Page 1

W eekend SV

Saukvalley.com

Your source for news and sports 7 days a week

Serving Lee, Whiteside, Carroll, Ogle and Bureau counties Saturday&Sunday, November 9-10, 2013 $2.00

SVM salutes our military, veterans

NEW CHURCH IN UNWELCOME SPOTLIGHT DIXON, A3

SPECIAL SECTION INSIDE

WEEKEND ENTERPRISE | MOTORCYCLE SAFETY

Are helmet laws needed? Four of five recent fatalities caused, at least in part, by head trauma The most recent death, that of 21-year-old Brandon Kiro, happened on Oct. 8 in Sterling. Police say that Kiro was riding east on East Lynn Boulevard shortly after 10:30 p.m. when he lost control of his motorcycle, which skidded across the road before coming to a rest in the westbound lanes. His preliminary cause of death, according to the Winnebago County coroner’s office, was multiple head trauma.

BY CHRISTI WARREN cwarren@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 521

STERLING – Since September, two people have died in motorcycle crashes in the Sauk Valley. For the year, according to preliminary numbers from the Illinois State Police, there have been five deaths. None of the victims were wearing helmets, and four of the five deaths were caused, at least in part, by head trauma.

In September, 21-year-old Bryan Schrimpf was killed when a car hit him on East Lincolnway in Sterling. Police say he was heading east on Lincolnway when a westbound Toyota Prius made a left turn in front of his motorcycle. He was taken by ambulance to CGH Medical Center, then flown to OSF St. Anthony in Rockford, where he later died. HELMET CONTINUED ON A4

Illustration by Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Helmets can protect the heads of motorcyclists from the trauma of accidents and from other dangers they face on the road. But should they be required by law? That’s up for debate.

WEEKEND FEATURE| TWIN CITY FIRE COMMAND

A team approach

ECONOMICS | HOUSING MARKET

Region avoids the worst of slump BY DAVID GIULIANI dgiuliani@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 525

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

For a little longer than one month, Gary Cook has been chief of the new Twin City Joint Fire Command of departments in Sterling and Rock Falls. He had been the interim chief in Sterling for 3 years. “Most of the changes have been developing for many years,” Cook said.

Chief says administrative consolidation going smoothly BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

STERLING – Gary Cook started as a Rock Falls firefighter 34 years ago. But as chief of the new Twin City Joint Fire Command, he says now is the most interesting time of his career. A little over one month into the consolidation of the

administrative functions of fire departments in Sterling and Rock Falls, the chief says this historic time for the cities has brought some great challenges, but even greater rewards. “Maybe my biggest challenge personally is that if there are problems, there’s no one to point at but yourself,” the Milledgeville

native said. While there are more meetings and paperwork on the administrative side, he says, everything is flowing well and fire service is the best it has been since he started. Three stations serve the two communities, and each side covers the other when it’s busy. “Whoever is logistically

closer, that unit gets the call – it doesn’t matter which town it’s in,” Cook said. Cook’s first official day as joint chief was Sept. 28, a day that wasn’t really all that different from any other because much of the heavy lifting had already been done, he said. TEAM CONTINUED ON A9

The average Lee County house, which was assessed at more than $137,000 in 2009, dropped in Inside value to about $129,000 this A look at year, according local housing to the coun- values in Lee ty assessor’s and Whiteside office. counties in That home, recent years, which w a s A10 assessed at $100,000 in 2002, reached its peak in 2009, a year after the housing crash. Since then, the house has decreased in value every year, falling more than 6 percent in the past 4 years. While that is significant, it’s not as dramatic as in other areas of northern Illinois. In the boom years of 20052007, “We didn’t see the growth the Chicago area did,” Lee County Assessor Wendy Ryerson said. “We don’t experience the same highs or lows that they do. We are more stabilized here.” The rate of decrease in value has slowed, to less than 1 percent in the past year. What’s going to happen now with housing values? “I expect to see a slow increase,” she said, “very slow.” Whiteside County’s data on average housing values goes back only to 2010. SLUMP CONTINUED ON A10

Mostly sunny

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 11 40 Pages

Today: 57/30 For the forecast, see Page A8

The color of it all

A look at some Sauk Valley scenes from the fall. See Page C12

Honoring their service Six ways for every American to support troops, families Also inside USA Weekend: Rob Lowe on portraying JFK Sausage and mushroom stuffing

Index Births................ C5 Markets ............ A8 Business........... C1 Obituaries ......... A4 Classified .......... D1 Opinion............. A6 Comics ............. B6 Scoreboard ...... B8 Community ..... C12 Scrapbook ....... C3 Sports .............. B1 Crossword Saturday ........... D7 State .............. A10 Support groups .. C5 Crossword Sunday ............. C8 Travel .............. C10 Dear Abby ........ C6 Weather............ A8 Lottery .............. A2 Wheels ............. D8


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

COMMUNITY WATCH Were we in

ERROR? Getting it right ECAREABOUTACCU 7 RACY ANDWEWANTTO CORRECTERRORSPROMPTLY 0LEASECALLMISTAKESTO OURATTENTIONAT  OR   EXTOR. Corrections 6ICKIE$ICKSONDROVE #HARLES4OWN 76A RESIDENT!RMAND9OUNG FROM!MBOYTO$IXONON 4HURSDAYSOHECOULD SPEAKWITHLOCALFIREFIGHT ERS$ICKSONSFIRSTNAME WASMISSPELLEDINASTORY IN&RIDAYSEDITION !LASTNAMEWAS INCORRECTINTHESTORY ABOUTTHE&EB 4HANKSGIVINGDINNERAT &IRST,UTHERAN#HURCHIN /HIO WHICHRANON0AGE #OFTHE.OVEDITION OF367EEKEND4HE CONTACTSNAMEIS.ANCY "RANDAU NOT(UGHES 7EREGRETTHEERRORS

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

OREGON

*AIL POSTEDBONDAND WASRELEASEDWITHANOTICE TOAPPEARINCOURT Libra Martin  OF2OCK FORD4HURSDAYWARRANT FORSPEEDINGPOSTED BONDANDGIVENNOTICETO APPEARINCOURT Wendy Wilson  OF 2OCKFORD4HURSDAYTRAFFIC WARRANTPOSTEDBOND ANDGIVENNOTICETOAPPEAR INCOURT

Amboy Police Barbara J. Goy  OF !MBOYPM4HURSDAY AT$IVISION3TREETAND#OM MERCIAL!VENUEIMPROPER LANEUSAGEISSUEDTRAFFIC CITATIONANDRELEASEDAFTER POSTINGBOND

Lee County Sheriff

Holly E. Sheley  OF.APERVILLEPM 4HURSDAYWARRANTFORFAILURE TOAPPEARONACHARGEOF UNLAWFULUSEOFCREDITCARD HELDAT,EE#OUNTY*AIL GIVENNOTICETOAPPEARIN COURT Griselda Rocha  OF 3TERLINGPM4HURS DAY+ANE#OUNTYWARRANT FORCONTEMPTPOSTEDBOND Sterling Police ANDGIVENNOTICETOAPPEAR Charles W. Hobbs  OF INCOURT 3TERLINGAM4HURSDAY Gary Lee Hunt  OF AT%AST&OURTH3TREETAND &RANKLIN'ROVEPM &IRST!VENUEIN2OCK&ALLS 4HURSDAY/GLE#OUNTYWAR FAILURETOWEARSEATBELT RANTnHOLDS STATE$EPART GIVENNOTICETOAPPEARIN MENTOF#ORRECTIONSWAR COURT RANTSHELDAT,EE#OUNTY Rolando Garcia  OF *AIL 2OCK&ALLSPM4HURS DAYAT#'(-EDICAL#ENTER BLOCKOF%AST,E&EVRE 2OADBATTERYGIVENNOTICE (APPYBIRTHDAYTO)SAIAH TOAPPEARINCOURT ,ESTER +ATHY#HOLKE 3HIR LEY!NDERSON -ABEL7OLFE #OLBIE#ARL AND)AN#ARL ALL Ogle County TODAY Sheriff (APPYBIRTHDAYTO%LLEN &ORBES +ALEB+ENNAY Barbara J. Bell  OF &ORRESTONAM&RIDAY +AREN"ONNELL 0AULA 3CHUELER 3ONNY7EEKS ON.ORTH/AK!VENUEIN &ORRESTONDOMESTICBATTERY "ARB3TONE *ESSICA"EN NETT $ALLAS&ULL -ICHAEL TAKENTO/GLE#OUNTY*AIL +ELEHER $ANIEL+ELEHER Brenda Wiltfang  OF 3AVANNAH+ONHORST AND 3TILLMAN6ALLEY&RIDAYDRIV "RANDON.OBLE ALLON3UN INGWHILELICENSESUSPEND DAY EDTAKENTO/GLE#OUNTY

Teen’s death ruled a homicide Ogle state’s attorney expects to file charges BY CHRISTI WARREN CWARREN SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

OREGON – The death of Oregon High School student Jon Williams was ruled a homicide Friday during an inquest by the Winnebago County coroner’s office. Ogle County State’s Attorney Mike Rock said he expect to file criminal charges in the death of the 18-year-old, and the coroner’s inquest will be one of many things his office will consider. “We’ll take a look at what

their findings are that led up to their conclusion,� Rock said. “We’ll take it into account. I’m not surprised. That’s kind of what we were expecting.� Winnebago County Coroner Sue Fiduccia said during an interview Friday that each coroner’s office has different rules for inquests. In Winnebago County, she said, they’re held in every unnatural death case. Inquests consist of a panel of six jurors who consider five verdicts: accidental, suicide, homicide, undetermined, and unnatural causes. Panel members hear information about the victim’s death, and they

decide the “manner of death.� The cause of Williams’ death had already been ruled to be “blunt trauma of the head due to a fall as a result of a physical altercation.� The official manner of Williams’ death, the jury decided Friday, is “homicide (involuntary manslaughter).� “In this particular case, they felt that even though there was a confrontation with a lot of people, where there were a lot of people fighting, someone punched him in the face, which caused him to fall to the ground, which caused a head injury, which caused his death,� Fiduccia said. Williams, 18, was pro-

SALUTE TO VETERANS

STERLING

Woman in serious condition

POLICE & FIRE

BY CHRISTI WARREN CWARREN SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

BIRTHDAYS

LOTTERY NUMBERS Pick Three-Midday:   &IREBALL Pick Three-Evening:   &IREBALL.ONE Pick Four-Midday:    &IREBALL.ONE Pick Four-Evening:    &IREBALL.ONE My 3-Midday:    My 3-Evening:    Lucky Day Lotto – Midday:      Lucky Day Lotto –

Evening:      Estimated Lotto jackpot: MILLION Estimated Mega Millions jackpot:  MILLION

Estimated Powerball jackpot: MILLION

MEGA MILLIONS      Mega Ball:  Megaplier: 2

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

American Legion representatives Al Tieken (left) and Ron Ottjepka raise the flag Friday morning at Jefferson School in Dixon. The school honored all veterans Friday with a ceremony in recognition of Monday’s Veterans Day.

DIXON

Man listed as critical after accident BY CHRISTI WARREN CWARREN SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

DIXON – A Dixon man was in critical condition Friday at a Peoria hospital after being struck by a car just before 6 p.m. Tuesday while crossing Galena Avenue near Family Video. According to a news

463 s !PPLIANCES s -ATTRESSES

Up To 12 Months Interest Free Financing Available 3610 E. LINCOLNWAY STERLING, IL

815-626-2996

16th Annual Homemade Christmas Items, Grape Vine Trees & More!

815-440-7921

8 miles south of Dixon on Rt. 52

Snowmen & Santas

Wed., Nov. 20th 5pm-9pm Thurs. & Fri., Nov. 21st & 22nd 9am-8pm Sat., Nov. 23rd 9am-2pm

"2%!4(% #,%!.%2 !)2

$20 OFF AIRwithDUCT CLEANING this ad s !IR $UCT #LEANING  3ANITIZING s #ARPET  &URNITURE #LEANING s &IRE  7ATER 2ESTORATION

Dixon, Illinois

www.supremecleanersinc.com

NEW LISTINGS NEEDED!! THE REAL ESTATE MARKET IS HEATING UP. PUT EXPERIENCE TO WORK FOR YOU...

TODAY!!

CALL EERI ERIC BIRD 815-973-6768

T R I V I A

Ask about our FREE Upgrade Special MILLEDGEVILLE DO-IT-BEST HOME CENTER

STERLING – A woman was in serious condition in a Rockford hospital on Friday after a Thursday afternoon car crash on the west side of Sterling. According to the Whiteside County Sheriff’s Department, Michelle Bragg was driving west on LeFevre Road at its intersection with McCue Road at 2:30 p.m. Thursday when her car was hit by a northbound truck. Authorities say Bragg was taken to CGH Medical Center before being airlifted to OSF St. Anthony Medical Center in Rockford. The truck driver was uninjured. The sheriff’s department has not released the name of the other driver.

Elks Page Park

TURKEY SHOOTS 35.$!9 ./6  34!243 !4  AM ^05",)# 7%,#/-%^ 4!2'%4  %!#( On Lowell Park Road 1 Mile North of Lowell Park at the Elks Page Park

'SFF &TUJNBUFT t 'SFF .FBTVSJOH t 'SFF %FMJWFSZ

Bring the Beauty of StarMark into Your Home. 3BJMSPBE BOE $PDISBO 4USFFUT .JMMFEHFWJMMF *   UPMM GSFF

$//2 02):%3 %6%29 (/52 s ,5.#( 34!.$ /0%. 05",)# ).6)4%$ "2).' ! &2)%.$ '5. 2!&&,% /. ./6%-"%2 4( 4)#+%43 !6!),!",%

SVWeekend

1) Which two graduates of George Washington High School in Alexandria Virginia became 1960’s rock stars who died of drug overdoses? 2) Rock music drummer Tommy Lee was married to, and divorced from, which two blonde TV babes? Answer located in today’s classified section

Before you make a move call‌

Subscription

Ernest Appleyard

Production Director

Jennifer Baratta

Advertising Director

Kris Boggs

SHIPPERTS

Human Resources

Moving & Storage

Subscribers should receive their paper by 7:00 a.m. weekdays, and by 8:00 a.m. Saturdays. Subscribers receiving the paper by carrier should call their your carrier, Daily Gazette subscribers should call 815-625-3600, and Telegraph subscribers should call 815-284-2222. Redelivery will be made in Sterling, Dixon, and Rock Falls. All other areas will receive

Randy Jacobs are 6:00 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

404 N. Lincoln Ave., Dixon, IL 288-3133 www.alliedvan.com

Press Foreman

US DOT 76235

Pancake Breakfast Saturday, November 9 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Christ Lutheran School

th

2000 18th Ave., Sterling

Pancakes, Po Pork rk Sausage, Sausage, Scrambled Eggs, Applesauce, Milk, Juice, or Coffee There The re wil willl al also so be some some gr great eat buys at the Scholastic Book Fair!

1688 Brandywine Lane, Dixon   t FSJDCJSE!ZBIPPDPN

OSF St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria. Lee County Sheriff John Varga said on Friday that his office was still investigating the crash.

Jocelyn Lilly, Kitchen Design: 815-266-1354

Q U E S TI ON ?

ILL CC 10540

815-288-1644 Exp. 11/30/13

release from the Lee County Sheriff’s Department, Frederick Rogers, 42, was walking east across Galena Avenue at its intersection with Fifth Street when a car driven by Sharon Wagner, of Dixon, struck him. Rogers was flown first to a Rockford hospital before being taken to FREE KITCHEN DESIGNS BY

“Like� us on Facebook www.facebook.com/saukvalley

nounced dead just after noon Aug. 11 at OSF St. Anthony Medical Center in Rockford. He had been injured early the previous day during a fight at a party in an Oregon home. Oregon police responded to a disturbance call at the home about 3:15 a.m. Aug. 10 and charged five teens with illegal consumption. At the time, Oregon Police Chief Darin DeHaan said that officers were told about a fight but saw no evidence of one. Several hours later on Aug. 10, during another call to the house, police found Williams unresponsive.

~ FREEWILL DONATION ~ ~ Handicapped Accessible ~

Ed Bushman

General

Telegraph General Manager

Joanne Doherty Finance Director

Sheryl Gulbranson

Circulation Director

Larry Lough Executive Editor

Trevis Mayfield Publisher

Jeff Rogers Managing Editor

SV Weekend uses recycled paper and is recyclable.

815-625-3600

815-284-2224

www.saukvalley.com


3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

DIXON

Church in spotlight after Google maps spreads image Members say they won’t alter its unique shape BY MATT MENCARINI mmencarini@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 529

DIXON – If it were 20 years ago, the shape of a church in Dixon wouldn’t have become the topic of discussion – locally, nationally and even internationally – that is has. Because of Google maps, the new Christian Science Church of Dixon, 324 W. First St., can be viewed from the sky. And from that aerial view, its shape – which resembles a penis – has sparked local and Internet discussion. Because of social media and blogs, talk about the aerial photo started to make its way around the Internet at the end of October. In the weeks since then, church officer Scott Shepherd said, the church has become the subject of not only goodnatured, sophomoric jokes but also a form of bullying. “The Internet has great capability for good,� he said in an interview this week, “and great capability for gossip and destruction.� Asked whether the

discussed among the six church officers, Shepherd said, and they decided not to alter it or to respond to the discussion. The church did, however, recently post a message on its Facebook page that said, “Giant fig leaf coming soon,� and also posted a photo of a leaf covering the church, in an effort to play along with the good-natured “joke,� Shepherd said.

church now intends to alter the shape, Shepherd answered, “None whatsoever,� adding that he doesn’t see what others think they see. “We didn’t design it to be seen as what they’re seeing,� he said. “And we didn’t design it to be seen from above.�

Tree preserved The church was designed by an architect, Shepherd said. The shape came about because the church wanted to have part of the building near the intersection of Highland Avenue and Second Street, plenty of windows for natural light, and a sanctuary, which is the eastern part of the building. But the church also wanted to preserve a large oak tree, which can be seen in the Google maps image, so the decision was made to curve the building around the tree. John McLane, a licensed architect for 40 years who is currently working on other projects in Dixon, said he and another architect had previously worked with the church on a design, but not what is being built. They parted ways with the church after they were unable to come up with an agreement on

Comments take a toll

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Members of the new Christian Science Church in Dixon designed the structure to preserve a tree, which gave the building its unique shape. a design, he added. He said it’s “a little bit of a stretch� to say the church shape resembles what others suggest. It was probably an accident, he said, and an architect wouldn’t necessarily have noticed the shape while designing it. “I doubt it, ...� he said. “It’s unfortunate that it’s gotten the publicity; that’s probably being looked by the church as negative.� Construction on the church is expected to be finished in December,

Shepherd said. He is now adding a storage shed, and some interior work needs to be completed. Two years ago, there was a different version of the church on the land. But the Environmental Protection Agency ordered ComEd to dig up and remove century-old contaminated soil on the property. The church accepted about $750,000 from ComEd and agreed to have the old church demolished to make way for a new one, Shepherd said. Almost all of that money

is gone, he added, which means the church won’t have enough to finish the electrical work for the organ to bring it up to code. The discussion about the church the past few weeks hasn’t been what Shepherd and the church wanted it to be. Shepherd said he considers the negative and derogatory comments, while not the majority, to be a form of bullying. The shape of the building and the attention it has attracted have been

But the negative comments have taken a toll, and Shepherd said some have been directed at the church, the city of Dixon, and Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the Christian Science religion. Despite what he called a distraction, Shepherd said the church is determined to carry on with services once the new church opens, and he wants the building to be a place where people of all faiths can talk about what they have in common. “I feel sorry for them,� he said of the people posting negative comments. “Jesus didn’t tell us to turn the other cheek to take more abuse. He told us to turn the cheek so we won’t behave like these people.�

ROCK FALLS

Senate hopeful for 36th District plans to announce candidacy today STAFF REPORT news@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 501

ROCK FALLS – Neil Anderson, a firefighter from Moline, will announce his candi-

dacy for the Republican nomination in Illinois Senate District 36 at 10:30 a.m. today at the Rock Falls Public Library, 1007 Seventh Ave.

The Democratic incumbent is Mike Jacobs, D-East Moline. Anderson’s family will be on hand at the event. Much of Whiteside County and part of Car-

roll County are in the 36th District. The public can attend the conference. Others Republicans taking part will be state Senate GOP

leader Christine Radogno; Bobby Schilling of Colona, a candidate for Congress; 45th District state Sen. Tim Bivins of Dixon; 37th District state Sen. Darin LaHood

of Dunlap; and former 36th District candidate Bill Albracht. The Illinois primary will be March 18, 2014. The general election will be Nov. 4, 2014.

Welcome

to Your New Kitchen Sauk Valley Dental is pleased to announce the addition of Dr. Matthew Haarmann, D.M.D. as an associate dentist. Dr. Haarmann is a graduate of St. Louis University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Haarmann is a member of the Illinois State Dental Society, American Dental Association and a Delta Dental Premier Provider.

r r r r r r

$BCJOFUS Z 'PS "MM #VEHFUT 4UPDL 5P 'VMM $VTUPN $BCJOFUS Z 1FSTPOBMJ[FE %FTJHO $PNQVUFS 3FOEFSJOHT "MM 4UZMFT PG $PVOUFSUPQT 0WFS  :FBST PG $PNCJOFE &YQFSJFODF

Dr. Haarmann is currently accpeting new patients and will be providing all phases of general dentistry including: Ĺ˜ 3UHYHQWDWLYH 'HQWLVWU\ Ĺ˜ 'HQWDO 5HVWRUDWLRQV Ĺ˜ (QGRGRQWLF 7UHDWPHQW Ĺ˜ &URZQV DQG %ULGJHZRUN Ĺ˜ ,PSODQW 5HVWRUDWLRQV Ĺ˜ 7RRWK ([WUDFWLRQ Ĺ˜ 3HGLDWULF 'HQWLVWU\

'U +DDUPDQQĹ‘V RIĹľFH KRXUV

DP  SP Ĺ˜ 0) DP  SP Ĺ˜ 6DWXUGD\V to make an appointment please call 815-288-4028 or 815-622-4028 Or email saukvalleydental@gmail.com to request an appointment

www.saukvalleydental.net

CREATIVE KITCHENS & BATH, INC. “We’ll get your kitchen cookin’!� Steve & Pam Workman, Owners Mon-Thur 9:30-5:00; Fri 9:30-4:00 Other Hours By Appt.

www.creativekitchensandbath.com  / -PDVTU 4UFSMJOH r 


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

OBITUARIES Edna V. Strom LILY LAKE – Edna V. Strom, 94, of Lily Lake, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013, at Heritage Square in Dixon, her residence for the past 4 years. Born Jan. 27, 1919, in Babcock, Wis., Edna was the eldest child of Carl and Fredrika Olson, who had immigrated from Sweden. Early in her childhood, the family moved to the Wasco farming community, where she attended school and graduated from St. Charles High School in 1936. For the next several years, Edna worked in Chicago as a secretary at Sears, Roebuck, and Co. On Sept. 7, 1940, Edna was married to Anders Elof Strom at Grace Lutheran Church in Lily Lake, their family church for all of their lives. To this union were born five children. Elof and Edna moved their family in 1952 to the Strom farm in Lily Lake. Edna was active in her church, where she directed choirs, taught Sunday school, led the women’s group, and organized the 75th- and 100th-year anniversaries of the church. She was an excellent pianist and frequent soloist for weddings and funerals, especially if songs were requested to be sung in Swedish. She was involved in her children’s schools and activities. In 1962, she began a nearly 30-year career at St. Charles National Bank, which now is known as Fifth Third Bank in downtown St. Charles. Beginning as an executive secretary, she retired as vice president at what then had become Old Kent Bank. During these years, she also was active in, and served as, president of, the local tri-cities Zonta group, an international, professional, business women’s organization. During her lifetime, she maintained regular cor-

Betty Jane Mortonson

respondence with many cousins in Sweden. She visited their homes in 1979 and 1990, and hosted them in hers more than a dozen times over the years. Edna is survived by her daughter, Rianne Leaf of Minneapolis; and three sons, Warren (Patti) of Lily Lake, John (Barbara) of Dixon, and Leland (Twyla) of Elgin and Washington, D.C.; 14 grandchildren, Nathan (Keri) Leaf of Houston, Aaron and Christopher (Cristy) Leaf of Minneapolis, Lucas (Melissa) Strom of Lily Lake, Damon Strom of Germany, Mary (Tim) Goral of Dixon, Sarah (John) Petersen of Washington, D.C., Rachel (Patrick) Chambers and Elizabeth Strom of Chicago, Sam Strom of West Dundee, Emily Strom of Dixon, Derek (Kim) Strom of Switzerland, Amber (Brandon) Ballard of Hampshire, and Tyler Strom of Elburn; and eight great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Elof, in 1985; a son, Lowell Anders, in infancy; a great-granddaughter; her parents; brothers, Carl and Roy Olson; sister, Leona (Mrs. Earl) Anderson; and nephew, Chuck Olson. The family wishes to thank the staff and friends at Heritage Square for their loving care in recent years. Visitation will be from 3 to 6 p.m. Nov. 16 at Conley Funeral Home, 116 W. Pierce St., Elburn, and from 12:30 to 1:15 p.m. Nov. 17 at Grace Lutheran Church in Lily Lake. The funeral will be at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 17 at the church. Burial will be at Lily Lake Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials be directed to the Rebecca Circle at Grace Lutheran Church, 5N600 Hanson Road, St. Charles, IL 60175, or Heritage Square, 620 N. Ottawa Ave., Dixon, IL 61021.

Catherine Propheter Revait MESA, Ariz. – Catherine Propheter Revait, 78, died Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, in Mesa. Catherine was born in Sterling to Bryce and Charlotte Wolf. She married Clem Propheter. He preceded her in death in 1980. She married Ray Revait in 1983. Survivors include her husband, Ray Revait; stepson, Robert (Bev) Propheter; daughter, Cyndi (Terry) DeBoer; sons, Bill (Karin)

Propheter and Ed (Jana) Propheter; eight grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. She also was preceded in death by her parents and one grandson. A celebration of life was Monday at Palm Lane Christian Reformed Church in Scottsdale, Ariz. A memorial has been established to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation.

Obituary information

Toribio E. Leal, Sr.

All obituaries, including death notices, are due by 4 p.m. Sunday through Friday if sent via email, obituaries@saukvalley. com or fax, 815-625-9390. Obituary corrections and clarifications will appear in the Corrections box on Page A2 the next publication day after we are notified of an error. Receipt of all obituaries must be confirmed by phone. Call 800-798-4085 ext. 530 or 502.

It’s been 3 years, Dad since you were taken away. But not 1 day goes by that I don’t think of you.

God Bless You All Ruth Boyer

arranging flowers. Betty was totally devoted to her children and grandchildren and extremely proud of their accomplishments. Betty is survived by her husband, Ken; her daughter, Nancy (Wolfgang) Wilim of Korneuburg, Austria, and their two children, Michael and Nikolaus; son, Mark (Beth) Mortonson of Medford, Ore., and their two children, Chris and Cathleen; daughter, Karen (Kevin) Kline of Tallahassee, Fla., and their four children, Eric (Lindsay), Adam (Emily), Aaron, and Ryan (Kristin); and son, John (Connie) Mortonson of Green Bay, and their two children, Michael (Karen), and Andrew (Hannah); five great-grandchildren; two nephews; and two nieces. She was preceded in death by her parents; her two brothers, Leroy and Clifford; her brother-in-law, Warren; two sisters-in-law, Dorothy and Margaret, and one niece, Valli. A memorial visitation for Betty will be from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and a memorial service at 11 a.m. at First United Methodist Church, 501 Howe St., Green Bay, with the Rev. Dave Wilkinson officiating. A luncheon reception will follow. Live streaming video will be available at www.fumcgb.org for those unable to attend the service. In honor of Betty, memorials may be made to the First Presbyterian Church, 410 Second Ave., Sterling, IL 61081.

Caroline C. Schumaker ROCK FALLS – Caroline Schumaker, 89, of Rock Falls, died Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013, at Sterling Pavilion Nursing Home. She worked as a bookkeeper at Marvin Schumaker Plumbing and Heating for more than 50 years. Caroline was born Feb. 18, 1924, in Massbach, to Frank and Caroline (Ehredt) Haas. She married Marvin Schumaker on March 24, 1945, in Adams, Minn. He preceded her in death in 1971. She was a member of Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church in Rock Falls. Survivors include one daughter, Sue (Keith) Dravis of Sterling; one son, Dennis (Virginia)

Schumaker, and one daughter-in-law, Sally Schumaker, both of Rock Falls; six grandchildren; and 15 greatgrandchildren. She also was preceded in death by her parents; and one son, David Schumaker. Visitation will be from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday and the funeral at 11 a.m. Monday at Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church in Rock Falls, with the Rev. Henrietta Milner officiating. Burial will be at Coloma Township Cemetery in Rock Falls. McDonald Funeral Home in Rock Falls is handling arrangements. Visit www.mcdonaldfuneralhomes.com to send condolences.

Local lawmakers think helmets should be worn, not required HELMET

motorists, and another for motorcyclists.

CONTINUED FROM A1

His cause of death was made official last week: blunt trauma of the head, neck, and abdomen. Mike Ball, 59, crashed south of Byron in July. His cause of death: blunt force trauma to the head, neck, and chest. Logan Williamson, 20, also died in July, in Fulton. His cause of death: blunt force injuries to the trunk. Rochelle’s Caleb Holder, 21, crashed in June in Rochelle. He died of blunt force trauma to the head, chest, and abdomen. Whether any of their deaths could have been prevented by wearing a helmet is up for debate. Of all 50 states, only three don’t have motorcycle helmet laws. Illinois is one of them; the two others are Iowa and New Hampshire. The remaining 47 have either universal or partial laws.

‘We are for right of choice’ ABATE of Illinois, or A Brotherhood Aimed Toward Education, actively works to maintain that freedom for the state’s bikers. State coordinator Mike Myers, a Rockford resident, has been riding motorcycles for the past 30 years, and he wears a helmet only when required by state law. “We aren’t against helmets,� he said. “We are for right of choice. This is our America, free America, and we can have a right of choice.� Myers said he went through 248 reports of crashes that resulted in fatalities, and that from what he saw, helmets weren’t always the answer. For him, the answer is awareness and rider education. “Those are the two keys that are going to save lives,� he said. “In a low-speed event, the helmet would make a difference, but with higher speeds, a lot of other things come into play.� ABATE produces two education programs: one geared toward general

Surgeons back helmet laws On the other side of the argument, the American College of Surgeons actively supports universal motorcycle helmet laws. According to an official statement, the college lists as its reasoning: Helmeted motorcycle riders have up to an 85 percent reduced incidence of severe, serious, and critical brain injuries compared with unhelmeted riders. Unhelmeted motorcyclists are more than three times as likely to suffer a brain injury when compared with helmeted motorcyclists. The average inpatient care costs for motorcyclists who suffer brain injury are more than twice the costs incurred by hospitalized motorcyclists without brain injury. A large portion of the economic burden of motorcycle crashes is borne by the public. When universal helmet laws are enacted, helmet use increases and fatalities and serious injuries decrease. When universal helmet laws are repealed, helmet use decreases and injuries and associated costs increase. A 2012 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seems to support those claims. According to the CDC report, in 2010, 42 percent of motorcyclists who were fatally injured were unhelmeted. Helmets saved more than 1,500 riders’ lives, but about 700 more lives could have been saved if all riders had worn helmets in 2010, the report says. A report published in the July 2012 Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons argues for a universal helmet law in Illinois. The report was written by Dr. Richard J. Fantus, a surgeon at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center. “Does a law interfere with an individual’s personal freedom?� he writes. MANDATE CONTINUED ON A8

Craft and Vendor Show Saturday, Nov. 16th 10am - 2pm

April 16, 1926 - Nov. 9, 2010

Storm & Bullet Shelters

Love & Miss You so much! Your Daughter, Rosemary Mena

Vendors Needed Call 815-564-9369 Rock Falls Community Building

In Memoriam

Judy Bruce

March 20, 1942 - November 10, 1994 It’s been 19 years since your spirit was set free. Day after day, I wish you were here with me. You were so strong and fought cancer for 8 yearsYou were determined to stay. But God wanted to stop the pain & tears, and took you away.

Card of Thanks

Thanks for the excellent care at CGH, Morrison Rehab, Dr. Hanlon & Dr. Dang. Rev. & Mrs. Bice for prayers and visits. All my visitors, phone calls, cards and gifts were all appreciated.

GREEN BAY, Wis. – Betty Jane Thompson Mortonson, 84, was born into eternal life Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, with her family by her side. She was born Aug. 29, 1929, in Chicago, the daughter of Valentine and Emma (Ladenthin) Thompson. She was a 1947 graduate of Taft High School in Chicago. Betty married the Rev. Kenneth Mortonson on Aug. 21, 1948, in Chicago. They celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary this year. Betty and Ken lived in Chicago, Marengo, Sterling, and Macomb. In 1998, they moved to Green Bay, where she resided until her death. Betty was an active member of each of the churches they served during Ken’s 40 years of ministry. She sang in choirs, participated in and led women’s groups, and energetically volunteered to help with many church activities. Betty was a member of P.E.O. Chapter N, in Green Bay. She never knew a stranger and was a fiercely loyal friend; going out of her way to help where help was needed. Betty loved music, loved to sing, and made sure all of her children had musical training. An avid gardener, Betty found happiness tending the incredible flower gardens and landscapes that she created. A lifelong learner, Betty took every opportunity to learn about horticulture and developed an expert knowledge on the subject. She was artistic, an excellent cook, and had a remarkable gift for

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

CarolA. McKee Nov. 10, 1938 - July 5, 2000

H

appy Birthday Carol, This is your 13th Birthday we have not been together. Gone but not forgotten.

Love, Don

Dad Miguel Angel Viveros Islas

Mom Maria Teresa Olvera Rojas

Three years ago today was the worst day of my life. My parents were tragically killed while riding their bicycles to church. This has devasted my family. It hasn’t gotten easier. We miss them dearly. My children will always miss the great grandparents they once had. I will cherish and remember what they taught me and forever miss my mom and dad. In loving memory.

They will never be forgotten.

Although I miss the warmth of your loving embrace & the cheerful smile RQ \RXU EHDXWLIXO IDFH , ÀQG FRPIRUW NQRZLQJ you’re in a much better place. I wish people would realize they can’t take back the harsh words they VD\ 7KH\ PD\ ÀQG RXW WRR ODWH DQG OLYH ZLWK WKH JXLOW GD\ DIWHU GD\ By the time I realized you were my best friend, our time together came to an end. I am grateful for the fun times we shared throughout the years. I’ll always cherish the memories, but that doesn’t take away the tears. Although we are apart, you will forever be in my heart.

Love, Jodi


Saturday, November 9, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

AGRICULTURE | HARVEST REPORT

USDA increases already record corn forecast Illinois thought to be leader in soybean yields BY MATT MENCARINI mmencarini@saukvalley.com    EXT

The 2013 harvest forecast continues to increase, predicting the best corn yield

in U.S. history and the third best soybean crop. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, which released its November crop production report Friday, increased its corn forecast by 1 percent from September, to 13.99 billion bushels, which would be 30 percent higher than the 2012 yield. The U.S. soybean yield

was predicted to be 3.26 billion bushels, up 3 percent from the September report and 7 percent from the 2012 yield. Because of the partial federal government shutdown last month, no October crop production report was released. From the September to November reports, the per-acre forecast for Illi-

nois corn increased from 165 bushels to 180, which Emerson Nafzinger, a professor of crop science at the University of Illinois, said might be one of the biggest increases ever. The increase for soybeans, from 46 bushels to 49, might be more surprising, he said. According to the USDA’s November report, Illinois

is expected to have the nation’s second highest corn yield, 2.11 billion bushels, trailing only Iowa’s 2.21 billion forecast. But Illinois is projected to lead Iowa in soybean production, the USDA said, 461 million bushels to 415 million. Doug Kuehl, who farms northwest of Morrison, has finished harvesting

his 500 acres. “The corn crop was good,� he said. “I probably averaged a little more than 200 bushels an acre, overall. The bean crop was a little disappointing. That was probably about 58 bushels [an acre].� Kuehl said the crops in the area look better than what farmers had expected in August.

Volunteer! Donate!

A Marketing Feature of Sauk Valley Media

The following following Local Organizations Organizations need support support this y ear! The year! PADS Homeless Shelter P.O. Box 543, Dixon 815-440-6306 Marion Youngren - Director Accepting monetary donations, mentors and home repair volunteers needed. Also household items and personal care products.

Food Pantry 2001 W. 4th St., Dixon 815-288-4848 Hours: M, W, F, 1-3pm Items needed: Food, cash donations, toilet paper & laundry items.

Goodfellows 1521 S. College, Dixon 815-440-5688 Items needed: cash donations for food vouchers, clothing and cold weather items, Christmas trees and decorations, games, puzzles, toys, books, household items

Kreider Services 500 Anchor Rd., Dixon 815-288-6691 In need of: used golf clubs and balls, basketballs, art & craft supplies. Special Olympic volunteers and other volunteers. Go to www.kreiderservices.org for volunteer info.

Morrison Food Pantry (Methodist Church) 203 W. Knox Street 815-772-4030 Kayweyn Beswick -Director Food donations, monetary, personal hygeine items, household supplies, infant needs, etc.

111 E. 29th Street, Sterling 815-626-2210 (office hours noon-6, please call ahead of time) In need of volunteers, monetary donations, books of stamps, socks & undergarments, coffee - reg. & decaf, powdered drinks (Country Time Lemonade), Kroger, County Market & WalMart gift cards.

Leydig Center

Sauk Valley Food Bank

1101 Warp Rd., Dixon 284-7772 Donations Drop Off: Mon., Thurs., Sat. 8-3 In need of: volunteers.Will accept clean, useable donations. Household items, furniture, clothing, books, etc.

1741 Industrial Drive, Sterling 815-626-4556 Hours: Monday-Thursday 9-noon. In need of volunteers, monetary donations, food & produce

Helping Hands (Nazarene Church) Prophetstown/Lyndon Food Pantry 215 Washington St Prophetstown, IL 61277 815-537-2924 or 815-718-2165 In Oct & Nov we are in need of Monetary donations for our Thanksgiving dinner baskets. Holiday items, including perishable items.

Rock River Christian Center 1800 Prophet Rd., Rock Falls 815-625-4371 Hours: M-F 1-4pm Items needed: food, paper items, cleaning products, personal care items , diapers

204 S. Ottawa Avenue, Dixon

815-288-2241

10 Franchises - 1 Location!

1208 E. 4th Street, Sterling 815-625-1146 Hours: Tues. 9-11, Thurs. 9-12. In need of volunteers, furniture, appliances, food & monetary donations. Also a huge need for personal care items.

Fish Pantry 902 E. 5th Street, Sterling 815-626-1734 Hours: M-F 9-11 Please call ahead In need of baked beans, tuna, canned fruit, pancake mix, syrup, peanut butter, volunteers, monetary donations in purchase of food from food bank. No personal items.

Abiding Word Church

This page is brought to you by the following area businesses:

1000 N. Galena Ave. Dixon, IL 61021

PADS/Twin City Homeless Shelter

303 E. Main Street, Amboy

815-857-2611

www.thejonesfh.com

MAPLE PANCAKE HOUSE 405 5th Avenue, Sterling 815-564-0542

806 E. Lynn Blvd Sterling, IL 815-626-1827 Hours: Tues.-Fri. 9-noon & 1-4 In need of food & monetary donations Operation Blessing in need of Thanksgiving Dinner Supplies.

Whiteside County Senior Center 12707 W. 9th St., Sterling 815-622-9230 Hours: Every Tues. 10am-noon (May come once a month - Income guidelines apply.) In need of food & cash donations for food and meat.

,ET US KEEP YOUR HOME FREE OF GERM CARRYING PESTS

CROWN Exterminators

Call Our Local Certified Staff Direct: Jerry Melton: General Manager / Technician 815-499-3094 Vanessa Greer: Certified Technician 815-631-8604 Mike Lavelle: Certified Technician 815-631-5707 Or 815-625-8604 answered 24/7 Serving the SAUK VALLEY area since 1981

s2ESIDENTIAL s#OMMERCIAL s)NSTITUTIONS s!PARTMENTS s2ESTAURANTS s )NDUSTRIAL

Give Back And Give Hope! EggsInParadise

3506 E. Lincolnway, Sterling, IL 61081

815-564-0735

(OURS 3UN 4HURS AM PM s &RI  3AT AM PM &RI .IGHT !LL9OU #AN %AT7ALLEYE 3AT .IGHT $IFFERENT 3PECIALS

W Willy’s illy’ands Cocktail Restaurant Lounge 815-626-0401 3210W.4th St. Sterling


Opinion !s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

CAPITOL SPOTLIGHT

THE CARTOONIST’S VOICE

Time to fish or cut bait on tax reform Get specific on tax breaks that should be gotten rid of

Rob Rogers, Newspaper Enterprise Association

EDITORIAL

Support better PTSD treatment A s Monday’s Veterans Day observance approaches, Americans need to recommit themselves to providing care and support for young military veterans from wars of the 21st century. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a disability that agencies from the Veterans Administration on down have been trying to do more to treat. We applaud those efforts, because of the large numbers of veterans that could greatly benefit from them. According to VA statistics, as of 2012, 2.5 million Americans had served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and 1.6 million of them had transitioned to veterans status. More than 270,000 veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan had been seen by the VA health system for potentially having post-traumatic stress disorder. The agency has awarded disability benefits to more than 150,000 of them. A huge number of ex-

What we think

Veterans risked their lives to protect the nation. We can never do enough to thank them, but that shouldn’t stop us from trying. Supporting better treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder is one way for the public to repay its debt to veterans.

military continue to suffer the mental toll of serving their country. It’s particularly sad when veterans with untreated post-traumatic stress disorder become so despondent that they take their own lives. Thankfully, much more is known now about this serious mental ailment, which in past wars was known as “shell shock.� Its sufferers were not viewed with much sympathy, as painfully evidenced by Gen. George Patton’s disrespectful treatment of a shell-shocked soldier during World War II. Other groups have joined the VA in reaching out to veterans with PTSD.

In May, Sauk Valley Media reported about the help received by a former Marine from Dixon, who was diagnosed with PTSD, from the Wounded Warrior Project. Wounded Warrior encouraged Colin Bond to leave a high-stress job, become more physically active, meet and compete with other veterans, and reassess his life. “Wounded Warriors changed my life,� Bond said. “There’s no doubt. It basically made me realize family and friends are what I need to be happy, not just something like keeping a job because it pays well.� For more information, go to woundedwarrior-

project.org on the Internet. This week, a Quad-Cities hospital announced it was strengthening its participation and leadership in community initiatives that focus on post-traumatic stress disorder. UnityPoint HealthTrinity, of Rock Island, plans to do more to identify military veterans when they come in. That way, care providers down the line can use that knowledge as they diagnose and treat illnesses (physical, behavioral and mental) that might be linked to military service. Efforts such as these help to supplement the care provided by taxpayers through the Veterans Administration. Veterans risked their lives to protect their fellow citizens. We can never do enough to thank them, but that shouldn’t stop us from trying. Supporting better treatment for PTSD is one way for the public to repay its debt to veterans.

THE READER’S VOICE

Give the new health care plan a chance KATHRYN BONNELL Amboy

If you tell a lie over and over, some people are going to start to believe it. That is what the Republicans are doing with the ACA, the Affordable Care Act. They are telling lie after lie, and getting away with it. I just hope people will realize it sooner rather than later. Every new program has taken time to get all of the kinks out. That includes Social Security,

Medicare, and Medicaid. But no, we can’t give the ACA any time to get the kinks out. Yes, some people are losing their insurance plans, only because their plan does not meet the standards of the ACA. They are junk plans, plain and simple. Most people are finding they can get better coverage for less money. So come on, people, take a breath and give the plan a break. You can bet when people realize that it is a good plan, they will no longer call it Obamacare. It should be called Romneycare, because it is the same plan that works so

well now in Massachusetts. They have 98 percent of their people covered by health insurance. Wouldn’t that be great for the country?

