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JULY 2018

DREAMS FROM THE GREEN

Crystal Lake golf girl goes pro Page 18

MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR Serving families since 1949 Page 23

THE

EXPLORE ILLINOIS’ NEW FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TRAIL Page 34

AMERICANA edition 1 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

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2 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 3


INSIDE

AMERICANA 8 LANDMARK STATUS Once a stately manner, country club and prep school for boys, the Dole Mansion continues to live out its legacy

31 AGING PEACEFULLY IN ONE PLACE Clarendale of Algonquin offers three levels of care under one roof

14 PALACE DE LA MUSIQUE At the Sanfilippo Estate, step back in time to enjoy musical relics of a bygone era

DINING & ENTERTAINING

18 LEXI HARKINS Crystal Lake golf girl goes pro 20 SHARING HISTORY ‘Step back in time’ at the Antique Shops of Ridgefield

TRAVEL

23 HONORING TRADITION McHenry County Fair – entertaining families since 1949

34 THE WRIGHT WAY Explore Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural legacy on new Illinois tourism trail

FAMILY IN FOCUS

OUT & ABOUT

29 SUBURBAN SUPERDAD: The conflicts with recounting the past

38 RIDES BY NIGHT Get revved up for these classic car shows, cruise nights

BUSINESS & CIVIC

42 CALENDAR See what’s happening in McHenry County this month!

30 COUNSEL AND COMPASSION As city council member and author, Geri Condon offers guidance while navigating life’s challenges

4 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

32 SLICE OF AMERICANA With a flaky, buttery crust and sweet, cinnamon-spiced filling, apple pie reigns supreme as a summertime staple

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 5


Editor's Note During all of my travels, I always attempt to be a good ambassador for America, representing the red, white and blue with an open mind, kindness and courtesy toward the ways in which other people do things in other places.

people, with very few of us actually being able to claim native status of this land.

From the bush of Botswana to the concrete jungle of Sao Paulo, I have come across more friendly faces than not, further cementing my belief that, no matter what you see on the news, we’re not all that different after all.

But, no matter how you choose to define your own American experience, the Fourth of July is a time when we can all come together with a common interest: to celebrate this country, our independence and what makes each of us uniquely American.

American or not, we all want the same things. We’re all just doing the best we can, with the chief concern being providing for our families and giving our children the best shot at a good life. As human beings that’s all any of us want. And as Americans, it’s no different.

Maybe being an American means that I’m free to choose what being an American means to me.

If you haven’t already guessed, this month’s issue is our Americana edition. From baseball and barbecues to classic cruise nights and apple pie, this summer, indulge in and enjoy all of the things that make this country uniquely American.

So, what does it mean to be American? What about an American living in the Midwest? Or, better yet, what about an American living in the Chicago suburbs? The more specific we get, the more nuanced the answers become. Not to mention the other outside cultural influences that shape our identity, beliefs and behaviors, as this country is a melting pot of

Thanks for reading.

Kara Silva, Editor

on the

COVER

Lexi Harkins has been swinging a golf club since the age of 6. And, now, the Crystal Lake resident is finally fulfilling her dream of becoming a professional golfer. Find out what life is like from the green for this young athlete, on page 18.

6 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

Published by Shaw Media 7717 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Phone: 815-459-4040 Fax: 815-477-4960 www.McHenryCountyMagazine.com

GENERAL MANAGER Jim Ringness 815-526-4614 jringness@shawmedia.com DIRECTOR OF NICHE PUBLISHING Laura Shaw 630-427-6213 lshaw@shawmedia.com EDITOR Kara Silva 630-427-6209 ksilva@shawmedia.com DESIGNER Alllison LaPorta 630-427-6260 alaporta@shawmedia.com CORRESPONDENTS Melissa Riske, Kelsey O’Connor, Jonathan Bilyk, Kevin Druley, Allison Horne, Sue Dobbe PHOTOGRAPHERS Ron McKinney, Nancy Merkling

McHenry County Magazine is available by subscription for $24 a year. If you would like each month’s edition mailed to your home, send payment information and address to McHenry County Magazine, 7717 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 or via email at subscriptions@ shawmedia.com.

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WEDDING SEASON IS AROUND THE CORNER! DON'T LET VARICOSE VEINS KEEP YOU FROM LOOKING AND FEELING YOUR BEST! When you think about an upcoming wedding or summer BBQ, do you worry about revealing your legs? Varicose veins are the blue lines that wind about your legs and bulge from the surface of your skin.

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LANDMARK

status

Once a stately manner, country club and prep school for boys, the Dole Mansion continues to live out its legacy By Kelsey O’Connor

8 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

If you’re driving down Country Club Road in Crystal Lake, it’s almost impossible to miss the Dole Mansion. The magnificent structure, with stone archways and a red-tile roof reminiscent of an Italian villa, is unlike anything else in the area.

The family moved into their new home in 1865. The total construction cost was $100,000, the equivalent of almost three million dollars today. In 1872, Dole began harvesting ice, a business that would soon evolve into a small empire.

“Architecturally, it certainly is significant,” says Dianna Kenney, president of the Crystal Lake Historical Society. “It certainly is a one-of-a-kind structure … . It’s size, stature, Italianate design – it’s just an extraordinary house.”

Harnessing the area’s natural resources, Dole and his brother built 12 ice houses in the area with a capacity for 100,000 tons of frozen lake water. The demand for ice was booming in the pre-refrigeration era, and thousands of boxes of ice were shipped by rail to Chicago, across the Midwest and as far as New Orleans.

But the Dole Mansion is much more than just eyecatching. The structure, and the man who built it, are deeply intertwined with Crystal Lake’s history. In the early 1860s, Charles Dole bought 1,000 acres of land near the serene waters of Crystal Lake, where he quickly commissioned European artisans to create a lavish mansion. The design included marble fireplaces, parquet floors, underground servant passageways and intricate woodwork carved from local black walnut trees.

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“It created all sorts of jobs and an industry for the community,” says Kenney. “It had a lasting impact and it was the start for many generations of Crystal Lake people that had jobs and economic success because of Mr. Dole.” As the years past, the ice harvesting business declined along with Dole’s health. The mansion changed hands several times, including to circus heiress Eliza Ringling

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You’ll feel at home here Senior Living Community

who expanded and transformed the property into a country club. The club was a popular haunt in the ’20s, but was forced to close down during the Depression. In 1944, the Franciscan Order of Lake Forest bought the mansion and converted it into a prep school for boys. Students and friars roamed the grand halls until 1976. The First Congregational Church was the next owner of the Dole Mansion, and the church began a tradition that would one day evolve into today’s popular Lakeside Festival. After several failed attempts to sell the mansion, the future of the Dole looked grim. In a last-ditch effort, the Crystal Lake community came together to save the historic property.

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–Continue on page 10 www.nwherald.com/magazine

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 9


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“Not only can you learn a lot about what life was like in the 1800s in McHenry County from the Dole Mansion, but you can learn a lot about what is important to our community through its continued existence. McHenry County is a community that values beauty, history and the arts.” – Siobhan Cottone, executive director of the Lakeside Legacy Foundation

–Continued from page 9 A group of community members and advocates launched the Lakeside Legacy Project, a 42-day fundraising campaign that raised $1.2 million dollars to purchase the property. This was the beginning of the Lakeside Legacy Foundation, the current owners of the Dole. Today, the mansion is home to the Lakeside Legacy Arts Park at the Dole. It’s a thriving hub for innovative artists, education and community events. The mission of the nonprofit is to provide arts programming for under-served populations, while preserving and protecting the Dole Mansion. “Our vision is to provide and foster innovative art education and a community destination that enriches the quality of life for those we serve,” says Siobhan Cottone, executive director of the Lakeside Legacy Foundation. The foundation converted the vast indoor space and property into a modern art park with galleries and studio spaces, while maintaining the historical and structural integrity of the space. Preserving historic places like the Dole Mansion is crucial, says Cottone. That’s because they tell the story of who a community was – and who it is now.

