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Thursday, May 2, 2013

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‘No reason to proceed’

City of Princeton 101

State drops Crundwell theft case

City manager hosts informational meeting By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

By Derek Barichello Shaw Media Service

DIXON – Citing a desire to save taxpayers about $300,000 on a “futile” trial, Lee County State’s Attorney Anna SaccoMiller on Tuesday dismissed theft charges against Rita Crundwell.

The former Dixon comptroller had been charged with 60 counts of theft for stealing $11.3 million in city funds between Jan. 1, 2010, and April 17, 2012. Sacco-Miller called further prosecution “futile” because it would not have meant more prison time for Crundwell or additional restitution to the city of Dixon.

PRINCETON – Princeton City Manager Jeff Clawson hosted an informational meeting on Monday to discuss various functions of Princeton’s government. He provided a breakdown of how the city’s tax dollars are spent, how the utility services are operated and how the city council functions. Below is a highlighted overview of just some of the topics discussed at Clawson’s presentation.

Crundwell’s attorney, Lee County Public Defender Bob Thompson, said he was confident he would have won the argument that state prosecution would not be legal. Crundwell was sentenced in February to 19 years, 7 months in prison for federal wire fraud for her admitted theft of nearly $54 million from the city over two decades. She

See Crundwell Page 4

City debt Princeton is currently sitting on about $40 million in overall debt, according to Clawson. Most recently, the city has refinanced about $10 million of the debt, which will reduce interest rate over the next 17 years. Clawson said the council hopes to refinance the debt one more time, but legally they have to wait until the next fiscal year. In the 2013-14 fiscal year, Clawson said it’s been suggested the city take a year off from funding capital projects. In the last couple years, the city has funded ongoing projects which have attributed to the debt. The next year will be focused on getting a handle on debt and determining where the city sits with its newest projects.

Tax levy The definition of tax levy and the amount paid for property taxes is one of the most misunderstood items, according to Clawson. Clawson said tax levy is the amount of money the city requests based on residents’ property taxes. The levy is a calculation of the assessed valuation of the city as a whole. The city levies

See Meeting Page 4 Year 167 No. 53 Two Sections - 32 Pages

98213 00012 1 7 © Bureau County Republican

BCR photo/Becky Kramer

Carson Fisher of Sheffield (center) displays his winning Tar Wars poster which took not only top honors in the Bureau County contest but also won top honors at the state level. Standing with Carson for photos are runners-up Jenna Nordstrom (left) and Saylor Jildera (right). Not able to attend Tuesday’s awards ceremony at the Bureau County Metro Center was runner-up Max Wollerman. Carson, a fourth-grader at Bureau Valley South, will represent Illinois at the national Tar Wars competition this summer in Washington, D. C.

Carson Fisher wins state Tar Wars contest By Becky Kramer news@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — A Bureau Valley South student won the Bureau County Tar Wars tobacco-free poster contest and then turned around to win the state competition as well. Carson Fisher learned he was the state winner at Tuesday evening’s awards ceremony sponsored by the Bureau/Putnam County Health Department and held at the Bureau County Metro Center in Princeton. More than 300 fourth- and fifth-grade students from area schools submitted posters for the annual local Tar Wars contest, with the artists of the Top 20 posters honored at Tuesday’s event.

Runners-up in the Bureau County contest were Max Wollerman, Jenna Nordstrom, both of Bureau Valley South, and Saylor Jildera of Ohio Grade School. Saylor learned on Tuesday evening that her poster went on to win third place in the state contest. As the overall state winner, Carson will go in July to Washington D.C., to compete in the national Tar Wars contest. The Illinois Family Physician Association, which sponsors Tar Wars, is sending Carson and a family member to the national competition. Carson’s winning poster depicted a big gold fish in a sea of blue, with a nearby cigarette dangling from a hook. The message on the poster simply stated, “Don’t get hooked.”

At Tuesday’s awards ceremony, Carson smiled as he explained he had chosen to draw a fish for the poster because he loves to hunt and fish. He completed the poster in just a day or two, the fourth-grader said. “I just can’t believe I was chosen first in the entire state of Illinois,” Carson said. “I am excited to go to Washington, D.C.!” Carson’s parents, Angie and Chad Fisher, said they are very proud of their son. Carson’s physical education and health teacher Vicki Litherland said she has someone from the local health department come to the school each year to explain and promote the Tar Wars program; she said the program is an excellent resource for her.

See Tar Wars Page 4

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2 Local 2 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

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Republican 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356 Get real-time mobile and e-mail alerts at

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Clarifications/Corrections Did we get it right? Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been made, call the Bureau County Republican at 815-8754461.

Seeking Sources Are you an area man who has his own “man cave?” You know ... an area in your home, basement or garage reserved just for you. Or maybe you are the wife of a “man cave” owner? Either way, the Bureau County Republican wants to share your “man cave” with other readers in an upcoming special section in the BCR. Call BCR Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at 815875-4461, ext. 244, or email her at dbarker@ bcrnews.com. ••• May 21 is National Waiters and Waitresses Day which recognizes the value and importance of a good waiter or waitress. The BCR would like to do a story about a waiter or waitress who enjoys their job and would be willing to share their career with other BCR readers. Contact BCR Staff Writer Goldie Currie at 815-875-4461, ext. 236, or email her at gcurrie@bcrnews.com. ••• The Bureau County Republican is located at 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 815-875-4461 FAX: 815-875-1235 The BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN (ISSN 0894-1181) is published tri-weekly (three times a week) by the Bureau County Republican, 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340. Periodical postage paid at Princeton, Illinois, 61356. POSTMASTER Send address changes to BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340.

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MaKenna DeGrush

Miracle for MaKenna Fundraiser event set for Saturday By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — In many ways, MaKenna DeGrush of Princeton sounds like many other 5-year-old girls. Her favorite television show is “Austin and Ally” on the Disney channel, and her favorite book is “The Little Mermaid.” She is a huge pasta lover and loves anything by country singer Taylor Swift. In the evenings, she likes to go for walks and to go get ice cream. MaKenna is a student in the Bright Beginnings program at Douglas School, where her favorite thing is to play with her friends. But MaKenna has some special challenges in life because she was born with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a motor neuron disease that causes muscle weakness and atrophy (wasting). Approximately 1 in 6,000

babies born are affected by SMA, which is linked to a genetic mutation in the SMN1 gene. To help raise funds for MaKenna’s ongoing treatment, the Princeton Elks Lodge is partnering with Service Master Restoration to host a benefit Saturday at the Princeton Elks Lodge. Princeton Elks Exalted Ruler Penny Best said the children/family portion of Saturday’s benefit will be from 3 to 5 p.m. and will include lots of activities and games, including a bouncy house provided by Beck Oil Co. The adult portion of the benefit will begin at 5 p.m. and will continue until enough money is raised to help with MaKenna’s expenses, Best said. Saturday’s benefit will include music by the Last Call from DePue and The Generics of Princeton, along with raffles and free food, provided by the Elks Lodge. Child tickets are $5 each, and adult tickets are $15 each.

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Benefit for MaKenna DeGrush When: On Saturday, the children/ family portion will be from 3 to 5 p.m. and will include lots of activities and games, including a bouncy house provided by Beck Oil Co. The adult portion will begin at 5 p.m. and will continue until enough money is raised to help with MaKenna’s expenses. Where: The Princeton Elks Lodge

MaKenna’s mother, Ashley Manzo, of Princeton talked about her daughter’s life with SMA, the concerns and ongoing medical needs. Manzo said MaKenna began to lose the ability to stand when she was about 8 months old, and she wasn’t interested in crawling. After months of indecision, her daughter was finally diagnosed with SMA when she was 15 months old.

Today, MaKenna can walk short distances around a room but uses a wheelchair for longer distances. In time, the family hopes to get an automatic wheelchair for her. At school, her classmates take turns wheeling MaKenna down the hallway in a stroller to her classroom. As MaKenna is getting older, she does realize her legs are more wobbly than other children’s

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legs, Manzo said. She realizes she can’t do the same things other kids can do, or she can’t do them in the same way. “We tell MaKenna that she’s fortunate for what she does have, and we try to help her understand that she can do things, but she just has to do them differently,” Manzo said. As far as ongoing medical treatment, MaKenna sees a specialist in Madison, Wis., once a month, sometimes less frequently. She takes trial clinical medications. She’s in physical therapy at the Lighted Way facility in LaSalle. Insurance covers some of the medical expenses but certainly not all of them, Manzo said. Everything seems to be a fight, with talk now that insurance could possibly not cover future out-patient therapy, she said. Children with SMA depend on therapy because they are missing the gene that sends signals to the body to make protein to build muscle, Manzo said. Once they lose muscle, they are never able to regain it, she said. On Tuesday, Best said the Elks Children Care Corporation will help every way it can to see that MaKenna has the ongoing therapy she needs. The Elks will continue their commitment to her care until she’s 21, Best said. Looking ahead to Saturday, Best said she hopes for a good turn-out for the benefit, which they are calling “Miracle for MaKenna.” Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.


3 Local Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Local

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 3

County plat books available PRINCETON — The Bureau County Supervisor of Assessments has new county plat books for sale, including rural road designations, village street layouts, property owners, aerial photography and government contracts. Books may be purchased for $30 in the Supervisor of Assessment’s office, 700 S. Main St., Princeton. Call 815-875-6478 for more information.

New faces on SV Council

The belt gets tighter

By Brock Cooper

By Donna Barker

news@bcrnews.com

dbarker@bcrnews.com

SPRING VALLEY — It was a changing of the guard in Spring Valley Monday as the outgoing mayor and city aldermen welcomed and swore in the new generation. “I would like to thank everyone in the city of Spring Valley for having me the last four years,” former Mayor Cliff Banks said. Banks was replaced with former alderman Walt Marini, and aldermen Rick Fusinatto, Mike Richetta and Marini were replaced with Dave Pellegrini, Michael Herrmann and Mark Actis respectively. Alderman Chuck Hansen was reelected to his seat. Marini then brought some familiar faces back to the council with his appointments of Jim Andreoni as city attorney, replacing Tom Tonozzi, and engineering firm Chamlin and Associates as city engineering firm, replacing Jack Kusek of McClure and Associates. Andreoni and Chamlin last filled their respective roles under former Mayor Jim Narczewski, who appointed them after he was sworn in May 2, 2005. Both had previously served under Narczewski, but were replaced by former Mayor Joe Taliano when he defeated Narczewski in 2001. Taliano appointed McClure and

PRINCETON — The Princeton Elementary School District could look quite a bit different in the next couple years if the school board goes ahead with some cost-saving measures discussed at this week’s meeting. Those cost-savings measures could include not replacing some retiring teachers, increasing class sizes and possibly closing a school building. In explaining the need for cost-savings measures at Monday’s board meeting, Superintendent Tim Smith said he is projecting an estimated $1.6 million deficit in the education fund for the current 2013 fiscal year. The district has budgeted a $1.6 million transfer from the working cash fund into the education fund to cover the deficit. The building fund is projected to end the year with an estimated $83,000 deficit, and the transportation fund could have an estimated $40,000 deficit. PES is also facing some outstanding issues which could greatly impact the finances of the district, Smith said. Those issues include the potential costs of pension reform, the new health care law and the new PARRC assessment program. Those numbers are still out there and are an unknown as to their impact on the district, he said. To capture needed savings for the district, there are several measures which

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BCR photo/Brock Cooper

Spring Valley City Clerk Rebecca Hanson swears in new Mayor Walt Marini at Monday’s Spring Valley City Council meeting. Associates as city engineer and Ray Nolasco as city attorney. Tonozzi swore in Spring Valley City Clerk Rebecca Hansen who then swore in the aldermen and city treasurer Jack Boroski. She then swore in Marini as mayor. Marini thanked Banks for his service and gave him, Fusinatto and Richetta plaques to commemorate their service. Marini also thanked his wife and the residents of the city for electing him mayor. “I believe this is an indication of what people can accomplish when they work together,” Marini said. In other business: • The council approved two special use permits for allowing the operation of a shooting range at 221 W. Dakota St. and 122 E. St. Paul St. • Street Superintendent John Schultz said the city received around 20 calls about water back-up following the

recent rain and flooding. He said about three or four of them were the city’s problem, and he also found a few sewer lines that needed to be televised. • Banks wanted everyone to remember to keep all paperwork and documents pertaining to flooding for state and federal flood and disaster relief programs. • Kusek said there were rumors that people worried about losing water because of the flooding, but that isn’t the case. It’s the wastewater treatment plant with flooding problems, not the water treatment plant. • Saturday will be the city’s annual spring clean-up, and the city is looking for volunteers. • Alderman Tom Nesti asked people to not deposit grass clippings into the street where they can flow into the sewers and cause damage and clogging. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

could be taken to cut expenses in the education, building and transportation funds, Smith said. One measure would be to diminish the number of class sections during the next two years, Smith said. The district can’t afford to keep its current class sizes, which now average about 23 or 25 students, depending on the grade level. That number could go up to an average of 27 or 28 students per class. He hopes to keep class sizes under 30 students, but things could get worse, Smith said. When asked if those larger classes would have a teacher’s aide, Smith said he couldn’t say if that would be a recommendation at this time. In those larger classes, four or five students could be out of the classroom at times for specialized services, he said. Another cost-savings measure would be in the music department, Smith said. The music program would not be cut, but less time could be given to it, which would result in one fewer music teacher, Smith said. Looking at potential savings which come through retiring teachers, Smith said there will be 13 retirements in the next couple years, and there is the potential consideration of not filling eight to 10 of those positions. The estimated savings to the district, by not replacing those retiring teachers, would be $400,000 in the first year and $600,000 in the second year.

To capture savings in the education fund is accomplished primarily through personnel, Smith said. The district is budgeting the same amount in supplies as it did 15 years ago and has seen cuts in technology spending, he said. One possible revenuebuilding step would be to implement a $50 technology fee for students which would be in addition to the regular $40 book rental fee, Smith said. Looking at the building fund, Smith said the district has to become more efficient in its building use. The board will need to look at the various school buildings and whether the district needs all its current sites, as well as the number of staff at each site. If the district downsizes, it could mean a reduction in its bus fleet. It is a tough decision to downsize the number of buildings, but it could be needed, Smith said. Any closing of a building, if the board approved the action, would not take place with the 2013-14 school year. After Smith’s presentation, board member Steve Bouslog requested Smith come back to the board’s May 20 meeting with formal recommendations for board consideration. The board needs to start looking at these possibilities, though he may not be ready to take action on any recommendations at the May meeting, Bouslog said. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

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4 Local 4 • Local • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Crundwell From Page 1 must serve no fewer than 16 years. That amount includes the $11.3 million on which the state charges were based. She also was ordered to pay full restitution. If convicted, the state sentence would have run concurrently with the federal sentence, SaccoMiller said. Even if Crundwell would have been sentenced to the maximum 30 years on the state charges, with the state’s day-off-for-day-served and good-credit policies, she likely would have served only 14 years, 6 months, effectively nullifying the state sentence and wasting the cost of the trial, the state’s attorney said. The 60-year-old Crundwell has appealed her federal sentence. Sacco-Miller did dismiss charges without prejudice, meaning she can refile within two years if the federal sentence is vacated or overturned. “In the event (her sentence is reduced) with the appeal, I’ll reconsider my decision,” Sacco-Miller said. “There’s no reason to proceed at this point.” Sacco-Miller said the $300,000 estimate was a conservative figure, in part because the trial would have to be moved outside of Lee County due to the number of direct victims in the jury pool – the taxpayers from whom the money was stolen. “The main reason (Crundwell’s) trial would potentially cost so much is that there are 60 counts that would be required to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt,” Sacco-Miller said. “The trial would likely take at least two weeks and would require expert testimony on the scheme for each count. There are tens of thousands of pages of discovery that would be analyzed and potentially hundreds of pages required to prove each count.” Sacco-Miller estimated an expert could cost about $20,000, transportation for Crundwell – based on an average between two

“There’s something wrong with the federal guidelines. She’s going to be behind bars a year for every $3 million stolen. I don’t think anyone should be able to steal $53 million and be out walking the streets.” Jim Burke likely potential prison facilities (one in Minnesota, one in Texas) – would be $4,451.40, and attorney fees are estimated at $92,000. Housing costs were estimated at $9,900. Those figures do not include costs for additional security during the trial, any other travel involving the case and trial preparation, and court time for the Sterling Police officer who investigated the case. Tuesday, Thompson was set to argue his motion to dismiss the case on the grounds that it constituted double jeopardy in light of Crundwell’s federal fraud conviction. Had Sacco-Miller not dropped the case, there’s a good chance he would have prevailed, he said after the hearing. “I know it was the right move,” Thompson said of Sacco-Miller’s decision. “I commend her for it. It was a courageous move because the popular decision would’ve been easier, but this one is the right one. That’s a good sign the state’s attorney is taking her job seriously.” Sacco-Miller said she researched Illinois law, spoke with several colleagues, and had a conference with Judge Ron Jacobson and Thompson before reaching her decision. Federal Judge Philip Reinhard’s sentence took into consideration the entirety of Crundwell’s crime, in regard to the sentence, forfeiture order and restitution orders he issued, she noted. When former State’s Attorney Henry Dixon filed the theft charges, he was told Crundwell’s federal sentence would range from about 8 to 10 years, giving him more reason to pursue prosecution, Sacco-Miller said.

