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Kane County

CHRONICLE SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2014 | $1.50 | KCCHRONICLE.COM

POPULAR PASTIME BRIDGE PLAYERS KEEP MINDS SHARP, ENJOY FRIENDLY COMPETITION. PAGE 4

Jeff Krage for Shaw Media

Bob Duhme of Wheaton plays bridge during a Dec. 27 bridge tournament at the Baker Community Center in St. Charles.

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Marmion boys’ groundswell of momentum halted in fourth quarter; Cadets fall to Notre Dame, 62-50. Page 16

Page 8 Since 1881.

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| GETTING STARTED

2

Ranking the job of newspaper reporter An uncle of mine recently sent an interesting newspaper clipping to me at the Kane County Chronicle. It was a piece from the Dec. 1 edition of The Baltimore Sun by Jean Marbella that discussed the annual “Jobs Rated” report from CareerCast.com, a work-related website. The news clip made note of the last job listed in CareerCast’s 2013 report of best to worst jobs, rated one to 200. What was the last job on the list? Newspaper reporter. That No. 200 ranking comes after dishwasher (No. 187), construction worker (No. 171), bartender (No. 150) and attorney (No. 117).

fared poorly in the ‘Jobs Rated’ report for years due to the job’s high stress and tight deadlines, low pay and requirement to work in all conditions to get the story. But journalism is not a dying art, nor is reporting a profession without prospects. Rethinking the industry has made reporters adapt.” And that’s exactly what the Kane County Chronicle has been doing. Our website, videos, social media platforms and other online tools have become an incredibly important part of our news team’s duties. And – to be clear – CareerCast lists online reporter as a different job than newspaper reporter. I also would agree with

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK Kathy Gresey Other journalism-related jobs on the list include publication editor (No. 168) and photojournalist (No. 188). The No. 1 job? Actuary. In conducting its report, CareerCast listed incomes associated with each job and measured factors pertaining to work environment, stress and hiring outlook. A story published on its website explains some of the reasoning behind why newspaper reporters received the “worst” rating: “Of course, newspaper reporters have

Ms. Marbella that many of the reasons listed for newspaper reporter being the worst job are some of the very same reasons why many such reporters love what they do. For example, meeting the public, competitiveness and – yes – even meeting deadlines. As for me, I enjoyed being a reporter, and I enjoy being a “publication editor.” And, yes, I even enjoy the stress – at least most of the time.

• Kathy Gresey is editor of the Kane County Chronicle and president of the Northern Illinois Newspaper Association Board. Contact her at kgresey@shawmedia.com or 630-845-5368. Learn more about NINA at ninaonline.org.

CAMPTON HILLS

8LOCAL BRIEFS

Larsen’s light show extended

Director sought for soil, water district

By AL LAGATTOLLA alagattolla@shawmedia.com CAMPTON HILLS – Brian Larsen said he was at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago last weekend, looking at the tigers, when two people came up to him, recognizing him from his family’s appearance on ABCTV’s “The Great Christmas Light Fight.” “They said, ‘You’re Brian from the Larsen Light Show,’” he said, adding that they told him that his show was better than the zoo’s light show. There is still time to check out the show, which is at Larsen’s home at 42W891 Beith Road in Campton Hills. Because of a snowy holiday season – and because there was some confusion over the new parking lot Larsen put in to help accommodate the cars that crowd Beith Road every year – he has decided to extend the show. Typically, Larsen would shut down the show by Jan. 2. Instead, he is extending it through Sunday. It will run from 5 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. both today and Sunday, into the early hours of Monday. Larsen has been putting on the show for years. The huge display features 1 million LED lights, as well as

Know more The Larsen Light Show will run from 5 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. today and Sunday. The show is at 42W891 Beith Road in Campton Hills.

2,400 strobe lights, 26 cosmic ribbons, 23 mini trees and 16 dancing hoops, among other highlights. It is synchronized to music that can be heard by drivers on their car’s radio on 88.5-FM. The show earned national notoriety when it won its segment of the ABC-TV show, earning the Larsens a $50,000 award. The 40-car parking lot was a significant change this year, and Larsen said the idea was to ease congestion on Beith Road, where cars will pull to the side of the road as they

slowly ease forward as others leave the area. Larsen was asking for a $7 donation for the Make-A-Wish Foundation, but he stressed that payment wasn’t required. Larsen said he went out to direct traffic at times. “People weren’t required to donate, and they never have been,” Larsen said. He said some visitors said they sat through long waits, and that others said they didn’t go because they didn’t want to drive on snow-covered roads. So he decided to extend the show’s run. He said he has received feedback indicating that people consider the show a tradition, and he appreciated the kind words he has heard from visitors. “That’s why we do it,” he said.

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8CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS Accuracy is important to the Kane County Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 630-845-5355; email, editorial@kcchronicle.com.

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Pick 3 Midday: 9-9-0 Pick 3 Evening: 3-0-9 Pick 4 Midday: 1-8-4-4 Pick 4 Evening: 6-4-2-7 Lucky Day Lotto Midday: 5-11-17-18-27 Lucky Day Lotto Evening: 6-10-16-19-23 Lotto jackpot: $10 million Mega Millions Number: 22-24-25-40-70 Megaball: 5 Megaplier: 5 Est. jackpot: $61 million

The Kane-DuPage Soil and Water Conservation District will begin accepting nominations for its director post, a two-year term, beginning Monday. Nominees must provide proof of residency or ownership of land within the district boundaries. Submit applications at the district’s office, 2315 Dean St., suite 100, St. Charles, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Deadline is 4:30 p.m. Feb. 3.

Annual concert today MAPLE PARK – Lee Murdock’s Annual Hometown Concert is set for 7:30 p.m. today at the Kaneland High School Auditorium, 47W326 Keslinger Road, Maple Park. Tickets cost $12.

– Kane County Chronicle

Powerball Est. jackpot: $60 million

8LIKE US Want to stay in touch on Facebook? Visit www.facebook.com/kanecountychronicle to join the conversation and get story updates.

8SOUND OFF The Kane County Chronicle’s Sound Off number is 630-845-5240. Callers may speak on topics anonymously, but messages should be kept to a maximum of 60 seconds. We will not print calls commenting on signed Letters to the Editor.

3615 E Main Street St. Charles Illinois 60174

630.584.2239 Hours of Operation: Monday-Thursday: 11AM-1AM Friday and Saturday: 11AM-2AM; Sunday: 9AM-12AM

Join Us For Lunch NOW OPEN!


CONTACT US

FACE TIME WITH TYLER HARJU

Where did you grow up? St. Charles. I graduated

from St. Charles North in 2010. Pets? A soft-coated wheaten terrier named Lily Who would play you in the movie of your life?

Michael C. Hall First job? A baseball umpire in Wasco As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? An astronaut. I’m going to school for business

administration. A book you’d recommend? “The Purpose-Driven Life”

by Rick Warren Favorite charity? Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Do you speak another language? Spanish What game show would you be on? “Family Feud” Favorite local restaurant? Los Burritos in St. Charles What is an interesting factoid about yourself? I lived

in the Dominican Republic last summer doing missions work. I worked with youth playing baseball.

Out About and

Kane County Chronicle staffers pick the best of what to do in your free time

‘Anime Club’ to meet at Batavia Public Library WHAT: Teenagers are invited to watch anime movies, preview new shows on DVD and meet other anime and manga enthusiasts. No registration is required. WHEN: 6:30 p.m. Thursday WHERE: Batavia Public Library, 10 S. Batavia Ave., Batavia INFORMATION: Teens can email Anime@ BataviaPublicLibrary.org.

Just Dad ‘n’ Me Dance at Geneva High School WHAT: Dads and daughters will enjoy entertainment, dancing and refreshments. All couples will receive a keepsake photograph. Registration is required. WHEN: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9 WHERE: Geneva High School, 416 McKinley Ave., Geneva INFORMATION: Registration is open for Geneva Park District’s annual event. Cost is $10 a person ($15 nonresident). Early registration is encouraged. Call 630-232-4542 or visit www.

genevaparks.org.

Casting call set for ‘Beauty and the Beast’ WHAT: A casting call is set for the Playhouse 38 production of “Beauty and the Beast.” Actors ages 8 to 18 are invited to audition. Those who wish to audition must prepare a musical theater song to be performed a capella of no more than 32 bars in length, and a monologue or cutting from a story or poem of no more than 1 minute in length. WHEN: The casting calls are set from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday and Friday. WHERE: Playhouse 38, 524 W. State St., Geneva INFORMATION: Call 630-232-4542 to schedule an audition. Callbacks are by invitation-only and will be from 2 to 6 p.m. Jan. 11.

‘From Soldier to Supervisor’ set at Aurora University WHAT: “From Soldier to Supervisor: Human Resources’ Role,” is a free educational program. The public is invited. Co-sponsors are

the university’s Dunham School of Business and Gallagher Benefit Services of Naperville. WHEN: 8 to 9 a.m. Jan. 29 WHERE: Aurora University banquet hall in Alumni Hall, 1410 Marseillaise Place in Aurora INFORMATION: Call 630-844-5527 or email sgreen@aurora.edu.

Beekeeping class set in Geneva WHAT: The Geneva Park District is sponsoring a beginning beekeeping class. The class will cover the basics of getting started raising honey bees. WHEN: It will begin Jan. 21, and will continue for eight Tuesdays through March 11. The class will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. WHERE: To register for the class, registration forms are available and course fees can be paid at the Persinger Recreation Center or at the Sunset Rec Center at 710 Western Ave., Geneva. For information, call Trish Burns, manager of Peck Farm Park, at 630-2628244.

TODAY’S WEB POLL Should school be canceled on Monday? 1) Yes 2) No 3) Too early to tell

VOTE ONLINE | Voice your opinion at KCChronicle.com. Follow us at twitter.com/kcchronicle, or become a fan on Facebook.

The Kane County Chronicle and KCChronicle.com are a division of Shaw Media, 333 N. Randall Road, Suite 2, St. Charles, IL 60174. All rights reserved. Copyright 2013 The Kane County Chronicle. Published since 1881 Newsstand price 50 cents Tuesday Friday, $1.50 Saturday. Basic annual rate: $182 Tuesday - Saturday.

Office hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 630-232-9222 Customer Service

800-589-9363 subscriptions@shawmedia.com 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday 7 a.m. - 10 a.m. Saturday (Requests for same-day redelivery of the newspaper are accepted until 10 a.m. each day) Classified Sales Phone: 800-589-8237 Email: classified@shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 Legal notices: 630-845-5219 Newsroom Phone: 630-845-5355 Email: editorial@kcchronicle.com Fax: 630-444-1641 Publisher Don T. Bricker dbricker@shawmedia.com General Manager Jim Ringness jringness@shawmedia.com Editor Kathy Gresey kgresey@shawmedia.com News Editor Al Lagattolla alagattolla@shawmedia.com Advertising director Laura Pass lpass@shawmedia.com Promotions coordinator Lisa Glavan lglavan@shawmedia.com

GETTING STARTED | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

St. Charles resident Tyler Harju, 21, was at St. Charles Bowl when he answered 11 questions for the Kane County Chronicle’s Brenda Schory.

3


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| COVER STORY

4

‘NOT JUST A CARD GAME’ For bridge players, pastime can be serious business By BRENDA SCHORY

Know more

bschory@shawmedia.com

F

or its aficionados, there is nothing like bridge. Marilyn Croft of St. Charles is a director – a designation earned by collecting points and passing a test. And because of her director status, she “owns” three weekly games played on Tuesday and Friday at the Hotel Baker in St. Charles and a Thursday game in Elgin. She is also considered a silver life master, having amassed more than 1,000 points. “I’ve been playing for about 10 years,” said Croft, 61, and that is a contrast from many players who learned as children from their parents. The weekly or club games are part of the American Contract Bridge League. The league is subdivided into 27 districts. Croft belongs to District 8 – with 3,800 members – which is further divided into five units. Croft’s unit is hosting the Northern Illinois Duplicate Bridge Regional Tournament from Sunday through Tuesday at the Crystal Lake Holiday Inn. “I started taking lessons, and I just fell in love with bridge,” Croft said. “It’s not just a card game … it’s very challenging. It really keeps your mind working. You have to figure out bidding – which is a language all itself. You have to figure out the best offense, the play of the hand, how to defeat the opponent’s contract.” The game sparks a lot of passion, drawing players from all age groups and walks of life, Croft said. At the weekly bridge games she runs, the oldest member is 89, and a month ago, the oldest player was 98. “We get a lot of professionals, teachers. It’s just all over the place,” Croft said. “In tournaments, we get retired people and math majors from the University of Chicago. ...

District 8 of the American Contract Bridge Association, which includes all Illinois counties outside of Chicago, provides information about bridge games, tournaments, membership and how to find a teacher and learn to play. More information is online at http:// home.comcast.net/~dist8.

“When you play duplicate bridge, it’s very competitive. But it’s also a friendly thing, and you meet a lot of nice people.” Bob Duhme of Wheaton

Sometimes we talk about it as the chess game of the card world.” Though tournaments draw a lot of competitive players, Karl Dencker, 81, of Lake in the Hills said the weekly games are where players keep their skills sharp. “The club game is where you learn and perfect your game,” Dencker said. “There is no place else that the bridge player can go to experiment with new conventions to work with a partner on. This is where you have to do it.” Dencker said he has played bridge for 25 years. He is a director, a certified bridge instructor and a bronze life master with more than 500 points. As president of the unit hosting the upcoming tournament, you’d think he’d be a knock-down-drag-out competitor. And you’d be wrong. “I take it as a game,” Dencker said. “When you’re all done with it, it’s still a game. It’s a good game. It’s probably the best card game going.” Dencker praised bridge as

Jeff Krage for Shaw Media

There were eleven tables in use during the Dec. 27 bridge tournament at the Baker Community Center in St. Charles. The game sparks a lot of passion, drawing players from all age groups and walks of life, said Marilyn Croft of St. Charles, a member of District 8 in the American Contract Bridge League. a game that keeps the mind sharp and, especially for seniors, gets them out and socializing. “I’ll never be a great bridge player – it does not interest me,” Dencker said. “But I love the game. I play well.” Estelle von Zellen, 89, of DeKalb, is a silver lifetime master, having amassed more than 1,000 bridge points. She said she never likes to miss a game. Von Zellen came from a card-playing family. “We played cards when we were not allowed to go out out on school nights,” von Zellen said. “I was playing blackjack when I was 5. I learned to play bridge from an uncle when I was in junior high school. It’s a lot of fun.” Bob Duhme of Wheaton said he began playing bridge in the 1980s, learning from a friend who needed a partner. Later, Duhme sat with bridge players coming home from work every day on the train, turning their seats so four players would face each other. The conductors rented them a board for 10 cents so they could use it as a table. “That whetted my appe-

tite, and I started to play duplicate bridge,” Duhme said. “When you play duplicate bridge, it’s very competitive. But it’s also a friendly thing, and you meet a lot of nice people.” Sometimes, passions in the game get the better of players and they will stomp out of a game in a bad mood over a few bad hands, Duhme said. “I have heard [players] say, ‘I hate this game. I am never going to play this game again,’ ” Duhme said. “They

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always blame themselves. ... But everybody always comes back.” A player’s passion for bridge can show up in interesting ways, Duhme said. “I had some good friends who got married. Then the bride spent the evening at a bridge tournament with me. It was at the Palmer House in Chicago,” Duhme said. “I like to say, ‘His wife spent her wedding night at the Palmer House ... with me.’ It always draws big laughs.”

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Seven-Day Forecast

Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

SUN

MON

Windy and Mainly cloudy, Becoming mostly cloudy with light cold with some breezy and frigid snow morning snow

Bill Bellis Chief Meteorologist

253

5-19

TUE

WED

Mostly sunny and continued cold

-8 -15

FRI

Increasing clouds Some light snow with light snow early; warmer late

-3-7

Tri-Cities Almanac

THU

18 16

Mostly cloudy and colder

22 15

29 14

Harvard

24/0 McHenry Statistics through 4 p.m. yesterday Belvidere 27/4 Temperatures Waukegan 24/1 27/5 High/low ..................................... 17°/-12° Normal high ......................................... 30° Rockford Crystal Lake Deerfield Record high .............................. 58° (2000) Algonquin 24/-1 25/3 28/8 26/4 Normal low .......................................... 16° Hampshire Record low ............................. -15° (1979) Schaumburg 25/3 Elgin 28/7 Peak wind .............................. S at 21 mph 27/4 DeKalb Precipitation 25/3 Tri-Cities Chicago 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ........... 0.00” 25/3 29/10 Month to date ................................... 0.26” Normal month to date ....................... 0.19” Oak Park Year to date ...................................... 0.26” 30/10 Aurora Normal year to date .......................... 0.19” Dixon 24/0

UV Index

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

26/4

Sandwich 26/5

Orland Park 28/8

10 a.m.