Government dumping on average citizens WILL WYATT Mount Morris

News item: The Federal Reserve states it will continue to buy treasury bonds and mortgagebacked securities at a clip of $85 billion a month. News item: Congress is deciding on how much money to cut from the

EDITORIAL BOARD

4(%&)234!-%.$-%.4

Jennifer Baratta Jim Dunn Sheryl Gulbranson Larry Lough Trevis Mayfield Jeff Rogers

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

What do you think? Do you agree with these letters? Do you disagree with these letters? Let us know. Write your own letter to the editor and send it to: letters@saukvalley. com farm bill portion of food stamps, which now stands at $85 billion a year. What’s wrong with this picture? The Feds (and Congress) will bend over backward to pacify the Wall Street barons, while they easily dump on the average person. What a government.

meaningfully in public. Sure, you hear plenty from politicians about tax reform, but it’s all generalities. They talk about a simpler code or a fairer code or a flatter code, but in truth, almost every member of Congress talks in gross generalities about LEE H. HAMILTON the monstrosity that is the Bloomington, Ind. tax code and comes out As Congress moves for- fervently for reform, withward on budget nego- out actually taking a stand tiations, the word out of on the tough issues. Washington is to expect TAX REFORM IS meannothing major: no grand bargain, just more stop- ingless without specifics. Continuing to exclude gap, short-term fixes. Yet, there’s one ray of e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u hope. The House and tions for health care, for Senate chairs of the tax- instance, will cost taxpaywriting committees, one ers some $760 billion over a Republican, the other the next 5 years, accorda Democrat, are prepar- ing to Congress’s Joint ing a comprehensive tax Committee on Taxation – but getting reform plan. They see the rid of it will budget negotiations as surely anger their opportunity to enact employers much-needed changes to and employour bloated, off-kilter tax ees. laws. We could The last time lawmakrecoup $379 ers managed to find a way Lee billion over to simplify and reshape Hamilton the next 5 the tax code was almost 3 decades ago, in 1986, years by cutting the mortwhen Ronald Reagan was gage interest deduction, still president. Since then, but how many homethere have been more owners do you know who than 15,000 adjustments would go along with the and amendments, leav- idea? The political power of ing a mess that just about everyone agrees must be the interests that benefit from reduced tax rates on cleaned up. Odds are against Con- dividends and long-term gress managing the task, capital gains, which will but its handling of the cost the Treasury $616 debate on tax reform tells billion between now and us a lot about how mem- 2017, is immense. So, in its own way, is bers approach difficult that of supporters of the issues. That’s because this lat- deduction for charitable est effort to rewrite the contributions ($239 biltax code is saddled by a lion). In all, tax breaks cost the deep-seated problem that spans both parties and all Treasury some $1.1 trilideologies: political timid- lion a year – which puts ity. Tax avoidance is a them well ahead of most highly sophisticated and other forms of federal lucrative business in this spending. Yet each has its own country, and politicians constituency – often a address it at their peril. vocal, well-funded, wellTHAT BECAME CLEAR organized one. Politicians during the summer, when who call for “tax reform� the senators leading the without going into speciftax-reform charge on ics butter their bread on their side of Capitol Hill, both sides – they ride the Democrat Max Baucus of public outcry against the Montana and Republican tax code in general, while Orrin Hatch of Utah, laid avoiding the outcry from out their initiative. They people hurt by the changwanted senators to take es that tax reform would a “blank slate� approach inevitably bring. After all, to the issue: no current a “loophole� to one group deduction, exemption, is usually a “lifeline� to or credit would continue another. So nothing hapunless a strong case could pens. Everyone knows that tax be made for it. Then they invited their colleagues to reform will involve limitidentify what they’d keep ing tax breaks. It should be possible to avoid the and what they’d reject. That was a fine start, political difficulties by until Baucus and Hatch capping the total withtook an extraordinary out eliminating specific step. They guaranteed breaks. But even this will senators 50 years of ano- require political backnymity for their sug- bone. Until Congress gestions, thus allowing shows us that its memeach senator to continue bers possess the courage attacking the tax code to detail publicly what’s mess without taking any needed, talk of tax reform specific public positions will be just that: talk. Note to readers: Lee on how to improve it. In other words, here’s a Hamilton is director of public issue of enormous the Center on Congress at c o n s e q u e n c e , a f f e c t - Indiana University. He ing every taxpayer in was a member of the U.S. the land, and they were House of Representatives afraid to talk about it for 34 years.

“Journalists, by their very nature, represent the ultimate strength of an open society as well as its ultimate vulnerability.� Judea Pearl, father of slain journalist Daniel Pearl, 2003

1UOTESBROUGHTTOYOUCOURTESYOF

3HAREYOUROPINIONS Mail: The Reader’s Voice Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway, P.O. Box 498 Sterling, IL 61081 Email: letters@saukvalley.com Fax: 815-625-9390 Website: Visit www.saukvalley.com Policy: Letters are to be no more than 300 words and must include the writer’s name, town and daytime telephone number, which we call to verify authorship. Individuals may write up to 12 letters a year.

OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN LETTERS AND COLUMNS ARE THOSE OF THE WRITERS AND DO NOT REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SAUK VALLEY MEDIA.


Saturday, November 9, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

SECOND OPINION

Here’s why we did it (or maybe we didn’t) W

hy did you do that? Why didn’t

you do it? Those might be the two most frequently asked questions the editor hears from readers. They go to the heart of what editing a newspaper is about: Making tons of subjective decisions on matters large and small every day. And every editorial decision – what to print or not print; whether it appears on the front page or the back – is subject to disagreement by someone who has different interests, standards and experiences. That’s why we love this business. INSIDE TODAY’S edition is a story about the new Christian Science Church in Dixon. You can read the details elsewhere in this section. It has, strangely, become a topic of much discussion – not just in Dixon, but worldwide. The building, which is expected to be opened next month, offers a highly functional design with beautiful views of the area, including the Rock River. And it was built to accommodate nature – to preserve a beautiful old oak tree that would have been destroyed

had the property been cleared for a traditionally designed building. Because of those octagonal rooms on either end of the building for its purposeful entry and sanctuary, and because of the gently curved design around that lovely oak, the shape of the church from an aerial view has received a lot of unwanted – and, frankly, unwarranted – attention. Such is life in these modern – though not necessarily advanced – times. IF THIS HAS BEEN a topic of community discussion – even international attention – for weeks, why is this newspaper just now publishing a story? If the shape of the church has received nationally televised exposure – on Jimmy Fallon’s late-night show as well as Tosh.0 on Comedy Central – why isn’t this page 1 news? Good questions. One Dixon reader called last week to say she found the attention to be “very disturbing� when “a very inappropriate picture� was shown on Fallon’s show. When she called a Rockford station to object, she says, she was given a number to call CBS in New York. Maybe she was

larryLOUGH Larry Lough is executive editor of Sauk Valley Media. Contact him via email at llough@ saukvalley. com.

given that number, we told her, because Fallon’s show appears on NBC. But her concern was our first concern: How do you deal with this story tastefully? And, second, how much attention should we give to the object of sophomoric giggling, which attracted online comments that mostly fit into a narrow range between naughty and vulgar? This was a story of wide (though shallow) interest, but of virtually no importance. How much “news� coverage does that justify? SO WHEN AN OFFICER of the church called us this week to talk, we willingly set up a meeting. Scott Shepherd came to that meeting with pages of notes of points that he, and fellow officers, wanted to make. Their primary objective, it seemed, was to reinforce the mission of their church and explain

THE READER’S VOICE

ACA problems are just the tip of the iceberg TIM BRATT Dixon

Many of those in favor of the new health care initiative, commonly known as Obamacare, will cite as evidence of its desirability and necessity the Preamble to our Constitution, which states that one of the six reasons for its creation was to “promote the general welfare� of its citizens. However, what will all too soon become evident, as time passes and the system sputters, backfires, and fails, is the absolute contradiction

that arises in resolving an outcome associated with the general welfare of a society as well as the particular liberty of an individual. The outcome may be agreeable to both on occasion, but the flaw, of course, is in attempting to create a similar outcome for disparate elements; in reality it can’t reasonably be done. What is perceived to be acceptable to the health and welfare of an individual cannot be extended to include the welfare of a society, or vice versa. The mess that we are witnessing at the moment, as we move to signing up for the promised “benefits� of Obamacare, is merely the tip

What do you think? Let us know. Write your own letter to the editor and send it to: letters@saukvalley. com of the ugly iceberg. The rancor that is yet to unfold as the central government attempts to redefine and structure a health care system to promote the general welfare of our society in contradiction with the individual liberties, defined and regulated by a well-formed conscience, will likely fuel an outcome that will never cease to fester. Which begs the question: Can a silk purse really be made from a sow’s ear?

Visit SVM’s website at www.saukvalley.com

&*+ 0HGLFDO &HQWHU :HOFRPHV

+HDWKHU :DNHILHOG 0' *HQHUDO 6XUJHU\ :H DUH YHU\ SOHDVHG WR DQQRXQFH WKDW +HDWKHU :DNHILHOG 0' KDV MRLQHG &*+ 0HGLFDO &HQWHU 'U :DNHILHOG VSHFLDOL]HV LQ *HQHUDO 6XUJHU\ DQG LV QRZ DFFHSWLQJ QHZ SDWLHQWV 'U :DNHILHOG UHFHLYHG KHU 0' IURP 5XVK 0HGLFDO &ROOHJH LQ &KLFDJR ,OOLQRLV DQG KHU %$ IURP (OPKXUVW &ROOHJH LQ (OPKXUVW ,OOLQRLV 6KH FRPSOHWHG KHU UHVLGHQF\ LQ *HQHUDO 6XUJHU\ DW WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ RI ,RZD LQ ,RZD &LW\ ,RZD ZKHUH VKH DOVR VHUYHG DV &KLHI 5HVLGHQW 'U :DNHILHOG SUHYLRXVO\ SUDFWLFHG DV D *HQHUDO 6XUJHRQ DW 0RUULV +RVSLWDO LQ 0RUULV ,OOLQRLV 'U :DNHILHOG ZLOO VHH SDWLHQWV LQ KHU RIILFH DW &*+ 0HGLFDO &HQWHU·V 0DLQ &OLQLF  ( 0LOOHU 5RDG LQ 6WHUOLQJ 7R VFKHGXOH DQ DSSRLQWPHQW FDOO 

   ( 0LOOHU 5G z 6WHUOLQJ ,/  z  z ZZZFJKPFFRP

that they would not let childish chatter cause them to alter the design of their church, which they’ve named Gathering Light: Center for Spiritual Seeking. They understood that the novelty of the design had a very short shelf life, and they were satisfied with letting the attention run its brief course before the Internet crowd moved on to other trivial matters. We applaud their approach. Any architectural revisions might ruin what promises to be an impressive use of natural light to create an atmosphere of openness and to promote a diverse search of personal spirituality. We look forward to visiting the completed building. MOST READERS didn’t notice, or didn’t care, that we dropped the cable TV channel guide on the front of TV Week, the programming guide we distribute with the weekend edition of this newspaper. Since we did that a few months ago, we have received a few calls – fewer than 10 – from readers who wanted to

know why it disappeared. In short, we did it because we had routinely received even more complaints about inaccuracies in the guide. The problem, we explained to readers who called, was that our market area is covered by nine different cable TV companies. The guide was intended to let readers in each cable service area know which channels corresponded to what networks. For example, ESPN is Channel 29 in some communities, and Channel 24 or Channel 7 or 51 or 22 or 18 or 26 in another. Discovery Channel might be the champ: eight different channel numbers among the nine cable providers in the Sauk Valley. But cable companies seemed always to be rotating programming around their available channels, and they didn’t notify us of those changes. Monitoring the ongoing channel changes of nine different cable companies just wasn’t an efficient use of our time. As a result, our guide was continually inaccurate. By the time we found out about a specific problem (because a

reader complained) and got it fixed, another company would scramble its lineup. We now advise callers to ask their cable providers for a channel guide for their specific service. That guide often is included with a monthly bill, or it can be found online. Sorry if our decision caused an inconvenience for some people. But an unreliable channel guide did viewers no good. We’re sure the cable providers are happy to accommodate their customers. OUR THANKS TO the anonymous caller who left a voice mail message for the editor Monday morning. “I’m so grateful for the Gazette,� he said, mentioning specifically “David Giuliani’s investigative work,� and “I like your wry editorials.� “Thank you for a nice paper that gives us a lot of pleasure,� he said. We know nearly all of our readers also appreciate their local newspaper – all for slightly different reasons. And we appreciate hearing from them.

Mart Plus

Banquet Room and Lounge MPDBUFE CFIJOE %BJSZ .BSU 1MVT t  UI "WF 4UFSMJOH

OPEN HOUSE

FRI. & SAT., NOVEMBER 8TH & 9TH 6PM - MIDNIGHT /,9( 086,& ‡ '5$:,1*6 ‡ )5(( 1$&+26 SPECIALS ON DOMESTIC & IMPORTED BEERS


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

MONEY & MARKETS The following stock quotations, as of 5 p.m., are provided as a community service by Robert Kim Pettygrove and Chad Weigle of Edward Jones, Dixon and Raymond James and Associates, Sterling. Abbott ....................... 38.12 Alcoa ........................... 9.06 AltriaCorp ................. 37.55 Autonation ............... 47.08 American Express .... 81.78 Arris-Group .............. 17.19 Apple....................... 520.60 ADM.......................... 41.45 AT&T ......................... 35.16 Bank of America....... 14.32 Boeing..................... 133.50 BorgWarner ............ 101.21 BP .............................. 46.09 Casey’s ...................... 77.07 Caterpillar ................ 84.24 CenturyLink ............. 31.33 Chevron .................. 121.21 Cisco ......................... 23.51 Citigroup .................. 49.94 CNW ......................... 40.59 CocaCola .................. 40.04 ConAgra.................... 32.64 Dean ......................... 19.39 Deere & Co ............... 81.51 Disney ....................... 68.54 Donaldson................ 39.90 DuPont ..................... 62.00 Exxon ........................ 92.71 Ford .......................... 16.84 Exelon ....................... 28.34 GE ............................. 27.04 FifthThird ................. 20.01 HawaiianElectric ..... 26.69

Hewlett Packard ...... 25.94 HomeDepot ............. 75.48 Intel Corp. ................ 24.09 IBM ......................... 180.06 IntlPaper................... 43.97 JCPenney .................... 8.23 JohnsonControls...... 47.66 Johnson&Johnson ... 94.05 JPMorgan Chase ...... 53.96 Kraft .......................... 52.73 Kroger ....................... 41.96 Leggett&Platt ........... 29.38 Manpower ................ 80.00 McDonald’s .............. 97.01 Merck&Co ................ 46.82 Microsoft .................. 37.78 3M ........................... 127.99 Monsanto ............... 107.21 Newell ....................... 29.01 AGL ........................... 47.55 Nike........................... 77.09 Parker-Han............. 116.12 Pfizer ......................... 31.32 Pepsico ..................... 85.83 Procter&Gamble ...... 82.49 RaymondJames........ 46.27 Republic ................... 34.32 Sears Hldg ................ 56.72 SensientTech ........... 52.01 Sprint .......................... 7.06 Staples ...................... 15.73 TheTravelers ............ 87.79 UnitedContinental .. 35.36 UnitedTech ............ 108.65 USBancorp ............... 38.08 USSteel ..................... 27.59 Verizon ..................... 50.20 Walgreen .................. 59.71 WalMartStores ......... 77.95 WalMartMexico ....... 24.65 WasteMgt ................. 44.15 Wendy’s ...................... 8.34

Commodities

Motorcycle helmet bills always fail MANDATE

CONTINUED FROM A4

“The simple answer is yes, but no differently than impaired driving laws, cellphone use laws, seatbelt use laws, and quarantine laws for infectious diseases. The purpose of these laws is to provide for the nation’s well-being.�

Legislators oppose mandate The matter of a motorcycle helmet law has come to a vote a number of times in the state Legislature, but it has been rejected every time. And

‘‘

I don’t think it’s appropriate for government to mandate that [wearing helmets on motorcycles].

’’

State Rep. Tom Demmer

while local legislators mostly support the use of motorcycle helmets, they also support riders’ freedom to choose. “I think people should wear helmets when they ride motorcycles,� Rep. Tom Demmer, R-Dixon, said. “But I don’t think I support a law to require

it. ... That’s an area where it comes down to personal responsibility. I don’t think it’s appropriate for government to mandate that.� Sen. Mike Jacobs, D-East Moline, agrees. “My personal opinion is that anyone who doesn’t wear a motorcycle helmet when they’re riding a motorcycle is crazy,� Jacobs said. “My public opinion is if they want to ride without a helmet, that’s their business. “There are risks in life; people choose to accept those risks. I certainly wouldn’t do it, but I understand those people who want the wind in their hair. ... I

Deck your home with brand new flooring Fa la la la la la la la la! Enter For A Chance To Win A

3 000

$ ,

+ROLGD\ 6KRSSLQJ 6SUHH Angie & Al Delhotal Owners

From The Sterling Merchants & Make Your Dreams Come True!

We guarantee you will love your new floor! 2528 E. Lincolnway Sterling,IL    s WWWANAmOORINGCOM

just don’t think it’s the state’s job to tell them to protect themselves.�

The following quotations are provided as a community service by Sterling Futures: Corn: Dec. 4.26½; March 4.38½; July 4.53½ Soybeans: Nov. 13.06; Jan. 12.96; May 12.58 Soybean oil: Dec. 40.25; March 40.98 Soybean meal: Dec. 422.30; March 402.80 Wheat: Dec. 6.49ž; July 6.68ž Oats: Dec. 3.35; July 3.06

Live cattle: Dec. 132.40; Feb. 133.95; April 134.80 Feeder cattle: Nov. 164.42; May 165.65 Lean hogs: Dec. 88.12; Feb. 92.07; April 93.70 Sugar: March 18.08 Cotton: Dec. 76.88 T-Bonds: Dec. 1312â…”2 Silver: Dec. 21.49 Gold: Dec. 1287.40 Copper: Dec. 3.2575 Crude: Dec. 94.44 Dollar Index: Dec. 81.34

3RD ANNIVERSARY SALE CELEBRATE WITH SAVINGS

25% OFF

*

EVERY regular priced item. Now through November 28, 2013 *Excludes Sliver Brand Jeans, Sale & Clearance Items

Dress Code

Closed 1RY  7KUX 'HF  

Tammy Larson  ( UG 6W 6WHUOLQJ ,/ ‡ 

Owner

‡ 2SHQ 7XHV :HG  AM -5PM, 7KXUV  AM -7PM, )UL  AM -5PM, 6DW  AM -4PM ‡ Closed Sunday & Monday

SERVICE FEES

During the month of November, Lenhart Plumbing is offering “Free Service Fees�. Present this coupon to our technician and all work we perform during the month of November will be FREE of travel and evaluation fees. Call now and schedule YOUR appointment. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed.. Or you Don’t Pay!

We answer our phones live 24 hours a day Sterling or Rock Falls: 815-625-3252 Dixon: 815-288-7915

Offer expires November 30, 2013 - Not valid with any other offers.

Rock Falls residents now qualify for the complete system rebate of up to $1000!


3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

Cook: Deputy chiefs Milby and Dettman ‘front-runners in field’ TEAM

CONTINUED FROM A1

“I was interim chief in Sterling for 3 years, and most of the changes have been developing for many years,� he explained. “From the Rock Falls side, there has been additional paperwork, some budgeting and payroll changes, but the staff has really rolled with everything.� That staff includes 18 firefighters in Sterling and 12 in Rock Falls, plus a deputy chief in each city. Cook splits his time between the cities, usually spending his mornings in Sterling and afternoons in Rock Falls. The intergovernmental agreement that created the combined entity had been in the works since 2010. Both city councils approved the pact on Sept. 9, in the first joint meeting of the bodies since the cities approved an automatic aid agreement 15 years ago. Although the command structure has been merged, Cook said, the departments are still independent, just enhanced and a little more polished. Cook believes that the biggest change in dayto-day operations is the implementation of deputy chiefs Bill Milby in Rock Falls and Mike Dettman in Sterling. Both had been captains of their respective departments. Now commonly known as deputy chiefs north and south, they are the keys to making sure everyone is on the same page in an emergency. “They are front-runners in the field,� Cook said. “With automatic aid, everyone knows their responsibilities and there’s no guesswork.� In addition to providing leadership in emergency situations, the

deputy chiefs coordinate educational programs for schools and the public, and lead the way in inspections and other fire prevention efforts. Cook said Milby and Dettman have made a point of becoming familiar with both communities. During recent Regional Office of Education school inspections, Milby handled the duties in Sterling, while Dettman went to Rock Falls. They also will swap areas for inspections of apartment buildings and commercial buildings. The leaders believe that the automatic aid agreement set into motion the natural evolution of Twin City. “With automatic aid, we all knew each other,� Milby said. “Even though some of us moved into different roles, the command structure hasn’t changed.� Milby said the unified command presence is consistent regardless of the type of situation. “It doesn’t matter if it’s a two-engine call or eight departments, we’re going to operate the same because everybody understands the system,� he said. The biggest change for Milby personally has been leaving the truck. “I was a captain riding an engine,� Milby said. “I went from being first to the scene to first in the office and relying on information from my captains on the engine.� Cook said it is too soon to really get a handle on the savings that can be derived from the move. Rock Falls has estimated initial savings at $45,000 a year. The chief’s $90,000 salary plus benefits will be divided between the cities in a ratio dictated by population. That now means Sterling takes on 61 percent, while Rock Falls picks up 39 percent.

More savings will come with joint purchasing of equipment and supplies. That includes detection and testing equipment, calibration units, and fire apparatus. While having one instead of two of many items will help the budget, the merger could eventually make it easier to get the big-ticket items when needed. Twin City has three front-line engines, two backup engines, and two aerial trucks. It is recommended that front-line trucks keep that status no longer than 15 years. With proper maintenance, they may be able to go an additional 5 years as reserves. The life expectancy of an aerial truck is 15 to 20 years. A front-line engine carries a price tag of between $350,000 and $400,000. An aerial truck is a huge investment – between $800,000 and $1 million each. Cook says there is no question the merger will save money over the

Where were you when you heard? !TONETIME IT was Pearl Harbor. In more recent YEARS ITWAS "UTFORADIFFERENT GENERATION ITWAS THEASSASSINATIONOF 0RESIDENT*OHN& Kennedy on Nov.   IN$ALLAS 3AUK6ALLEY-EDIA WILLPUBLISHAPACKAGEOFSTORIESINLATE.OVEMBERIN OBSERVANCEOFTHETHANNIVERSARYOFTHATNATIONAL tragedy. 7EWOULDLIKETOHEARREADERSRECOLLECTIONSOF WHERETHEYWERE WHATTHEYWEREDOING ANDHOW THEYREACTEDWHENTHEYFIRSTHEARDTHEPRESIDENTHAD been shot. 9OUAREINVITEDTOSHAREYOURMEMORIES IN WORDSORLESS BYSENDINGANEMAILSLUGLINE*&+ TONEWS SAUKVALLEYCOMORALETTERTO*&+-EMORIES %,INCOLNWAY 0/"OX 3TERLING ), 9OUMAYALSOTAKEWHATYOUWRITETOTHE36- OFFICEIN$IXONOR3TERLING0LEASEINCLUDEYOURNAME ADDRESSANDAPHONENUMBER 3UBMISSIONDEADLINEISPM.OV

B & D HOME SERVICES

5HVLGHQWLDO ‡ &RPPHUFLDO

3OXPELQJ ‡ +HDWLQJ &RROLQJ ‡ (OHFWULFDO

201 W. 14 , Rock Falls th

815-626-0897

 

     &' ()' ' &        !"#  $%

Lic # 058-157413

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $ Top $ Dollar $ $ $ Paid! $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1707 East 4th St., Sterling $ $ (815) 625-9600 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

WE BUY CARS!

long haul, but even more important is enabling the combined forces to provide the best service whenever it’s needed. “We really hope that the big-ticket items can come a little sooner with the consolidation,� Cook said. “But we don’t need excesses; we just want to be prepared for everything.� Sterling Mayor Skip Lee said that everything he has heard affirms the merger has been a pretty seamless transition. He attributes that to the history of the two squads. “These departments have been working closely together for decades,� Lee said. “They’ve trained together, worked under the same operational structure.� Although Twin City is in its infancy, the mayor said he has had received no negative feedback from citizens. “When your house is on fire,� Lee said, “you don’t care what decal is on the hat.�

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Fire Chief Gary Cook is now leading both Sterling and Rock Falls fire protection districts. Cook said the merger in administration makes each department a little more polished but still independent.


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

Leader of Realtors group expecting small increases SLUMP

CONTINUED FROM A1

According to assessor’s office statistics, a Whiteside County house assessed at $100,000 in 2010 had dropped by this year to about $95,500, which is down almost 2 percent over the past year. From 2010 to 2013, an average house’s value dropped 4.5 percent in Whiteside County and 5.9 percent in Lee County. That compares well to Rockford. During an even shorter timespan – from 2010 to 2012 – an average house’s value declined 12 percent in Rockford, according to information compiled by the Rockford Register Star. Statewide, the median prices for housing increased 12.9 percent in September over the previous year, according to the Illinois Association of Realtors. Chicagoland saw some of the biggest increases, by 22.6 percent in the city and 15.6 percent in the suburbs. “Communities are not treated equally when it comes to demand for housing,� said Jon Broadbooks, a spokesman with the Illinois Association of Realtors. “One of the things in the Chicago area is there was a tremendous amount of bad loans. You can argue whether the loans should have been made or not, but it has

A look at local housing values (ERESWHATHAPPENED TOTHEVALUEOFTHEAVERAGE HOUSEIN Lee CountySINCE  .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........   .........  3OURCE,EE#OUNTY!SSESSORS/FFICE

(ERESWHATHAPPENED TOTHEVALUEOFTHEAVERAGE HOUSE INWhiteside County SINCE  .........   ...........   ...........   ........... 

3OURCE7HITESIDE#OUNTY !SSESSORS/FFICEINFORMATION DOESNTGOEARLIERTHAN

Remember 4HE,EE#OUNTYASSESSORRECENTLYSENTVALUATIONNOTICESTOPROPERTYOWNERS2ESIDENTS HAVEUNTIL.OVTO FILEAPPEALS7HITESIDE #OUNTYSDEADLINEHAS PASSED #ALLTHE,EE#OUNTY ASSESSORSOFFICEAT   taken several years to clean that up. In smaller communities, you didn’t have that dynamic going on.�

Real estate, he said, remains a sound, longterm investment. “Despite everything that happened in the housing bust, I don’t think people would be buying houses if they didn’t think there was some value in ownership of property,� Broadbooks said. “If you look at it in aggregate, you will see property values increase over time. They don’t make more land.� Chris King, president of the Sauk Valley Association of Realtors, said she expected small increases in housing values in the area. “I don’t see any major changes until we have a major announcement of economic value to us. We’ll be much slower than the rest of the state,� said King, who works at United Country Sauk Valley Realty. She said she hopes the eventual opening of a federal prison in Thomson will someday help the Sauk Valley economically, referring to the federal government’s plans to open a prison along the Mississippi River in Carroll County. Ryerson said assessments always lag behind changes in housing prices because they are based on a 3-year rolling average, which prevents volatility for taxing bodies and taxpayers. “It provides for a stabilized revenue stream,� she said.

#()#!'/!0 n)LLINOIS 'OV0AT1UINNSAID&RIDAY HEHASSELECTEDFORMER

DART SE Stk#D579

MSRP ............ $18,885

PETE’S DISCOUNT. ..............$300 FACTORY REBATE ............$2,000

PETE’S PRICE >

16,585

$

*

New 2013 Chrysler

200 LX Stk#D563

MSRP ............ $19,990 PETE’S DISCOUNT ...............$493 FACTORY REBATE ............$2,500

PETE’S PRICE >

16,997

$

*

New 2014 Dodge

IN BRIEF Gov. Quinn picks Vallas

New 2013 Dodge

#HICAGOSCHOOLS#%/AND GUBERNATORIALCANDIDATE0AUL6ALLASASHISRUNNINGMATEFOR CALLING HIMALONGTIMEREFORMER ANDEXPERTONFISCALAND

EDUCATIONISSUESWHOWILL BEALIEUTENANTGOVERNOR hFORTHECOMMONGOODv 6ALLASRAN#HICAGO0UBLIC 3CHOOLSFROMUNTIL 

GRAND CARAVAN SE HANDS FREE UCONNECT, V6, 6, FLEX FUEL Stk#D794

MSRP ............ $21,285 PETE’S DISCOUNT. ..............$371 FACTORY REBATE. ..............$500 MIDWEST OWNER LOYALTY BONUS CASH .............................$750

PETE’S PRICE >

19,664 19,664

$

*

New 2013 RAM

1500

4X4, V8 HEMI Stk#D671

MSRP ............ $31,240

PETE’S DISCOUNT ............$2,241 MIDWEST CONSUMER CASH .. $1,000 2013 RAM TRUCK BONUS CASH... $1,000

26 26,999 ,999

$ PETE’S PRICE >

*

New 2013 Ram

QUAD CAB 4X4 Stk#D638

MSRP ............ $36,170

PETE’S DISCOUNT ............$2,189 MIDWEST CUSTOMER RETAIL CONSUMER REBATE ................... $1,250 MIDWEST 2013 BONUS REBATE ..$1,000 2013 RAM TRUCK BONUS REBATE .$1,000

PETE’S PRICE >

30,731

$

*

OR 2,000 in Rebates PLUS 0% for 72 Months

$

Better Quality‌ Better Service‌ Better Prices Visit us at WWW.PETEHARKNESS.COM

CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM

815-625-2290

Rt 40 S Sterling, Illinois

7YPJLZ KV UV[ PUJS\KL [H_ [P[SL SPJLUZL VY KVJ MLLZ :LL KLHSLY MVY JVTWSL[L KL[HPSZ ZVTL X\HSPĂ„JH[PVUZ L_JS\ZPVUZ TH` HWWS` +LHSLY UV[ SPHISL MVY LYYVYZ


Sports

THAT’S SUPER

v weekend

Steamers ready for next challenge, B3. e-mail: sports@saukvalley.com

Section B

saukvalleysports.com

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Stay updated

Coming soon

Follow SVM Sports staffers on Twitter on Saturday for updates from high school football games. Or visit saukvalleysports. com for all the updates.

Check out video highlights and player interviews from Saturday’s gridiron clash between the Newman Comets and the Eastland-Pearl City Wildcatz at saukvalleysports.com.

‘Like’ us! Sauk Valley Sports

Sports for the Sauk Valley fan!

SVM WEEKEND SPECIAL | SPOTLIGHT ON DAVE JAMISON

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Sterling native Dave Jamison, 75, holds the ever-elusive Wally award he was given at the World Series of Drag Racing in August at Cordova Dragway Park. Jamison has competed in 59 of the 60 World Series.

SINGLE-LANE LIFE

Wally tells Jamison he’s one of drag racing’s best

T T

BY CHRISTOPHER HEIMERMAN | cheimerman@saukvalley.com | 800-798-4085, Ext. 552

he race track has been many things to Dave Jamison. A nursery for each of his four kids. A playground for them, and the perfect site for family reunions. But recently, it became the ultimate Victory Lane, where the 75-year-old Sterling native celebrated his sound defeat of cancer.

Oh, and it’s treated him pretty well as a field of competition. Jamison has competed in 59 of the 60 World Series of Drag Racing, and he’s done his fair share of winning. One month removed from leaving prostate cancer in his rearview, Jamison was presented with a Wally. The solid brass figurine of NHRA founder Wally Parks, along with its walnut base, stands 18 inches tall and checks in at 12 pounds. Jamison’s bears the inscription: For Your Ever Enduring Dedication to the Love of Drag Racing.

Without warning, the race organizers at Cordova Dragway Park – the home of the World Series since 1956 – held up the race, allowing drag racing fixture Bill Pratt to approach Jamison at his rearengine dragster and present him with the most elusive accolade a drag racer can be given. “It was like my reward for going through that whole deal with cancer,” said Dave, his face lighting up in his kitchen Tuesday afternoon nearly as brightly as it did in pictures his wife, Ann, provided SVM. LIFE CONTINUED ON B4

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL | 2013 SAUK VALLEY SKYHAWKS PREVIEW

A mother’s love of game Hammelman returns to basketball court after birth of son BY LARRY BRENNAN lbrennan@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 550

Being a high school studentathlete is hard. Being a college student-athlete is harder. Being a college student-athlete and a mother – mind-boggling. Last fall, Aleena Hammelman was supposed to be a freshman on the Sauk Valley Community College women’s basketball team. Then, quite literally, life happened. Hammelman got pregnant. Her son, Carter, was born Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com Sauk Valley’s Aleena Hammelman drives the lane Monday April 29 this year. Would college have to be against Lincoln. Hammelman is balancing school, basketball, put on hold? What about her and being a mother.

Sports inside

Did you know? Aleena Hammelman started playing varsity basketball in fifth grade at Sterling Christian. athletic career? “There was no question I was coming back,” said Hammelman, who scored 10 points, pulled down 10 rebounds, dished out six assists, and grabbed three steals in the Skyhawks’ 72-53 season-opening

win Monday over Lincoln. “I don’t know how she does it, being a mom and going to school,” her teammate Jordan Giddings marveled. Obviously, Hammelman’s body changed, at least for a while. “I gained 50 pounds,” she said. Hammelman, a 2012 Sterling High School graduate and the 2012 SVM girls basketball player of the year, rebounded quickly, getting back into shape as soon as it was possible. The weight was not a long-term issue.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Cat Matt goes on hunt for big buck, B8.

Bertrand, Illini start season, B5.

LOVE CONTINUED ON B5

Suggestion box Comment or story tip? Contact Sports Editor Dan Woessner at dwoessner@saukvalley.com or 800-798-4085, ext. 555


TOP OF 2

Early exit Andrew Bynum #AVALIERSPLAYER WHO MISSEDALLOFLASTSEASON AFTERHAVINGSURGERYON BOTHKNEES ADMITSHE MIGHTBEFORCEDTORETIRE

Bad karma? Shea McClellin "EARSDEFENSIVEEND WHOSESACKINJUREDAaron RodgersON-ONDAYIS DOUBTFULFOR3UNDAYS GAMEWITHHAMSTRINGINJURY

Your guide to what’s going on in sports

"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

MY 2 CENTS

Grow up, Mr. Incognito On the tube TV listings Saturday Auto racing 10:30 a.m.

s.!3#!23PRINT#UP PRACTICEFOR!DVO#ARE &OX3PORTS 11:30 a.m.

s.!3#!2.ATIONWIDE POLEQUALIFYINGFOR3ERVICE -ASTER &OX3PORTS 1:30 p.m.

s.!3#!23PRINT#UP h(APPY(OUR3ERIES vFINAL PRACTICEFOR!DVO#ARE &OX3PORTS 3 p.m.

s.!3#!2.ATIONWIDE 3ERVICE-ASTER %30.

College football 11 a.m.

s)OWAAT0URDUE "4. s+ANSAS3TAT4EXAS4ECH OR&LORIDA3TAT7AKE &OREST !"# s!UBURNAT4ENNESSEE %30. s0ENN3TAT-INNESOTA %30. s-ISSOURIAT+ENTUCKY %30.5 s4#5AT)OWA3T &3. s5!"AT-ARSHALL #3. s7+ENTUCKYAT!RMY #"33PORTS 2 p.m.

s53#AT#AL &OX 2:30 p.m.

s)LLINOISAT)NDIANA "4. s.EBRASKAAT-ICHIGAN !"# s"95AT7ISCONSIN %30. s-ISSISSIPPI3TAT4EXAS !- #"3 s54%0AT.4EXAS #3. s(AWAIIAT.AVY #"3 3PORTS s*AMES-ADISONAT.EW (AMPSHIRE ."#30 2:45 p.m.

s4ULSAAT%#AROLINA &3.

T

he first day of football practice my freshman year of high school, the team met in the stands of Roscoe Eades Stadium. It was the sort of meeting that happens at the beginning of every sports season. The coaches talked about expectations. The coaches also talked about procedure – you know, get a physical if haven’t already, show up for practice on time, behave in school and do your homework. One little tidbit sticks out in my mind as I think about the bullying situation in the NFL where Jonathan Martin – a 312-pound offensive lineman – is accusing his Dolphins teammate Richie Incognito – another 300-plus pound lineman – of harassment. It’s sparked a debate about the practices of NFL players throughout the league. You know, what’s appropriate motivation, and what is bullying. Before I try to pretend to understand the minds of professional athletes, let’s go back to the bleachers in August of 1996. The coaches discussed the locker room situation. For those that haven’t been inside the stadium – at least the stadium as it was organized in 1996 – there were two rooms separated by the showers. At the south end was a smaller room, stuffed with lockers for the freshmen. On the other side of the bathroom and showers was the

DANWOESSNER 3PORTS%DI TOR2EACH HIMAT DWOESSNER SAUKVALLEY COMCOM OR   EXT 

Sunday Auto racing 2 p.m.

s.!3#!23PRINT#UP !DVO#ARE %30. 6 p.m.

after the meeting. A few years later, I was on the varsity team, and I don’t think I ever gave the freshmen a second thought when they wandered through the locker room. I think as a freshman, I sort of expected to be picked on. When I was a senior, it didn’t interest me to pick on them. See, I grew up, and so did the people around me. As far as making playAP ers tougher, we dealt Dolphins lineman Richie Incognito has been with that on the field by accused by teammate Jonathan Martin of bullying practicing harder. I cerand harassment. The case has sparked debate tainly had to get used to the physical play of around the NFL supporting both men. high school football. I didn’t need any Wouldn’t you know larger sophomore and teammates yelling it that just a day or two varsity locker room. At at me, or calling me the far north end of the later, I got to test that names, or threatening theory. I had to talk to stadium was the office the coaches about prac- me (much less my for the coaches. family). tices that I would miss One of the coaches Neither did any of the because of a family trip mentioned that freshother players on my men were at the bottom to Atlanta. team, even ones who At that point, I was of the totem poll, but developed slower. that he didn’t think that 150 pounds and 5-10. So Mr. Incognito, and older players would take Decent size for a freshman, but nowhere near your apologists: I don’t advantage of that. buy that your actions as big as some of the But, it was probably were with Martin’s best varsity players. Gulp. best to stay out of the interests and the team’s So I went. other teams’ locker best interests in mind. And you know what room, unless you had I just think while the happened next? to get to the coaches people around you grew Nothing. office. up, you just grew bigger. I walked through the See, boys will be boys, See, at 6-foot-3, 319 and even the most trust- varsity side and not one pounds, you are a big ing coaches know that of them noticed, and high school boys can the same was true when guy, but you seem to be a very small man. make poor decisions. I walked back through

6 p.m.

s4EXASAT76IRGINIA &OX s6IRGINIA4ECHAT-IAMI %30. s(OUSTONAT5#& %30. s3OUTHERN-ISSAT,OUISI ANA4ECH #"33PORTS 7 p.m.

s,35AT!LABAMA #"3 s.OTRE$AMEAT0ITT !"# s5TAH3TAT5.,6 %30.5 9 p.m.

s5#,!AT!RIZONA %30. 9:15 p.m.

s&RESNO3TAT7YOMING %30. 9:30 p.m.

s3AN$IEGO3TAT3AN *OSE3T #"33PORTS

Men’s basketball 7 p.m.

s$RAKEAT)LL #HICAGO #3. 7:30 p.m.

s%)LLINOISAT .ORTHWESTERN "4.

Golf Noon

s0'! 4HE-C'LADREY #LASSIC THIRDROUND AT3T 3IMONS)SLAND 'A 4'# 2:30 a.m. (Sunday)

s%UROPEAN0'! 4URKISH !IRLINES/PEN FINALROUND AT!NTALYA 4URKEY 4'#

NHL 7 p.m.

s0ENGUINSAT"LUES &3.

Soccer 8:55 a.m.

s0REMIER,EAGUE 7EST "ROMWICHAT#HELSEA ."#30 11:30 a.m.

s0REMIER,EAGUE 7EST (AMAT.ORWICH ."# 1:30 p.m.

s-,3PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS LEG TEAMSSITE4"$ ."#

s.(2! !UTO#LUB&INALS AT0OMONA #ALIF %30.

Men’s basketball 9:30 p.m.

s#HICAGO3TAT)NDIANA "4.

Women’s basketball 5 p.m.

s$UKEAT#AL %30.5

College field hockey 11 a.m.

s"IG4ENTOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP "4.

Women’s soccer 11 a.m.

s!MERICAN!THLETIC CHAMPIONSHIP %30.5 1 p.m.

s"IG4ENTOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP "4. s3%#TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP %30.5 s"IG%ASTTOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP &OX3PORTS s-6#TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP &3. 3 p.m.

s!##TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP %30.5 3:30 p.m.

s"IGTOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP &OX3PORTS

College volleyball 3:30 p.m.

s.EBRASKAAT-INNESOTA "4.

Golf Noon

s0'! 4HE-C'LADREY #LASSIC FINALROUND 4'#

NFL

3 p.m.

s.#3TATEAT$UKE %30.5 s+ANSASAT/KLAHOMA3T &OX3PORTS s#ORNELLAT$ARTMOUTH ."#30

On the tube TV listings

Noon

NFL | BEARS

Why is Cutler rushing back to field?

S

omething is amiss on the midway, and while the monsters seem quite pleased, I am perplexed – even a tad troubled. Jay Cutler will start at quarterback against the Detroit Lions on Sunday. Under almost any circumstances, one would have to think that’s a good thing. “Jay has, since the day he got hurt, spent 24-7 here,� coach Marc Trestman said. “He was here the entire bye week. He’s done everything he can on and off the field to get ready. “The last couple of days, he’s gone through an excessive protocol to make sure that he was, by doctor’s evaluation, cleared to play the game on Sunday. This morning, they cleared him to play. He practiced the entire practice [Thursday], he took every rep, and had a good practice. I expect him to start Sunday.� So here’s where my dilemma begins. Trestman said this just under 18 days after Cutler tore a tendon in his groin. In what parallel universe are there just under 18 days in “a minimum of 4 weeks, and then a week-to-week evaluation after that?� That was the diagnosis and prognosis of the Bears’ medical people. Both general manager Phil Emery and Trestman emphasized that would be their guide in bringing Cutler back,

s,IONSAT"EARS &OX s"ENGALSAT2AVENS #"3 3:25 p.m.

s"RONCOSAT#HARGERS #"3 7 p.m.

s#OWBOYSAT3AINTS ."#

Soccer 5:55 a.m.

s0REMIER,EAGUE .EWCAS TLEAT4OTTENHAM ."#30 8 a.m.

s0REMIER,EAGUE -AN CHESTER#ITYAT3UNDERLAND ."#30 10:05 a.m.