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10 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

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“Not only can you learn a lot about what life was like in the 1800s in McHenry County from the Dole Mansion, but you can learn a lot about what is important to our community through its continued existence,” she says. “McHenry County is a community that values beauty, history and the arts. It is a community that supports its artists, local entrepreneurs and young talents.”

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But preservation isn’t always enough. Communities must come together to find a functional purpose for the space, says Kenney. “The most important thing about any historic building is you have to find a way to use it that makes sense,” she says. “It can’t just be an empty building. You have to find a way to use it that respects its history. The Lakeside Legacy has done a great job at doing that, I couldn’t be happier.”

Looking for your next adventure?

The Dole Mansion is located at 401 Country Club Road in Crystal Lake. For more information about the Dole Mansion, contact the Crystal Lake Historical Society at 815-455-1151 or www.cl-hs.org. For more information about the Lakeside Arts Park, visit www. lakesideartspark.org or call 815-455-8000.

Let us take you there.

www.work-world.com | www.staffingsmiles.com Crystal Lake 14 N. Walkup Ave.

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847-587-2442 MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 11


Huntley Huntley Farmers Market and special events

Pride

The Huntley Square is the place to be for family fun this summer. On Saturdays, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Huntley Farmers Market lines Coral and Church streets, offering customers fresh produce, eggs, meats, baked goods, coffee, honey, olive oil and more.

Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m., visitors can experience Huntley’s weekly Summer Concert Series. Pack a picnic dinner or enjoy a meal at one of the many downtown eateries – such as Parkside Pub, BBQ King Smokehouse, Sal’s Pizza Place, Morkes Chocolates, Village Inn, Sammy’s Bar and Grill, or Manny’s Gelato and Café – before the concert. Then pick a spot and set up camp. On Sunday, Aug. 5, pack up the family and your bicycles to enjoy an 8- to 9-mile-long adventure through Huntley’s many bike paths and parks. Registration for Bike Huntley begins at 1 p.m. at the Huntley Town Square. The ride will begin at 2 p.m., and festivities will conclude at 3:30 p.m. with a community cookout. Be sure to “like” Huntley Farmers Market and Special Events on Facebook to stay up-to-date on all upcoming events, or visit www.huntley.il.us for more information.

The Summer Concert Series schedule is as follows: July 3: The Billy Elton Band July 17: Johnny Russler and the Beach Bum Band July 31: The Blooze Brothers Aug. 14: The DuPage Band Aug. 21: The Four C Notes

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11103 S. Church St. (Just across the alley from Strode’s) www.plentyinhuntley.com For special gift items for you and yours, visit Plenty in downtown Huntley. You’ll find sweet and sassy, warm and whimsical, and encouraging and enlightening gifts, such as signs, jewelry, cards, trinkets, socks, soaps, art prints, prayer flags, home goods and everything in between. Discover the abundance and beauty of Plenty, which is open from 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Plenty also does private shopping events. Bring this ad in for 20 percent off your next purchase.

12 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

AMERICANA

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Huntley’s Tacos Locos 12132 Route 47, Huntley 224-569-6790 • htlcateringinfo@gmail.com

For upscale, authentic, traditional Mexican food and drinks, Huntley’s Tacos Locos is the place to visit. Each recipe has been perfected from generation to generation. All of the meat is USDA Choice or Certified Angus Beef, and only the freshest ingredients are used in every homemade item on the menu, which also features vegan and vegetarian options. Enjoy the restaurant’s specialty cocktails, which feature premium-grade liquor. And Tacos Locos always has a cooler full of Jarritos Horchata, Mexican Coke, and other fountain drink favorites. Tacos Locos opens at 11 a.m. during the week, and noon on the weekend. Catering and delivery options are available. So, call the restaurant for your next event.

The Instrument Barn butterfly 11810 Main St., Huntley Over the Rainbow - $20 847-562-6616 garDen - $19 FRIDAY JULY 13TH www.theinstrumentbarn.com FRIDAY JUNE 8TH

You won’t melt, but your chocolate wicked You’ll want these butterflies to fly! They’re will!Instrument Enjoy your ‘Over the Rainbow’ day The Instrument Barn is the place for all of your musicwitch needs. The both cute and delicious. Instead, create a as you drop a chocolate house on the wicked Barn’s products go through a very thorough inspection process to make sure molded garden to host rice krispie and pretzel witch, decorate a ruby red rice krispie shoe, and customers are gettingwith an instrument perfect playing condition.  Customers rod butterflies complete flowers in and create a fabulous candy rainbow. are encouraged to reach out to the shop’s well-educated staff members gummi worms.

via email or phone to discuss the instrument they want to purchase. The - $19 butterfly Instrumentwars Barn’s staff is here help customers get thepokemon instrument that will Space - to$19 make them the best musicians they can be.  FRIDAY JULY 20TH the Rainbow - $20 Over MONDAY JUNE 11TH garDen $19 Travel into a far away galaxy while Capture your FRIDAY Pikachu peep with13TH your Poke JULY

2018 creating Star Wars chocolates Ball caramel apple. Make these and more. FRIDAY JUNE 8TH You won’t melt, but your chocolate wicked including your own pretzel rod lightsabers. When it comes to candy projects like this, You’ll want these butterflies to fly! They’re witch will! Enjoy your ‘Over the Rainbow’ day Approves Yoda does of your marshmallow you gotta make ‘em all! both cute and delicious. Instead, create a as you drop a chocolate house on the wicked Yoda and other candy creations that we molded garden to host rice krispie and pretzel witch, decorate a ruby red rice krispie shoe, and guarantee will be out of this world! rod butterflies complete with flowers and create a fabulous candy rainbow. gummi worms.

butterfly

2018 Morkes Chocolates Over the Rainbow - $20 Unicorns garDen $19 11801 Main St., Huntley hawaiian FRIDAY JULY 13TH pokemon - $19 Forever! - $19 FRIDAY JUNE 8TH 847-458-8585 • morkeshuntley.com You won’t melt, but your chocolate wicked Space wars $19 (moana) $19 You’ll want these butterflies to fly! They’re witch will! Enjoy your ‘Over the Rainbow’ day FRIDAY JULY WEDNESDAY JULY 20TH 25TH MONDAY JUNE 11TH

cute and delicious. Instead, create a as you drop a chocolate house on the wicked We at Morkes Chocolates ofboth Huntley recently celebrated our 3rd Anniversary THURSDAY Travel intogarden aJUNE far away galaxy while and molded to14TH host rice krispie pretzel witch, decorate aunicorns ruby red rice krispie Prance in and discover that do Capture your Pikachu peep withshoe, yourand Poke on theSail beautiful StopStar and enjoy our delicious coffee drinks, fresh awayTowne into Square. a Hawaiian paradise on your rod butterflies complete with flowers and You will create a caramel fabulous candy creating Wars chocolates exist! feel the magic apple. as yourainbow. makethese and more. Ball Make donuts or delicious chocolate! Kids of all ages enjoy our Award winning Candy Moana-inspired sail. Yourworms. oasis willpretzel includerod lightsabers. gummi including your own unicorn nibbles,When mold your ownto colorful it comes candy projects like this, chocolate tree as pretzels, Camps. Indulge all palm your Approves senses youYoda lingermarshmallow over a latte and sweet treat on our and create does of your marshmallow unicorns, caramel and you gotta make ‘em all!They Classes run approximately 1.5 hours in length. flowers and more! outdoor patio. Check outYoda our website for all our upcoming Candy Camps and and other candy creations that we chocolate pretzel horns. rs” and a maximum of 15. m of 8 “campe a minimuunicorn have FRIDAY JULY 20TH class but are special events! MONDAY JUNE 11TH guarantee will be out of this world! Parents are welcome to stay during the

pokemon - $19

Space wars - $19

take me out to the Travel into a far away galaxy while Capture your Pikachu peep with your Poke / apple.Unicorns creating Star Wars chocolates mincraft hawaiian Ball caramel Make these and more. including your own pretzel rod lightsabers. ballgame - $19 When it comes to candy projects like this, Forever! - $19 Approves Yoda does of your marshmallow you gotta make ‘em all! legos $19 2018 (moana) $19 Yoda and JUNE other candy creations that we WEDNESDAY 20TH WEDNESDAY JULY 25TH 5 years old. required to stay if the camper is under made Classes are peanut-free and most can be te is gluten-free upon request. Dairy-free chocola charge. al available for an addition

. Candy camps prices listed are per camper $10 per camper Walk-ins run from 10am - 3pm and are (unless otherwise noted).