Noon

2 p.m.

4 p.m.

0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme

Air Quality Reading as of Friday

City Arlington Hts Aurora Deerfield Des Plaines Elgin Gary Hammond Janesville

Today Hi Lo W 28 8 sn 26 4 sn 28 8 sn 29 9 sn 27 4 sf 34 16 sn 33 11 pc 23 -1 sf

Sunday Hi Lo W 8 -20 sn 6 -23 sn 9 -18 sn 9 -19 sn 7 -21 sn 18 -13 sn 15 -20 sn 1 -19 c

Today Hi Lo W 30 11 sn 26 3 sf 27 2 sn 28 7 sn 30 13 sn 27 6 sn 29 9 sn 27 5 sf

City Kankakee Kenosha La Salle Morris Munster Naperville Tinley Park Waukegan

Sunday Hi Lo W 13 -21 sn 5 -19 sn 6 -20 sn 10 -18 sn 15 -18 sn 8 -20 sn 11 -20 sn 7 -19 sn

Fox River Stages 0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous Source: Illinois EPA

Weather History A storm on Jan. 4, 1982, drenched San Francisco, Calif., with 12 inches of rain and dumped 10 feet of snow on Lake Tahoe in just two days. The extreme storminess that month was blamed on a strong El Nino.

Fld: flood stage. Prs: stage in feet at 7 a.m Friday. Chg: change in previous 24 hours. Station Fld Prs Chg Station Fld Prs Chg Montgomery........... 13..... 11.07...... -0.08 Algonquin................. 3....... 1.38...... -0.02 Burlington, WI ........ 11....... 7.32....... none New Munster, WI .... 19....... 6.87..... +0.06 Princeton .............. 9.5........ N.A..........N.A. Dayton ................... 12....... 5.79....... none McHenry .................. 4....... 1.33...... -0.02 Waukesha ................ 6....... 2.78...... -0.03

Sun and Moon Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset

Today 7:21 a.m. 4:35 p.m. 9:23 a.m. 9:00 p.m.

Sunday 7:21 a.m. 4:36 p.m. 9:58 a.m. 10:10 p.m.

First

Full

Last

New

Today Hi Lo W 30 28 sn 47 34 pc 30 23 s 12 -1 sf 31 15 pc 28 25 s 44 31 pc 29 10 sn 36 27 pc 62 29 pc 25 10 sn 23 -1 c 77 66 s 66 48 pc 33 24 pc 28 4 sn 64 39 pc 71 53 pc

Sunday Hi Lo W 35 26 sn 49 22 c 41 40 i 3 -9 sn 29 19 pc 40 38 i 47 30 c 10 -18 sn 37 -9 r 41 20 pc 24 -2 pc 3 -15 c 78 66 pc 53 29 c 27 -18 sn 10 -12 c 57 40 s 77 54 pc

City Louisville Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Francisco Seattle Washington, DC

Today Hi Lo W 41 31 pc 76 70 sh 27 4 sf 14 -18 c 44 34 pc 59 49 c 26 22 s 46 18 s 22 -3 c 72 60 c 26 20 s 71 48 s 35 26 pc 42 14 pc 31 14 sf 63 45 pc 43 32 c 35 27 s

Sunday Hi Lo W 39 -7 r 81 69 sh 7 -16 c -12 -26 c 44 6 sn 65 28 c 42 42 i 22 10 pc 5 -14 c 80 61 pc 40 39 i 69 45 s 42 10 r 17 -10 sn 28 13 pc 63 45 pc 45 32 c 43 40 i

Sunday Hi Lo W 59 45 s 51 43 r 43 21 s 43 32 sh 91 70 s 63 47 pc -3 -13 sn 54 39 pc 79 60 pc 52 45 r 45 34 pc 88 74 pc

City Mexico City Moscow Nassau New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Toronto

Today Hi Lo W 70 44 pc 28 25 c 80 73 sh 66 43 pc 46 37 sh 90 77 s 55 54 sh 41 27 s 84 75 t 83 64 s 52 36 pc 29 23 c

Sunday Hi Lo W 72 45 pc 33 29 c 83 70 sh 66 41 pc 48 45 sh 88 75 r 58 46 r 41 25 c 84 75 t 82 66 pc 45 32 c 29 9 sn

World Weather City Athens Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Manila

Today Hi Lo W 56 43 s 59 44 pc 38 23 pc 46 39 c 86 66 s 63 49 c 3 -18 sf 55 43 c 82 60 pc 46 37 r 48 32 r 86 74 t

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Jan 7

Jan 15

Jan 23

Jan 30

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

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• Saturday, January 4, 2014

Regional Weather

City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Boise Boston Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Dallas Denver Des Moines Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

5

WEATHER | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

TODAY

National Weather


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

6

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8LOCAL BRIEFS

7

Illinois residents will receive a breakdown of state spending, information about its unpaid bill backlog and other tools to help them better “follow the money” when they open their income tax returns in 2014, Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka has announced. The information will also be online at www. illinoiscomptroller.com.

Children can audition for ‘Babe’ at STC theater

Loose Dentures? Did you know that dental implants can make your dentures incredibly stable and less painful? Use little or no pastes. Avoid embarrassing moments by eating and speaking with confidence.

County clerk’s office to close on MLK Jr. holiday The Kane County Clerk’s Office will be closed Jan. 20 for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Regular business hours will resume at 8:30 a.m. Jan. 21. Those with questions should call the Kane County Clerk’s Office at 630-232-5950.

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BATAVIA – A program, “What Do Scientists Know About The Big Bang?” is set for 8 p.m. Feb. 7 at Fermilab, which is at Pine Street and Kirk Road, Batavia. The lecture will be by Dr. John Carlstrom, University of Chicago. Tickets cost $7. This talk will discuss what we have know about the Big Bang and how we learned it. For information or to order tickets, visit www.centerstageticketing.com/sites/fermilab/ events.php.

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– Kane County Chronicle

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ST. CHARLES – Steel Beam Children’s Theatre, 111 W. Main St. in downtown St. Charles, will hold auditions for its next children’s show, “Babe the Sheep Pig,” from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday at the theater. Children ages 9 through 16 are invited to audition. This play is directed by Daina Geisler and produced by Lori Holm. No preparation is needed. Children will read from the script and will be seen on a first-come, first-served basis. Rehearsals will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays (occasional Sunday), starting Jan. 11. The performances will be on Saturdays and Sundays, Feb

22 through March 16. Tuition if cast is $295, with scholarships available to families in need. Contact Lori Holm with questions at 630-887-7269, or via email at LoriHolm1@gmail.com.

LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Tax mailings to detail state spending issues


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| LOCAL NEWS

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Court services to get $300K for probation help Meant to reduce need for prison By BRENDA SCHORY bschory@shawmedia.com ST. CHARLES TOWNSHIP – Kane County Court Services will receive a $300,000 state grant to help nonviolent offenders complete probation and not go to prison. Kane is one of 18 grant recipients in 31 counties to receive nearly $7 million through Adult Redeploy Illinois, administered through the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority. Kane County Court Services Director Lisa Aust said the grant will cover the cost of hiring three more probation officers who specialize in high-risk defendants – those who are more likely to go to prison because they cannot complete the terms of their probation. “They are missing their appointments because maybe they don’t have transportation,” Aust said. “Maybe they do not have employment, so they are not paying their fines.” The temporary probation officers are hired only for the length of the grant, which ends June 30, Aust said, adding they hope to apply for another grant by then. Program manager Deanna Cada, who wrote the successful grant, said the program is for adults 18 and older. The probation department has identified about 100 people in the county who would benefit from this type of intensive service. “These are not people committing serious crimes, they are not violent offenders,” Cada said. “Somehow, they have had this stumble, this barrier to being successful, and then they spiral downward. ... This is to have those barriers removed, so they can be successful [and] stop the

downward spiral.” Aust said keeping people out of prison benefits them and their communities. “They’re employed, paying taxes, taking care of their kids, their families, paying rent, supporting the local economy,” Aust said. “And it’s not costing us by having to house them in prison.” Cada said one of the things the Department of Corrections looks at in considering grant applications is the annual cost of incarceration versus how much it costs to help one person. “It’s still more reasonable than sending somebody to the Department of Corrections,” Cada said. “We’re not keeping a hardened criminal in the community. We’re keeping people in the community who are contributing to it.” Tom Shaer, a spokesman for the Department of Corrections, said the program already has demonstrated its impact on the criminal justice system. “We’re still tabulating 2013, but for part of 2011 and in 2012, the 10 sites in full implementation diverted 838 nonviolent offenders – which is the equivalent of two cell blocks of a prison,” Shaer said. “It’s an average cost of $21,500 to incarcerate an individual for a year. Of those enrolled since it began, 91 percent avoided prison altogether and did not commit another offense.” State officials have estimated the savings at more than $17 million in incarceration costs. Kane County State’s Attorney Joe McMahon said the county will see the benefit from the grant. “The research has shown the people who go back to work are less likely to find themselves back in the system for reoffending,” McMahon said. “This grant will help court services work with people who are on probation. ... We’ll all see a benefit. This is great work.”

Announce your Wedding in Celebrations Each Saturday in the Kane County Chronicle Visit KCChronicle.com/forms or Email Celebrations@KCChronicle.com or Call 877-264-2527


8LOCAL BRIEFS GENEVA – A Geneva faculty recital is set for 7 p.m. Friday at Geneva United Methodist Church, 211 S. Hamilton St., Geneva. Faculty performers will include Kevin Henrickson from Geneva Middle School North, featuring voice and guitar, and William Alles on the euphonium, coming from Geneva Middle School South. Teaching at both GMS North and South, Helen Bogda will perform violin, Linda Duneske on the cello, and

Jason Flaks with his trumpet. Leah Kamm, teaching at Williamsburg Elementary School, will sing, and Sue Kautz, who teaches at Western Avenue and Fabyan elementary schools, will perform the accordion. There will be Keith Pitner from Harrison Street and Heartland elementary schools on his trombone, Andrew Barrett from the district office on his guitar, and Julie Lawrence from Geneva High School on her cello. The cost is $5 per person or $15 per family. There will be a spread of sweets after the

performance. All proceeds are donated to the Geneva Music Boosters Scholarship Fund. For information, call Kristen Severson at 630-262-9212 or Bonnie Eich at 630-232-4663.

Academy registering students for dance class GENEVA – Registration is now open for the 2014 Sunset Dance Academy classes for ages 2 and older. Classes begin the week of Jan. 6. Sunset Dance Academy is at 710 Western Ave., Geneva. There are more than 80 nonrecital and recital

programs offered. For information, call 630-232-4542 or visit www.genevaparks.org.

Dirty Dozen Brass Band set to play in Batavia BATAVIA – The Dirty Dozen Brass Band will perform at 8 p.m. Jan. 25 at Fermilab’s Ramsey Auditorium. Fermilab is at Pine Street and Kirk Road, Batavia. The cost is $30, or $15 for ages 18 and younger. For information or reservations, visit www.fnal.gov/culture or call 630-840-2787 on weekdays.

– Kane County Chronicle

8OBITUARIES ROBERT BRUCE ELLIOTT

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. – Robert Bruce Elliott, 93, departed this life to claim his white robe and stand before the Throne of God (Rev. Chapter 7). He passed away peacefully Monday morning – Dec. 30, 2013 – at Hospice of West Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala. He was born March 14, 1920, in St. Charles. He was preceded in death by his parents, Paul and Ethel Elliott; and two sisters, Ethelyn Swanson and Audrey Pooley. Survivors include his wife of 71 years, Edith Elliott; son, David Elliott (Becky) of West Palm Beach, Fla.; daughter, Candace Elliott Denny (Milton) of Tuscaloosa; and son, William (Chad) Elliott (Kae) of Casper, Wyo.; 11 grandchildren; and many great-grandchildren. Robert Elliott was a longtime member of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. Services will be conducted by the Rev. Charles Pieplow, interim pastor of the University Lutheran Church of Tuscaloosa, at Memory Chapel Funeral Home at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4. The visitation will be one hour prior to the service. Robert was born in St. Charles on March 14, 1920. Prior to World War II, he played drums in a swing band that led him to become a radio operator (telegraph key) in the U.S. Army 106th Division. He was captured in the Battle of the Bulge

in 1944 and spent the remainder of the war in five different German prison camps. He received a Purple Heart and many different service ribbons. He was liberated in 1945 and spent most of his career in sales. He never met a stranger and made a friend out of everyone he met. A very gentle spirit with a great sense of humor, he was loved by all! He also loved Tuscaloosa and Alabama football. Pallbearers and honorary pallbearers will be family and friends. Condolences may be offered at www.memorychapelfuneralhome. com. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Gideons or to University Lutheran Church. Please sign the guest book at www.legacy.com/kcchronicle.

GLORIA G. MILLER Born: March 4, 1959; in Chicago Died: Jan. 2, 2014; in Geneva MAPLE PARK – Gloria G. Miller, 54, of Maple Park, Ill., died at 1:50 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, at Delnor Community Hospital in Geneva. She was born March 4, 1959, in Chicago to George and Bernice (Bialek) Schneider. Gloria graduated in 1981 from Northern Illinois University with her B.S. in business and human resources. She married Steven Miller in 1983 at Our Saviors Lutheran Church in Rockford. Gloria had been working at the Opportunity House in Sycamore for the past year and a half. She previously worked at Illinois Tool Works, Mooseheart and Weye-

hauser. Survivors include her husband, Steve Miller of Maple Park; brother, George (Joann) Schneider of Wheaton; sister, Patricia (Anthony) Calabrese of Elburn; three nephews; and three nieces. She was predeceased by her parents. Services will be at 11 a.m. Monday, Jan. 6, at Our Saviors Lutheran Church, with the Rev. Tony Dusso officiating. The visitation will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 5, at Olson Funeral & Cremation Services, Quiram Sycamore Chapel, 1245 Somonauk St., Sycamore, and also an hour prior to the service from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday at the church. Burial will be at Scandinavian Cemetery in Rockford. Memorials may be made to the charity of donor’s choice. To send a condolence or share a memory, visit www.olsonfh.com. Please sign the guest book at www.legacy.com/kcchronicle.

JOAN RUNDE Born: July 11, 1926 Died: Dec. 26, 2013 SAN JOSE, Calif. – Joan Runde was born July 11, 1926, to Marie (Cull) and Ed Loehnis. She passed away peacefully in San Jose, Calif., on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013, from complications from lung cancer. Raised in Wisconsin and California, she attended Chippewa Falls High School and then University of Wisconsin. She worked as a teller at the First National Bank of Madison, where she met a customer and future husband, Austin Runde. They married in 1950 at St.

Raphael’s Cathedral in Madison and had seven children: Catherine Marie, who passed at birth in 1951; Cyd Runde of St. Charles; Lisa Runde of San Jose, Calif.; Damian Runde of Montgomery; Eric Runde of Elburn; Al Runde of Batavia; and Neil Runde of Brush Prairie, Wash. She had 14 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. In 1959, Joan and Austin moved from Wisconsin to raise their family in Batavia, where Austin worked selling farm equipment. Joan worked for Illinois Bell and Fermi National Accelerator, as well as being a landlord, working until beginning her retirement in 2013, selling her last rental home. Locally, Joan was active in PTA and Cub Scouts but became a world traveler in her retirement years. She traveled to Europe in 1989 with Lisa, where they backpacked through seven countries in six weeks. She also traveled twice to Austria with friends. She took up cruising and went to Alaska, Hawaii and through the Panama Canal. In 2013, Joan moved to San Jose, Calif., to live with Lisa and pursue retirement, enjoying the oceans, mountains and especially the Redwoods. A music lover of varied interests, her favorites were Itzhak Perlman and The Rolling Stones. A lifelong student and avid reader, she liked to study politics and science and debate different viewpoints of life. A private interment is planned, with a memorial to celebrate her life being planned for March 29 in Batavia. Please sign the guest book at www.legacy.com/kcchronicle.

editorial@kcchronicle.com AURORA – Metro West Council of Government, a nonprofit organization that represents municipalities in Kane, Kendall and DeKalb counties, will host its annual Legislative Dinner from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at Gaslite Manor Banquets, 2485 Church Road in Aurora. Legislators who have confirmed their participation include state representatives Linda Chapa LaVia, Keith Farnham, Michael Fortner, Stephanie Kifowit, Robert Pritchard, Timothy Schmitz and Michael Tryon, and state senators Linda Holmes, Karen McConnaughay and Michael Noland. They will share their perspectives on the upcoming legislative session in Springfield and the challenges Illinois will face this year. They will also address three questions that represent legislative issues of importance to local governments. The cost to attend is $25 for members of Metro West and $30 for nonmembers. For information, call 630-859-1331.

8FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS Edward (John) McArdle: Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, at St. John Neumann Catholic Church. Edward will be laid to rest in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery in Geneva. James B. Naughton: Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, at St. Patrick Catholic Church, 408 Cedar St., St. Charles. Interment will be in Union Cemetery in St. Charles.

Obituary deadline The deadline for obituary notices is 4 p.m. for the next day’s edition. Obituaries can be emailed to obits@kcchronicle.com. For more information, contact news editor Al Lagattolla at alagattolla@ shawmedia.com.

• Saturday, January 4, 2014

Born: March 14, 1920; in St. Charles Died: Dec. 30, 2013; in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

KANE COUNTY CHRONICLE

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LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Local faculty to perform recital at Geneva church

Legislative Dinner set for Thursday


ST. CHARLES

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A new Dunkin’ Donuts location has been proposed for the Goody’s Restaurant building at 2057 Lincoln Highway in St. Charles. The proposal is headed to the city’s planning and development committee on Jan. 13.

New Dunkin’ Donuts possible on Route 38 ST. CHARLES – A new Dunkin’ Donuts restaurant appears headed for Route 38 in St. Charles, as the St. Charles Planning and Development Committee will hear plans to convert the building that houses Goody’s Restaurant into a two-unit building. The meeting is set for 7 p.m. Jan. 13 in the council chambers of City Hall, 2 E. Main St., St. Charles. The Goody’s building is at 2057 Lincoln Highway, which is Route 38. City planner Matt O’Rourke said the proposal calls for a minor change. Plans will call for a drive-

through for the Dunkin’ Donuts. The two businesses both would be housed in the existing building. O’Rourke said the changes would be “mostly cosmetic.” “They are not really changing anything physically about the site – some new signage, those sorts of things,” he said. It would be St. Charles’ second Dunkin’ Donuts restaurant. Another location exists at 1711 W. Main St. in St. Charles. Other Dunkin’ Donuts restaurants are in South Elgin and Batavia, and a new shop is planned for Route 47 in Elburn. The restaurants sell doughnuts, coffee, sandwiches and bagels, among other items.

8LOCAL BRIEFS Orchestra faculty benefit concert set for Sunday

Writers Workshop plans meeting for Jan. 13

ELGIN – The third annual Elgin Youth Symphony Orchestra Faculty Benefit Recital is set from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday in the Spartan Auditorium at the Elgin Community College Arts Center, 1700 Spartan Drive, Elgin. The concert is free, but tickets must be reserved in advance at tickets.elgin.edu or by calling 847-622-0300. Donations to benefit the EYSO scholarship fund will be accepted at the concert.

BATAVIA – The Batavia Public Library Writers Workshop will meet from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Jan. 13 at the library, 10 S. Batavia Ave., Batavia. Writers of all genres, high school students and adults are invited. Writers share their works and offer each other helpful criticism. Registration is not required. For information, contact workshop facilitator Frank Rutledge at weatherbone@comcast.net.

– Kane County Chronicle

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LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

LEFT: Sixyear-old Ryan Edgerton of Batavia skates at the Fox Valley Ice Arena in Geneva for an open skating session Friday morning.


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| OPINIONS

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OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Accomplishing nothing To the Editor: I’m not sure how requiring bars to pay an additional $2,300 to the city to stay open until 2 a.m. will curb over-serving. What Mayor Ray Rogina and the St. Charles City Council is proposing amounts to nothing more than extortion. And as with every other tax/fee/ mandate/permit/etc., the cost will simply be passed on to bar patrons. So, the end result is the government grows at the expense of its citizens while accomplishing nothing. Lowell Bike St. Charles

WRITING TO US The Kane County Chronicle welcomes original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the editor. Letters can be emailed to letters@kcchronicle.com, faxed to 630-444-1641 and mailed to Letters, Kane County Chronicle, 333 N. Randall Road, Suite 2, St. Charles IL 60174.

OUR VIEW

A New Year’s wish list for Springfield Welcome to 2014, an election year for statewide offices, including governor, state representatives and state senators. Obviously, with it being an election year, it will be less likely for those seeking office to say or do anything that might lose them votes. Which means it could be a long and unproductive 2014 in Springfield. Wait, sounds like 2013. And 2012. Anyway, even against all odds, we have

a wish list of things we’d like to see happen in state government this year. • Allow the “temporary” income-tax increase to expire come Jan. 1, 2015. In 2011, a lame-duck General Assembly passed personal and corporate income-tax increases to help pay off a backlog of unpaid bills. The personal-tax rate jumped to 5 percent from 3 percent. If allowed to expire, the rate will decrease to 3.75 percent in 2015.

• Squash all talk of a progressive income tax. In a progressive – or graduated – structure, higher earners pay a larger percentage of their income than lower earners. Some Democrats in Springfield are – not surprisingly – pushing for a progressive tax. However, any change from a flat tax would require amending the Illinois Constitution. • Fix Illinois’ business climate. Business-by-business

Editorial board Jim Ringness

Kathy Gresey

Al Lagattolla

Jay Schwab

negotiated deals are bad for Illinois and are unfair to other businesses, particularly small businesses, which represent a large part of the economy. Continuing to give some big employers major tax breaks while not doing the same for others is not a viable long-term solution for Illinois’ poor business climate. • We have more units of government than any other state in the nation. We could

use fewer. The Local Government Consolidation Commission, which state Rep. Jack Franks, D-Marengo, chairs, is due soon to release its report on consolidating government. We hope the commission offers substantial and meaningful ways to eliminate needless levels of government in Illinois and that the General Assembly takes steps toward enacting consolidation.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. First Amendment, U.S. Bill of Rights


8SOUND OFF I’m responding to “How is Obamacare fair?” It’s not fair. It’s not for the average person. If you are making $50,000 or $60,000 a year, you can afford your health insurance, even if you have a family of four or five. But the rest of us who have our own health insurance, since I moved here a very long time ago … we pay our own health insurance. It’s not fair at all. We have to cut back on everything else. I guess that’s what they want us to do – cut back.

Sound Off guidelines n The Kane County Chronicle’s Sound Off number is 630-845-5240. n Please speak clearly and slowly. Keep messages to a maximum of 60 seconds. n Callers may speak on topics anonymously. n Because of the volume of calls to our Sound Off line, please limit yourself to one call a week. n We will not print attacks of a personal nature or those accusing persons of crimes or illegal conduct that have not been previously published or documented. n We will not print calls commenting on signed Letters to the Editor. n We reserve the right to edit comments for obscene, libelous and otherwise inappropriate comments, as well as for space considerations. n Sound Off comments are the opinions of our readers and, as such, should not be taken as fact.

The streets of Geneva

The snow in Geneva I’m calling about the snow in Geneva. They want you to shop local. How do they expect, when you park your car, to jump over a pile of snow on a curb and sidewalk? The only way you can get in is to walk past all the parked cars to the far end, where they have it shoveled. I see no reason why they can’t keep it open. They keep talking about handicapped people. How do you expect a handicapped person, or even a regular person, to jump over those big snow piles that they have on the sidewalks next to the curb?

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They can come after you Today is the beginning of a brand new year, Jan. 1, 2014. In this year, the citizens of the United States of America are faced with mountainous spy laws and things that we cannot do. And a lot of these people supporting it don’t realize that if they support gun laws and support having drones that come into your house or into your schools, and those drones are able to be armed ... someday, they can come after you. Maybe today, just so that the government can get these

Call today for more information.

630.232.7733 www.genevaplace.org laws passed, they will say it’s only for this protection or for that protection. But remember, for every action, there’s an equal and opposite reaction. And those laws will eventually

be used against you. You really need to think about 2014 and protecting all of your freedoms – your freedom of speech, your freedom of religion and your freedom to seek medical care

Batavia and priorities I would like to know how the city of Batavia has funding to blow up two fireworks displays this year and put up a useless arch, and yet offer no aid to the independent businesses lining Wilson Street that suffered greatly during the lengthy construction project. All of the beautification will mean nothing if there are only empty storefronts lining the street. Batavia, get your priorities straight. A little bit of help will go a long way.

A warped sense of reality Last week’s Sound Off caller went too far, saying our government is the “nastiest government on the face of the Earth. ...” This person needs a reality check. First, Snowden is a traitor, plain and simple. Second, by our government’s efforts, we have successfully kept our country safer than most since 9/11. Third, Google most oppressive nations, and you will find 16 nations, 1.6 billion people, or 23 percent of the world’s population have no say in their government and face consequences if they do speak out. The irony is that our sons and daughters are fighting for the freedoms, so that this person can say we are the nastiest. We can only hope that a person with this warped sense of reality has a sphere of influence that is very small. Hopefully, he isn’t indoctrinating a family with children who would share those values. It is not what made our country as great as it is.

Criminals will obey? What a brilliant idea. The city of St. Charles, among other places, are posting signs that will prohibit the carrying of

firearms on their property. I’m sure criminals, or anyone else bent on illegal activity, will obey those signs. The reasonable thing to do would be for those to allow those who are properly licensed to carry most anywhere.

Prove me wrong The Illinois State Legislature disrespected and trashed the state constitution with their recent vote on so-called pension reform. The Illinois governor disrespected and trashed the state constitution when he signed it into law. You say, “How did they do this?” Or, “How could they do this?” Simple. They ignored the constitution that clearly states pensions cannot be diminished or impaired. Perhaps these lawmakers haven’t read the constitution, or maybe they don’t understand it, or maybe that part that state pensions cannot be diminished or impaired was redacted. Or maybe they think it doesn’t apply to them. Obviously, that’s it. The constitution doesn’t apply to state lawmakers. It only applies some of the time, all of the time or never, depending on the whims of the lawmakers. This is a Kleenex constitution, and this is what Illinois has. Illinois Supreme Court, please prove me wrong.

Where is the common sense? Can someone tell me why the Oswego School District is holding an institute day on Monday, Jan. 6? That means there is no school for students on that day. Are you kidding me? They just had two weeks off. Where is the common sense? What an inconvenience to parents who have to get sitters for their children. This is the kind of poor planning that causes people to vote against school referendums. By the way, I am a retired educator with 30 years of experience as a principal. I’ve had plenty of practice when it comes to planning a school calendar. I cannot understand the rationale behind this decision.

13

• Saturday, January 4, 2014

What is going on with the streets department in Geneva? The streets have never looked so bad. Side streets are icy. The plowing is not being done on time. It’s unsafe. Geneva was known for the best streets and best maintenance in the area. What has gone wrong?

and pay for what you need, not what the government thinks you need. Get your taxes down, and control your government. I hope everyone in 2014 has a very happy, healthy and prosperous new year. And I hope and pray that we have much less, and less intrusive, government.

LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

It’s not fair


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| LOCAL NEWS

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What to do with that Christmas tree GOOD NATURED Pam Otto “Deck the Halls” is one of those infectious Christmas songs that tells you exactly what you need to do to make your holiday festive – besides boughs of holly, you don your gay apparel, troll ancient Yuletide carols, strike the harp, join the chorus, etc. But what happens when all your decking, donning and trolling is done? Although ancient boughs of holly likely were dried and reused, or recycled into compost (or possibly composte, as the song’s roots date back to the 16th century), today’s extravagant, modern traditions bring with them an equally elaborate array of modern problems. What’s the best way to dispose of O Christmas Tree? And what about those Christmas lights? You know, the ones that, O Shoot, won’t work anymore? Thankfully, our friends at Kane County Recycles and Advanced Disposal have some easy, and earth-friendly, tips that can help put the fa-la-la back in your halls, even as you un-deck them. For those of us who prefer the look, feel and scent of a live Christmas tree, your disposal options may lie as close as your front curb. Advanced Disposal will be providing free pickup during the weeks of Jan. 6 and Jan. 13 in Batavia, Geneva and St. Charles. Other waste haulers and municipalities are offering similar services. A comprehensive list was run in the Dec. 23 issue of the Kane County Chronicle and can be found online at www. countyofkane.org/Recycling/ Pages/christmastreerecycling.aspx. This option is certainly convenient, but is it green, in an eco-friendly sense? I called Advanced Disposal and learned that the company’s trucks bring Christmas trees to the company’s transfer facility, from which they are then transported to Compost Supply (motto: Giving new life to old dirt) in Sheridan.

Photo provided

Christmas trees can be recycled, and it’s sometimes as easy as just putting them out on the curb. Not bad! For the cost of some fossil fuels and truck traffic, neither of which you pay for directly, all the good things that went into growing your holiday tree can be returned to the soil for use again ... maybe as nourishment for a new Christmas tree that still is young and growing. But what if you’re in the market for other uses for Der Tannenbaum? Although it doesn’t provide use for the whole tree, one of my favorite things to do with pine tree trunks is to slice them into “tree cookies.” Complete instructions are available at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ website (http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/ education_safety/education/ plt/activity_sheets/treeCookie.pdf) but the general idea is to let the trunk dry thoroughly, then slice with a saw to produce “cookies.” Sand and seal and you have the perfect blank canvas for ornaments, wall hangings, drink coasters or other art projects. Pine boughs left over from this project can be laid beneath acid-loving plants to provide nutrients. Speaking of pine boughs,

all those that were wound up with wire to produce fresh wreaths and garlands are not recyclable curbside. But you still can make use of them. Remove wires, ribbons and any other inorganic decorations then, as above, lay them beneath shrubs and herbaceous plants that like a little acid in their soil. Then there is the conundrum of artificial trees. Are they really a greener option for holiday décor? The same tree, used year after year, certainly is a green concept. But what happens when it’s time to retire a tired artificial ’Baum? If it’s still in usable condition, you can always list it on Craigslist or donate it at one of our area’s many fine resale shops. (But if you opt for the latter, be sure to call first, as many operations have limited storage space and only accept Christmas items in the weeks before, as opposed to after, the holiday.) Here, too, you can get creative and, instead of looking at the tree as a whole, consider its parts. Can its boughs be separated and wound into reusable wreaths or garland? Can you tie a branch or two

together to create swags for outdoor light fixtures? Possibilities are as endless, and evergreen, as your own imagination. Now, prelit artificial Christmas trees can provide their own challenges, especially when the wiredon lights start to go bad. “Monstrous hybrids,” says Jennifer Jarland, Kane County’s recycling coordinator. She gives credit for the term to “Cradle to Cradle,” a book by architect William McDonough and chemist Michael Braungart that makes a solid case for new manufacturing processes to eliminate waste altogether. With lights that are structurally integrated into the

tree, when one or the other goes bad the user has few choices other than to send the “monstrosity” to the landfill. Jarland suggests a possible solution is to just keep using the tree, even with its temperamental light strands. We agree. At Hickory Knolls, where an aging prelit tree graces our lobby, we’ve simply purchased additional lights and plugged them in on a separate circuit whenever we’ve been unable to repair sections that have gone dark. Once decorated, the supplemental strings aren’t even noticeable. The result: One 10-foot “monster” diverted from a landfill. As for strings of lights ... is it just my imagination, or are newer strands really only built to last a season or two? If you, like me, have tried replacing bulbs and fuses to no avail, Jarland offers another solution. “Christmas tree lights can be brought to our monthly electronics recycling events, or any of our permanent drop-off locations.” Electronics recycling occurs on the second Saturday of each month, from 8 a.m. to noon in the lot behind the office of the Kane County Circuit Clerk, 540 S. Randall Road, St. Charles. Locations and hours for permanent electronics dropoff locations can be found at www.countyofkane. org/Recycling/Pages/electronics/otherLocations.aspx.

• Pam Otto is the manager of nature programs and interpretive services at the Hickory Knolls Discovery Center, a facility of the St. Charles Park District. She can be reached at 630-639-7960 or potto@stcparks.org.

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Although ACC boys hoops is 1-10, it’s hard to count the Chargers out considering the program’s postseason pedigree under Nate Drye, writes sports editor Jay Schwab. PAGE 17

LOG ON TO KCCHRONICLE.COM/PREPS THIS WEEKEND FOR COVERAGE OF TODAY’S GENEVA-KANELAND BOYS BASKETBALL GAME AT THE UNITED CENTER, THE BATAVIA-SOUTH ELGIN BOYS BASKETBALL GAME AND THE ST. CHARLES EAST-EVANSTON GIRLS BASKETBALL GAME.