MCT

Bears quarterback Jay Cutler lies on the ground grimacing in pain after being sacked by Washington Redskins defensive end Jarvis Jenkins on Oct. 20. Cutler was diagnosed with a torn tendon in his groin. Less than 18 days later, Cutler says he’s been cleared to play. one, or is Cutler just a miraculous healer? HUBARKUSH “We stayed on it,� 3HAW-EDIA Cutler said. “Did a lot "EARS of soft tissue work with ANALYST (ECANBE our chiropractor Josh REACHEDAT Aiken, Bobby [Slater] HARKUSH and Chris [Hanks] in SHAWMEDIA COM there did a good job. Used a machine called the ARP over at Synergy Sports just up the road. Threw a lot of stuff at it. and Emery reiterated I wanted to get back as last week leading up soon as possible.� to the Packers game it Were the Bears’ mediremained unchanged. cal people not aware “No. 1, the doctors had this miracle cure was told us that the injury out there, or is it poswas what it was, it was a sible Cutler’s not comlegitimate 4-week injupletely ready and is just ry,� Trestman said. “And rushing back? Jay took it upon himself, “Yeah, if I wasn’t like I said literally, 24-7, back to 100 percent, or doing everything he they [coaches] had any could to rehab.� doubts in it, I wouldn’t I have known most have been practicing of the Bears’ doctors today,� Cutler said. for close to 2 decades. Cutler says he’s 100 They’re not perfect, percent, his coaches have watched him work but they’re really good. And Cutler’s case really and apparently haven’t seen anything yet to doesn’t seem all that complicated or unusual. cause them to doubt him, but here’s someDid the Bears’ doctors thing that puzzles me. miss the boat on this

“He practiced the entire practice today, he took every rep and had a good practice,� Trestman said. If the docs said it was a minimum 4 weeks and then week-to-week evaluation, and you let him come back at least a week and a half early, would you really let him take every rep his first time back on the field? And if that is, in fact, what happened, why would Josh McCown, who couldn’t possibly be any more supportive of Cutler’s return, give this response when asked if he got any reps in practice. “I’m not going to get into that,� McCown said. I am not a conspiracy theorist, I’m not suggesting anything untoward, and I sincerely hope Cutler is 100 percent and ready to go. Common sense suggests he can’t be, and if he’s not, the Bears can only hope his early return doesn’t do more damage than it does good.

s0REMIER,EAGUE !RSENALAT -ANCHESTER5NITED ."#30 2:30 p.m.

s7OMENSEXHIBITION 53 VS"RAZIL ."# 8 p.m.

s-,3PLAYOFFS TEAMS SITE4"$ %30.

Tennis 8 a.m., 2 p.m.

s!407ORLD4OUR&INALS SEMIFINAL %30.

Let us hear it s'AMERESULTS STORY TIPS ATHLETEOFTHEWEEK NOMINATIONS TEAMAND INDIVIDUALSTATSCANBE FAXEDTO   CALLEDINTO   EXTORE MAILEDTO SPORTS SAUKVALLEYCOM

Contact us at 800-798-4085 Sports Editor Dan Woessner EXT DWOESSNER SAUKVALLEYCOM Asst. Sports Editor Christopher Heimerman EXT CHEIMERMAN SAUKVALLEYCOM Sports Reporters Larry Brennan EXT LBRENNAN SAUKVALLEYCOM Ty Reynolds EXT TREYNOLDS SAUKVALLEYCOM Brian Weidman EXT BWEIDMAN SAUKVALLEYCOM


3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

sportShorts

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

VOLLEYBALL | CLASS 2A BUREAU VALLEY SUPERSECTIONAL

SVM staff, wire services CROSS COUNTRY

On the calendar Local events

Johnson qualifies for nationals 3AUK6ALLEY##FRESH MANAND2OCK&ALLSNATIVE Aubree JohnsonWILLRUN ATTHE.*#!!NATIONAL MEET3ATURDAYIN&ORT $ODGE )OWA *OHNSONSTIMEOF MINUTES SECONDSATTHE REGIONALMEETLASTWEEKEND IN*OLIETEARNEDHERASPOT ATNATIONALS3HEWASTHE LONE3KYHAWKTOADVANCE 3AUKSWOMENANDMEN BOTHPLACEDSEVENTHAT REGIONALS

Saturday Women’s basketball 1 p.m.

s3AUK6ALLEYAT2OCK6ALLEY

Cross Country 9 a.m.

s3TATEMEETAT$ETWEILLER 0ARK 0EORIA

Football 1:30 p.m.

s#LASS!PLAYOFFS ND ROUND 3TILLMAN6ALLEYAT %RIE 0ROPHETSTOWN

TRACK & FIELD

Engle earns Hall of Fame nod ,ONGTIME/REGONTHROWS COACHDoug EngleHAS BEENVOTEDINTOTHE)LLINOIS 4RACK#ROSS#OUNTRY #OACHES!SSOCIATION(ALLOF &AME ANDWILLBEOFFICIALLY INDUCTEDON*AN  %NGLE WHOCOACHED STATEQUALIFIERSAND ALL STATERSINMORETHAN YEARSASTHE(AWKS THROWSCOACH ISONEOF SEVENCOACHESnOUTOF NOMINEESnSELECTEDBYTHE  MEMBER)4###!(ALL OF&AMECOMMITTEEATTHEIR ANNUALMEETINGLASTMONTH %NGLEWASNAMEDTHE )4###!SASSISTANTCOACH OFTHEYEARIN NBA

Carter suspended, Chalmers fined 4HE-AVERICKSVince CarterWASSUSPENDED ONEGAMEWITHOUTPAY &RIDAY WHILETHE(EATS Mario ChalmersWASFINED  BYTHE."!FOR SEPARATEINCIDENTSTHISWEEK #ARTERMADECONTACTWITH HISELBOWTOTHEHEADOFTHE 4HUNDERSSteven Adams DURING7EDNESDAYSGAME IN/KLAHOMA#ITY #HALMERSHITTHE#LIPPERS Blake GriffinINTHETHROAT WITHHISFOREARMDURING 4HURSDAYSGAMEIN-IAMI

Bobcats coach has heart surgery #HARLOTTEHEADCOACH Steve Clifford underwent SUCCESSFULSURGERY&RIDAY TOHAVETWOSTENTSPLACED INHISHEART ANDISRESTING COMFORTABLYATTHEHOSPITAL #LIFFORDCHECKEDHIMSELF INTOTHEHOSPITAL4HURSDAY AFTERSUFFERINGCHESTPAINS (ALLOF&AMERPatrick Ewing A"OBCATSASSISTANT WILLSERVEASACTINGHEAD COACHUNTIL#LIFFORDSRETURN NHL

Panthers fire head coach, assistants !FTERANOTHERTHIRD PERIOD COLLAPSE4HURSDAYSTRETCHED THE0ANTHERSLOSINGSTREAK TOSEVENGAMES &LORIDA '-Dale TallonFIREDCOACH Kevin DineenANDHIS ASSISTANTCOACHES&RIDAY 4HE0ANTHERSARE   ANDHAVEALLOWEDAN%AST ERN#ONFERENCE LEADING GOALS4HEYARERANKED THONTHEPOWERPLAY THINFACEOFFPERCENTAGE ANDNDINPENALTYKILL

2 p.m.

Photos by Alex T. Paschal/apsachal@saukvalley.com

ABOVE: The Fulton volleyball team celebrates its championship Thursday night at the Class 2A Farmington Sectional. The Steamers earned their first trip to the Elite Eight since 2003 with a 25-19, 25-13 win over Abingdon-Avon. BELOW: Fulton’s Camerin Huizenga (8) spikes the ball during Thursday’s match. The addition of the sophomore to the varsity roster midway through the season seemed to spark the Steamers.

Better late than never Fulton finds flow in time for improbable playoff run BY LARRY BRENNAN lbrennan@saukvalley.com    EXT

Who would have thought Fulton would be the last Sauk Valley area volleyball team standing? Not Steamers coach Stacy Germann. At least, not until recently. “Probably not midway through the season,� said Germann, who is in her 19th season as Fulton’s head coach. “We had a streak when we lost seven in a row. It’s been a roller-coaster ride for us.� Fulton struggled mightily much of the season, but is making all the right moves in the postseason. The Steamers, who finished 7-7 and tied for fourth in the Three Rivers North, entered the postseason 11-17 overall, and as the No. 3 seed in the the five-team Riverdale Regional. Four wins later, and they’re headed to the Bureau Valley Supersectional at 7 p.m. Saturday. Fulton (15-17) will face Fieldcrest (32-4-1), which has two losses to last year’s 2A state champion, Deer CreekMackinaw, and one to 2012 2A runner-up Dakota. While the Steamers won their first sectional since 2003, when Fulton made its only trip to state, Fieldcrest won its first girls team sectional in any sport. One key addition to the roster seemed to be the missing link for the Steamers. “A little ways into the season, we brought up Camerin Huizenga, a sophomore,� said classmate Betsy

6 p.m.

s#LASS!PLAYOFFS ND ROUND /REGONAT!URORA #HRISTIAN

Volleyball 7 p.m.

s#LASS!"UREAU6ALLEY 3UPERSECTIONAL &ULTONVS &IELDCREST

SUPERSECTIONAL ROSTERS

Fulton vs. Fieldcrest When: 7 Saturday Where:"UREAU6ALLEY (IGH3CHOOL -ANLIUS Twitter:4Y2EYNOLDS ( 34Y2EYNOLDS) Leonard, who had team highs of seven kills and four blocks in Fulton’s 25-19, 25-13 sectional championship win over Abingdon-Avon. “She’s a really good hitter. She helped us a lot on the right side and outside.� “We brought [Huizenga] up about a third of the way into the season,� Germann said. “We finally got our lineup solid and got used to those rotations. It just took us a while. It took them about seven games to get used to it.� A tough schedule made it hard on Fulton at times, but it all seems to be paying off in the end. “Our tournaments and the hard competition that we played helped us, and made us play more together,� said junior Chelsea Lesniewski, who had five aces and three kills Thursday. The ability was there. It just took a while for the Steamers to show it. “I felt like we had potential,� Lesniewski said. “I thought we could do it if we put our minds to it.� “We had a lot of talent individually, but we just weren’t working together,� Leonard said. “Toward the middle of the season, we figured out how to play as a team.� Germann is proud of the turnaround her

s#LASS!PLAYOFFS ND ROUND %ASTLAND 0EARL#ITY at Newman

Fulton Steamers (15-17) !VERI,EITZEN 3O -ARLA3TOECKER 3R /LIVIA%DFORS 3R *ENNA*AMES *R "ONNIE#OLEMAN *R #AMERIN(UIZENGA 3O #HELSEA,ESNIEWSKI *R 2ACHAEL"EIERMANN 3R "ETSY,EONARD 3O *AMIE(UENNEKENS *R +ERRIGAN%NLOE *R !NN2ENKES 3R *ENNIFER-ATJE *R

            

team has accomplished in such a short time. “It’s very rewarding, because we were frustrated at the beginning of the year,� she said.

Sterling Pavilion Skilled nurses staffed 24 hours per day, 7 days a week.

“I knew they had it in them. It’s what we were hoping for at the beginning of the season. “It’s better late than never.�

Fed up

Family Spaghetti

with Cable? Switch to Satellite and Save

105 E. 23rd Street, Sterling

815-626-4264

Fieldcrest Knights (32-4-1) 4ESSA(OLLAND *R 2/11 'RACIE7IESENHOFER Sr.  +AROLYN$E-AY *R  +EGANNE,UDWIG *R (ANNAH0ETERSON 3O  (ALEY2UESTMAN 3R  ,EKSI,ADD 3O  +AITLYN0ETERSEN 3R ,AUREN4JADEN 3O  +IRSTYN0ETERSEN 3R 18 %MMIE7IESENHOFER So.  #OURTNEY-ORITZ *R  +ENZIE-EYER 3R

!.4%..! s 3!4%,,)4% s 3526%),,!.#% s ).4%2.%4

815-625-4492

includes garlic bread & salad

1899

$

+tax

Dine-in only.

Saturdays or Sundays. Expires 11/30/13.

Mama Cimino’s Dine-In ~ Carry-Out ~ Delivery

104 S. Peoria Dixon 288-4448 or 288-4449

Let us help you

“SHED THE CLUTTER!�

All-Safe Storage Center’s

Outdoor Parking Area Providing safety and security at an affordable price!

Why pay for mini storage when you can have your own mini storage in your back yard?

s 0ERFECT FOR WINTER STORAGE FOR YOUR BOAT TRAILER CAMPER OR OTHER VEHICLES s 3TORAGE AREAS FULLY ENCLOSED BY A  FOOT SECURITY FENCE s  HOUR A DAY SECURITY CAMERA MONITORINGRECORDING SYSTEM Call Today s !CCESS THROUGH MAIN GATE BY SECURITY CODE ONLY s !LL NIGHT SECURITY LIGHTING to Reserve

Your Space!

Free Delivery!

10 Barns to Choose From! Monthly Payments Available. No Credit Check Needed!

Dixon

All-Safe Storage Center www.allsafecenter.com

 4IMBER #REEK 2D OFF OF ,OWELL 0ARK 2D $IXON s    "USINESS /FlCE /PEN - &  TO  AND 3AT  TO NOON

Barn Yard

Located on the corner of Boyd and Everett (next to Wendy’s) 815.285.3481 www.cottonstatebarns.com


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

A MAN AND HIS DRAGSTER 3INCE *AMISONHASDRIVENTHESAMEDRAGSTER ALTHOUGHITSBEENREFURBISHEDSEVERALTIMES OFTENTOABIDEBY.(2!STANDARDREVISIONS s#HASSIS#OMMERCIALLYMADEREAR ENGINE ALTHOUGH *AMISONPUTITTOGETHER s%NGINE TRANSMISSION*AMISONBUILDSTHE CUBIC INCH#HEVYENGINESANDTHETRANSMISSONS s4IRES INCHBASEINREAR WITH INCH WIDEREAR SLICKS INCHNARROWTIRESINFRONT s(ORSEPOWER0ULLS ALTHOUGH*UNIORSPULLSMORE

THAN nh4HATWASHISDESTINY TOPASSDAD v$AVE SAID s&UELINJECTION-ANUAL s0ERFORMANCE2UNSQUARTER MILEINSECONDSAT MPH s&UELMILEAGE"URNSGALLONSOFMETHANOLPERQUARTER MILEnTHATS MILEPERGALLON

Racing a way of life for Jamison family LIFE

CONTINUED FROM B1

In one of the photos, longtime friends John Pedgraft and Jeff Wolf, who orchestrated the honor, are seen leaning on a fence. Dave can’t confirm that more than those two and Pratt knew what was coming. “That absolutely floored us,� Ann said. “We had no idea.� Both of them cried. But then, dry eyes were scarce that afternoon. “There aren’t many people who could do what my dad did,� Jamison’s son, “Little� Dave, said. “I had such a feeling of pride. I was trying to maintain my composure. I felt like crying like everybody else. It was just such a great moment for me, that I was there. Those Wallys are really hard to come by.�

The 70-year itch Jamison’s father, Lee, was a mechanic. Any good one tends to do a lot of work in his garage at home. So at the ripe age of 5, young Dave could be found under the hood, honing his skills and feeding his infatuation. “Mechanical things were really interesting to me ‌ how things worked in general,â€? said Dave, who attended Sterling High School. “The easiest classes for me were the classes that pertained to doing something: physics, machine shop. It was like, ‘You guys need to learn how to do that? I already know how.’â€? He cut his teeth behind the wheel well before he could get his license at age 15. When his brother, Brad, went into the service, Dave drove his ’47 Pontiac from the family house – where Dave and Ann still live – on East 2nd Street to the cemetery and back. He said he was keeping it “limbered up.â€? “Who went with you?â€? Ann asked. “Nobody,â€? Dave said. “Nobody? You just got into the car and drove?â€? she pressed. It was a different time. Jamison “tried to competeâ€? in his first World Series in Lawrenceville at age 15, and had to miss out the next year. He was broke. Determined to not miss another, he delivered papers for the Gazette and worked full-time at a gas station while attending Sterling. The same year he graduated, he fathered his first child, Debbie. So he took a fulltime gig as the assistant circulation manager. After his day shift, he worked 6 to 11 at the station as an assistant manager before loading bread trucks from 2 to 4 a.m. “I actually made more than my father,â€? Dave said. “But that was when you could get by with 4 hours of sleep.â€? Born with a silver wrench in their hand “Littleâ€? Dave, also known over the years as Scotty and Junior, had a temporary crib that wouldn’t quite meet modern standards. “He went to the track the first time when he was 6 months old, and he laid in the back window,â€? Dave said. “That was his

Photo submitted

Sterling native Dave Jamison, accompanied by his son, Dave (helmet in hands) accepts his Wally award from Bill Pratt on Aug. 25 at Cordova Dragway Park. Leaning on the fence are John Pedgraft (left) and Jeff Wolf, who orchestrated the honor for their longtime friend. little crib while we raced. All of the kids were like that.� Before you call Child Protective Services – it’s too late, anyway – that package-tray crib was in the back of the tow car, not in any racing vehicles. Jamison shared a lot of stories he preferred not appear in print. “Kids today don’t need any help doing things that they shouldn’t,� Dave said. Junior is grateful for his upbringing. “You look at stuff like that nowadays, and you wonder if that was child abuse,� he said, laughing. “But it was such a different time back then. Society was just a little freer. I look back on my childhood, and the things that I did; there’s no way you’d do that today. I’m glad I grew up when I did.� After all, he had family all over the Midwest. And as a weekend of racing drew near, the four siblings would pepper dad about where they were going and with whom they’d get to play. “They knew everybody and would say, ‘Where are we going this week?’� Dave said. “’We’re going to Union Grove, Wisconsin.’ ‘Oh, wow, we’ll get to see Joe!’ “It was like a big family.� “They’re all really good people,� Ann said. “Decent people. Honest people. You couldn’t ask for better friends. You really couldn’t.�

Four on the floor Dave and Debbie have helped in the bulk of their dad’s races. But life has a way of getting in the way. For instance, Dave’s career with Flambeau took him to North Carolina, and he and his wife, Kathy, now live in Twinsburg, Ohio. Junior is a feared drag racer in his own right, his current dragster even faster than dad’s. And for a while, his son, Josh, was winning plenty of junior dragster races, although his passion for guitar has taken over. “But for a while, we had three generations going,� Dave said.

“That’s pretty neat.â€? His other daughters, Terri and Mary, have had a hard time making it to a lot of races. But the whole gang was there for dad’s 50th anniversary. And Terri once hooked her hubby, Jeff Scanlan, with her speed-shifting prowess. “She was such a gearhead,â€? Ann said. “She could drive a 4-speed like nobody’s business. He said he never saw a woman drive a 4-speed like that.â€? “He couldn’t speed shift, and she taught him how,â€? Dave said. “That was it.â€? “I think it was a week later that they were married,â€? Ann said. “No, no ‌ that’s not true,â€? Dave interjected. More years than not, Dave has been an integral member of the pit crew, and at the tender age of 8, Debbie would help carry out engine blocks. “I always really liked being part of the pit crew,â€? she said. “I always thought I was learning a craft. It helped me with the world, mechanically. As a girl, that’s not something you would always be taught.â€? She would sit in the driver’s seat as the dragster was guided back from a run. While she laments not being able to fulfill her dream of actually driving it, she’s all too aware of the overwhelming amount of practice required to harness speeds of 200-plus mph and G-forces touching 4. Not to mention hitting negative-4 when the chute is pulled. “My dad always knew it was my dream,â€? Debbie said. “But I just never really had the time to learn it. It takes a lot of practice and dedication.â€?

Making the team John Beien lives down the street from Dave and Ann, and calls Dave Jamison “a father.� But they met as coworkers in the mid-’70s as mechanics at Bun Austin Chevrolet. About 15 years ago, Beien started working on Jamison. He wanted to join the crew. “I had to talk him into

it,� Beien said. “He ran a real close-knit group. He could almost run it on his own. But he had close friends who helped him through the years, but I worked my way up to it. You’ve gotta earn your stripes.� Mission accomplished, says Ann. “John Beien is a wonderful person, and there isn’t anything he wouldn’t do,� she said. “It really takes a team. Every member,� Dave said. Dan and Mike Banes round out the crew, along with Junior, when he can make it. While Jamison still builds his own engines and transmissions, he’s relinquished a lot of the race-day work in order to focus. But he admits he’s guilty of micro-management. “I think so,� he said. “I know so,� Ann confirmed. While other drivers relegate their wives to the grandstands, Ann is another integral part of the team. She logs all the races in the computer and tows him back after runs. “They are such a great partnership,� Beien said. “It’s amazing, and they are excellent for each other.� The crew chief also appreciates the racer’s reverence for safety. “And I know when he can’t do it anymore, he won’t,� Beien said. Dave’s contemporaries affectionately call him “The Legend,� and some day it will be time to fade away. It just might not be any time soon.

prostate-specific antigen – test, then had to have a biopsy. The results came back positive. “We spent most of the summer fighting that,� Dave said. The battle log includes five trips to Peoria a week for 5 weeks, preceded by three appointments before treatment began, and then two more after. Jamison chose Peoria because Debbie’s husband, Dan, had his interstitial brachytherapy there, and beat cancer way too early in his life. The treatment involves 21 needles being injected into the prostate to administer radiation. “I thought it would be painful, but the worst thing about the whole deal was the drive to Peoria on a two-lane road,� Dave said. Hold your laughter. “He’s serious,� Ann said. Despite Debbie living in Hudson, just 45 minutes away, Dave and Ann drove home every day, to check on the pets and, frankly, out of principle. “He wanted to drive back and forth,� Debbie said. “I tried my hardest to get him to come over. He wanted to make sure their animals were fed, and he wanted to be comfortable and not put me out.�

the phone, but when I saw him in person, it was one of those shocking moments. It was for real, and it was hard to take. You have this image of people in your mind, and then you don’t see them for a while.â€? In late July, Jamison was declared cancer-free. His first question of his doctor was whether he could race. “He said he’d never had anybody ask him that before,â€? Dave said. “I’d just gotten through with it, and the first thing I want to know about is racing. He said, ‘You’ll find out if you can or you can’t.’ He said I was fit enough.â€? Jamison’s regular doctor agreed. The medical clearance turned Cordova into a family reunion unlike any other. “It was really like a celebration,â€? Dave said, his eyes becoming big as half-dollars. “Everybody knew what happened to me. Hearing them say, ‘He’s here! He’s here!’‌â€? “It was really exciting, especially when he got the Wally,â€? Ann said. His family – immediate and extended – struggled to express what it meant to see the honor play out. “It was just really amazing,â€? Debbie said, then offering a few seconds of pause. “There was so much satisfaction and He still can happiness for him, for Knowing how headstrong her husband was, him to get back in the car and feel good again. It’s Ann always believed very reflective. He never he’d beat it. But there compromised.â€? were moments of “I felt so happy for him, weakness. “There were times when and it was an honor that he really deserved,â€? Beien I thought, ‘Is this really the way it’s going to be? Is said. “He’s not a guy to he really going to be OK?’ go out and beat his chest. He just does his thing. It Yield sign Then I would go take a Jamison has had some ride and cry, and then I’d was rewarding for me to novel conversations while come back,â€? Ann said, her see him get it. Everything came together, and for renewing his license. eyes welling with tears. him to actually get out For instance, the woman “See, I didn’t know there and race, it couldn’t at the desk had a hard that,â€? Dave said. have come together time believing he’d never “I’d tell him I had to go better.â€? gotten a speeding ticket. somewhere,â€? Ann said. Jamison says other “Getting a ticket is a Further proof that the drivers shrug off the rite of passage for men, apple fell near the tree, adrenaline rush that right?â€? Dave said. “Nope. Junior put on his best comes with the lights Nothing. I should’ve poker face. coming down. had one. Call it luck or “My dad is one of those “Yeah, right. OK,â€? he whatever.â€? kinds of guys who never said. “To tell the truth, But in April, in renewing complains about anyI think adrenaline plays his NHRA license, Dave’s thing. If anything’s not a big part. And I get as physical unearthed some- right, you’re not going to much of a rush today as I thing downright unlucky. hear about it,â€? he said. ever have.â€? He had to take a PSA – “I kept tabs on him on


Saturday, November 9, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

SCOREBOARD

MEN’S BASKETBALL | ILLINOIS 80, ALABAMA ST. 63

Football

Welcome back

Playoff Pairings Second round CLASS 1A

Upper bracket s .O  3TOCKTON   AT .O  'ALENA   3ATURDAY s.O!QUIN  AT.O,ENA 7INSLOW   3ATURDAY s .O  !BINGDON   AT .O  /TTAWA -ARQUETTE  3ATURDAY s .O  3TARK #OUNTY   AT .O  ,EO   3ATURDAY Lower bracket s.O4RI 6ALLEY  AT.O!RGENTA /REANA  3ATURDAY s .O  #ARROLLTON   AT .O  #ASEY 7ESTFIELD  3ATURDAY s .O  -AROA &ORSYTH   AT .O  !RTHUR ,OVINGTON  3ATURDAY s.O"ROWN#OUNTY  AT.O#AMP 0OINT#ENTRAL  3ATURDAY

Rice makes hometown crowd happy with big debut BY DAVID MERCER !SSOCIATED0RESS

CHAMPAIGN – Rayvonte Rice scored 22 points and had nine rebounds in his debut to lead Illinois to a season-opening 80-63 win over Alabama State on Friday. Rice is a Champaign native, but spent two seasons at Drake before transferring to Illinois (1-0). The hometown kid made the most of his chance Friday. He scored seven points over a 3-minute span early in the second half to push Illinois’ lead to a commanding 54-37. Nnanna Egwu had a double-double for Illinois with 10 points and 10 rebounds. Joseph Bertrand scored 14 and had eight boards. Jamel Waters led Alabama State (0-1) with 27 points. He was 5-of-6 from 3-point range.

CLASS 2A

Upper bracket s.O%ASTLAND 0EARL#ITY  AT.O .EWMAN  3ATURDAY s.O-OMENCE  AT.O(ALL  2 Saturday s.O2OCKRIDGE  AT.O-ERCER #OUNTY  3ATURDAY s.O%LMWOOD "RIMFIELD  AT.O &ARMINGTON  3ATURDAY Lower bracket s.O#ERRO'ORDO  AT.O!THENS   3ATURDAY s.O#ARLINVILLE  AT.O!UBURN   3ATURDAY s .O  #ARLYLE   AT .O  3TAUNTON   3ATURDAY s.O'ILLESPIE  AT.O#ARMI 7HITE #OUNTY  3ATURDAY

CLASS 3A

Upper bracket s.O+ANKAKEE-C.AMARA  AT.O 7INNEBAGO  3ATURDAY s.O3TILLMAN6ALLEY  AT.O%RIE 0ROPHETSTOWN  3ATURDAY s .O  /REGON   AT .O  !URORA #HRISTIAN  3AUTRDAY s.O3ENECA  AT.O2OBESON   3ATURDAY Lower bracket s .O  4OLONO 5NITY   AT .O  7ILLIAMSVILLE  3ATURDAY s.O3T*OSEPH /GDEN  AT.O -ONTICELLO  3ATURDAY s.O2OBINSON  AT.O'REENVILLE   3ATURDAY s.O-T#ARMEL  AT.O#ARTERVILLE   3ATURDAY

CLASS 4A

Upper bracket s .O  %VERGREEN 0ARK   AT .O  0HILLIPS  3ATURDAY s.O0LANO  AT.O'ENESEO  1 Saturday s.O(ARVARD   .O+ING   s.O2OCKFORD,UTHERAN  AT.O 2OCHELLE  3ATURDAY Lower bracket s .O  (ERRIN   AT .O  "ELLEVILLE !LTHOFF  3ATURDAY s .O  2OCHESTER   AT .O  "REESE -ATER$EI  3ATURDAY s .O  0EOTONE   AT .O  1UINCY .OTRE$AME  3ATURDAY s.O!LLEMAN  AT.O-AHOMET 3EYMOUR  3ATURDAY

CLASS 5A

Upper bracket s.O-ONTINI  AT.O7OODSTOCK -ARIAN  3ATURDAY s .O  +ANELAND   AT .O  *OLIET #ATHOLIC  3ATURDAY s .O  3YCAMORE   AT .AZARETH !CADEMY  3ATURDAY s .O  ,INCOLN 7AY 7EST   AT .O  'LENBARD3OUTH  3ATURDAY Lower bracket s.O3ACRED(EART 'RIFFIN  AT.O 'LENWOOD  3ATURDAY s.O,IMESTONE  AT.O(IGHLAND   3ATURDAY s.O7ASHINGTON  AT.O-T 6ERNON  3ATURDAY s .O  .ORMAL 5 (IGH   AT .O  *ACKSONVILLE  3ATURDAY

CLASS 6A

Upper bracket s.O"OYLAN  AT.O#ARY'ROVE   3ATURDAY s .O  -ARMION   AT .O  0RAIRIE 2IDGE  3ATURDAY s .O  "ATAVIA   AT .O  2OLLING -EADOWS  3ATURDAY s.O,AKE&OREST   .O$E,A 3ALLE   Lower bracket s.O!RGO  AT.O2ICHARDS  3ATURDAY s.O,INCOLN 7AY.ORTH   .O 2ICH#ENTRAL   s.O0ROVIDENCE  AT.O1UINCY   3ATURDAY s.O.ORMAL#OMMUNITY  AT.O %AST3T,OUIS  3ATURDAY

CLASS 7A

Upper bracket s .O  (ONONEGAH   AT .O  ,AKE :URICH  3ATURDAY s .O  7HEATON .ORTH   AT .O  &ENWICK  3ATURDAY s .O  3CHAUMBURG   AT .O  3T 0ATRICK  3ATURDAY s .O  'LENBARD 7EST   AT .O  #ONANT  3ATURDAY Lower bracket s.O$OWNERS'ROVE.ORTH   .O 7HEATON7ARRENVILLE3OUTH   s.O#HICAGO-T#ARMEL   .O 3T2ITA   s .O  %DWARDSVILLE   AT .O  "RADLEY "OURBONNAIS  3ATURDAY s .O  ,INCOLN 7AY %AST   AT .O  /SWEGO%AST  3ATURDAY

CLASS 8A

Upper bracket s.O,OYOLA  AT.O.ILES.OTRE $AME  3ATURDAY s .O  -AINE 3OUTH   AT .O  /AK 0ARK 2IVER&OREST  3ATURDAY s.O"ARRINGTON  AT.O'URNEE 7ARREN  3ATURDAY s.O3TEVENSON  AT.O'LENBARD .ORTH  3ATURDAY Lower bracket s.O-ARIST   .O"OLINGBROOK    s .O  7AUBONSIE 6ALLEY   AT .O  /SWEGO  3ATURDAY s.O.APERVILLE#ENTRAL   .O (OMEWOOD &LOSSMOOR   s .O  3IMEON   AT .O  .EUQUA 6ALLEY  3ATURDAY

Volleyball Postseason pairings CLASS 3A

Princeton Sectional Tuesday’s results s,A3ALLE 0ERUDEF3TERLING    s3YCAMOREDEF$UNLAP     Thursday’s result s #HAMPIONSHIP ,A3ALLE 0ERU DEF 3YCAMORE   

CLASS 2A Bureau Valley Supersectional

Saturday’s game s&ULTONVS&IELDCREST PM Winner advances to state tournament vs. Hamilton County Supersectional, 1:30 p.m. Friday atRedbird Arena, Normal South Beloit Sectional Tuesday’s results s /REGON DEF #HRISTIAN ,IBERTY !CADEMY     s)##ATHOLICDEF$AKOTA      Thursday’s result s#HAMPIONSHIP )##ATHOLICDEF/REGON     Farmington Sectional Tuesday’s results s&ULTONDEF/RION    s!BINGDON !VONDEF3TARK#OUNTY      Thursday’s result s #HAMPIONSHIP &ULTON DEF !BINGDON !VON   

CLASS 1A

Pearl City Sectional Tuesday’s results s3TOCKTONDEF.EWMAN    s+EITH#OUNTRY$AYDEF%RIE      Thursday’s result s #HAMPIONSHIP +EITH #OUNTRY $AY DEF 3TOCKTON   

NBA

Rice was never seriously recruited by Illinois. So he went to Drake before head coach John Groce lured Rice back in his first season as coach. Rice had to sit out a season under NCAA transfer rules, a year Groce has said the stocky guard put to good use, taking off fat and adding muscle. On Friday, Rice looked like the experienced, floor-savvy guard the very young Illini will need. Over a 3-minute span early in the second half, he scored seven points, five of them from the free-throw line, to push Illinois’ lead to 54-37 with 14:20 to play. Not long after knocking down the last of those free throws, Rice headed to the bench for a breather and heard a deserved round of applause from his hometown crowd.

Bertrand watch s3TERLINGGRADUATEHAD POINTS REBOUNDS ASSISTS ANDTURNOVERSINMINUTES "ERTRANDMADEOFATTEMPTS FROMTHEFIELD ANDMADEBOTH HISFREETHROWS

AP

Illinois guard Joseph Bertrand collides with Alabama State forward Maurice Strong during Friday’s game in Champaign. Bertrand scored 14 points as the Illini won 80-63.

MEN’S BASKETBALL | INDIANA 100, CHICAGO STATE 72

Hoosiers follow rules to win Indiana knocks down 45 free throws to beat Ross, Cougars BY MICHAEL MAROT !SSOCIATED0RESS

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – The Hoosiers followed the rules Friday night. They attacked the basket, drew fouls, and made free throws. Defensively, they blocked shots and avoided fouls. And, of course, they won another season opener. Jeremy Hollowell scored a career-high 16 points and had four blocks, and Noah Vonleh added 11 points, 14 rebounds and three blocks in his college debut, leading Indiana past outmanned Chicago State 100-72. It went just the way coach Tom

Ross watch s$IXONGRADUATEHADPOINTS REBOUNDS BLOCKS STEALS ASSISTANDTURNOVERIN MINUTES(EMADEOFSHOT ATTEMPTS INCLUDINGOFFROM  POINTRANGE Crean drew it up. “We knew they were going to get up and press us,� Hollowell said. “With the new rules, we wanted to take advantage of it and attack the basket and get fouled. I think we did a good job of that.� The Hoosiers (1-0) did all of that and more. They blocked 13 shots,

breaking the Assembly Hall record set in 1999 against San Francisco, and falling one short of their overall record set at Penn State in 2000. They made 45 of 55 free throws, breaking the school record for made free throws (43) first set against Michigan in 1943, and tied against Ohio State

in 1997. They outrebounded Chicago State (0-1) 62-36, and had six players score in double figures. They won their 16th consecutive season opener, and their 29th consecutive home opener. And the loudest roar from the crowd might have come when Jeff Howard put in a layup with 11 seconds to go, giving ticket-holders some free food at a nearby restaurant, and Indiana its first 100point game in its season opener since Murray State in November 1992.

Hammelman back into shape for season LOVE

CONTINUED FROM B1

“The first few weeks were kind of hard,� she said. “After that, it kind of fell off with breastfeeding. Then, I got right back into basketball.� Hammelman returned to the court 6 weeks after delivery. “Coach [Jed Johnson] told me to take it easy, but I didn’t think I was that out of shape,� she said. “I was like, ‘Man, I thought I’d be a lot worse,’ but it definitely took some time.� Johnson was amazed how quickly Hammelman returned. “When she came in, she was in wonderful shape,� he said. “There were no worries that way at all. She was ready to go Day 1.� Life as a student-athlete and mother has been anything but easy. “It is very difficult. It’s hard to juggle everything at once,� Hammelman said. “I get a lot of support from my family and my boyfriend. It’s a lot easier with support, but it’s definitely hard sometimes, like getting enough sleep. But, I like it. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.� Giddings, a Rock Falls grad, and Hammelman are two of the seven locals on the roster. The lone returning local player is sophomore Rebecca Hendley of Dixon. The other four Sauk Valley area freshmen include Newman grad Jaimie Hurd, Rock Falls grad Aubree Johnson, AFC grad Sarah Matson, and Amboy grad Autumn Smith. “I’m excited about how much local talent we’ve got,� coach Johnson said. “I’ve been trying to build this program for 4 years now, and get local talent out here. This is a big year for us, because we’ve got a bunch of it.� Not on the roster is freshman Rock Falls grad Morgan Mammosser, who has decided to focus on volleyball. Johnson is assisted by former Newman and Western Illinois University star Michele Salvatori.

Sauk Valley Skyhawks

Roster No. Name Yr.  !LEENA(AMMELMAN &R  !UBREE*OHNSON &R  +RYSTAL*AMES &R  2EBECCA(ENDLEY 3O  *AIMIE(URD &R  3ARAH-ATSON &R  3HELDEEN*OSEPH 3O  *ORDAN'IDDINGS &R  -ORGAN$EAN &R  !UTUMN3MITH &R  0AIGE#ALOW 3O * Virgin Islands

.OV .OV .OV .OV .OV .OV $EC  $EC $EC $EC *AN *AN *AN *AN *AN *AN *AN *AN *AN &EB &EB &EB &EB &EB &EB &EB &EB -ARCH 

Ht. Pos. High school   ' 3TERLING   ' 2OCK&ALLS   ' (ONONEGAH   ' $IXON   ' .EWMAN   ' !&#   ' +INGSTOWN   &# 2OCK&ALLS   # 3T"EDE   & !MBOY   & &REEPORT

Remaining schedule

AT2OCK6ALLEY PM -ADISON PM AT-ALCOLM8 PM AT3OUTH3UBURBAN PM 7AUBONSEE PM $ALEY PM AT,INCOLN4OURNAMENT AT$ALEY PM )LLINOIS#ENTRAL PM AT4RUMAN PM #ARL3ANDBURG PM )6## PM +ENNEDY +ING PM AT"LACK(AWK PM AT+ISHWAUKEE PM -ALCOLM8 PM AT(IGHLAND PM "LACK(AWK%AST PM AT#ARL3ANDBURG PM AT)6## PM "LACK(AWK PM AT+ENNEDY +ING PM +ISHWAUKEE PM (IGHLAND PM AT+ANKAKEE PM AT"LACK(AWK%AST PM 4RUMAN PM AT2EGION4OURNAMENT&REEPORT

AP

Bulls forward Luol Deng (9) shoots during Friday’s game in Chicago. Deng came up an assist short of a triple-double in the Bulls’ 97-73 win.

One assist away from history Deng falls short of triple-double BY K.C. JOHNSON #HICAGO4RIBUNE

CHICAGO – Last week, Luol Deng joined Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Jerry Sloan and Tom Boerwinkle as the only players in franchise history to appear in 10 seasons with the Bulls. Friday night, Deng came a Nazr Mohammed missed reverse layup away from joining more history. Deng narrowly missed becoming the 25th Bull to post a triple-double, settling for 19 points, 11 rebounds and nine assists in a 97-73 victory over the hapless Jazz. And, yes, Jordan, Pippen, Sloan and Boerwinkle all had at least one. Shortly after Mohammed’s miss, Jimmy Butler replaced Deng, who was appearing in his 619th career regular-season game. Deng also added five steals. If Friday didn’t mark Deng’s best all-around game, it at least entered the team picture. The Bulls committed 20 turnovers, but otherwise looked better offensively against a Jazz team that treated defense as if it were optional. They shot 52.8 percent, with 56 points in the paint and 16 fast-break points. Joakim Noah dunked off a pretty feed from Deng on the game’s first possession. Derrick Rose swished a 3-pointer and scored on 6-foot, 11-inch Enes Kanter on the Bulls’ next two. All five starters scored in the first 6 minutes as the ball moved with precision. The Bulls committed seven turnovers in a 3-minute, secondquarter switch that almost prompted Thibodeau to turn over the scorer’s table. But ultimately, Carlos Boozer joined Deng in double-double land, posting 18 points and 10 rebounds in just 24 minutes. Rose added 12 points with five assists in just 28 minutes, and didn’t appear in the fourth. Overall, no starter but Deng logged heavy minutes because of the blowout. Whether this is a good development given the rust Thibodeau keeps alluding to is debatable. The Bulls don’t play again until Monday, when they host the Cavaliers at the United Center at 7 p.m.

Bulls 97, Jazz 73 Star of the game:,UOL $ENG "ULLS PTS  REBS ASSISTS STEALS Up next:#AVALIERSAT "ULLS PM-ONDAY TV/Radio:#3. &- !-


"s367EEKEND Dilbert by Scott Adams

www.saukvalley.com

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Zits® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Arlo & Janis by Jimmy Johnson Garfield by Jim Davis

Freshly Squeezed by Ed Stein Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley

Blondie by Dean Young & John Marshall

Wizard of Id by Brant Parker and Johnny Hart

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis Rose is Rose by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Pickles by Brian Crane Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom

Baby Blues by Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman

Soup To Nutz by Rick Stromoski

Family Circus by Bil Keane

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

Alley Oop by Dave Graue and Jack Bender

Bridge Frank & Ernest by Bob Thaves

Bidding order can make difference

Grizzwells by Bill Schorr

After the opener bids one of a suit and the next player makes a takeout double, if the responder redoubles, it shows at least 10 high-card points and often a desire to try to penalize the opponents. So, if fourth hand (the advancer) bids a suit, the opener (unless he can double with length there) typically passes to give his partner a chance to double. In contrast, what does it mean if the opener bids immediately, in front of his partner? The answer is that the opener has a minimum or subminimum opening bid with offensive, not defensive, values. An example is the North hand in the diagram. He has only 11 high-card points and

a hand that is built for declarer play, not defense. South, a tad disappointed, signs off in three no-trump. West leads the heart three, and East puts in the eight. Af-

ter winning with his king, how should declarer proceed? South starts with only five top tricks: one spade, two hearts and two diamonds. However, he can hope to win at least six diamond tricks, if not seven. But he must be careful not to play a diamond to dummy’s jack. Then he would fall foul of the foul 4-0 split. Instead, declarer must finesse dummy’s nine on the first round. Here, he ends with 11 tricks: one spade, two hearts, seven diamonds and one club. But even if East could take the first diamond trick, the contract would be safe. Finally, note that many experts play an immediate jump rebid by opener also indicates a bare 11 or 12 points, with a hand having even more winners and scant defensive values. © 2013 UFS


Saturday, November 9, 2013

#/,,%'%&//4"!,,

TY’S CAMPUS BLITZ

367EEKENDs"

PREVIEW | NO. 13 LSU AT NO. 1 ALABAMA

Heisman hype heating up I n recent years, the Heisman Trophy race has, more often than not, become a competition between the best players on the best teams ‌ and most often lately, it’s been between the quarterbacks of the best teams. Now, there have been plenty of candidates from all over the field the past few seasons, but QB has become THE position for Heisman winners. Eleven of the last 13 recipients have been QBs; actually, with Reggie Bush’s 2005 Heisman vacated, you could say 11 of the last 12 (Alabama’s Mark Ingram in 2009 is the lone wolf). That being said, I believe this year will be more of the same. When looking at the top teams in the country, the QB position is the main reason why those teams are where they are, atop the polls. So here’s my unofficial breakdown of the top candidates to walk away with the most coveted award in college football, and the list is 100 percent quarterback (all of whom, by the way, are semifinalists for the Davey O’Brien Award): Leader of the Pack:

Jameis Winston, Florida State redshirt freshman (149-for-212 passing, 2,502 yards, 20 TDs, 6 INTs; 153 rushing yards, 3 TDs). As the Seminoles keep putting up big margins of victory against top-tier opponents, Winston’s name will keep creeping up the Heisman charts. He seems to play better on the bigger stage, and is currently the nation’s best third-down quarterback. Hot on his Heels:

Marcus Mariota, Oregon redshirt sophomore (164-for-259, 2,531 yards, 22 TDs, 0 INTs; 495 rushing yards, 9 TDs). A West Coast stud, Mariota sometimes gets the shorter end of the stick in an East Coast-centric society. But his zero in the interception column, along with the Ducks’ ability to put up big stats will keep him toward the top of the heap. Oregon’s loss to Stanford might put a dent in his Heisman chances, but his stats are stil impressive enough to keep him in the thick of the hunt.

tyREYNOLDS Sports reporter. (ECANBE reached at treynolds@ saukvalley. COMOR   EXT

Incumbent: Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M redshirt sophomore (200-for276, 2,867 yards, 26 TDs, 8 INTs; 564 rushing yards, 8 TDs). Manziel’s stats are even more impressive than when he won the Heisman last year, but the Aggies already have two losses and he doesn’t yet have that signature win in 2013. He’s got to be mentioned as a front-runner because of his numbers and his history of already winning the award, but his controversial actions throughout the offseason may have soured some of his fellow Heisman winners on giving him the award again. Under the Radar: AJ McCarron, Alabama 5thyear senior (145-for-209, 1,862 yards, 16 TDs, 3 INTs). While his stats aren’t as gaudy as the other guys on this list, he’s got national championships in both his previous seasons as the Tide’s starting QB, and has a 32-3 record with a total of 65 TDs and 11 INTs in the last 2½-plus seasons. The Tide seem to have the inside track on a third national title, and the pedigree and winning nature of McCarron should have him higher on the Heisman watch list than he has been so far. Dark Horse: Jordan Lynch, NIU 5th-year senior (164-for-258, 1,871 yards, 19 TDs, 5 INTs; 1,150 rushing yards, 12 TDs). I say dark horse, but it doesn’t get much darker than this. Lynch is one of the best running QBs in NCAA history, and has led the Huskies to a 21-2 record as a starter the past two seasons. But being in a “mid-majorâ€? program, Lynch is often overlooked on the national stage, and he’s fighting a big-time uphill battle to even get an invite to NYC’s Downtown Athletic Club for the Heisman ceremony.