TUESDAY guarantee will be out of this world!

JULY 31ST

.

You will hit a grand slam at thisTHURSDAY camp! You willJUNE 14TH Pranceareinavailable and discover that camp:unicorns do each candy time slots Why you build with blocksforwhen you can Sail away into a Hawaiian paradise onwould your Multiple mold a real size baseball, make delectable exist! You will feel the magic as you make build projects out of chocolate? We wonder 10am, 12pm, 2pm Moana-inspired sail. Your oasis will include candy hot dogs (with mustard of course!), and unicorn nibbles, mold your own colorful which you’ll enjoy building more - Lego people tree pretzels, red, white, and bluechocolate popcorn! palm You won’t care if marshmallow unicorns, and create caramel and or Kreepers? to , go 25TH flowers and more! to register WEDNESDAY JULY tion and informa you never get back after these great treats! For more chocolate pretzel unicorn horns.

Unicorns Forever! - $19

Come Visit!

hawaiian (moana) - $19

mdo ntle Prance and sHu discover thaty.co unicorns Moinrke Sail away into aout Hawaiianto paradise on your me the exist! You$19 will feel magic as you make Classes run up! approximately 1.5 the hours in length. They Mix it trollstake - $22 Moana-inspired sail. Your oasis will include mincraft / unicorn nibbles, mold and your own colorful of 15. have a minimum of 8 “campers” a maximum palm tree pretzels, marshmallow THURSDAY 2ND THURSDAY JUNEchocolate 28TH unicorns, and create caramel and ballgame -Parents $19 are AUGUST flowers and more! welcome topretzel stay the class but are chocolate unicorn legos - during $19 Mix it up with our last candy camp of the horns. Hair Up’ as we make our tall Troll head WEDNESDAY JUNErequired 20TH to stay if the camper is under 5 years old. THURSDAY JUNE 14TH

85 11801 Main Street, Huntley, IL | 847-458-85

Classes run approximately 1.5 hours in length. They have a minimum of 8 “campers” and a maximum of 15.

take me out to the ballgame - $19

summer. Everyone gets kabobs, caramel are welcome to stay during the class but are piece together and then dive intoParents chocolate TUESDAYand JULY 31ST required to stay if the camper is under 5 years old. Classes peanut-free apples, and are more, but you get to most mix it can up be made projects! Rainbow cream cone You fudge, will hitice a grand slam at thisandcamp! Classes are peanut-free most can beYou made will gluten-free upon request. Dairy-free chocolate is Why would you build blocks when gluten-free upon request. Dairy-free chocolate is you can with the toppings! Decorate your treatswith troll, and a jumbo marshmallow puff. mold a real size baseball, delectable availableAnd for anmake additional charge. build projects out of chocolate? We wonder www.nwherald.com/magazine however you’d like! available for an additional charge. we will be making Troll ‘hair’ onsite day candy hot dogs (withall mustard of course!), MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 13 Candy camps prices listed are per camper.and AMERICANA which you’ll enjoy building more - Lego people Walk-ins run from 10am - 3pm and are $10 per camper JUNE 20TH with a cotton candy machine! red, white, and WEDNESDAY blue popcorn! You won’t care if (unless otherwise noted). TUESDAY JULY 31ST Kreepers? Candyor camps prices listed are per camper. you You never after great willget hit back a grand slam atare this camp! will Multiple timethese slots available for treats! eachYou candy camp:

mincraft / legos - $19

.

Walk-in Days person it up! - $19 trolls - $22- $10 per Mix

Why would you build with blocks when you can mold a real size baseball,10am, make delectable 12pm, 2pmWalk-ins run from 10am - 3pm and are $10 per camper build projects out of chocolate? We wonder candy hot dogs (with mustard of course!), and (unless noted). which you’ll otherwise enjoy building more - Lego people red, white, and blue popcorn! You won’t care if For more information and to register, go to or Kreepers?

10am - 3pm

.


PALACE DE LA MUSIQUE

W

hen you visit the Sanfilippo Estate, it’s like stepping back in time to the early 1900s, before the time of radio, when the music from automated instruments filled dance halls in cities around the world. Those music machines provided countless hours of entertainment for past generations, and one of the finest collections of those historic relics is on display in Barrington Hills. The collection, which has about 6,000 pieces, is housed in a 44,000-square-foot museum at the residence of Marian and Jasper Sanfilippo. The pieces, which date from 1870 to 1930, include a wide range of music machines – from original Thomas Edison cylinder record players to machines that play cymbals, drums, tambourines, violins and many other instruments – as well as posters, lighting fixtures and other artifacts from the time period. All of the pieces, which were manufactured in the U.S., France, Germany or Belgium, have been restored and still play music from their original era. The estate also is home to one of the largest theater

14 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

organs in the world, which was built in 1927. It contains 8,000 pipes and five keyboards.

for ticketed tours on select dates and for charity events.

Gregory Leifel, executive director of the Sanfilippo Foundation, says automatic music machines stopped being produced in 1950, but the “small orchestras in a box” are an important part of music history.

The music rooms are decorated with exquisite crystal chandeliers, art glass doors and ornate antiques, giving the estate a magical look and feel that isn’t found anywhere else in Northern Illinois.

“This is a priceless collection. There are a lot of one-of-a-kind pieces. You can’t find these things anymore,” Leifel explains. “If people wanted to hear music before radio, they had to play it themselves or go to a dance hall where there were either live bands or automatic music instruments.”

“The house was built to look like an old 1920s movie palace. It’s hard to describe because there’s nothing else like this,” Leifel says. “[Jasper] wanted to keep this history alive and wanted people to experience it, because the machines would either be in a private collection never to be seen or destroyed. Part of putting this collection together was to share it with the community.”

The Sanfilippo estate was originally built in 1974 as a 6,000-square-foot private residence, where the Sanfilippos raised their five children. Jasper Sanfilippo, who was a mechanical engineer, is an avid music fan and was fascinated by the automatic music instruments. He began collecting them shortly after the family moved into the home and, as his collection grew, he had two additions constructed, including a 350-seat theater that hosts concerts throughout the year. While the family’s residence remains private, the music collection and theater are open to the public

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While touring the collection, guests will see how each machine works and hear its music, as well as view the Sanfilippo’s 1890 French salon carousel, which has 36 horses and four gondolas, and is one of the most complete and largest European carousels in the world. Several area nonprofit organizations have hosted fundraising events at the estate, which has helped

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Enjoy musical relics of a bygone era at the Sanfilippo Estate in Barrington Hills By Aimee Barrows

“[Jasper] wanted to keep this history alive and wanted people to experience it, because the [music] machines would either be in a private collection never to be seen or destroyed. Part of putting this collection together was to share it with the community.” – Gregory Leifel, executive director of the Sanfilippo Foundation

to raise more than $14.5 million for various charity groups in the last 10 years. Most charity events are open to the public, and guests also can get a tour of the collection while there. “We allow charities to come in and do a fundraising event here because we wanted to give them an opportunity to raise a lot of money in a unique setting,” Leifel says. “Our venue attracts a lot of people to the charities because they want to see the carousel and the collection, so it’s a chance for the charities to get more supporters. People can see a world-class collection in one of the most beautiful environments they’ll ever see.” For more information about the Sanfilippo Estate or to schedule a tour, visit the website at www.sanfilippofoundation.org or email info@ sanfilippofoundation.org. –Continued on page 16 www.nwherald.com/magazine

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 15


SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Do your Back-to-School Shopping at Too Cute!