• Saturday, January 4, 2014

Cadets clipped MARMION’S MOMENTUM STALLS IN FOURTH QUARTER OF MATCHUP AGAINST NILES NOTRE DAME. PAGE 16 Jeff Krage for Shaw Media

Marmion’s Jordan Glasgow leans in for a shot during Friday’s game at Notre Dame in Niles.

CENTRAL TROUNCES R-B The Burlington Central girls basketball team plays at a pace of its choosing in win over Richmond-Burton. PAGE 18

DESPERATE HOUSEPETS

TALK FUELS ACC GIRLS The Aurora Central Catholic girls basketball team gets a pregame pep talk before conference win against Walther Christian. PAGE 18

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

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Photos by Jeff Krage for Shaw Media

ABOVE: Marmion’s Jake Esp goes up for a shot during Friday’s game at Notre Dame in Niles. TOP RIGHT: Marmion’s Tyler Maryanski heads toward the basket after a steal. BOTTOM RIGHT: Marmion’s Corey Friel looks to make a pass inside the paint.

NILES NOTRE DAME 62, MARMION 50

Esp’s big night not enough for Marmion By JAY SCHWAB jschwab@shawmedia.com

N

ILES – Jake Esp and the Marmion boys basketball team could practically do no wrong in the third quarter of Friday’s game at Niles Notre Dame. Once the fourth quarter began, that groundswell of momentum vanished abruptly, and so did the Cadets’ chances to complete their comeback. Notre Dame prevailed in the nonconference matchup, 62-50. A poor first half meant Marmion had a 14-point deficit to chase in the second half, and the Cadets were able to wipe it away in less than five minutes to open the third quarter. Esp capped a 16-2 Cadets third quarter surge to tie the

game, 34-all, on an inside basket with 3:18 to play in the quarter. The 6-foot-4 Sugar Grove resident scored 15 of his team-high 25 points in the quarter, going 6 for 6 from the floor and 3 for 3 from the free throw line. Perhaps most impressive was a slick, spin move along the baseline that resulted in a three-point play as Esp trimmed the deficit to four points. He showed great versatility throughout the run. “I put a lot of work last year into my moves and my shot, my mid-range shot,” Esp said. Marmion coach Ryan Paradise admired the junior forward’s performance. “We ran some things to try and get him some space, but he just had it going offensively,” Paradise said.

Notre Dame (7-7) reclaimed the lead quickly after the Cadets briefly tied it and maintained a narrow advantage the rest of the quarter, taking a 44-41 edge into the fourth. That’s when Marmion (4-9) encountered a deep and costly funk offensively, reminiscent of the game’s early stages. The Cadets came up dry offensively on each of their first six possessions of the fourth quarter, beginning with a charge call on point guard Michael Sheehan and concluding with a five-second call for a turnover. In the meantime, the Dons were scoring with regularity at the other end, ballooning their lead back to 12 points before Marmion made a last, desperate push. The Cadets mustered a

7-0 run capped by a Sheehan 3-pointer – the only made 3 for Marmion in 12 attempts – to come within 55-50 with 1:54 to play. But Notre Dame salted the game away at the free throw line, leaving Paradise to lament his team’s listless first half. “It was uninspired, it was lifeless and, in the third quarter, we flipped a switch, but you can’t do that against a good team like Notre Dame and come out of here with a win,” Paradise said. “We were down too big, too early.” Despite a steal and dunk by senior Tyler Maryanski in the closing seconds of the first half, Marmion trailed, 32-18, at the break. The Dons already had a 12-point lead at 18-6 after a long offensive rebound yielded a buzzer-beating 3-pointer by Ammar Be-

car in the first quarter. While Marmion enjoyed a banner night from Esp, Notre Dame had the night’s high scorer in lefty guard Joe Mooney, who scored 30 points. The junior’s older brother, Notre Dame graduate Matt Mooney, now plays at Air Force. “There’s a little bit of history there, there’s a little genetics there,” Notre Dame coach Tom Les said. “Matt’s home for the holidays and I had lunch with him today. I told him that one of the jobs of an older brother is to make his younger brother better than he was. He does a good job of pushing him, and Joe has been coming along and doing a nice job.” Junior guard Jordan Glasgow added eight points for the Cadets.


your source.

PREP ZONE Jay Schwab ACC’s interior woes are somewhat understandable considering the Chargers have been without 6-foot7 senior Sean Anger, who broke his collarbone during football season. Drye said Anger was his squad’s top player during the summer. “It’s been a struggle to fill in without him,” Drye said. “Hopefully, getting him back, whenever he does [return], will be a boost for us.” ACC has compounded its rebounding travails by frittering away too many possessions with turnovers. As poorly as the Chargers have played at times, it’s hard to count out ACC considering the program’s postseason pedigree under Drye. ACC has been one of the area’s most successful programs during the past decade, including regional championships in 2007-08, 2010-11 and 2011-12. Last season, the Chargers stunned powerhouse Wheaton Academy in a regional semifinal before narrowly losing in the final against St. Francis. Drye has overseen the Chargers’ rise from a program that went 8-21 his first season to one that has finished with winning records in five of the past six seasons. So this? A 1-10 start to the season? The fiery Drye’s patience certainly is being tested. “But I’m sure it’s no more frustrating for me than any of the guys,” Drye said. “We’re in the same boat. We all want to get to the same

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place, so I’m not going to get down on them if they’re giving effort. … I’m not going to scream and yell and belittle them for doing the best they can at that moment in time. A lot of them are still learning how to play and what-not.” Drye noted that the Chargers’ top two scorers against Oak Lawn, Mac Cowen and Brett Czerak, both are freshmen. Sophomores Evan Schuetz and Nick Faltz also have had strong moments. A team with so many youngsters typically makes big strides as the season unfolds. That’s the ACC way, anyhow, which could be alive and well come March, no matter what the Chargers’ record says now.

• Jay Schwab is sports editor of the Kane County Chronicle. He can be reached at 630-845-5382 or jschwab@ shawmedia.com.

Temple at UCF, 3 p.m., ESPNews Oklahoma State at Kansas State, 3 p.m., ESPNU Virginia at Florida St., 4 p.m., ESPN2 Pro basketball Atlanta at Bulls, 7 p.m., WGN Women’s college basketball DePaul at Creighton, 4 p.m., FS1 SUNDAY’S SCHEDULE College football GoDaddy.com Bowl, Arkansas St. vs. Ball St., at Mobile, Ala., 8 p.m., ESPN Men’s college basketball Northwestern at Michigan, 11 a.m., BTN Purdue at Minnesota, 1:30 p.m., BTN Iowa at Wisconsin, 7 p.m., BTN Pro football Playoffs, AFC Wild Card, San Diego at Cincinnati, 12:05 p.m., CBS Playoffs, NFC Wild Card, San Francisco at Green Bay, 3:40 p.m., Fox Pro hockey San Jose at Blackhawks, 7 p.m., WGN, NBCSN AHL, Rockford at Wolves, 3 p.m., WCUU

• Saturday, January 4, 2014

The Aurora Central Catholic boys basketball program has turned in some thrilling postseasons despite carrying unimpressive records into March. The Chargers might be taking that formula to an extreme this season. Veteran ACC coach Nate Drye’s team won only once in the 2013 portion of its schedule, and will lug an unsightly 1-10 record into Tuesday’s game at Joliet Catholic. Past Chargers teams have found another gear after being around .500 during the regular season. But ACC has a lot of work to do to sniff .500 Nate Drye this time. “We don’t have to be good until March, and so until then, it’s just an improvement time,” Drye said. “The kids have gotten better. We’ve done it before. They just have to get better. “One of the few nice things about where we are is it’s easy to see improvements for us. You see kids getting better. We just have to do it on a more consistent basis.” ACC picked up its lone win against a Milwaukee opponent at the recent East Aurora Holiday Tournament, and almost nabbed win No. 2 on Monday before falling in overtime to Oak Lawn in the tournament finale. Mostly, though, the Chargers have been pushed around this season. “Our biggest issue by far and away has been rebounding,” Drye said. “We’ve struggled to defensive rebound and keep people off the glass. When we get stops, they’re instantly negated by giving up the offensive rebound, so that’s hurt us a lot.”

TODAY’S SCHEDULE College football BBVA Compass Bowl, Vanderbilt vs. Houston, at Birmingham, Ala., noon, ESPN NCAA, FCS, championship, North Dakota St. vs. Towson, at Frisco, Texas, 1 p.m., ESPN2 Pro football Playoffs, AFC Wild Card, Kansas City at Indianapolis, 3:35 p.m., NBC Playoffs, NFC Wild Card, New Orleans at Philadelphia, 7:10 p.m., NBC Hockey AHL, Iowa at Wolves, 7 p.m., WCUU Men’s college basketball Nebraska at Ohio State, 11 a.m., BTN Cincinnati at Memphis, 11 a.m., ESPN2 Michigan St. at Indiana, 1 p.m., CBS Butler at Xavier, 1 p.m., WPWR Penn State at Illinois, 1:15 p.m., BTN Richmond at Florida, 2 p.m., CSN Creighton at Seton Hall, 2 p.m., FS1 Duke at Notre Dame, 3 p.m., CBS

17

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Struggling Chargers in it for the long haul

WHAT TO WATCH


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

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GIRLS BASKETBALL: BURLINGTON CENTRAL 51, RICHMOND-BURTON 28

Burlington Central girls trounce R-B By JARED BIRCHFIELD editorial@kcchronicle.com BURLINGTON – Given the frigid weather conditions Friday night, the Burlington Central girls basketball team could not be blamed if it was anxious to complete the game against Richmond-Burton and go home. Central coach Mark Smith kept reminding the team during the first half that a calmer tempo was needed if the team wanted to leave the gym with a victory. Central found the right pace of play and defeated Richmond, 51-28, in the Big

Northern East Conference game. “We were going a million miles an hour,” said Smith, who kept yelling “Slow down” from the sidelines during the first two quarters. “I know they are anxious and hyped up. They love to play. When you press, you kind of get into that hectic rhythm, so it’s kind of hard to slow it down. We adjusted well.” “We got to work on that, slowing down,” said Central sophomore Samantha Pryor, who led all scorers with 19 points. “Slow down and get better looks at the basket.” Central’s pressing defense

forced three Richmond turnovers in the opening minutes of the game that yielded three quick baskets. Central (12-2, 2-0 Big Northern East) led, 207, after the first quarter. “We are preaching to them that quick shots aren’t good and I thought we took a lot of quick shots [in the first half],” Smith said. “When they go in, you get a nice little run, but if they don’t go in then you have to play defense for another 30 seconds.” Richmond-Burton, which had not played a game since Dec. 20, found its groove in the second quarter. R-B was able to close the gap to seven

points with five minutes to play in the half on a Jessica Guenther layup. R-B (5-7, 0-2) outscored Central, 10-9 in the second quarter and trailed 2917 at halftime. “I thought we did a really good of shaking off the rust,” Richmond-Burton coach Courtney Ludois said. “I don’t think it took us too long to get back in our rhythm so that was good to see.” “We kind of go through spurts of energy,” added R-B’s leading scorer, Hannah Koenig, referring to her team’s second quarter play, “When our energy is up, that is working for us.”

Koenig had nine points on the night. Central found its rhythm in the third quarter with an 11-3 run that started and ended with Samantha Pryor’s 3-pointers. Central doubled up Richmond-Burton, 42-21, by the end of the third quarter. “When we were patient, we got wide open looks inside,” Smith said. “A few other times we went inside and kicked it out for a wide open three.” Shelby Holt scored nine points for Central while teammate Samantha Cruz added six.

GIRLS BASKETBALL: AURORA CENTRAL CATHOLIC 47, WALTHER CHRISTIAN 31

Pregame pep talk has quite the effect on ACC girls By JAKE POWERS jpowers@shawmedia.com AURORA – The Aurora Central Catholic girls basketball team met with former Chargers players before its Friday night game against Walther Christian to talk some basketball. The advice that the alumni bestowed on the current team seems to have taken an immediate effect. ACC beat Walther Christian, 47-31, in what junior guard Jordyn Sundberg said was an effort inspired by the team’s pregame conversation. “Before the game started we had a bunch of alumni come in and talk to us and that meant a lot,” Sundberg said. “With them coming in to talk to us, it showed that we needed to play for them and play for each other and really come together as a team.” ACC (8-6, 2-1 SCC Blue) clearly took the push to play team basketball to heart. The Chargers allowed only two Walther Christian points in the third quarter to take command of the game and build a strong lead. The key for ACC in the

“Before the game started we had a bunch of alumni come in and talk to us and that meant a lot. With them coming in to talk to us, it showed that we needed to play for them and play for each other and really come together as a team.” Jordyn Sundberg Aurora Central Catholic guard third quarter was shutting down Walther Christian’s Dana Turner, who had scored 13 points in the first half and appeared poised to continue the effort into the third quarter. ACC coach Mark Fitzgerald knew that his team had to make adjustments defensively in order to slow down Turner and Walther Christian (3-10, 0-3 SCC Blue). “We knew we would sacrifice the outside shot for the dribble drive and we knew that she’s a very excellent player, but, you take that away, it takes away a lot of her game,” Fitzgerald said. “So we switched it back to zone and mixed up the zones and the kids for the most part did a really good job. We got some key charges on her, and that was really good to see.”

Sundberg, who drew one of the offensive fouls on Turner, said that the game rested on how well the Chargers would bounce back defensively in the second half. “That was our game plan the whole time to stop [Turner] and as you could see, we couldn’t really do that [in] the first half,” Sundberg said. “Once we realized that we just needed to step in front of her and take those charges, that’s what we ended up doing.” Sundberg opened up the third quarter with a steal and took it all the way to the hoop for an easy layup to put ACC up, 30-21. Junior forward Natalie Droeske added a layup, and freshman center Taylor Harazin tacked on two free throws to account for all the scoring the Chargers would

get in the third quarter. The Broncos were scoreless until the final seconds of the quarter, when Turner put in a contested layup to move the score to 34-23 at the end of the period. The six points that ACC scored in the third quarter were all that it would need. Turner scored six points in the final period for the Broncos, but ACC’s Gabi Alfaro countered with seven points of her own to prevent any sort of comeback. Kali Soris also scored five points in the fourth quarter for ACC. Fitzgerald praised the play of Sundberg, even though most of her contributions could not be found on a stat sheet.

“She has come on unbelievably strong,” Fitzgerald said. “We’ve been preaching about using the proper hand to make the steals, and she came up huge today for us. I mean she is the reason we won that game. A lot of good efforts everywhere, but she was key to us today.” Alfaro (10), Soris (9), Alex Horton (8) and Sundberg (6) rounded out the top scorers for the Chargers. Walther Christian’s Turner finished with a game-high 21 points. Fitzgerald sees the game as a turning point for ACC, which has had an inconsistent start to its 2013-14 campaign. “Hopefully this is the start of something good here,” Fitzgerald said.

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They tried to surprise me with this, and I guess I kind of knew back at the state

ITCCOA HALL OF FAMER MIKE POWERS

cross country meet. They tried to surprise me with all this, and it just didn’t work out. The Hall of Fame committee got together and I guess the middle of November, I actually found out. ... I’m very excited to be part of this Hall of Fame. We’re a fairly young association, and I’m very humbled to be part of that elite group.

Were you expected to feign surprise, then? In the past, we’ve never tried to surprise anybody, but I wasn’t expecting this at all. I’m just two years out of being president of the association, and it usually

TUESDAY Boys basketball: Mooseheart vs. Gage Park at United Center, TBA; Glenbard West at St. Charles East, 7:15 p.m.; Geneva at South Elgin, 7:15 p.m.; Aurora Central Catholic at Joliet Catholic, 7 p.m. Girls basketball: St. Charles

Yeah, it’s all gone so fast, it’s seemed like. I’ve done a lot at the high school level, some at the college level. I’d like to do more at the college level. We’ll see where it goes. Right now, I’m kind of focused on the mentoring program that goes on with our officials. We’re trying to work our IHSA officials with USATF officials, that’s kind of where I’m hanging the hat right now. There’s a clinic we started five years ago that’s coming up at St. Charles East on Jan. 25 that’s trying to target first-, second- and thirdyear officials. ... We’re trying to find ways to keep our officials, to get them track meets. We’re trying to ask ADs, will you hire a second official? .. It’s not like football

Do you feel like you’ve seen about every corner of Illinois track? Came from a small high school [downstate Oakland] and it kind of evolved. Everything kind of happens for a reason. I guess you could say I’ve found something I’m very excited about, very passionate about. You go back 10 years ago, 15 years ago when I got involved in the association, I’ve gotten more involved. ... It’s the best thing I’ve ever done is join that association and become a leader.