TY’S GAMES TO WATCH Virginia Tech at No. 11 Miami When: 6 p.m. Saturday TV: ESPN Where: Sun Life Stadium Line: Miami by 6½ What’s up: The ’Canes will be fired up after a loss to rival FSU, and they still control their own destiny in the !###OASTAL$IVISION4HE(OKIESALSOCONTROLTHEIROWN destiny, but may not have the speed and athleticism to match up with Miami. My pick: Miami 31-14

AP

Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron (10) passes during the Crimson Tide’s win over Tennessee. The Tide know that a spot in the national title game is at risk when they host LSU on Saturday.

THE BIG ONE

Even Saban admits stakes high against LSU six meetings in Tuscaloosa. “Just to play a game of this magTUSCALOOSA, Ala. – Even Nick nitude with this type of team, this Saban isn’t protesting too loudly is kind of our national championthat Alabama-LSU is just another ship right here,� Tigers linebacker game. Lamin Barrow said. “And I feel The stakes are too high, the like those guys feel the same way, recent meetings too competitive, so it’s a kind of different attitude and the rivalry just too darn when we play these guys. You hate compelling. to lose to a team like Alabama.� “It’s probably hard for everybody Here are five things to watch in to think that this is just another this SEC West showdown: game,� Saban said. Covering Beckham & Landry: For the top-ranked Crimson Alabama’s secondary has typically Tide’s laser-focused coach, that been Saban’s pride and joy, but amounts to a monumental coninjuries and youth have turned cession to what Saturday night’s the cornerback spot opposite meeting with the Tigers at Bryant- Deion Belue into a revolving door Denny Stadium means for both of starters. teams and fan bases. Potential starter Bradley Sylve’s For Alabama (8-0, 5-0 Southeast- status is uncertain with an ankle ern Conference), it represents one injury. As if covering LSU receivof the biggest remaining hurdles ers Odell Beckham Jr. and Jarvis toward a crack at a third consecu- Landry, who have a combined tive national title. 1,891 receiving yards and 16 LSU (7-2, 3-2) hopes to spoil touchdowns, isn’t hard enough. that bid and still turn the season Texas A&M’s Mike Evans torched into something special despite the Tide for 279 yards early in the losing to both Georgia and season. Mississippi by a field goal. Plus, Points galore? The last time LSU it’s Alabama. visited Bryant-Denny, the teams “It’s definitely huge. I can’t even combined for 15 points and zero understate that,� Tigers running touchdowns, even with overtime back Jeremy Hill said. “It’s a big thrown in. game. I’m not even going to sit The last three meetings prohere and lie to you guys. You just duced a collective 74 points. The can’t let it overwhelm you.� oddsmakers’ over-under for this Hill said that’s one thing one is 55 points. The Tide are Alabama does well in big games. ranked second in the SEC in scor“They don’t let the moment get ing offense and LSU fourth, and to them,� he said. both have plentiful weapons for The Tide are 15-4 against oppoquarterbacks AJ McCarron and nents ranked in the Top 10 over Zach Mettenberger. the past six seasons. Then again, Mettenberger vs. McCarron: nobody has beaten Saban and They’re two of the SEC’s most the Tide as many times as LSU’s efficient, dangerous passers. three victories since 2007, and the Alabama’s McCarron has the Tigers have won five of the past big-game reputation, but LSU’s BY JOHN ZENOR !03PORTS7RITER

Mettenberger is poised to become the first LSU quarterback to pass for 2,500 yards in back-to-back seasons. They had quite a duel last season, when both had some cold spells and stretches where they caught fire. McCarron has been steadily leading Alabama to big leads, and hasn’t gone the distance much this season, keeping his numbers down some. He has thrown for 16 touchdowns against three interceptions. Mettenberger has thrown five interceptions in the past two games, but only seven all season. Underdog LSU: The Tigers are 12-point underdogs in a rivalry where the margin for the last three regular-season meetings has been almost a dead heat: LSU 50, Alabama 48. LSU coach Les Miles says his team doesn’t take on an underdog mentality. Tigers defensive tackle Anthony Johnson is feeling a bit put out by all the attention tilting toward the Tide. “It’s personal with me because I – I’m not saying I dislike them, I have an edge against them,� Johnson said. “It’s always been Alabama and LSU, Alabama and LSU, but this year people are just saying ... Alabama is going to get past that team. Honestly, I don’t like that.� Coverting third downs: Stopping LSU’s offense on third-down plays has been every bit as hard for opponents as converting them against the Tide’s defense. The Tigers trail only Louisville nationally with a 57.6 percent success rate. Opposing offenses are converting just 29.5 percent of their chances against Alabama.

Texas at West Virginia When: 6 p.m. Saturday TV: Fox Where: Milan Puskar Stadium Line: Texas by 6 What’s up:!FTERSOMEEARLY SEASONSLIP UPS THE,ONGHORNSAREATOPTHE"IGSTANDINGS STILLLOOKINGFORTHAT AUTOMATIC"#3BERTH4HE-OUNTAINEERSGOTAHARD FOUGHTOVERTIMEWINAT4#5LASTWEEK BUTWILLHAVETO play better this week to beat Texas. My pick:4EXAS 

No. 13 LSU at No. 1 Alabama When:PM3ATURDAY TV:#"3 Where:"RYANT $ENNY3TADIUM Line:!LABAMABYž What’s up:&ORTHETHIRDSTRAIGHTSEASON BOTHTEAMS COMEINTOTHISHEAVYWEIGHTFIGHTOFFABYEWEEKxAND THEROADTEAMHASWONEACHOFTHOSELASTTWOMEETINGS "UTWHILETHE4IDESOFFENSEANDDEFENSEAREASGOODAS EVER THE4IGERSDEFENSEISNTASSTOUTTHISYEARAFTERLOSINGNEARLYEVERYSTARTERTOTHE.&,)TLLBETOUGHTOBEAT "AMA EVENIFTHEIROFFENSEISBETTERTHANBEFORE My pick:!LABAMA 

No. 19 UCLA at Arizona When: 9 p.m. Saturday TV: ESPN Where:!RIZONA3TADIUM Line: !RIZONABY What’s up: 4HE"RUINSSNAPPEDATWO GAMESLIDELAST week, but it’s never been easy for them in Tucson. The Wildcats have won three in a row since back-to-back LOSSES ANDTHEIROFFENSECANPUTUPSOMEPRETTYGAUDY numbers. My pick: 5#,! 

FULL SLATE Saturday’s games EAST 7+ENTUCKY  AT!RMY  AM 2OBERT-ORRIS  AT##35  AM 0RINCETON  AT0ENN  AM "ROWN  AT9ALE  AM (ARVARD  AT#OLUMBIA  AM (OLY#ROSS  AT,EHIGH  AM *AMES-ADISON  AT.EW(AMPSHIRE   AM 6ILLANOVA   AT 2HODE )SLAND   AM "UCKNELL  AT&ORDHAM  NOON 2ICHMOND  AT3TONY"ROOK  NOON -AINE  AT!LBANY.9   PM #OLGATE  AT,AFAYETTE  PM (AWAII  AT.AVY  PM #ORNELL  AT$ARTMOUTH  PM 4EXAS  AT7EST6IRGINIA  PM .OTRE$AME  AT0ITTSBURGH  PM SOUTH &LORIDA 3T   AT 7AKE &OREST   11 a.m. 7ESLEY  AT#HARLOTTE  AM 6ANDERBILT  AT&LORIDA  AM -ISSOURI  AT+ENTUCKY  AM 5!"  AT-ARSHALL  AM !UBURN  AT4ENNESSEE  AM !RKANSAS  AT-ISSISSIPPI  AM !PPALACHIAN 3T   AT 'EORGIA   AM 6IRGINIA  AT.#AROLINA  AM -ARIST  AT#AMPBELL  NOON #OASTAL #AROLINA   AT #HARLESTON 3OUTHERN  NOON .##ENTRAL  AT(AMPTON  NOON 3AVANNAH3T  AT(OWARD  NOON 3AN$IEGO  AT-OREHEAD3T  noon .#!4  AT-ORGAN3T  NOON %)LLINOIS  AT-URRAY3T  NOON 'ARDNER 7EBB  AT6-)  NOON 4HE#ITADEL  AT%LON  PM

3AMFORD  AT&URMAN  PM &LORIDA !-   AT 3# 3TATE   PM *ACKSON3T  AT!LABAMA!-  1 p.m. 3OUTHERN5  AT!LABAMA3T  1 p.m. 7OFFORD  AT#HATTANOOGA  PM 7 #AROLINA   AT 'EORGIA 3OUTHERN   PM 4EXAS3OUTHERN  AT-635  PM *ACKSONVILLE  AT-ERCER  PM $AVIDSON  AT3TETSON  PM !USTIN0EAY  AT4ENNESSEE3T  2 p.m. 0RESBYTERIAN  AT,IBERTY  PM 3YRACUSE  AT-ARYLAND  PM 4ULSA  AT%AST#AROLINA  PM .ORFOLK 3T   AT "ETHUNE #OOKMAN   PM .#3TATE  AT$UKE  PM % +ENTUCKY   AT *ACKSONVILLE 3T   PM &)5  AT-IDDLE4ENNESSEE  PM ,AMAR  AT.ORTHWESTERN3T  PM 54 -ARTIN  AT-EMPHIS  PM 3OUTHERN-ISS  AT,OUISIANA4ECH   PM !RKANSAS3T  AT,OUISIANA -ONROE   PM 6IRGINIA4ECH  AT-IAMI  PM (OUSTON  AT5#&  PM ,35  AT!LABAMA  PM MIDWEST 3-5  AT#INCINNATI  AM 4#5  AT)OWA3T  AM 0ENN3T  AT-INNESOTA  AM )OWA  AT0URDUE  AM 6ALPARAISO  AT"UTLER  NOON 7-ICHIGAN  AT%-ICHIGAN  NOON $AYTON  AT$RAKE  PM .#OLORADO  AT.$AKOTA  PM 4ENNESSEE 4ECH   AT 3% -ISSOURI

LINE   PM -ONTANA  AT3OUTH$AKOTA  PM )NDIANA3T  AT3$AKOTA3T  2 p.m. -ISSOURI3T  AT3)LLINOIS  PM )LLINOIS  AT)NDIANA  PM .EBRASKA  AT-ICHIGAN  PM )LLINOIS 3T   AT . $AKOTA 3T   PM "95  AT7ISCONSIN  PM 9OUNGSTOWN 3T   AT . )OWA   4 p.m. SOUTHWEST +ANSAS3T  AT4EXAS4ECH  AM 4ULANE  AT543!  PM .ICHOLLS 3T   AT 3AM (OUSTON 3T   PM 'RAMBLING 3T   AT !RK 0INE "LUFF   PM 54%0  AT.ORTH4EXAS  PM -ISSISSIPPI3T  AT4EXAS!-  PM +ANSAS  AT/KLAHOMA3T  PM -C.EESE3T  AT3TEPHEN&!USTIN   PM 3% ,OUISIANA   AT #ENT !RKANSAS   PM FAR WEST 3OUTHERN#AL  AT#ALIFORNIA  PM 35TAH  AT7EBER3T  PM -ONTANA3T  AT%7ASHINGTON  PM .EVADA  AT#OLORADO3T  PM "OSTON#OLLEGE  AT.EW-EXICO3T   PM !RIZONA3T  AT5TAH  PM /LD$OMINION  AT)DAHO  PM 0ORTLAND3T  AT)DAHO3T  PM 5TAH3T  AT5.,6  PM #OLORADO  AT7ASHINGTON  PM 5#,!  AT!RIZONA  PM &RESNO3T  AT7YOMING  PM 3$IEGO3T  AT3*OSE3T  PM

FAVORITE )OWA 7+ENTUCKY AT#INCINNATI AT$UKE AT%AST#AROLINA AT)NDIANA 4#5 &LORIDA3T AT-ARSHALL AT-IAMI AT-INNESOTA AT-ARYLAND -ISSOURI AT.ORTH#AROLINA at Florida 7-ICHIGAN AT543! &RESNO3T AT4EXAS4ECH AT7ISCONSIN AT-ISSISSIPPI AT#OLORADO3T AT7ASHINGTON 4EXAS !RIZONA3T AT-ICHIGAN AT.AVY AT.ORTH4EXAS AT/KLAHOMA3T 3OUTHERN#AL .OTRE$AME AT4EXAS!- "OSTON#OLLEGE 5TAH3T AT-IDDLE4ENN AT,A -ONROE AT,OUISIANA4ECH !UBURN AT5#& AT!RIZONA AT!LABAMA AT3AN*OSE3T

LINE       ž ž  ž ž ž ž ž 10 ž  ž ž      ž ž    ž ž  ž ž  ž ž ž ž  ž ž

O/U  ž ž  ž       ž  ž 42½ ž   ž ž ž  ž  ž ž   ž    ž ž ž     ž  

DOG AT0URDUE AT!RMY 3-5 .#3TATE 4ULSA )LLINOIS AT)OWA 3T AT7AKE&OREST 5!" 6IRGINIA4ECH 0ENN3T 3YRACUSE AT+ENTUCKY 6IRGINIA Vanderbilt AT%-ICHIGAN 4ULANE AT7YOMING +ANSAS3T "95 !RKANSAS .EVADA #OLORADO AT7EST6IRGINIA AT5TAH .EBRASKA (AWAII 54%0 +ANSAS AT#ALIFORNIA AT0ITTSBURGH -ISSISSIPPI3T AT.-EXICO3T AT5.,6 &)5 !RKANSAS3T 3OUTHERN-ISS AT4ENNESSEE (OUSTON 5#,! ,35 3AN$IEGO3T


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

FRIDAY’S SCOREBOARD

No apologies; no excuses; get after your big buck

W

ell, I just hate being right but, as it turns out ‌ I am. The big buck reports have really started to roll in. Seems those big boys are in the mood for love all of a sudden. Whether or not the ladies are ready, I’m not sure. But, if you’re a deer hunter, being in the woods is a necessity right now. I ventured out on my first hunt of the year earlier this week and, if there ever was an old saying to describe my hunt, it would definitely be in the right place at the right time. I arrived in the swampy woods just southeast of Erie and was tucked into my tree by 3 in the afternoon. I got settled in for the evening and had high hopes, as the timber had been left alone for the whole season. Well, some 20 minutes into my sit, I pull out the old reliable grunt tube and try my best to imitate the sound of a buck running a doe. I either hit it just right, or this dude was deaf, but whatever the reason, just a minute later, I’m face to snout with a beautiful 10-point buck. This ol’ boy was ticked off, too, looking for a fight and thrashing small trees as he approached. At some 9 yards, he got more than he bargained for, as the rage broadhead found its way through his ribcage, and that, as we say, “was all she wrote.â€? This fine Whitetail ended field dressing at 202 pounds, and sported 10 perty darn even points. Just a great animal. Man, I almost felt guilty

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

NFL

Men’s basketball

AMERICAN CONFERENCE W .EW%NGLAND  .9*ETS  -IAMI  "UFFALO  )NDIANAPOLIS 4ENNESSEE (OUSTON *ACKSONVILLE

W    

#INCINNATI #LEVELAND "ALTIMORE 0ITTSBURGH

W    

+ANSAS#ITY $ENVER 3AN$IEGO /AKLAND

W    

East L T         South L T         North L T         West L T        

Pct    

PF    

PA    

Pct    

PF    

PA    

Pct    

PF    

PA    

Pct PF       

PA    

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East L T Pct PF                 South W L T Pct PF .EW/RLEANS      #AROLINA      !TLANTA      4AMPA"AY      North W L T Pct PF $ETROIT      #HICAGO      'REEN"AY      -INNESOTA      West W L T Pct PF 3EATTLE      3AN&RANCISCO     !RIZONA      3T,OUIS      Thursday’s result -INNESOTA 7ASHINGTON Sunday’s games $ETROITAT#HICAGO NOON 0HILADELPHIAAT'REEN"AY NOON *ACKSONVILLEAT4ENNESSEE NOON #INCINNATIAT"ALTIMORE NOON 3T,OUISAT)NDIANAPOLIS NOON 3EATTLEAT!TLANTA NOON /AKLANDAT.9'IANTS NOON "UFFALOAT0ITTSBURGH NOON #AROLINAAT3AN&RANCISCO PM $ENVERAT3AN$IEGO PM (OUSTONAT!RIZONA PM $ALLASAT.EW/RLEANS PM Monday’s game -IAMIAT4AMPA"AY PM $ALLAS 0HILADELPHIA 7ASHINGTON .9'IANTS

AP

Cheyenne Voss of Erie poses with a nine-point buck he bagged this past week. taking that buck. I mean, deer hunting successfully with a bow and arrow usually is a ton of work. So days like this one are like a breath of fresh air. Generally, success comes only after scouting and shooting and preparing. Heck, the only preparing I did this year was pack my backpack. I have paid plenty of dues, though, so I will take it. Like I said before, the reports are starting to roll in, and it should only get better from here. My buck, while swollen around the neck, was still covered in fat, indicating that the rut is not in full swing yet. A whitetail buck can lose 30 to 40 percent of its body weight during the rut chasing the ladies around. A great diet plan, if you ask me. This week, a good buddy of mine, Cheyenne Voss from Erie, hit it big in the deer woods. Take a look at the picture above. What a tremendous deer we got right here. Now last

year, Cheyenne scored on an absolute monster deer, and by the looks of things, he’s got this thing figured out. This here nine-pointer is just plain old fantastic. Congrats to old Cheyenne and, who knows, the season’s young. Maybe there’s another monster to come. So, I haven’t forgot about the Rock River. No, not one bit. One thing that hopping in a tree and smacking a big buck will do for me is push me right back to the river. The water temps on the Rock are still hovering in the mid-40s, and the channel cat bite is strong. This week, I also got my first accidental walleye of the season, and had reports of a strong sauger bite, as well. I guess what I’m saying is that there is just a ton of great stuff going on out there right now. No excuse to be indoors. Get outside and live a little this weekend, all. Go Catfish!

W    

PA     PA     PA     PA    

Line Sunday Favorite

Line O/U Sunday AT4ENNESSEE   AT'REEN"AY   AT0ITTSBURGH  ž AT.9'IANTS  ž AT)NDIANAPOLIS ž  3EATTLE ž ž #INCINNATI ž  AT#HICAGO  ž AT3AN&RANCISCO   AT!RIZONA ž  $ENVER   AT.EW/RLEANS ž  Monday -IAMI ž 

Underdog *ACKSONVILLE 0HILADELPHIA "UFFALO /AKLAND 3T,OUIS AT!TLANTA AT"ALTIMORE $ETROIT #AROLINA (OUSTON AT3AN$IEGO $ALLAS AT4AMPA"AY

College football Big Ten Conference Overall W-L Pct. W-L Pct. Legends Division -ICHIGAN3T       .EBRASKA       -INNESOTA       -ICHIGAN       )OWA       .ORTHWESTERN       Leaders Division /HIO3T       7ISCONSIN       0ENN3T       )NDIANA       )LLINOIS       0URDUE       Saturday’s games )OWAAT0URDUE AM 0ENN3TAT-INNESOTA AM "95AT7ISCONSIN PM )LLINOISAT)NDIANA PM .EBRASKAAT-ICHIGAN PM Saturday, Nov. 16 )NDIANAAT7ISCONSIN AM 0URDUEAT0ENN3T AM -ICHIGANAT.ORTHWESTERN PM -ICHIGAN3TAT.EBRASKA 4"! /HIO3TAT)LLINOIS 4"!

Top 25 schedule Thursday’s results .O3TANFORD .O/REGON .O"AYLOR .O/KLAHOMA Friday’s result .O,OUISVILLE 5#ONN Saturday’s games .O!LABAMAVS.O,35 PM .O&LORIDA3TATEAT7AKE&OREST AM .O!UBURNAT4ENNESSEE AM .O-ISSOURIAT+ENTUCKY AM .O  4EXAS !- VS -ISSISSIPPI 3TATE PM .O-IAMIVS6IRGINIA4ECH PM .O/KLAHOMA3TATEVS+ANSAS PM .O5#,!AT!RIZONA PM .O&RESNO3TAT7YOMING PM .O5#&VS(OUSTON PM .O7ISCONSINVS"95 PM .O!RIZONA3TATEAT5TAH PM .O.OTRE$AMEAT0ITTSBURGH PM .O4EXAS4ECHVS+ANSAS3T AM

Big Ten schedule Friday’s results )LLINOIS !LABAMA3T )NDIANA #HICAGO3T )OWA 5.#7ILMINGTON -ICHIGAN 5-ASS ,OWELL -ICHIGAN3T -C.EESE3T -INNESOTA ,EHIGH .EBRASKA &LORIDA'ULF#OAST 0URDUE .+ENTUCKY 7ISCONSIN 3T*OHNS Saturday’s games -ORGAN3TAT/HIO3T AM 7AGNER#OLLEGEAT0ENN3T PM %)LLINOISAT.ORTHWESTERN PM Sunday’s games .EBRASKA /MAHAAT)OWA PM *ACKSONVILLE3TAT)LLINOIS PM

Sunday’s games 3AN!NTONIOAT.EW9ORK AM 7ASHINGTONAT/KLAHOMA#ITY PM .EW/RLEANSAT0HOENIX PM -INNESOTAAT,!,AKERS PM

NHL

Friday’s box scores

ILLINOIS 80, ALABAMA ST. 63 ALABAMA ST. (0-1) 0AGE   'RAHAM   3TRONG      2OBINSON      7ATERS    "ROWN   !RMSTRONG    )NGRAM   ,E&LORE   Totals 23-66 8-13 63. ILLINOIS (1-0) %KEY   %GWU   "ERTRAND    !BRAMS   2ICE    4ATE   ,A4ULIP   (ILL   -ORGAN   .UNN     #OLBERT      Totals 27-61 22-30 80. Halftimen)LLINOIS   3sn!LABAMA 3T 7ATERS  "ROWN  ,E&LORE   )NGRAM  'RAHAM  3TRONG  2OBINSON   )LLINOIS   ,A4ULIP   !BRAMS  2ICE  .UNN  4ATE  (ILL   %KEY    Reboundsn!LABAMA 3T  3TRONG  )LLINOIS  %GWU   Assistsn!LABAMA3T7ATERS )LLINOIS  !BRAMS   Foulsn!LABAMA 3T  'RAHAMOUT )LLINOIS

INDIANA 100, CHICAGO ST. 72 CHICAGO ST. (0-1) $ENARD      0IPPEN      2OSS      $ISMUKES      $UHON   'RAY   'RIFFIN    +ARIS   $IMAKOS    "ATSON   2OSENBERG    $AVIS   2OSENTHAL   3TARKS  Totals 21-81 22-27 72. INDIANA (1-0) 3HEEHEY   6ONLEH   7ILLIAMS      &ERRELL      (OLLOWELL   #ALOMERIS    -ARLIN      'ORDON      -OSQUERA 0EREA      %THERINGTON    $AVIS   &AGAN    2OBINSON   (OWARD   (ARTMAN   *URKIN   &ISCH ER  Totals 27-59 45-55 100. Halftimen)NDIANA 3sn#HICAGO3T  2OSENBERG  0IPPEN  $UHON   2OSS   $IMAKOS   $ISMUKES   'RIFFIN   "ATSON   'RAY   )NDIANA   (OLLOWELL   3HEEHEY   &ERRELL    Reboundsn#HICAGO 3T  2OSS )NDIANA6ONLEH Assists– #HICAGO 3T  'RAY  )NDIANA  &ERRELL  Foulsn#HICAGO3T$ENARD 0IPPEN OUT )NDIANA

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct 0HILADELPHIA    .EW9ORK    "ROOKLYN    4ORONTO    "OSTON    Southeast Division W L Pct -IAMI    #HARLOTTE    /RLANDO    !TLANTA    7ASHINGTON    Central Division W L Pct )NDIANA    -ILWAUKEE    $ETROIT    #HICAGO    #LEVELAND    WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct 3AN!NTONIO    (OUSTON    .EW/RLEANS    $ALLAS    -EMPHIS    Northwest Division W L Pct /KLAHOMA#ITY    -INNESOTA    0ORTLAND    $ENVER    5TAH    Pacific Division W L Pct 'OLDEN3TATE    0HOENIX    ,!#LIPPERS    ,!,AKERS    3ACRAMENTO    Friday’s results "OSTON /RLANDO 0HILADELPHIA #LEVELAND )NDIANA 4ORONTO 7ASHINGTON "ROOKLYN /4 .EW9ORK #HARLOTTE /KLAHOMA#ITY $ETROIT #HICAGO 5TAH -INNESOTA $ALLAS .EW/RLEANS ,!,AKERS 3AN!NTONIO 'OLDEN3TATE 0HOENIX $ENVER 3ACRAMENTOAT0ORTLAND LATE Saturday’s games 5TAHAT4ORONTO PM )NDIANAAT"ROOKLYN PM 0HILADELPHIAAT#LEVELAND PM "OSTONAT-IAMI PM /RLANDOAT!TLANTA PM ,!#LIPPERSAT(OUSTON PM 'OLDEN3TATEAT-EMPHIS PM $ALLASAT-ILWAUKEE PM 0ORTLANDAT3ACRAMENTO PM

GB ˆ ž ž   GB ˆ   ž ž GB ˆ  ž ž 

GB ˆ    ž GB ˆ ž ž  ž GB ˆ ˆ  ž 

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L OT Pts GF GA 4AMPA"AY       4ORONTO       $ETROIT       "OSTON       -ONTREAL       /TTAWA       &LORIDA       "UFFALO       Metropolitan Division W L OT Pts GF GA 0ITTSBURGH       7ASHINGTON       .92ANGERS       #AROLINA       .9)SLANDERS       .EW*ERSEY       #OLUMBUS       0HILADELPHIA       WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L OT Pts GF GA #OLORADO       #HICAGO       3T,OUIS       -INNESOTA       .ASHVILLE       $ALLAS       7INNIPEG       Pacific Division W L OT Pts GF GA !NAHEIM       3AN*OSE       0HOENIX       6ANCOUVER       ,OS!NGELES       #ALGARY       %DMONTON       Note: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s results 4ORONTO .EW*ERSEY 3/ 7INNIPEG .ASHVILLE #OLORADO #ALGARY "UFFALOAT!NAHEIM LATE Saturday’s games %DMONTONAT0HILADELPHIA NOON &LORIDAAT/TTAWA PM 4ORONTOAT"OSTON PM 4AMPA"AYAT$ETROIT PM -INNESOTAAT#AROLINA PM .9)SLANDERSAT#OLUMBUS PM 0ITTSBURGHAT3T,OUIS PM #HICAGOAT$ALLAS PM 7ASHINGTONAT0HOENIX PM 6ANCOUVERAT,OS!NGELES PM Sunday’s games .9)SLANDERSAT-ONTREAL PM .ASHVILLEAT.EW*ERSEY PM &LORIDAAT.92ANGERS PM %DMONTONAT#HICAGO PM 3AN*OSEAT7INNIPEG PM 7ASHINGTONAT#OLORADO PM 6ANCOUVERAT!NAHEIM PM

Auto racing NASCAR Sprint Cup Points Leaders *IMMIE*OHNSON -ATT+ENSETH +EVIN(ARVICK +YLE"USCH $ALE%ARNHARDT*R *EFF'ORDON TIE #LINT"OWYER 'REG"IFFLE *OEY,OGANO +URT"USCH #ARL%DWARDS 2YAN.EWMAN +ASEY+AHNE

Points Behind   ˆ                                    

AdvoCare 500 Lineup

After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Ariz. Lap length: 1 miles (Car number in parentheses)  *IMMIE*OHNSON #HEVROLET  MPH  $ENNY(AMLIN 4OYOTA   *OEY,OGANO &ORD   +YLE"USCH 4OYOTA   *EFF'ORDON #HEVROLET   #LINT"OWYER 4OYOTA   +ASEY+AHNE #HEVROLET   +URT"USCH #HEVROLET   +EVIN(ARVICK #HEVROLET   -ARTIN4RUEX*R 4OYOTA    $ALE %ARNHARDT *R #HEVROLET   "RAD+ESELOWSKI &ORD   0AUL-ENARD #HEVROLET   -ATT+ENSETH 4OYOTA   *EFF"URTON #HEVROLET   -ARK-ARTIN #HEVROLET   2YAN.EWMAN #HEVROLET   'REG"IFFLE &ORD    *UAN 0ABLO -ONTOYA #HEVROLET   -ARCOS!MBROSE &ORD   !RIC!LMIROLA &ORD   %LLIOTT3ADLER 4OYOTA   #ARL%DWARDS &ORD   2EED3ORENSON &ORD   *USTIN!LLGAIER #HEVROLET   "OBBY,ABONTE 4OYOTA   2ICKY3TENHOUSE*R &ORD   *OSH7ISE &ORD   #OLE7HITT 4OYOTA   #ASEY-EARS &ORD   4RAVIS+VAPIL 4OYOTA   $ANICA0ATRICK #HEVROLET   $AVID'ILLILAND &ORD   $AVID2AGAN &ORD   **9ELEY #HEVROLET   *AMIE-C-URRAY #HEVROLET    $AVID 2EUTIMANN 4OYOTA /WNER 0OINTS  4IMMY(ILL &ORD /WNER0OINTS   -ICHAEL -C$OWELL &ORD /WNER 0OINTS   ,ANDON #ASSILL #HEVROLET /WNER 0OINTS   4ONY 2AINES #HEVROLET /WNER 0OINTS   $AVE "LANEY #HEVROLET /WNER 0OINTS   *OE .EMECHEK 4OYOTA /WNER 0OINTS

Don’t Let This Happen To You Be Winter

Ready.

Get Serviced Today s s s s s s s s

Cooling System Service Heating & Air Conditioning Computer Tune-Ups Complete Electrical Service Brake Service Struts & Shocks Timing Belt Service Towing Available

Domestic Imported & Classic Cars Welcome

CALL TODAY! (815) 625-5749

B&R Auto & Truck Electric “We Stand Behind Our Work�

Established 1983 / Brad Thomas, Owner  %AST 4HIRD 3TREET 3TERLING ),  s WWWBANDRAUTOELECTRICCOM


3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

Make The Sauk Valley Area YOUR

And Register To Win Your Share Of...

3000

$

Worth of Sauk Valley Dollars 6 Winners Each Day! Monday-Friday November 11-December 6

$150 per day

>PUULYZ ^PSS IL UV[PÄLK I` WOVUL All Sauk Valley Dollars need to be picked up at the Telegraph or Sauk Valley Media by December 20, 2013. 6MÄJPHS 9\SLZ 1.The contest will be open to all shoppers during the Christmas Selling Season starting November 11 through December 6. 2. No purchase necessary, no obligation to buy, need not be present to win. 3. Promotion is open to any customer. Business owners, managers and employees are eligible to win in any business other than the business where they are employed.

Visit any of the participating business while you are doing your holiday shopping, be sure to register for the Sauk Valley Dollar Give-A-Way. No purchase necessary. Accents Angelo’s II Bangkok Gardens Bergners Beverage Store Books On First Clover Hills Appliance Country at Heart County Market, Dixon County Market, Sterling Dairy Mart Plus Dixon Ace Hardware & Outdoor Center Dixon Food Center Don’s Seafood & Chicken Express Lane-Shell Galena Steak House

2900 E. Lincolnway, Northland Mall, Sterling 2525 E. Lincolnway, Sterling 504 S. Galena Ave., Dixon 2900 E. Lincolnway, Northland Mall, Sterling 500 W. Route 30, Rock Falls 202 W. 1st St., Dixon 2400 Locust St., Sterling 1910 E. 4th St., Sterling 1380 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 210 W. 3rd St., Sterling 312 16th Ave., Sterling 900 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 500 Chicago Ave., Dixon 1501 W. 4th St., Sterling 2402 E. Lincolnway, Sterling 1101 N. Galena Ave., Dixon

Harold’s Furniture JC Penney K’s Korner Kelley Williamson/Mobil Kelley Williamson/Mobil Kelly’s Lamb’s Tap Oliver’s Corner Market Pam’s Hallmark Razor Replay Sandy’s Restaurant Showplace Antiques Shopko The Chicken Coop Urban Outlet

1210 W. Rock Falls Rd., (Rt. 30) Rock Falls 2900 E. Lincolnway, Northland Mall, Sterling 13030 Galt Rd., Sterling 1300 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 4002 E. Lincolnway, Sterling 218 Locust St., Sterling 215 W. 2nd St., Rock Falls 748 N. Brinton Ave., Dixon 1331 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 955 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 1127 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 307 First Ave., Sterling 1350 N. Galena Ave., Dixon 208 W. 10th St., Rock Falls 2900 E. Lincolnway, Northland Mall, Sterling

$3,000 will be given away between November 11 and December 6.


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

Trade up to iPhone 5s ÂŽ at U.S. Cellular. ÂŽ

Trade in your iPhone 5 and get iPhone 5s for a penny. Upgrade your device to the network that works where and when you need it.

Visit a store.

         .%7 92 !'-4 35"*%#4 4/ ! 02/2!4%$  %!2,9 4%2-).!4)/. &%% &/2 !3)# (/.%3 -/$%-3 !.$ (/430/4 $%6)#%3 !.$ !  %!2,9 4%2-).!4)/. &%% &/2 -!240(/.%3 !.$ 4!",%43 2%15)2%$  $%6)#% !#4 &%% !.$ #2%$)4 !002/6!, -!9 !00,9 %'5,!4/29 /34 %#/6%29 %% !00,)%3 #522%.4,9   ,).%-/.4( 4()3 )3 ./4 ! 4!8 /2 '6-4 2%15)2%$ #(!2'% $$ &%%3 4!8%3 !.$ 4%2-3 !00,9 !.$ 6!29 "9 36# !.$ %1-4 (!2%$ !4! ,!. 2%15)2%$ &&%2 6!,)$ ).34/2% /.,9 !4 0!24)#)0!4).' ,/#!4)/.3 !.$ #!../4 "% #/-").%$ !,)$ &/2 ,)-)4%$ 4)-% /.,9    

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

 %,,5,!2


Business

www.saukvalley.com

Section C

Saturday, November 9, 2013

SV Weekend

BUSINESS NOTEBOOK

Cook’s ready to close up shop items, as well as Yankee candles, greeting cards, coffees and teas. Boehle said that business has been good; closing the business was just a personal decision. “It was just time to retire and enjoy family,� she said. “This is a 7-days-a-week routine.� All of the store’s inven-

BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

O

REGON – The Cook’s Collection, a staple at Conover Square, soon will close. After 33 years at the same location, owner and operator Sandra Boehle has decided to retire. As the name would imply, the store has a variety of kitchen

tory has been marked down. There is no firm closing date; it depends on how fast the merchandise sells, Boehle said. Some fixtures also are for sale. Boehle said said she’ll miss all the friends she has made through the store over the years. The Cook’s Collection is in Suite 102 at Conover Square,

201 N. Third St. The phone number is 815-732-2926.

Fulton business to mark anniversary FULTON – Fulton Meat Market will celebrate its 30th anniversary next week. Owner Tom Maus said the store will mark the occasion with special activities at the

ADVANCES IN EYEWEAR

market during regular business hours Wednesday through Nov. 16. There will be free sandwiches, drawings for prizes and other giveaways. Fulton Meat Market, 211 11th Ave., will be open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. during its anniversary week. For more information, call 815-589-3213. NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C8

daveRAMSEY

High-tech specs

Financial straight talk. For more advice, plus special readers offers, visit davesays. org or call 888-22PEACE.

Single and financially accountable Dear Dave, Do you have any tips for how a single person can stay on track with their finances? –Debbie

MCT News Service photos

A pair of glasses fitted with BluTech lenses is pictured. The lenses are infused with melanin, a natural pigment found in the iris of the eye, to help filter out high-energy blue light and UVA/UVB radiation.

Technology adds new dimension to world of prescription eyeglasses

G

BY ANDREA CHANG MCT News Service

oogle Glass has been hogging the spotlight when it comes to eyewear, but get ready to see new technology designed for those stuck with old-fashioned prescription eyeglasses. About 64 percent of Americans wear glasses to improve vision. Many can’t stand them, complaining that glasses are cumbersome, headache-inducing or don’t work in all situations. Meanwhile, the growing amount of time people spend in front of computers and mobile devices has also raised concern about the potential damaging effects on eyesight. That’s spurring innovation among eye specialists, who say the glasses industry has been largely stagnant since bifocals were invented by Benjamin Franklin in the 18th century. “It’s a marketplace with slow technology adoption. There hasn’t been new technology in eyeglasses in forever,� said Stephen Kurtin, chairman of Superfocus, which makes adjustable-focus glasses that enable wearers to choose the best focus for every distance. Now companies are designing a host of solutions to aid glasses wearers, including futuristic lenses and even an iPhone application that developers say can help people wean themselves off glasses. One area of focus has been on reducing eyestrain for people who spend several hours a day staring at computers, tablets

Optometrist Robert Shapiro exmaines Hilda Lozano at Family Eyecare in Los Angeles. About 64 percent of Americans wear glasses to improve vision. and smartphones. Many optometrists believe the light emitted from such devices could damage a viewer’s eyesight over time, although that hasn’t been conclusively proven. Still, lens companies are rolling out a slew of new lenses that they say will help ward off those potentially harmful effects.

“Why would you take the risk? Let the science unfold and let us protect ourselves as it’s unfolding,� said Don Oakley, president of VSP Optics Group, which this year introduced its Unity with BluTech lenses at 30,000 eye doctor offices in the U.S. SPECS CONTINUED ON C8

925 Depot Avenue Lindsey Nauman-Kaleel,

Cancer Patients Benefit from Physical Therapy Most insurances accepted. Patients seen from any physician. Most patients seen within 72 hours. Appointments available 3 times per week.

815.284.1700

www.orspt.com

Dixon, IL

RAMSEY CONTINUED ON C8

815-284-6564

Penny Beelendorf PTA

PT, MPT

Cancer, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and breast reconstruction have a profound effect on musculoskeletal, functional and

Convenient Appointments: Mon.—Fri.

Dear Debbie, It’s really pretty simple. The first thing is the same advice I give to married couples, and that is to live on a monthly budget. Sit down at the end of each month and write down – on paper – all your expenses and income for the following month. When you think about it, budgeting really isn’t that difficult. Some of your expenses, like your rent or mortgage payment, will be the same. If you have a car payment (which I really hope you don’t), it will remain constant, as well. Things like groceries and utilities may fluctuate based on the time of year, but you can make a pretty accurate estimate by looking at past months. The second thing I’d recommend is that you find someone to be your accountability partner. It should be someone who is wise and good with money and a person who loves you enough to call your bluff or hurt your feelings a little when necessary. They can be a close friend, parent or even your pastor. Just sit down together over a cup of coffee once a month and talk about your finances. You could even go over your budget together, line by line. Ideally an accountability partner is someone who’s ahead of you on a particular journey and can help direct you along the path to wisdom. It’s their job to hold you accountable for what you’re doing and the decisions you’re making, for your own good. –Dave

cardiovascular health. You can rely on ORS of Dixon for the highest quality of individual physical therapy care.

201 Lincoln Statue Dr.

Dixon, Illinois 61021

CLINIC EASILY ACCESSIBLE

s6ANITY4OPS s3HOWER"ASES s3HOWER7ALL0ANELS s4UB7ALL0ANELS s9%3'UARANTEED&OREVER 3TOPINTOSEEINPERSONORWWWONYXCOLLECTIONCOM


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

AHS October Student of Month Danielle Corcoran, a 17-year-old student at Amboy High School, is the October Student of the Month. She is the daughter of Jerome and Tina Corcoran. She has three sisters, Taylor, 19, Cassidy, 13, and Sidney, 12, and two brothers, Nicholas, 9, and Luke, 7. Top teacher: Elizabeth Scriven teaches AP English. She makes the class fun and interesting because she doesn’t just stick to the plot of the story. She makes sure we get something out of every book by including lots of discussion and always making us think by asking her famous question, “Why?� She also is very laid back and pretty hilarious. Favorite class: My favorite class is English with Ms. Scriven because I enjoy reading and writing, and in her class, we not only read literature, but we analyze and discuss it and how it continues to be relevant through so many decades. Extracurricular: I am a member of National Honor Society, Spanish Honor Society, Art Club, chorus, and vice president of my class. I also play volleyball, and I plan to be a member of the track team, and get involved with the spring musical. After graduation: After high school, I would love to attend an out-ofstate, 4-year university to major in theology and get a minor in art, so that I can illustrate children’s books. Paycheck: This past summer I worked for Pioneer as a detasseler, which I enjoyed, despite the warnings from so many others that had tried their hand at it. I also worked as a Rec Plex attendant at Woodhaven Lakes, where I scooped ice cream, helped with day camp, and did other miscellaneous tasks. I enjoyed working with the people there, and it gave me the chance to meet new people and make new friends.

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Danielle Corcoran, 17, has been named Amboy High School’s Student of the Month for October. She plans to major in theology with a minor in art at a 4-year university after graduation. Who is your best friend? My best friends are my two little sisters, Cassidy and Sidney, and my two big “sisters,� Leah and Jordan Saunders. We always have great times and good laughs, and they’re always willing to join in when I randomly burst into song. Favorite singer or musical group: I think Celine Dion has the most beautiful voice. I enjoy singing songs by Carrie Underwood, and Disney movies always have the best soundtracks. Favorite actor. Denzel Washington. Favorite movie: My favorite movie is a tie between “Remember the Titans� and “Glory Road.� Hobbies: I enjoy drawing, singing, playing sports, and laughing.

favorite word to say is “indubitably,� and my favorite season is summer.

some people say she looks like Cheryl Crow, so she is basically my secret twin.

Least favorite class: Math. Even though my teacher is great, I don’t enjoy numbers.

Personal trivia: I’m lactose intolerant.

What makes your blood boil? I hate lies. What kind of music makes your skin crawl? Screamo. Where are some of the places you like to hang out? I love to go hiking at Franklin Creek State Park. It is very pretty there at the peak of each season, and I enjoy having movie nights and Joe’s popcorn at Grandma’s house

MILITARY TRAINING Airmen finish basic training

4OWNSHIP(IGH3CHOOL ANDAGRADUATEOF )LLINOIS6ALLEY#OMMUNITY #OLLEGEIN/GLESBY !IR&ORCE!IRMENST 3OMMERSISTHEGRAND#LASS#HRISTOPHER$ SONOF2ICHARD3OMMERS "AUGHANAND+ILEY* OF0ROPHETSTOWN(EISA 3OMMERSHAVEGRADUGRADUATEOF-OLINE ATEDFROM (IGH3CHOOLANDA BASICMILITARYTRAINING GRADUATEOF"LACK(AWK #OLLEGEIN-OLINE AT*OINT "ASE3AN !NTONIO Soldier completes ,ACKLANDIN instruction at fort Christopher 3AN!NTONIO Baughan !RMY.ATIONAL'UARD 4HEAIR0VT3KYLER--ILLEROF MANCOM,EAF2IVERGRADUATED PLETEDAN FROMBASICCOMBATTRAININTENSIVE INGAT&ORT*ACKSONIN  WEEK #OLUMBIA 3# PROGRAM $URINGWEEKSOFTRAINTHATINCLUD- ING THESOLDIERSTUDIED EDTRAINING THE!RMYMISSION CORE Kiley INMILITARY VALUES PHYSICALFITNESS Sommers DISCIPLINE ANDINSTRUCTIONAND ANDSTUDPRACTICEINBASICCOMBAT IES SKILLS "AUGHANISTHESON -ILLER THESONOF*OEL OF$ENNIS"AUGHANOF -ILLEROF,EAF2IVER ISA -ENDOTA(EISA GRADUATEOF&ORRESGRADUATEOF2OCHELLE TON(IGH3CHOOL

STUDENT OF DISTINCTION

Dream job: A toll collector. It would be fun because I could have a different accent for each person that drives up. Trading places: I think it would be interesting to trade places with an Olympic gold medalist, just to see what it feels like to be the best in the whole world at something you love to do.