–Continued from page 15

Each summer, guests are invited to enjoy live performances and tours of the collection as part of the Sanfilippo Estate Summer Concert Series. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for tours and concerts begin at 8 p.m. The carousel pavilion is open for 45 minutes following the performances. Tickets cost $45. HERE ARE A FEW UPCOMING DATES TO MARK YOUR CALENDARS: JULY 21

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 17


LEXI HARKINS CRYSTAL LAKE GOLF GIRL GOES PRO

By Sue Dobbe-Leahy

The first time she swung a golf club at age 6, Lexi Harkins found her passion. “Until then, my folks took me to ballet, tap, gymnastics and lots of activities that didn’t appeal to me,” Harkins recalls. “Golf gave me a challenge I still enjoy every day. I love the individuality of the game. You compete against yourself. And, with discipline and training, golf is a sport where you can continually improve.” And, improve, she did. Harkins is launching her professional golf career this year. “I love the game of golf for all the lessons it has taught me. For example, honesty, humility, respect, and that hard work pays off,” she says. Lippold Park in Crystal Lake was where Harkins started taking lessons with then-pro John Swenson. Swenson coached Harkins through Junior Golf, as she began dreaming of a career in professional sports. Tournaments around the country, as well as in Scotland and Mexico, refined her skills and confidence. And the Crystal Lake Central High School golf team put Harkins in the spotlight with articles in local newspapers. Discipline in her sport carried over to academia. Harkins was third in her graduating class at Central High School in 2014. University of North Carolina offered her a full scholarship, and she performed well on the UNC golf team. After three years, she transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Mathematics in May. Harkins qualified for two U.S. Amateurs, including the top 16 finish. She was in the top 25 individual finish at the National Collegiate Athletic Association nationals in 2017. This year, she placed second in the Hawkeye Invitational and fourth place at the University of Kentucky tournament. Going pro requires the same discipline and hard work that Harkins has put into her sport for 15 of her 21 years of life. Beyond the hard work that she contributes, the professional golf tour requires financial support. Family and friends are contributing to some of the expenses. For most professionals, sponsors and donors make up the difference. “Sponsors and donors help pay for Qualifying School,” Harkins says. “Then there are expenses with the tournaments you enter – plus

18 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

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SHARING HISTORY

‘Step back in time’ at the Antique Shops of Ridgefield

By Kevin Druley

T

heresa Wendt shuttles from station to station while presiding over the Antique Shops of Ridgefield, a network of four stores all nestled in proximity to the small, unincorporated McHenry County community of Ridgefield, northwest of Crystal Lake.

Wendt makes shop calls. She makes phone calls. She makes herself approachable, and accountable, and she stays busy. She makes the day better for countless others in the process, as anyone who has trekked from store to store can attest. “Frankly, Teresa is a huge draw, in and of herself. I think she’s just an amazing person with an engaging personality,” says Douglas VanHouten, an antique dealer who also handles website and marketing matters for the shops. “At 88 years old, she can still remember people’s names very vividly and remember what they’ve purchased from her. I think people always remember and come back to Ridgefield for Theresa, frankly.” For Wendt, the feeling has been mutual throughout her 52 years in the business. “The customers – the people I have met and dealt with over the years – have really been a delight for me,” she says. “They’re all very nice. So, that’s what’s made it for me.”  The tagline of the website, www.theantiqueshopsofridgefield.com, touts the quaintness of the community and its four multi-dealer shops, which are within walking distance of one another and situated around the railroad tracks: “Spend a day antiquing in the country … without the drive to the country,” it reads. Wendt owns three of the shops, but rents them out and chooses to work daily, a pastime she relishes. As with the furniture that stirs her antiquing passion, it’s part of Wendt’s fabric. While she’s witnessed her share of evolution in antique trends that’s what she enjoys about it. Change cycles constantly, and ultimately it does so enough to return tastes to a former era, connecting customers across generations. “Different periods have come and gone, you know, periods of furniture, and the likes and dislikes over the years,” Wendt says. “And, you know, it goes and comes. It’s popular at one time and then it loses the popularity and will come back again.” One thing that doesn’t return? The trains.

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While you’re out

Didn’t get enough of antiquing at the Shops of Ridgefield, then head to Roscoe Woodstock Antique Mall, located at 890 Lake Ave. in Woodstock, for “Three centuries of treasures from every corner of the Earth.” The last passenger train stopped in Ridgefield during the 1960s, but the community welcomes its share of visitors via automobile. The shops – Country Church Antiques, The Peacock Shoppe, Railroad Street Market and Simone-Michele Antiques and Vintage – rest about one mile from Route 14, in between Crystal Lake and Woodstock. Wherever patrons start on their antiquing journey, they’re sure to check in on the other three shops. It’s an established pattern, and missing one of the four would feel incomplete. Besides, when have you ever heard of an antique collector in a hurry? Especially in a place where, in VanHouten’s experience, feels “like you step back in time” amid the bustle of the nearby northwest suburbs.

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“We really value and respect the history of the items and the people that came before and used and touched and experienced the items that we’ve come in contact with,” VanHouten says. “I think that’s sort of a tangible experience that we’re kind of privileged to pass along to our customers, and I think they feel that, and I think it’s something that sticks with them. … It’s very clear to them that we’re not just about selling items, but we’re sort of in the business of sharing history, and I think customers remember that, and I think – certainly – they want and respect a fair value, which … we’re always able to give them in a large variety. “…For pretty much the entire history of the shops, the items are pretty carefully curated. So, it’s certainly variety, but we really strive to be true to ourselves and to our customers.”

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MARK YOUR CALENDARS From Sept. 7 to 9, antique collectors of all interest levels can enjoy the Vintage Finds Off Route 14 event, a “crawl” which showcases vintage and antique shops along that thoroughfare’s corridor. At press time, participating shops spanned west to east from Marengo to Mt. Prospect, and ranged as far north as McHenry. For an updated list, or for more information, visit www. vintagefindsoffroute14.com.

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Honoring tradition McHenry County Fair – serving families since 1949 By Kelsey O’Connor

Like many local children, Ken Bauman grew up going to the McHenry County Fair. Today, he’s the leader of a group of passionate volunteers that keeps the fair running year after year. “It just kind of becomes a part of you,” says Bauman, who has been president of the McHenry County Fair Association for the past six years. “You get bit by the fair bug and you want to help and support it.” The fair is considerably different than when Bauman first went as a child. The operation has steadily grown over the years, both in attendance and square footage. Two years ago, the fair added 12 more acres of land to make space for parking and future expansion. As for people, the fair drew around 80,000 visitors last year. Bauman and his team are hoping this year’s event, which will run from Tuesday, July 31 to Sunday, Aug. 5, will match or even surpass that number. “We’ve really been listening to our vendors and our spectators and trying to do some of the things they’re asking for,” he says, “It takes time, but we’ve been trying hard to do what people want.”

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 23


“We’re constantly trying to improve things and be that central entertainment hub for the county. We’re trying to find that niche that satisfies everyone, so there’s something for everyone to see and do.”

– Ken Bauman

President of the McHenry County Fair Association

That includes mixing up the entertainment roster with fresh acts. One new performer is Kevin Adair, a hypnotist who will perform three times a day – Wednesday through Sunday. The KidBucks Game Show and Magic Show is another recent addition that’s sure to be a hit with the youngest guests. New country singers will be performing at the fair for the first time, and the Pro Bull Riding event will now be accompanied by a mutton-busting event where kids under age five can ride sheep. “We’re constantly trying to improve things and be that central entertainment hub for the county,” says Bauman. “We’re trying to find that niche that satisfies everyone, so there’s something for everyone to see and do.” Bauman and his team plan to continue upgrading the fair’s lineup and facilities. On Friday, buying a raffle ticket will get visitors into the country concert and put them in the running to win a grand prize of $15,000 cash or a 2018 FLHZ Street Glide; second price is $3,000 cash; the third prize is $2,000 cash; the fourth prize is $1,000 cash; and the fifth prize is $500. Total cash prizes are worth 24 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