What spurred you to track officiating? I didn’t see myself as a track official years ago. I kind of enjoyed being a track coach. It kind of worked out that one day at at track meet at St. Charles, I was a timer. I was a little bored as a coach and I found as an official, there’s always something to

do. This was back in 1984. I go, ‘This is a no-brainer.’ I had a couple opportunities to get back into track coaching. I was already coaching football and basketball and had a family and went with the track officiating, then.

How many hats do you wear at given meets? Most of our officials think they’re going to be just a starter. … You have to know everything about everything, that’s what we’re trying to get across to our new officials. … When I’m not on the track starting at the state track meet, I’m in the pole vault pit [for the boys].

You did the Buck Drach shuffle, going from St. Charles East to West Aurora. Coincidence? Buck asked me to go with him, to coach football there. This is my eighth year there and Buck’s retired from teaching and coaching. I’ll be retired from teaching but not from coaching. I’m pretty excited to be getting back in the Upstate Eight at West Aurora.

PREP ROUNDUP

PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Boys basketball: South Elgin at Batavia, 6 p.m.; St. Charles East at Evanston, 7 p.m.; Geneva vs. Kaneland, at United Center, 2 p.m.; Marmion at Buffalo Grove, 4:30 p.m. Girls basketball: Evanston at St. Charles East, 6 p.m.; Rosary at Plano, 3 p.m. Wrestling: Batavia at Elgin, 5:30 p.m.; St. Charles East at Waubonsie Valley Quad, 10 a.m.; Geneva at South Elgin, 10 a.m.; Marmion at Cheesehead Invite, (Kaukauna, Wis.), 8 a.m. MONDAY Girls gymnastics: Batavia at Waubonsie Valley, 6 p.m. Girls bowling: Jacobs at St. Charles East, 4:30 p.m.

To what extent does your career blur together?

where you have five officials or basketball where you have three officials. We’re happy to get one and glad to get two.

East at Streamwood, 7:15 p.m.; Marian Central at Aurora Central Catholic, 7:30 p.m.; Burlington Central at Marengo, 7:15 p.m.; St. Francis at Guerin Prep, 7 p.m.; Chicago Christian at Rosary, 7 p.m.; Yorkville at Kaneland, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Stillman Valley at Burlington Central, 6 p.m.; Immaculate Conception at St. Francis, 5 p.m. Boys bowling: Geneva at Streamwood, 4 p.m.; St. Charles East at St. Charles North, 4 p.m. Girls bowling: St. Charles East at Elgin, 4 p.m.; St. Charles North at Streamwood, 4 p.m.; Kaneland at Sycamore, 4 p.m. WEDNESDAY Boys basketball: Chicago Bulls Academy at St. Francis, 7:30 p.m. Girls bowling; Metea Valley at Geneva, 4 p.m.; Kaneland at La Salle-Peru, 4 p.m. Girls gymnastics: Batavia at Geneva, 6 p.m.; St. Charles North at Metea/ Waubonsie Valley, 6 p.m.

Burlington Central handles Harvard in conference play KANE COUNTY CHRONICLE HARVARD – The Burlington Central boys basketball team earned a Big Northern Conference East road win, topping Harvard on Friday, 60-47. Sean Fitzgerald scored 15 points and Duncan Ozburn added 14 points to pace the Rockets (10-4, 2-1 Big Northern Conference East). “I thought we played pretty well,” Central coach Brett Porto said. “I would have liked to see us be a little bit better decision-makers in the fourth quarter. … But other than that, we moved the ball pretty well and were able to pressure the ball pretty nice and create some quick buckets [in transition]. Overall, it was a pretty good effort for us.” The Rockets led, 35-27, at halftime.

WRESTLING Buffalo Grove Quad: Geneva

defeated Proviso West and Buffalo Grove but fell to Grant. The Vikings’ Austin Chaon (170 pounds) and Alex Crowe (160 pounds) had the lone Geneva wins in the Grant match. Richmond-Burton Quad: Kane-

land defeated Richmond-Burton and Woodstock but lost to Mundelein. Matthew Redman (126 pounds), Austin Parks (160) and Tom Price (170) won two matches apiece for Kaneland.

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• Saturday, January 4, 2014

When did you learn of your induction?

Weekend Chit-chat with

takes a bit longer than that to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. … About 10 members of my family were going to be there, but with the poor weather conditions, just my brother showed up. He’s from Le Roy.

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Batavia resident Mike Powers gained induction into the Illinois Track & Cross Country Officials (ITCCOA) Hall of Fame in a ceremony in Bloomington last month. ITCCOA brass tried to make the move a surprise, but Powers proved to be ahead of the curve. A track official since 1984 – a year in which he moved on from Morris to St. Charles High – Powers began his teaching and coaching career in Pecatonica in 1977, and has been at West Aurora since 2006. He plans to retire as a math teacher at the end of the school year but remain as a Blackhawks assistant coach in charge of the offensive line and special teams. He’ll always be game to talk track, as he did with Kane County Chronicle sports reporter Kevin Druley in the latest edition of the Weekend Chit-chat. Here’s an edited transcript:


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| SPORTS

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How does Emery rate as Bears general manager? In the eyes of many, Phil Emery did not inherit a particularly tough act to follow as general manager of the Bears from Jerry Angelo. But history is not always fair in how it treats its subjects. In 11 seasons as the Bears GM, Angelo won four NFC North (Central in 2001) titles and one NFC Championship (2006). Angelo drafted eventual Pro Bowlers Lance Briggs, Charles Tillman, Tommie Harris, Nathan Vashar, Matt Forte and Devin Hester, but that’s not a lot to show for 10 drafts. Angelo had as many misses (Adam Archuletta, Orlando Pace) as he did hits (Reuben Brown, John Tait) in veteran free agency and eventually his tenure was recognized mainly for his draft busts. Emery arrived shortly after the 2011 season with a clear mandate to upgrade the talent in every area of the Bears roster. How has he done so far? It is unfair and inaccurate to try and judge a college draft class in fewer than two years, but reasonable to value veteran moves at the end of a full season. Emery’s first big move was to trade two third-round draft choices to the Miami Dolphins for Brandon Marshall and he clearly knocked it out of the park. Marshall has proven to be one of the three or four best wideouts in football and he’s brought none of the offfield baggage with him that haunted his stays in Denver and Miami. Score the Marshall trade an A+. The 2012 NFL free agent class included quarterback Jason Campbell, running back Michael Bush, special teamers Blake Costanzo and Eric Weems, wide receiver Devin Thomas and defensive backs Kelvin Hayden and Jonathan Wilhite. Bush was strong behind Forte in 2012 but disappointed this year and Kelvin

BEARS INSIDER Hub Arkush Hayden performed well at the nickel in 2012 before spending 2013 on injured reserve. Costanzo and Weems have been OK and Thomas and Wilhite failed to make the team. That group is a C+ at best. The 2012 draft and undrafted rookie free agent class can now be evaluated after its second season. And, if anything, it resembles an Angelo draft. Trading up to get wide receiver Alshon Jeffery in the second round looks great, but that’s about it and that’s a problem. Defensive lineman Shea McClellin has disappointed, cornerback Isaiah Frey inherited the nickel from Hayden as pretty much the only choice and was OK at best most of the time, and offensive lineman James Brown made the team but failed to dress for a game this season. A grade of C on Emery’s first draft is probably kind. The 2013 veteran free agent class, including Jermon Bushrod, Martellus Bennett, Matt Slauson, James Anderson and D.J. Williams looks like a B+ or possibly even an A if Bushrod, Bennett and Slauson take another step forward in 2014. The 2013 draft class yielded four starters in Kyle Long, Jordan Mills, Jon Bostic and Khaseem Greene, backups Marquess Wilson and Cornelius Washington, and free agents Michael Ford, Zach Minter and Demontre Hurst. This group shows real promise, but is a year away from being evaluated. Emery took over an 8-8 club, improved to 10-6, fired his coach and then backslid to 8-8 this year. All of that serves as the backdrop for this offseason, and the likelihood that the roster he takes to Bourbonnais this July will most likely

define Emery as the Bears general manager. He has an offense that is ready to win right now with two of the most important pieces, Forte and Marshall, rapidly approaching the point in their careers where NFL backs and receivers can decline quickly. His defense needs a complete overhaul and he has precious little time to get it done. Emery’s off to a good start by re-signing Robbie Gould, Tim Jennings and Slauson and he’s staked his future on Jay Cutler. With the Cutler gamble, Emery’s 2014 veteran free agent and draft classes have to hit to keep the wolves away from his door.

• Hub Arkush covers the Bears for Shaw Media and HubArkush.com. Write to him at harkush@shawmedia. com.

Offense shows improvement While any club can always get better, statistically the Bears made a quantum leap forward on offense in 2013 and it’s hard to find areas demanding improvement. They finished eighth in total offense, fifth passing, fourth protecting the quarterback and second in points per game. Their weakest areas were running the football, where they were 16th, and kickoff return average, where they were also 16th. That does not bode well for the return of Devin Hester.

1

2

On defense, the Bears’ numbers are a different story. They finished 30th in total defense, 32nd in yards per play, 32nd against the run, 26th against the pass, 26th in sacks, 25th in third-down

efficiency and 30th in points allowed. The Bears were 11th in turnover/takeaway ratio at +5, and tied for 13th in takeaways with 28. Penalties were a problem for the Bears with 98 for the season for 708 yards against 69 penalties by their opponents for 647 yards. The Bears also had 230 yards nullified by penalties while their opponents lost just 127.

3

Offensive tackle Jermon Bushrod and tight end Martellus Bennett led the Bears with seven penalties each. Cornerbacks Charles Tillman and Zack Bowman each had six penalties and defensive lineman Corey Wootton and wide receiver Alshon Jeffery each had five.

More To read how youth will dictate Bears’ defensive change, turn to PAGE 24.

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

22

By JOE COWLEY Chicago Sun-Times Carlos Boozer was sidelined with a sore right knee Friday and didn’t practice. His teammate’s reactions to that news? They didn’t flinch. Welcome to Bulls basketball 2013-14, where an empty training room means there must have been a bomb scare. “Everyone is back now, so we have to get going,” reserve big man Taj Gibson said. “It’s that time of year. As a matter of fact, we’re past due.” Injuries have been a big reason why. Obviously Derrick Rose is lost for the season with right knee surgery, but this was the first week

one is back now,” Thibodeau said after the Friday practice. “So that’s the important thing, to keep putting the work in that’s Carlos Taj Tom necessary to win. Boozer Gibson Thibodeau And I think we’re moving in the right in a while that everyone else direction. I think we’ve imwas upright, healthy and proved in a lot of areas. We playing. know we have a long way to And while the news on go and there are a number of Boozer was a bit of a sur- things we have to do better. prise, it wasn’t believed to be We have to continue to take anything major, according to it step by step. coach Tom Thibodeau. “I think you can’t start What is major these days looking down the road or beis starting to put consistent hind at what may have been wins together for a group missed. You have to concent h a t h a s u n d e r a c h i e v e d trate on your improvement since Opening Night in Mi- a n d m o v e f o r w a r d f r o m ami, healthy or not. there. Now that we have ev“You just hit on it – every- eryone, it allows you to get

into a rhythm both offensively and defensively.” And besides that, looking back would only be a reminder of the nightmare that has plagued this team since Rose first tore his left anterior cruciate ligament in the 2012 playoffs. Rose hasn’t been the same player since, and the Bulls haven’t been the same team. Plantar fasciitis, spinal taps gone wild, groins, backs, elbows, pick a body part and it’s likely broken down on a current player on the roster. This week, however, there was some normalcy. Life without Rose, but all the other pieces back, now that Luol Deng’s Achilles soreness was behind him. That’s why Bulls players have been talking about

their place in the standings at 13-18, as well as being able to push to a playoff spot, and then who knows. “Yeah, I think the fact we’ve been through it,” Thibodeau said of his current core remaining confident they can make a playoff run. “Now we didn’t have all the injuries early on like we did this year, so that’s different. But I think there’s a belief that now with everyone back we can be successful. But we have to put the work into it. You can’t skip the work part of it. “The work part together is the important thing. And I like where we are right now. I like that guys feel good. Hopefully we can remain healthy and just move forward from there.”

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Powers inducted into ITCCOA Hall of Fame

St. Charles Wildfire boys travel basketball team captures trophy

8SPORTS NEIGHBORS BULLETIN BOARD Geneva Baseball Registration open Registration for the 2014 Geneva Baseball spring season is now open. Geneva Baseball’s youth baseball program is for players ages 5 to 17, and

leagues emphasize skill development, sportsmanship and teamwork. To register or learn more about Geneva Baseball, visit genevabaseball.com.

– Kane County Chronicle

Recovery is everywhere.

Photo provided

Batavia resident Mike Powers stands with Illinois Track and Cross Country Officials Association Hall of Fame chairman Bill Bulat. Powers was inducted into the Hall of Fame on Dec. 14. “The Hall of Fame Award is for persons who have contributed to the benefit of track and field in the state of Illinois,” said Bill Bulat, ITCCOA Hall of Fame chairman. Powers has been involved in track and field as an athlete, coach and track official since 1967. Powers has officiated at high-profile track events, including championship meets for USA Track and Field, the NCAA and the Illinois High School Association.

Dedicated to the prevention, intervention and treatment of addictive behaviors.

• Saturday, January 4, 2014

Photo provided

The St. Charles Wildfire fifth grade travel basketball team captured the Great Wolfe Shootout Championship Trophy in Wisconsin Dells on Dec. 21. The team won four games, the first against Middleton, Wis., 36-26, second game against Wisconsin Dells, 54-23, third game against McFarland, Wis., 34-22, and the championship game against Lodi, Wis., 46-26. The team is coached by Tom Craven and assistant coaches Tom Locascio and Scott Mortensen. Front row from left to right: Tommy Craven and Nick DeMarco. Back row left to right: Andrew Olson, Bennett Mortensen, Colton Sanchez, Martin Didier, Sam Wade and Jack Locascio.

23

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014 *

| SPORTS

24

Youth will dictate Bears’ defensive change By ADAM L. JAHNS Chicago Sun-Times As fascinating as a move to a 3-4 defense might be after years of being in Lovie Smith’s Tampa-2 defense, there were no promises made by the Bears’ brain trust – general manager Phil Emery and coach Marc Trestman – that it would happen. What was promised is that the Bears’ defense will experience an influx of youth, whether it’s expanded roles for current second- or third-year players or bolstering their defensive ranks through the draft. The youth, ultimately, will decide whether a schematic change is best. “I think if we draft heavily towards defense, we’re going to have a younger defensive team, given that we brought in two young linebackers and [a] defensive end this year,” Emery said. “Given that we picked up [defensive end] David Bass as an extra draft choice for want of a better word. A lot

“I think if we draft heavily towards defense, we’re going to have a younger defensive team, given that we brought in two young linebackers and [a] defensive end this year.” Phil Emery Bears’ general manager of the depth players that we have right now are young, so given that, with the draft, depending on who we sign as a [unrestricted free agent], we’re not going to necessarily go after an older player. We may. [Defensive tackle] Jeremiah Ratliff played well for us and we certainly want to entertain that discussion with him. So there will be a blend, but our overall age as a defense will be younger.” This is where it gets intriguing. Bass said this season that the Oakland Raiders originally drafted him to be a 3-4 outside linebacker. Ratliff was a Pro Bowl nose tackle in the Dallas Cowboys’ 3-4 defense.