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“There were ongoing plea negotiations, and as we were unable to come up with an agreement, I have to assume it would proceed to a trial,” Sacco-Miller said. “She has to agree to enter a plea for a sentence to be imposed.” Crundwell, who is in Boone County Jail awaiting assignment to a federal prison, did not appear in court Tuesday. Sacco-Miller said she would notify the U.S. Marshals Service of the dismissal to get the ball rolling on Crundwell’s transfer. Mayor Jim Burke said the city council was notified of SaccoMiller’s decision. Even though he would have liked to see Crundwell get a stiffer sentence, Burke said the state’s attorney made the right decision under the circumstances. “There’s something wrong with the federal guidelines,” the mayor said. “She’s going to be behind bars a year for every $3 million stolen. I don’t think anyone should be able to steal $53 million and be out walking the streets.” Sacco-Miller also called upon all cities, townships and governmental agencies in Lee County to establish a practical and effective protocol to safeguard against theft and fraud. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Meeting From Page 1 about 12 percent of what residents pay or about $1.5 million. A third of that money goes to the library, the second third goes to police and fire departments’ pension and the final third goes into the city’s general fund. The tax levy money going to the general fund is usually spent on liability insurance and workers’ compensation, Clawson said.

Water Treatment Plant Clawson described the new water treatment plant as “an expensive proposition.” “We’re looking at anywhere between $18 to $20 million to build it,” he said. “Most of that money we used IEPA low-interest loan money to pay for it.” He said the new plant is designed for 4.3 million gallons a day. “That’s beyond the need right now. There was future growth envisioned for that,” he said. The new plant is nearing completion and expected to be online by fall. Thus far, the project is only 1 percent over budget, which Clawson said was “pretty good.”

Wastewater Treatment Plant There have been issues at the wastewater treatment plant that are being addressed, Clawson said. “We put a new system online, and it isn’t quite working the way we’d like it yet. So we’re working

Tar Wars From Page 1 She learned last week about Carson’s first-place state poster, Litherland said. “It’s so exciting and won-

with the contractors on that,” he said. “It was about a $2.5 million investment in the cannibal system; that’s designed to reduce the volume of sludge at the plant.” The city pays about $150,000 annually to haul sludge from the plant. The new system was supposed to save the city $100,000 annually. Until the system is functioning correctly, the city is forced to spend the money to haul sludge.

Princeton’s TIF region is located south of Interstate 80 on both sides of Main Street.

“It isn’t current cash flowing, which means the city is losing a little bit of money on an annual basis ... We’re trying to get one more retail-type project, and then it will cash flow through the end of it’s time,” Clawson said. Clawson explained in a TIF area every dollar of new property taxes from a business goes to the city, rather than other taxing bodies like the school districts or park district. “The money can only be spent within that geographic area to help enhance other projects,” he said. Clawson explained if the city asks a business to come to the TIF area without the TIF incentive, it will force businesses to say no. If the city doesn’t offer the incentive, other cities like Peru or Geneseo will mostly likely get that business. “A lot of people argue it’s taking money out of the school districts or these other taxing bodies … Not really true at all because it’s all new money. It isn’t taking a revenue stream that’s currently going to the school district or somebody and taking money out of that.” The TIF funds are allocated over 23 years. Once the time period is up, the “new dollars” go into the other taxing bodies. Clawson said he plans to host additional meetings on local government. He suggested interested citizens bring ideas they want to hear more about so he can explain, teach, or discuss further any interests or concerns. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

derful for our student to represent Illinois,” Litherland said. Joy Jaraczewski, health educator with the Bureau/ Putnam County Health Department, said the purpose of the Tar Wars poster contest is to promote being

smoke free and to educate people about the dangers of tobacco use. Carson’s poster was simple and to the point, with just the right message to not get hooked on tobacco, she said. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Economic development Clawson said he was recently directed by the city council to begin “aggressively” enhancing Princeton’s economic development. While he spent most of his first year working on the administrative side of the city, he said his second year will focus on developing new ways to attract businesses. “The council thinks that’s important, and we are going to try and pursue that even more … A lot of us feel like the economy is starting to come back,” he said. “It’s not perfect by a longwise, but it is starting to show some positive signs we haven’t seen in awhile. We are encouraged by that.” The council will be discussing selling more land in the city’s Technology Park this month. Clawson said the good news will bring new jobs and enhance existing revenue stream.

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5 Obit Records Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • Record & Obit • 5

Obituaries Wayne Boehle

James Denholm

PRINCETON — Wayne C. Boehle, 77, of Princeton passed away Tuesday, April 30, 2013, at Heartland Health Care Center in Henry with his family by his side. Born July 10, 1935, in Amboy to Herbert and Iola (Conderman) Boehle, he married Betty Lashley Aug. 31, 1954, in United Methodist Church in Ohio, Ill. He graduated from Princeton High Wayne School in 1953. He farmed northeast of Boehle Dover for most of his life. He was a member of the Princeton Moose Lodge. He enjoyed traveling with his wife, especially seeing the American West, reading, hunting, welding, ironwork and restoring old tractors. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Betty Boehle of Princeton; two children, Kerry (Terry) Boehle and Susan (Rick) Fandel, both of Princeton; four grandchildren, Daniel (Justine) Boehle of Salt Lake City, Utah, Erin (Kevin) Tomman of Bloomington, Kimberly (David) Morse of Princeton and Whitney Fandel of Des Moines, Iowa; five great-grandchildren, Hallee, Payton, Faith, Jameson and Maxim; two brothers, Allen (Donna) Boehle and Russell (Aldina) Boehle; one sister, Sharon (Dave) Sivers; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and one sister in infancy. Services will be at 10 a.m. Friday at the Norberg Memorial Home, Princeton, with the Rev. Derek C. Boggs and the Rev. Mary Gay McKinney officiating. Burial will be in Prairie Repose Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 5 to 8 p.m. today, Thursday, at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to the Bureau County Food Pantry or the Bureau County Health and Wellness Clinic. Online condolences may be left at www.norbergfh. com.

TISKILWA — James Leonard “Hessie” Denholm of Tiskilwa passed away of natural causes Saturday, April 27, 2013, at Methodist Hospital in Peoria. He was born Feb. 11, 1919, to John James Denholm and Laura Anna Mathis Denholm at the Denholm Farm Homestead south of Andover, S.D. He attended elementary school in District 217-18 and graduated from Andover Public High School in 1938. Leonard enlisted in the James South Dakota National Guard from 1934 Denholm to 1939. On Aug. 25, 1939, he married Ellen Emma Brown in Sisseton, S.D. The wedding dance was held in Eden, S.D. This union of marriage continued for 27 years. He farmed from 1945 to 1981 in the Andover, Webster and Waubay area. Leonard served on the school boards in Scotland and Racine Townships, the Day County ASC committee, the Farmers Union Oil Co-op Board of Directors, was county chairman of the Day County Farmers Union for several years, secretary of the Third District Farmers Union for several years and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention in San Francisco, Calif., in 1984. In 1988 he was elected South Dakota Delegate to the Electoral College in Washington, D.C. Leonard served as a field representative for the South Dakota Farmers Union from 1949 until 1951. During that time he organized three Farmers Union Co-op Oil Stations, four Farmers Elevator Associations, three Federal Credit Unions and consulted for several other Farm Co-operatives in South Dakota. He managed the Day County Farmers Union Shipping Association in the early 1950s. In 1960 he was an organizational coordinator for a Farmers Co-op Milk Drying Plant at Waubay, S.D. He was well-known in his home community from engaging in custom farm work, sheep shearing and haystack moving. He married Audrey M. Duncan of Tiskilwa on Nov. 8, 1992. After his marriage to Audrey, they traveled the country visiting family and friends. He was a member of the Boyd’s Grove Methodist Church, working with the Boyd’s United Methodist Men’s Service, served on the voting polls until the age of 93, he volunteered with Hospice and visited many shut-ins throughout the area. He and Audrey had a winter home in Ocala, Fla., for a few years where they enjoyed the warmer weather. He loved to work and had the patience to fix anything he put his hands on. Working past his retirement, he continued farming in the area and at home. Leonard is survived by Audrey, his wife of 21 years, and eight children from his first marriage, two daughters and six sons, Twyla Denholm Barron of Sioux Falls, S.D., Ila Denholm Thompson of Webster, S.D., James W. Denholm of Rapid City, S.D., Jerry J. Denholm of Omaha, Neb., Arby C. Denholm of Granbury, Texas, Scott J. Denholm of Sioux Falls, S.D., Dan F. Denholm of Bellview, Neb., and Rocky L. Denholm of Sioux Falls, S.D. He has two surviving sisters, Marietta Morehouse of Austin, Texas, and Annetta Belle Dedrickson Smith of Arlington, Texas; one brother, Frank E. Denholm of Brookings, S.D.; more than 20 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; three stepdaughters, Sandy Stewart of Mesa, Ariz., Shirley Feurer of Lynnwood, Wash., and Joann Golden of Henry; three stepgrandaughters, Jennifer Tucker of Henry, Mariah Calkins of MountLake, Wash., and Tess Prange of Belleview, Neb.; and six stepgreatgrandchilden. Preceding him in death are three brothers, John Millard Denholm of Webster, S.D., Robert Lawrence Denholm of Denver, Colo., and Burdette Elroy Denholm of Webster, S.D.; one sister, Laura Jean Golden of El Monte, Calif.; and his mother and father. Leonard lost a son and twin daughters in infancy. A memorial service will be held at the Boyd’s Grove United Methodist Church in Bradford, at a later date. Burial and funeral services are being provided by Coester Funeral Home in Webster, S.D., at 2 p.m. Monday.

Illinois State Police announces special traffic patrols in May LASALLE – Illinois State Police District 17 Commander, Lt. Robert Atherton, has announced that officers will conduct Special Traffic Enforcement Patrols (STEP) between May 1 and May 31 in LaSalle County. District 17 troopers will concentrate on speeding, failure to use occupant restraints, and other driving offenses as part of their enforcement efforts. The STEP program involves a combination of increased enforcement and public information designed to raise public awareness and compliance to all traffic laws. Speeding is a contributing factor in 31 percent of all fatal crashes nationwide. In Illinois, speed-related crashes account for over 40 percent of all traffic fatalities. Safety Belt Enforcement Zones may also be used during the STEP program. Troopers will enforce the primary safety belt law to ensure drivers and all of their passengers are buckled up. Every hour someone dies in America simply because they are not wearing their safety belt. Statistics show that half of all people killed in traffic crashes are not properly buckled up. This project is funded by the Illinois Department of Transportation, Division of Traffic Safety.

Police reports Illinois State Police Accident

Scott Albrecht, 58, of Port Clinton, Ohio was driving a 2012 Freightliner tractor/trailer at 4:32 p.m. April 29 northbound on the Interstate 180 ramp to Interstate 80 eastbound, when he lost control of his vehicle. The truck rolled over onto the driver’s side. The trailer was loaded with plastic granules and also came to rest on the driver’s side, blocking the ramp for about five hours. Albrecht was taken to Perry Memorial Hospital, where he was treated and released for minor injuries. Albrecht was ticketed for improper lane usage. Serving Since 1907

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Robert Jones REIDSVILLE, N.C. — Robert Verle “Bob” Jones, 90, of Reidsville, N.C., formerly of Wyanet, passed away Friday, April 5, 2013, after a brief bout with cancer. He was born Nov. 11, 1922, in Wyanet to Verle and Cora Jones. He retired from Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line in 1985 after 35 years of Robert employment. Jones Surviving are his wife of 69 years, Betty (Streicher) Jones of Reidsville, N.C.; two sons, Gary R. (Marianne) Jones of Youngsville, N.C., and Greg L. (Carol) Jones of Reidsville, N.C.; two grandchildren, Melanie Jones Tudor and Derek L. (Jessica) Jones, both of Reidsville, N.C.; four great-grandchildren, Tyler and Grayson Tudor, and Conner and Caden Jones, all of Reidsville, N.C.; one sister-in-law, Norma Hamrick of Wyanet; one brother-in-law, Norma Plumley of New Berlin, Wis.; and five special nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; one sister, Betty Lou Plumley; and one brother and sisterin-law, James Donald and Marie Jones. Services were held April 8 at the First Presbyterian Church in Reidsville, N.C., with Dr. Doug McLeroy and the Rev. Ralph Clayton officiating. Burial was in Evergreen Memory Gardens, Reidsville, N.C. Visitation was held April 7 at the Wilkerson Funeral Home in Reidsville, N.C., and also at the home of Greg and Carol Jones in Reidsville, N.C. Memorials may be directed to Hospice of Rockingham County, P.O. Box 281, Wentworth, NC 27375.

Donna Bivins WYANET — Donna Lee Bivins, 80, of Wyanet passed away Monday, April 29, 2013, at Perry Memorial Hospital in Princeton. She was born June 8, 1932, in Wyanet to George and Hazel Conley. Donna married Paul “Gene” Bivins on Feb. 21, 1974, in the Bureau Township Community Church in Wyanet. Donna She graduated from Wyanet High Bivins School. She was a life-long homemaker and owned the Treasure Chest Store in Walnut. She volunteered at The Closet in Princeton for many years. She was an amazing mother and grandmother, was animal lover, a great cook and loved the outdoors. Donna is survived by her husband of 39 years, Paul “Gene” Bivins of Wyanet; four daughters, Paula Wooden of Wyanet, Laurie (Russell) Wood of Henderson, Ky., Becky (Steve) Andrews of Buda and Carla (Larry Black) Blades of Princeton; one son, Beck Weaver of Naples, Fla.; 11 grandchildren, Dave Turpen, David Lewis Jr., Leanne Eckberg, Amy Reuter, Holly Blades, Jesse Weaver, Michael Blades, Justin Carroll, and Lucas, Betsy and Eli Wood; 25 great-grandchildren; and one brother, Jake Conley. Also surviving is her dog, Rowdy. She was preceded in death by her parents; one brother, Cleo Conley; an infant daughter, Becky Weaver; and an infant grandson, Michael Perry. Services will be at noon today, Thursday, at the Norberg Memorial Home, Princeton, with Chaplain TerryAnn Dumyahn officiating. Burial will follow in the Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet. The family will receive friends from 10 a.m. to noon today, Thursday, at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to The Closet, Friends of Strays or Vitas Hospice. Online condolences may be left at www.norbergfh.com.

Obit deadlines

Deadlines for obituaries are 2 p.m. Monday for Tuesday’s paper, 2 p.m. Wednesday for Thursday’s paper and 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday’s paper.

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6 Perspective 6 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Perspective Bureau County

Republican

Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

Living in harmony Music and me go way back. I went to a Lutheran school as a child. Back then they apparently had the students audition to be members of the Cherub Choir, and one day I came home from school all upset. “They said I didn’t make it,” I told my folks. So my folks asked me to sing a hymn, which I did, and then Dad talked to someone, and pretty soon I was with the rest of my COMMENTARY classmates in the Cherub Choir. I’ve always loved music, and I’ve always loved to sing. Dad couldn’t wait until I graduated from eighth grade and was old enough to sing in the church choir. I guess my mom didn’t think too much of the idea of Dad joining the choir by himself, but it was all right for the two of us to attend. My 20s passed without me doing much more than singing along with the radio, but my 30s brought children and more regular church attendance. When our flock was still little, choir was too hard, especially since it would have left Dave with our four alone in the pew. (Although it would have been fine by me!) I sang with a couple of special groups, but I didn’t become a regular choir member until we moved to Spring Valley in 1993. We joined St. John’s in Peru, and I was in no hurry to join the choir. But October rolled around, and there was a special invitation for anyone to join, just for the Christmas cantata. I joined, planning to quit after Christmas, and I’ve been there ever since. I was happy with all the rest of the sopranos in the back row until the day our choir director asked me to sing a solo. Me! Did I tell you how I didn’t make the cut for Cherub Choir? But he insisted, so I trembled my way through a verse of “Beautiful Savior.” Beautiful it was not, but it gave me the confidence to start singing out. Not beautifully, perhaps, but generally tunefully. About 10 years ago we were without a choir director. Other than one class in music theory in college, I didn’t know anything about directing, and my piano playing is two fingers, four if there aren’t any sharps or flats. I offered to direct just long enough for the Christmas cantata, and that, as they say, was that. I’m still there, choosing music, and directing and singing along with all four parts. Now we are in the process of wrapping up our singing for the season. This will be my last season as director as time and events have called me to other opportunities. I’m afraid I’m making the most of my “farewell tour,” and we’re singing all of my favorites. May 19 will be our last Sunday, and I’ve saved my best for last. We have a wide range of talent in our choir – ranging from the sublime to the one-noters – but we all believe in the power of music. So I’ll be singing out, wherever, whenever, I’m called to sing. I’ll share my gift, as great or as small as it might be. I’ll make my joyful noise, every chance I get. And if you’re there and listening, I’ll be the one with the slightly flat high E. Putnam County Record/Tonica News Managing Editor Barb Kromphardt, who is also a staff writer for the Bureau County Republican, can be reached at bkromphardt@bcrnews.com.

