityn Skinner (from left), Timmber Skinner, Ayden Lawless and James Smith.

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8 History/classifieds 8 • The Tonica News • Friday, January 3, 2014

Classifieds General Terms and Policies The Tonica News reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. CLASSIFIED LINE AD & LEGAL DEADLINES:

• Friday Paper deadline Friday before by 3pm We Accept

Call 815-875-4461 classified@bcrnews.com

-100Announcements 108 • Lost & Found Missing Cat, last seen at 2nd and Taft Street in Standard. Mostly White with black markings by his eyes, under mouth with a black tail. He is declawed, 20 lbs, and his name is Oreo. Strictly indoor cat so he is probably very scared, and he is missed so much. Please call if you have seen or taken in. Lynn or Rick Camatti, 815-339-6855

- 200 Employment 228 • Help Wanted GRADE LEVEL: Jr. High Middle School. Salary/ Benefits: As specified by the negotiated union contract in the amount of $725 for the boys position and $725 for the girls position. Duties: We are looking for 2 coaches: Head Boys Track Coach and Head Girls Track Coach for the Tonica Grade School District #79. Qualifications: Previous experience as a head track coach or assistant track coach would be given preference but not required. Candidates with a teaching certificate will be given preference as well. Additional Notes: You must be able to pass a drug screening and background check. Send Letter of Interest to: Superintendent Mr. Suarez, 535 North 1981st Road, Tonica, IL 61370 or call 815-442-3420

232 • Business Opportunities ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICES RIGHT HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

- 400 Merchandise 450 • Under $1000 ADVERTISE YOUR VEHICLE SALE HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

- 700 Real Estate For Sale 767 • Mobile Home Sales PROMOTE YOUR RENTAL We can help! Call 815-875-4461

999 • Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, OTTAWA, ILLINOIS PROBATE DIVISION IN THE MATTER OF) THE ESTATE OF ) DOROTHY M. ) DANIEL, ) DECEASED ) NO. 13-P-059 Notice is given to Creditors of the death of DOROTHY M. DANIEL of 140 N. 6th St., Princeton, Illinois, who died on March 20th, 2013. Letters of Office were issued to ROSE MARIE LUND of 12570 2100 North Ave., Princeton, Illinois 61356, of whose attorney is HELMIG & HELMIG, 1824 Fourth Street, Peru, Illinois, 61354. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk, Circuit Court, in the LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois 61350, or with the representatives, or both, on or before June 30th, 2014, which date is not less than 6 months from date of first publication, or, if mailing or delivery of a notice from the representative is required by section 18-3 of the Probate Act of 2000, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before said date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. GIVEN this 19th day of November, 2013. ROSE MARIE LUND EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

DOROTHY M. DANIEL, DECEASED Published in the Tonica News Dec. 20, 27, 2013 and Jan. 3, 2014.

2000, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before said date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. GIVEN this 19th day of November, 2013. NELLIE M. DIXON, WILLIAM J. DIXON, and JOHN W. DIXON Executors of the Estate of JUNE M. DIXON, DECEASED Published in the Tonica News Dec. 20, 27, 2013 and Jan. 3, 2014.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 Description of Improvements: SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH DETACHED 2 CAR GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $84,496.29. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1310406 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I579284 Published in the Tonica News Dec. 27, 2013, Jan. 3 and 10, 2014.