The two young linebackers? Jon Bostic played in a hybrid defense at Florida that he compared to what the Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots run. Khaseem Greene played linebacker in a system at Rutgers that mimicked some 3-4 alignments. Even more compelling is that Trestman and Emery indicated that defensive end Shea McClellin could be making a switch to linebacker. Emery also suggested that free agent Corey Wootton, who played defensive tackle and end because of all the injuries, could fit into a 3-4 defense, as “a guy that transcends scheme

for us.” Emery said he expects to continue contract talks with the 26-year-old. So, where does this leave Cover-2 staples, cornerback Charles Tillman (a free agent) or defensive end Julius Peppers (who is under contract for two more years)? Or Lance Briggs, the leader of the Bears defense? Or even linebacker D.J. Williams, who played in a 3-4 defense in Denver and was commended for his limited play this season by Emery? “We’re going to have to draft to get younger,” Emery said. “It doesn’t have anything to do with Tillman, Williams or Lance Briggs.” Peppers’ future with the Bears, though, is at precarious point with him having a cap hit over $18 million in 2014 and his 2013 season not worth such a commitment. Emery said Peppers remains under contract and that he’s proud he’s a Bear, but added, “We will work through each and every player on our squad to determine where

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we’re going with him.” Whatever happens, veteran cornerback Tim Jennings, with a new four-year deal in hand, will be part of it. He wouldn’t object to being part of 3-4 defense or something similar. “It’s definitely something we could handle, if he can just get the right guys in the system,” Jennings said. “They’ve got a plan about it and they want me to be a part of it.” And although a youth movement may lead to the departures of some long-time teammates, Jennings understands the realities of free agency and what happens after down seasons. “I definitely don’t think it’ll hurt,” Jennings said. “This is a franchise that would like to continue to grow and make some improvement. I think you have to get younger. You can’t be like a mid-30s veteran team. You have to bring guys in there to get the job done, and to be able to carry that legacy for a long period of time.”


weekendlife Kane County Chronicle • Saturday-Sunday, Jan. 4-5, 2014 • Page 25 • KCChronicle.com

Why I let my kids handle a rifle, and why I did, too My brother approached on his ATV. “Hey, Noah, you wanna jump on?” He offered, gesturing gamely toward the seat behind him. Noah grinned. “Sure,” I said, “If you’ve got a helmet.” I winced. “Sure, back at the house,” he replied. He did a 180 and led the way back to his gorgeous home, deep in the south-Georgia woods. “Thanks Mom. I’m gonna have to turn in my man-card now,” my 15-yearold said as we followed. I almost felt sorry for him. Sometimes I really hate this part of my job, the one that requires that I be mindful of striking a healthy balance between safety and adventure. (You may recall that three years ago, when I took Noah and his buddies skiing, I showed them how to ski off the jumps. Yes, we all wore helmets, and yes, I got more air than any of them, but I digress.) If you’re lucky, you and your children also got to visit with extended family over the holidays. If you’re really lucky, like I was, your kids’ aunts and uncles actually looked forward to hanging out with them. My brother taught Noah how to use his ATV, and my fishing-obsessed sister-in-law generously volunteered to take him fishing

TALES FROM THE MOTHERHOOD Jennifer DuBose with her one morning off the coast (oh my, never before have I been treated to such a fish-fry!). They also asked if I had any objection to my kids learning to shoot a .22-caliber rifle. Whoa. That one stopped me in my tracks. They’d be aiming for cans, not critters, but still, adventuresome as I am, handling firearms is way outside my comfort zone. I imagine you bumped into the edges of your comfort zone, too, in one way or another, if you got a chance to hang with family over the holidays. It happens. I could have said no. To his great credit, my brother didn’t put me on the spot in front of my kids. That was cool. Still, I admit, it was hard for me, as I truly wish guns had never been invented. After some reflection I said yes. Like it or not, in our well-armed society – whether it involves friends who hunt or some other circumstance

– our kids may someday be faced with a situation involving guns, and I decided that I’d rather my kids’ first exposure include a lesson in handling them safely by someone I trust, instead. (This conundrum reminds me about how I feel about sex education. They’ll learn it all, one way or another and from many sources, but I’m glad that the first – and most oft-heard – voice my children hear on the subject is mine.) My brother made sure the kids knew to stand behind the person holding the gun and taught them the importance of using the safety, among other things. Whether they’re interested in hunting or not, I know that my kids, like most, are naturally curious and may be tempted to see what guns are all about, if given the opportunity (unless guns are locked up completely away from them, where they’ll never stumble upon them, they have the opportunity), and I wanted my children to consider the enormous power and responsibility that comes with handling one – and they did. Holly wasn’t game but, like Noah, I was also curious to see how it felt to shoot a real gun. In spite of expert coaching, I never hit the cans. I came close, once, but all I hit was dirt. (When it occurred to me that I might be harm-

ing the little ones living there, I decided I was done. But that’s me.) Because accidents happen, I won’t allow my kids to touch firearms again, but I am grateful we all had this one opportunity. I actually hope they’ll choose to never use them again, but when they’re adults, they’ll have to decide for themselves. I’ll be honest, I don’t know if I made the right choice in allowing them this experience, but it felt right in my gut. One new mom I know put it best, as she considered another conundrum, that of how best to care for her newborn: “It’s mind blowing … every decision seems like the most important thing ever, and there’s never really a ‘right’ choice. I suppose this is what parenting is, though. Right?” Right. We may lose a lot of sleep thinking things through, but it’s worth doing. We learn, as this new mom already has, that there’s really no onesize-fits-all way to solve parenting questions. You’ve got to go with the choice that settles best in your gut. This one, for me, felt right.

• Jennifer DuBose lives in Batavia with her husband, Todd, and their two children, Noah and Holly. Contact her at editorial@kcchronicle.com.

Musical duo, February Sky, to perform folk concert Jan. 10 KANE COUNTY CHRONICLE editorial@kcchronicle.com GENEVA – The annual Evening of Folk Music concert, sponsored by the Geneva Park District, will continue at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, when folk singers February Sky return with its multi-instrumental professional folk act. The performance will take place at the Unitarian Universalist Society of Geneva, 102 S. James St., Geneva. February Sky, of Trout

Lake, Mich., and formerly of Campton Hills, will feature traditional singer and Celtic guitarist Phil Cooper with songwriter and singer Susan Urban. Cooper sings and plays his own arrangements of traditional songs and tunes on a six-string guitar and cittern, and he also interprets a number of carefully chosen songs from the best of modern folk song writers. Urban is a writer of story songs and humorous “slice of

life” songs. She accompanies her singing on guitar, a six-string banjo, a mountain dulcimer and hand-percussion instruments. February Sky will present a combination of old and new songs addressing a wide range of human experience, vocal harmony and instrumentation. The folk music concert is free and open to the public. For more information, call 630-232-4542 or visit www.genevaparks.org.

Provided photo

Celtic guitarist Phil Cooper (left) and singer Susan Urban of February Sky will perform Jan. 10 at the Unitarian Universalist Society of Geneva.


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| WEEKEND LIFE

26

ECC to present generations of pianists in American Grands XIX which applies classical music styles to the Lady Gaga hit “Bad Romance.” Per American Grands tradition, all three performances will open with the “Star Spangled Banner” and close with “Star and Stripes Forever.” “It’s inspiring to see pianists of all ages come together to perform as a group and celebrate their love of this instrument,” said music director Larry Dieffenbach in a news release. “We have literally hundreds of performers play at these concerts, and most of our pieces feature 24 pianists, two per piano, on stage playing together. This year we’re playing with that format a bit, and we’ll be doing a piece that will feature

KANE COUNTY CHRONICLE editorial@kcchronicle.com ELGIN – During the American Grands XIX on Jan. 25, more than 400 pianists of all ages and skill levels will grace the stage in the Elgin Community College Arts Center’s Blizzard Theatre in Elgin. Performances will take place at 1, 4 and 7 p.m. in the Blizzard Theatre, located in Building H at 1700 Spartan Drive. This season’s performance pieces range from classical works by Handel and Beethoven to more contemporary works, including a piece entitled “Lady Gaga Fugue” arranged by Giovanni Dettori,

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36 players on stage at once, three per piano. It’s a truly amazing thing to witness. ” The production, which will include a total of 462 pianists, is sponsored by Cordogan’s Pianoland in Geneva. Cordogan’s, the event’s sponsor since its inception, provides and maintains the 12 grand pianos that grace the rgbstock.com photo stage at the annual event. The Elgin Community College Arts Centre in Elgin will host the AmeriTickets to American Grands can Grands XIX, featuring more than 400 pianists of all ages and skill XIX cost $24 for adults and $15 levels, on Jan. 25. for children ages 12 and younger. Tickets for all performances in the ECC Arts Center are available online at tickets. ALL PRO elgin.edu or at the ECC Box Office, located in the arts center. To purchase tickets by phone, call 847-622-0300.

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

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Louis Braille (1809-1852), Braille alphabet inventor; Patty Loveless (1957), singer-songwriter; Michael Stipe (1960), singer-songwriter; Dave Foley (1963), actor/comedian; Julia Ormond (1965), actress. – United Feature Syndicate

HOROSCOPE By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

Why the graphic novel belongs in the classroom By MICHAEL CAVNA The Washington Post

TODAY – If you are not careful, indecisiveness will cause stagnation. Lack of confidence in your abilities may make you overly impressionable. Surround yourself with inspiring people who will reassure you that you’re making good choices. This is the year to exorcise your demons and think positively. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – It’s best to lie low and allow someone else to take the lead. You will discover far more about this person if you remain passive. Don’t be forthcoming about your plans, or someone may try to beat you to the finish line. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Be honest; it will be impossible to hide your feelings. Make your needs clear and search for a way to sort out existing problems. People who don’t understand your values should be regarded as acquaintances – not friends. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Make a point of mingling today. This will be a good time to network. If you are in the right place at the right time, an investment opportunity will arise. Stay motivated. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Decisions may be clouded by emotional issues. To avoid a misunderstanding, be open about whatever is distracting you. Face difficulties methodically so they don’t resurface later. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – A physical activity may lead to new friendships. Someone from your past may turn up unexpectedly. Be cautious in order to avoid this person taking advantage of you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – Meeting up with chums will be inspiring. Travel will stimulate you, and you may make new friends. As long as you are conservative with your money, investments can be made. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – Reading will lead to valuable information. Idleness is the enemy. Make adjustments to your home environment, but stick to a budget. Keeping busy will help your mood. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Your ego will be bruised if you have allowed someone to make a fool of you. Trying to feel better through extravagance will not help. Choose to be a passive observer today. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – A financial endeavor may leave you disillusioned. Don’t allow loved ones to meddle in your finances – their suggestions won’t pay off. Offer advice, but don’t lend money. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Now is a great time to travel. You can learn, have fun and make new friends. Conversations with fascinating and unique individuals will inspire and energize you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Professional changes are necessary. Look into taking a new direction or starting your own business. Others are unlikely to be helpful, but you will find satisfaction in doing the work yourself. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Today, you will need to say “no.” Avoid projects that make you uneasy. Employ tact when handling other people’s concerns. Try not to get wrapped up in someone else’s drama.

A young girl, a primary grade-schooler with a well-worn library card, was enthusiastically reading a riveting memoir when a stern tone descended upon her. “What is that?” the teacher asked/accused. “It’s a graphic novel,” came the girl’s reply. Such works, the girl was told, were unacceptable for classroom “reading time,” let alone for a book report. The teacher’s sharp ruling boiled down to a four-word excuse for banishment: “Graphic. Novels. Aren’t. Books.” Sigh. Here we go again ... . Two decades after Art Spiegelman’s landmark Holocaust graphic novel “Maus” won the Pulitzer Prize and helped stake a fresh claim for comics as literature – paving the way for the appreciation of such works as “Persepolis” and “Blankets” and “American Born Chinese” – do a significant number of teachers and administrators remain mired in such backward thinking? Unfortunately, my rhetoric is rhetorical. These curricular “worldis-flat’ers” are still thick on our school grounds. But it’s time for the culture’s tectonic plates to more rapidly force a shift in academic thought. As we step into 2014, this lingering bias in curriculum needs to cease. We urge the least enlightened of our educators to catch up with the rest of the class. And to make our case, let us present Exhibit A: The young girl who faced that rebuke of illustrated books is a relative of mine. And that book (ahem)

Because what the larger academic problem calls for is persuasion. A struck match. Into Plato’s cave, let us bring truer illumination. What follows is not some broad indictment of modern American education. I was born into a brood of teachers – the family crest might as well be a chalkboard – and I deeply value what too often is one of the nation’s more thankless and underpaid cornerstone careers. Plus, as an artist who has spoken to thousands of impressive educators, The Washington Post image I applaud those who Two decades after Art Spiegelman’s landmark Holocaust graphic novel thoughtfully and “Maus” won the Pulitzer Prize and helped stake a fresh claim for com- passionately help ics as literature, a significant number of teachers and librarians still inform and shape dismiss them as something less than books. Six books that belong in young minds while schools are (clockwise from top left) “March: Book One,” by John Lew- keeping an open mind is, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell; “The Property,” by Rutu Modan; “Hip themselves. On this Hop Family Tree,” by Ed Piskor; “Boxers,” by Gene Luen Yang; “Marble front, so many of them Season,” by Gilbert Hernandez; and “Zits: Chillax,” by Jerry Scott and “get” it. Jim Borgman. What this essay is, at heart, is an extendbest books of the year by in question was “Stitches: ed hand in the name such outlets as Publishers A Memoir,” acclaimed of better understanding, Weekly; and was a finalist author David Small’s especially as our schools for the 2009 National Book poignant personal story of are filled with so-called “reAward for young people’s a dysfunctional childhood luctant readers” and other literature. home – including his adostruggling learners. No less than Pulitzer lescent battle with throat We face an educational Prize-winning cartoonist/ cancer, which may have imperative: Why not use author/playwright/screenbeen caused by his docevery effective teaching writer Jules Feiffer said tor-father’s early over-emtool at our disposal? aptly of Small’s masterbrace of X-ray radiation. Decades of studies have piece: “It left me speechIn Small’s masterful shown the power of visual less.” prose and liquid pictures, learning as an effective Of the teacher’s we vividly experience the scholastic technique. wrong-headed thinking, voiceless boy-patient’s raw We know that comics – I was left speechless. Her emotions. the marriage of word and decision was not a mere Even four years ago, picture in a dynamic relajudgment against one book, tionship that fires synapses quite a few people would but an ignorant indictment have begged to differ with across the brain – can be of all graphic novels. As that grade-school teacher. a bridge to literacy and a blanket criticism, it was “Stitches” climbed the path to learning. unabashedly threadbare. bestseller list of the New Armed with that knowlConsider my commenYork Times, which deemed edge, the last thing we need tary here, then, to be a the book worthy of review; blocking that footbridge is criticism of that criticism. was named one of the the reluctant teacher.


DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips with us. I don’t have a good relationship with her boyfriend. We don’t have much in common, and when he drinks, he gets angry for no reason and takes it out on me or Mom, and it puts the whole household in an awkward position, sometimes lasting for days. When he’s sober, he can be fun to be around. I have talked with my mom about this. She promises she’ll talk to him and things are going to change, but they never do. She doesn’t want to break up with him because she can’t afford to pay the mortgage on her own. I have thought about moving in with my dad, but I don’t want to upset her. What do I do? – Wants To Move In With Dad Dear Wants: Your mother hasn’t asserted herself with her boyfriend because she’s financially dependent on him. She’s afraid if she insists he do something about his drinking, he will leave her.

The affair and the boyfriend were her choice, not yours. If you want to move in with your father to avoid being around a verbally abusive drunk – and your father is willing – that’s what you should do. It’s OK to take care of yourself. Dear Abby: I’m a 32-year-old woman. My boyfriend of 11 years passed away almost three years ago. I loved him very much and miss him every day. Some well-meaning friends and family members have suggested a dating site. Abby, when does someone know if it’s time to move on? – Scared In Oregon Dear Scared: If the only reason you haven’t reached out before is fear of rejection, then it’s time to move on. Ask your friends and family to help you write a profile, and then consider what happens next as an “adventure.” There are no guarantees you’ll immediately find a relationship. And if you don’t, you could still make some friends. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. • Write Dear Abby at www. dearabby.com.

Variety of plant-based foods provide adequate protein Dear Doctor K: My teenage daughter has become a vegetarian. How can I make sure she gets enough protein? Dear Reader: You have less to worry about than you might think. When it comes to getting protein in your diet, there are many meat-free options. Our bodies need protein (made of amino acids) for the health of every cell, and particularly to build strong muscles, bones and skin. Some of these amino acids are called “essential.” Our bodies cannot make essential amino acids, so we must get them from foods. Meats have plenty of essential amino acids, but they also contain some unhealthy components, such as saturated (“bad”) fat. Vegetables, grains and nuts are lower in essential amino acids than meat-based proteins. But combining plant-based proteins will ensure that your daughter gets enough amino acids. If your daughter eats a variety of plant-based foods, she’ll be fine. There are many ways to get protein from plants. Whole grains are a good source, and they’re complex carbohydrates as well.