Barb Kromphardt

Advice from a gym rat The weather has finally broken, and it is officially Spring. People are certainly feeling the season. I can tell just from the fresh faces I see at the gym. Let me explain. I have periods in my life where I become a real gym rat. You can’t tell by looking, but I usually work out four or five times a week. For the most part, I see the usual suspects hitting the weight room, track, classes or what I call the machine room. The gym is a habit for us. I may not know their names, yet I do know what they like to do, and that they will be there the next day like clockwork. There are two times a year at any gym in the country that a boatload of new enthusiasts show up to get in shape. The first period begins on Jan. 2 when guilty holiday indulgers and resolution-bound promisemakers decide it is time to get in shape. The second wave comes when spring is near and the desire to get those beach bodies inspires people to get off the couch and get into shape. Unfortunately, it never lasts. and after a week or so, it’s me and my fellow heavy-users again. I’ve tried to figure out why people

Derek Johnson COMMENTARY don’t stay, and I think I have found a couple of reasons. The first deterrent, I think, is comfort. Imagine someone who does not exercise in public often showing up at the gym and running into us heavy-users. They may not know what to do, where to do it, and are probably concerned on some level about looking silly in front of people who are methodically pushing through a workout. My advice is to toss that aside. No one is born knowing how to work out. More importantly, fitness is as trendy as fashion or pop music, so don’t worry about knowing how to work out immediately. I’ve been told and re-told since high school the “right way” to exercise, and I’ll be darned if it does not change six months later. It’s like the coffee is good for you; coffee is bad for you back and forth. So, as long as it is safe for yourself and everyone else, do what you want.

And, don’t be afraid to ask people questions because gym rats are way more than happy to give advice. The second thing I’ll say builds on the first. If you want to stick with working out, do things that you enjoy. If you like walking, then walk. If you like lifting weights, then lift weights. If you’re like me and you don’t care for the machines, then don’t use them. There are also some different facilities throughout the county to choose from. Admittedly, it can be hard to find out what those exercise routines are. Personally, I have found the program that works best for me in the latest fitness craze known as Crossfit (Google it). It wears me out, leaves me in pain, and I like doing it. Before that I was always lifting heavy weights in the latest and greatest way to do that and then moving onto 20 or so dreadful minutes on some machine. I wish I had thought about trying something different sooner because I would have never stopped exercising had I found something I liked this much. Derek Johnson of Dover can be reached at derekeus@hotmail.com.

Spring has sprung! Finally! Signs of life everywhere have begun to show! After what seemed to be an interminable winter, our day lilies and hostas have popped up, and our magnolia tree is in full bloom. While the green grass and pretty flowers are beautiful to see, the real excitement for a chef this time of year is the start of the food growing season. Fortunately I have developed relationships with several area farms who have greenhouses and can provide me with some vegetables year round, so it never feels like complete famine. But the variety of vegetables and fruits I will be able to source will increase dramatically as the weeks progress and summer gets into full swing. Particular favorites this time of year for me are the abundant fresh greens I have been getting, including arugula and claytonia. For those who do not know claytonia, it is also called miner’s lettuce and was discovered by the gold miners growing wild in California. It is a tender and sweet green that has an almost clover like shape and is fantastic as a garnish in soups as it does not wilt like spinach. And of course arugula is fantastic in both salads and in pesto. I also am extremely fond of asparagus and cannot get enough of the fresh specimen. I use it for soups, salads, roasted, grilled, shaved raw ... you name it. As the season progresses, not only will I continue sourcing from local farms, but I will be expanding my herb and vegetable garden here at the inn. I confess I am eliciting the help of a professional because I have a black thumb. Blame it on my

Monika Sudakov COMMENTARY roots in California where nobody has space to grow anything and living in Las Vegas, where nothing grows. Needless to say, once it is in the kitchen, I know what to do with it, but while it is in the ground, it eludes me. I guess we all have our strengths and weaknesses, right? But I digress. Because of the special help we are getting this year, we are planning on planting numerous heirloom varieties of tomatoes, several types of eggplant, a rainbow of colors of beets, cucumbers, peppers and a myriad of herbs including multiple types of basil, cilantro and parsley. If you’re thinking this sounds an awful lot like a Mediterranean salad of some kind, you’d be right. All the key ingredients you need for healthy Mediterranean cuisine. I can’t wait! Something that is important to me is that we grow our food organically and that we source our food from farms that do the same. I’m not so insistent on organic certification per se, but rather knowledge first-hand that food was grown as such. I think our food has enough chemicals in it without adding more. If that means my yield isn’t as high or that my fruit isn’t perfect, so be it. A farmer once told me, if there are no bugs on your food, you probably shouldn’t eat it either. That being said, I’d be a hypocrite if I didn’t say I have to supplement some of my food with convention-

ally grown items from the grocery store. But the less I have to do that, the better. Not only do I know where my food is coming from, I am supporting the local economy in doing so. Finally, this time of year is also when the farmers’ markets kick into full swing. What a great opportunity to get fresh produce and incorporate a leisurely walk in the fresh air. Farmers markets can actually be extremely affordable because most of the food you get there is grown and harvested in season. You aren’t trying to buy something that is only available in the winter in Costa Rica, but rather something that was grown locally that is available now in abundance. Take advantage of that. A second option for keeping cost down on organic produce is to join a CSA or community supported agriculture plan. There are many, and they all have slightly different ways of operating; but the basic gist of it is that you pay for a share of the crop that a farmer is growing. They do the work, and each week, you reap the benefits from the fresh fruits and vegetables that are available that week. An average share is about $20 a week and is more than enough produce to feed a family of four. You can locate CSAs as well as other local farms through websites like www.localharvest.org or feel free to contact me at the inn, and I’d be happy to connect you with the farms I use. Eat well! Monika Sudakov is the chef and innkeeper at the Chestnut Street Inn in Sheffield. She can be reached at monikaandjeff@chestnut-inn.com.

TO Letter THE Editor

Laffer curve no secret To the Editor, The Laffer curve may not be known to many Americans, but it is well known to economists. It is an economic theory that supports “supply side” economics. There are many opinions about the relationship between tax

rates and government revenue as described by the Laffer curve. But the fact is, decreasing taxes also decreases tax revenue, and increased economic activity does not make up the difference. The real test of this theory is how it actually performed in practice. It was the guiding

economic principle of the George W. Bush administration from 2000 to 2008. We know how that worked out – financial meltdown, massive unemployment, loss of trillions because of the housing crisis, and the worst economic conditions of my lifetime (66 years). Equally troubling is the eco-

nomic inequality which has increased dramatically during this period, too. There are many reasons for this debacle not the least of which is the Bush tax cuts which were justified by using the Laffer curve. Let’s not repeat the same mistake again. Barry J. Mayworm Princeton


7 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Life&Arts

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 7 Safety Town — The Princeton Junior Woman’s Club is now accepting registrations for this year’s Safety Town. See Page 7.

Gallery to feature pottery with ‘pop’ PRINCETON — Karen Russell, a ceramicist who lives in Barrington, will be the Prairie Arts Council’s featured guest artist during the month of May. The first Friday night opening reception for Russell will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Prairie Arts Center, 24 Park Ave. East in Princeton. Russell creates hand-built pottery, each piece containing some kind of botanical embellishment and most always a ladybug for “a pop of red.” Her creations are both beautiful and functional. Her plates, platters, bowls and ever-popular berry bowls are each decorated with hand-built, three-dimensional botanical embellishments. From flowers to fruit, leaves and pinecones, she carefully

fashions these embellishments in a realistic way and then attaches them to her pieces. Eleven years ago, Russell signed up for a pottery class and took another and another and “pretty soon ended up with two kilns in my basement,” Russell said. Russell has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and a master’s in education. She has taken countless classes in pottery and studied botanical drawing with an instructor from the Art Institute of Chicago. She continues to sell her works at art shows across Illinois and Wisconsin. She has traveled as far as Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Delaware with her pottery. Last summer she was juried into the Chicago Botanic Garden Art Festival. Sev-

eral stores in the Chicago area have carried her pieces. Her pottery can also be seen at Sweeties Caramel Creations in Princeton who has carried Russell’s pottery for several years. Russell’s exhibit at the Prairie Arts Center will be open through May 18. Open hours at the Arts Center are Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon, and Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. All of her pieces are for sale and can be purchased and taken on the same day. The opening reception on Friday is open to the public. All art exhibits, as well as the opening artist receptions at the Prairie Arts Center, are open and free to the public. For more information, call 815-875-2787.

Hall reschedules art festival for Monday SPRING VALLEY — Hall High School has rescheduled the Art Festival for Monday. The art exhibit will be open to the public in the gym from 6 to 7 p.m. The art work of approximately 80 students will be divided into 24 categories. While the art work is being judged, students will attend workshops

where they will use their creative talents to make a project. Dinner will be served to participants in the cafeteria. At 6 p.m., everyone will return to the gym for the awards ceremony and listen to the judges’ critiques of the blue ribbon winners and the Best of Show. Ribbons will be given to the first four places, and

the blue ribbon winners will also receive a conference medal. The judges for this year’s festival will be Dana Collins and Linda Ribar. The various workshops that students will be attending, and the presenters, include tie-dyeing T-shirts, Tina Frasco and Cheri Linnig; dichro-

ic pendants, Carrie Gonzalez; pencil/charcoal drawing, Hugo Heredia; and glass etching, Mary Michael. The art festival is being made possible through a grant provided by the Hall Education Foundation. The organizer for this event is Karen Klopcic, art teacher at Hall High School.

PJWC announces Safety Town registration PRINCETON — The Princeton Junior Woman’s Club is now accepting registrations for its annual Safety Town program, set for June 17-28 at St. Louis School in Princeton. Safety Town is a twoweek program that runs each weekday from 9 to 11 a.m. The program is open to children who are residents of Bureau County and are or will be 4 or 5 years old by June 1.

The registration fee is $40 per child and includes 28 hours of fun and learning, two local field trips, guest educators and daily snacks. For more information, visit the PJWC Facebook page. A registration form is available at tinyurl.com/ cc32s3j. Mailed registrations must be postmarked by Monday. In-person registration will be from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Prouty Building in

Princeton. PJWC will also be accepting volunteer applications from high school students who wish to earn volunteer hours. Volunteer applications can be downloaded from tinyurl.com/bl7rb2w. Volunteers may also register

in person at the Prouty Building on registration night. Registrations are processed on a first-come basis. Space is limited. For more information, call Meagan Johnson at 815-878-7824 or Pamela Wingate at 734-658-5433.

and performances. Interested musicians may join the band by coming to the first rehearsal. Music may be taken home to practice, but you agree to make sure the folder is returned to all rehearsals and concerts, even if you cannot attend. Members are asked to bring their own chair and music stand to concerts. Chairs and stands are provided for rehearsals. There will be six concerts this season: June 2, 16 and 30, and July 14, 21 and 28. All concerts are on Sunday evenings at Soldiers and Sailors Park in Princeton beginning at 6 p.m.

••• Items for the Life & Arts section can be emailed to news@bcrnews.com.

Community Notes Open house Meeting planned WYANET — The Wyanet Historical Society has changed its meeting date to the first Tuesday of the month. The group will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Historical Hall. Members are encouraged to attend as the group will make plans for the ice cream social on Memorial Day.

Fundraiser postponed PRINCETON — The First Congregational Church of Bureau Relay for Life team’s yard sale, originally scheduled for Thursday and Friday, has been moved to May 9 and 10. Proceeds will benefit the American Cancer Society.

Cookout WYANET — The Wyanet Community Club will host a cookout from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Wyanet Locker. The menu will include rib eyes, butterfly chops, pork burgers, brats, hot dogs, chips and pop.

PRINCETON — Princeton Elementary School District 115 will hold an open house to honor its retirees from 4 to 6 p.m. May 28 in the Logan west cafeteria. The public is invited to attend.

Legion meeting SPRING VALLEY — The Dominic Oberto American Legion Post will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. May 9 at the Knights of Columbus rooms, 307 W. St. Paul St.

IVCC production OGLESBY — Illinois Valley Community College’s theatre and music departments will present “Broadway and Beyond!” at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday in St. Bede Academy’s Little Theatre. Guests will enjoy a Broadwaythemed night with the Choir, Show Choir and Improv groups performing. For information, visit www.ivcc.edu/theatre. Admission is $5; IVCC students are free with their college ID.

Golden Eagles WYANET — The Wyanet Golden Eagles will meet at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday at Main Street BBQ, Wyanet. Lunch is “pay for your own” and seniors 50 and over are welcome to attend. For information, call Louise at 815-699-7768.

GED graduation OGLESBY — Illinois Valley Community College’s Adult Education program will honor its General Educational Development (GED) graduates at 7 p.m. May 20 in the IVCC Gymnasium.

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Community Band will begin its ninth season PRINCETON — The Princeton Community Band will begin its ninth season with a first rehearsal from 7 to 8:30 p.m. May 9 in the Logan Junior High School band room. Rehearsals will continue each Thursday through July 25. PCB is open to anyone in Princeton and surrounding areas who is high school age (including entering freshmen fall 2013) through adult. Members must have instrumental music experience and should have their own instruments. High school students can receive community service hours for rehearsals

Midday Connection — The next meeting of Midday Connection is May 14 in Oglesby. See Page 8.

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8 Life 8 • Life & Arts • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Midday Connection meeting scheduled for May 14 OGLESBY — The Illinois Valley Midday Connection, a nondenominational Christian Women’s Group, invites all women from the Illinois Valley area to come to its monthly luncheon and program at 11:30 a.m. May 14 at Deer Park Country Club, 100 Deer Park Lane, Oglesby, (south off of Route 71, about 1/2 mile west of Route 178). The cost is $15 inclusive, paid at the door, for the lunch and pro-

gram. The theme for the May luncheon is “New Fashion! New Attitude! New You!” Enjoy “Fashions By Cato’s,” worn by local models who will be showing all the latest trends and fashions as the special feature of the day. “You Can Plan for the Future, But You Can’t Predict it” is the theme of the talk presented by author, speaker and teacher, Viki Scherer. Reservations and or cancellations must be

made by Tuesday. Free child care is available if a reservation is made by the deadline. Call Vickie at 815-223-4687 or Anita at 815-2232852. Email reservations can be sent to scolari12@comcast. net. The group will have an Illinois Valley Prayer Connection at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the home of Arlene Brandner, 273 2519 Road, Peru. All women are invited to come for prayer and fellowship.

Religion briefs Christian Book Club PRINCETON — First Lutheran Church of Princeton Christian Book Club meets the second Tuesday of every month from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the church library at 116 N. Pleasant St. The selection for May is “Grace” by Richard Paul Evans. Call the church office at 815-875-1685 with any questions. All are invited to attend.

kids from age 4 through the eighth grade are invited. To enroll, call Sherrie at 815-646-4156.

CWU gathering PRINCETON — To help celebrate May Friendship Celebration, area women are invited to join Church Women United at 9:30 a.m. Friday at the First Methodist Church in Princeton. The theme is “Swinging Wide the Doors of Hospitality.”

Vacation Bible school TISKILWA — Enrollment has begun for the Tiskilwa Community Vacation Bible School which will be from 6 to 8 p.m. June 17-20. All Tiskilwa churches are involved, and

Learning

Stage

LS

Polka mass LASALLE — The Polka Massters will perform a polka mass at 4 p.m. Saturday at St. Hyacinth Church in LaSalle.

Learning

Stage presents:

Camp 56

Performing Arts Camp June 17 - 28

WHO: Ages 8-18 WHEN: 9am-3pm M-F

Catholic theologian speaks about the crisis in Western culture PERU — The parishes of St. Joseph, St. Mary and St. Valentine in Peru recently hosted a series of presentations by Kenneth Howell, a well known Catholic theologian and speaker. Howell discussed the current crisis in western culture, whereby people no longer think it’s possible to judge whether something is right or wrong. As a remedy, Howell suggested that Catholic schools rededicate themselves to the study of philosophic realism and logical reasoning and that the beauty of the Catholic Church be shared with others. He also offered explanations in defense of the Catholic Church’s position against the redefinition of marriage based on natu-

Kenneth Howell ral moral law; namely, that there is a natural intrinsic meaning of marriage which cannot be altered by civil law or by judicial decree. Finally, Howell described his own journey from being a Presbyterian minister to his reception into the Catholic Church. The presentations were

followed by questions and answer sessions. More than 120 persons were in attendance. A free-will offering was collected. The event was sponsored by the Peru Catholic parishes in response to the recommendations of the GIFT planning program of the Diocese of Peoria.

Methodist Church’s Parent’s Day Out accepting registrations PRINCETON — Parent’s Day Out, located in the First United Methodist Church at 316 S. Church St., is accepting registrations for the 2013-14 school year. Beginning its third year, Parent’s Day Out is a quality, affordable and flexible childcare program that gives parents a much deserved break and offers structured activities for children including; circle time, free play, crafts, music,

snacks and Bible stories. Parent’s Day Out is for children ages 2 to 4 years old and applications are taken throughout the school year. The program runs from September through May. Classes are on Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Classes fill quickly. Register to reserve your spot today. To register and for more information, contact the First United Methodist Church at 815-872-2821.

Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation Presents

“A Toast To Health” Wine Tasting Evening Friday, May 10th 6:00 - 9:00 pm A Hundred Acres Orchard and Market Princeton, IL Wine Tasting and Hors d’oeuvres Catering by Mark Allen’s Music provided by

“River City String Trio” Tickets are $50 per person

For more information or to purchase tickets contact Brenda Streit, Foundation President at 815-876-4481.

• Auditioning, improv, make-up, wardrobe, stage design, lighting & sound, musical theater • All campers will be performing in “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” • $80 non-refundable fee • Register: Festival 56 box office in Princeton from 10am-12pm on May 4, or by emailing: illinoisalliance4artsed@gmail.com (to receive all paperwork, and to complete registration by mail). • For more information, call Amber Harper at (815) 878-0386 or (815) 379-2031

Raffle Item: 14 karat white gold black and white diamond round cluster pendant Donated by Bruce Jewelers Raffle tickets are $5 per ticket.

Proceeds to benefit Perry Memorial Hospital.


9 Sports Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 9 Wally World — Lee Wahlgren’s outdoor column is on page 10 in today’s BCR.

Baseball: Hall 7, PC 4

Fanning, Hall win key TCC showdown By Derek Johnson sports@bcrnews.com

Brett Fanning Hall winning pitcher slugged two home runs

SPRING VALLEY — Hall Red Devil baseball made a statement in Tri-County Conference play Monday evening defeating Putnam County 7-4 at Kirby Park. PC did manage to rally in the end, but it was not enough to overcome the

seven-run advantage built with two home runs and three RBIs off the bat of starting pitcher Brett Fanning. “He showed up,” Hall coach Tom Keegan said of his senior ace, Fanning, who struck out eight batters in six innings. “That’s his last crack at Putnam County. He’s played them a couple

of times in basketball with the ball there in his hands at the end and they didn’t win the game. Hopefully, this makes up for some of that a little bit because he was clutch for us.” Hall improved to 4-0 in the Tri-County Conference and 13-4 overall. In the first inning, PC (148, 3-1) did manage to get

Diamond roundup Tigresses spook Lady Ghosts

two base runners off a walk of outfielder Jack Egan and a hit from short stop Xavier Warren. But, the runners were stranded. In the bottom of the first, Hall leadoff man Taggert Venegas was hit by a pitch, and two batters later Fanning hit a home run to send them both across the plate. “Brett got us off to a good

start there, we needed that … just maybe a little breath of fresh air,” Keegan said. “But, the good thing for us is that we were able to withstand some innings. In the fourth inning we were able to extend (the lead) … as it turns out we needed all of the them. We knew

See Hall Page 11

Baseball: St. Bede 13, Mendota 1

Cousin power

Smith, Bima carry Bruins past Trojans three runs scored, and a two-run home run to straight-away center field MENDOTA – St. Bede in the top of the third pitcher Damon Smith inning. virtually domiSmith, Bima’s nated the Mendota cousin, pitched a Trojans’ batting complete game gem, order Monday afteryielding only one noon, as his Bruins unearned run on scored runs in five five hits – all singles of the game’s seven – walking one and innings en route to striking out nine Damin a convincing 13-1 Trojans among his Smith victory. 88 pitches thrown. St. Bede’s lineup Senior right-hander “Damon did a nice pitched five-hit recorded 13 hits, complete game job,” SBA coach including five douJohn Bellino said. bles and a home “We got a lot of hits, run, and coaxed 11 scored enough runs, walks, as the Bruins and Damon shut (13-1) plated 13 and them down.” stranded another 12 Smith retired runners on base. the first 11 batters “They are, by he faced until Jon far, the best hitting Gehm walked on a Logan team we’ve seen all 3-1 count with two Bima year,” said Menouts in the bottom Went 4-for-5 dota coach Aaron with two doubles, a of the fourth frame. Sester of St. Bede’s homer and 4 RBIs Trae Blumhorst folvarsity baseball lowed Gehm with an squad. “Their kid, Smith, infield single, Mendota’s was dealing today. first hit recorded, but Hat’s off to him. He’s both runners were left on probably one of the bet- base. ter pitchers we’ve seen By that time, the Bruins this year ... mixed up his already led, 7-0. pitches well. St. Bede struck for “And, man, they could three runs in the second. rake. Anything we threw Bima doubled, Brandon over the plate, any mis- Pietrowski singled, and take we made, pitching- Steven Ebner walked in wise, they took advantage consecutive plate appearof, and ripped the ball.” ances. All three eventuLogan Bima was the ally scored. hottest-hitting Bruin on The Bruins matched this day, going 4-5 with a that number of runs one pair of doubles, four RBIs, See Bruins Page 11

By Bill Schwabenland sports@bcrnews.com

By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

The number zero had been stuck on the Princeton Tigresses for three games in a row. Zero as in no runs scored against L-P, St. Bede and Streator. On Tuesday, the Tigresses broke out in a big way, banging out 13 hits in a 10-0 win over IVC in NCIC softball play at Little Siberia Field. The Tigresses scored three runs in the third, six in the fourth and evoked the 10-run rule in the sixth on a bloop hit by Kat Pranka off the shortstop’s glove. “We’ve been shutout three games in a row, so that was big,” PHS coach Bob James said. “The L-P and St. Bede games we faced really good pitching and had a couple kids who hit. The Streator game Monday was had. We didn’t hit the ball well. Our approach was bad, everything thing was bad. “(Tuesday) was refreshing. We hit the ball hard from the get-go. Hopefully we got he ball rolling.” Pranka led the PHS hit parade with a 3-for-3 day at the plate, driving in four runs with a double. Heidi James (double, 2 RBIs), Makenzey Wilson

See Roundup Page 10

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

Trojans win war Princeton’s Zach Hicks makes his return at No. 2 singles Tuesday vs. Mendota. He won his battle, but the Trojans won the war 7-2

Play for Danny: a cause to believe in I’ve met a lot of great kids covering sports in Bureau County the past 26 and a half years and become friends with many of them, now, who are all grown up. One of the first kids I met when I arrived in Bureau County was Danny Gelsomino of Princeton. Danny was a kid who loved his sports. He was a steady guard for Tony Lavorato’s last

Kevin Hieronymus HIERONYMUS’ HYPOTHESIS

Tiger basketball team in 198687 and a solid player for the PHS baseball team. I hope he doesn’t remember one of the first stories I wrote about him. We played a lot of good H-O-

R-S-E games at his driveway hoop on Miles Court, back when I still had a little game. I think he’s still looking for some revenge. Danny, the son of Vince and Jeanie Gelsomino of Princeton, is a father of two beautiful kids, Kasey 13, and Nathan, 10. They look like real chips off the block, sharing a love for their dad’s sports teams from the pictures I’ve seen. Well, Danny could use our

help. He was diagnosed with incurable Stage 4 Adenocarcinoma (lung cancer) and bone and brain metastasis on Feb. 6, 2012. He is among 4 percent of non-smokers who have lung cancer. He had more tests done Monday and the family is praying the cancer has not spread. Nathan Gelsomino’s selfportrait he drew in school this year displays a shirt with two words: “I believe.” That’s his

way of saying he believes his dad will beat cancer. His friends back home are ready to help him with his battle and to defray some of his medical expenses. The 1987 PHS graduate has been selected as this year’s recipient of the Jay Braida Golf Open, to be held July 13 at Hunter’s Ridge. Sign-ups are coming in good, but there is still a need for more golfers,

See Hieronymus Page 11


10 Sports 10 • Sports • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County still wet, but budding beautifully Lee Wahlgren

As I drove around Princeton Tuesday, I was totally amazed by all the flowOUTDOOR COLUMNIST ering trees and bushes that I saw. Just a week ago when it was they would be a meal fit much cooler and rainy, for a king. Such great there was hardly a bud memories. on any tree. Yellow, • Coming up a week white and purple can from this Saturday will now be seen on almost be the ever popular every block. I am a little Bureau Valley Ducks sad because I know they Unlimited crawfish boil. won’t be around very Several of the committee long, but we all can enjoy members will be out at them this week. the fairgrounds early so May is here and we can get all those little Bureau County seems to critters boiled up in time. be really behind, due to The actual time for unusual spring weather. this event will be noon We certainly hope to to 4:30 p.m. at the fairdry out a little bit so our grounds. Your $20 ticket farmer friends can get will get you an all-youinto the fields. I don’t can-eat meal plus bevkeep track, but it seems erages. The important that we haven’t been this thing is that you call in far behind heading intro your reservations, as May in many years. there will be no tickets With a little more sun sold at the door. You and some higher temneed to call Bret Brown peratures, we might be at 815-303-0884 to able to find some morels. reserve your ticket. Without a doubt, they There will be a live aucare one of my favorite tion, a silent auction and outdoor delicacies. My a tier raffle with many dad taught me how to great outdoor items. search for them when Please remember to call I was little, but I never Bret for your tickets. became as good a hunter • Finally, we are makas he was. Then, Mom See Wally Page 11 would fry them up so

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Roundup

Softball: Putnam County 13, Hall, 6

From Page 9

Lady Panthers bust loose vs. Hall By Derek Johnson sports@bcrnews.com

SPRING VALLEY — Tuesday’s conference match-up between Hall and Putnam County turned nasty late for the Lady Red Devils softball team. Going into the fifth, Putnam County was up a slim 1-0 before their bats exploded to add six runs in each of the fifth and sixth innings to win 13-1. Hall’s only run came in the bottom of the sixth when Rebecca Herrmann went yard. “I don’t like that one to nothing stuff,” PC coach Chris Walker said. “When we got into the game we hit the ball well. That’s the thing. The St. Bede game, I have to thank them because that’s when we started hitting the ball. I mean we are hitting the ball hard now. We’ve been averaging about 11 hits the last four games. That’s a good thing.” In the top of the fifth, things got out of control for Hall. PC’s

See Softball Page 11

(double, RBI) and Steph Farrell all added two hits. Freshman southpaw Madison Menzel shut out the Grey Ghosts on two hits, fanning six. The Tigresses evened their record to 2-2 in the NCIC for second place behind St. Bede, and 7-8 overall. PHS will host its Senior Night Friday before its game with LaMoille/Ohio. Riverdale 5, Bureau Valley 4: The Rams pushed a run across in the top of the seventh at Manlius Monday on a leadoff double and an error for the Three Rivers Conference win. The Storm struck first on pitcher Irini Petros’ two-run single in the first inning to take a 2-1 lead. Petros added a RBI hit in the third to regain a 4-3 Storm edge. Riverdale tied the game at four with a run in the fifth. In the end, Riverdale’s Sadie Mosher got the best of the Storm, striking out 15 batters while scattering five hits and a walk for the win. Petros fanned 10 in the loss. Erie/Prophetstown 4, Bureau Valley 1: Emily Phillips had two hits in Tuesday’s Three Rivers Conference loss on the road. Savannah Mettler

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

PHS freshman Madison Menzel makes her pitch against IVC Tuesday. PHS won 10-0. She scattered two hits and struck out six for the win. twirled a four-hitter and drove in a run to lead the Panthers. Mettler struck out four and walked one in the complete game. Princeton 11, Streator 8 (F/S): Sarah Ray was the winning pitcher at Streator Monday with relief help from Maddie Cain, who helped the cause with a RBI double. The Tigresses lost Tuesday at Chillicothe. Junior college: IVCC advanced to the Region IV final this weekend after taking two out of three games over Blackhawk on Tuesday. IVCC posted 1-0 and 8-7 wins around a 5-3 setback.

F/S baseball Princeton 7, IVC 5:

Isaac Salazar knocked in three runs with two hits and Levi Bates added two hits with an RBI as the Kittens topped the Grey Ghosts Monday. Winning pitcher Zach Friel struck out four in five innings. Princeton 28, Manual 0: The Kittens scored runs by the dozen Tuesday at Prather Field. Chaz Williams had a double with two RBIs and two runs scored. Winning pitcher Luke Hoffman tossed three scoreless innings with five strikeouts. Bureau Valley 5, E/P 4 (5): Winning pitcher Sean Shepard brought in the winning run with a walk-off walk in the bottom of the 10th. The BV varsity lost to E/P on the road 6-1.

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11 Sports Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Wally

From Page 10

ing plans for our annual PHS Fish and Game Banquet. It will be held in the PHS cafeteria on May 14. Members and their parents will meet and enjoy some of their outdoor harvests. There will be a small raffle and the presentation of the Mike Smallwood Outdoorsman Award. We will show a ‘70s video

Bruins

From Page 9

inning later. That’s when Bima launched his two-run homer to center, and Pietrowski, who had doubled, scored on Ebner’s sac fly to right field. Austin Schwab singled home Brad Groleau, who walked and moved to second on a wild pitch, in the top of the fourth. Freshman Garet Zinke took the pitching loss for Mendota (5-12), allowing seven runs on 10 hits over five innings, walking four and striking out two.

Softball

From Page 10 Lauren Colby hit a leadoff double. After the next batter struck out, PC’s Monica Monroe singled and drove in Colby. Monroe was able to score on a catching error at short when Annie Miller hit a grounder. Then Stephanie Wilson drove in Miller. Only a fly out by Allison Voss interrupted the volley. By the time PC had made it through the entire order they were up 7-1. Hall, who had three errors in the inning, went three up and three down on offense. “(They had) a lead-off double, then an out and they got an extra run, then we got two outs and

Hieronymus

during the evening. We are making the final preparations for our annual Canada fishing trip. I still have a couple of students that could use a little help, if you so choose. There will be about 42 students, parents and friends making the trip. Enjoy your outdoors! Lee Wahlgren is the BCR Outdoor Columnist. Contact at him pdub52@gmail.com

“We had a freshman on the mound today who’s a really good thrower, and he’s learning to be a pitcher,” Sester said. “Today was a big learning curve for him. Against good teams like this, if you keep the ball up, they’re going to hit you. But he’s enjoying his time on varsity, and he’s learned lots of lessons.” St. Bede’s seventh inning featured a tworun double to deep right field by Bima, followed by another RBI double to deep left field by Pietrowski. Groleau, Bima and Pietrowski all scored three runs apiece. they scored five runs with two outs. Then we had an error … and they scored five runs else it would have been a two to nothing game going into the sixth inning,” Hall coach Pete Kasperski said. Hall relieved Stocking and brought in Heide Neilson in the top of the sixth, but PC matched its fifth inning play going through the entire order and adding six more runs. Stocking then returned to close the inning out. Rebecca Herrmann hit a home run in the bottom of the inning with one out, but that would be Hall’s only score in the game. The game was ended after the sixth due to the 10-run rule. Stephanie Stocking was the losing pitcher while

From Page 9 You can also call Michael Robinson at 815-878-1861 The Braida Open, now in its fourth year, is held by the friends of Jay Braida, who passed away June 19, 2005 after a battle with cancer. Jay was an overall great guy. • Angel in the outfield: I was heartbroken to hear the loss endured by Bureau Valley softball coach Brian Humphrey, whose newborn daughter Parker passed away April 19. His family’s loss is shared by the entire Bureau Valley community and many others. The Storm coach can take comfort he will always have his little angel in the outfield no matter where he plays. • Get well wishes: Every athlete has had a coach influence them along the way coming through the ranks. One coach who surely effected the players in the Princeton football program in the ‘70s and ‘80s was assistant coach Steve

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • Sports • 11

Tennis/golf roundup

Mendota spoils PHS Senior Night By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

Princeton High School took time to honors its five senior tennis players prior to Tuesday’s meet with Mendota. The visiting Trojans, however, had plans of their own, capturing a 7-2 victory. The Tigers enjoyed success at the top with No. 1 Garrett Kostello (6-2, 6-4) and No. 2 Zach Hicks (6-3, 6-3) scoring singles victories. Mendota claimed the rest of the matches including a 7-6, 7-5 win over Kostello and Hicks at No. 1 doubles. Nate Duffy had an 8-4 win at No. 2 singles for the Princeton F/S. Seniors honored included Nick Toth, Miguel Austin, Andrew Birkey, Jonathan Kaler and Kostello. Geneseo 4, Princeton 1: Brady Frank and Ian Nichols posted the Tigers’ lone win, rallying for an 0-6 ,6-4, 10-14 decision at No. 2 doubles. Geneseo won the F/S meet 5-0. Junior college: IVCC ace Lady Panther Shelby Yepsen chalked up another fine performance. Both teams began the game by loading the bases in the first and then stranding the runners. After that, not much happened before the fifth. Hall went three up and three down in the second, while PC stranded two more base runners. PC’s Monica Monroe got a base hit in the top of the third and was subsequently driven in by Annie Miller. Hall’s Brenna Faletti slapped a thundering double in the bottom of the third but was stranded. In the fourth, Hall’s defense took care of business getting three quick out, but were also unable to score.

Kiser, the mastermind of the Tiger Style Running Wild theme song for the 1989 state runners-up. He is recovering from an April 4 accident and doing much better. If all goes well, he will return home soon. Get well soon, Ki. I’d also like to pass best wishes on to my pal Don Smith, one of my favorite Cub fan friends, who suffered a heart attack while doing one of his many volunteer community projects. Get well, Smittie. The Cubbies need you up and at them. • Looking to help out a young athlete chase his dreams, Garrett Duffin might be your answer. The PHS sophomore has aspirations to play Division I basketball and will play AAU ball this summer to take a step in that direction. It can be a costly adventure and he could use some financial help if anyone would like to help. Give him a call at 815-872-0689. Kevin Hieronymus is the BCR sports editor. Contact him at khieronymus@ bcrnews.com

Photo contributed

Princeton’s five senior tennis players were presented a cake in their honor for Senior Night Tuesday. PHS seniors are with Jonathan Kaler (from left), Garrett Kostello, Nick Toth, Andrew Birkey and Miguel Austin. finished fourth in the Region IV Tournament. Princeton’s Scott Blessman took part in a second-place finish at No. 3 doubles.