within 10 days after it has been filed. Andrew Skoog Clerk of the 13th Judicial Circuit Court Ottawa, Illinois Published in the Tonica News Dec. 27, 2013, Jan. 3 and 10, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, OTTAWA, ILLINOIS PROBATE DIVISION IN THE MATTER OF) THE ESTATE OF ) JUNE M. DIXON ) DECEASED ) NO. 13-P-212 Notice is given to Creditors of the death of JUNE M. DIXON of 205 W. First St., Streator, Illinois, who died on October 21, 2013. Letters of Office were issued to NELLIE M. DIXON of 205 W. First St., Streator, Illinois 61364 and WILLIAM J. DIXON of 43 East 20th, Floor 2, New York, NY 10003 and JOHN W. DIXON of W. 304 N. 7180 County Rd. E., Hartland, WI 53029 all of whose attorney is HELMIG & HELMIG, 1824 Fourth Street, Peru, Illinois, 61354. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk, Circuit Court, in the LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois 61350, or with the representatives, or both, on or before June 30th, 2014, which date is not less than 6 months from date of first publication, or, if mailing or delivery of a notice from the representative is required by section 18-3 of the Probate Act of

NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given on December 13, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of LaSalle County, Illinois concerning the business known as CNJ STYLE located at 11 Bailey Creek Dr., Tonica, IL 61370 which certificate sets forth the following changes in the operation thereof: the following person ceased doing business under the above assumed name and have no further connection with or financial interest in the business carried on under such assumed name, Christine N. Eimer. Dated December 13, 2013. /s/Christine N. Eimer Applicant Published in the Tonica News Dec. 20, 27, 2013 and Jan. 3, 2014.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY - OTTAWA, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) TOSHA J DOTY; WILLIAM E DOTY; ) DEFENDANTS ) 13 CH 224 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on October 9, 2013, Sheriff (eff. 1/11/12) in LASALLE County, Illinois, will on February 4, 2014, in LaSalle County Courthouse707 East Etna Rd (North Door) Ottawa, IL 61350, at 11:30 a.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of LASALLE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: THE EAST 3 FEET OF LOT 18 AND ALL OF LOT 19 IN BLOCK 10 IN MARSEILLES LAND AND WATER POWER COMPANY ADDITION TO MARSEILLES, SITUATED IN THE CITY OF MARSEILLES; ALL SITUATED IN LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 15-49-118-009

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF ) LETITIA GRUBAR, ) DECEASED. ) 2013-P-232 NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS AND HEIRS AND LEGATEES WHOSE NAMES OR ADDRESSES ARE UNKNOWN AND CLAIM NOTICE Estate of LETITIA GRUBAR, Deceased. Notice is given of the death of LETITIA GRUBAR, of Lostant, Illinois. Letters of office were issued on December 13, 2013, to GERALD M. HUNTER, 129 W. Walnut Street, Oglesby, IL 61348, who is the attorney for the estate. Notice is given to any heirs or legatees whose names or addresses are not stated in the Petition for Letters of Office, that an order entered by the Court on December 13, 2013, admitting the decedent’s will to probate. Within 42 days after the date of the order of admission you may file a petition with the Court to require proof of the will by testimony of the witnesses to the will in open court or other evidence, as provided in 755 ILCS 5/6-21. You also have the right under 755 ILCS 5/8-1 to contest the validity of the will by filing a petition with the Court within 6 months after admission of the will to probate. Claims against the estate may be filed with the office of the Circuit Clerk, Probate Division, LaSalle County Courthouse, Downtown Courthouse, Ottawa, IL 61350, or with the representative, or both, within 6 months from the date of issuance of letters, or if a claim notice is mailed or delivered personally to a creditor of the decedent, on or before the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed within the time allowed is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LASALLE COUNTY OTTAWA, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) TOSHA J DOTY; WILLIAM E DOTY; ) DEFENDANTS ) 13 CH 224 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on October 9, 2013, Sheriff (eff. 1/11/12) in LASALLE County, Illinois, will on February 4, 2014, in LaSalle County Courthouse707 East Etna Rd (North Door) Ottawa, IL 61350, at 11:30 a.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of LASALLE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 15-49-118-009 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 507 CLARK STREET MARSEILLES, IL 61341 Description of Improvements: SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH DETACHED 2 CAR GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $84,496.29. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1310406 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I579284 Published in the Tonica News Dec. 27, 2013, Jan. 3 and 10, 2014.

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TON-01-03-2014  

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