$21,500. There will be only 3,000 tickets sold. A single ticket bought means that there is a one-in-3,000 chance of winning; with two tickets, there is a one-in-1,500 chance; and with four tickets bought, there is a one-in-750 chance of winning. The funds from ticket sales will go toward building new grandstands. While there are quite a few additions, there also are plenty of traditions that aren’t going anywhere. The annual truck and tractor pulls in the Grandstand on Saturday always draw a huge crowd. During the event, contestants with souped-up machines hooked up to weights will show off their impressive horsepower. Kids can get in on the fun with pedal pulls. Youngsters can try their best to pedal small toy tractors as more weight is added to the attached sled. All ages can compete for free, and each participant will receive a coupon for a free ice cream cone. They’ll also be entered in a drawing to win their very own pedal tractor. Though there’s plenty of entertainment, agriculture is the true heart of the fair. While much of McHenry County is rural, a large portion of the community AMERICANA

doesn’t interact with farms and farmers on a regular basis. The fair is an opportunity for visitors to learn more about the local agricultural system. “Our mission is to promote and educate people about agriculture,” says Bauman. “There’s a large disconnect between the community and agriculture. It touches every one of us every day, and not only through food; there’s our clothing, our car, everything.” There will be exhibits featuring almost every type of agricultural area, including beef, dairy, sheep, goats, swine, poultry and pigeons, rabbits, grains and horses. Local farmers will be on hand to answer questions about the exhibits and their industry. One of the draws of the fair is that there’s something for every age. Children can hunt for treasures in the Barnyard Discoveries area, watch a magic show, and compete in the KidsBucks Game Show. Members of 4-H, a hands-on youth education program, will also be presenting their agriculture projects to the judges throughout the weekend.

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McHenry County Fair

highlights Tuesday, July 31

Barnyard Discoveries – Noon McHenry County Queen Pageant – 6 p.m. $2 ticket prices and discounted rides

Wednesday, Aug. 1

Dairy Goat Show and Poultry Show – 9 a.m. Combine Derby – 6 p.m. Scout Day: $4 tickets for Boy or Girl Scouts in uniform

Thursday, Aug. 2

Mother/daughter and father/son look-alike show – 5:30 p.m. Next Level Pro Bull Riding Rodeo with mutton busting for kids – 6 p.m. First Responder Day: $4 tickets for firefighters, police and EMTs with an ID

Friday, Aug. 3

Pedal pull competition – 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Talent show – 7 p.m. Logan Mize and Kentucky Headhunters perform – 7 p.m. Raffle drawing – 10 p.m.

Saturday, Aug 4 Older children and teens will find plenty to do, from carnival rides and games to a chainsaw sculpture show and a hypnotist. They also can compete for a scholarship in the McHenry County Queen Pageant on Tuesday night. Adults can enjoy the beer garden with live entertainment from Thursday through Sunday. On Friday night, there’s a country concert in the Grandstand featuring Logan Mize and Kentucky Headhunters. Most of the fair events can be enjoyed by all ages, making it a perfect event for families. There may be an astounding number of things to do and see, but for Bauman, the best part is just walking around and seeing the joy that the fair brings to its thousands of visitors. “I get to know a lot of people from year to year,” he says. “I get to see the smiles on people’s faces and the families having a good time. It’s just rewarding to know you made some family happy and gave them some lifelong memories.” www.nwherald.com/magazine

The McHenry County Fair will run from July 31 to Aug. 5 at the McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Road, Woodstock. For more information or to buy tickets, visit mchenrycountyfair.com.

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Pedal pull competition – 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Veteran’s Salute – 5 p.m. Watermelon eating content – 5:30 p.m. ISP Truck and Tractor Pulls – 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Veteran’s Day: $4 tickets for veterans with an ID

Sunday, Aug 5

Pedal pull competition – 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Demolition Derby – 1 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

TICKET PRICES

Season pass: $25 One-day adult: $8 One-day child, senior or military with ID: $5 One-day child under age 5: Free Parking: Free MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 25


26 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

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2018 MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR July 31st - August 5th X 2018 FLH ® E ID L stREET G

$25

2018 RAFFLE!

Enter to win: 2018 FLHX STREET G LIDE® or $15,000 CASH! PROCEEDS TO BENEFI T THE MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR ASSOCI ATION

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EANT Y QUEEN PAG T N U O C Y R N MCHE RBY COMBINE DE ING RODEO PRO BULL RID LOGAN MIZE ADHUNTERS KENTUCKY HE LS TRACTOR PUL ISP TRUCKS & Y OLITION DERB M E D S N O IC DERBY

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KIDBUCKS GAME SHOW SHOWS K C O T BARNYARD DISCOVERIES B LIVES SHOWS R J & L FISHING POND OPEN ACTOR PUL R T T S E E T TRAIN DISPLAY ANTIQU L PULL CON A D E E STILT WALKER KIDS P RANS SALUT S T E I MAGIC SHOW VET HIB IAL EX C R E M D HYPNOTIST COM AL FOO CARNIV TOR PARADES TALENT CONTEST AC R T E U CARNIVAL RIDES & GAMES ANTIQ DAILY CONTEST LOTS & LOTS OF ANIMALS

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 SUBURBAN SUPERDAD 

THE CONFLICT with recounting the past By JONATHAN BILYK

It may have happened when I was standing in front of Ronald Reagan’s boyhood home in Dixon. The former president had died not too long before, and flowers, ribbons and other memorials were still being left by admirers and political supporters in front of the otherwise normal-looking Midwestern home, where we’re told he lived as a boy. Reagan was a movie star, the governor of California, a conservative political icon and the 40th American President credited with restoring America’s sense of optimism, recharging the economy and bringing prosperity to millions, while also bringing down the Soviet Union and ending the Cold War. Or maybe he didn’t actually do any of those things, and just happened to be in the right place at the right time. Or maybe he was actually a terrible president, who altered the course of American history for the worse in many ways. It all depends on whom you ask, of course. Contemplating the very different ways in which this one president was viewed just a couple of decades since he won 49 states in his re-election campaign, my thoughts wandered further, turning to the possibility that in the not too distant future, it could fall to me to try to explain to my thenhypothetical children the events and consequences of those halcyon days of yore – my childhood – in the 1980s. From there, my mind raced over the entirety of American history – or at least, what I thought I knew about my nation’s past. As a boy, the concept of ‘Merica writ was paramount: the patriots (not the football team; I watched my Chicago Bears bludgeon them into submission in the only Super Bowl that ever meant anything) standing for freedom and liberty against the British crown; the Founding Fathers enshrining limited government and the rights of the individual www.nwherald.com/magazine

in a new democratic republic, the likes of which the world had never seen; the Union Army marching forth under the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” to preserve government of the people, by the people, for the people, ending slavery in the process; the industrial revolution, raising living standards and introducing the internal combustion engine to the world; former President Teddy Roosevelt and his big stick, and soft tone, setting the table for the American century to come; waves of doughboys rolling ashore to turn the tide of World War I; the Allies storming the beaches of Normandy and island-hopping across the Pacific to defeat totalitarianism in World War II; the Marshall Plan and other acts of American assistance, helping Western Europe, Japan and Korea become the engines of industry and prosperity we know them as today; the Civil Rights movement, and the march on Washington, with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream echoing over the mall; and then outlasting the Soviets in the Cold War, heralding the dawn of a Pax Americana. But – later, of course – I learned, while all of that may be true, it was true only after a fashion, and, in many ways, obscured so many other areas of American history my naïve childish mind couldn’t yet process. Understanding the racism and supremacism that countenanced the abominations of the African slave trade, despite the supposed rights enshrined in our founding documents; the reluctance of many, even during the Civil War, to actually ever grant freed slaves and their descendants equal rights – a reluctance that gave birth to outright oppression in the atrocities of the Jim Crow era, and continues to shape our society and politics to this day; massacres and dispossession of native peoples; industrial pollution that fouled air and water, bringing disease and soiling communities in its wake; the mistreatment of immigrants; the use of nuclear weapons; Manifest Destiny; Vietnam; and on and on, before even touching on the current issues roiling American society. FAMILY IN FOCUS

The prospect of such conversations was overwhelming, making me wonder how any parent could possibly fairly address such topics. Illinois is blessed, in many ways, with a rich history, which has shaped America’s history in so many ways. While the list may seem to begin with Lincoln – though it certainly does not – so many luminaries from America’s past have called Illinois home at some point in their lives, landing the state at the crossroads of U.S. history. So, there is little doubt, that while traveling about Illinois – and often not very far from home – my no-longer-hypothetical children will encounter faces and places from the past. And these will call out for a fair hearing and a fair presentation, which cannot overlook or flinch from the flaws, yet also should not diminish the recognition of their nationand world-changing achievements. And, today, as new events and controversies continue to shape the course of American history, I still wonder how I am to present this information as a parent – with a wealth of information from throughout history at my fingertips – as the current conflicts continue to rage in our 21stcentury world and in my own mind.