If you could go anywhere in the world for free, where would it be? I’ve always wanted to go to Italy because of its What is the key to sur- beauty and history, and if my trip was free, I could viving high school? Do your own homework and try all the fancy restaukeep a positive attitude. rants.

Pat Donahue, senior vice president of Stillman Bank, presented Kelci Foss, Oregon High School’s Senior of Distinction, with a gift certificate. Foss is an active participant in class discussion and encourages her peers to join in. Photo submitted by Heather Walden.

Read this: One of my favorite books is “Pride and Prejudice,� by Jane Austen. I like it because it I’m in the dictionary is beautifully written, and next to: Smiley. I never Favorite food: That’s get tired of smiling, and I it is a pure, genuine, olda tough one. But peanut butter and jelly sandwich- think sometimes it says a fashioned love story. lot more than words. es are somewhere at the Shout out: I would love top of the list. to shout out to Chuck Secret twin: I’ve never been told that I look like Klein, for his unending Do you have any other friendship and support any celebrities, but I’ve favorites? My favorite since the day I was born. always been told that I color is green, my favorThanks, Chuck. look like my mom, and ite holiday is Easter, my Favorite game or outdoor activity: I love to run.

Useless knowledge: Trig identities.

Mary Meany

Sarah Trobaugh

COLLEGE NEWS Ball State University

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

Iowa State University

AND4REVIN+ENNEDY !GRIWestern Illinois BUSINESS!SSOCIATIONOF)OWA University .ONRESIDENT3CHOLARSHIP !-%3 )OWAn!REASTU-5.#)% )NDn-ATT -/,).%n4IM(AWKINS AND$ONNA-C#UNE &RED (AWKINS FORMERLYOF%RIE DENTSAREAMONGTHOSE FORMERLYOF%RIE GRADUAT&OREMAN3CHOLARSHIPFOR AWARDEDSCHOLARSHIPSFROM 'ROWTHIN,EADERSHIP0ARTICI- ED-AYFROM7ESTERN GRADUATED-AYFROM "ALL3TATE5NIVERSITYWITH )OWA3TATE5NIVERSITY#OL)LLINOIS5NIVERSITY1UAD PATION BOTHOF7ALNUT A-ASTEROF!RTSDEGREEIN LEGEOF!GRICULTUREAND,IFE #ITIESWITHA-ASTEROF 3CIENCESFORTHECURRENTACAPUBLICRELATIONS 3CIENCEDEGREEINCOUNUW-Platteville DEMICYEAR SELOREDUCATION 0,!44%6),,% 7ISn2OB4HEYARE*ESSICA3ANDEROF Graceland "AILEYVILLE !LBERT#AND2UTH ERT4AYLOROF/REGONWAS UW-Whitewater University "4IMM3CHOLARSHIP*USTIN AWARDEDTHE0ORTER%LLIFRIT 7()4%7!4%2 7IS ,!-/.) )OWAn-OLLY (OHLENOF$IXON !RLENEAND -USIC3CHOLARSHIPAND7ILn2EBECCA#LAUSENOF LIAM*$ENNIS-USIC3CHOL#RUMPOF3TERLINGPER(AROLD%STES!GRICULTURAL /REGON ASOPHOMORE ARSHIPATTHE5NIVERSITYOF FORMEDIN'RACELAND 3CHOLARSHIP!SHLEY6EGTER 5NIVERSITYSHOMECOMING OF-ORRISON +ENNETH-AND 7ISCONSIN 0LATTEVILLE#OLLEGE COMMUNICATIONMAJOR HASBEENNAMEDTO OF,IBERAL!RTSAND%DUCAMUSICAL h,ITTLE3HOPOF 2UTH)7AGNER!GRICULTURAL THE(OMECOMING TION (ORRORS v/CT  -EMORIAL3CHOLARSHIP+IM*ACOB$ICKMANOF,ANARK 3TEERING#OMMITTEEAT #RUMPANDOTHERS BERLEE'ERARDYOF3TILLMAN WASAWARDEDAMUSICSCHOL- THE5NIVERSITYOF7ISCONWERESELECTEDFROMA 6ALLEY 2ODAND-ARY"RANNEN%NDOWED3CHOLARSHIP GROUPOF SIN 7HITEWATER ARSHIP

WORKING TOGETHER

Micah Trancoso

Maegan Trygstad

Nicolas Wallin

WACC names Students of Month STERLING – The following students were named September Student of the Month for outstanding effort and performance at Whiteside Area Career Center. Brandyn Ibarra (not pictured), the son of Susan Ibarro, welding and manufacturing, AFC High School in Ashton. Mary Meany, the daughter of Robert and Cindy Meany, commercial food service, Dixon High School. Micah Trancoso, the son of Janette Trancoso,

criminal justice, Newman Central Catholic High School. Sarah Trobaugh, the daughter of Kenny Trobaugh, early childhood education. Sterling High School. Maegan Trygstad, the daughter of Einar and Jackie Trygstad, health occupations, Newman Central Catholic High School. Nicolas Wallin, the son of Mike and Brook Elmendorf, building trades, AFC High School.

Amboy homework club continues at Teen Turf

At the Oct. 5 football game, Amboy and Bureau Valley music departments combined for a halftime performance. The high school band performed “Safety Dance,� sung by Frank Monier and Chelsea Higgins. It was joined by the Bureau Valley North Band and South Band to perform “Louie, Louie� and the school song. Ann Lusher is the high school band director. Photo submitted by David Larkin.

AMBOY – Teen Turf’s after school homework program is open to students in third grader and older. Central School student can ride the school bus to Teen Turf, 225 W. Main St., and stay until 5 p.m. Those attending will get a snack, play games, and spend an hour doing homework. Volunteers and someone to help with cleaning and maintenance are needed. Teen Turf also is look-

ing for a senior citizen to help with the Experience Works Program. Those who qualify will be paid. Senior Moments chair aerobics continue at 10 a.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. A high intensity aerobics class also is available at 5:15 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. The classes are free; donations will be accepted. For more information, call 815-857-4800.


Saturday, November 9, 2013

Scrapbook www.saukvalley.com

EARLY MORNING FISHING

367EEKENDs#

LIGHTING UP THE NIGHT SKY

The sun sets over the field at Ashford University in Clinton, Iowa. The photo was taken in June as the LumberKings faced the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers. This photo recently was selected as the MiLBY.com top photo of the year. Photos submitted by Paul Gierhart of Rock Falls.

Fishermen in their boat start the day at 7 a.m. Sept. 13 in Hayward, Wis. Photo submitted by Randy Scott of Harmon.

FIRST AT CLASSIC

Fireworks light up the sky during a Clinton LumberKings game in August in Clinton.

JUNIOR DUKES AT PLAY

U14 Sterling United got first place Sept. 29 at the Midwest Classic near Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Soccer team members are (from left) Carter Gearing, Zoey Ward, Adrian Blancas, Jake Gebhart, Alberto Baca, Juan Brusienio, Alex Marquez, Nate Hawkins, Miguel Gallardo, James Roddy, Patrick Nelsen, Kaleb Polzin, Dawson Koett, Mitchell Petrosky, Kerry Mullen, Sierra Sotelo, and Chloe Halverson. Photo submitted by Christine Bushman. Dixon Junior Dukes had a busy football season. The eighth-grade roster lists Noah Wilcox, Jared Harrison, Tyler Lowry, Matthew Milby, Elijah McGlown, Christian Hage, Diondre Wilson, Joshua Dallas, Tyler Hess, Nyrel Sullivan, Cody Elliott, Savian Hernandez, Dane Sperling, Brock Burgess, Jackson Jeffery, Owen Bergstrom, Cade Coffey, Colton Buzzard, Nick Beauchamp, Satwant Chima, and Sebastian Heeren. The coaches are Seth Tegeler, Matt Coffey, Mark Dallas, Chris Harrison, Curt Hussing, Mike Leblanc, Mike Lovett, and Kevin Sperling. Photos submitted by Wade Buzzard.

TOP OF THE ROCK

Tim Noll of Chicago, the son of Sally and Peter Noll of Sterling, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in the summer of 2011 with a group from Venture Expedition out of Minnesota. Everyone in the group got to the top. Tim also completed a 3,300-mile cross-country bicycle trip with Venture to raise money for water wells in Africa. Photo submitted by Peter Noll.

Cheered onto the field, a Dixon Junior Duke gets ready for a game. The seventhgrade roster this season included Isaic Sanchez, Bryce Christiansen, Derien Duncan, Colin Brechon, Payton Lawrence, Cade Callison, Talbir Chima, Kyle Crawford, Eric Gentry, Jett Gaffey, Ethan Weidman, Nolan Randick, Connor Beachem, Brayden Forrest, Todd Schlosser, Aidan Long, Ben Piper, Joseph Heckert, Trevor Bishop, Colten Moore, Charles Helfrich, Caleb Buzzard, Brendan Boelter, Dylan Messer, Sean Phalen, Logan Schaeffer, Alex Boswell, Clint Schielein, Hunter Wilson, Finn Brandon, Christian Stephenitch, Oscar Van Sickle, Tyler Christiansen, AJ Schmall, and Jacob Vondersmith. The coaches are John Heckert, Tim Crawford, Kyle Gaffey, and Kyle Lawrence.

Wanted: Photos from you A scrapbook is a book with blank pages, and that’s what our Scrapbook page is without your pictures. We want to fill the page with images that capture lives in the Sauk Valley. They can be submitted by email to photos@saukvalley.com or can be taken to the Sterling and Dixon offices.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

IN THE SPIRIT OF HALLOWEEN

CHEFS PREPARING FOR MEAL

Whiteside County Health Department staff recently dressed up as characters from “The Wizard of Oz.� Photo submitted by Angie Chavira.

Duane Nielsen (left) and Larry Geesey get ready to start cooking for the third annual 40&8 and 8&40 spaghetti supper, which will be served from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday at Harvest Time Bible Church, 1802 Dixon Ave., Rock Falls. The cost is $7 for adults and $3.50 for those 8 and younger. The supper is open to the public. Photo submitted by Geesey.

IN BRIEF Candle-lighting ceremony set

The first-place winners of the Rock Falls Youth Council annual Halloween Costume Contest Oct. 27 are (front row, from left) Cordez Murry, animals; Maycee Tindell, cartoon and storybook character and best of show; Ellie Wasson, most unusual; Taj Jones, scariest; and Collin Halverson, movie and TV character; and (back row) Cliff Karrow, historical and celebrity; Courtney Moor, mother; Alysia Zarecor, prettiest; Drew Scott, funniest and second place best of show; Davien Tindell, miscellaneous; Brayden Williamson, most original and third place best of show. Photo submitted by Joan Fritz.

Library announces new seasonal hours FRANKLIN GROVE – Winter hours are now in effect at Franklin Grove Public Library, 112 S. Elm St. The library will be open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The book club will meet at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 19 in the children’s room. This month’s selection is “The Master Butcher’s Singing Club,� by Louise Erdrich. Copies are available at the circulation desk. Movie night will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Nov. 22. “Mon-

sters University� will be shown. Thanksgiving Craft Day will be from 10:30 a.m. to noon Nov. 23. Children younger than 8 need to have parental supervision for movies and crafts. New books are “Gone,� by James Patterson; “The October List,� by Jeffery Deaver; “Silencing Eve,� by Iris Johansen; “A Cold Season,� by Alison Littlewood; “The Autobiography of Mark Twain Vol. 2;� “My Story,� by Elizabeth Smart; “Doing Hard Time,� by Stuart Woods; “Storm Front,� by John Sandford; “Ghost Gone

Wild,� by Carolyn Hart; “Inherit the Dead,� by Lee Child; “Starry Night,� by Debbie Macomber; “Nightstar,� by Fern Michaels. “The Spymistress,� by Jennifer Chiaverini; “Loss of Innocence,� by Richard North Patterson; “Unspoken,� by Dee Henderson; “The Letters of Ernest Hemingway Volume 2�; “Identical,� by Scott Turow; “Sycamore Row,� by John Grisham; “Police,� by Jo Nesbo; “Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy,� by Helen Fielding; “Esrever Doom,� by Piers Anthony; “Outlaw,� by Ted Dekker; “The Abominable,� by

Dan Simmons; “Christmas Bliss,� by Mary Kay Andrews; “Critical Mass,� by Sara Paretsky; “Duck the Halls,� by Donna Andrews; and “Silent Night,� by Robert B. Parker. New DVDs are “Frozen Ground,� “Monster High: 13 Wishes,� “The Hangover Part III,� “Pacific Rim,� “The Purge,� and “The Croods� The library will close for Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Nov. 27, and will remain closed Nov. 28 and 29. Regular hours will resume Nov. 30. For more information, call 815-456-2823.

Ogle County recorder can copy veterans’ papers OREGON – Ogle County veterans documents, such as reports of separation and DD 214s, can be recorded with the county

clerk and recorder. Copies of the documents are placed on permanent and secure record in the recorder’s office. The

copies are provided at no charge to the veteran, with proper identification. The recorder’s office is at 105 S. Fifth St., Suite 212.

Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday and Friday. For more information, call 815-732-1115.

MONEY FOR ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION

$)8/.n!NANNUAL REMEMBRANCECEREMONY TORECOGNIZEPEOPLEWITH !LZHEIMERSDISEASEWILL BEATPM.OVAT THE!LZHEIMERS!SSOCIATION2OCK2IVER/FFICE  3(ENNEPIN!VE !NYONEMAYATTEND THECEREMONYANDLIGHT ACANDLEINHONOROR INMEMORYOFFRIENDS ORFAMILYAFFECTEDBY !LZHEIMERSDISEASEORA RELATEDILLNESS #ANDLESCANBEPURCHASEDFOR#ALLTHE OFFICEAT   OR  TOBUY ACANDLEORFORMORE INFORMATION

Lions Club offers hams for holidays -/22)3/.n4HE-ORRISON,IONS#LUBSANNUAL HAMSALEISUNDERWAY 0ROCEEDSWILLSUPPORT THEVISUALLYANDHEARING IMPAIRED ALONGWITHCLUB COMMUNITYPROJECTS /RDERSMUSTBE RECEIVEDBY.OVFOR DELIVERYBY.OVAND ANDBY$ECFOR $ECDELIVERY4HE COSTISPERPOUND 4HEAVERAGEWEIGHTOF HALFHAMSARETO POUNDSANDWHOLE HAMS TOPOUNDS 4OORDERORFORMORE INFORMATION CALL&LORA 3TRALOWAT   "OB3MITHAT   *IM"LAKEMOREAT   OR-ARTHA+OPHAMERAT   

)SERVICEPLAQUEAT6ETERANS-EMORIAL0ARKIN $IXON 4HEMEETINGISOPENTO ANYONEWITHANINTEREST INGRAVERESTORATION#ALL   FORMORE INFORMATION

Vendors still can sign up for show 2/#+&!,,3n4HE SIXTHANNUALCRAFTAND VENDORSHOWWILLBEFROM AMTOPM.OV ATTHE2OCK&ALLS #OMMUNITY"UILDING  7TH3T 6ENDORSPACEISAVAILABLE4HECOSTISAND ARAFFLEITEM 4HEREISNOCHARGEFOR THEPUBLICTOATTEND &ORMOREINFORMATION CALL#HRIS-EIERAT  

Fundraiser forum to assist flight 34%2,).'n!3AUK 6ALLEY6ETERANS#ONVENTION BENEFIT FORUM AND REUNIONWILLBEFROMTO PM.OVATTHE ,ATIN!MERICAN3OCIAL #LUB 7,INCOLNWAY 3PEAKERS INFORMATIONBOOTHSFORVETERANS ARMEDRECRUITMENTAND ENTERTAINMENTARESCHEDULED4HEFRONTBARWILLBE OPENUNTILAM 0ROCEEDSWILLBEDONATEDTOTHE(ONOR&LIGHT &ORMOREINFORMATION CALL  

Deceased loved ones remembered

-/22)3/.n"OSMA 2ENKESAND"OSMA 'IBSONFUNERALHOMES WILLHAVEAHOLIDAY 34%2,).'n3TERLING REMEMBRANCEPROGRAM 2OCK&ALLS(ISTORICAL FROMTOPM.OV 3OCIETYMEMBERSWILL AT%,INCOLNHEARAPROGRAMABOUT WAY RESTORINGVETERANSGRAVE 4HEPROGRAMISTO MARKINGSATPM3UNCOMMEMORATELOVED DAYIN2YBERG!UDITORIUM ONESDURINGTHEHOLIDAY AT#'(-EDICAL#ENTER SEASON %,E&EVRE2OAD &AMILIESSERVEDBYTHE 0AT'ORMANWITHTHE FUNERALHOMESWITHINTHE ,EE#OUNTY(ISTORICAL LASTYEARWILLBEPRESENT3OCIETYWILLBETHEPREEDWITHAGLASSGUARDSENTER'ORMANRECEIVED IANANGELORNAMENT AN)LLINOIS'ENEALOGICAL PERSONALIZEDWITHTHE 3OCIETYAWARDIN NAMEANDDATESOFTHE FORRESTORINGORREPLACING DECEASEDLOVEDONES GRAVEANDGRAVESTONE #ONTACTINFO BOSMAMARKINGSAT/AKWOOD RENKESCOMOR  #EMETERYIN$IXON AND FORMOREINFORMAFORERECTINGA7ORLD7AR TIONORTOREGISTER

Grave restoration topic of meeting

Art on display at gallery

Nancy Sweitzer (left), Alzheimer’s Association – Central Illinois Chapter program director, accepts a donation from Avonlea Cottage in Sterling. The cottage had a team that participated in the Rock River Walk to end Alzheimer’s Sept. 28 at Lowell Park in Dixon. Margarita Cornejo, Avonlea administrator, and her staff raised $1,500 to help the Rock River Branch, which serves Lee, Ogle, and Whiteside counties. Photo submitted by Janet Veach.

DIXON – The Next Picture Show’s “Shades of Grey 9� art show started Oct. 25. Winners from Dixon were Mike McNamara, first place for “Minnie’s Last Stand,� and Graydon Cafarella, third place for “Path in the Woods.� Other winners are Jane Lee of Rockford, “Birds in My Garden,� best of show; Carolyn McKee Freese of Serena, “Forest Greys,� second place; and Karen Stew-

art Casper of Milan, “Kari in Leather,� and Christine Myroth of DeKalb, “Linked Memories,� both honorable mention. The artwork will be displayed through Nov. 26 at the gallery, 113 W. First St. The deadline to submit artwork for the Regional Survey 9 show is Dec. 3. Go to www.thenextpictureshow.com for details. For more information, call 815-285-4924.


Saturday, November 9, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS Mallory Grace Diehl Tami and Jamie Diehl of Milledgeville are the parents of a daughter born at 10:54 p.m. Oct. 29, 2013, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Mallory Grace Diehl weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces at birth and was 20.5 inches in length. She is welcomed by Toby, 15, Zach, 12, Tyler, 10, Carson, 8, Ethan, 5, and Hailey, 2. Maternal grandparents are Rick and Lori Osborn of Morrison. Paternal grandmother is Lola Diehl of Milledgeville. Maternal great-grandparents are Othel Osborn of Prophetstown and Fern Shoquist of Spooner, Wis. Paternal great-grandmother is Josephine Boelkins of Chadwick.

Aria Miracle VanBuskirk Tabitha VanBuskirk of Rock Falls is the mother of a daughter born at 7:16 p.m. Oct. 28, 2013, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Aria Miracle VanBuskirk weighed 4 pounds, 12 ounces at birth and was 18 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Jim and Charity

Howard of Rock Falls and Kenny and Angela VanBuskirk of Dixon. Maternal great-grandparents are Margeret Sanders of Savanna, Ken and Deloris VanBuskirk of Dixon, and Richard and Ellen Sheidler of Mount Morris.

Katelyn Marie Mendez Savannah Bellini and Jesse Mendez of Sterling are the parents of a daughter born at 12:39 p.m. Oct. 15, 2013, at KSB Hospital in Dixon. Katelyn Marie Mendez weighed 8 pounds, 3 ounces at birth and was 21 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Tina Bellini of Rock Falls and James Bellini of Elgin. Paternal grandparents are Karen Mendez and Eloy Mendez, both of Sterling. Maternal great-grandparents are Cora Bellini and James Bellini, both of Sterling. Paternal great-grandparent is Consuelo Mendez of Rock Falls.

at 5:02 a.m. July 24, 2013, at KSB Hospital in Dixon. Nolan Henry Cochran weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces at birth and was 22 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Lenny Missel and Theresa Missel, both of Streator. Paternal grandparents are Earl Cochran and Brooke Cochran, both of Sterling. Maternal great-grandmother is Jean Ann Chamness of Streator. Paternal great-grandmother is Marjorie Smith of Sterling.

HenLeigh Samantha Munz

Sarah Marth and Jake Munz of Milledgeville are the parents of a daughter born at 2:37 a.m. Oct. 27, 2013, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. HenLeigh Samantha Munz weighed 9 pounds, 3 ounces at birth and was 21.5 inches in length. She is welcomed by SkyeAnn Munz, 5, and BreyLynn Munz, 2. Maternal grandparents are Jean and Conrad Walker of Polo and Walt Culbertson of Lyons, Nolan Henry Colo. Cochran Paternal grandmother is L a u r e n a n d B r i a n Vicky Munz of Sterling. Cochran of Sterling are Paternal great-grandthe parents of a son born mothers are Mary Munz

of Sterling and Harriet CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Morris of Rock Falls. Elizabeth Joann Johnson weighed 8 pounds, 9 Olivia LouAnn ounces at birth and was Hubbard 22 inches in length. Monica Grooms and Maternal grandparents Paul Hubbard of Rock are Dennis and Maggie Falls are the parents of Guenzler of Elizabeth a daughter born at 7:38 and Milissa Behrens of p.m. Oct. 31, 2013, at Galena. CGH Medical Center in Paternal grandparents Sterling. are Kelley Johnson of Olivia LouAnn Hub- Savanna and Ron Johnbard weighed 6 pounds, son of Clinton, Iowa. 13 ounces at birth and Maternal great-grandwas 20 inches in length. parents are Marion and She is welcomed by Joyce Guenzler of ElizaMackenzie Hubbard, 10, beth and Ronald Behand Laia Hubbard, 6. rens of Sterling. Maternal grandparPaternal great-grandents are Pam Fowler and parents are Suzanne Scott Fowler and Monte Atherton of Savanna, G r o o m s a n d L e a n n Joseph Reifsteck of SterStage, all of Rock Falls. ling, and Dave and Mary P a t e r n a l g r a n d p a r - Lou Johnson of Clinton, ents are Nelda and Scott Iowa. Hubbard of Sterling. Maternal great-grandDixie Kay parents are Barry and Maves Louise Montague of Sarah K. and Carl R. Sterling and Jerry and Judy Fowler of Rock Maves of Sterling are the parents of a daughter Falls. Paternal great-grand- born at 6:17 p.m. Oct. parents are Ed and Jean 16, 2013, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Cushing of Rock Falls. Dixie Kay Maves weighed 7 pounds, 12 Elizabeth Joann ounces at birth and was Johnson 19 inches in length. Sarah Guenzler and Maternal grandparents Cody Johnson of Savan- are Barbara K. Mavesna are the parents of a K n o w l e s a n d D a v i d daughter born at 12:32 Knowles, both of Rock p.m. Oct. 30, 2013, at Falls.

Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., closed, Big Book, United -ETHODIST#HURCH %#HIcago Ave., Davis Junction. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., open, women’s; noon, open; 6 p.m., open, 90-92 S. Hennepin Ave., Dixon. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., open, tradition; 12:30 p.m., closed; 7 p.m., closed  "AZAAR!MERICANA 7 Third St., Sterling. FHN Memorial Hospital flu shot clinic, 9 a.m. to noon, 3ULLIVANS&OODS #HICAGO !VE 3AVANNA    Alcoholics Anonymous, 9:30 a.m., at the former St. Anne’s Grade School, 32 N. Jones !VE !MBOY    Parkinson’s Support Group, 10 a.m., board room, Mercy 3OUTH-EDICAL#ENTER 3 "LUFF"LVD #LINTON )OWA    Women’s Alcoholics Anonymous, 10:30 a.m., 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 11 a.m. to noon, Walmart, 1901 First Ave., Rock Falls. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous, noon, 6 p.m., &IRST#HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH !VE 2OCK&ALLS   $OWNSTAIRS WESTDOOR Sauk Valley Group Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, open, BACKDOOR &IRST!VE Rock Falls. Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 1 to 2:30 p.m., Save-A-Lot, 928 First Ave., Rock Falls. Sauk Computer User Group,  PM 7HITESIDE#OUNTY 3ENIOR#ENTER 7.INTH St., Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., open, First Presbyterian #HURCH #ALVIN2OAD Rochelle. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., closed, Village of Progress, 710 S. 13th St., Oregon. Sunday Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 a.m., closed; 7 p.m., open, 2OCHELLE#OMMUNITY(OSPITAL 900 N. Second St. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 a.m., closed; 11 a.m., open; 1 p.m., closed, Spanish; 7 p.m., CLOSED "AZAAR!MERICANA  W. Third St., Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., closed; noon, open; 6 p.m., closed, step, 90-92 S. Hennepin Ave., Dixon. Alcoholics Anonymous, 10 AM OPEN (ORIZON6IEW&ARM BARN .2IVER2OAD Oregon. Sauk Valley Group Alcohol-

ics Anonymous, 10 a.m., open, "IG"OOK BACKDOOR  First Ave., Rock Falls. Sterling-Rock Falls Historical Society, 2 p.m., Ryberg !UDITORIUM #'(-EDICAL #ENTER %,E&EVRE2OAD Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 6 PM CLOSED #HURCHOF3T !NNE .#HERRY3T -ORrison. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous, 6 p.m., First #HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH !VE 2OCK&ALLS   $OWNSTAIRS WESTDOOR Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, clearance required, BAAbble on for Life PRISONGROUP    Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, Spanish, St. PatRICK#ATHOLIC#HURCH +ELLY Drive, Rochelle. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 PM CLOSED 3EVENTH!VE W., Lyndon. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 PM CLOSED -OUNT-ORRIS 3ENIOR#ENTER %&RONT3T

pressure clinics, 2:30-3:30 PM #HRISTIAN,IFE2ETIREMENT #ENTER %RD3T .O Sterling. Mercy Nursing free blood pressure clinics,   p.m., Parkway Apartments, 710 W. LeFevre Road, Sterling. TOPS Chapter IL 634 meeting, PM 37ALNUT St., Franklin Grove. Mercy Nursing free blood pressure clinic,TO PM !RROWWOOD -ARTIN Road, Rock Falls. TOPS, PM WEIGH IN PM 0OLO#HURCHOFTHE"RETHREN 3#ONGRESS!VE 0OLO    Celebrate Recovery, 6 to 8 p.m., 201 W. Market St., MorRISON    Celebrate Recovery, Christcentered recovery group,  PM 2EVIVE#OMMUNITY #HURCH %&RONT3T -OUNT -ORRIS    Rock Falls Rotary, 6 p.m., Beelendorf’s, 200 W. 10th St., Rock Falls. Overeaters Anonymous, 6 PM 2OOM #'(-EDICAL #ENTER %,E&EVRE2OAD 3TERLING    Rock Falls Optimist Club, PM #ANDLELIGHT)NN Monday Holiday: SVM has not received 2200 First Ave., Rock Falls. Rock Falls Boy Scout Troop cancelation notices on these 306, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Fellowevents. Abuse Changing Team, ship Hall, Harvest Time Bible #HURCH $IXON!VE 2OCK   Falls. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 Veterans of Foreign Wars a.m., open, Methodist church, Post 5418, 7 p.m., VFW Post, &IRST!VE &ORRESTON Veterans Affairs representa- &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS  tive, AM 2OCK2IVER#ENTER   Al-Anon, 7 p.m., Church of 3TH3T /REGON  God, #LAY3T -OUNT#AR  roll. Narcotics Anonymous, 10 Lee County Genealogical AM OPEN TH!VE Society, 7 p.m., second-floor Sterling. CONFERENCEROOM +3"(OSPITAL Alcoholics Anonymous, %&IRST3T $IXON NOON CLOSED 3T0AUL Survivors of Suicide Sup,UTHERAN#HURCH 3&IFTH port Group, 7-9 p.m., Second St., Oregon. 2EFORMED#HURCH TH Alcoholics Anonymous, !VE &ULTON    noon, closed, step; 6 p.m., Tampico Lions Club, 7 p.m., open, 90-92 S. Hennepin Ave., Good Times, 106 N. Main St., Dixon. 4AMPICO    Dixon Rotary Club, noon, Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 LOWERLEVEL 3T,UKE%PISCOp.m., closed, step study, New PAL#HURCH 74HIRD3T (OPE&ELLOWSHIP#HURCH  Dixon. STATE2OUTE +INGS Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 noon, closed, Big Book; 6 p.m., p.m., closed, 808 Freeport closed, Spanish; 7 p.m., open, Road, Sterling. "AZAAR!MERICANA 7 Samuel H. Davis Masonic Third St., Sterling. Lodge 96,PM 7 Reality Check Narcotics ,INCOLN3T -OUNT-ORRIS  Anonymous, noon, 6 p.m., &IRST#HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH   Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 !VE 2OCK&ALLS   PM CLOSED 3T,UKES%PIS$OWNSTAIRS WESTDOOR Senior Information Services, COPAL#HURCH 74HIRD3T Dixon. TOPM #ARROLL#OUNTY Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 &AMILY(EALTH#ENTER  (EALTHCARE$RIVE -OUNT#ARROLL PM CLOSED &IRST0RESBYTERIAN#HURCH 4HIRD3T    Savanna. Mercy Nursing free blood

Holiday recycling sites announced OREGON – The Ogle County Solid Waste Management Department is working with Behr Iron & Metal in Rochelle, local fire departments, and city and village halls to collect and recycle holiday lights. Acceptable light strings include Italian mini-lights, traditional lights (larger glass bulbs), rope lights, LED lights, and other similar string lights. Extension cords also will be accepted.

Garland, live greens and wreaths, and other decorations will not be accepted. The lights will be sent to a regional recycling facility. Drop-off containers for the holiday lights will be available beginning Friday through Jan. 31 at OCSWMD, 909 W. Pines Road; Ogle County Courthouse, 105 S. Fifth St.; Byron Fire Department, 123 N. Franklin St.; Rochelle Fire Department,

401 Fifth Ave.; Mount Morris Fire Department, 15 E. Center St.; Stillman Valley Fire Department, 200 S. Rural St.; Forreston Village Hall, 102 S. Walnut St.; Village of Davis Junction, 207 N. Elm St.; and the city of Polo, 115 S. Franklin Ave. Proceeds received from the recycling of the lights and wires will be donated to United Way in Ogle County. For more information, call the OCSWMD at 815-732-4020.

Peninnah Kay Wheeler Laura and Matthew Wheeler of Dixon are the parents of a daughter born at 9:23 a.m. Oct. 9, 2013, at Rockford Memorial Hospital. Peninnah Kay Wheeler weighed 4 pounds at birth and was 17.5 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Jeffrey and Terri Scanlan of Sterling. Paternal grandparents are David and Ronna Wheeler of Dixon. Maternal great-grandparents are David and Ann Jamison and Patricia Jamison, all of Sterling, and Norden and Mary Scanlan of Tampico. Paternal great-grandparents are Donald and Norma Funkenbusch of Ewing, Mo., and Carolyn and Raymond Wheeler of Springfield.

THANK GOODNESS

SUPPORT GROUPS, CLUBS, AND SERVICES Today

Maternal great-grandparents are Ruth and David E. Knowles of Rock Falls. Paternal great-grandmothers are Robert and Dorothy Nolan of Walnut and JoAnn Photzes of Dixon.

Thank you for successful Candy Day DON PAUSER JERRY PAUSER AL MOINE residents of Dixon

On behalf of the visually and hearing impaired, the Lions Clubs of Dixon wish to thank you, the citizens of Dixon and the surrounding area, for your generous support of our Candy Day. The Lions of Illinois Foundation will receive a minimum of 60 percent of these funds for use in such activities as Camp Lions and other foundation projects. The remaining amount will be retained by the Dixon Lions clubs for use in local humanitarian services. The following Dixon businesses also are thanked for underwriting the cost of candy and other supplies used in our successful Candy Day: the Telegraph, Supreme Cleaners, Ace Hardware, Edward Jones Investments (Chad Weigle, adviser), Books on First, Dr. Kurt Nelson (optometrist), Dixon Floral, and Mama Cimino’s Restaurant. Thanks also to the U.S. Post Office, County Market, Walgreens Drug Store, Walmart, Shopko, Dixon Food Center, and Oliver’s for use of storefront space to accept donations. Note to readers: Don Pauser is the treasurer, Jerry Pauser was the Candy Day chairman for the Noon Lions Club, and Al Moine was chairman for the Evening Lions Club.

Health fair was fantastic ANNA HATZIPANAGIOTIS Mount Morris

On Oct. 25, a gigantic health fair was held with booths from several towns, including DeKalb, Dixon, Amboy, Mount Morris, Polo, Belvidere, and Rockford, and mas-

sages, hospitals, nursing homes, Mary Kay, medical, beauty, police, cooking demonstrations, legal and medical workshops, screenings for spine, blood pressure, bone density, hearing, insurance, financial, vaccines, wood carving, veterans, neurology, park district, even White Pines Inn, and I could go on. This health fair was complete in every sense of the word and of great benefit to the many, many attendees – with handouts and instructions, recipes, door prizes, and treats. Wow. Many people, I am certain, spent a great deal of time coordinating and preparing for this event, and the facilities at Rock River Center were fantastic. I want to thank Rock River Center and the University of Illinois, as well as all who had a part in this huge undertaking. It was a great, worthwhile event. Thanks again.

Wheelchair athlete sends appreciation RAYMOND CUEVAS 4UCSON !RIZ

I would like to thank the public for their donations. It’s a great feeling to know there are people who care and are willing to help when it’s needed. Without your support, it makes it difficult to attend events like the National Veterans Wheelchair Games. The wheelchair games help people like myself, who are dependent on a wheelchair for mobility, create a goal, and get out and do something. I’ve managed to meet old friends and make new ones who have the same or worse obstacles as I, to talk with and share new methods, skills, or equipment to help continue living a strong and fulfilling life. It gives me great pleasure to inform you I was

successful in my events and accumulated three gold medals and one silver medal. The gold medals were achieved in bowling, with a combined three-game total of 420; discus and javelin, setting a new record and personal best in both events. My loan silver medal came in the shot put, being beaten by a gentleman 20 years my junior. Even with the high level of competition, bonds of friendship and serious ribbing (while laughing, of course) flourished everywhere during the games. The games are held under the same strict rules as the Olympics. The feeling of being able to compete, even at my age in a wheelchair at this level of competition, astounds me. I am just as amazed at the determination of others, with the same obstacles life has left us with. Of course, none of this would have been possible without the financial and moral support I received from supporters like you. I could never be able to thank you enough for the benefits I’ve received by going. Once again, thank you very much. Note to readers: Raymond Cuevas was a member of Sterling High School Class of 1973 and served in the U.S. Marine Corps.

Appreciation for supporting medical benefit ROSA BARB Sterling

I would like to thank the communities for all their support for the Karen Rippy Cochran benefit. Without your support, the event would have been a failure. God bless each and every one of you for the outpouring of support. Without the support of the communities, we wouldn’t have been able to help Karen with her medical items. Thank you all very much.

Cartridge World joins recycling day STERLING – America Recycles Day is Nov. 15, and thousands of events will be held across the U.S. Cartridge World Sterling often reuses many of the components in empty printer cartridges. If the store cannot reuse the cartridge, it recycles the cartridge in an envi-

ronmentally responsible manner at no cost to the consumer. In addition to printer cartridges, the store will recycle cell phones and other small electronic equipment, and will help find ways for businesses and consumers to recycle larger electronics, such as printers, fax

machines, and copiers. For information about Cartridge World’s ecofriendly products or initiating a recycling program in an office or school, visit Cartridge World – Sterling, 3307 E. Lincolnway, or contact store owner, Doug Watson at watson@cartridgeworldusa. com or 815-625-2345.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

Woman sets bar high in search for Mr. Right Dear Abby: I’m a single woman who has had a string of unsuccessful relationships. When a man is into me, I’m not into him and vice versa. I know the problem is mostly mine. I’m very independent. I don’t want a man to consume my life – just be a part of it. It seems like the men I date want to smother me. My friends tell me that most women enjoy this. I hate it. I need a certain amount of time alone. I am attracted to manly men, but the ones who are attracted to me are either emotionally needy or they take longer to get ready to go anywhere than I do. It’s frustrating. I have met some men who would have been wonderful catches, but I felt nothing. I know

DEARABBY $EAR!BBY ISWRITTEN BY!BIGAIL 6AN"UREN ALSOKNOWN AS*EANNE 0HILLIPS4HE COLUMNISPROVIDEDTHROUGH 5NIVERSAL 5CLICK

friendship is the basis of all relationships, but physical attraction is important to me. A relationship won’t work if I can’t bring myself to be intimate with the person. In all my years of dating, I have been in love only twice. Any help would be appreciated. – Lost in Washington State Dear Lost: I wish I had

a magic lamp that would give you what you’re looking for in a puff of smoke, but I don’t. What I can offer is that you need to continue looking for someone who is as independent as you are, so you can find an attractive man whose needs are similar to yours. Some couples find the process of dating a smooth and easy one. For others it’s complicated, but not impossible. I agree that the basis of strong relationships is friendship and compatibility. Dear Abby: How does one stop family and old friends from going on and on about their aches, pains, symptoms, conditions, doctor visits, and medications in excruciat-

Morrison UM Church gets ready for its annual bazaar MORRISON - The the annual Home for the Holidays Bazaar will be from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 16 at Morrison United Methodist Church, 200 W. Lincolnway. There will be several varieties of homemade pies, including blueberry, apple. and pumpkin. There also will be homemade cookies, candies, and jams, and a craft sale. Breakfast will be served from 7 to 10 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

This year the bazaar will feature a theme basket silent auction. Baskets include Willow Tree figurines, Longaberger pitchers, Longaberger baskets, Timberlake tickets, Casey’s, a children’s basket, a fall basket, a Barbie basket, and a Christmas basket. One of the sports baskets will have an autograph of Gavin Floyd, a Chicago White Sox pitcher. All the baskets are put together by the women of the church, with donations

from community businesses and church members. The auction begins at 8 a.m. and ends at noon. Winners need not be present. Another annual planned event is the home tour. Five homes will be featured this year. The home tour begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the bazaar or in advance at the church office. A map and driving directions are included. For information, call the church at 815-772-4030.

WELCOMING NEW MEMBERS

The Sterling Optimist Club welcomed two new members at its Oct. meeting. Attending were (from left) Steve Moser, standing by his sponsored new member, Dan Sallee; and Dr. Kelley Guthrie, new member, and her sponsor, Brandy Wren; and (back row) Mark Sedig, lieutenant governor of Zone 3, and Sam Meier, club president. Sedig conducted the installment. Photo submitted by Barry Montague.