Golf Junior college: The IVCC golf team finished

Hall

third in the second conference tournament of the spring season. Host Carl Sandburg College won the tournament with a score of 308. Black Hawk College was second with 310. IVCC was third with 338. Sauk Valley, fourth with 342.

From Page 9

they were never going stop fighting. They are too good of a team and we respect them. They weren’t going to make it easy, that’s for sure.” PC stranded two again in the top of the fourth inning, but Hall came in and exploded in the bottom. Second basemen Zach Urbanski led off with a double. Matt Boucher advanced the runner to third with a sacrifice bunt and then first baseman Trevor Urbanski hit a sacrifice fly to score the runner. It was 3-0 Hall when Venegas and third basemen Danny Nolasco singled

Scoreboard At Mendota

Baseball

St. Bede         033  102 4  - 13 13 2 Mendota         000  00 1 x  - 1  5 4 St. Bede (13-1): Lucas cf 4-0-1-0, Postula lf 4-0-0-0, Brady cr/lf 0-2-0-0, Groleau rf 3-3-1-0, Schwab 2b 4-2-2-1, Bima 1b 5-3-4-4, Pietrowski ss 4-3-3-1, Ebner c 3-0-1-2, Smith p 4-0-1-2, Bellino 3b 3-0-0-0. Totals: 34-13-13-11. HR: Bima. 2B: Bima 2, Pietrowski 2, Schwab. WP: G. Zinke (7 ip, 1 r, 0 er, 5 h, 1 bb, 9 k). LOB: 12. At Spring Valley

Putnam County 000 000 4 - 5 Hall 200 500 x - 7 WP: Fanning (6ip, 4h, 3r, 0er, 11k, 0bb). RP: Schmitt (1ip, 1h, 1r, 1er, 1k, 1bb). LP: Fay (3.6, 9h, 7r, er, 2k, 2bb), Ballerini (2.1ip, 1h, 0r 2k,1bb). PC hitting: Fay (0-4, r), Egan (r), Warren (0-3, r), Ballerini (0-4), Carboni (0-4), Pletsch (2-4, 2b, 3rbi), Pettit (2-4), Kasperski (0-2), Copeland (0-2), Krieser (1-1, r). Hitting for Hall: Venegas (2-4, 2r), Nolasco (0-4, r), Fanning (2-4, 2hr, 5rbi), Moreno (3-4, 2 2b, r), Villareal (2-3, rbi), Trevier (0-3), Z. Urbanski (1-2, 2b, r), Boucher (0-1), T. Urbanski (0-2, rbi). LOB: PC 9, Hall 8. At Prophetstown

Bureau Valley 000 001 0 - 1 3 2 E-P 000 501 x - 6 7 1 WP: Jepson. LP: Wagenknecht. At Manlius

Softball

Riverdale 102 010 1 - 5 Bureau Valley 202 000 0 - 4 WP: Mosher (7ip, 5h, 4r, 3er, 15k, 15k, 1bb). LP: Petros (7ip, 6h, 5r, 3er, 10k, 4bb). BV hitting: E. Phillips 2b (3-4, r), DeWaele 3b

The tournament was held at Lake Bracken Country Club in Galesburg. Individual scoring for IVCC was Tanner Galyen 83, Tyler Dobrich 84, Logan Koepke 85, Alex Harrison 86, Jake Stiel 90, and Kyle Chase 90.

back-to-back. Hitting after Nolasco was Fanning who cranked another one out of the park to put the lead at six. Hall catcher Blake Moreno added another single and eventually made it home in on a Miguel Villareal RBI. That is when PC’s Harold Fay was relieved by Ballerini. PC got out of the inning shortly after. The score stayed same until the top of the seventh inning when Fanning was relieved by Austin Schmitt. PC managed to get four singles and their first run before clean-up hitter Austin Pletsch hit a three-run double to put them within three runs. Schmitt retired Justin Pettit on a groundout to end the rally.

(0-2, 2r), A. Phillips c (0-3, r), Petros p (2-3, 3rbi), Scott lf (0-3), Dar. Kepner ss (0-3), Brummel 1b (0-3), Reuter rf (0-2), DeVenney (0-1), Dana Kepner cf (0-2), Weborg (0-1). Total: 27-4-5-3. SB: E. Phillips. At Princeton

Princeton 10, IVC 0. WP: Menzel (6ip, 2h, 0r, 6k, 0bb). PHS batting: James (2-3, 2r, 2rbi), Hughes (1-1, r, rbi), Jaques (1-2, 3r), Pranka (3-3, 2r, 2b, 4rbi), Wilson (2-3, 2rbi), Bates (2-2, r, 2b, rbi), Bauer (0-3), Hall (0-1), Farrell (2-2, r), Menzel (0-2, sac), Holmbeck (0-0). At Princeton

Streator 6, Princeton 0. LP: Menzel. F/S: Princeton 11, Streator 8. WP: Ray. At Prophetstown

Bureau Valley 000 100 0 - 1 4 E-P 002 200 x - 4 7 WP: Mettler (7ip, 4h, 1er, 4k, 1bb). LP: Petros (7ip, 7h, 4r, 2er, 1k, 4bb). BV hitting: Emily Phillips (2 hits).

Girls track

Brockman Invitte at Kewanee

Team scores: 1. Erie-Prophetstown 163; 2. Annawan 102; 3. Kewanee 92.5; 4. Riverdale 79; 5. Stark County 52; 6. Bureau Valley 49.5; 7. St. Bede 19. 100 - 1. Cobert (EP) 13.19; 3. Hoffert (BV) 13.49; 200 - 1. Rus (EP) 26.62; 2. Hoffert (BV) 27.44; 400 - 1. Roth (SC) 1:02.85; 800 – 1. Draminski (Ann) 2:32.49; 1600 – 1. R Weidner (BV) 5:33.57; 3,200 – 1. Woodworth (EP) 13:26.82; 3. Sickley (SB) 14:11.83; 100 hurdles – 1. Fisher (Ann) 16.71; 300 hurdles – 1. Oltman (Riv) 47.20; 400 relay – 1. E/P 50.49; 800 relay – 1. E/P 1:47.54; ; 3. BV (Haley DeVoss, Katelin Johnson, Lauren Peterson, Hoffert) 1:52.36; 1,600 relay – 1. E/P (C. Cobert, Pa. Rus, Co. Reiley, R. Cobert)

4:07.05; 3,200 relay – 1. E/P 10:36.41; High jump – 1. Roman (Ann) 5-7; Pole vault – 1. Brown (Ann) 9-9; Long jump – 1. Pe. Rus (EP) 16-10 3/4; Triple jump – 1. Pa. Rus (EP) 34-9 1/2; Shot put – 1. Block (Kew) 38-5; 3. Syndey Lebahn (BV) 32-1 1/2; Discus – 1. Block (Kew) 126-0; 3. Urbanowski (SB) 89-3. Geneseo Invite

Team scores: 1. Geneseo (171), 2. Moline (133), 3. East Moline (59); 4. L-P 48, 5. Ottawa 41,; 7. Rockridge 41, 8. Rockford Auburn 20, 9. Orion 9. PHS place finishers: 1st - Smallwood, triple jump 37-0 1/2; long jump, 17-8 1/2); Mead, 800 2:26.1; Schertz, shot, 36-6; 3rds - Holland, shot, 34’-5; 4ths - Clark , discus, 102-8; 6ths - Mead, 200, 28.3; Holland, discus, 100-1.

Boys tennis

At Princeton

Geneseo 4, Princeton 1. Singles: Toth (P) lost 6-1, 6-0; Beetz (P) lost 7-5, 4-6, 10-8. Doubles: Hicks/Kostello (P) lost 6-1, 6-1; Frank/Nichols (P) won 0-6, 6-4, 10-4; Austin/Duffy (P) lost 6-2, 6-0. JV: Geneseo 5-0. Singles: Stephanov (P) lost 8-3, Birkey (P) lost 8-5. Doubles: Birkey/ Stephanov (P) lost 8-2, Rodda/Warren (P) lost 8-2, Butler/Koler (P) lost 8-2. At Princeton

Mendota 7, Princeton 2. Singles: Kostello (P) def. C. Phalen 6-2 6-4; Hicks (P)def. Meyers 6-3, 6-3; Carroll (M) def. Beetz 6-2, 6-4; Prescott (M) def. Frank 7-5, 6-1, Hohertz (M) def. Nichols 6-2,4-6, 10-7; Foley (M) def. Kaler 6-0, 6-0. Doubles: Carroll/Prescott (M) def. Kostello/Hicks 7-6, 7-5; C. Phalen/Meyers (M) def. Frank/ Nichols 6-1, 6-3; N. Phalen/Bruno (M) def. Toth/Birkey 6-2, 6-1. JV: Mendota 8-1.


12 NASCAR 12 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Next up

Sprint Cup Race: Aaron’s 499 Where: Talladega Superspeedway When: Sunday, 1:00 p.m. (ET) TV: FOX Sports 2012 Winner: Brad Keselowski

Talladega Superspeedway Built for speed, leads to restrictor-plate ‘tight, difficult’ racing Talladega Superspeedway, site of this weekend’s Aaron’s 499, was built with maximum speed in mind, but throughout its history, that speed also has been a problem. The speeds shown in practice for the first race in 1969, coupled with the tire failures brought about by those speeds, led to a major driver boycott. Officials and race teams continued to search for ways to deal with speed before a major change came following the Winston 500 in 1987. Bill Elliott set NASCAR’s alltime qualifying mark of 212.809 miles per hour to win the pole for that race, with Bobby Allison on the outside pole with a speed of 211.797 mph. Allison’s mark is the third-fastest qualifying effort ever, behind Elliott’s record speed and his speed of 212.229 mph the year before at Talladega. But on the 21st lap, Allison’s engine blew as he roared down the frontstretch. Parts flying from his engine punctured his right rear tire and launched his No. 22 Buick into the grandstand fence, ripping down a section and injuring several fans. NASCAR responded by

placing restrictor plates on the engines to slow speeds, but racing with the restrictor plates also has been controversial. The plates lead to big packs of cars and often multi-car crashes. But fans seem to love those packs and the crashes, so the debate goes on. ESPN TV commentator Dale Jarrett, a nominee for the NASCAR Hall of Fame for his driving exploits, has seen it all, literally, when it comes to restrictor-plate racing. His first Sprint Cup start at Talladega came in the same race that Allison crashed, and the last of his 32 Cup wins came at Talladega in the fall of 2005. He said little has changed at Talladega over the years. “It’s the same as always to me,” he said. “It’s tight, difficult racing. You get so many people involved at the end of the race, and it’s going to be high-speed pushing and shoving. It’s no different than when we started running the restrictor plates back after the 1987 accident with Bobby Allison.” Jarrett has vivid memories of that incident. “I was 14 or 15 cars

Rusty Jarrett/Getty Images for NASCAR

Bill Elliott

Lowe’s Motor Speedway Archives

Bill Elliott’s No. 9 Coors Ford. behind that, just close enough to see what happened,” he said. “When Bobby’s car went up in the air, my biggest thought was trying to keep my focus and not become part of the incident. “It looked to me like the car was going straight to the flag stand. I was concerned that’s where it was going, and then obviously into the stands.

“It was much relief when I knew that didn’t happen.” Even though he was still running an estimated 215 miles an hour at that point, he recalls other details. “I saw parts and pieces flying,” he said. “I saw the car hit the fence out of the corner of my eye. “I remember seeing the caution flag. I don’t think the flagman ever flinched.

I don’t know how he didn’t, because that’s where it looked like the car was heading.” Jarrett said he doesn’t believe there is a simple way to find a balance between what the fans and promoters want at Talladega and what the drivers will like. Some have suggested lowering the banking in the turns at Talladega, which would slow speeds and break up the packs. But track and series officials have been reluctant to consider that in the past. “Fixing the race track is not going to happen,” Jarrett said. “There’s really not anything you can do unless you spend

a ton of money and downsize the engines tremendously, which is probably not a bad thing for the entire series.” Jarrett said his longtime car owner Robert Yates made a push for that back in 1995, but it didn’t gain any traction. So, that means the plates are here to stay, he said. “You can’t have the cars running 200-something miles an hour,” he said. “Most racing that the fans enjoy is frustrating to the drivers. We’re not going to get them both on the same page. As a driver and a competitor, you go in knowing that you’ve got a long day ahead of you.”

Copyright 2013/Distributed by Universal Uclick

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13 Biz Ag Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Business&Ag

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 13 Business story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Lyle Ganther at 815-875-4461, ext. 273, or email him at lganther@bcrnews.com.

Ag story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Barb Kromphardt at 815-875-4461, ext. 242, or email her at bkromphardt@bcrnews.com.

BCR photo/Lyle Ganther

Open house held for Step Forward Program BCR photo/Lyle Ganther

Pharmacist Lisa Stefani, owner of Princeton Pharmacy, stands in the business’ new location at 610 N. Main St. at Harvest Commons. Employees behind the counter are Shannon Townsend (left to right), pharmacy tech; Chris Cikanek, pharmacy tech; Jennifer Phillips, pharmacist; Mary Hassler, pharmacy tech, and Donna Purl, pharmacy tech.

Princeton Pharmacy opens at new location By Lyle Ganther lganther@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — A longtime pharmacy in Princeton is open for business in a new location with a new name but with the same staff and hours. Princeton Pharmacy, formerly Kirby-Henning Pharmacy, opened Monday at its new location at 610 N. Main St. Pharmacist Lisa Stefani, who has owned the business since January of 2003, said she decided to change the name to have a new start at its new location located within Harvest Commons, a new building complex developed by Ray Mabry of Princeton. Work began on Harvest Commons last December

when ground was broken after two houses had been demolished there to make room for the complex. “One of the primary reasons we moved was to have a more user friendly drive-up,”’ she said. “A drive-up window is more popular these days than it was in the past. “This building was built with a drive-up while the other location, the driveup was added on. It was awkward for our customers to access it and was really hard for them to see when exiting,” added Stefani. “I loved the old historic building, but I like the new location being more centralized.” The new building is slightly smaller in size than the older location,

but Stefani indicated the newer building uses space more efficiently than the older one at 501 S. Main St. in Princeton. Stefani likes the immunization room at her new location. “We started this two years ago in a semiprivate room that was an office with no door,” she said. “We now have a private, separate area for immunizations. We are focusing on wellness more, and immunizations are a part of that.” Princeton Pharmacy will still carry the gifts and toys it carried at the older location. Stefani said prescriptions for customers who were previously able to walk to the pharmacy from the Princeton HiRise or Clark House can

now be delivered from the new store to these locations. “Monday was the first day we were open at the new location, and we had positive responses, mainly to the handicapped accessible door to get into our location,” she said. The parking lot for customers to get to Princeton Pharmacy is located in the back of the building. Another reason for moving was the plans to have a public space in front of the building next to Main Street for people to enjoy during nice weather if they are out walking along North Main Street, added Stefani. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Claretta Leuchtenberg of Princeton talks with Trisha Hamrick of Colonial HealthCare and Rehabilitation Centre at an open house on April 25 for the new Step Forward Program consisting of 15 short-term rehabilitation private rooms for people recovering from a stroke, joint surgery or illness.

Illinois Retina Institute marks 10th year PERU — Illinois Retina Institute is celebrating its 10th anniversary with an evening reception from 5 to 7 p.m. May 13 at 3602 Marquette Road, Peru. This event is open to the public. Some features of the evening include: Hors d’oeuvres and wine, tours, met providers, Dr. Kishore and Dr. Ekong, door prizes and free retina scan for eye disease. Pre-register by calling 815-223-7400-

Space limited to first 20 callers. The Illinois Retina Institute provides specialized eye care for diseases of the retina including macular degeneration, diabetic eye disease, problems from injury or previous surgery, torn and detached retinas and uveitis. More information is available by calling 815-223-7400 or visiting the website at www.illinoisretinainstitute.com.


May 1 - 31

Chestnut Street Inn honored SHEFFIELD — Chestnut Street Inn in Sheffield has been selected as a Top 10 Culinary Inn by BedandBreakfast.com. Chestnut Street Inn is recognized as a top inn around the world providing the best travel experience in this category. BedandBreakfast.com is a comprehensive global site for finding bed and breakfast properties around the world, with more than 13,000 properties worldwide representing nearly 80,000 rooms.