 Jonathan Bilyk writes about the triumphs and travails of being a modernday dad who legitimately enjoys time with his family, while tolerating a dog that seems to adore him. He also doesn’t really like the moniker “Superdad” because it makes it sound like he wants to wear his undergarments on the outside of his pants. (Also, the cape remains on back order.) MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 29


COUNSEL AND COMPASSION

As city council member and author, Geri Condon offers guidance while navigating life’s challenges By MELISSA RUBALCABA RISKE | Photo by FROM ME 2 YOU PHOTOGRAPHY

T

hrough struggles in life, Geri Condon has forged a path to face and conquer challenges and uses those experiences as inspiration to help others. Condon changed her direction of study during her senior year in college upon the realization that professional counselors serve as an incredible support system for those going through their own challenges in life. So, Condon went to graduate school and became a professional counselor. But it was when her family faced a near-tragedy that she decided that more needed to be done to help people going through dark times. At the time, her son had attempted suicide. “Out of that almost tragedy, we needed to help people,” Condon says. With her son’s permission, Condon wrote a book, entitled “My Journey to Hell: A Story of Love, Loss and Hope.” The book shared her struggle as a parent and a professional counselor. Condon says, at the time of the crisis, she felt as though she and her family were wearing masks, going about their daily lives and not allowing others to see the devastation they felt. “I said, ‘We need to talk about this. We need to get rid of the stigma of mental health,’” Condon says. “If I don’t talk about this, who will?” Even if she could only help one person through their struggles, that was enough. “My goal was, if I can help one person from the struggles I went through, if I can reach one other family, then I’ve achieved my goal,” she says.

As she shares her own pains and struggles, it is a goal she has managed to achieve many times. Additionally, her family’s experience propelled her to work in the community by serving on the board of the McHenry County Suicide Prevention Task Force and the Not One More Illinois organization. “Her passion for the town and for helping other people is probably one of the things I admire most about her,” says longtime friend Dorothy Wolf. Wolf says she met Condon when the two served as presidents of the Parent Teacher Organizations at their schools. Wolf says it was a challenging time in the community, and she recalls an admiration for the way people listened and worked with Condon. “She’s not afraid to say what needs to be said. That’s what makes her stand out,” Wolf says. Condon says her father, Gary Orler, was very active in the community and in politics. With her father as an example, her own interests in the community and the political process, Condon didn’t shy away when others suggested that Condon run for city council. “That’s just what you do; you step up when your community needs you,” Condon says. This spring marked her 15th year as a member of the McHenry City Council, and says she enjoyed the opportunity to work with others, resolve issues and help see the revitalization of the downtown. Condon says that she’s proud of the work, and she’s also ready to pass along the reins, adding that she will no doubt find other avenues to

share her time and energy. Condon named her counseling service Capture Your Path Counseling and says her aim is to help clients take control of their lives with healthy lifestyle choices and directions. “I think we all have a path in life,” Condon says. “Just like a rushing stream, we can allow ourselves to be carried along, or we can take control.”

2017 Sponsors

30 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

BUSINESS & CIVIC

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Aging peacefully

in one place

Clarendale of Algonquin offers three levels of care under one roof

W

By Kelsey O’Connor | Provided photos

hen selecting a senior living community, it’s important to consider the levels of care offered. Some communities specialize in a particular type of care, such as assisted living, but residents may need to turn elsewhere if their needs change or progress.

Assisted living offers around-the-clock nursing care and regular assistance with routine tasks, such as bathing, dressing, providing medication reminders, escorting to meals, and more. Residents enjoy the privacy and comforts of home, while having opportunities to socialize and receive help where they need it.

That’s why many seniors and their loved ones opt for a community that offers multiple levels of care. One local community that provides a spectrum of care services is the Clarendale of Algonquin, an award-winning senior living community near the heart of Algonquin.

The memory care area is carefully designed to be a secure space for seniors with memory impairment, such as Alzheimer’s. The highly-trained staff focuses on promoting well-being and enriching the lives of residents through meaningful activities.

“We’re unique because we encompass three levels of care under one roof,” says John Jorgenson, executive director of Clarendale of Algonquin. “Seniors can age in place, and their care will progress as their needs progress.”

“In memory care, we try to focus on what’s still remembered instead of what’s lost,” says Jorgenson. “We try and get folks involved and in the common areas as much as possible.”

Clarendale offers independent living, assisted living and memory care services. By providing a wide range of services, the community is able to provide residents with the care they need – even as those needs change. “As all of us age, our needs become greater,” says Jorgenson. “We’re here to help assist with those needs and keep seniors as independent as possible for as long as possible.” The independent living neighborhood consists of cozy one- and two-bedroom apartments with a full suite of amenities, including a full kitchen, dishwashers, garbage disposals, and a washer and dryer in each unit. Residents can choose to enjoy meals in the dining room or cook at home. www.nwherald.com/magazine

Residents in each level of care can take advantage of the various activities and events that take place each day. One popular event is “Paint and Pinot,” where residents can sip wine and tap into their artistic side. The schedule is intended to address each area of wellness, from spiritual and intellectual to emotional and beyond. Physical wellness also is a top priority. A range of physicians visit the community regularly, including general practitioners, podiatrists, optometrists and dentists. Clarendale also has in-house physical, occupational and speech therapists.

Clarendale of Algonquin 2001 W. Algonquin Road, Algonquin www.clarendaleofalgonquin.com 847-243-6763.

“All of the resident’s medical needs can all be taken care of right here in the community,” says Jorgenson.

BUSINESS & CIVIC

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 31


Slice of

Americana

With a flaky buttery crust and sweet, cinnamonspiced filling, apple pie reigns supreme as a summertime staple By Kelsey O’Connor

32 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

Few food items evoke as much nostalgia as a slice of homemade apple pie. The dessert instantly conjures up a wistful yearning for a simpler time. It serves as a symbol of patriotism on par with baseball, bald eagles and the American flag itself. “It’s the all-American dessert,” says Steve Theofanous, owner of Crystal Lake diner Around the Clock Restaurant. “Americans love their apple pie; it’s part of Americana.” How did the fruity, flaky treat become so closely linked with our country’s identity? Early Pilgrims crafted the earliest American pies. These savory creations were stuffed with fowl, venison or beef and wrapped in a tough, butterless crust – nothing like the delicate desserts we enjoy today. Fruit pies, as we know them, began to take shape in the late-1700s. With the French having introduced butter, sugar also became cheaper and apples more readily available due to a tree-planting pioneer with the nickname Johnny Appleseed. The three ingredients came together, and the American apple pie was born. Jim Rice, manager at Riverside Bake Shop in downtown McHenry, has a simpler explanation for the American obsession with pie. “They taste good,” he says. “And they’re easy to serve.” Today, you can find pies of all kinds at bakeries across the county. In McHenry County, you never have to go far to enjoy a slice. At Around the Clock Restaurant, guests are greeted by a case of baked goods as soon as they walk in the door. It’s a display case that’s hard to resist. “Most of the people that dine-in will have a slice, if they don’t buy one whole,” says Theofanous. The restaurant’s in-house bakery crafts 19 different types of pie, including classics, seasonal options and sugar-free varieties.