The Salvation Army sets goal STERLING – This holiday season and all year, The Salvation Army in Sterling and Rock Falls will provide food, clothing, and emergency assistance to people in need in the community. Lt. Cindy Marquis said they need to raise $138,500. Traditionally, The Salvation Army’s bell ringers in Whiteside County help generate significant support for community-

wide programs at their red kettles. However, they continue to face restricted access in setting up kettles. Local donations are down due to the economy. Home foreclosures are unprecedented, unemployment is still a major problem, and prices for essentials are rising, Marquis said. All this contributes to an increase in families seeking help during the Christmas sea-

son and an increase in the cost of providing help. The 2013 Red Kettle Campaign begins Tuesday. The Salvation Army is scheduling volunteers to help in their mission to serve everyone in need. To donate, call 815-6251622, mail a check to P.O. Box 336, Sterling, IL 61081. Go to www.onlineredkettle.org/whitesidecounty to donate online. The kettle campaign also can be followed on Facebook.

ing detail? Aside from my mother (who is 85), I don’t care to hear about this from others. It has taught me a lesson I wish people would follow: While I do have back issues, I speak of them only to my doctor. I try to be patient, but some folks seem to need someone to vent to. I don’t want to be the one they “tell all� to. I try to tune it out, but I wish there was an easy way to let them know enough is enough. Any ideas on the best way to handle these people? Or am I stuck being a good listener forever? – Nobody’s Therapist in Crofton, Md. Dear Nobody’s Therapist: Try this: Say, “Really, I’m sorry to hear

that.� Then change the subject to something you read in the newspaper, saw on television, or that’s happening in your community. Dear Abby: Tell me what you would have done in this situation. While dining at an expensive restaurant on a rare night out, we were seated directly across from a nice-looking family. As I was eating my meal, I had a nauseating view of their child’s butt crease. The boy was about 12 or 14, and I didn’t want to embarrass him in a public place, but it put a damper on my enjoyment of the meal. Would it have been appropriate to approach

his mother and quietly tell her? Obviously, the kid didn’t know or care that he was exposed. The restaurant was full, so I couldn’t request another table. – Lost My Appetite in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Dear Lost My Appetite: The first thing I would have done was resist the urge to walk over and plant a stalk of celery in the great divide. And then, because moving to another table wasn’t possible, I would have moved my chair so that the view of the young man’s cleavage wouldn’t have been “head on.� Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

IN BRIEF Nativity display planned in Lanark

TUR THESPECIALGUEST WILLSPEAKABOUTHERLIFE TEACHING NEWSPAPER ,!.!2+n!DISPLAYAND REPORTING ANDHERHUSPROGRAMOF.ATIVITYSETS BANDSBATTLEWITHAMYOCOLLECTED-ARCIA,ATHROP TROPHICLATERALSCLEROSIS KNOWNAS,OU'EHRIGS OF,ANARK WILLBEAT $ISEASE PM.OVAT,ANARK 5NITED-ETHODIST#HURCH 2ESERVATIONSAREDUEBY PM.OVCALL)RENE %,OCUST3T AT  4HOSE 3HESTARTEDCOLLECTWHOHAVETOCANCELALSO INGIN$URINGTHE AREASKEDTOCALL PROGRAM SHEWILLSHARE STORIESABOUTTHESETS WHICHCOMEFROMALLOVER Mixed nuts being THEWORLD #ALL  DUR- sold as fundraiser INGWEEKDAYMORNINGS $)8/.n,EE#OUNTY TOMAKEARESERVATIONTO #OUNCILON!GINGHASA ATTENDORFORMOREINFORFUNDRAISERFORTHE#HRISTMATION MASORDERINGSEASON /NE POUNDCONTAINMethodist church ERSOFDELUXEMIXED ham supper, sale 'EORGIA.UTSAREBEING SOLDFOR0ROCEEDS WILLBEUSEDTOSUP4!-0)#/n4HE PORTTHESOCIALSERVICE 4AMPICO&IRST5NITED -ETHODIST#HURCHANNUAL PROGRAMSATTHE$IXON HAMSUPPERANDBAKE 3ENIOR#ENTERAND SALEWILLBEFROMTO THROUGHOUT,EE#OUNTY PM7EDNESDAYAT 4HE'EORGIA.UT#O THECORNEROF,INCOLNAND HASBEENACANDYAND 'LASSBURNSTREETS NUTMANUFACTURERSINCE 4HEALL YOU CAN EATMEAL  INCLUDESHAMWITHVEG#ALL  FOR ETABLE SALAD DESSERTAND MOREINFORMATIONORSTOP BEVERAGE FORADONATION INFROMAMTOPM ATTHEDOOR#ARRY OUTS -ONDAYTHROUGH&RIDAYAT WILLBEAVAILABLE 7 3ECOND3T$ELIV4HEBAKESALEWILLBE ERYISAVAILABLEFORORDERS UPSTAIRSINTHESOUTH3UN- OFORMOREINTHE$IXON DAYSCHOOLROOM AREA 4HEWHEELCHAIRACCESSIBLEENTRANCE WITHAN ELEVATORTOTHEBASEMENT Student’s art on ISONTHESOUTHSIDEOFTHE display at Ashford CHURCH #,).4/. )/7!– .INE &ORMOREINFORMATION STUDENTSIN!SHFORD5NICALL4ERRY'ASKILLAT VERSITYS $DESIGNCLASS   WILLSHOWCASETHEIRART INANEXHIBITTITLEDh!FTER Chiropractor to .EVELSONv 4HEEXHIBITWILLBEOPEN speak at lunch THROUGH4HURSDAYINTHE 2/#+&!,,3n2OCK UNIVERSITYS#ORTONA!RT 2IVER!REA#HRISTIAN 'ALLERY 7OMENS#LUBWILLMEET 4HEREWILLBEANARTISTS ATAM.OVFOR RECEPTIONFROMTO Ah)TSA'OOD,IFE,UNAM4UESDAY4HE CHEON vAT#ANDLELIGHT #ORTONA!RT'ALLERYISON )NN &IRST!VE THESECONDFLOOROF!SH-ALE FORD5NIVERSITYS3T#LARE GUESTSARE (ALLAT."LUFF"LVD WELCOME #HELSEA+INGOF-OR4HESPECIAL RISONISAMONGTHESTUFEATUREWILL DENTSWHOSEWORKWILLBE BE$R3TEONDISPLAY VEN#ARLSON 4HEGALLERYISOPEN OF#ARLSON TOTHEPUBLIC FREEOF Viki #HIROPRACTIC CHARGE FROMAMTO Scherer AND!CUPMWEEKDAYSAND PUNCTUREIN FORPRIVATESHOWINGSBY 3TERLING APPOINTMENT&ORINFORMA6IKI3CHEREROF$ECATION CALL  

New, old goods for sale at lodge $)8/.n!MULTI FAMILY RUMMAGESALEWILLBEFROM AMTOPM.OV AT$IXON-OOSE,ODGE &AMILY#ENTER  3HOP2OAD 4HEREISNOADMISSION4HEPUBLICISWELCOME-ORETHANADOZEN VENDORSWILLBEOFFERING ITEMS#ALL   FORMOREINFORMATION

Talk covers state care directives -/22)3/.n$EB+EASCALLOF#'(-EDICAL#ENTER WILLPRESENTAFREEPROGRAM ATPM4HURSDAYAT /DELL0UBLIC,IBRARY 3 -ADISON3T 3HEWILLTALKABOUT)LLINOIS !DVANCE#ARE$IRECTIVES THEHEALTHCAREPOWEROF ATTORNEYANDLIVINGWILLS3HE ALSOWILLTOUCHUPONADO NOT RESUSCITATEORDERAND ANEWDOCUMENTTOSTATE RESIDENTS THEPHYSICIAN ORDERSFORLIFE SUSTAINING TREATMENT !DVANCECAREDOCUMENTS WILLBEAVAILABLEATTHEPRESENTATION 4HEPROGRAMISOPENTO THEPUBLIC&ORMOREINFORMATION CALL  

Presentation on bullying scheduled $)8/.n4HE$IXON 0OLICE$EPARTMENTINCONJUNCTIONWITH$IXON0UBLIC 3CHOOLSWILLOFFERACOMMUNITYPROGRAMAT PM7EDNESDAYINTHE AUDITORIUMAT$IXON(IGH 3CHOOL ,INCOLN3TATUE $RIVE 4HEPRESENTATIONWILLDEAL WITHBULLYING CYBERBULLYING INTERNETSAFETY SEXTING ANDSOCIALNETWORKSAFETY !NTHONY1UADRARO $IXON 0OLICE/FFICERAND2EAGAN -IDDLE3CHOOLRESOURCE OFFICER WILLBETHEHOST 4HEHOUR LONGPRESENTATIONISFREEANDOPENTO THEPUBLIC!QUESTIONAND ANSWERSESSIONWILLFOLLOW0OLICEDEPARTMENTAND SCHOOLMEMBERSWILLBE THERE &ORMOREINFORMATION ORTOREGISTER CONTACT 1UADRAROATAQUADRARO DIXONSCHOOLSORGOR  

FISH FRY FUNDRAISER

World War II museum open Sunday ROCHELLE – The Roberts Armory World War II Museum will be open from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday in honor of Veterans Day. There is no admission fee. Artifacts from World War II specializing in the

history of the 70th Tank Battalion, 10th Mountain Division, and Rochelle World War II veterans will be on display. To get to the museum, go to the intersection of state Route 251 and

Intermodal Drive, where an Army truck will be visible. Signs will guide visitors along a 3-mile route. Visit www.rochelletourism.com/attractions/ html for more information.

More than $2,000 was collected Oct. 3 at the annual Knights of Columbus Farley Fish Fry at Edgewood Golf Club in Polo. Taking part were (front row, seated) Bill Burkardt; (middle row, from left) Sarah Donnelly, Lyne Grell, Jerry Farley, Diane Schoaf, Connie Grobe, Rose Johnson, and Kay Farley; and (back row) John Schoaf and Larry Farley. All proceeds go to the Dixon and Polo food pantries. Photo submitted by Jerry Farley.


Saturday, November 9, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

4-H BRIEFS Window display winners named #LUBSIN#ARROLL#OUNTYPARticipated in a window display CONTESTDURING.ATIONAL ( Week, Oct. 6-12. The winners of the contest and display locations ARE DIMENSIONALnBEST  (MESSAGE -ILLEDGEVILLE (OTSHOTS (#LUBAT-ILLEDgeville State Bank; most ORIGINAL ,ANARK,IGHTNING Bugs, at the Exchange State "ANKIN,ANARKBESTUSE OFSELECTEDTHEME #ARROLL #OUNTY+IDS (#LUBAT THE National Bank, Mount #ARROLLANDBESTNEWMEMbership message, Thomson Sandburrs at Thomson ,IBRARY In the 3-D division the winners are: most original, #HADWICK!CHIEVERSATTHE 4(%.ATIONAL"ANK#HADwick; best use of selected theme, Savanna Smiles at THE National Bank in Savanna; and best new membership message, #LEVER#LOVERSAT0LATINUM 0ERFORMANCEIN,ANARK

Members to be recognized Sunday -/5.4#!22/,,n 4HE#ARROLL#OUNTY ( !CHIEVEMENT0ROGRAMTO HONORCOUNTY (ERSAND clubs for their hard work and accomplishments for THEPAST (YEARWILLBEAT 2 p.m. Sunday at Naaman $IEHL!UDITORIUM 3#LAY 3T (FAMILIESAREENCOURaged to attend. Ice cream sundaes will be served after the program.

Leadership course planned in Dixon $)8/.n! (CLUBOFFICER and leadership extravaganza will be from 9 a.m. to noon .OVAT3AUK6ALLEY#OMMUNITY#OLLEGE STATE 2OUTE 4HEWORKSHOPISFORALL ( club officers, teens, leaders, and parents. Teens will participate in the officer training course, how a meeting is run and team building. Sessions for club leaders and parents will be on putting fun and motivation Into club meetings, cloverbuds, and adult and youth partnerships. There will be hands-on SKILLSESSIONS (ERSAND VOLUNTEERSFROM#ARROLL ,EE and Whiteside counties will BEONHANDTOHELP2EGISTRAtion deadline is Monday. Go to http://web.extension.uiuc. edu/clw to register. The program is free.

Horse members to have potluck -/5.4#!22/,,n!LL #ARROLL#OUNTY ((ORSE Project members past and present, their families, and ANYINTERESTED (ERSARE welcome to a family supper at 6 p.m. Nov. 16. Each family is asked to bring appetizers and or desserts and their own table service to Naaman Diehl !UDITORIUM There will be a speaker on equine related topics. The horse committee will present awards and honors. 4HEREALSOWILLBEA ( (ORSE#OMMITTEEMEETING For more information on any of the programs listed, CONTACT,EANNE2AHN #ARROLL #OUNTYPROGRAMCOORDINATOR atlrahn@illinois.edu or call the OFFICEAT  

West Carroll FFA Land Use team members are (from left) Glenn Hoffman, Rachel Badtke, Clare O’Connor, Tessa Sibley, Christy Ralston, Tom Watson, Chloe Carson, Dylan Williams, Kristen Houzenga, and Ashley Hunt. Photos submitted by Christy Ralston.

West Carroll FFA team members score big SAVANNA – West Carroll FFA members won the Oct. 3 Land Use Career Development Event with a score of 1,301. The competition was hosted by the Stockton FFA Chapter. Area farmers provided the pits . Land Use CDE is a contest during which FFA members judge all aspects of the soil. Members of the varsity team were Clare O’Connor, Tessa Sibley, Chloe Carson, Dylan Williams, and Tom Watson. Junior varsity team members were Glenn Hoffman, Rachel Badtke, Christy Ralston, Ashley Hunt, and Kristen Houzenga. Team members who placed were Carson, first; O’Connor, second; Williams, third; and Sibley, sixth. The top four scores from the varsity team will advance to state.

West Carroll FFA members (from left) Dylan Williams, Clare O’Connor, Chloe Carson, and Tessa Sibley, also placed seventh at the Oct. 15 Career Development Event at Black Hawk East College in Kewanee. O’Connor place ninth out of the top 10 in the state. Members judge four soil pits and aspects of the soil, including texture, structure, water holding capacity, and permeability.

WEST CARROLL FFA BRIEFS Students attend STAR Conference SAVANNA – Area FFA members attended the recent Section Teams Activities and Responsibilities Conference at Black Hawk College East Campus in Kewanee. The conference was presented by the Illinois Association FFA officers. Section officers set goals, pre-

pared for their leadership training school, and were informed of their duties throughout the upcoming year. They also exchanged ideas to take back to their sections and chapters. Among those attending were Section I officers, Chloe Carson, president, and Dylan Williams, reporter, both from the West Carroll chapter in Savanna; Tyler Pieper, treasurer from the Dakota

FFA chapter, in conjunction with the American Red Cross, collected 134, including 21 double red units of blood during a recent blood drive. The Oct. 25 drive was one of the largest, if not largest, high school-sponsored blood drives in the state. October blood In other FFA news, the FFA corn plot was hardrive successful vested Oct. 26 by Don SAVANNA - The West Metz. The corn, Golden Carroll High School Harvest H-9011 4011, was

chapter; Tayler Meneguin, sentinel from River Ridge in Hanover; Jordon Ollerich, secretary, and Joe McGinnis, vice president, both from LenaWinslow High School in Lena.

planted by Metz on April 28, and yielded an average of 175 bushels per acre. The chapter recognized Metz planting, harvesting, and drying the corn; AG Tech for donating the chemicals and fertilizer; and Al Hoffman for donating the lime. The proceeds from the plot help to send students to FFA conferences and conventions.

Whiteside County 4-H members, clubs recognized MORRISON – The University of Illinois Extension Whiteside County 4-H achievement recognition program was Oct. 20 at St. Peter Church. Those receiving awards and their clubs are: Leon Wide Awakes Club of Prophetstown: Abbey Baker, achievement. Cottonwood Club of Morrison: Quinn James, junior animal care; Kara Saville, Kayla Saville, Kate Henson, and Emily Henson; animal science; Allie Wiersema, I DARE You award; Kara Saville, Golden Needle Award in memory of Jareldean Duncan Morgan; and third place window display. Garden Plain Ripsnorters: Kaylie Huizenga, animal science, top 4-H’er, and top horse exhibitor in memory of Tony Silva. Fenton Wizards of Erie: Logan Eggers, engineering and technology; Corbin Eggers, food and nutri-

Whiteside County Achievement Award winners are (from left) Quinn James, Kate Henson, and Malory Eggers; and (back row) Allie Wiersema, Logan Eggers, Corbin Eggers; and Kaylie Huizenga. Photo submitted by Susan O’Connor. tion and top communicator in memory of Abbie Huizenga; Berkley Eggers and Abby Stichter, home and family; Malory Eggers, personal development

and top first-year 4-H’er; Erin Stichter, community and global understanding; Abby Stichter, top secretary; and first place window display.

Hume Happy Hustlers of Tampico: Club of the Year; and Connor Sandrock, top junior showman in memory of Kyle Miller.

Genesee Hillbillies of Sterling: Joshua Waite, top visual arts exhibitor in memory of Mary Catlett; and second place window display.

IN BRIEF Master Gardener training to start

unteer work and 10 hours of continuing education. 2EGISTRATIONISREQUIRED !NORIENTATIONINTERVIEWWILL be conducted with participants before the class. 2EGISTRATIONFORTHETRAINING IS #ONTACT,ISA6ALLE EXTENsion program coordinator, AT  ORGOTO web.extension.illinois.edu/ bdo to register or for more information.

The University of Illinois Extension’s Master Gardener training will be from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. &RIDAYS *ANTO!PRIL AT3AUK6ALLEY#OMMUNITY #OLLEGE STATE2OUTE 2, Dixon, !FTERTHEINITIALTRAINING 60 hours of volunteer work are required over a 2-year period. Once the 60 hours are completed, the volunHomemade gifts teer becomes a certified topic of next class Master Gardener. To maintain active status, each /2%'/.n#ANDICE year the volunteer must -ILLERAND-ARILYN#SERnus, University of Illinois complete 30 hours of vol-

Extension educators, will present Holiday Gifts from Your Kitchen and Garden from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Nov. ATTHE/GLE#OUNTY %XTENSIONOFFICE 7 0INES2OAD They will teach ways to make gifts from what is grown in the garden and can be found in a kitchen. This is a hands-on workshop. Those attending will take home their crafts. Items to be made include an evergreen grapevine wreath, terrarium ornament, pomander balls, dried herb and floral sachets, herb popcorn and savory herb dip.

several colleges from Illinois and Wisconsin will be on hand. !NYSTUDENTINTERESTED in majoring in agriculture is welcome to attend the program and meet with college and university representatives. For more information, call the extension in Ogle #OUNTYAT  

at Grace United Methodist #HURCH %#HAMBERlin St. “Meals for a Healthy Heartâ€? is designed for anyone interested in preventing or managing heart disease. In each session, participants receive recipes, watch cooking demonstrations, taste foods, and Ag College Day learn about proper diet Thursday in Oregon Healthy cooking and exercise. The cost is $10, which /2%'/.n!GINTHE tips course offered covers both sessions and #LASSROOMWILLHOSTA#OLLEGE!G$AYFROMAMTO $)8/.n4HE5NIVERSITYOF includes food and supplies. 1:30 p.m. Thursday at the Illinois Extension will have Visit web.extension. 2OCK2IVER#ENTER 3 a cooking class for heart ILLINOISEDUCLWORCALL 10th St. health from 10 a.m. to 2EPRESENTATIVESFROM noon Monday and Nov. 18  TOREGISTER Herbal-spiced cider and TREATSWILLBESERVED!LL recipes will be shared. The COSTIS2EGISTRATIONIS due Nov. 18. To register or for more information, contact the extension office at web. EXTENSIONEDUBDOOR  


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

COSMETICS

Consumer advocates turn heads, taking on industry BY HEATHER SOMERVILLE -#4.EWS3ERVICE

I

t began more than a decade ago with four women who wondered whether the hair spray, perfume and shampoo they were using every day were safe. Their quest to find an answer led them to their neighborhood drugstores, where they spent hours reading the labels on beauty products. What they read disturbed them: lists of chemicals and ingredients whose names they couldn’t pronounce. This bootstrap effort grew into a national movement – the San Francisco-based Campaign for Safe Cosmetics – that has transformed the way consumers shop for personal care items, pushed the cosmetics industry to change the way it makes products, pressured lawmakers to call for more oversight, and moved Walmart, the world’s largest retailer, to announce a policy last month banning some harmful chemicals from beauty merchandise. “They really moved the needle on this,� Tracey Woodruff, director of the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment at the University of California-San Francisco, said of the campaign. “The way that we think about cosmetics and chemicals has changed because of the work that they did.� After setting up its headquarters in 2004 in the heart of San Francisco, the group tapped into one of the country’s most environmentally progressive areas, finding allies among the activist groups there and a political climate that embraced toxic chemical regulations. The cam-

MCT News Service

Stacy Malkan (left) and Janet Nudelman, co-founders of the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, sign Target customer comment cards that the store recently introduced in response to the organization’s petition for cosmetics free of toxic chemicals in Oakland, Calif. paign launched the first large-scale grass-roots challenge to the country’s $60 billion beauty products industry, and in 2005 helped drive passage of California’s Safe Cosmetics Act – still the only law of its kind in the country – that requires cosmetic companies to disclose to public health officials the ingredients in their products sold in California. “The fact the (campaign) is housed in the Bay Area has everything to do with the success that we’ve had over the past decade,� said Janet Nudelman, an early leader in the safe cosmetics movement and program director at the Breast Cancer Fund, which shares its office with the campaign. The Personal Care Products Council, the industry trade group, declined to answer questions from the San Jose Mercury News, saying in an email the questions “would require considerable time as they cover a multitude of complex issues.� The council’s website says manufacturers “uti-

lize the best science and latest available research data to substantiate the safety of a cosmetic product before it is marketed� and comply with guidelines “established by scientific and regulatory bodies around the world.� The council says that more than 11 billion personal care products are sold each year, with about 150 reported adverse reactions – namely skin rashes or allergies – which it says makes beauty products safer than food or medicine. Concern about a group of chemicals called phthalates touched off the campaign. Phthalates, a class of man-made chemicals, are common ingredients in personal care products. Even in low doses they may cause early-onset menopause, infertility in males when exposed to the chemicals as babies, birth defects and developmental disorders, according to research from several medical and scientific bodies, including the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and UC-San Francisco.

App tailored for each individual SPECS

CONTINUED FROM C1

BluTech lenses are infused with melanin, a natural pigment found in the iris of the eye, to help filter out high-energy blue light and UVA/UVB radiation while allowing what Oakley called “innocuous� light to pass through. The melanin gives BluTech lenses a yellowish hue, and is available for any prescription. Other companies produce lenses with bluelight filtering coatings. Oakley said BluTech lenses reduce eyestrain and fatigue from long hours spent in front of the computer. Adding BluTech lenses to a pair of glasses is typically less than $100; they can be

worn indoors and outdoors and can also be added to nonprescription glasses. He cautioned that BluTech “doesn’t prevent anything per se but it protects.� Although many eye doctors think all that time staring at your smartphone is bad for your eyes, one firm is encouraging people to use mobile devices to improve their vision. GlassesOff Inc. is gearing up to launch an iPhone app this year that it claims can enhance near-vision sharpness. The New York company contends that human vision is based on two main factors: the quality of an image captured by the eyes and the imageprocessing capabilities of

the brain as it interprets the image. By spending 12 to 15 minutes a day, three times a week for three months completing a game-like program, GlassesOff says, a user can improve the imageprocessing function by teaching the brain to better interpret blurred images. The app is tailored for each individual and adapts according to his or her progress; the goal is to wean a viewer off reading glasses altogether. “It’s relevant to practically any person that I know,� said Nimrod Madar, chief executive of GlassesOff. “We can empower people to self-improve their vision condition, so you’re no longer depending on external intermediates.�

Dad seeks way to help daughter RAMSEY

CONTINUED FROM C1

A prodigal daughter Dear Dave, My daughter used to live an irresponsible lifestyle and was bad with money, too. While she was in college, she also took on $20,000 in student loan debt. Since that time, she experienced a serious illness. She’s recovering now, and it has really changed her behavior and her outlook on life, spiritual matters and money for the better. I could pay off the loans for her, but I’m wondering if there’s a better way to help. –Eddie

Dear Eddie, If I were in your shoes, and I had the means to pay off her student loan debt without putting myself at risk financially, that’s exactly what I’d do. Sometimes the best gift you can give a person is to let them wallow around for a while in the mess they made. Being forced to work your way out of bad decisions and irresponsible behaviors is a great remedy in lots of cases. But in this situation, with what you’ve told me about her previous health issue, and the fact that she’s now being responsible with money, behaving and making better life choices, I’d want her to be as free as possible as she takes up this new walk. My advice is to try to be

a huge blessing to your daughter. Right now, she’s a lot like the prodigal son. She’s come around in her thinking and realizes what’s right and what really matters. Give her the biggest hug she’s ever had, Eddie. Then, throw a party and write a check to knock out that student loan debt. –Dave Dave Ramsey has written four New York Times best-selling books: “Financial Peace�, “More Than Enough�, “The Total Money Makeover� and “EntreLeadership�. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the Web at daveramsey.com.

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

Driver will deliver to residents you want fast food or something more upscale, all you have to do is give Kutz a call at 815-440-3997. He or one of his helpers will go out and pick up what you’ve ordered and bring it to your door for a $5 flat fee. Dixon Food Taxi customers either pay for the food with a card when ordering, or they reimburse Kutz and associates when they bring the food. Although Kutz prefers cash, he accepts credit cards through a Square Register system on his Android phone.

NOTEBOOK

CONTINUED FROM C1

Dixon man starts food delivery service DIXON – Hungry for food from an eatery that doesn’t deliver? Jason Kutz, 36, says he thought it would be neat if everyone delivered and so he has started a business in an attempt to make it happen. Dixon Food Taxi is based out of the lifelong Dixon resident’s home. Whether

For now, hours are 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Friday. Kutz hopes to expand the hours as business picks up. He also says he’d like to eventually add Sterling and Rock Falls to his service area. “It’s taken off kind of slow, but now it’s growing, mainly by word of mouth,� Kutz said. Dixon Food Taxi has a Facebook page. A website, dixonfoodtaxi.com, is a work in progress; when it is finished, customers will be able to get service from the site.

Astrograph

Choose the direction you want to go, and turn your ideas into tangible possibilities. Take action instead of waiting for someone else to beat you to it. Simple, precise moves and cost-effective decisions will be your ticket to a better future. Acceptance and ready adaptation will improve the outcome. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A day off will do you good. Whether you read a good book or get out with friends or loved ones, the time spent will encourage you to be more productive. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You’ll be torn between what you want and what you can do. Be realistic and refrain from showing anger if you want to avoid discord. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Consistency will play a role in the outcome of a touchy situation. Look for an unusual solution to a problem, and you will realize that you have something special to offer. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Keep your emotions tucked away and your ears tuned in to what others do and say. If someone expects

A day off will do you good. Sunday, November 10, 2013 something unreasonable of you, make yourself scarce. Do your own thing.

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Have your game plan ready to go, and you won’t lose a beat when it comes to gaining success and recognition. An opportunity to partner with someone could prove fortuitous. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t let changes made by others disturb you. If you follow through with your SODQV \RX ZLOO ÀQG ZD\V WR PRYH forward, alone or with someone you encounter along the way. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Partnerships will make a difference in the way you move forward. Keep your emotions hidden until you are positive about your feelings. A personal move will result in greater stability. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Reevaluate your current position and your reputation. You may want to make a couple of personal changes that enhance your popularity as well DV \RXU FRQÀGHQFH

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Sharing is required today, bringing results that are far beyond your expectations. Socialize, enjoy interesting gatherings or visit a place that makes you feel at home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Look over your investments or calculate your assets and liabilities. You will have to make some serious decisions regarding your generosity and those who are putting unreasonable demands on you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Maintain your schedule by clearing up XQÀQLVKHG EXVLQHVV 6WDUW WKH SURcess now, so that you can enjoy a little downtime with friends or family. Romance is encouraged. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Consider your situation and the people involved in your life. Make tough choices that will ease some of the problems you’ve been facing. Stop ZDIà LQJ DQG VWDUW PRYLQJ IRUZDUG

6HH 7RGD\¡V &ODVVLÀHG 6HFWLRQ IRU &URVVZRUG $QVZHUV


3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

Racers of all ages zoom through the streets of Dixon Oct. 12 during the Hairy Buzz 10K Run for charity. Leading the pack are Kim Sollars, 36, and Paul Campbell, 56, (far right) both of Dixon. They were the top female and male finishers. Photos submitted by Stacia Staples.

Charity run winners give back to the communities DIXON – Results from the Oct. 12 Hairy Buzz 10K Run for charity 12 have been announced. The overall male and female finishers were Paul Campbell, 56, at 41 minutes, 30.7 seconds; and Kim Sollars, 36, at 48 minutes, 37.2 seconds, both of Dixon. Campbell

donated to Granny Rose Animal Shelter and Sollars donated to Open Sesame Children’s Learning Center, both in Dixon. St. Mary School in Dixon also received a donation for the largest group of registrants. Each organization received $375. Top finishers in their age

Stacia Staples (left) director of the Hairy Buzz 10K Run, donated $375 to Jean Spohn, principal of St. Mary School in Dixon. The school received money for having the largest group of registrants at the Oct. 12 race in Dixon.

and gender brackets were Anna Whelan, 11; Alex Whelan, 13; Coral Engle, 30; Matthias Kemmeren, 34; Leann Pitzer, 40; Jeremy Munson, 37; Sandy Lightner, 50; and Marcus Mossholder, 52, all of Dixon. Other racers were Tristen Smith, 10, Beth Welty,

30, Kaile Schreiner, 26, Val Smith, 29, Katie Krigge, 31, Eric Clark, 32, John Plescia, 31, Carol Ardis, 46, Jennifer Baratta, 39, Beth McLane, 36, Ron Deters, 37, Joe Welty, 57, and David Schreiner, 51, all of Dixon; Angelica Tintori, 44, Kevin Hemmen, 41, and Jody Ranjel, 55, all of Sterling;

Staples also presented $375 to Lori Reubin, executive director of Open Sesame Children’s Learning Center in Dixon. Kim Sollars, 36, of Dixon, the top female finisher, selected the daycare as her charity.

Colleen Geary, 31, of Polo; Tyler Stauffer, 22, of Ashton; and June Danekas, 51, of Oregon. The sponsors were Studio 404 Salon, KSB Hospital, Sauk Valley Media, Now Care, Ken Nelson Auto Group, Mama Cimino’s, The Stable’s Bar, Wahl Clipper, Raynor, Dixon

Police Charitable Association, and Dixon Main Street. Committee members were Stacia Staples, Laurie Hicks, Anthony Welty, Bill Montavon, Sally Montavon, Keith Aurand, Bill Mick, Brad Sibley, and Ryan Marshall, all of Dixon.

Paul Campbell, top male finisher of the race, selected Granny Rose Animal Shelter in Dixon as his charity. Staples presented $375 to Judy Lohse, manager of the shelter.

New recycling drop-off open Sleepout to benefit homeless shelter OREGON – The Ogle County Solid Waste Management Department has announced a new pilot program, the Ogle County Residential Electronics Recycling Drop-off Program in honor of America Recycles Day. OCSWMD is working with the Byron Forest Preserve District and Universal Recycling Technologies to provide two new drop-off sites to make electronics recycling more convenient for county residents. Beginning Friday, electronics may be dropped off from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday or 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the last Saturday of the month at the large, marked, shipping containers at the OCSWMD parking lot, 909 W. Pines Road. Another drop-off point is at the Byron Forest Preserve District Stone Quarry parking lot, 6845 North German Church Road, Byron. The hours are 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday and during the day on the first weekend of the month (closed at dark and on holidays). Acceptable items are adding and answering machines, cables, cable receivers, calculators, cameras, camcorders, two-way radios, CD ROM drives, cellphones, telephones, comput-

ers, laptops, copiers, fax, scanners, digital clocks, converter boxes, music players, and video disc recorders, discs, CDs, computer mouses, floppy disk, hard, and zip drives, intercom systems, joysticks, game controls, and keyboards. Microwaves, modems, monitors, pagers, palm organizers, hand held games, portable radios and CD players, postage machines, printers, projectors, routers, satellite receivers, servers, shredders, software, stereo equipment, speakers and receivers, switch boxes, tablets, iPads, iPods, PDAs, tape recorders, TVs, projection TVs, typewriters and word processors, UPS (battery backups), VCR or DVD and laser disc players, and video game players also will be accepted. Do not dump any other waste into the container than what is listed above. Only residential-generated electronic items are accepted. No business electronics are allowed. Businesses may contact OCSWMD at 815-7324020 for other options. Take electronics to the drop-off site only during open hours. Unload and stack items carefully in container. No help is available at the site. Do not leave items outside of the

container. Once items have been placed in container they become the property of URT. The sponsors are not responsible for injuries or stolen items. The OCSWMD recommends residents clean the hard drive in computers and other memory devices being recycled to protect privacy and data. Go to www.oglecounty.org for instructions. It is the duty of the user of the recycling program to ensure data erasure. The OCSWMD or the Byron Forest Preserve District assumes no responsibility to protect electronic data remaining in any electronics deposited in the containers. Once received by URT, all hard drives will either be wiped clean using a secure three-step process, or will be shredded and destroyed before recycling. As a certified e-Stewards recycler, URT adheres to the strictest security and environmental guidelines for recycling and downstream accountability. This pilot program will supplement the special electronics recycling events held in Lee and Ogle counties each year. For more information, call the OCSWMD at 815-732-4020.

IST#HURCHYOUTHPASTOR This year’s recipient, -EGAN ANDHERTWOCHILdren will be present to DIXON – The public, volunteers, and supporters of accept the keys of their Dixon Habitat for Humanity NEWHOMEFROM#HRIS Gehlbach, habitat presiare welcome to the open house and dedication cere- dent. mony for this year’s Habitat 0ROJECT(OUSE.OVAT Bat experts to 3#OLLEGE!VE give presentation 4HISISTHEORGANIZATIONS THNEWHOME!SHORT OREGON – The Prairie CEREMONYWILLBEATPM 0RESERVATION3OCIETYOF/GLE CONDUCTEDBY7ADE"UZ#OUNTYWILLOFFERAFREEEDUZARD &IRST5NITED-ETHOD- CATIONALPROGRAMONBATS

“Incredible Bats� will be at PM.OVAT+ICKAPOO .ATURE#ENTER . Limekiln Road. Sharon and Dan Peterson of New Lenox, certified bat EXPERTS WILLGIVEAMULTIMEdia presentation, answer questions, and show a live FRUITBAT!LLOFTHEIRBATS were born in captivity, and have not been exposed to rabies. 4HEPROGRAMISOPENTO THEPUBLIC#HILDRENARE welcome with adult supervi-

DIXON – PADS first “One Night Without a Home,� evening will be Nov. 22 in the parking lot at the shelter, 805 W. First St. The evening will start at 6 p.m. and ends after breakfast at about 8 a.m. Nov. 23. Participants are encouraged to collect pledges for sleeping in 1-hour increment shifts. They may stay for the entire night or sponsor other individuals sleeping outside. Breakfast will be served at 7 a.m., with tours of

the shelter from 6 to 8 a.m. PADS Board members also will sleep outside the shelter and supervise the event. The program is an opportunity for housed people to spend a night outside to discuss, think, and learn about homelessness. The goal is to promote advocacy, awareness, and education through PADS, (Providing Advocacy, Dignity, and Shelter). To register or for more information, contact

Vanessa White, PADS Board president, at whiteva1970@yahoo. com or call 815-4406598. Participants should dress in layered, warm clothes, and shoes or boots, and bring a sleeping bag and blankets, and their own beverage. A bonfire will be kept going all night. PADS will not be responsible for any participants’ items. The PADS shelter has been open since 1990, and has served hundreds of men, women, children, and infants.

Local DAR member’s work on display The Rock River Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution again will be a participating contributor to the USA Tree featured in Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry’s “Christmas Around the World and Holidays of Light� exhibit. The tree, sponsored and decorated by the DAR’s Chicago Chapter, will feature a “Made in the USA� theme which requires all ornaments, traditional or Americana, to be made in America. The Rock River Chapter’s ornaments are crocheted “clothespin� angels handcrafted by 92-year-old member, Caroline Colton Kaletka.

Caroline Colton Kaletka, stands in front of the Rock River Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution USA Tree ornaments. The 92-year old member crocheted the clothespin angels. Photo submitted by Rosanne M. Kaletka-Johnson. The “angels� are clothed mas trees from approxiin traditional red, white mately 55 countries and and blue and feature gold ethnic groups. halos. The display will be open The exhibit has Christ- from Thursday to Jan. 5.

IN BRIEF House, dedication scheduled in Dixon

SION,IGHTREFRESHMENTSWILL be served after the presentation. &ORMOREINFORMATION email the society at pposc. ORG GMAILCOMORCALL  

Winter bird feeding program planned /2%'/.n0EGGY $OTY 5NIVERSITYOF)LLInois Extension educator, ENERGYANDENVIRONMENTAL stewardship, will offer a

WINTERBIRDFEEDINGPROGRAMTOHELPGUIDEPEOPLE on their quest to provide appropriate winter food for birds. 4HEPROGRAMWILLBEFROM TOPM.OVAT THE/GLE#OUNTY%XTENSION OFFICE 70INES2OAD Doty will display some commercial food types and show pictures of the species these seeds will attract. Information will be offered as to what food to avoid, feeder care, water

requirements, and, most IMPORTANTLY BUDGETINGFOR the winter commitment of FEEDINGLOCAL NON MIGRATOry species. 4HISPROGRAMALSOWILL OFFERBASICBIRDWATCHING techniques to help the novice birder better identify THESEWINTERGUESTS 4HECOSTIS2EGISTRATIONISNEEDED&ORMORE information, contact the 5OF)%XTENSIONOFFICEAT web.extension.illinois.edu/ BDOOR  


Travel

Maui confidential BY GARY A. WARNER MCT News Service

T

hirty years ago, I had just been fired from my first job, as a Sacramento, Calif., politician’s press secretary. I unexpectedly had time and money to take my first solo vacation. I called up Western Airlines (yes, it was that long ago) and booked a flight to Maui. It was beautiful, exotic and – best of all – the new home of J.D., a high school buddy from Long Beach, Calif., who would let me crash on his couch in Makawao, upcountry on the slopes of Haleakala. J.D. worked as a beachboy at the old Intercontinental hotel in south Maui. He snuck me hotel snorkels, fins, lounge chairs and towels. When not sunning and swimming, I would drive J.D.’s ancient, rusting Volkswagen van, nicknamed “bummer bus” for its proclivity to break down. I’d go from Kihei to Kula, Wailuku to Wailea, and everywhere in between. We’d party at night. On Saturday, J.D. and I drove up to Haleakala to see the sunset. Yes, sunset – I’m not getting up at 5 a.m. on my vacation to freeze my behind off. On Sunday, we made the drive out to Hana to go skinnydipping with locals at Red Sand Beach. When I left after a week, I was in love with Maui. Though my allegiance has shifted to Kauai over the years, Maui was my first love – and you never forget your first love. I’ve been back two dozen times since. I was hardly alone in my admiration for Maui. Tourism has boomed over the past three decades. There are fewer than 150,000 residents on Maui, but more than 2.2 million visitors wing in each year. The island’s landscape has been warped by mainlanders’ needs, from the manicured swaths of golf courses to the Krispy Kreme and Walmart next to the airport entrance. But the Maui I fell in love with still exists. Drive less than a half-hour out of the airport and you can be high up on the green flank of Haleakala, or strolling a deserted North Coast beach, or hiking around the wind-carved volcanic peaks of Iao Valley. To mark 30 years, I’m rolling out my list of the over- and underrated on the island. For the hard-core Costco-to-condo crowd, this list won’t matter much. For others, my under-

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

rated might be your overrated. We can agree to disagree – but I’m right.

Town Overrated: Lahaina. The former royal retreat, missionary center, whaling harbor and early Hawaiian capital seems to have turned into one big T-shirt-selling, timesharehawking, whale-watching, video-playing, luau-touting tourist trap. The banyan trees are amazing, the museums are interesting and the Pioneer Inn is tied for the oldest hotel in Hawaii, built in 1901, the same year as the Moana-Surfrider in Waikiki. But every time I drop into Lahaina, my mental meter is running the numbers on how many minutes until I can get out of town. Underrated: Wailuku. In the past, I would have said Paia. But that once-scruffy North Coast counterculture outpost has become a trendy address in recent years. So I will double down on the ramshackle funkiness and go with Wailuku. A dud at first impressions, the county seat is dotted with ugly government office buildings and is far from the nearest beach. But the back streets are full of plantation-era shops and tiny Japanese stores and clubs. The Bailey House museum, dedicated to the early missionaries, leaves me shaking my head at how sour and dour these men of God could be – even before their sons began gobbling up land and importing Asian laborers at serf-like wages. Janice Fairbanks runs the lovely Old Wailuku Inn at Ulupono, a B&B where guests on my most recent visit included Dutch tourists and a Honolulu businessman. The Wailuku Coffee Co. serves the best caffeinated brew on Maui. Best of all: only a trickle of tourists. On Hawaii’s slickest tourist island, you can find a town the tour buses have passed by.

The overrated, underrated and unknown on the island

Underrated: Hamoa. The best beach on Maui that you’ve probably never heard of (unless you listen to the English indie rock band Gomez). It is past Hasegawa’s General Store on the Hana Highway, a long way from the sunscreen-slathered hordes on the resort-area beaches. Twice when I’ve visited, I’ve had the whole beach to myself. The crescent-shaped shoreline was once the lip of a small volcano.

Activity Overrated: Zip-lining. Like an invasive plant that can’t be rooted out, wires strung around natural places for people to hurtle down while bellowing at the top of their lungs has become one of the mainstays of overdeveloped resort areas around the world. Maui is no different. Adrenaline junkies love it. You, or your kids, might love it. But for me, it’s the kind of hyperactivity I come to Hawaii to escape. Underrated: Bodysurfing. With some of the best beaches in the world and well-shaped waves much of the year, learning how to get into the hollow of a wave and use your lead hand to scoot along the face of the short wall of water is a simple pleasure I can indulge all day. My favorite beach is D.T. Fleming State Beach, though in churning winter water you can end up with a face plant and a swimsuit full of sand if you pick the wrong wave.

Celebrity resident

Overrated: Oprah Winfrey. The great land baroness of Maui, she has 63 acres outside of Hana and a big, white, twostory, Hawaii plantation-style mansion on the old Thompson Ranch, upcountry near the flank of Haleakala. Every “property for sale” sign sets off speculation that Oprah might add to her holdings. Whether she is visiting Maui or doing something on the mainland or elsewhere in the world, you will Beach Overrated: Kapalua. This is no hear about it in the local newsskanky Baldwin Beach. It’s still papers and on TV. a Maui beauty, the No. 1 choice Underrated: Charles Lindin the first-ever “Best Beach” bergh. Yes, I know he has been in the U.S. rankings. But its dead since 1974. At least you popularity has brought in ever can see his grave. Everyone else bigger crowds. The once-open is hard to pin down. Clint Eastspace behind the ring of palm wood has a home in South Maui, trees has been developed into while the counterculture lifea resort area, giving it a less style around Paia has attracted natural feeling than when I first actor Owen Wilson, singer Willie visited three decades ago. It’s Nelson, actor Woody Harrelson no longer the best beach in the and Aerosmith frontman and “American Idol” judge Steven U.S. – or even on Maui.

Tyler. The late George Harrison, “the quiet Beatle,” owned more than 150 acres around Nihiku, near Hana. Most of the celebrities fiercely protect their privacy. Harrison sued his neighbors for using a pathway to the beach. Lindbergh, the great aviator, is buried in Kipahulu, just beyond Hana. You have to go behind the old Palapala Hoomau Church to find his pretty, lava rock-rimmed grave. Lindbergh was a pioneer in coming to Maui for celebrity privacy, and even in death he attempts to hide.

Eating Overrated: Any luau. I’ve been to at least a half dozen commercial luaus around the islands and didn’t enjoy any of them. The modern luau industrial complex has taken a traditional feast and turned it into a Vegas-style overeaters buffet of middling quality food, lots of expensive booze and then a floor show. It’s a mainstay of group package tours and timeshare hawkers (“free luau if you come see our property”). Underrated: Ranch-grilled burgers. At the Honolua General Store near the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua and especially at Ulupalakua Ranch Store & Grill in the upcountry, you can have a great hamburger grilled to perfection and served at benches beside old ranch- and plantation-style buildings. Laid-back and delicious.

Swimming Overrated: Pools. Every resort hotel in West and South Maui has an amazing pool, with the ones at the Grand Wailea, Fairmont Kea Lani, Hyatt Regency Maui and Westin Maui among the best in the world. But to see people sitting at a pool with their backs to the ocean and a sparsely crowded, world-class beach just a few feet away is a crime against nature. I know why they do it – as my daughter said when she was younger about her preference for the pool, “There’s stuff in the ocean.” Well, darling, with all those people standing around with beers in hand, I can assure you there is “stuff” in the pool, too. Underrated: Pacific Ocean. No island has more great beaches than Maui. Kapalua, D.T. Fleming, Napili, Kaanapali, Wailea and Hamoa just begin to cover the options. Even the airport has a good beach. Being slightly sunburned and having a lingering

saltwater taste in your mouth is the feeling of being on vacation. If the pool is all you want, save your money and go to Las Vegas or Phoenix.

Shopping Overrated: Whaler’s Village. Most of the same Californiabased surfwear stores and overpriced jewelry shops you’ll find in Waikiki are packed into a two-story mall. The parking garage is striped for cars from the 1970s, so make sure you have your collision damage waiver on your rental Mustang before trying to squeeze it between two SUVs. I didn’t and paid the price. Underrated: Paia. The haven for hippies-turned-shopowners on the north end of the island is a great stop on your way to Haleakala, the airport or the island’s best fish restaurant, Mama’s Fish House. In between the patchouli oil and crystals, you’ll find plantationera stores turned into funky boutiques selling secondhand aloha wear, artisan jewelry and interesting bathing suit designs. Maui Girls bikinis were featured in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition.

Season Overrated: Summer. So you like bleeding out of your wallet? Hawaii sits just north of the equator, meaning there isn’t a big difference between the seasons. Yes, it is marginally warmer and drier in summer. But the biggest difference is in prices, with summer costing twice as much as other times of year. Airfare from Los Angeles in early August: $1,000 roundtrip. Airfare in late September: $490. Underrated: Fall. The summer crowds have gone home and the snowbirds have yet to arrive. There are no spring vacation hordes and Japanese “Golden Week” tourists clogging up a big chunk of April and May and driving up prices. With most vacationers having already spent their money on a trip to Hawaii, airlines and hotels have to drop prices steeply to get people to come. Many visitors won’t go because of a fear of rainfall from a tropical storm or even a churning hurricane. But it’s a long shot, and the savings are enough to offset any apprehension. My favorite time is right after Thanksgiving, when fares are low and the tropical-style Christmas season is in full swing.

MCT News Service

Beachgoers enjoy the sand and waters of Kaanapali Beach on Maui in Hawaii. Fall can be a good time to visit the islands because of a reduced number of visitors.


3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 

IN BRIEF

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA

Case manager Red Ribbon winner MORRISON – Deborah Leroy was named this year’s Arlene Valentine Sustained HIV/STD Leadership Red Ribbon Award winner. Leroy was recognized for her work as a medical case manager for the Northwest )LLINOIS()6#ARE#ONNECT Program at the Whiteside #OUNTY(EALTH$EPARTMENT The program is funded through the HRSA Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program. The award is given to an individual who has served as an outstanding leader in a community-based organization or health department conducting HIV/STD prevention or care services for at least 5 years. Leroy has been an integral part of the program SINCE DELIVERINGSERVICESTOCLIENTSINAFIVE county rural area.