Each November, BedandBreakfast.com names 30 overall top inns based on the quality and quantity of traveler reviews from the past year. Starting in December 2011, BedandBreakfast.com decided to recognize more of the world’s best inns and began a monthly awards program to honor 10 more B&Bs every month in a special category. “These award-winning inns, including Chestnut Street Inn, really showcase bed and break-

fasts and inns that often become a destination to discover, and not just a place to stay,” says Gregory Sion, general manager of BedandBreakfast. com. “Travelers select bed and breakfasts because they enjoy staying in a one-of-a-kind place that offers not only character, special amenities and unmatched hospitality, but also enables them to discover new experiences.” “It’s a true honor to be chosen for the Top 10 Culinary Inns award,

and we are thrilled that our hard work has set us apart,” says Monika Sudakov, Chestnut Street Inn innkeeper. Chestnut Street Inn was recently featured in Midwest Living Magazine as one of the 30 top B&Bs in the Midwest. Chef Monika creates Mediterranean inspired gourmet dinners using locally grown organic foods from several farms. The inn’s phone number is 815-454-2419. Its website address is www. chestnut-inn.com.

Liu to join Illinois CancerCare at PMH PRINCETON — Dr. Jane Liu with Illinois CancerCare in Peoria will be joining the medical staff at Perry Memorial Hospital in May. Liu will be taking over Dr. Allen

Vukov’s responsibilities at the Illinois CancerCare clinic at Perry Memorial Hospital as of June 1. Vukov is retiring on May 31. Liu received her medi-

cal degree in Beijing, China. She completed an internal medicine residency at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Calif. and her hematology/oncology

fellowships were done at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla. She is board certified in internal medicine, medical oncology and hematology.

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14 Legals 14 • Legals • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

LegalNotices STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY IN RE ) THE MATTER OF ) Tre Xavier Mickel ) Tre Xavier Martinez ) NO. 13-MR-27 NOTICE OF FILING OF PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME Notice is given you, the public, that on May 28th, at 1:15 p.m. a hear-

ing will be held on a Petition for change of Name asking the Court to change my present name of Tre Xavier Mickel to the name of Tre Xavier Martinez. The hearing will take place at 700 S. Main Street in Princeton, Illinois. Date: 4-16-13 PLAINTIFF /s/Tre Xavier Mickel Published in the Bureau County Republican Apr. 25, May 2 and 9, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY - PRINCETON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. ) Plaintiff, ) -v.) MICHAEL B. ZNANIECKI A/K/A ) MICHAEL ZNANIECKI, et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 00061 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on May 23, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: THAT PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 5 AS SHOWN ON ‘’MONUMENT RECORD’’ RECORDED AS DOCUMENT #92-4186 IN DEED RECORD BOOK 768, PAGE 260, IN THE RECORDER’S OFFICE OF SAID COUNTY, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41’ 18’’ EAST 723.44 FEET ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER TO A POINT 127.52 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL 1 AS SHOWN ON A PLAT OF SURVEY RECORDED AS DOCUMENT #98-3099 IN DEED RECORD BOOK 915, PAGE 841; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 00’ 00’’ EAST 127.52 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 53’ 10’’ EAST 162.00 FEET ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 1; THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 50’ 19’’ EAST 742.35 FEET ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF PARCELS 1, 2 AND 3 TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL 4 AS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT OF SURVEY, SAID CORNER BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED HEREIN; THENCE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 09’ 41’’ WEST 549.54 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 50’ 19’’ EAST 400.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 09’ 41’’ EAST 509.24 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF PARCEL 5 AS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT OF SURVEY; THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 53’ 23’’ WEST 107.81 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 5; THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 50’ 19’’ WEST 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE UNDERLYING COAL, FIRECLAY AND OTHER MINERALS, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO DIG, MINE AND REMOVE THE SAME WITHOUT ENTERING UPON THE SURFACE THEREOF, ALL LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 25366 1150 NORTH AVENUE, PRINCETON, IL 61356 Property Index No. 23-05-300-006. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-18468. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-18468 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 00061 TJSC#: 33-4985 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I527996 Published in the Bureau County Republican Apr. 25, May 2 and 9, 2013. 12-062484 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF BUREAU PRINCETON, ILLINOIS MIDFIRST BANK ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) MARK PERRY A/K/A MARK W. PERRY; ) STATE OF ILLINOIS; UNKNOWN OWNERS ) AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; ) UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS ) Defendants, ) 12 CH 93 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 21, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, May 29, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. in the office of HB Wilkinson Title Co., 10 Park Avenue West, Lower Level, Princeton, Illinois 61356, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 6 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 3 IN BLOCK 3 IN THE VILLAGE OF TISKILWA, FORMERLY INDIANTOWN, ALL LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: ALL THAT PART OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE LOCATED IN THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 7 IN BLOCK 3 IN THE VILLAGE OF TISKILWA, FORMERLY INDIANTOWN, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 148.57 FEET ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 7 TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE DUE SOUTH 8.49 FEET ON THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST, 148.57 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE DUE NORTH 9.42 FEET ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 7 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL OF THE FOREGOING PARCEL 1 AND PARCEL 2 LEGAL DESCRIPTION IS

ACCORDING TO A PLAT OF SURVEY MADE BY J. WILLIAM SHAFER, ILLINOIS PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYOR #2213, DATED FEBRUARY 5, 1992, FILED FEBRUARY 12, 1992 AT 2:46 P.M. IN BOOK 758 AT PAGE 342 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 92-861, AND BOTH OF THE FOREGOING PARCELS ARE LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. PARCEL 3: EASEMENT FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 AS CREATED BY JUDGMENT ORDER TO QUIET TITLE ENTERED OCTOBER 19, 1995 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN CASE NUMBER 95-CH-11, TO USE, KEEP AND MAINTAIN A GARAGE OVER THAT PORTION OF THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 7 IN BLOCK 3 IN THE VILLAGE OF TISKILWA, FORMERLY INDIANTOWN, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS, UPON WHICH THE GARAGE OWNED BY THE OWNERS OF PARCEL 1 IS LOCATED, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT OF SURVEY MADE BY J. WILLIAMS SHAFER, ILLINOIS PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYOR #2213, DATED FEBRUARY 5, 1992, FILED FEBRUARY 12, 1992 AT 2:46 P.M. IN BOOK 758 AT PAGE 342 AS DOCUMENT 92-861, TOGETHER WITH THE LIMITED AND REASONABLE RIGHT TO ENTER ONTO THE SAID EAST 1/2 OF LOT 7 IN BLOCK 3 IN THE VILLAGE OF TISKILWA FOR THE SOLE PURPOSE OF REPAIRING, KEEPING AND MAINTAINING SAID GARAGE, ALL OF THE FOREGOING IS LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 21-12-477-016; 21-12-477-017. Commonly known as 320 Jefferson Street, Tiskilwa, IL 61368. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sale Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, FISHER and SHAPIRO, LLC, 2121 Waukegan Road, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015. (847) 291-1717. Refer to File Number 12-062484. I526044 Published in the Bureau County Republican Apr. 18, 25 and May 2, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY - PRINCETON, ILLINOIS COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, ) L.P. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) BERNADETTE MONCHER; PATRICK ) MONCHER; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND ) NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 09 CH 34 125 HENNEPIN STREET LADD, IL 61329 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN YOU, PATRICK MONCHER; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; defendants, that this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: LOTS FOUR (4) AND FIVE (5) IN BLOCK THIRTY-SEVEN (37) IN THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW VILLAGE OF LADD, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS; EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE UNDERLYING COAL AND FIRECLAY TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO DIG, MINE AND REMOVE THE SAME WITHOUT ENTERING UPON THE SURFACE THEREOF; SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 125 HENNEPIN STREET LADD, IL 61329 and which said Mortgage was made by, BERNADETTE MONCHER; PATRICK MONCHER; Mortgagor (s), to M.E.R.S., INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MBNA AMERICA (DELAWARE), N.A. Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of BUREAU County, Illinois, as Document No. 050867; and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this County, Mary C. Dremann

Bureau County Courthouse 702 South Main Street Princeton, Ill. 61356 on or before May 28, 2013, A JUDGMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES Attorneys for Plaintiff Thirteenth Floor 1 North Dearborn Chicago, Illinois 60602 Tel. (312) 346-9088 Fax (312) 346-1557 PA 0906350 I527473 Published in the Bureau County Republican Apr. 25, May 2 and 9, 2013. ANNUAL TREASURER’S REPORT NEPONSET – MACON MULT-TOWNSHIP ASSESSEMENT DISTRICT FISCAL YEAR ENDING March 31, 2013 TOWNSHIP -- REVENUE SUMMARY: Interest – $10. TOTAL REVENUES - $10. TOWNSHIP -- EXPENDITURE SUMMARY: All disbursements less than ($2,500) – $425 TOTAL VENDORS: $425. TOWNSHIP – COMPENSATION SUMMARY: Range: Under $25,000.00: Paul Barry, Eldon Eigsti, Betty Anne McInnes, Laurie Mueller, Raymond Robinson. TOTAL COMPENSATION: $4,306. SUMMARY STATEMENT OF CONDITION (Excerpt from Comptroller Report) Revenues 10 Expenditures 4,731 Excess of revenues over expenses (4,721) Net increase in fund balance (4,721) Previous year fund balance 12,726 Current year ending balance 8,005 I, Eldon Eigsti, Clerk of Neponset - Macon MultiTownship District #12, Bureau County, Illinois, do herby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual Treasurer’s Report for the year ending March 31, 2013. Published in the Bureau County Republican May 2, 2013. ANNUAL TREASURER’S REPORT NEPONSET – MACON MULT-TOWNSHIP ASSESSEMENT DISTRICT FISCAL YEAR ENDING March 31, 2012 TOWNSHIP -- REVENUE SUMMARY: Property Taxes – $5,622: Interest – $50. TOTAL REVENUES - $5,672. TOWNSHIP -- EXPENDITURE SUMMARY: All disbursements less than ($2,500) – $1,385 TOTAL VENDORS: $1,385. TOWNSHIP – COMPENSATION SUMMARY: Range: Under $25,000.00: Paul Barry, Eldon Eigsti, Betty Anne McInnes, Laurie Mueller, Raymond Robinson. TOTAL COMPENSATION: $5,386. SUMMARY STATEMENT OF CONDITION (Excerpt from Comptroller Report) Revenues 5,672 Expenditures 6,771 Excess of revenues over expenses (1,099) Net increase in fund balance (1,099) Previous year fund balance 13,825 Current year ending balance 12,726 I, Eldon Eigsti, Clerk of Neponset - Macon MultiTownship District #12, Bureau County, Illinois, do herby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual Treasurer’s Report for the year ending March 31, 2012. Published in the Bureau County Republican May 2, 2013. ANNUAL TREASURER’S REPORT NEPONSET – MACON MULT-TOWNSHIP ASSESSEMENT DISTRICT FISCAL YEAR ENDING March 31, 2011 TOWNSHIP -- REVENUE SUMMARY: Property Taxes – $6,496: Interest – $84. TOTAL REVENUES - $6,580. TOWNSHIP -- EXPENDITURE SUMMARY: All disbursements less than ($2,500) – $1,080 TOTAL VENDORS: $1,080. TOWNSHIP – COMPENSATION SUMMARY: Range: Under $25,000.00: Paul Barry, Eldon Eigsti, Betty Anne McInnes, Laurie Mueller, Raymond Robinson. TOTAL COMPENSATION: $3,430. SUMMARY STATEMENT OF CONDITION (Excerpt from Comptroller Report) Revenues 6,580 Expenditures 4,625 Excess of revenues over expenses 1,955 Net increase in fund balance 1,955 Previous year fund balance 11,871 Current year ending balance 13,825 I, Eldon Eigsti, Clerk of Neponset - Macon MultiTownship District #12, Bureau County, Illinois, do herby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual Treasurer’s Report for the year ending March 31, 2011 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 2, 2013.


15 Checkered Flag Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • Checkered Flag Challenge • 15

CheCkered flag challenge

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Stats courtesy of NASCAR.com

Avg. Finish 13.6 12.0 13.9 10.4

Points 2,311 2,403 6,221 6,309

MonograM glad Creations Christian Cyr, CPA • Financial Advisor 220 E. High St. • Hennepin • 925-7501 Securities and advisory services offered through SII Investments, Inc.® (SII), member FINRA/SIPC and a Registered Investment Advisor. SII and Cyr Financial are separate and unrelated companies.

Torri’s Used Cars

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Peaces of Fashion For today’s women

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16 Accuweather 16 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

From you, for you

We want to hear from you – From you, for you is an interactive page for readers to share their photos, questions and comments. For information on how to submit a story, question or comment, contact BCR Associate Editor Rita Roberts at rroberts@bcrnews.com.

Todd Borsch of Princeton submitted this photo of the Bureau County Fairgrounds, more than a hundred years ago, about 1910.

•••

A trip down Memory Lane “A trip down Memory Lane” is an opportunity for BCR readers to submit their long ago photos from yesteryear. If you’d like to share an old photograph with other BCR readers, send your photo along with pertinent information to BCR Associate Editor Rita Roberts at the BCR, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 or email to: rroberts@bcrnews.com.

5-day Planner Today

Tonight

High 60

Low 40

Friday

High 52

Saturday

Low 42 High 55

Low 44 High 57

Weekly weather This year High April 30

Low

88

One year ago Prec.

62

0

Low

Prec.

59

48

T

High

Low

90 (2007)

32 (1956) 27 (1958)

April 29

76

51

0

55

41

.62

90 (1970)

April 28

70

52

0

49

42

.52

86 (1970) 28 (1950)

April 27

66

43

0

57

34

TR

88 (1956)

26 (1946)

April 26

68

41

0

64

40

0

88 (1962)

31 (1976)

April 25

54

38

T

78

46

0

92 (1963)

32 (1972)

April 24

51

34

.05

67

45

T

92 (1960)

19 (1956)

Source: National Weather Service Reporting Station, Princeton asterisk means new record temperature

Over 50? Time for a financial checkup.

Hellman, Agent 24 N Main St eton, IL 61356 815-875-2393 .lhellman.com

Especially as you near retirement. Be proactive when it comes to your financial health. It’s never too late to get on the right Lorita Hellman, Agent Lorita Hellman, Agent path to a healthy financial 324 Main St you get 324 NNMain future. Let meSthelp where you to be. Princeton, ILneed 61356 Princeton, IL 61356 Like a good neighbor, Bus: 815-875-2393 Bus: 815-875-2393 State Farm is there.® www.lhellman.com www.lhellman.com CALL ME TODAY.

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Over 50? Time for a financial checkup. Especially as you nearnear retirement. Especially as you Be proactive when it comes to your retirement. financial health. It’s never too late to get on the right path to a healthy future. Be proactive whenfinancial it comes to Let me you get where youIt’s need to be. yourhelp financial health. never Like a good neighbor tooFarm late istothere. get on ® the right State path a healthy financial CALL MEto TODAY.

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Monday

Low 45 High 62

Low 49

Sun & Moon

Records

High

Sunday

Sunrise..............................................................5:54 a.m. Sunset............................................................... 7:56 p.m. Moonrise............................................................ 1:46 a.m. Moonset...........................................................12:42 p.m. Last

New

First

Full

May 2

May 9

May 17

May 24

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1

“PRSRT.STD.” US POSTAGE PAID NO. 486 PRINCETON, IL 61356 SHAW MEDIA

VOL. 7 NO. 41

Thursday, May 2, 2013

BCR photo/Becky Kramer

Ready for the races Members of the Red Hat Society celebrated their 14th anniversary on Saturday with a pre-Kentucky Derby luncheon event at the Princeton Elks Lodge. The Kentucky Derby will be held this Saturday with 20 thoroughbreds racing around the one and one-quarter mile track at Churchill Downs Racetrack in Louisville, Ky. The Kentucky Derby, known as the fastest two minutes in sports, has run every year since 1875. The Kentucky Derby is the first leg of the U.S. Triple Crown and is followed by the Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes. The preshow for this year’s Kentucky Derby will be televised by the NBC network, beginning at 4 p.m. Eastern time.

18

Months Interest

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2 2 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Here is what

RutH Wood from Wyanet, IL had to say about her care at Perry Memorial Hospital…

— FEATURES —

3 Hometown beat All about you 4 Calendar 4 5 Library corner 6 Around the county 7 Entertainment Food court 8 10 Sports 12 Marketplace

“The staff was very attentive and kept a close eye on me during my inpatient stay at Perry. I appreciated Dr. Pratt’s proactive treatment. The food was also very good and there was a nice variety from which to choose. I have now been going to Perry’s Lab for testing. The Lab staff is efficient and the service is quick”.

Sports

Volume 7 No. 41 The Bureau County Journal is published weekly on Thursday at 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 by the Bureau County Republican

All rights reserved. Copyright 2013.

Factual Accuracy: Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been published, please bring it to our attention. Call the Bureau County Republican at 815875-4461 or email at news@bcrnews.com.

!

See Pages 10-11

Illinois Valley

Experience the quality and compassionate care and service at Perry Memorial Hospital.

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3 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 3

Your hometown beat

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

Meeting Calendar May 6 Princeton City Council, 7 p.m., city hall Princeton Park District Board, 4:30 p.m., Bureau County Metro Center Sheffield Village Board, 7 p.m., Sheffield Community Center Walnut Village Board, 7 p.m., village hall

May 7 Dover Village Board, 7 p.m., village hall Manlius Village Board, 5:30 p.m., village hall

Auction Calendar May 4 – Bill, Sandy and Doug Brown, real estate (former Tribune Building), 10 a.m., 413 S. Main St., Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. May 4 – Lawn and garden public auction, mowers, utility tractors, implements, vehicles, RVs, trailers, ATVs, motorcycles and miscellaneous, 9:30 a.m., 401 W. Main St. (The Shed), Wyanet, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. May 18 – Kerchner trust, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at 15212 Illinois Highway 92 (Green River Country Club), Walnut United Country Dahl Real Estate, auctioneers. June 11 – Art and Donna Johnson estate, real estate, 5:30 p.m., 136 N. Washington St., Sheffield, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers.