ASK DOCTOR K Anthony L. Komaroff Try quinoa, barley, bulgur wheat, amaranth, millet, and brown and wild rice. Nuts, nut butters and seeds are another protein source, and they are rich in healthy, unsaturated (“good”) fat. There are many to choose from: almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios and walnuts; almond butter; and cashew butter. Pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds are also good options. But the richest source of plant-based protein is the legume family: lentils, split peas and black-eyed peas. And beans: black, kidney, garbanzo, lima, navy, pinto, white and kidney. The soybean, another legume, is the source of tofu and tempeh, which are rich in protein. (Try to limit your daughter to two to four servings of soy per week.) I’ve put a table listing the amount of protein in several vegetarian foods on my website, AskDoctorK.com. As you start out, you’ll need

to get creative to adopt a more vegetarian-friendly mindset. Here are some suggestions from Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition for Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital: • Add beans and whole grains to soups. • Throw beans and nuts in salads, pasta dishes and sauces. • Substitute tofu for meat in stir-fries. • Snack on whole-grain crackers with bean salsa or hummus. I had dinner several weeks ago with an old friend who had been a meat eater all his life. In fact, I called him a world-class carnivore. He had been on a meat-free diet for the past three months and told me he never felt better. His energy was better and his blood pressure was lower. Before you know it, turning to plant-based proteins will become second nature. Your daughter – and perhaps the rest of your family – will thank you for it.

• Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to send questions and get additional information.

do not normally succeed Dr. Wallace: I’m 16 and have been going steady with Ryan for six months. We were the perfect couple until he had to move with his family to California. Before he left, he said it would be good if we continued to go steady, and I agreed. Now I’m not so sure this is such a good idea. All of my friends are going on dates and having tons of fun while I sit at home on the weekends watching television and doing my homework. I’d like to remain good friends with Ryan, but I’d also like to have the opportunity to go out with other guys. My sister says I’m selfish, but I really don’t think so. I’m positive you will agree with me. If so, I’ll write to Ryan and declare my freedom and encourage him to date other girls. – Wanda, Knoxville, Tenn. Dear Wanda: Yes, by all means, you should date other guys. Long-distance romances rarely succeed, especially between teens as young as you and Ryan. You need to be socially active and experiencing life, not tied to your “commitment” to a young man who has moved half a continent away. Declaring your freedom is not being selfish; it’s being sensible. Dr. Wallace: My best friend’s father died recently. It was a shock to her entire family. I have never met her father, but my friend always told me how nice he was. I would like to send her a sympathy card, but my grandmother said that it would be improper because I didn’t know my friend’s father. Please give me your opinion. – Nameless, Newport, R.I. Dear Nameless: It’s never improper to send a sympathy card when a friend loses a loved one. I’m sure your friend

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace and her family would be pleased to know that you cared. Dr. Wallace: I’m 19 and Andrew is 21. We have known each other three months and want to get married next month. We definitely love each other very much. There is no doubt about this. My parents like Andrew, but they don’t feel we’ve known each other long enough. How long do you think a couple should know each other before getting married? – Kayla, Ballwin, Mo. Dear Kayla: There’s no magic waiting period, though the average is probably about a year. Successful marriages result from both long and short engagements. Basically, the amount of time a couple should wait depends on their level of maturity; the less mature they are, the more likely they might be making an impulsive, ill-considered decision. Marriage will be a great test of one’s patience and shouldn’t be embarked on for the sake of immediate gratification. Why be in such a hurry? Waiting a little longer, as your parents suggest, should not be a problem if Andrew really is the right choice as your life partner. If the two of you are really in love, this love will survive the getting-toknow-you phase of the engagement in which you have long, serious discussions about what each of you wants for the future, how many children (if any) you both want and much, much more. • Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@ galesburg.net.

• Saturday, January 4, 2014

Dear Abby: I met a guy I think is perfect for me on a dating website. We have gone on several dates and they have been great. He respects my morals and even has some of his own, which isn’t easy to find. The problem: He says I am exactly what he has been looking for except for one thing. I look like his mother. He says he really likes me and would like to keep dating to see if he can get past this issue. I like him very much. Is there something I can do, short of plastic surgery? – Dead Ringer In Arizona Dear Dead Ringer: Before changing anything, you need to explore more closely what he’s saying. Ask to meet his mother, then judge for yourself how strong the resemblance is. It’s possible the similarity is less physical and more about your personality or mannerisms. You should not alter your image to please anyone but yourself. Dear Abby: My parents divorced many years ago, and ever since, I have lived with my mother and visit Dad on his days off from work. Mom cheated on Dad, and the man she cheated with lives

29

ADVICE | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Man turned off by date’s resemblance to mom Long-distance romances


Arlo & Janis is on vacation. Please enjoy this strip from Jan. 8, 2011.

Garfield

Big Nate

Frank & Earnest

Crankshaft

Soup to Nutz

Stone Soup

The Born Loser

Dilbert

Rose Is Rose

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, January 4, 2014

| COMICS

30


Beetle Bailey

31

Blondie

847.361.5511 South Elgin, Illinois

Pearls Before Swine

The Argyle Sweater

Real Life Adventures

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• Saturday, January 4, 2014

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CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

BRIDGE by Phillip Alder

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

| PUZZLES

32

The junior winner comes from China

CELEBRITY CIPHER

The 2013 Richard Freeman Junior Deal of the Year went to Chen Yuechen from China. The deal, which was described by Fu Tsiang, occurred during the Chinese Junior Championships, played in Suzhou, some 60 miles from Shanghai. In the auction, two hearts was either natural or a big, balanced hand. Over the forced two-spade puppet, two notrump promised 24-26 points. After Stayman, North invited a slam with four no-trump, and South accepted despite his minimum count because he had all of those aces and kings. Without a clear opening lead, Chen (West) chose his lowest club. Cao Jiahao (East) correctly put in his nine, and South won with his ace. Declarer played a diamond to dummy’s jack, then ran the heart jack. How did West defend? West realized that declarer needed two more dummy entries, one to repeat the heart finesse and one to cash the 13th heart. Those entries had to come in spades. West won with his heart ace and led another diamond, a key play. (A club would have given South four tricks in the suit with a good guess. And a spade would have been won by dummy’s 10.) South took this trick, cashed the club king to try to drop the queen, then led his spade seven. West was ready, playing his jack to kill the second dummy entry. Now the contract had to fail. South took only three spades, two hearts, four diamonds and two clubs. (More about this deal on Monday.)


Saturday January 4, 2014

“Snowshadows” Photo By: Jon

Upload your photos on My Photos – Kane County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Kane County Chronicle Classified. Go to KCChronicle.com/myphotos

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General Office Full Time Position / 40 hrs a week. Lyon Industries, South Elgin Call 847-841-7716

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BEDROOM SET - 5 Pc. Wood Bedroom Set. Includes 6 Drawer, 4 Drawer, 3 Drawer Dressers, Headboard w/storage and Footboard. Double Mattress & Boxspring Included w/ Frame. Montgomery / Oswego. $180 obo. 630-892-4564

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NO RESERVE AUCTION OF COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE THE FOLLOWING REAL ESTATE WILL BE OFFERED AT A NO RESERVE AUCTION HELD ON SITE AT 2901 WEST MAIN STREET, (RT. 64) ST. CHARLES, ILLINOIS. (½ MILE WEST OF RANDALL ROAD ON RT. 64 AT THE INTERSECTION OF RT 64 & CAMPTON HILLS ROAD.

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THIS 2 ACRE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY IS IMPROVED WITH 5 COMMERCIAL RENTAL UNITS. TOTAL SQ. FOOTAGE OF THE BUILDING IS 14,219 SQ.FT. 2 UNITS ARE CURRENTLY LEASED WITH 3 UNITS VACANT. THIS PROPERTY HAS A 30 CAR PARKING LOT, RT. 64 FRONTAGE WITH A VERY HIGH TRAFFIC COUNT. CURRENT REAL ESTATE TAXES $26,935.00. TAX PARCEL #09-29300-059, KANE COUNTY. THIS PROPERTY HAS AN ASSESSED VALUATION OF $929,946.00. INTEREST RATES ARE AT A ALL TIME LOW. TALK TO YOUR LENDER NOW. COME WITH A VISION TO SEE WHAT THIS PROPERTY CAN DO FOR YOU AND BID YOUR PRICE AT AUCTION.

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Page 34 â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, January 4, 2014

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Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up? Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

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Saturday, January 4, 2014 • Page 35

No. 1222 GOOD ONE! By ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / Edited by Will Shortz

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Note: When this puzzle is done, draw a line connecting the 21 circled letters from A to U in alphabetical order. The resulting shape will provide a clue to 6-, 8-, 14-, 53- and 70-Down.

ACROSS 1 Help to harm 5 Part of a pharaoh’s headdress 8 Worker with a trowel 13 Much 16 Mideast capital 17 Symbol of mass density 18 Mercurial 19 “The Caine Mutiny” captain 21 Many an early French settler in America 23 More off-putting 24 European capital 25 Special seating area in an airplane 26 Cry from Scrooge 27 With 63-Down, 1997 P.G.A. champ who captained the 2012 U.S. Ryder Cup team 29 Good scores in diving 30 Like many coats and tunes 33 Make calls 34 General ___ chicken 35 Special mall event 37 Bride of 1981 Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

39 Jules or Jim in “Jules et Jim” 40 Amarillo-to-Dallas dir. 41 L.G.B.T. rights advocate 42 Iowa city 43 Done: Fr. 45 Lands 47 Without ___ (dangerously) 48 It may be full of icons 51 Tease, with “on” 54 2-Down, for one 55 Some H.S. math 56 Slanting 58 “Say what?” 59 One more 61 Words that precede “Born is the King …” 63 House committee chairman Darrell 64 Mexican sauces 65 Ear-related study 66 Hilarious types 67 Strain 68 Reproductive stock 70 New hire, typically 72 Hydrocarbon suffix 73 Target number 74 Fr. holy woman 75 British rule in India 76 [I’m mad!] 77 “Don Quixote” composer 79 Idiosyncrasies 81 Overseas assembly 83 Number-crunching grp.

84 Bach’s “___, Joy of Man’s Desiring” 85 Greek earth goddess 86 Robe closer 89 Nuke 90 Chef Lagasse 92 Unseen scenes 94 Taunt 95 One ___ customer 96 Name on a swim cap 98 Funny Anne 100 Giving a boost 103 How-___ 104 Moneymaker for Money 106 Compact Olds 107 Futuristic weapon 109 Like a rendition of “Deck the Halls” 110 He’s no Einstein 111 Boo-boos 112 Thriller writer Follett 113 Rural storage 114 Preserve, in a way 115 China producer 116 Nettle 117 Half of a noodle dish?

6 [See blurb] 7 Something it’s not good to go to 8 [See blurb] 9 Cousin of “aargh!” 10 Lose traction 11 Mrs. ___ cow 12 Braced (oneself) 13 Give it the gas 14 [See blurb] 15 Expulsion, as of a foreign diplomat 18 Majority owner of Chrysler 19 Play callers, for short 20 Big money units, in slang 22 Lead-in to while 26 ___ cheese 28 Beatles tune from “A Hard Day’s Night” 31 Some wings 32 Broad 36 ___-Coeur (Paris basilica) 38 Unknot 44 Suffix with sentimental 46 Cries of joy 47 Throw for ___ 48 Common game piece DOWN 49 Expulsion 1 Gray 50 Futuristic weapon 2 Good source of 51 One of 11 pharaohs aluminum 3 What cowlings cover 52 Bedub 4 Took up the slack in 53 [See blurb] 55 Termite’s nemesis 5 River of Pisa

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57 Item in Santa’s sack 60 Eastern holiday 62 Ransacks 63 See 27-Across 65 Home of Thunder Bay: Abbr. 66 ___ Rao, “The Serpent and the Rope” novelist 68 Tailors’ inserts

69 Sister of Helios 70 [See blurb] 71 Charged 73 In the role of 78 Guest-star in, say 80 Nile deity 81 Mideast ruler 82 Symbolic effort in support of equal rights

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84 “Cloud Shepherd” artist 85 Departs 87 Writer Ann 88 Mideast national 89 Self-sealing bag 91 Vintage wedding gown fabrics 93 Mideast ruler 94 Spanish cession in the SpanishAmerican War

97 Millennia on end 99 Extension 101 Charge carrier 102 Greek diner order 105 Winter sports locale 108 Son of ___ 109 Bit of winter sports equipment


CLASSIFIED

Page 36 • Saturday, January 4, 2014

ANDERSON BMW

RAYMOND CHEVROLET

360 N. Rte. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

118 Route 173 • Antioch, IL

888/682-4485

(866) 561-8676

www.andersoncars.com

MOTOR WERKS BMW Barrington & Dundee Rds. • Barrington, IL

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

www.raymondchevrolet.com

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG KIA

630/584-1800

1107 S Rt. 31 between Crystal Lake and McHenry

2525 E. Main Street St. Charles, IL 60174

www.zimmermanford.com

815/338-2780 www.reichertautos.com

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

815/385-2100 www.garylangauto.com

888/800-6100 www.clcjd.com

847/683-2424

MOTOR WERKS HONDA 800-935-5913

815/385-2100

GURNEE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM

www.garylangauto.com

888/471-1219

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG BUICK Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

REICHERT BUICK 2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

815/338-2780 www.reichertautos.com

7255 Grand Avenue • Gurnee

www.gurneedodge.com

ST. CHARLES CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

www.motorwerks.com

O’HARE HONDA

A S H E N

R A M S E S G U A M

B A U X I T E A N O I N T Z I P L O C

E N G I N E S G O L F E R C A B R E R A

T A U T E N E D T E T A P P E A R O N

A R E N R O S T S A O C O R H E S G Q U U S A S E T I S O N

S H O W B A C K E R E O S M O I R E S

P O T

F I B A E L T L E L U S A A L N O O T O N E P T A T I J E S E R I A S N G A Y G R R O P O D

M I C H E L A N G E L O S C U L P T U R E

A S O N C K L E K I E R D A V D R E A D Y D M E S E T D A T I L N O E O G Y O L T T E R S S E G A E O U T E E D O O S P N S P S K E I R

F U E L T A N K

A Q E B R I S O F S I M F I I E S T L T H L I S R I O R A I N A J G N A T A O B T A K E M E A R I N T I R I T N S I K M E

R E N V O I

Route 120 • McHenry, IL

G E E S

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

425 N. Green Bay Rd. Waukegan/Gurnee, IL

409A Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

www.classicdealergroup.com

200 N. Cook St. • Barrington, IL

800/935-5923

(630) 513-5353

23 N. Route 12 • Fox Lake

888/446-8743 847/587-3300

www.libertyautoplaza.com

119 Route 173 • Antioch

(224) 603-8611 www.raymondkia.com

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG MITSUBISHI 815/385-2100 www.garylangauto.com

1119 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL

KNAUZ HYUNDAI

847-234-2800 www.knauzhyundai.com

847/816-6660 www.libertyvillemitsubishi.com

Land Rover Lake Bluff 375 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

1611 East Main Street • St. Charles, IL

www.stcharlescdj.com

771 S. Randall Rd. • Algonquin, IL

866/469-0114 www.rosenrosenrosen.com

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY

800-935-5913

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

ANDERSON VOLKSWAGEN 360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

Barrington & Dundee Rds. • Barrington, IL

www.motorwerks.com

800/935-5913

ANDERSON MAZDA

www.motorwerks.com

360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

BULL VALLEY FORD/ MERCURY

LIBERTYVILLE CHEVROLET

800/407-0223

MARTIN CHEVROLET 5220 Northwest Highway Crystal Lake, IL

815-459-4000 www.martin-chevy.com

LIBERTY VOLKSWAGEN MOTOR WERKS SAAB

ST. CHARLES CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

www.bullvalleyford.com

1611 East Main Street • St. Charles, IL

BUSS FORD

www.stcharlescdj.com

(630) 513-5353

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

815/385-2000 www.bussford.com

SPRING HILL FORD

800 Dundee Ave. • East Dundee, IL

CRYSTAL LAKE JEEP 888/800-6100 www.clcjd.com

39 N. Rte. 12 • Fox Lake, IL

TOM PECK FORD

847/587-3300

847/669-6060

888/471-1219

www.raychevrolet.com

www.TomPeckFord.com

7255 Grand Avenue • Gurnee

www.gurneedodge.com

www.libertyautoplaza.com

409 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

www.motorwerks.com

PRE-OWNED

www.Knauzcontinentalauto.com

MERCEDES-BENZ OF ST. CHARLES

KNAUZ NORTH 2950 N. Skokie Hwy • North Chicago, IL

225 N. Randall Road, St. Charles

847-235-3800

877/226-5099

www.knauznorth.com

www.st-charles.mercedesdealer.com

BARRINGTON VOLVO 300 N. Hough (Rt. 59) • Barrington, IL

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

GURNEE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM

13900 Auto Mall Dr. • Huntley, IL

200 N. Cook Street • Barrington, IL

847-680-8000

800/935-5393

KNAUZ CONTINENTAL AUTOS 847-234-1700

888/600-8053 www.springhillford.com

RAY CHEVROLET

847-855-1500

920 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, IL

www.piemontechevy.com

www.libertyvillechevrolet.com

GURNEE VOLKSWAGEN 6301 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL

www.GurneeV W.com

888/682-4485

AL PIEMONTE CHEVROLET

847/362-1400

www.andersoncars.com

Barrington & Dundee Rds., Barrington, IL

www.andersoncars.com 770 Dundee Ave. (Rt. 25) • Dundee, IL 847/426-2000

www.classicdealergroup.com

888/682-4485

MOTOR WERKS INFINITI

www.garylangauto.com

847-CLASSIC (252-7742)

www.libertyautoplaza.com

MOTOR WERKS PORCHE

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

815/385-2100

www.paulytoyota.com

847-680-8000

815/385-2000

GURNEE CHRYSLER JEEP AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG DODGE RAM CHEVROLET 7255 Grand Avenue • Gurnee www.gurneedodge.com