DINING & ENTERTAINING

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The most popular summer pie is the award-winning triple berry pie, a sweet blend of cherry, blueberry and raspberry under a traditional lattice crust. But the most popular pie year-round is the classic apple pie. The bakers use granny smith apples, which they’ve found to have the best flavor and texture when baked. “We find that those are the most tasty,” says Theofanous. “They have the perfect tart flavor to them.” The bakery also has a Dutch apple pie – which has a sweet, sugary topping – and a caramel apple pie. Other fruit pies include peach, blueberry, cherry and strawberry rhubarb. There also are cream pies, such as lemon meringue, banana cream, chocolate cream, coconut cream, and French silk. All pies are made from all-natural ingredients and don’t have preservatives.  River Side Bake Shop has been serving up sweet creations from scratch for 47 years. Its pie selection includes apple, blueberry, cherry, banana, custard, banana cream, lemon meringue, strawberry rhubarb, and pumpkin (during the holidays). Despite the large selection, the classic apple pie still reigns supreme. Guests can grab a slice of popular flavors, such as apple and cherry, or take home a whole pie of their favorite variety.  “We’re a scratch bakery,” says Rice. “We make everything from scratch – all the dough, ingredients – and we cook all our own fruit.” Another local institution with award-winning pies is Tom’s Market in Huntley. “We’re known for our pies. We offer quite the variety,” says Gail Legee, assistant bakery manager. In the summer, visitors line up to get a taste of the bakery’s strawberry cream pie made with the market’s own fresh strawberries. The award-winning caramel apple nut pie is another popular pick throughout the year.  “People don’t really make pies anymore,” says Legee. “They still like pie, they just don’t want to make it themselves. To do it right, you need to have the right recipe. We feel we do a pretty good job of it.”

“It’s the allAmerican dessert. Americans love their apple pie… .” – Steve Theofanous, owner of Crystal Lake diner Around the Clock Restaurant.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

DINING & ENTERTAINING

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 33


THE WRIGHT WAY Rookery

Home facade

Explore Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural legacy on new Illinois tourism trail

Emil Bach House

Photos courtesy of Frank Lloyd Wright Trust

By KELSEY O’CONNOR

34 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

TRAVEL

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Unity Temple

Laurent interior

A

round the world, Frank Lloyd Wright is known for his unique vision that transformed American architecture. In Illinois, he’s known for his stunning creations scattered throughout the state. Now, a new Frank Lloyd Wright Trail will make it easier than ever to explore his local works. “Illinois is home to more Frank Lloyd Wright structures than anywhere else in the country,” says Cory Jobe, director of the Illinois Office of Tourism. “The new trail celebrates Frank Lloyd

Wright history and his connection to Illinois, allowing tourists from around the world to discover the work of one of America’s greatest architects” The Illinois Office of Tourism unveiled the trail in May as part of National Travel and Tourism Week. The trail is designed to celebrate Wright’s legacy and connection to Illinois. The self-guided architectural tour features 13 Wright edifices that are open to the public in Oak Park, Chicago, Geneva, Rockford, Belvidere, Springfield, Kankakee, Hampshire and Dwight.

“Frank Lloyd Wright created the Prairie style architecture in the Prairie State,” says Jobe. “He was a great innovator and artist with a dynamic vision. Nearly 60 years after his death, visiting Wright buildings is as popular as ever.” Wright lived and worked in Illinois for the first 20 years of his career, leaving his architectural mark across the state. The Chicago area, in particular, has the largest concentration of original Wright sites in the world. Five of these sites, which are operated by the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, welcomed more than 150,000 visitors last -Continued on page 36

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TRAVEL

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“Illinois is home to more Frank Lloyd Wright structures than anywhere else in the country.” – CORY JOBE, Director of the Illinois Office of Tourism

-Continued from page 35

year, including 90,000 just to Wright’s home and studio in Oak Park.

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“Frank Lloyd Wright’s full name was Frank Lincoln Lloyd Wright, so it is fitting that this trail is now initiated in Illinois, the ‘Land of Lincoln,’” says Celeste Adams, Frank Lloyd Wright Trust president and CEO. “The trail calls attention to the many public Wright sites in this state, and we are happy to be part of a program that benefits everyone.” The trail will feature two unique itineraries. The first will showcase Wright’s creations across 110 miles from Chicago and Oak Park to Rockford, with stops along the way in Geneva, Hampshire and Belvidere. The second, longer trail, begins in Chicago and Oak Park and stretches 240 miles through Springfield and Kankakee. The itineraries also will feature local restaurants and attractions, with an emphasis on stops that are historically and architecturally significant. Later this summer, official Frank Lloyd Wright Trail road signs will be added throughout the state.

PLEASE CALL 815-669-4386 TO SCHEDULE A PERSONAL TOUR TODAY! Muirhead Home playroom

36 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

TRAVEL

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Enlightened Balance Chakra Spa Chakra Spa

Psychic Readings & Reiki Offered Daily

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Representing over 80 LOCAL Artists Unity Temple sanctuary

Sites on the Frank Lloyd Wright Trail include: 1. Emil Bach House, Chicago

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2. Charnley-Persky House Museum, Chicago

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3. The Rookery, Chicago

Crystal and Rock Shop

4. Frederick C. Robie House, Chicago

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5. Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park

30 North Williams Bring Street Market Suit F Historic Downtown Crystal Lake 815-307-1180 www.EnlightenedBalance.com

6. Unity Temple, Oak Park 7. Colonel George Fabyan Villa, Geneva 8. Muirhead Farmhouse, Hampshire 9. Petit Memorial Chapel, Belvidere 10. Kenneth Laurent House, Rockford 11. B. Harley Bradley House, Kankakee

SEE THE COLOR YOU EXPECT TO, FOR AS LONG AS YOU EXPECT TO.

12. Frank L. Smith Bank, Dwight 13. Dana-Thomas House, Springfield  For more itinerary information and route details, visit www.enjoyillinois.com.

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TRAVEL

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 37


S E D I R

BY NIGHT

GET REVVED UP FOR THESE CLASSIC CARS SHOWS, CRUISE NIGHTS By Kevin Druley Most people in Woodstock know Deb Klein’s soon-to-be 80-year-old mother by her nickname, Gaga. Many of the same folks channel the giddy spirit of that moniker when the Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show arrives each August.

“It’s just amazing to me that this town rallies around whoever we’re raising funds for, that is usually always in this town also,” Deb Klein says. “It’s a very tight-knit group we have found in Woodstock. Very tight-knit and very supportive.”

“We just have fun all night long,” Klein says. “Hot rods, music, great people, great food, great prizes, and it’s a great benefit.”

Here’s a look at other summer car shows and cruise nights in and around McHenry County:

This year, all proceeds from car entrance fees, raffles and food sales will go to Helping Paws Animal Shelter in Woodstock. Centered on the Woodstock town square, the show will take place from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18.

“We just have fun all night long. Hot rods, music, great people, great food, great prizes, and [the Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show is] a great benefit.” – Deb “Gaga” Klein

For the Kleins, organizing the event is a family affair several times over. In addition to her husband, Jim, Deb Klein gets help from her mother, daughter and son-in-law in fulfilling all aspects of the show. “Without them, we wouldn’t be doing it,” Klein says. The Kleins are further involved with a cruise night that operates from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays during the summer at Offsides Sports Bar &Grill, 600 S. Eastwood Drive, Woodstock. All kinds of classic cars are welcome, and food specials are available. As with the August show, all raffle and drawing proceeds benefit Helping Paws, a longtime volunteer destination for multiple generations of Klein family members, as well.

38 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

OUT & ABOUT

GREEN STREET CRUISE NIGHT

Check out iconic and classic automobile offerings on Green Street in downtown McHenry from 5 to 9 p.m. every Monday through Aug. 6. This year marks its 10th anniversary. Scheduled July theme nights include “Back to the ’50s” on July 2 and “Trucks” on July 9. “We are completely free to the community,” says Shannon Letizia, who organizes and hosts the cruise nights with her husband, Paul. “There’s no registration fees; there’s no admission fees. We hand out our awards completely free. We have about 30 to 35 raffle drawings each night that [are] completely free, as well. … We really have a [lot of] support from our community and our fellow business owners to provide these events all free to the community.” People have noticed, to be sure. Letizia estimates that most cruise nights welcome 1,000-plus spectators for the cars, food and other entertainment along Green Street. “Every year, we’ve grown exponentially,” she says.

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RICHMOND FRIDAY NIGHT CRUISE NIGHT

Peruse the gallery at the Richmond Fire Department, 5601 Hunter Drive and Route 12, from 5 to 8 p.m. Fridays through Aug. 26. Call 815-790-7146 for more information.