Seeking Sources Are you an area man who has his own “man cave?” You know ... an area in your home, basement or garage reserved just for you. Or maybe you are the wife of a “man cave” owner? Either way, the Bureau County Republican wants to share your “man cave” with other readers in an upcoming special section in the BCR. Call BCR Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at 815-875-4461, ext. 244, or email her at dbarker@bcrnews.com. ••• May 21 is National Waiters and Waitresses Day which recognizes the value and importance of a good waiter or waitress. The BCR would like to do a story about a waiter or waitress who enjoys their job and would be willing to share their career with other BCR readers. Contact BCR Staff Writer Goldie Currie at 815-8754461, ext. 236, or email her at gcurrie@bcrnews.com. ••• The BCR is looking forward to seeing your springtime photos to share with other readers. Email your photos and information to BCR Copy Editor Terry Himes at thimes@bcrnews.com. You can also drop a photo by our office at 800 Ace Road, Princeton. Remember to let us know where you took the photo, as well as who is in it. ••• What kind of great treats are you preparing in your kitchen? We’re hoping you’ll share your recipes with our readers. Recipe columnist Judy Dyke would like to feature one of your recipes in an upcoming edition of the Bureau County Journal. Send your recipes to her at judyd2313@frontier.com. You can also mail them to her attention at the BCR, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356. •••

In 1978, a joint congressional resolution established Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week. The first 10 days of May were chosen to coincide with two important milestones in Asian/ Pacific American history: the arrival in the United States of the first Japanese immigrants (May 7, 1843) and contributions of Chinese workers to the building of the transcontinental railroad, completed May 10, 1869. In 1992, Congress expanded the observance to a month-long celebration. • 18.2 million - The estimated number of U.S. residents in 2011 who were Asian, either alone or in combination with one or more additional races. • 5.8 million - The Asian alone or in combination population in California in 2011. The state had the largest Asian population, followed by New York (1.7 million). The Asian alone-or-in-combination population represented 57 percent of the total population in Hawaii. • 46 percent - Percentage growth of the Asian alone or in combination population between the 2000 and 2010 censuses, which was more than any other major race group. • 4 million - Number of Asians of Chinese, except Taiwanese, descent in the United States in 2011. The Chinese (except Taiwanese) population was the largest Asian group, followed by Filipinos (3.4 million), Asian Indians (3.2 million), Vietnamese (1.9 million), Koreans (1.7 million) and Japanese (1.3 million). • $67,885 - Median household income for the Asian alone population in 2011. Median household income differed greatly by Asian group. For Asian Indians, for example, the median income in 2011 was $92,418; for Bangladeshi, it was $45,185. • 12.8 percent - The poverty rate for the Asian alone population in 2011. • 15.4 - Percentage of single-race Asians without health insurance coverage in 2011. • 50 percent - The percentage of the Asian alone population 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree or higher level of education. This compared with 28.5 percent for all Americans 25 and older. • 85.1 percent - The percentage of the Asian alone population 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma. • 20.7 percent - The percentage of the Asian alone population 25 and older who had a graduate (e.g., master’s) or professional degree. This

compared with 10.6 percent for all Americans 25 and older. • 589,000 - The additional number of the Asian alone population who voted in the 2008 presidential election than in the 2004 election. All in all, 48 percent of Asians turned out to vote in 2008 — up 4 percentage points from 2004. A total of 3.4 million Asians voted. • 1.5 million - Number of businesses owned by Asians in 2007, an increase of 40.4 percent from 2002. • $506.0 billion - Total receipts of businesses owned by Asians in 2007, up 54.9 percent from 2002. • 44.7 percent - Percentage of Asian-owned businesses that operated in repair and maintenance, personal and laundry services; professional, scientific and technical services; and retail trade in 2007. • 47.2 percent - Percentage of businesses in Hawaii owned by people of Asian descent. It was 14.9 percent in California and 10.1 percent in New York. California had the most Asianowned firms at 508,969 (32.8 percent of all such firms), followed by New York with 196,825 (12.7 percent) and Texas with 114,297 (7.4 percent). • 264,695 - The number of the Asian alone population military veterans in 2011. About one in three veterans was 65 and older. • 48.5 percent - The proportion of civilian employed single-race Asians 16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations, such as financial managers, engineers, teachers and registered nurses in 2011. Additionally, 17.4 percent worked in service occupations, 21.1 percent in sales and office occupations, 9.6 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations and 3.3 percent in natural resources, construction and maintenance occupations. • 80 percent - Percentage of Asians in 2009 living in a household with Internet use — the highest rate among race and ethnic groups. • 33.5 - Median age of the Asian alone or in combination population in 2011. The corresponding figure was 37.3 years for the population as a whole. • 25.6 percent - Percent of the Asian alone or in combination population that was under age 18 in 2011, while 9.0 percent was 65 or older. In 2011, there were 1.4 million native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders who were U.S. residents. Hawaii had the largest population with 359,000, followed by California (329,000.)

Follow the Bureau County Republican, the Bureau County Journal and/or Illinois Valley Living online. You can also follow the BCR on Facebook.

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4 4 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

All about you Anniversaries 60th Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Padgett of Ladd, April 25.

Birthdays May 2 • Audrey Barlow • Cecelia Mestan • Steve Lampkin • Sara Hudson May 3 • Courtney Hartmann • Terese DeSerf May 4 • Alanna Whitmore • Dillon Pearson • Randy Gibson • Shirley Olin • Kathy Hassler May 5 • Jackie Martin • Adele • Jill Marenda

May 6 • Carolyn Senneff • Violette Epperson May 7 • Shelley Cook • Linda Townsend • Alex Pierce • Brenda Jensen May 8 • Trudi Buckman • Anthony Nordstrom • Deb Jikia • Zoe Hemminger • JoAnn Gerard • Randy Welsh • Katie Click • Bob Click • Liz Svadbik

Births Davis — Alan Davis and Sandra (Brokaw) Mallery of Tiskilwa, daughter, April 19. Swanson — Douglas and Kathryn (Woeckel) Swanson of Spring Valley daughter, April 25.

Death Notices Erickson — Jack Arlie Erickson, 88, of Princeton, April 25. Flood — Phillip Flood, 72, of Princeton, April 21. Hartz — Nina N. Hartz, 95, of New Bedford, April 25. Jackson — Elsie Jean Jackson, 74, of Princeton, April 25. Manning — Jerry Paul Manning, 74, LeRoy, formerly of Bradford, April 27. Rod — Alfred “Fritz” Rod, 79, of Mendota, formerly of Sublette, April 22. Rod — Patricia Anne (Roth) Rod, 77, of Princeton, April 21. Specht — Maxine M. Specht, 85, formerly of Tampico, April 22. Weber — John C. Weber, 56, of Bartlett, formerly of Sheffield, April 18.

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LASALLE — The first flower and plant sale fundraiser benefiting the Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living and Grace United Methodist Church will be Friday and Saturday, May 3-4, in the church parking lot, 1345 Chartres St. in LaSalle. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Products are from Mid American Growers and Hornbaker Gardens.

LASALLE — The Polka Massters will perform a polka Mass at 4 p.m. Saturday, May 4, at St. Hyacinth Church in LaSalle.

PRINCETON — A bluegrass, gospel and country music jam will be from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, May 17, at the First Lutheran Church at 116 N. Pleasant St. in Princeton. Jams will continue the third Friday of each month. Players and listeners are welcome. Snacks and soft drinks available. For more information, call 815875-2057.

Cinco de Mayo Festival MENDOTA — The Illinois Valley Hispanic Partnership Council celebrates its 15th annual Cinco De Mayo Festival at the Mendota Civic Center from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 3, to celebrate cultural awareness. The festival is a free event and where one can enjoy authentic food, folkloric dancers, raffles, information booths, queen, miniking and mini-queen contests and entertainment for all.

Cookout WYANET — The Wyanet Community Club will host a cookout from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 4, at the Wyanet Locker. The menu will include rib eyes, butterfly chops, pork burgers, brats, hot dogs, chips and pop.

Bingo PRINCETON — The Princeton Moose Lodge will host a bingo night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and sandwiches will be available for purchase. The lodge will continue to host bingo the first and third Tuesday of each month. For more information, call the lodge at 815879-5261.

Wine tasting PRINCETON — The Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation will host a wine tasting evening from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 10, at A Hundred Acres Orchard and Market in Princeton. The event will include wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres with music provided by the “River City String Trio”. Tickets are $50 per person. Bruce Jewelers has donated a 14 karat white gold, black and white diamond round cluster pendant as a raffle item. Raffle tickets are $5 each. You need not be present to win. To purchase tickets to the event and/or raffle tickets, call 815876-4481. All proceeds from the event will benefit Perry Memorial Hospital.

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Car wash WALNUT — The Walnut Cub Scout and Boy Scout troops will host a car wash from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 18, in the Citizens First State Bank parking lot. Washes are $5 for cars, $7 for vans. Lunch will be available for purchase. The event is sponsored by Panther Outdoor Maintenance Services Inc. All proceeds will go toward fees for day camp.

Rod and custom show LASALLE — The Last Chance Swap Meet and Rod and Custom Car Show will be from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 19, at the LaSalle Speedway, Route 6, east of LaSalle. Open to all makes and models of cars, race cars and motorcycles. Rain or shine. Show car entry is $5. Vendors spaces $20. Admission is $3, 12 and younger free with adult. Car corral is $8 with one admission.

Free parking and a full concession stand. For more information, contact Bob Beenenga at 815-228-3177 or 815442-3275.

Bingo PRINCETON — The Princeton Moose Lodge will host a bingo night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 21. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and sandwiches will be available for purchase. The lodge will continue to host bingo the first and third Tuesday of each month. For more information, call the lodge at 815879-5261.

Garden Faire and Walk UTICA — the annual Garden Faire and Walk sponsored by the Utica Garden Club will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 8 and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, June 9, in downtown Utica. There will be a great variety of garden and craft vendors and a plant sale with reasonably priced perennials, annuals, herbs and vegetables from the club members’ gardens. The Garden Walk includes a self-guided tour of private gardens. Tickets can be purchased for $8 at the Garden Faire. Rain or shine. For more information, email: club@uticagardenclub.org or call 815667-4856 or 815-2524573.

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5 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 5

Library Corner PRINCETON — Today, Thursday, May 2, Secretary of State Drivers License Services will meet from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the library meeting room. Also, library programs Director Ron McCutchan will present a program on Islamic Gardens at 6:30 p.m. in the library meeting room. Monday, May 6, The Monday Night Movie will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the library meeting room and feature Charles Xavier who grew up privileged in New York and Erik Lehnsherr who grew up underprivileged in Poland. As children, the mind-reading Charles finds a friend in the shape-lifting Raven, and Erik finds an enemy in Sebastian Shaw, an energyabsorbing Nazi scientist who treats Erik like a metal-bending lab rat. By 1962, Charles has become a swaggering genetics professor, and Erik has become a brooding agent of revenge. CIA agent Moira brings the two together to work for Division X. Tuesday, May 7, a WUNT meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. in the local history room. A Talk About will take place at 6:30 p.m. in the library meeting room. The Lions Board will meet at 7 p.m. in the staff kitchen. Wednesday, May 8, Nook Color and Nook Tablet basic workshop will be from 2 to 3 p.m. in the library meeting room. Bring a fully-charged device and Princeton library card. Chicks with Sticks meets at 6:30 p.m. in the library, and Widmark Wednesday will feature “The Frogman” at 6:30 p.m. in the library meeting room. WALNUT — Walnut Public Library has teamed up with Vintage Tech Recyclers to host a cell phone recycle drive. It’s time to empty the junk drawers and help out the library. Drop cell phones off at the library, Celebrating 20St. years located at 101 Heaton If theof library is closed, leave it in the

drop box. Recycling old cell phones keeps toxic materials out of landfills. Drop-off is free, and there is no limit on the number of phones brought in. All proceeds from recycling old phones will go toward the library’s new furnace and air conditioner. The library is also looking to host a large electronics recycle drive during the spring townwide garage sale. This includes old computers, printers, monitors, TVs, microwaves, etc. The library is looking for a building to leave about six large pallets for a week or so before and after the sale. The building must have a lock on it. The library staff would have someone attending the building during drop-off times. Another option is if someone in the community would be willing to lend a semi-trailer that could be closed and locked. The semitrailer would be parked in the library parking lot during the sale. Those interesting in helping the library locate a building or semi-trailer, please call Michele at 815-379-2159. SPRING VALLEY — Story time is held from 5:30 to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the children’s room at the library. There is a story and craft-related project during this time for preschool through second grade children. A parent must accompany their child. The event is free of charge. TISKILWA — The library’s Earth Day program was for the birds! On April 22, 16 children and seven adults enjoyed the Earth Day celebration. Each child created an original bird house from recycled milk bottles. They also listened to stories about recycling, which were read by library clerk Sharon Anderson. Treats were made by Liz Piacenti. LAMOILLE — The LaMoilleClarion Public Library’s hours quality and service! have been changed to noon to 6 p.m. on Mondays and

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Wednesdays. On Wednesday, May 8, the library will hold a story hour at 2:30 p.m. in the children’s area of the library. New books added to the library’s collection include: “Daddy’s Gone a Hunting” by Mary Higgins Clarks, “Orphan Train” by Christina Baker Kline, “The Storyteller” by Jodi Picoult, “Garden of Stones” by Sophie Littlefield, “The One and Only Ivan” by Katherine Applegate, “Llama Llama Nighty Night” by Anna Dewdney, “Red Truck” by Kersten Hamilton and “Even Monsters Need Haircuts” by Matthew McElligott. For those who have considered purchasing an electronic device but aren’t sure where to start, maybe the library can help. Visit the library and try out a Nook, Kindle, Google Nexus, iPad or laptop. The Nexus, iPad and laptop are not available for checkout, but visitors will have the opportunity to try them while in the library. These items have been made Photo contributed possible through the Eliminate the Digital Divide Grant. The library also has become a member of the OMNI consorAbout 16 children gathered at the Tiskilwa Public Library on tium, which allows patrons to April 22 for a special Earth Day program. The children made borrow eBooks and downloadbird houses out of recycled milk bottles, read stories about able audio books. recycling and ate treats. Summer is right around the library within the last couple of tinues to hold its preschool corner! This year’s summer months. Many of the books are story times at 10:30 a.m. on reading theme is “Have Book the first and third Mondays of Will Travel.” Beginning in June, on Amazon’s “Best Picks” lists. each month. The program is story hours will be on Tuesdays Stop in to see the wide range of titles that are now available. designed for ages 3-5. All chilwith Cara and Evan. More inforThe library is also taking dren must be accompanied by mation will be released soon. names of those interested in a a parent or guardian. Each sesSHEFFIELD — The Sheffield basic computer class. Sign up sion consists of stories, activiPublic Library would like to at the library to be added to ties and a craft. start a monthly book club. the list. PERU – The Peru Public Interested adults should call The library’s book club is Library holds a story time for librarian Sue Lanxon at 815reading “Stay Close” by Harlan children ages 3-5 at 10:30 a.m. 454-2628 or 815-454-2592. Coben this month. The club every Wednesday. Children OHIO — The Ohio Public meets at 1 p.m. in the library hear stories, sing songs, Library is hosting a book sale on the first Tuesday of the dance and learn finger plays. at the library through May 11.  Registration is required. For There are a variety of titles and month. Interested readers are welcome to stop by and join more information visit www. authors on sale. HYDRAULIC DOORS the club. perulibrary.org or call 815-223There is also a large number LADD — The library con0229, ext. 5. of books that came into the

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6 6 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Around the county Manlius Class of 1948 plans Grand Reunion II Safety Town registration MANLIUS — The Grand Reunion II, sponsored by the Manlius High School Class of 1948, for members and their guests of the classes of 1932 to 1953 will begin at noon May 18 at Hunter’s Ridge Golf Course, Route 26 south of Princeton. Members

of the 1914-1931 classes and their guests are also welcome to attend. The reunion will begin with a “Get Acquainted” period followed by lunch, presentations by the Manlius Historical Society and Bureau Valley School Foundation, entertainment — some of

Briefs Princeton Community Band begins ninth season PRINCETON — The Princeton Community Band will begin its ninth season with a first rehearsal from 7 to 8:30 p.m. May 9 in the Logan Junior High School band room. Rehearsals will continue each Thursday through July 25. PCB is open to anyone in Princeton and surrounding areas who is high school age (including entering freshmen - fall 2013) through adult. Members must have instrumental music experience and should have their own instruments. High school students can receive community service hours for rehearsals and performances. Interested musicians may join the band by coming to the first rehearsal. Music may be taken home to practice, but you agree to make sure the folder is returned to all rehearsals and concerts, even if you cannot attend. Members are asked to bring their own chair and music stand to concerts. Chairs and stands are provided for rehearsals. There are six concerts this season: June 2, 16 and 30, and July 14, 21 and 28. All concerts are on Sunday evenings at Soldiers and Sailors Park in Princeton beginning at 6 p.m.