Morrison man completes program MORRISON – Martin Koster of Morrison has graduated from the University of Illinois, Institute of GovernMENTAND0UBLIC!FFAIRS Leadership Academy program for local government officials. +OSTER A7HITESIDE#OUNTY Board member, graduated /CT4HELEADERSHIP academy is designed for county officials. Its central focus is on critical thinking, problem solving, communications, planning, self-assessment, and change.

New Bedford Royal Neighbors of America donated baskets with diapers, formula, bath supplies, and other items for infants and children Oct. 26 to the Moms Helping Moms pantry in Princeton. Taking part in the donation were (kneeling, from left) Elizabeth Arkels, pantry coordinator; Neva Peterson; and Nancy Hartz and Mary Hartz with Royal Neighbors; and (back row) Judy Lathrop, Shirley Lootens, Polly Lickhart, Pat Etheridge, Patsy Swanson, Marjorie Chesser, Joanne Nelson, and Lois Swanson, all with Royal Neighbors. Photo submitted by Mary Etheridge.

Phone company to help schools #()#!'/n6OTING begins at 9 a.m. Monday for THE53#ELLULARS#ALLING!LL #OMMUNITIESCAMPAIGN 53#ELLULARISGIVINGCOMmunities the opportunity to help improve the education of students at 20 schools by challenging them to rally community support for the chance to win a share of $500,000. The top 20 schools that garner the most community votes will each win $25,000 to use as they wish to enhance their educational experience. The program is open to all kindergarten through TH GRADESCHOOLS PUBLIC or private, in the companies service area. Voting WILLENDATAM.OV #OMMUNITYMEMBERS can go to www.uscellular. com to cast a vote for their favorite school. Voters can then check back daily to track their school’s ranking and share school spirit on their social media networks to garner attention. Voting is limited to one vote per person. Since the program began IN 53#ELLULARHAS awarded $4 million to 56 schools. Go to uscellular.com/callingallcommunities for a complete list of rules.

BorgWarner official IZOD race supplier AUBURN HILLS, Mich. – BorgWarner’s second year as the official turbocharger SUPPLIEROFTHE):/$)NDY#AR Series reinforced its reputation for durability and powerful performance. The company’s Engineered For Racing turbochargers maintained their no-incident track record after logging nearly 450,000 miles during practice, test, qualifying, and race events over two comPLETE):/$)NDY#AR3ERIES seasons. EFR turbochargers ALSOBOOSTEDTHE53 4IME!TTACKAND7ORLD Time Attack champions, as well as the American Le Mans Series LMP2 chamPIONFOR  AND  ALLWITHOUTINCIDENT The technology was featured at the SEMA show .OV IN,AS6EGAS$URing the show, the company also hosted this year’s Indianapolis 500 winner, Tony Kanaan, the BorgWarner Trophy, and the FX Motorsports Development Acura. BorgWarner operates a plant in Dixon.

Members of Royal Neighbors of America Youth Chapter 30 helped with a chicken noodle dinner Oct. 19 at Coleta United Methodist Church. They are (front row, from left) Rachel Meiners, Hannah Meiners, Zari Stoeker, and Emma Everly; and (back row) Marci Shank. Volunteers served more than 190 people and raised money for church activities and area charities. Photo submitted by Robin Meiners.

Royal Neighbors of America New Bedford Chapter invited the community to an afternoon of bingo Oct. 7. Members provided prizes, cookies, and drinks. Helen Hardesty called the numbers. Photo submitted by Mary Etheridge.

Members of Prophetstown Royal Neighbors of America Adult Chapter 516 donated 10 teddy bears to April House Children’s Advocacy Center in Morrison. At the presentation were (from left) Terry Gaskill, event planner; Esther Kuelper, past president; Johanna Hager, licensed clinical professional counselor at the center; Betty Dennis, recorder and treasurer; and Kelly Wilhelmi, Whiteside County sheriff. April House provides services for abused and neglected children, and is a nonprofit organization. Photo submitted by Terry Gaskill.


Community

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

Fall. Photos by Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

T

Autumn

hou comest, Autumn, heralded by the rain, With banners, by great gales incessant fanned, Brighter than brightest silks of Samarcand, And stately oxen harnessed to thy wain! Thou standest, like imperial Charlemagne, Upon thy bridge of gold; thy royal hand Outstretched with benedictions o’er the land, Blessing the farms through all thy vast domain!

Thy shield is the red harvest moon, suspended So long beneath the heaven’s o’er-hanging eaves; Thy steps are by the farmer’s prayers attended; Like flames upon an altar shine the sheaves; And, following thee, in thy ovation splendid, Thine almoner, the wind, scatters the golden leaves! -Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

3ATURDAY .OVEMBER 


place ads online www.saukvalley.com

CLASSIFIED SAUK VALLEY

Section D

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Dixon

LOST

110

IS YOUR PET MISSING? Read our found section in todays paper. Just in case it is not there, call one of your area animal shelters listed below: Lee County Animal Control (815)284-3833 Granny Rose Animal Shelter (815)288-7387 Whiteside County Animal Control (815)625-3507 Happy Tails Humane Society (815)626-2994 A public service of Sauk Valley Media Lost Yorkie, very small female, wearing black leash. Kilgore Park area Sterling. Reward. 815-213-0963.

PERSONALS

125

J.S.

ADOPTION NOTICES

128

ADOPTION is a loving choice. You created a precious life- we cannot. We could be the answer to each other's prayers. We're KEITH and JAIME; a loving, secure, childless couple, ready to adopt. Contact us or our caring attorney Sara 773-509-0099 or 800-509-0097

♥ ADOPTION: ♥ A Creative Financially Secure Home, Art, Music, LOVE, Laughter, Family awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid. Beth ♥1-800-990-7667♥

I know your deep hurts... I know your great losses...

I CARE

Jesus (+GPA)

VOLUNTEERS

126

CASA 15th Judicial Circuit (Lee/ Carroll/Ogle Counties) is seeking volunteers to advocate for children in the court system involved in abuse and neglect cases. Your involvement can impact a child’s future. Contact Vanessa White, Director of Advocate Services (815) 288-1901 www.casalee carroll.com Home of Hope is looking for dedicated volunteers to help in their mission to help those touched by cancer. Areas of need: reception/ office, events, massage therapist, reflexologist, maintenance etc. If you have a couple hours a week/ month, please call 815 288-4673 to schedule an appointment. Contact Connie or Joan. Hours of operation are M-TH. 8-4, Fri. 8-3 LOVELAND MUSEUM... Are you interested in Dixon and local history, Civil War, Blackhawk War? Are you a people person? We are looking for people like you to help host our Museum one or more days a month. The Museum is open Thurs. & Fri. 9-2, Sat. 103. Interested? Please stop at the main office at the Loveland Community House between 8-4 Mon. thru Fri. to pick up an application and learn more. 513 W. Second St. 815-284 2741

Loving Couple Wanting to Adopt We will provide a loving, happy home where your baby will thrive and grow, with a mom and dad who are very eager to become parents. We will provide unconditional love, security and support for your baby. All approved expenses paid. To learn more about us, Call 708-9576849 or email us at: seanandjennifer adopt@gmail.com LCFS#012998

Advertise Your Rentals in Sauk Valley Classifieds

REAL ESTATE 202 SERVICES PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference , limitation or discrimination based on race, color,religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-279275.

BUSINESS PROPERTY

MILLEDGEVILLE

AMBOY

FARMS / ACREAGE

Country Home 2885 Grandview Rd., Milledgeville, on 2 ½ acres, 1,680 sq. ft., 3 BR, 3 car garage, great hunting, deer, turkey, plenty of wildlife. $92,500. Serious pre-approved inquires only. 815-6311407.

Mobile homes for sale. $600 down. Owner financed. 815-716-6565.

FARMS FOR SALE

CEMETERY LOTS

2 LOTS in Chapel Hill “Garden of Faith” $800 OBO 815-646-4741

MOBILE HOMES 230

MOBILE HOMES

Sale or Lease, Superb E. end business corner, high traffic, good parking, AGT owned, 815-625-2225/815535-6115

209

DIXON Dixon- 2BR/1ba. 1100Sqft Screened porch, 2 car garage. $95,000 608-343-7372. Web ID#529068

STERLING 3 BR., 1304 Griswold Ave. As is, needs work, newer vinyl windows. $18,000. OBO 815718-3481.

HOMES FOR SALE

230

Advertise your mobile homes for sale here!!

205

FOR SALE BY OWNER

226

210

DIXON

CHATEAU ESTATES Homes for sale and rent call our office for details

815-284-2000

235

57 acres approximately 53 tillable with river frontage

11.5 acres, river frontage, road to river with cement dock

Matt Hermes, Broker

815-288-4648

3 bed 2 bath $24,900 2 bed 2 bath $17,900

ROCK RIVER ESTATES Homes for sale and rent call our office for details

815-284-2000 2 bed 1 bath on the river $27,900 2 bed 1 bath $9,900

Lee County Farm for sale 160 Acres m/l – Dixon Township *Nearly all tillable Available to farm in 2014. $9,750/Acre. Broker Monte Van Kooten 815 7182244. www.Sterling LandCompany.com

ENJOY

A Quality Lifestyle!

Sterling Towers Apts. FOR 62+ AND THOSE WITH HANDICAPS/DISABILITIES

APARTMENTSFURNISHED 305 NELSON 1 BR $350/mo.+ $350dep. Util. Incl. 815-626-1956

STERLING Efficiencies, 1 & 2 BR. Apts. (563) 243-0383, Sterling/R.F.

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED 306 Attractive 1 & 2 BR. apts. with some utilities. Sterling & Rock Falls. No pets, no parties. Refs. req. 815-336-2305. HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our Classified Department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626-SOLD or 284-SOLD

AMBOY

DIXON

1 & 2BR Apts. Reasonable. Dep/ refs. 815-440-8116

2BR Upper, No pets. $500 + dep & ref. 815-288-5445

200 S. Boyd Ave. 2BR, good cond. $425/mo. Available immediately. Call Ed Reagan 312337-7384

2BR, lower apt., very spacious, pets allowed w/ dep., $475/mo., all utilities pd. but electric. 815-994-0755

ASHTON 1&2 BR., Ashton/ F.G. 815-5626828/562-5075.

DIXON 1BR, garage. Heat, & water furn. No pets. $450 + dep. 815-440-6214 2BR clean, quiet. No smoking or pets. $500 + dep. 815-652-3365. 2BR laundry, appl. garage. No pets. 815-499-3753.

PRIVATELY OWNED RENT SUBSIDIZED FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS

(815)626-6873 TTY (800)526-0844 EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

Northland Park Apartments Apartments Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom Washer & Dryer Units Fitness Center Beautiful, Private Setting Balconies / Patios Open House Daily

1st 3 Months 1/2 OFF! Call Me 2-Rent (815)632-7368

Motor Routes Available Inquire in person at:

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

or call: 625-3600 or 284-2222, ext. 301

(Located Behind Northland Mall)

Custom Built Websites by Shaw Shaw Media Media Digital Digital

Newly Remodeled N.E., Corner Lot. 2BR, 1½BA, New appl. 2 Car Garage. 1102 Steinman Like new! $88,500 815-440-7521

Classifieds Work!

Terry of Rock Falls sold his 2002 Pontiac Grand Am for $4200 using

C CCLASSIFIEDS LASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE

dailyGAZETTE dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

TELEGRAPH TELEGRAPH

815-284-2224 815-625-3600

lovelandcommunity house.org.

TR IV I A AN SW ER 1) Mama Cass Elliot & Jim Morrison 2) Heather Locklear and then Pamela Anderson Before you make a move call…

SHIPPERTS Moving & Storage

404 N. Lincoln Ave., Dixon, IL 288-3133 www.alliedvan.com ILL CC 10540

US DOT 76235

Condo Style, 2BR apt. w/private entrance and deck. Appliances included plus W/D. Water, sewer, garbage provided. Tenant pays elec. Off road parking. No pets. Lease & dep. req. $650/mo. Call 815378-2151

Motor Route Drivers

DIXON

625-3600 or 284-2222

3BR Upper in downtown Dixon. Heat & garbage incl. $600/mo. + dep. Pick up application at 210 W. 1st St.

Sauk Valley Media is looking for

Mobile Home, RF, “Handy Man Special”, immed. Poss., $5,000/obo. 309-716-5622

Call

2BR, Northside, w/appls. & laundry hookups. 815-4405604.

Call today to get started!

815-625-3600 ext. 630 shawmediadigital.com


A1

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, November 9, 2013 s PAGE D2

SERVICE DIRECTORY SAUK VALLEY

Air Cond./Heating

Bicycles

Eikenberry Sheet Metal 412 E. 3rd, Sterling Service work heating & cooling; gas, electric. Free estimates Accept Visa & MC on all new installations. CALL 815-625-0955

FARLEY'S APPLIANCE Heating & Cooling Sale & Service Free Estimates New & Replacement Units We service all brands! Call Today (815)284-2052 GATOR HEATING & COOLING Taking a Bite Out of High Prices!

Call Kelly @ 815-631-6232 24 hr Emergency Service Licensed, Bonded Insurance

Appliances

TELEVISION IN HOME REPAIR All Types Brands & Models Over 25 yrs. Exp. Call Ron for a free quote at 815-561-0011

Auto Detailing GENE'S AUTO DETAILING  fenal Results le Rates Call 815-973-3104    

Automotive

Car Audio/Video/Starters LOW PRICE GUARANTEE Complete Automotive Detailing & Accessories

Window Tinting *LIW &HUWLĂ€FDWHV Hot Rods & Choppers Consignment / Sales 1807 Locust St. Sterling IL

(815) 625-2500

www.HotRods Choppers.com

Basement Waterproofing Prater Paint & Waterproofing We Dry Up Basements & Crawl Spaces, Remediate Mold & Install E-Z Breathe™ Ventilation Systems 815-626-5165

www.praterpaintand waterproofing.com

By Appointment 201 13th Ave. Sterling, IL (815)622-8180

Brick & Masonry LAUTS MASONRY & GENERAL CONTRACTING   Stone &ed Wo   Po     Over 35 Years Experience Quality work for a reasonable price. ndedd 815-718-4885 MASONRY PRO'S %Stone %$ d !t % w $    !  Get $     one  "  Fe   te $ e# I!d nded 815-564-8754

Cabinets Anselmo's Inc. Beautiful Kitchens Great Prices! Visit Our Showrooms! Cabinets, Countertops, Sinks, Faucets & More. We install. Estimates by appointment. 1235 W. LeFevre Sterling 815-625-3519

Carpentry KRIS’ KARPENTRY (815)564-9576 For all your building needs incl. kitchens, baths, basements, siding, replacement windows, additions & trim carpentry. It's time to replace those old windows to save money on heating. Call for a free estimate. No job too large or too small. Kris is a craftsman with 30 yrs. exp. Licensed, Bonded, Insured.

Cleaning Service

âœąCarpet/ Upholstery âœąMaid/Janitorial Residential & Commercial Available Now 815-632-3822 www.advanced cleaners.biz

Cleaning Service

Fireplaces

Hauling

M&M Cleaning Service (Matt & Mandy) No job too small Home or Office Bonded & Insured Serving Lee & Ogle, Whiteside & LaSalle Counties 815-440-9121 or 815-677-6266

Fireplace Safety Inspections Liners, damper replacement, screens, glass doors, chimney caps, log sets, inserts, wood, gas, electric, mantles, grates & more. Anselmo's, Inc. 1235 W. LeFevre Sterling 815-625-3519

A-1 HAULING Small or Large Truck Rentals Estate Clean-ups Garage & Building Demolition Construction Complete Septic Skid Loader & Back Hoe Work Materials Hauled Firewood 815-626-1956

★Professional ★ ★Cleaning ★ âœ˝$20/ hr. flat rates available âœ˝Weekly/ bi-weekly/ monthly 815-590-9426 or 815-564-7345

Computer Repair G & H PC REPAIR Virus Removal & Data Recovery$50. We also do: ( grades (#Reto$ (# Restoratio ( !  Desig Hardware/Software Certified. 815-499-4871

Construction RAM CONSTRUCTION eny  te  extu ng 



Licensed, Insured & Bonded 815-285-8148

Drywall DIEHL'S DRYWALL, INC. Also wallboard hanging & Interior Painting Over 20 yrs experience. Call Jamie at 815-499-3047 or 815-225-9927

Dumpster Rental

Dumpster Rental for Clean-ups & Construction Small & Large containers avail. Tidy Bug Inc. Dixon, IL tidybuginc.com 815-456-3001

Electricians C.P. ELECTRIC For Your Electrical Needs. New Homes, 100 amp. Service Updates, Rewires 25 Yrs. Experience ™Licensed ™Bonded ™Insured Musky & Bass Fishing Consultant Leave Message 815-626-6219

Furniture Repair Days Furniture Repair Expert repairs on recliners, sofas, chairs, tables, beds, regluing. 815-626-5136

Genl. Contracting Gilbertson Construction Residential & Commercial. Remodeling, house additions, windows, siding & doors. Also mobile home repairs. Licensed, Bonded, Insured. No Job Too Small. 30 yrs exp. (815)6220087.

RR&D

Remodeling of All Sizes Kitchens, Bathrooms, Basements, Family Rooms all inishing   loor Finishing Commercial & Residential Call 815-535-8488

Handyman A Families Handyman Huge Winter Discounts for all your home improvement needs. Make us your Families Handyman. 815-994-0075 HANDYMAN/ GENERAL Contracting, siding, drywall, concrete work, decks, flooring (tile, linoleum, carpet, wood), bathroom and kitchen, complete remodels, additions all types of home repairs. Free Estimates and Insured-Bonded 815-564-7428 LawnCare Service    val     up &  val        . Fr Esta  815-590-6336

Haul/Clean Service JOHN'S CLEANUP & REMOVAL Anything goes!! Estate Cleanups PHONE 815-622-0240

Home Improvement

815-973-3023 815-732-4408

Landscaping DREAMSCAPES BY DENNIS, INC Complete Landscape Services & Designs

24 HOUR SERVICE Now Offering Sewer Camera Service Visa, MC, Discover 815-285-7999 Lic# 058-172719

Mobil Pressure Wash Service Commercial, esidential emis Yo me we  ant! Call Ben 815-590-2694

Property Maint.

Lawn Care

JR's Janitorial

(815) 857-3281

Blosser's Lawn Service Mowing & Trimming spring & fall Cleanup and More Call now for a FREE estimate! Brenton Blosser 815-716-3428 bdb@emypeople.net

Fall Clean Up & More Also, Snowplowing Free Estimates 815-625-8972

Painting BALAYTI PAINTING

and Property Maintenance

. %mmercial .sidential .i'tes .Reduced'!al Rates .Reliable '!ndlyervice .Insured enior Discounts .Available7 rvinWhiteside %unty lloruote    Local Cell#

Interior & Exterior Light Carpentry Pressure Washing 35 Years Experience Insured - References Cell #815-440-2202

SPECIALIZING IN erior Pa od r Cle   sured d Boed, S k Falls area. Now Accepting Credit & Debit Card Payments Free Estimates

815-739-2089

Lewis Plumbing 815-288-0028 Serving All of the Sauk Valley Area Lic.#058-173956

Roofing

Illinois License #104.016127 Bonded/Insured &oofing&Siding &indo$!& oors & tion!& Garages& %$& cks and more Free Estimates 815-213-0556

Roofing/Siding

Power Washing

www.dreamscapes bydennis.com

Plumbing

www.mullerslane farm. com

KRATZNER'S PLUMBING

LONG CONSTRUCTION General Contractor

www.d she repair.or

PAUL’S HANDYMAN SERVICE “Anything Your Husband Won’t Do!�  xperience On All Manner of Home Repairs & Maintenance since 1986 (815)625-2607

Plumbing

Roofing

“Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured CALL NOW FOR End of Summer Specials on Steel Roofing, Windows & Siding $oofing$Siding $# $ ecks $ tions $es & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

“Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured CALL NOW FOR End of Summer Specials on Steel Roofing, Windows & Siding $oofing$Siding $# $ ecks $ tions $es & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

Snowplowing

Tree Service

MIKE'S SNOW PLOWING ommercial   ways  xon Sterling R.F. Starting at $15 Free Estimates 815-590-6570

✤✤✤✤✤✤✤✤✤✤✤✤

Storage

✰CORNER✰ STORAGE

Dixon near Walmart Sterling near Menards Various Sizes

GREAT RATES 815-973-3613

Franklin Storage Sizes 10x10 thru 10x40 2011 N. Brinton Ave. Dixon (815)285-0201 or (815)440-9563 STERLING CENTERS, INC. 301 W. Third St. Sterling Warehousing & Storage Solutions 490,000 sq.ft. Avail Dedicated areas for Vehicles, Boats Rvs, Trailers & Motorcycles 1.815.441.3916 Email: info@ sterling-centers .com Sterling Logistix is offering indoor or outdoor Boat & Camper storage. For info. Call Scott 815626-0217 or s.bailey@sterling logistix.com

www.allsafe center.com

Randy L. Moore

High-Security Storage Solutions and Much More!

815-626-1333

IL State Roofing Licensed 104-002247(1986) Bonded-Insured

Specializing in:

ss Gutters

ing Roofing s/Winws General Contracting & Construction 815-625-6142 Free Estimates

  

Climate Controlled Storage Low-Cost Moving Truck Rental Confidential Document Shredding We Ship FedEx & UPS! Expert Packaging Services Value Boxes & Packaging Supplies EBAY and EMOTORS Internet Auction Sales Over 15,000 Sales Office Hours: Mon-Fri. ☛ 8:306, Sat. ☛ 8:30noon 690 Timber Creek Rd. Dixon, (815)285-2212

Tree Service Specializing in:

ss Gutters

ing Roofing s/Winws General Contracting & Construction 815-625-6142 Free Estimates

  

TIMBER TREE SERVICE Tree & Limb Removal Stump Removal Storm Clean-up Free Estimates Fully Insured Tom May 815-238-7277 Dixon, Illinois

Water Softeners The Softener Man Repair on all makes & models Service Call Special $19.95 Over 30 years experience 815-323-1622

Welding WELDING & FABRICATION N-SITE   LUMINUM STAINLESS STEEL 815-973-9110

Go BOLD

âœśSince 1981âœś â—†Home Improvement â—†New Construction Fall is time to

re-roof, re-side, or build your garage or addition!

BRAD'S TREE SERVICE Tree & Limb Removal Stump Removal Storm Clean-up Mulch & Firewood       Ins d 815-857-3674 Amboy, IL

A&M TREE SERVICE WE'LL BEAT ALL WRITTEN BIDS! Free estimates 25 yrs Experience Fully Licensed/ Insured Serving Sterling / Rock Falls/ Whiteside County Area 815-590-1677

Get SOLD Bold type draws readers to your ad.

Get your ad noticed!

GO BOLD CALL

815-625-3600 815-284-2222

To place your AD TODAY!

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

It’s easy to find what you want...

www.saukvalley.com

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com


A1

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, November 9, 2013 s PAGE D3

EY

C NOTICES CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WHITESIDE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF THELMA L. ADAMS, Deceased No. 13 P 120 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of THELMA L. ADAMS. Letters of Office were issued to GARY S. ADAMS, 1408 E. 4th Street, Sterling, Illinois 61081, as Independent Representative, whose attorneys are WARD, MURRAY, PACE, & JOHNSON, P.C., 202 E. 5th Street, Sterling, IL 61081. Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, Whiteside County Courthouse, 200 East Knox Street, Morrison, Illinois 61270, or with the Representative, or both, on or before May 7, 2014, and any claim not filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the Representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. Dated this 30th day of May, 2013. Gary S. Adams, Independent Representative Mark E. Zumdahl WARD, MURRAY, PACE & JOHNSON, P.C. Attorneys for Estate 202 E. 5th Street Sterling, IL 61081-0400 815-625-8200 November 2, 9, 16, 2013

DIXON

POLO

ROCK FALLS

Large upper apt. stove, refrig, garbage, near shopping center, NO PETS, $500/mo. + $500 dep. 815-284-3862

2BR upper, completely remodeled. Applcs. Garage, AC. No pets, no smoking. Dep/ refs. req.$595/mo. 815946-3191 after 5p.

Lg. 1BR. + appl. No pets. $425 + dep. 815-625-4701

LG 2BR, stove/ref., storage/laundry rm w/washer & dryer, car port. $550/mo. + dep. 603 S. Hennepin. No smoking or pets. Ref. Req. 815-440-3040 between 9am-8pm.

Large 2BR, C/A appli., sound proof. Gar. $585/mo. + dep. Avil. Dec 1st. 847-738-2334

Nice 2BR garage & fireplace, garbage & water inc. $575 + dep. 815-973-5886

HARMON 1st Month Free! 2BR, appl. incl. Pet friendly. $475/mo. 815-562-7368

MILLEDGEVILLE 2 bedroom apt in Milledgeville. Washer, dryer hookups, off street parking. Immediate Occupancy. $375 per mo. Dep. and refs. required. Call 815-222-3705 2 BR, stove & refrig, W/D C/A 1 car garage. No pets. $400/mo. + Dep. & Ref. 815-946-3330 or 815-751-3377

MT. MORRIS 1 Br. All utilities, plus cable/internet incl., $500/mo. Call Todd 815-994-2050 1BR, Mt. Morris. $310/mo. + dep., 815-508-2345

PROPHETSTOWN 3BR, 3 BA Luxury Apt., w/2 stall attached garage. Utilities negotiable. Call Kophamer & Blean Realty 815772-2728.

ROCK FALLS 1 & 2BR, Hampton Apts. 815-625-7043 1 BR. $400 815718-5278 1BR, $425 mo, includes util. East Rt. 30. 815-508-2345 2 BR apt., RF, 815-592-7826.

★ NEW TODAY ★ 2BR Duplex, no pets. Info 815625-9638. 2BR upper, $695 / mo. Utilities included. 630-414-1031 2BR, stove, refrig. furn. heat, water & sewer included, $525/mo. + dep. 563-880-8622 Edon Apts. 2BR, $480 mo., $400 dep. Refs. req. No 815-537dogs. 9190, 815-4413999.

STERLING

NICE 1BR, 304 Ave. B, $375 mo.+ dep. No Pets. (815) 626-8647.

STERLING

RIVER RIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Bedroom

Great Location Garages Available

$

495

PER MONTH

1st Month’s Rent

$

1.00

*

*with 1 year lease

Next to

ALDI in Sterling

1-815-414-2288

1 & 2BR apts. $380-$420. 815562-7368 Rochelle Realty. W#527849

Sterling Rentals Newer 2 Bedroom $599.00 & Up Applcs., Fireplaces 2002 3rd Ave. 1836 First Ave. 606 W. Lefevre 2 BR $535.00 1 BR $465.00 1 Studio $390.00 Partial Heat, Water, Sewer, Refuse Removal, Laundry Facilities, Satellite

(815)626-1431

★ NEW TODAY ★ 1BR apt. near Mall. Applcs. Incl. W/D. Quiet. No pets. 815-535-6115. 2BR $450 + dep. No pets/smoking. 815-590-3004. 2BR Duplex, $675/ mo. Call 815-9736768. Apts. No pets. Call 815-716-0367. Housemate Wanted $300/mo. Private Room. Everything included except food. Call 815-626-1122. New & Improved 2BR $500. No pets. 630-3277046. Park Setting, newer 2BR, L/R, garage, NS, 1 floor, near CGH, energy efficient, 1832 2nd Avenue $585/mo. 815-499-0199. Sinnissippi Townhomes First Mo. Free! Spacious 2 BR. 2 story townhomes. Central air, good location. Laundry hookup. (815)6261130.

WOOSUNG 604 Griswold Ave. 2 BR, 1BA, Ground level Unit, Newly Remodeled. $525/ mo. Requires sec. deposit. Call Matt @ 310-750-5663

HOMES FOR RENT

310

AMBOY 3BR home, 2ba. $700/mo. Call 815973-6768.

DIXON 1BR, Stove & frig. incl. Basement. No Pets. Tenants pay utilities + deposit. $475 month Available now! 815-440-2613 2BR Duplex w/gar. New E-windows, Appl., util., snowplowing incl. $550/ mo. 815-973-2831 7410 Rock Nation Rd. Sm. 2 story home near Lost Nation Golf Course. Appls., 2 baths, 2 car garage, heat furn. Available Now! 815-761-2435 or 815-562-7854. Dixon 2BR/1ba 1100sq.ft. Rental/ credit/criminal check, no smoking screened porch, 2 car gar. $700 + sd. 608-343-7372. For Rent Condominium On the River Boat Dock Incl. 2 BR 2BA Upper 1400 sq. ft. 1 Car garage Snow removal Lawn care $925/mo. + util. Lease-opt to buy 815-378-2151 Nice 2BR. No Pets. $485 + dep. 815-535-6731.

PROPHETSTOWN

STERLING

1 BR furnished. No Smoking. $500/mo. 815-441-3406

1112 6th Ave., Sterling, within walking distance to several schools. 3 Brs., 1 bath, newly updated kitchen. Stove, refrig. furnished, new carpet, 1st floor laundry room w/ washer/dryer hookup, central air, gas heat, unfinished basement & garage. Tenant will be responsible for all utilities, lawn care & snow removal. $700 per mo. + dep. Lease req. No pets & no smoking. (815) 288-1644 for more information.

Small 2-3 Br., 1 car garage, big yard, newly remodeled. 815-6329036.

ROCK FALLS 1BR, applcs. Bsmt. No pets. $425+ dep. 815-625-4701 2 BR, 1 car Gar. W&D hookups, no pets, $475+$475 Dep. 815-625-1900 211 W. 18th St., 3 BR ranch, NICE!!, $698/mo., WHY RENT? 815-8787399. 3 BR., 1¾ ba., 2 car gar. No pets. 815-625-0624. House for Rent: 1 bed, kitchen appliances, basement, main floor laundry room with w/d hook up, $525/mo. Avail. immed. Call 815-622-2725. SNLrentals. com Large 2BR Townhouse, all ground level. Excellent area. 800 Dixon Ave. No pets. Refs. req. 815-336-2305.

1403 E. 18th St. 3BR, 1.5ba. 2.5 car garage. Beautiful woodwork. $925/ mo. + dep. Call 815-632-3234. Photos @ villow.com 2 BR., 1 car garage. $675 mo., lease, dep. req. H&H Rental Properties, LLC, call or text 815-625-7995. 2BR home, 1 ba. $650/mo. Call 815973-6768. 3 BR, 1102 1st Avenue, For Rent 815-626-8790

Small 2BR 1 car garage $495/mo. + dep. & ref. 815632-7111.

3BR home, across from park, close to school. $700/mo. + dep. No pets. 815-508-7534.

Why Rent? You CAN Own! Totally Remodeled, 3BR Home. $650/ mo. 815-878-6356.

Nice home 3BR, w/ garage, close to Sterling schools. No Smoking, no pets. $700 + dep. 815-245-9704.

Think Green Everyone wants a cleaner, greener environment, so the buzz words are “think global, act local.” Here’s something you can do in your everyday life to be more environmentally-friendly. Think green. If you are a subscriber of the daily Gazette or Telegraph, we are asking you to recycle your plastic bags and rubber bands by just giving them back to your carrier or driver.

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY Sauk Valley Media publishers of

dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH


A1

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, November 9, 2013 s PAGE D4

Currently Recruiting

Check out our current vacancies at www.sinnissippi.com. www.sinnissippi.com.

Delivery/Warehouse Position Full time Delivery/Warehouse Position available. Must be neat, organized, enjoy working with people and have a good driving record. This position involves delivery of furniture and/or appliances and electronics; therefore, heavy lifting may be required. Benefits package included.

Call 815-625-3600 or 815-284-2222

Published Every Other Tuesday!

C E L E B R A T I O N S

E. D. ETNYRE & CO.

E. D. Etnyre & Co.

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/V/D

Call Classified ToSAUK sell those extra items! VALLEY SAUK VALLEY LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE TELEGRAPH

6DODU\ %HQHĂ€WVDVDUH &XVWRPDU\ZLWKWKLV (63SRVLWLRQ -REGHVFULSWLRQDYDLODEOH DWWKHGLVWULFWRIĂ€FH

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600

815-284-2222

Part-Time Independent Living Specialist Northwestern Illinois Center for Independent Living seeks an enthusiastic, self-motivated team player for A part-time/35 hour a week position as an Independent Living Specialist. 7UDYHO WR ÀYHFRXQW\ DUHD UHTXLUHG ² PLOHDJH UHLPEXUVHG $ SUHVHQWDWLRQWHDFKLQJ GHPR ZLOO EH UHTXLUHG 3HRSOH ZLWK GLVDELOLWLHV HQFRXUDJHG WR DSSO\ $VVRFLDWH 'HJUHH RU +LJKHU SUHIHUUHG &KHFN RXW RXU ZHEVLWH ZZZQLFLORUJ WR OHDUQ KRZ \RX FDQ DSSO\ 3RVLWLRQ PD\ EHFRPH IXOO WLPH ZLWK EHQHÀWV LQ  'HDGOLQH WR DSSO\ IRU WKLV SRVLWLRQ November 19, 2013

Send application, resume, and cover letter to: NICIL Michele Miller – Executive Director 412 Locust Street, Sterling, IL 61081 EOE No Email Resume! * No Phone Call!

Sensient Flavors, a leading manufacturer of dairy ingredient products, is seeking a Maintenance Mechanic. Minimum requirements include a High School diploma, and 3-5 years of industrial maintenance experience. College/ technical training with a background of PLCs a plus. Experience with boilers, waste water treatment, and food/ beverage background preferred. Must have excellent mechanical and troubleshooting skills; Competitive comSHQVDWLRQ H[FHOOHQW EHQHÂżWV . ESOP. Equal Opportunity Employer.

,QWHUHVWHGDQGTXDOLÀHG $SSOLFDQWVVKRXOG ÀOORXWDQRQOLQH DSSOLFDWLRQDW ZZZVWHUOLQJSXEOLFVFKRROVRUJ *RWR'LVWULFW6HUYLFHV +XPDQ5HVRXUFHV -RE2SHQLQJV (PSOR\PHQW Application Apply by Nov 14th

CLASSIFIEDS C dailyGAZETTE

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/V/D

Maintenance Mechanic

Sterling Schools Washington Wa shington School (1) Opening: Elementary Nurse RN or LPN

t Assemblers (2nd Shift) t Shot Blast Operators (2nd Shift) t Welders (1st, 2nd and 3rd Shifts) t CNC Machine Operators (2nd Shift)

1333 S. Daysville Road Oregon, IL 61061 www.etnyre.com

1333 S. Daysville Road, Oregon, IL

Visit Sauk Valley Classifieds at saukvalley.com

Production Positions

Apply in person between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

For consideration, please apply in person between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. or email resume: humanresources@etnyre.com

EOE

PAVING YOUR WAY TO A NEW CAREER

Full-Time Positions, Full Benefits Package. 1-3 years of Experience

1st & 3rd Shift Weekends Qualified candidate will control access to and monitor the physical property. Ability to follow Post Orders and direct visitors. Punctuality and professionalism a must.

Apply in person to: Ashley Furniture HomeStore/ Knie Appliance & TV Inc. 3614 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL.

NURSES

Long term care facility is accepting applications for PT QXUVHV6WRSLQDQGĂ€OORXWDQDSSOLFDWLRQRUDSSO\RQOLQH at www.good-sam.com. AA/EOE, M/F/Vet/Handicap, Drug Free Workplace. Good Samaritan Center - Prophets Riverview 310 Mosher Dr. Prophetstown, IL 61277 815-537-5175

PART TIME SECURITY GUARD

Email resume to: ÀDYRUBLQG\UHFUXLWLQJ#VHQVLHQWWHFKFRP Or mail resume to: 6HQVLHQW )ODYRUV Attn: HR Department  ( 0DLQ 6W $PER\ ,/  12 3+21( &$//6 25 :$/.,16 3/($6(

Human Resources Manager Rochelle Community Hospital has an immediate opening for a Human Resources Manager. Our hospital is a small, critical access facility located in Rochelle, Illinois with approximately 250 employees. This is a full-time, exempt SRVLWLRQUHSRUWLQJGLUHFWO\WRWKH&KLHI([HFXWLYH2IÀFHU Responsible for the overall planning, organizing, implementing and controlling of the human resources functions. Serve in an advisory capacity to all constituHQWVZLWKUHJDUGWRSHUVRQQHODGPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGWKHHIIHFWLYHDQGHIÀFLHQWXWLlization of human resources. Overall organizational responsibility for payroll, FRPSHQVDWLRQ DQG EHQHÀWV UHFUXLWPHQW DQG UHWHQWLRQ HPSOR\HH UHODWLRQV DQG compliance to human resources policies and procedures. Position requirements: ‡%DFKHORUVGHJUHH ‡\HDUV+XPDQ5HVRXUFHVH[SHULHQFH ‡6XSHUYLVRU\H[SHULHQFHSUHIHUUHG Additional areas of responsibility: ‡,QWHUSUHWDWLRQRIIHGHUDODQGVWDWHODERUODZV ‡2YHUVLJKWRIHPSOR\HHHYDOXDWLRQSURJUDP ‡'HSDUWPHQWDOEXGJHWLQJ ‡(PSOR\HHJULHYDQFHDQGGLVFLSOLQHSURJUDP ‡(PSOR\HHKHDOWKSURJUDP ‡8QHPSOR\PHQW ‡)0/$$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ 4XDOLÀHGDSSOLFDQWVVKRXOGVHQGUHVXPH and salary requirements to: 5RFKHOOH&RPPXQLW\+RVSLWDO $WWQ+XPDQ5HVRXUFHV 1QG6WUHHW5RFKHOOH,/ )D[ ZZZURFKHOOHKRVSLWDOFRP E.O.E.

2014 SPRING ADJUNCTS

Sauk Valley Community College seeks innovative individuals for the following openings: Accounting 100 Basic Accounting M/W 4:00- 5:45 pm Accounting 101 Financial Accounting - T 6:00-9:40 pm 0DVWHU¡V GHJUHH LQ DFFRXQWLQJ RU UHODWHG Ă€HOG ZLWK  JUDGXDWH credit hours in accounting required. English 101 &RPSRVLWLRQ ,  77K  DP English 101 &RPSRVLWLRQ , ² )  DP English 101 Composition I - Th 6:00-8:45 pm English 103 Composition II - M/W 3:30-4:45 pm English 103 &RPSRVLWLRQ ,,  77K  DP 0DVWHU¡V GHJUHH LQ (QJOLVK RU UHODWHG Ă€HOG ZLWK  JUDGXDWH FUHGit hours in English required. Math 121 - College Algebra - T /Th- 6:00-7:40 pm 0DVWHU¡V GHJUHH LQ PDWK RU D UHODWHG Ă€HOG ZLWK  JUDGXDWH FUHGLW hours in math required. Nursing 130 - Fundamentals (Clinical) – CGH 7KXUV ² ²  SP )UL    DP Registered IL Nurse license (or eligibility for licensure), 2 years experience in clinical nursing, and master’s degree in nursing required. Psychology 103 - ,QWUR WR 3V\FK 77K  DP Psychology 215 - 6RFLDO 3V\FK  77K   SP 0DVWHU¡V GHJUHH LQ SV\FKRORJ\ RU UHODWHG Ă€HOG ZLWK  JUDGXDWH credit hours in psychology required. Please see complete application requirements and apply on-line at on Sauk’s website at www.svcc.edu (click on Job Opportunities).

Sauk Valley Community College Att: Human Resources 173 Illinois Route 2 Dixon, IL 61021 e-mail employment@svcc.edu EOE

Hot Deals Can be found in Sauk Valley Classifieds... Sell Your Unwanted Items Easily!

It’s a dog-gone deal!

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600 or 815-284-2222


A2 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 501 NOTICEPURSUANT to the Business Opportunity Sales Law of 1995, every business opportunity must be registered with the Illinois Securities Department. Protect yourself and get the facts before you hand over your hard earned money by contacting the Illinois Secretary of State's Securities Department at 1800-628-7937. This notice provided as a public service by Sauk Valley Classifieds.

EMPLOYMENT

505

Welder Fabricator

Full time. $30/hr. Must have 15 yrs experience.Please No phone calls or walk ins. Mail resume to:

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South Dixon, IL. 61021

Diesel Mechanic

Full time. $30/hr. Must have 15 yrs experience. Please No phone calls or walk ins. Mail resume to:

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South Dixon, IL. 61021

Class A CDL Driver Hauling Grain & Fertilizer $20.00 per Hour plus overtime. Hauling NH3 with a Hazmat endorsement $25.00 per Hour plus overtime. Must have 5 \HDUV YHULĂ€DEOH H[SHrience. Please mail resume to:

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South 'L[RQ ,/ 

Combination Waitress/kitchen help, PT. Apply in person at Joe's Pizza, 119 S. Peoria Ave., Dixon. No phone calls please Floor Tech needed immediately in Dixon. No exp. needed. Call 630903-4013 Hiring PT Cook breakfast & lunch. Must have short order cook exp. Must be 21 or older. Leave name and number for interview 815-4415036. Legal Assistant Seeking an experienced, self-motivated Legal Secretary to join our team. Duties include project management, client interaction, scheduling, document production, filing, and answering phones. Computer skills required; dictation skills preferred. The successful candidate will be diligent, pleasant, able to communicate well, and adept at multitasking. Legal assistant experience required. To apply please send your cover letter and resume to either saukvalleylaw@ gmail.com Please send replies to Box #:1192, c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O. Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081 Northern Grain Marketing is seeking Experienced CDL drivers. Immediate openings for temporary local grain hauling. Hours may vary. To inquire call Tom Wilson @ 815-973-3016. Teachers Full Time or Part Time immediate positions. Rock Falls Day Care Center, 729 W Rt 30, Rock Falls, IL 815-625-0106 or fax resume to: 815-625-1581

EMPLOYMENT

505

Part Time Night Custodian Milledgeville School is accepting applications for the position of Part Time Night Custodian. Position to start December 2, 2013. Wages negotiable based on experience and skills. Submit letter of interest and resume by November 18th, 2013 to: Paula Rademacher, Principal Milledgeville Elementary School 100 E. 8th St. Milledgeville IL 61051 Phone 815-225-7141, Ext. 224 Email: prademacher@di st399.net TO OUR

READERS:

Sauk Valley Media does not knowingly accept advertising which is in violation of the law. Likewise, we do not knowingly accept advertising which is fraudulent or has malicious intent. While we attempt to screen advertising with potential fraud, it is impossible to screen all potential problems. We strongly encourage our readers to exercise caution and common sense, particularly when dealing with companies with which you are not familiar. Warehouse/ Driver: Wausau Supply Company, Rochelle, IL seeks warehouse/ material handler(s) with Class A CDL. Warehouse material handling & Forklift exp. preferred. CDL-A w/100K mile experience required. Great Pay & Comprehensive Benefits. Email resume to: humanresources@wausaus upply.com or Fax to: 877-879-4150

CHILD CARE

512

Little Blessings Childcare has immediate daycare openings for infant-school age. 1st & 2nd shifts. 815-285-3811 Lic# 48927502

Any Where Any Time Online! saukvalley .com

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, November 9, 2013 s PAGE D5

CHILD CARE

512

NO INDIVIDUAL, unless licensed or holding a permit as a childcare facility, may cause to be published any advertisement soliciting a child care service.* A childcare facility that is licensed or operating under a permit issued by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services may publish advertisements of the services for which it is specifically licensed or issued a permit. Sauk Valley Media strongly urges any parent or guardian to verify the validity of the license of any facility before placing a child in it's care. *Family homes that care for no more than three (3) children under the age of twelve or which receive only children from a single household, for less than 24 hours per day, are exempt from licensure as day care homes. The three children to whom this exemption applies includes the family's natural or adopted children and any other persons under the age of 12 whether related or unrelated to the operator of the day care home. (DCFS Rule, Part 377.3 (c))

REVIEW ROUTES AVAILABLE! EARN EXTRA $$$$ BY WORKING ONLY 1 DAY PER WEEK! Pick Up Papers on Tuesday and Deliver by Thursday! Extremely Flexible ~ Between 150-300 Papers

Call for Availability 815-625-3600 ext. 301 Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

l l a C

Classified

To sell those extra items! SAUK VALLEY

Winning Wheels Inc. is opening a new wing and has opportunities for Nurse Aides! Shifts: 2nd (2pm-10pm) or 3rd (10pm-6am) )XOO WLPH RU SDUW WLPH ‡ KU

Every other weekend and some holidays required If you are looking for a chance to make a real difference and become part of a dynamic team dedicated to helping others reach their fullest potential – Apply Today!