Stop in and see why we were voted

‘FLAMING FRIDAY’ CRUISE NIGHTS

Kabob’s, 551 S. Eighth St., West Dundee, enters the mix this summer with a Friday show that runs from 5 to 8:30 p.m.

THE MCHENRY COUNTY LIVING CRYSTAL LAKE CAR SHOW

the BEST

A new location with expanded parking awaits patrons this year, as the show sets up shop at the corner of Woodstock and Oak streets in Crystal Lake from 6 to 9 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month through Oct. 4.

Ladies’ Clothing Boutique

CARY CRUISE NIGHT

A longstanding McHenry County staple, the cruise night operates from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays along West Main Street in downtown Cary. Early arrival is encouraged, as attendees often couple visits with a meal at a downtown restaurant. Visit www.carygrovechamber.com for more information.

THUNDER ROAD CRUISE NIGHT

Swing by the Pizza House, 4216 N. Johnsburg Road, Johnsburg, from 4 to 9 p.m. each Wednesday.

ALGONQUIN MALL CRUISE NIGHT

Another new offering on the cruise night scene runs from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays at 1900 S. Randall Road, Algonquin. Email rudyk@global.net for more.

‘COFFEE AND CARS’ CRUISE IN

Admit it. You’re probably thinking about cars when you wake up, anyway, so why not satisfy your craving right off the bat? From 8 a.m. to noon on the first Saturday of each month, Restorations Unlimited, 304 Jandus Road, Cary, hosts a gallery of classics, as well as a look-in at restorations of vintage rides. Call 847-639-5818 for more information.

FIESTA DAYS CAR SHOW

Check out the 50th anniversary of the show at Petersen Park, 4300 Petersen Park Road, McHenry, from 9 a.m. to 3:30p.m. July 15. Hosted by the Northern Illinois Street Rod Association, the show welcomes cars of all types and makes. Visit www.fiestadayscarshow.com for more information.

GARY LANG MADE IN THE USA CLASSIC CAR SHOW

Stroll the campus at 1107 Route 31, McHenry, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 22. All proceeds from the event will benefit the Bob Hacker Memorial Fund.

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OUT & ABOUT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 39


Identify Health Issues Without

R A D I AT I O N ? I started learning the benefits of having a holistic life style early on in my life, when my first son was born. As a new mom, I gained deeper knowledge throughout my 13 years being married to the late Dr. Cody and managing our holistic-based wellness center. In the spring of 2011, I was recovering from paralysis caused by Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) when I discovered lumps in my left breast. Wanting to stay congruent with my holistic philosophy and not rush into an invasive procedure unless it was absolutely needed, I learned about Thermography. This is a radiation free, noninvasive, painless breast screening tool that has ability to detect abnormal cellular activities in the breast. This procedure allows for developing pathology to be discovered 5 to 10 years before a cancer tumor would grow dense enough to be detected through a mammogram. I was so impressed with my experience, I decided to start Northwest Medical Thermography, and make thermography more available to those searching for a noninvasive holistic approach. 40 | JULY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

During my certification for thermography, I had my first full body thermal scan done. My thermal images were again sent to an MD that specializes in thermal interpretation and writes a comprehensive report of findings. Without receiving this

report from the MD, I would not have had the opportunity to make changes to dramatically improve my health and prevent me from developing diabetes. I am dedicated to helping people to be proactive in their health journey. Don’t wait for something to happen, but correct your health issues before they become a medical emergency! Northwest Medical Thermography has grown in many ways. Not only do I service many health care offices throughout northern Illinois and Wisconsin but have added thermography for horses and Bemer PEMF therapy for both humans and horses. Now we can also help find the source of a horse’s pain, allowing us to

understand their needs better. With endless gratitude for the ability to see my dream of bringing thermography to the community, I am thrilled to also be of service to equine health. Medical grade thermal imaging system is: • Radiation free, 100% safe for you. • Painless, no touch breast scanning. • Thoroughly reviewed and reported on by certified MD’s and Vets. Call Today for your evaluation!

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MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | JULY 2018 | 41


CALENDAR JULY 2018

HARVARD FOOD TRUCK FEASTIVAL

WOODSTOCK’S FIFTH ANNUAL SUMMER IN THE PARK

WHEN: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, July 14 WHERE: N. Ayer St., Harvard The Harvard Food Truck FEASTival will encompass three blocks of downtown Ayer Street. The event will feature food trucks, live music, domestic and craft beer, an art and crafts fair, and classic car show. The entry fee is $5 and children ages 12 and younger will be admitted free of charge. For more information, visit www.cityofharvard.org.

ROTARY’S ROCKIN’ RIBFEST

WHEN: Thursday, July 12, through Sunday, July 15 WHERE: Sunset Park, 5200 Miller Rd., Lake in the Hills This popular four-day festival will feature mouth-watering barbecue, drinks and live music entertainment on grounds of Sunset Park. The family-oriented event will feature nationally renowned professional barbecue masters, as well as other fest fare, such as funnel cake, homemade lemonade, roasted corn and more. The Rockin’ Ribfest is the signature fundraising event for the Lake in the Hills Rotary Club. For more information, visit www.lithribfest.com.

MCHENRY FIESTA DAYS

WHEN: Thursday, July 12, through Sunday, July 22 WHERE: Petersen Park, 4300 Petersen Park Road, McHenry McHenry Fiesta Days will feature 11 days of fun, including a carnival, live music, an ice cream social, arts and crafts in the park, a car show, and the annual Fiesta Day Parade. For more information, visit mchenryfiestadays.com.

WHEN: Times vary, Wednesday, July 18, through Sunday, July 22 WHERE: Woodstock Emricson Park, Woodstock

Woodstock’s signature summer event, Summer in the Park, will feature music and concerts, children’s entertainment, a food court and beer garden, bouncies and other children’s activities, a pool party, bags tournament, movie in the park, an old-fashioned ice cream social, carnival game booths and more. For more information or a schedule of events for the five-day festival, visit www.woodstockfestivals.org.

FOOD AND WINE PAIRING – FARM-TO-TABLE, SUMMER HARVEST WHEN: 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, July 21 WHERE: Loyola Retreat and Ecology Campus, 2710 S. Country Club Road, Woodstock

The food and wine pairing, chef-demonstrated event is the first farm-to-table dinner of the season. Dinner starts with a wine reception in the garden with hand-passed appetizers and will lead to a fivecourse dinner. Tickets cost $80. For tickets or more information, visit www.luc.edu.

DAMYAK CHALLENGE

WHEN: 8 to 10 a.m. Saturday, July 21 WHERE: Miller Point, 1207 Riverside Dr., McHenry Participants can enjoy the morning on beautiful Fox River while challenging themselves to paddle from Miller Point down to the McHenry Dam and back.

Registration begins at 7 a.m. at Miller Point. The entrance fee is $30 in advance and $35 the day of the event. For more information or to register, visit damyak.com.

VILLAGE OF RICHMOND’S CHRISTMAS IN JULY CRAFT AND VENDOR SHOW

WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 21, and Sunday, July 22 WHERE: Richmond’s Memorial Hall, 10308 Main St., Richmond The Village of Richmond will host its first Christmas in July Craft and Vendor Show Admission is free. Get into the Christmas spirit by enjoying Christmas music while shopping in historic Memorial Hall. Come browse the many crafters displaying and selling a variety of handcrafted items, along with a few vendors offering their special services. The event will feature a silent auction, and popcorn and refreshments will be available. Proceeds will help Richmond Community Food Pantry. For more information, visit richmond-il.com.

MCHENRY COUNTY FAIR

WHEN: Tuesday, July 31, through Sunday, Aug. 5 WHERE: McHenry County Fair Grounds, 11900 Country Club Road, Woodstock Visitors to the annual McHenry County Fair will find all their county fair favorites, such as exhibits, vendors, livestock shows, a rodeo, fair food and drinks, a demolition derby, carnival, Queen pageant and more. For more information or a schedule of events, visit www.mchenrycountyfair.com.

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14

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MC Mag July 2018  
MC Mag July 2018