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050

920 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, IL

www.clcjd.com

888/471-1219

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

CLASSIC TOYOTA/SCION

LIBERTY NISSAN

CALL FOR THE LOWEST PRICES IN CHICAGOLAND

ROSEN HYUNDAI

PAULY TOYOTA

515 N. Green Bay Rd. Waukegan/Gurnee, IL

www.knauzlandrover.com

www.oharehyundai.com

www.raysuzuki.com

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

LIBERTYVILLE MITSUBISHI

888/800-6100

1001 S Milwaukee Ave • Libertyville IL

A D D O N

RAY SUZUKI

920 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, IL

888-553-9036

ST. CHARLES CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

I S R A E L I

www.Knauz-mini.com

847-604-8100

CRYSTAL LAKE DODGE

P H A S E R

847-604-5050

LIBERTY KIA

CALL FOR THE LOWEST PRICES IN CHICAGOLAND

775 Rockland Road • Lake Bluff IL 60044 (Routes 41 & 176 in the Knauz Autopark)

www.garylangauto.com

847-680-8000

www.oharehonda.com

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

O U S T E R

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

www.garylangauto.com

www.motorwerks.com

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG SUBARU 815/385-2100

RAYMOND KIA

O’HARE HYUNDAI

815/385-2100

MOTOR WERKS CADILLAC

815/385-2000

KNAUZ MINI

888-538-4492

(630) 513-5353

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG 815/385-7220 www.sunnysidecompany.com CADILLAC

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY

CLASSIC KIA

River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

1611 East Main Street • St. Charles, IL

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY CHRYSLER DODGE

www.bullvalleyford.com

www.arlingtonkia.com

www.stcharlescdj.com

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

800/407-0223

847/202-3900

847-CLASSIC (252-7742)

FENZEL MOTOR SALES

206 S. State Street • Hampshire, IL

PAULY SCION

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

ARLINGTON KIA AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG IN PALATINE 1400 E. Dundee Rd., Palatine, IL GMC Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER

BULL VALLEY FORD/MERCURY

815/385-2100 www.garylangauto.com

2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

407 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

www.KnauzBMW.com

ZIMMERMAN FORD

REICHERT CHEVROLET

KNAUZ BMW 847-604-5000

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com

847/381-9400


CLASSIFIED

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com

Saturday, January 4, 2014 • Page 37

LUTHERAN

METHODIST

Bethany Lutheran Church

Baker Memorial United Methodist Church

8 S. Lincoln St., Batavia (corner of Lincoln and Wilson) (630) 879-3444 www.bethanybatavia.org 9:00am – Traditional Worship 10:00am – Coffee Hour 10:30am- Sunday School 10:45am – Contemporary Worship Nursery care is available throughout the Sunday morning. Monthly Last Friday Community Supper 5:00-7:00 pm Free to the Community

Bethlehem Lutheran Church

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD ❃

Sanctuary 1S430 Wenmoth Rd. (630) 879-0785 www.sanctuaryag.com Sunday Service at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9:00 a.m. Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m. Bible studies and children’s Bible clubs for all ages

BAPTIST ❃

First Baptist Church of Geneva “Reach. Connect. Equip. Serve” East Campus (EC) 2300 South Street, Geneva Sunday: Traditional – 9:15 & 10:45 a.m. Worship Café – 9:15 a.m. West Campus (WC) 3435 Keslinger Road, Geneva Saturday Worship - 5:00 PM Sunday: Contemporary 9:15 & 10:45 AM (630) 232-7068 www.fbcg.com Hand in Hand Christian Preschool: 630-208-4903

CATHOLIC ❃

Holy Cross Catholic Church

2300 Main St., Batavia (630) 879-4750 Saturday Mass: 4:15 p.m. Sunday Masses: 6:30, 8:00, 9:45 & 11:15 a.m. Weekday Lenten Masses: 6:30 a.m., 8 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Holy Day Masses: 7:00 p.m. Anticipatory, 6:30 a.m., 12:10 p.m. & 5:00 p.m. Confessions: Sat. After 8:30 a.m. Mass & 3:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Mon.- Fri. 7:00 a.m. - 7:55 a.m. Tuesdays 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Chaplet of Divine Mercy: Tues. 8:30 a.m. & Sat. 4:00 p.m. Eucharistic Healing Service & Chaplet, Tues. 6:00 p.m. Rosary for Life: 1st Saturday of each month at 9:00 a.m. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament: Sun. to Sat. 1:00 p.m. Msgr Daniel Deutsch - Pastor

St. Patrick Catholic Church

(downtown) 408 Cedar St., St. Charles, IL 60174 Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & Noon (Crane Road) 6N491 Crane Rd. St. Charles, IL 60175 Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday, 8:00 a.m., 9:45 a.m., & 11:30 a.m.

St. Peter Catholic Church 1891 Kaneville Rd., Geneva (630) 232-0124 Weekday Masses Monday-Thursday 7AM & 8AM Friday during Summer 7AM & 8AM Friday during School Year 7AM & 8:45 AM Saturday 8AM Weekend Masses: Saturday 4:30PM Sunday 7AM, 9AM, 11AM, 5PM Holy Day & Holiday Masses Call the church for Mass times on these special days Confessions: Monday through Friday, 7:30 -7:55 AM Saturday, 8:30-10:00 AM & 3:15-4:15 PM

COVENANT ❃

Batavia Covenant Church, Preschool 1314 W. Main St., Batavia. (630) 879-3721 bataviacov.com Sunday Worship Hours: • 9:00 am Contemporary Worship Service • 10:00 am Coffee (Fellowship Hall) • 10:35 am Traditional Worship Service Preschool: (630) 879-3795

1145 N. 5th Ave. St. Charles, IL 60174 1 mile N. of Rt. 64 on Rt. 25, (630) 584-2199 www.bethlehemluth.org Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m./ 9:15 a.m./ 10:30 a.m. Adult Learning, Sundays: 9:15 am/10:30 am Worship on Saturdays 5:30 p.m. Uplift on Saturdays 6:30 pm Teen led Praise Gathering Bethelem Preschool Center: Full Day Child Care/Half dayPreschool 630-584-6027

Geneva Lutheran Church “Serving Christ in the Heart of the Community” 301 South Third St., Geneva (630) 232-0165 www.genevalutheran.org Communion Worship Schedule Saturday – 5:30pm in Chapel Sunday - 9:00am in Sanctuary 10am - CoffeeHouse - free treats/beverages 10:15 am - Education Hour for ages 3 yrs.-adult Parents’ Day Out Program ages 2-5yrs. - M-F, 9:30am12:30pm or 10am-1pm age 4yrs., 12:30-3pm Building is ADA compliant.

St. Mark’s Lutheran Church & Preschool (Missouri Synod) 101 S. 6th Ave., St. Charles (Just South of St. Charles Library) (630) 584-8638 The Rev. Timothy P. Silber, Sr. Pastor Worship Schedule: Saturday @ 5:30 p.m. Traditional Worship Sunday @ 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Sunday @ 11:00 a.m. Praise Worship Education Hour @ 9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. All services elevator access St. Mark’s Nurturing Center Preschool for ages 2 – Pre K (630) 584-4850 www.stmarksstc.org

Fourth Ave. & Main St., St. Charles Join Us for Worship 9 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:45 a.m. Jazz Worship In the Sanctuary Nursery Care Available Senior Pastor: Rev. Ronni Sue Verboom 630-584-6680 www.bakermemorialchurch.org

PRESBYTERIAN ❃

Fox Valley Presbyterian Church (USA) A Welcoming Church 227 East Side Dr., Geneva (630) 232-7448 (1 blk. N. of Rt. 38.) (630) 232-7448 www.fvpres.com 8:30 a.m. Worship (informal) 10:00 a.m. Worship (traditional) 10:00 a.m. Church school Nursery Care Provided 8:30-11:00 a.m. Adult Breakfast Club 8:30 a.m. Confirmation (7-8th grd.) 4:00 p.m. Youth Group 7:00 p.m. The Growing Place Weekday Preschool We are a Stephen Ministry Church

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST ❃

Congregational Church of Batavia

21 S. Batavia Ave. (Rt. 31) Batavia 630-879-1999 www.congregationalchurch.org Interim Pastor, Greg Skiba Sunday Worship 9:00 & 10:30 am Nursery care available Sunday School 10:30 am for age 3-12th grade Wednesday 5 pm: LOGOS Children & Youth program, K-8 Sunday 5:30-8 pm: LOGOS Sr. High program with dinner Batavia Nursery School 630-879-9470 “No matter who you are, or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here.”

To include your place of worship, please call Asma at 815-526-4459.


K C

CHRONICLE Saturday, January 4, 2014

D DETACHE TE UI IN-LAW S CAR W/TWO GARAGE

PRIVATE ESTATE ON 5+ ACRES This private estate offers a tranquil setting amid a stunning wooded oasis complete with trickling stream! St. Charles Schools! Incredible home with ONLY the finest details and amenities. Reclaimed wood beams from a civil war barn provide the perfect balance of old and new, blending history with function. Spectacular Master Suite with private sitting area and panoramic views, dressing room with custom cabinetry and spa like bath!

34W341 Country Club Rd , Wayne

$1,650,000

View This Home and Many Others at: www.TheMcKayGroup.com

Debora McKay 630-587-4672 630-542-3313 2690 E. Main St. • St. Charles Owned and Operated by NRT, Incorporated

ABR, Broker, CHMS • Luxury Home Specialist Relocation Specialist • Top 1% of Coldwell Banker

email: Debora@TheMcKayGroup.com


39

Stephanie Doherty

Direct: 630•587•4656 Cell: 630•643•3602

SEARCH ANY HOME LISTED IN THE MLS AT:

WWW.STEPHANIEDOHERTY.COM Email me at Stephanie.doherty@cbexchange.com ST.

S

LES ST.

A CH

Walking Dis to High School! $625,000 9 Car Garage! Exquisite home in Rivers Edge on 3/4 acre lot! Volume ceilings! Iron spindle staircase! 2 fireplaces! Cherry, granite & stainless kitchen! Turret sun room! 2 laundries! Heated garage! ST.

Private Acre!

GE

NE

ELG

$500,000 St Charles Schools!

GE

LES

ST.

R CHA

$314,900 Amazing Potential

Luxury townhome walking distance to golf clubhouse that just breathes sophisticated! Hardwood on entire 1st floor! Custom millwork! Plantation shutters! 3 season porch! Wow!

NE

VA ST.

$475,000 Finished Eng. Basement!

Executive brick beauty in desirable Thornwood community! Volume ceilings! Hardwood floors! Dramatic 2 story family room! Stone fireplace! Community pool/ sportscore!

VA

$335,000 Impeccable Townhouse

Ideally located to Randall corridor & walking distance to elementary school! Peaceful screen porch & deck! Large oversized kitchen for the largest of families! Finished daylight basement with full bath!

TH

SOU

Rare ranch on 2 private wooded acres backing to nursery & forest preserve across! Finished walkout! In ground heated pool & 2 hot tubs! Whole house generator! Got toys!

S

RLE

CHA

IN

RLE

AR

CH

Owned and Operated by NRT, Incorporated EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

$375,000 Culdesac Acre Plus!

Enjoy expansive views! No neighbors behind! All new carpet! Gleaming hardwood floors! Dramatic vaulted family rm! Big granite island kitchen! Awesome back yard! Pella windows! VA

$254,900 Full Walkout!

Ranch home on 2 plus acres zoned for horses but yet only a minute to the Randall corridor! Perfect open floor plan has huge rooms! Gigantic vaulted kitchen! Oversized great room w/stone fireplaceFull basement! 2 car heated garage!

ST.

$175,000 Finished Basement!

Situated on a nice size corner lot in the highly desirable downtown Pottawatomie district, this property is an investors dream! Updated exterior siding, windows & boiler! This one will not last!

$350,000

Wonderfully maintained & updated! Sophisticated decor! Hardwood floors! Newer maple granite kitchen! Big family room that opens to screen porch! All newer baths! Finished basement! 3 Car!

VA

NE

GE

A CH

$369,900 Private Garden Retreat!

3000 sf set on an approx 1/2 acre peaceful wooded culdesac lot! Volume ceilings! 3 fireplaces! SS Appliances! 3 season sun porch! Vaulted master! Wet bar! 2nd kitchen!

LES

$209,900 Location Location!

Full front porch elevation adds appealing curb appeal to this Mill Creek row home! Spacious deck & covered patio for two outdoor living areas! Walk to town center! Close to Metra!

RLE

A CH

$359,000 All Brick! Walkout!

Wide vista views! Big deck, firepit & shed! Extra large family rm has wall of built ins & bay! Maple peninsula kitchen! Finished basement has bar, rough in bath & 5th bed/office! CH ST.

S

RLE

ST.

AR

NE

GE

S

LES

AR

CH

GO ICA

T CH

WES

$125,000 Walk to School & Metra!

Unbelievable price for this totally updated 3 bed ranch just a few blocks to downtown Geneva on a huge lot! Hardwood floors! Vaulted family room! 2 car garage! Won’t Last!

$99,900

Quiet tree lined street brings you to this updated newly painted bungalow! Walking distance to high school, metra & downtown! Original restored millwork! Shady back yard patio & deck! Awesome 3 season front porch!

Happy New Year!

Your Community Connection.

Call to start your subscription today! 800-589-9363

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

Connect with the Best... Proven Success! “Your Fox Valley Connection!”


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, January 4, 2014

40

LOSE WEIGHT NOW! Connie, Batavia -- “Lost 44 lbs, with Dr. Mullick’s recommended system, and it stayed off.”* Jamie, Geneva -- “Lost 12 pound in my FIRST MONTH!! It really works. Had tried Weight WatchersTM which did not work for me, but this system works.”*

Call for appointment NOW!! TAKE CONTROL & LOSE WEIGHT NOW Program invented by a Physician at Johns Hopkins Supported by Dr. Mullick who trained at Johns Hopkins. Lose up to 15 lbs per month* Clinically proven & sustainable program

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Do you have a deductible? Call now to PAY LESS. Heartburn, Diarrhea, Constipation, Liver Disease, Pancreatitis, Abdominal Pain, Colitis, Crohns/Ulcerative Colitis, Gallbladder, Rectal Bleeding We have quality doctors and team on staff to serve you well. Its our honor to take care of you.

AMERICAN COLONOSCOPY AND ENDOSCOPY CENTER 2631 Williamsburg Ave 301. Geneva. Illinois. Call now for your appointment. 630-232-2025

GOT GAS! If you have bloating, diarrhea, constipation or gas come on in for testing. We have new solutions and offer a new look to your symptoms. CALL NOW FOR AN APPOINTMENT 630-232-2025

SAVE YOUR LIFE!TELLYOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS Get colon cancer screening. Beatable, Treatable, Preventable in most situations. S. from Geneva. “I am glad I had my colonoscopy done at the American Colonoscopy and Endoscopy center. I had some polyps removed and that will likely prevent a cancer. The facility was wonderful and it saved me money.”

LET’S BEAT IT! 630-232-2025.

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*Results may not be typical.

KCC-1-4-2014  
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