Apply in person: 701 E. 3rd St. Prophetstown, IL 61277 Or online at: www.winningwheels.com

Applicants must complete pre-employment physical, drug screen and background check.

EOE

Visit Sauk Valley Classifieds at saukvalley.com

Social Services Services our Social Services department with primary responsibilities including individual and group counseling, case management and community integration. This is an excellent opportunity for an enthusiastic human services professional to join our growing team in one of the nation’s leading residential rehabilita-

CLASSIFIEDS C

POSITION WANTED

SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS TELEGRAPH

dailyGAZETTE dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600

815-284-2222

515

P.A 7 years exp. Will cook, clean, run errands, Dr, shopping etc. Part time day hrs or overnight & weekends. Call 815718-3990

C Print All E Your L Special E Events Here! B R A T I CALL O N S TODAY

Senior Warehouse Data Steward Coordinator As the world’s largest food producer, Nestle know success

well. As an industry leader, we offer a competitive wage and EHQHÀWVSDFNDJH:HFXUUHQWO\KDYHDQRSSRUWXQLW\IRUD6HQLRU :DUHKRXVH 'DWD 6WHZDUG &RRUGLQDWRU DW RXU 1HVWOH¡ 3XULQD )DFLOLW\LQ&OLQWRQ,$

Job Duties:

‡3URYLGHVWUDLQLQJDQGWHFKQLFDOJXLGDQFHWRZDUHKRXVH team members. ‡$GPLQLVWHUV&OLQWRQ3ODQW:DUHKRXVH0DQDJHPHQW6\VWHPDQG /RDG&RQÀJXUDWRUDSSOLFDWLRQV ‡5HYLHZVDQGXSGDWHV:06ELQDQGSURGXFWFRGLQJWRRSWLPL]H VSDFHXWLOL]HUDQGRSHUDWHSURGXFWLYHO\ ‡(QVXUHVQHZ83&¡VDUHVHWXSSURSHUO\ ‡3UHIHUVÀOHVPDLQWHQDQFHWRV\VWHPWDEOHV ‡7URXEOHVKRRWVV\VWHPDQG5)SUREOHPVDQGUHSRUWVDSSOLFDWRU problems. ‡&RRUGLQDWHVSK\VLFDOLQYHQWRU\RIÀQLVKHGJRRGV ‡5HVHDUFKHVLQYHQWRU\YDULDQFHV ‡(QVXUHVGDWDLQWHJULW\EHWZHHQ:06&3,&DQG 6$36\VWHPV

%DVLF4XDOLĂ€FDWLRQV ‡+LJK6FKRRO'LSORPDRU*('$$'HJUHHSUHIHUUHG ‡*HQHUDOFRPSXWHUNQRZOHGJHZRUNVWDWLRQH[SHULHQFH  UHTXLUHG SURJUDPPLQJ H[SHULHQFH 64/  SUHIHUUHG $PLQLPXPRI\HDUVJHQHUDORIĂ€FHHOHFWULFDOH[SHULHQFH UHTXLUHG%DFNJURXQGLQ$FFRXQWLQJ:DUHKRXVHRIĂ€FH clerical operations or inventory management desirable.  +DQGV RQ H[SHULHQFH ZLWK D FRPSXWHUL]HG ZDUHKRXVH management system highly desirable. ‡([SHULHQFHLQ:066$3([FHOSUHIHUUHG ‡0XVWEHDEOHWRSULRULWL]HZRUNHIIHFWLYHO\XQGHUSUHVVXUHDQG KDQGOHPXOWLSOHWDVNV([FHOOHQWRUJDQL]DWLRQFRPPXQLFDWLRQV NH\ERDUGDQGPDWKHPDWLFVVNLOOVDUHUHTXLUHG0XVWEHDVHOI starter who can work with minimal guidance. ‡$EOHWRZRUNDPSPDQGRYHUWLPHDVQHHGHG +RXUVVXEMHFWWRFKDQJH0D\UHTXLUHZRUNLQJUHPRWHO\

All interested candidates must apply online at www.nestlepurinacareers.com no later than Monday, November 18, 2013 under job number 13005152 no phone calls please

625-3600 or

284-2222

Physical, drug screen & alcohol screen may be required. EOE

APPLY ONLINE AT

CGH Medical Center 100 E. LeFevre Road - Sterling, IL 61081 815.625.0400

www.cghmc.com Find It All Online!

 Current Job Postings  Employment Applications  Apply Online!  E-Mail Human Resources  Sterling/Rock Falls Info & Links

Current Positions RN – Home Nursing Two positions - 40 hrs/wk Days & PRN (on call); Two years’ experience in hospital or home nursing; BSN preferred LPN – Family Practice – Kim Tucker, NP 32 hrs/wk Days; Active Illinois license required Ophthalmology Tech – Dixon 40 hrs/wk Days; PXVW EH D FHUWLÀHG 0HGLFDO $Vsistant CT Tech PRN (on call); rotating shifts covering weekends, holidays, etc; ARRT registered in CT & ,(0$ OLFHQVH

System Administrator – Information Technology 40 hrs/wk Days; Bachelor’s degree or AssociDWH¡V GHJUHH ZLWK  \HDUV¡ H[SHULHQFH LQ ,7 ÀHOG experience in systems application and analysis; GDWDEDVH DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ RQ 0LFURVRIW DQGRU 2Uacle SQL System Specialist – Information Technology 40 hrs/wk Days; Bachelor’s degree or equivalent H[SHULHQFH LQ &RPSXWHU 6FLHQFH 0LFURVRIW $Ftive Directory and operating systems preferred; VHUYLFH GHVN &LWUL[ 90:DUH QHWZRUNWHOHFRPmunications a plus EMR Application Analyst – Electronic Medical Records 40 hrs/wk Days; College level coursework in FRPSXWHU VFLHQFH UHTXLUHG $VVRFLDWHV%DFKHORU¡V GHJUHH LQ EXVLQHVV RU WHFKQLFDO ÀHOG SUHIHUUHG

tion centers for young adults with neurological impairments. 4XDOLÀHG FDQGLGDWHV PXVW KDYH D FROOHJH GHJUHH DQG H[SHULHQFH LQ WKH 6RFLDO 6HUYLFHV ÀHOG :H RIIHU D XQLTXH DQG UHwarding career opportunity, with a competitive salary and EHQHÀW SDFNDJH

For consideration please fax or mail resume to: Amie Topp Winning Wheels 701 E 3rd St. Prophetstown, Il 61277 Applicants must complete pre-employment physical, drug screen and background check. Phone 815-537-5168 EOE Fax 815-537-5268 Apply online at: www.winningwheels.com

ROUTES AVAILABLE! Towns

Streets

Sterling Sterling

E. LeFevre, 17th-19th Ave. W. LeFevre, Ave. I-K

Route

Customers

60 57

71 58

Call for Available Routes in Morrison & Milledgeville Call For Available Routes in Rock Falls

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

815-625-3600 ext. 301

Earn Holiday CASH!

CREDIT ANALYST

Minimize risk for customers & company by establishing terms & limits, communicating payment requirements, determining release of holds, & presenting recommendations for complex situations. Â˜Ă‡ÂşÂšÂžĂ‰Â„Ä˛ĂƒÂśĂƒÂ¸Âş ÂşĂ?Ă… Ă…Ă‡ÂşÂťÂşĂ‡Ă‡ÂşÂšÂƒ –¡Ä˺ œËºÇœŸº šœÉœ ÂşĂƒĂ‰Ă‡ĂŽÂ Â¤ÂťÄ˛Â¸ÂşÂ Â¸Ă„Ă‚Ă‚ĂŠĂƒÂžÂ¸ÂśĂ‰ÂžĂ„Ăƒ { ÂśĂƒÂśĂ ĂŽĂ‰ÂžÂ¸ÂśĂ ĂˆĂ€ÂžĂ Ă Ăˆ Ă‡ÂşĂ†ĂŠÂžĂ‡ÂşÂšÂƒ Schedule rotates weekly 8-5, 9-6, 10-7

ECOMMERCE MERCHANDISING & SALES SPECIALIST

Maintain large online product catalog, manage merchandising projects & coordinate work of other ECom employees, Ă‡ÂşĂˆĂ„Ă Ă‹Âş ÂžĂˆĂˆĂŠÂşĂˆ ĂŒÂžĂ‰Â˝ Â¸ĂŠĂˆĂ‰Ă„Ă‚ÂşĂ‡Ăˆ { ÂśÂ¸Â¸Ă„ĂŠĂƒĂ‰ ÂşĂ?ÂşÂ¸ĂŠĂ‰ÂžĂ‹ÂşĂˆÂƒ Â˘ĂŠĂˆĂ‰ ÂšÂşĂ‚Ă„ĂƒĂˆĂ‰Ă‡ÂśĂ‰Âş ºº¸ÉžËº ÅÇÄ¿º¸É Ă‚ÂśĂƒÂśÂźÂşĂ‚ÂşĂƒĂ‰Â Â¸Ă„Ă‚Ă‚ĂŠÂ‚ ĂƒÂžÂ¸ÂśĂ‰ÂžĂ„ĂƒÂ Â¸ĂŠĂˆĂ‰Ă„Ă‚ÂşĂ‡ ĂˆÂşĂ‡Ă‹ÂžÂ¸ÂşÂ Â¸Ă„Ă‚Ă…ĂŠĂ‰ÂşĂ‡Â Ă…Ă‡Ă„ÂˇĂ ÂşĂ‚ Ă‡ÂşĂˆĂ„Ă ĂŠĂ‰ÂžĂ„ĂƒÂ { leadership skills.

CSR (Sales Support/Order Management) Â§ÂşĂ‹ÂžÂşĂŒ ÄǚºÇ ǺÅÄÇɠǺ¸ºžËº Ă…Ă‡Ă„Ă„ÂťĂˆÂ Â¸Ă„Ă‚Ă‚ĂŠĂƒÂžÂ¸ÂśĂ‰Âş ĂŒÂžĂ‰Â˝ { act as liaison for Sales/Suppliers, track shipments & enter status updates in computer. Must be able to comprehend & retain complex processes, Â¸Ă„Ă‚Ă‚ĂŠĂƒÂžÂ¸ÂśĂ‰Âş ÂşÂťÂťÂşÂ¸Ă‰ÂžĂ‹ÂşĂ ĂŽÂ ĂˆĂ„Ă Ă‹Âş Ă…Ă‡Ă„ÂˇĂ ÂşĂ‚Ăˆ { ĂŒĂ„Ă‡Ă€ ĂŒÂžĂ‰Â˝ Âś ˜‚ ǞºÉÎ Ă„Âť Ă…ÂşĂ‡ĂˆĂ„ĂƒÂśĂ ÂžĂ‰ÂžÂşĂˆ Ă„Ăƒ Ă‹ÂśĂ‡ÂžĂ„ĂŠĂˆ Ă‰ÂśĂˆĂ€Ăˆ ÂžĂƒ Âś ÂťÂśĂˆĂ‰Â‚Ă…ÂśÂ¸ÂşÂš šºœš‚ Ă ÂžĂƒÂşÂ‚ÂšĂ‡ÂžĂ‹ÂşĂƒ ÂşĂƒĂ‹ÂžĂ‡Ă„ĂƒĂ‚ÂşĂƒĂ‰Âƒ –¡Ä˺ œËºÇœŸº ¸ÄÂÅÊɺÇ { Ă‰ĂŽĂ…ÂžĂƒÂź ĂˆĂ€ÂžĂ Ă Ăˆ Ă‡ÂşĂ†ĂŠÂžĂ‡ÂşÂšÂƒ ÂĽĂ‡ÂşĂ‹ÂžĂ„ĂŠĂˆ ĂˆÂśĂ ÂşĂˆ ĂˆĂŠĂ…Ă…Ă„Ă‡Ă‰ ÄÇ ÄɽºÇ Çºà œÉºš ÂśÂšĂ‚ÂžĂƒ ÂşĂ?Ă… Ă…Ă‡ÂşÂťÂşĂ‡Ă‡ÂşÂšÂƒ šº¸ÉžËº Ă„Ă‡ÂźÂśĂƒÂžĂ?ÂśĂ‰ÂžĂ„ĂƒÂ Â¸Ă„Ă‚Ă‚ĂŠĂƒÂžÂ¸ÂśĂ‰ÂžĂ„Ăƒ { ¸ÄÂÅÊɺÇ ĂˆĂ€ÂžĂ Ă Ăˆ Ǻ‚ quired.

HALO offers a fun environment, generous ÂˇÂşĂƒÂşÄ˛Ă‰Ăˆ Ŝ¸ÀœŸº { Â¸ÂśĂˆĂŠÂśĂ ÂšĂ‡ÂşĂˆĂˆ Â¸Ă„ÂšÂşÂƒ ÂŤÂžÂşĂŒ Êà à ¿Ä¡ ÂšÂşĂˆÂ¸Ă‡ÂžĂ…Ă‰ÂžĂ„ĂƒĂˆ { œÅÅà Î Ă„ĂƒĂ ÂžĂƒÂş σ ĂŒĂŒĂŒÂƒÂ˝ÂśĂ Ă„ÂƒÂ¸Ă„Ă‚Â„Â¸ÂśĂ‡ÂşÂşĂ‡ĂˆÂƒ Â?–¥¤ ÂžĂˆ ÂśĂƒ ÂšĂ†ĂŠÂśĂ Â¤Ă…Ă…Ă„Ă‡Ă‰ĂŠĂƒÂžĂ‰ĂŽ šÂÅà ÄκÇ }¢„›„„™~


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, November 9, 2013 s PAGE D6

STERLING Nice 3BR, 2 ba. 1800 sq.ft. home w/garage. Hardwood floors/fenced yard/appliances furnished. No smoking. $850/mo. Call 815-631-1076 Rent to own. 2BR 815-622-9665. Realtor Owned.

COMMERCIAL RENTAL

311

Secured 3 acre w/ high bays and office, 3818 River Rd., Sterling. 815-626-8790

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

315

WAREHOUSE / 330 STORAGE Henson Storage. RV, Boat, Car, Motorcycle storage. 815-590-2181. Sterling Logistix is offering indoor or outdoor Boat & Camper storage. For info. Call Scott 815626-0217 or s.bailey@sterling logistix.com

GARAGE SPACE

331

10x20 $50/mo. + $35 dep. 815-5909478.

LOANS

402

THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of Sauk Valley Media does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by “900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. Sauk Valley Classified makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact the Better Business Bureau 330 N. Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611. 312-832-0500

CRAFT SALE

621

Sterling Towers Bazaar 2403 E. 19th St. Community Room November 9th 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch available 11-12:30 Crafts, Bakesale, Lunch, Raffle, 50/50 Raffle, Silent Auction *Park on E. 19th *

AREA GARAGE SALES 624

APPLIANCES

DIXON GARAGE SALES 624

CLOVER HILLS

Fri. & Sat. 9-3, 1716 W. 9th St. NO EARLY SALES! Moving everything must go! CHEAP! Tools, above ground pool 8x20, 150cc motorcycle, 150cc 2 person Sandrail $300, freezer, toys, curios cabinets $100 obo, Laz-boys. Come see! We probably have what you want! Will consider all offers! 3BR, 1BA Ranch home w/5car garage for sale.

ROCK FALLS GARAGE SALES 624 3003 Middle Dr. (Dixon Ave to Hermis Dr. then to Middle Dr.) Fri. 1-4 Sat 8-12 X-Mas Sale Heated Garage. Outside Xmax décor, icicle lights, lots of Xmas. No Toys. Fri. 10-6 and Sat. 8-3 3002 Middle Rd. Clothing, household items, fax machine, lawn items, toys, Holiday decorations, and much misc. Sat. 10-4 & Sun. Noon-4 31605 E. Thome Road Garage Sale! Saturday 9-1 8769 Clearview Dr. Off Rt. 40 after Montmorency School Tupperware, Brand name womens sz. 11-16 & mens XL2X, baby clothes, Mary Kay & décor.

STERLING GARAGE SALES 624 Fri. & Sat. 9-3 30784 Holly Rd. (1 mi. N. of Menards, off Polo Rd.) ALUMINIM TREES, lights, a lot of Christmas indoor & out, Indian paintings, Tag dishware, BIRDCAGES, & much misc. Sat. 8-4 SRF Historical Society Big Treasure Sale Continued Find A TreasureNew or Old Lincoln Learning Center E. 3rd St.& 7th Ave.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 705 I Buy: Antique furniture, fishing tackle, toys, post cards junk. 815-445-6151 Meito- bone china. Made in Japan- 6 piece setting w/ accessories. Gold blue floral edge trim. Call 815-6265303

GUNS & ARCHERY

706

Baretta model 686 Silver Pigeon 12ga. O/U. Never used, in case. $2,000/ obo. 815-213-2221 Must have FOID

710

LEASE TO OWN APPLIANCES TV’S MATTRESSES

815.625.8529

BUILDING SUPPLIES

720

D-face Tongue & groove pine siding from True North log homes, 116 boards most 16' by 11¼” wide by 2” thick. Worth $20,000. Selling for $10,000 815-652-6803

COMPUTERS

735

Mac Pro Quad Core/2.66 Ghz, equipped for the graphic designer or photographer, 13 GB RAM, 3 hard drives, 2 DVD burners, options available. $725. 815-626-7125.

WOOD / FUEL

746

Dry, stored, hardwood for sale. $70 You pick up. 815778-3783.

FURNITURE

755

Brass queen bed, $100, Dresser/mirror, $75 exc. cond. 815-626-0774. Estate Furniture Sale! 11 piece dining room set, 5 piece twin bedroom set, recliner chair, power recliner, two oak TV stands, Oriental rug w/ round glass coffee table, game table w/ 4 swivel chairs, and a set of Pfaltzgraff dinnerware 45 pieces. Call: 815-441-4427 Ethan Allen maple double 4 poster canopy bed. $450. Maple drop leaf table, $275. Antique: Mr. & Mrs. Chairs $375 and spinning wheel $40. Call 815-652-8726. Mattress sets: Twin $99, Full $129, Queen $159, King $199. Will deliver! Kern Mattress Outlet 309-4527477. Oval table w/ 6 chairs & four leaves, seats 10, $100. 815-6259330.

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775 4 Long haired black kittens & 2 calico. Free 815677-8948 75 gal. fish tank w/ light & accessories. $25 815499-9713 9 kittens free to good homes only. Call 815-772-4342. Male cats, young both neutered. Free to good INDOOR homes only. 815-499-9923. Plexiglas / Wood 44x24 gecko/turtle cage w/heat lamps $65 815-973-2368 Yellow Lab puppies. $350. Call 815-876-0705

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775

MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

WARNING ADS FOR FREE PETS Your beloved pet deserves a loving, caring home. The ad for your free pet may draw response from individuals who will sell your animal for research or breeding purposes. Please screen respondents carefully when giving an animal away. Your pet will thank you!

2 ladies 2 pc. party dresses, sz. 16, $30, Men's Haggar black suit, sz. 42 coat, sz. 40 pants, $35, Ronco Showtime rotisserie w/ manual, pd. $120/now $35, & 3 crock pots in 1 unit, used once, $25. Call 815-6263142. 9' Artificial Christmas Tree, very full. Storage bins Inc. $100. Call 815625-4502 Annual Dixon Coin Club Show. Sunday Nov. 10 at VFW Dixon 9-4. Free admission.

LAWN MOWERS

779

1971 110 JD lawn tractor w/mower deck & extras. Exc. cond. $1500 OBO. 815-857-4282

CHRISTMAS TREES

780

7' Douglas Fir pre lit X-max tree, w/ attached hinged branches. $25 815535-3963

LAWN & GARDEN

781

Craftsman chainsaw - few hours $100 815-8783192 FREE HORSE MANURE for your garden. Free loading. Call 815772-3393.

SNOWBLOWERS 782 Craftsman Snowblower 21” clearing width. 179CC 4 cycle OHV. Electric start. Like New! $300 OBO 815718-5199

TICKETS / TRAVEL 787 & EVENTS No person or business, unless properly licensed by the Illinois Secretary of State, may sell ticket(s) for any sporting event or otherwise, for more than the price printed upon the face of the said ticket(s). Only licensed ticket brokers may legally advertise, negotiate and execute the sale of ticket(s) for any amount over what is printed upon the face of ticket.

ELECTRONICS

790

Apple Ipod Nano 7th Gen. 16GB purple, w. case. No charger. Great con. Barley used. $100 815-535-6131

TOOLS & MACHINERY

792

Crystal Lake O.D. Precision Grinder, bench top model, approx. 5” center, 2 1/2” swing, will grind to tenths, tenths indicator incl., $450 815-9733223.

KRINGLE'S KORNER

794

New In Boxes, Rudolph's Xmas Town Village, by Hawthorne Village. 9 houses & 20 figurines. $350 815535-3963

WANT TO BUY 795 Wanted: Ginseng roots. Turley Ginseng Co., Greenville. 618-664-2871 cell: 618-604-2855 We buy antiques, lamps/lighting, vintage costume jewelry, antique toys, pocket knives, fountain pens. Call 815-259-3550.

Black suede boots from Bergners, ladies sz. 8. $20. 815-441-4543. Christmas dishes. Service for 20. $75. Plus serving dishes. 815-625-0355 Christmas Toy train set, Winter Belle Express $25 815-440-4221 Custom corn hole boards & bags made to order. Deposit required. Call 815-440-8659 Green Mason Jars (12), 1 QT., $15 815-857-3410 JFK: 9 magazines & 15 books $100 815-857-3564 Kodak digital visions 52mm-2.0x lens. Used 3 times. $15. 815-626-6203 Leather Coat, ladies, med., exc. cond., $30 815441-2247. Leather Coat, ladies, small, exc. cond., $30, 815441-2247 Pre-mixed paint (10 gallons) & sheet rock mud. $20. 815-677-0896 Recliner, real good cond. $60. 815718-4385. See More Online Photos, Commerce, Expanded Text ➛Look for WEB ID ➛Log on to: www.saukvalley. com classifieds ➛Enter the WEB ID in the WEB ID Box ➛View Photos, Expanded Text BUY ONLINE!! saukvalley.com CLASSIFIEDS Thanksgiving wreath w/turkey. Like new. $6. 815441-4543. Train Set, Rudolph & the Island of Misfit Toys $75 815-40-4221 Twin, full, queen, king beds $90. Recliner, dryer, reclining sofa, twin size sofa sleeper, upright chest. 815718-4385. Weed Eater Blower $20 815-8573410 Weed Eater brush trimmer $20 815857-3410 Women's leather coat w/fur collar, sz. M. Like new. $40. 815-441-4543

FARM LAND WANTED

815

Family Farm operation looking to expand acres. Cash rent, 50/50 or custom farming.Please send replies to Box #:1180, c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O.Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081 Farmland wanted to rent or custom farm in 2014 & beyond. 815-9702695

HORSES & SUPPLIES

835

2003 Bee Stinger 3 horse bumper slant load trailer with dressing room & extras. $6800 815-288-7669.

FARM EQUIPMENT

855

8N Ford, 4 speed, 3 pt., 12v, grill guard, exc. cond., $2250 w/ 2 bottom plow, $2350 w/ new 6 ft. blade, obo 815-379-2541.

CLASSIC CARS

904

1967 Ford Mustang, project car. Runs. $6,000/obo. Call 815-622-8176.

AUTOMOBILES

905

Bob Endress Auto S&S

13571 Lincoln Rd. (Rte 30 West) Morrison, Illinois

815-772-3215 USED AUTOS 2009 Chevrolet Silverado Reg. Cab, 32,000 Miles 2008 Pontiac Torrent 2008 Buick Lucerne CXL 2008 Buick Enclave 2005 Chevrolet Trailblazer LT Sunroof & Leather 2004 Buick Rainier 2002 Pontiac Montana 2002 Pontiac Bonneville 2000 Buick Century 2000 Ford Explorer LTD AWD 1999 Chevrolet Blazer 4x4 1999 Chevrolet Silverado Regular Cab, Low Miles, Half Ton 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 4x4 http://endress autosales. webs.com/ Business Hours: Monday 8 to 8, Tues.-Fri. 8 to 5, Saturday 8 to 3

Get SOLD Bold type

draws readers to your ad. Get your ad noticed!

*Plus tax, title, license & doc fee.

1995 Plymouth Neon, 161k, 4 cyl., auto, 35 mpg., w/many new parts, $1500 obo 815-973-1207

NEW REAL DEAL

FOR ALL READERS!

A 5 Line REAL DEAL

ad runs for 30 days in Sauk Valley Classifieds, 4 Ogle County Papers, The Review and saukvalley.com all for only $38! Special must be mentioned at time of ad placement. Offer expires 12/31/13 No Commercial Advertising, Pets, Garage Sales, Wood/ Fuel, Tickets/ Travel or Real Estate

2003 Volkswagen Beetle GLS, loaded, blue, 5spd. 117K mi. $5,000 obo 815-857-3739

FARM LAND AUCTION Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013 at 11:00 am Sale to be held: The Auction Shed 900 South Division Ave. in Polo, IL 61064

205 Acres +/- Farm Land; 174.37 Total FSA Located in Sections 28 & 33 of Palmyra Township Lee County, IL. “HARD ROAD ACCESS” FARMLAND Consists of 174.37 Total Acres FSA 160.24 Cropland 14.13 CRP SOILS: 233C2, 675B, 8076A, 280B, 280D P.I. 121.5 TAXES $ 4,068.14 METHOD OF SALE 205 Acres X Price per Acre. 10% down day of auction. Balance due at closing; closing December 30th, 2013. For More Information Contact: Lenny Bryson- Auctioneer 900 South Division Ave Polo, IL 61064 Ph) 815-946-4120

Go BOLD

Owner, Northwest Illinois Aggregates, LLC

OPEN TENANCY 2014 Attorney: Dan Fishburn Fishburn Whiton Thruman 815-235-2511

For photos, aerials, soil maps, and terms & conditions, visit www.lennybrysonauctioneer.com

GO BOLD

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

CALL 815-625-3600 815-284-2222 To place your AD TODAY!


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, November 9, 2013 s PAGE D7

HOW LOW CAN WE GO!

AUTOMOBILES

Cipher for 11/08 CELEBRITY CIPHER by Luis Campos Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

YOUR CHOICE! $249 A

TODAY’S CLUE: C equals G

MONTH WITH ZERO DOWN!

“UNGLC K MZSKL GD K JNHHGUAB

NO TAX - NO PLATE

O G E E G P R A J J K D V, D G L P N G J P Z L D G -

NO NOTHING!!!

JUST SIGN & DRIVE & GET 3.09% ON APPROVED CREDIT. MAKE NO PAYMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY OF 2014 ON QUALIFIED CREDIT!!! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR???  72<27$ &$05< ;/(

DJD WHGLPGWKAAB GL ONKAGLC MGJT SNL.â&#x20AC;? -- FZDNWT PZLHKO Previous Solution: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe our favorite quotations say more about us than the stories and people weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re quoting.â&#x20AC;? -- John Green (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-8

Cipher for 11/09 CELEBRITY CIPHER by Luis Campos Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLUE: K equals M /2: 0,/(6

LOADED, LOCAL TRADE, ALL THE BELLS & WHISTLES, LIKE NEW!

249/MO*

$

â&#x20AC;&#x153; E O E B A I G C X Y W L D A K YAW Y Y G D Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; D D I P B AW D B E A I D A B B R D E AW R G G F K R F P Y E B A I G C H Y L R C Y B Y W L W E H M Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; D

 $&85$ 76;

D G Y Y V. â&#x20AC;? - - X E B M R X C G Y S E D

905

2005 Chrysler Sebring Touring Conv., exc. cond., 86.5K mi., $7,500 815-440-2145. 2006 Honda CRV, 1 owner. Exc. cond. Loaded, 121,000 mi. $8800 OBO. 815-7723555. 2008 Nissan Rogue, AWD, 105K mi., well maintained, $8,800 obo 608-515-6330. 2009 Pontiac Vibe, good tires, new brakes. Cherry red. 4dr. Interior great cond. $10,000/obo 815-994-0977. Credit Problems? Bad Credit? No Credit? We might be able to help! If you're looking to buy a vehicle we have many financing options available through qualified lenders. Call Brett Simpson today at 815-2855313. Ken Nelson Auto Plaza. creditautosales dixon.com Always over 100+ vehicles to choose from. HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our classified department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626SOLD or 284SOLD. PHOTOS ONLINE!!

LOADED, LOCAL TRADE, ALL THE TOYS!

249/MO*

$

 0$='$ , 7285,1*

Previous Solution: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a woman is a terribly difficult task, since it consists principally in dealing with men.â&#x20AC;? -- Joseph Conrad (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-9

Astrograph Proceed with caution.

249/MO*

$

 1,66$1 $/7,0$

/2: 0,/(6 SUNROOF, 1-OWNER, PREMIUM PACKAGE

249/MO

$

*

 &+(952/(7 ,03$/$ /7

/2: /2: 0,/(6 1-OWNER, LIKE NEW!

249/MO

$

*

 &+(952/(7 0$/,%8 /7

21/<  /()7 )25 7+,6 35,&(

/2: 0,/(6

SUNROOF, LEATHER

249/MO*

$

S.U.V.S

Saturday, November 9, 2013

BLACK ON BLACK AND SHARP!

Choose events that broaden your outlook or have the potential to bring you in contact with creative people. Inspiration will help you use your assets and qualities more effectively. A close relationship will improve your life. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Avoid any sort of emotional entanglement that will cause others to question you. Holding on to what you have will improve your life and brighten your future. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Helping others is fine, as long as your motives are genuine and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let anyone take advantage of you. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect anything in return, and you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be disappointed. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Getting together with people who share your concerns will bring good results. A crucial relationship will develop that will alter your personal life and overall direction. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Emotional issues will surface, forcing you to deal with a problem that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been putting off. Face your dilemmas with honesty and integrity, and you will come out on top.

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Keep your money matters a secret. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to listen carefully to make a decision that can influence a financial or legal concern. Base your ultimate choice on your gut feeling and the facts at hand. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Restlessness should not be allowed to dictate your words or actions. You are likely to make a costly mistake. Stay calm and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go overboard in any aspect of your life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to play today. Downtime will help you rejuvenate your spirits and will give you a better view of what you may need to do to improve an important relationship.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Proceed with caution. Involving yourself in an emotional discussion will not likely end in your favor. Listen carefully and retreat until you have a rock-solid perspective and plan. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Make your move and do it with finesse. You will attract positive attention and meet people who are heading in a similar direction as you. Romance is in the stars. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Look over your long-term plans and consider your options regarding work and money. Putting a budget in place by cutting your overhead will help ease stress.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -Speak from the heart and ask questions that will give you a better idea of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expected of you. Caution must be taken if you want to avoid exhaustion or minor injury. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a good influence on others if you share your ideas, thoughts and intentions. Keep a close watch on an unpredictable situation, as guidance will be required.

Š2013 UFS

 1,66$1 6(175$ 65

ONLY 4,000 MILES!

249/MO*

$

 )25' )2&86 6(/

 72 &+226(

NICELY EQUIPPED, 1-OWNER

249/MO*

$

 +$5/(< 675((7 */,'(

When you see the above logo in a classified ad in the paper you'll find a whole lot more online. Just go to www.saukvalley. com Classifieds, and enter the Web ID included in the ad.

GET YOUR GAME ON

With The

909

2002 Yukon XL, dark gray, ½ ton 1500, 4 wheel dr,. 188K mi. Firestone tires and cattle guard. 5.3 Liter $5,500. Call 815622-8055 2005 Ford Explorer, 4 Wh. Dr. V6, Leather, 3rd row seats, sunroof. Great Con. $5,900 815-499-9902

TRUCKS

910

2003 F350 11' flat bed dually. 68K mi. Good cond. $7500/ obo. 815-499-7195

ACROSS

TRUCKS

910

2007 CHEVROLETColorado Pickup New Low Price $7999 38K mi. 815-284-1135 For Sale: 1996 Ford Ranger 4x4, asking $3500/obo Call 815-626-1779 between 5 & 7 or leave message.

VANS

911

2002 Pontiac Montana Van, full pwr., cold air, very good cond. Clean inside & out. $3900. 815-4995578. 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, 115K New motor w/90K, new brakes. Just serviced. $6500/ obo. 815-718-0840 2006 Sienna XLE DVD, moonroof, heated leather $11,900/OBO 815-406-2226 284-3711 Nights

TRAILERS/RVS

945

2001 24' Coachman Catalina Lite, sleeps 6, new AC. $4,500 815-9737909 or 973-0773

AUTOS WANTED

960

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 815-499-3543

CASH 4-CARS

We are licensed & insured to buy vehicles. Running or non running, scrap, Ect. 7 days a week. All Calls Answered!

(815)499-3543 $$$$$$$$$$$$$

AUTOS WANTED

960

$$$

815-441-0246 ABSOLUTELY

THE BEST CASH PAID FOR JUNK or

Unwanted (running or not)

VEHICLES $150-$2000

We Pay the BEST! Guaranteed! Fastest Pickup All calls answered 7 days a week. Licensed Dealer

815-441-0246

(Don't be lied to this number is not affliated with anyother number in paper}

We Buy Used cars & trucks. Call Dixon ATV 815-288-2146

SELL

those unwanted items with the help of a Sauk Valley Classified Ad

625-3600 284-2222

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

815-441-0246 ABSOLUTELY THE BEST CASH PAID FOR JUNK VEHICLES

$150-$2000 We Pay the BEST! Guaranteed! Fastest Pickup All calls answered 7 days a week. with any other number in the paper.)

815-441-0246 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

43 Unbar, in poetry 1 Jacques, in 46 Getting song closer 6 Ohio city 11 Oui and ja 48 Radio noise 12 Timid sort 50 Kind of 13 Foment cracker 15 Posers 54 Place of 16 Male safety goose 55 Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 18 Pixel state 19 RN helper 56 Leading 21 Wander the pack (about) 22 Wild plum 57 Tooth problem 23 Destroy 25 Likely to DOWN 28 Strong and tough 1 Memo abbr. 30 Moo goo 2 Cartoon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; pan Chihuahua 31 Dory 3 PC key mover 4 Held sway 32 Check fig. 5 Is, in 33 Bonfire Barcelona remains 6 Cupid 35 Cocoon 7 Down for dweller the count 37 What â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 8 Felt that? remorse 38 Remote 9 Peace button Prize city 40 Wine glass 10 Wrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feature abode 41 Dues 14 MIT grad, payer, for often short 15 TV, radio, 42 Small fry etc.

Answer to Previous Puzzle

17 Family member 19 Burro alternative 20 Ship destinations 22 Bernard â&#x20AC;&#x201D; of CNN 24 Zilch 25 Ventricle neighbor 26 Put down asphalt 27 Monorail 29 Edible root 34 Singer Yma â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 36 On a bicycle

39 Madame Bovary 43 Job safety org. 44 Egyptian god 45 Chalet feature 46 Flag waver? 47 Phillips University town 49 Earl Grey, e.g. 51 Raincoat 52 I knew it! 53 Myrna of old movies

PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Random House Crossword MegaOmniousâ&#x20AC;? Vols. 1 & 2

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY

103 IN. MOTOR, 6 SPEED, ABS, VANCE & HINES 2-1 PRO PIPE, ANTI-THEFT, PRO PROGRAMMER

:::0$-(6.,027256,1&&20

815-625-9600

dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600 815-284-2222

0RQ7KXU  Â&#x2021; )UL  Â&#x2021; 6DW DPSP *$0 Down,72 months @3.09%APRfinancingwith approved credit.Photosfor illustrationuseonly.

11-9

Š 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Wheels

Saturday, November 9, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs$ Paid Advertisement

2014 JEEP CHEROKEE ferential. This 4WD system is standard on the Trailhawk and optional on most other Cherokees. We’re also able to lock the rear differential on our Cherokee Trailhawk, and for most of the day we have the SelecTerrain dial in Rock mode, which is also exclusive to the Trailhawk (other 4WD Cherokees have only Auto, Sport, Snow and Mud/Sand) and only active in 4WD Low. Along with hill descent control, its main function is to keep you crawling along slowly enough that your Jeep will be able to make the drive home.

Submitted by Ken Nelson Auto Group

M

oab, Utah, is exactly the kind of place you imagine driving a 2014 Jeep Cherokee. There are gorgeous red rock arches, buttes and pinnacles that rise up out of the high desert landscape, and the best way to see it all is to catch a ride on one of the local tours. Then again, if you have a Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk, you could just see it all on your own. The Trailhawk is the off-road-themed version of the all-new Jeep Cherokee, which goes on sale in September. Although Jeep’s latest SUV uses front-wheel-drive architecture, the 2014 Cherokee Trailhawk has both the off-road hardware and the ground clearance to climb these trails without that stands in its path. And isn’t that the whole point of owning a sport-utility vehicle? An All-New Compact Jeep The 2014 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk summons a bit of its predecessor’s toughness, but it’s really not aimed at traditional Jeep buyers. Instead, it’s the much larger population of compact crossover SUV buyers. Built on the same architecture as the 2013 Dodge Dart, the 2014 Jeep Cherokee represents a fresh start. It’s almost 2 inches shorter from nose to tail than Dodge’s sedan, and its wheelbase is basically the same (107 inches even on the Trailhawk, slightly less on wider, though, and it’s 10 inches taller overall. There are basic similarities in suspension design, but no components are shared, we’re told. Inside, there’s noticeably more headroom and legroom than in the Dart. It’s much easier to get comfortable in the Cherokee’s driver seat (even though the steering wheel has a similarly limited range of height adjustment), and the

Ours does, but we still can’t see anyone with serious off-road plans choosing it over the Wrangler Unlimited leading our caravan. A stock four-door Wrangler has 10 inches of clearance (versus the Cherokee’s 8.7), better approach and departure angles, more wheel

Finally, a Small Jeep You Can Take Seriously. high-mounted rear bench has fore-andaft adjustment and supports our thighs without pushing our head into the rafters. This is one of the better backseats in the compact crossover class. Comfort comes at the expense of cargo capacity, though. With its rear seats folded, the Jeep tops out at 54.9 cubic feet, which is 10-15 fewer cubic feet than most other compact crossovers. No doubt the full-size spare tire, packhawks and all Cherokees with the Tow package, eats into some of the volume.

part of the deal. With the tow package, Your other engine option on the 2014 Cherokee is a 2.4-liter inline four-cylinder, which features variable intakevalve timing and lift (Fiat’s MultiAir technology) and is rated at 184 hp at 6,400 rpm and 171 lb-ft of torque at 4,600 rpm. Choosing the four-cylinder will save you $1,495. But even with the Cherokee’s standard nine-speed automatic transmission driving the front wheels (or all four wheels as on our test vehicle), acceleration on the roads around Moab (which is situated at 4,000 feet) never feels more than adequate, and the power delivery isn’t especially smooth.

A Pleasing V6 So it won’t haul as many packages of toilet paper, but the 2014 Jeep Cherokee has something most rivals don’t: an optional V6. This new, transversely mounted 3.2-liter engine is based on the likable 3.6-liter Pentastar engine but has slightly smaller cylinders. Compression is slightly higher, too, at 10.7:1 versus 10.2 on the 3.6-liter. It’s rated for almost as much power as the largerdisplacement V6, with 271 horsepower at 6,500 rpm. Torque drops off to 239 pound-feet at 4,400 rpm compared to 260 on most of the 3.6 applications.

The V6 Cherokee is another story, though, as it gives the 2014 Jeep not found in any SUV with a fourcylinder engine. There’s plenty of power here, and the new nine-speed automatic provides smooth upshifts. mode on the Cherokee’s SelecTerrain dial to get downshifts at our preferred

drive (3.52 versus 3.25 ordinarily) and a 4,500-pound tow rating. have only been released for a couple versions of the 2014 Cherokee. Fourcylinder models with the light-duty Active Drive four-wheel-drive system are rated at 24 mpg combined and 21 city/28 highway, while V6 Cherokees with this 4WD system are rated 22/19/27. Ratings are still to come for the front-drive versions, as well as Cherokees with the more deluxe Active Drive II 4WD system. Steady Over the Boulders and by more deluxe, we mean that it has low-range gearing, though the setup is a little different than usual. Jeep’s engineers wanted the Cherokee to be as capable as a rear-drive-based SUV in off-road situations (with the rear wheels getting as much torque as the front wheels), but on pavement they wanted to cut off power to the rear that work, our 2014 Cherokee has a low-range planetary gear set in both its power takeoff unit and its rear dif-

transmission. A manual mode is also

YEAR END AL

Was

Rebate

$24,050 $ 1,400 $ 2,000

NOW

20,650

$

*

AL STK # DD059

10,000 OFF MSRP W

AL

W

***

Rebate

Mike Freeman General Mgr.

Was

KN Discount

W

E LN

AL

2013 CHRSYLER 200 TOURING

W

E LN

AL

STK # CD020

$18,885 $ 742 $ 2,000

Rich Vogeler Sales Mgr.

NOW

16,143

$

*

Craig Buchanan Sales Mgr.

Was

KN Discount

Rebate

Brett Simpson Business Mgr.

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT- DVD!!!

STK # DD065

$19,990 $ 759 $ 2,500

Jamie Curia Sales

NOW

16,731

$

*

Steve Acree Sales

Carl Buehler Sales

Was

KN Discount

$29,185 $ 5,570

Chad Conderman Sales

$

NOW

26,481*

2013 DODGE JOURNEY SXT - 3RD ROW SEAT!

ALSTK # DD074

STK # DD023

Was

KN Discount

$31,715 $ 5,234

E LN

2013 DODGE DART

E LN

2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY - DVD

AL STK # CD034

Was

2013 RAM 2500 DIESEL

W

KN Discount

W

E LN

ALL NEW 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE

E LN

$

FOR TRADES

IT HAS ARRIVED!!!

2014 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE

STK # JE003

KN Discount

Grand Interior In past years, the gap in civility between the Cherokee and Grand Cherokee cabins was large, but for 2014, they’re far more comparable. The materials in the 2014 Jeep Cherokees we’re driving look and feel nicer than the stuff in the Dart, and honestly, we’re hard-pressed to name another small crossover that beats it for style. The equipment list is also beyond anything Jeep has ever offered in a compact SUV.

DOLLAR

DEALS! W

it’s far more enjoyable to drive than the original Cherokee.

TOP

GREAT E LN

for driver error. Plus, the 2014 Jeep Cherokee feels too hawk, which has the tallest ride height and a more off-road-oriented spring and damper calibration (along with wider wheels and tires), rides comfortably when we’re going faster than we should on these trails. Back on the pavement, it offers about as cushy a ride as you’ll get in this class. The downside is that the Jeep feels heavy and soft around turns. The electric-assist power steering is precise, but the Cherokee isn’t sporty like the

$26,485 $ 4,815

W

E LN

ALSTK # DD118

$

NOW

21,670*

2013 RAM CREW CAB

NOW

23,615*

$

Justin Meyers Sales

Rusty Baker Sales

$4,000 REBATE + 0%x72 mos.**

Nick Melsness Sales

Jeff Wilson Sales

Adam Chapman Sales

1000 N. GALENA, DIXON, IL

CHRYSLER

*Tax, license, title, $164 doc dee additional. All rebates & incentives applied. **0% APR financing with approved credit plus tax, title, license & doc fee. ***All rebates and incentivies applied. Photos for illustation use only.

815-288-4455 WWW.KENNELSONAUTO.COM

TEL-11-09-2013  

TEL-11-09-2013