PMH Foundation to host wine tasting event PRINCETON — The Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation will host a wine tasting evening from 6 to 9 p.m. May 10 at A Hundred Acres Orchard and Market in Princeton. The event will include wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres with music provided by the “River City String Trio”. Tickets are $50 per person. Bruce Jewelers has donated a 14 karat white gold, black and white diamond round cluster pendant as a raffle item. Raffle tickets are $5 each. You need not be present to win. To purchase tickets to the event and/or raffle tickets, call 815-876-4481. All proceeds from the event will benefit Perry Memorial Hospital.

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which will be provided by attendees— and a picture taking session. The event will end with a show and tell session. Participants should bring those old pictures, mementos, school annuals and clothing, as well as the “good old days” stories. Reservations are

needed by May 11 and should include the class/ classes represented and $18 per attendee. Reservations should be sent to: Gail Etheridge, 28243 Woodside Drive, Rock Falls, IL 61071; 815-6264731. For more information, call Jim Carlson at 815-332-5916.

Scholarships Princeton Memorial Scholarship and Ruth E. Patterson Lang Scholarship PRINCETON — Application forms for the 2013-14 Princeton Memorial Scholarship Fund and Ruth E. Patterson Lang Scholarship Fund are now available. Application forms can be obtained either in the Princeton High Guidance Office or may be downloaded at www.phs-il.org from the Scholarship link. Any graduate of Princeton High School is eligible to apply for scholarship consideration. All completed applications must be returned to Brian Church, Princeton High School guidance director, no later than noon on June 7. For additional information or assistance in obtaining an application form, contact the guidance department at 815-875-3308, ext. 229.

PAC art scholarship PRINCETON — Princeton’s Prairie Art Council will award the annual $1,000 art scholarship this spring. All art students who reside in Bureau County, and who will be attending college as an art major in the fall of 2013, are invited to apply. The award will be determined through a portfolio competition. Students should prepare a portfolio of five to 10 original works, a statement of intention and a letter of recommendation. These should be delivered to the Prairie Arts Council, 24 Park Ave. East, Princeton on May 8 between 2 and 4 p.m. A panel of members appointed by the Prairie Arts Center will award the scholarship, and a $200 runner-up award. The winners will be announced during the following week. Further information is available from area high school art and guidance faculty, and from Dana Collins, PAC art scholarship chair, at ndana@comcast.net.

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PRINCETON — The Princeton Junior Woman’s Club is now accepting registrations for its annual Safety Town program, set for June 17-28 at St. Louis School in Princeton. Safety Town is a twoweek program that runs each weekday from 9 to 11 a.m. The program is open to children who are residents of Bureau County and are or will be 4 or 5 years old by June 1. The registration fee is $40 per child and includes 28 hours of fun and learning, two local field trips, guest educators and daily snacks. For more information, visit the PJWC Facebook page. A registration form is available at tinyurl. com/cc32s3j. Mailed

registrations must be postmarked by Monday. In-person registration will be from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, at the Prouty Building in Princeton. PJWC will also be accepting volunteer applications from high school students who wish to earn volunteer hours. Volunteer applications can be downloaded from tinyurl.com/ bl7rb2w. Volunteers may also register in person at the Prouty Building on registration night. Registrations are processed on a first-come basis. Space is limited. For more information, call Meagan Johnson at 815-878-7824 or Pamela Wingate at 734-6585433.


7 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 7

Entertainment ‘Kid Pickers’ It was just about the coolest thing you’d ever seen. Most people might’ve described the old bottle as garbage. True, it was dirty and Terri half-sticking Schlichenmeyer out of the ground. Yes, it was junk. But there was writing on the side and a date on the bottom. It was blue and when the sun hit it just right, despite the dirt, you could see something awesome. Yeah, most people would call that bottle “garbage,” but you call it a treasure. And in the new book “Kid Pickers” by Mike Wolfe (with Lily Sprengelmeyer), you’ll meet folks who would agree.

When American Picker Mike Wolfe was your age, he loved nothing more than “picking through junk.” His room, he says, was filled with “rusty gold.” He especially loved bikes and old comic books. “I never thought of it as junk,” he says. “To me, this was treasure.” Picking is fun, you see, and becoming a Kid Picker is easy: having this book is a good start, and the tools you need are in your head. You shouldn’t even need a lot of money because some of the best finds are free or cheap. All you have to do is start looking for things that interest you. Neighborhood garage sales are great places to pick. They’re also great places to practice using your bargaining skills, so you’ll need to know how

to negotiate. Don’t be afraid to bargain down because it never hurts to ask, right? You’ll find a lot of great stuff at auctions, but that takes practice, lots of caution, and an adult’s help. Keep your eyes open and know what you’re bidding on, or you could end up with something you’d never want in a million years! Thrift shops are picker’s paradise. Antique stores have tons of treasures. Flea markets don’t have real fleas, but they do have lots of goodies. You might also have good luck picking within your own family’s attic or barn. Then, no matter where you find your prize, try to find out more about it. Who owned it? Where did it come from? Is it worth

Hall High School reschedules art festival for Monday SPRING VALLEY — Hall High School has rescheduled its art festival for Monday. The art exhibit will be open to the public in the gym from 6 to 7 p.m. The art work of approximately 80 students will be divided into 24 categories. While the art work is being judged, students will attend workshops where they will use their creative tal-

lots of money, or is it just cool? And finally… what are you going to do with it? Remember thinking you might strike it rich with something you dug out of a barn, a box, or a bucket of dirt? Give your kids those dreaming possibilities, too, by giving them “Kid Pickers” to read. Author and History Channel star Mike Wolfe speaks to the hearts of junk yard pups with a bit of biography and even more useful hints. I liked the encouragement that kids get here – including advice on picking their family history – and I loved the pictures. I also think the profiles of other young pickers are just plain fun. Alas, the words “ask permission” are somewhat lacking here so,

before you send your kids out with this book, be sure to repeat them a few times. With that reminder fresh in their heads, 7-to-12-year-olds will find “Kid Pickers” to be a goldmine. Terri Schlichenmeyer is a book reviewer from West Salem, Wis. She

Cliffnotes “Kid Pickers: How to Turn Junk into Treasure” by Mike Wolfe with Lily Sprengelmeyer. 2013, Feiwel and Friends. $12.99/$14.99 Canada. 114 pages.

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ents to make a project. Dinner will be served to participants in the cafeteria. At 6 p.m., everyone will return to the gym for the awards ceremony. The art festival is being made possible through a grant provided by the Hall Education Foundation. The organizer for this event is Karen Klopcic, art teacher at Hall High School. Ford 815.875.1180

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8 8 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Food court Warmer weather is finally here … I hope, and rather than heat up the kitchen when there are so many activities needing your attention, maybe just try whipping up some sandwiches for the family. I hope you enjoy these.

Cucumber Sandwiches 1 8-ounce carton cream cheese spread 2 teaspoons ranch salad dressing mix 12 slices pumpernickel rye bread 2 to 3 medium cucumbers In a bowl, combine cream cheese and dressing mix. Spread on one side of each slice of bread. Peel cucumbers if desired; thinly slice and place on six slices of bread. Top with remaining bread. Serve immediately.

Cran-Orange Turkey Bagel

In a bowl, mash oranges 2 16.3-ounce tubes large with a fork. Stir in cranrefrigerated biscuits berry sauce. Spread cream (like Grands) cheese over the bottom 8 ounces cheddar cheese of each bagel; top with slices or 2 cups (8 turkey and cran-orange ounces) shredded sauce. Replace bagel tops. cheddar cheese In a skillet, cook beef and onion over medium heat until beef is no longer pink; drain. Add the taco season1/4 cup steak sauce (I ing and prepare according like A-1) to package directions. Cool 2 tablespoons plus 1/3 slightly. Flatten half of the cup Shake ‘n Bake biscuits into 4-inch circles; seasoned coating mix, place on cookie sheet. divided Spoon 1/4 cup meat mix1 pound ground beef ture onto each; top with 4 hamburger buns In a bowl, combine the two cheese slices or 1/4 steak sauce and 2 table- cup shredded cheese. Flatspoons of coating mix. ten the remaining biscuits; Crumble beef over mixture place on top and pinch and mix until combined. edges to seal tightly. Bake Shape into four 3 1/2-inch at 400° for 15 minutes or patties. Dip both sides of until golden brown. patties in remaining coating. Place on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 20 minutes or until 6 hot dogs, minced no longer pink, turning 1/2 cup dill pickle relish once. Serve on buns with 1/4 cup chili sauce desired condiments. 2 tablespoons prepared

Oven-Baked Burgers

Hot Dog Sandwiches

Taco Puffs

1 11-ounce can mandarin oranges, drained 1 pound ground beef 1 16-ounce can whole1/2 cup onion, chopped berry cranberry sauce 1 envelope taco seasoning 6 tablespoons cream cheese, softened 6 onion bagels or any other flavor you like, split and toasted 1 pound deli turkey, thinly sliced

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Digital Presentation Fri . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 7:15 9:30 Sat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:45 4:30 7:15 9:30 Sun . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:45 4:30 7:15 Showtimes good 5/3/13 thru 5/9/13 .

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• Rhubarb • Onion Plants & Sets • Asparagus • Garden Seed • Seed Potatoes • Strawberries • Blueberries • Raspberries • Over 40 Varieties of Peppers & 80 Varieties of Tomatoes

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Walk a mile in her

ShoeS a men’S march againSt violence

May 18, 2013 • 1-4 PM Princeton

Will you be

MAN ENOUGH

to teach them?

Walk organized by the City of Princeton Tourism & Freedom House Register at www.firstgiving.com or call Freedom House at 815-872-0087

mustard 12 slices of bread In a small bowl, combine hot dogs, relish, chili sauce and mustard. Mix well. Spread on six slices of bread; top with the remaining bread.

Italian Beef Hoagies 1 boneless sirloin tip roast (about 4 pounds), halved 2 envelopes Italian salad dressing mix 2 cups water 1 16-ounce jar mild pepper rings, undrained Hoagie buns, split Place roast in 5-quart slow cooker. Combine the salad dressing mix with water; pour over roast. Cover and cook on low for eight hours or until meat is tender. Remove meat; shred with a fork and return to slow cooker. Add pepper rings; heat through. Spoon 1/2 cup meat mixture onto each bun.

Judy Dyke GRANDMA JUDY’S CAFE

Bacon Bean Sandwiches

Bacon-Tomato Bagel Melts

5 slices bread, lightly toasted 1 16-ounce can pork and beans 10 bacon strips, cooked and drained 4 slices onion, separated into rings 5 slices American cheese or Velveeta Place toast on an ungreased baking sheet. Spread each slice with 3 tablespoons beans. Top each with two bacon strips, a few onion rings and a cheese slice. Bake at 350° for 15 to 20 minutes or until cheese is melted and lightly browned.

2 bagels, split and toasted 8 tomato slices 8 bacon strips, cooked 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese Ranch salad dressing Place bagel halves, cut side up, on a baking sheet. Top each with two tomato slices and two bacon strips. Sprinkle with cheese. Broil 5 inches from heat for 1 to 2 minutes or until cheese begins to brown. Serve with ranch dressing.

See Recipes Page 9


9 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Recipes From Page 8

Triple-Decker Salmon Club 3/4 cup small curd cottage cheese 1/4 cup dill pickle relish 1 6-ounce can salmon, drained, bones and skin removed 1 celery rib, chopped 6 slices bread, toasted Lettuce leaves In a small bowl, combine cottage cheese and pickle relish. In another bowl, combine salmon and celery. For each sandwich, top one piece of toast with lettuce and half of the cottage cheese mixture. Top with a second piece of toast; spread with half of the salmon mixture. Top with a third piece of toast and serve immediately. Makes two sandwiches.

Open-Faced Sandwich Supreme 3 1 8 8 4

cups small broccoli florets envelope hollandaise sauce mix ounces sliced deli turkey ounces sliced deli ham slices sourdough bread, toasted In a saucepan, cook the broccoli in a small amount of water until tender, drain. Prepare the hollandaise sauce according to package directions. Warm the turkey and ham (I use the microwave) and layer over the toast. Top with broccoli and sauce. Makes four openfaced sandwiches.

Tangy Beef Turnovers 1 pound ground beef 1 medium onion, chopped 1 16-ounce jar sauerkraut, rinsed, drained and chopped 1 cup (4 ounces) Swiss cheese, shredded

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 9 3 8-ounce tubes refrigerated crescent rolls In a skillet, cook beef and onion over medium heat until meat is no longer pink. Drain. Add sauerkraut and cheese; mix well. Unroll crescent roll dough and separate into rectangles. Place on greased baking sheet; pinch seams to seal. Place 1/2 cup beef mixture in the center of each rectangle. Bring corners to the center and pinch to seal. Bake at 375° or until golden brown.

Nutty Marmalade Sandwiches 1/2 cup peanut butter 1/4 cup orange marmalade 1/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese 1 to 2 teaspoons lemon juice 6 slices bread In a small bowl, combine peanut butter, marmalade, cheese and lemon juice; mix well. Spread over three slices of bread; top with remaining bread.

Corny Chicken Wraps 2 cups cubed, cooked chicken breast 1 11-ounce can whole kernel corn, drained 1 cup salsa 1 cup (4 ounces) cheddar cheese, shredded 8 6-inch flour tortillas, warmed In a saucepan, combine chicken, corn and salsa. Cook until headed through. Spread cheese over tortillas. Place about 1/2 cup chicken mixture down the center of each tortilla; roll up. Secure with toothpicks. I hope you enjoy these quick and easy sandwiches. If you have any questions, email me at judyd2313@ frontier.com. I’m always happy to receive your recipes too, which I will publish in an upcoming column.

815.875.1180 West Peru Street • Princeton, IL www.browningdealerships.com

don’t miss this incredible sale with prices that won’t last long! 2011 Ford Fiesta SE

2012 Ford Focus SEL

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2013 Lincoln MKS

2003 Ford Mustang

Bring Mom out to enjoy the beauty of our gardens!

Kids’ Containers for Mother’s Day Saturday, May 4 at 10 AM

Here’s a chance for the kids to get their hands dirty and create something pretty for Mom.

Use your Princeton Preferred Card to receive 10% oFF annuals! Free GardeninG ToGeTher Workshops SATurDAy, MAy 4 Saturday, May 11 at 10 am LeT’s TaLk hosTas

at 10 am CanninG 101

Workshops are planned through June 8th. Visit our website for the complete listing.

Hostas, Trees & Shrubs, Perennials, Daylilies, Grasses, Ponds, Pottery, Granite, Garden Art

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2008 Ford Fusion SEL

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sale absolutely ends monday, may 5th, 2013! *Plus tax, title, doc and evr fees. See Browning Dealerships for details.

Join our ViP TexT LisT

To Receive Exclusive Offers & Updates! Get up to 20 messages per month per program. Text HELP for help. Text STOP to cancel. Msg&Data Rates May Apply. Terms & Conditions available at www.homepagesdirectories.com, email textsupport@homepagesdirectories.com, or call 1-800-807-6870.


10 Sports 10 • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Sports Senior spotlight Katie Hoffert Name: Katie Hoffert Nickname: Bugg. School:  Hall High School. Date/place of birth: I was born on Dec. 7, 1994 in Spring Valley. Hometown: Hollowayville. Family: My parents are Mark and Lisa Hoffert. I also have three sisters, Tricia, Beth and Abby. Sports: Cross country, cheerleading, and track and field. Favorite sport and why: Track and cross country are tied for my favorite sport because I love to run. Likes: running and ice cream. Dislikes: mean people. Person with the greatest influence on my athletic career (and why): Liz Mosbach has greatly influenced my athletic career because she is an amazing runner and her dedication and success has pushed me to be great like her. Person with the greatest influence in my life (and why): My cousin, Julie, because she has inspired me to become a doctor. If stranded on a deserted island, I would have my: Cell phone. The CD in my player at home/car is: Taylor Swift. People would be surprised to know: I have a major sweet tooth. I stay home to watch: Criminal Minds. When I need luck for a big game, I: Wear my spikes I’ve had since 6th grade. The funniest person I’ve ever met (and why): Nicki Ernat. Have you met her? What they’ll say about me at school after I graduate: She was the valedictorian. Most embarrassing moment: Tripping up the stairs while going to class. Most unforgettable moment: Going to state three years in a row with my best friends and an amazing team. Ultimate sports fantasy: Placing at State in cross country or track. What I would like to do in life: I would like to be an OB/GYN when I grow up. Three words that best describe myself: Outgoing, perfectionist, friendly.

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

The ultimate sports fantasy for Hall senior Katie Hoffert would be placing at State in cross country or track.


11 Sports Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • Sports • 11

LaMoille Jack and Jill Relays BCR photos/Hal Adkins

DePue’s David Moreno is a shadow of himself in the hurdles at LaMoille.

Bureau Valley South’s Kylie Floyd lets the discus rip.

Girls are on the go for a relay at LaMoille. The girls joined together with the boys for the “Jack Brenna Rieker hands off to LaMoille Allen teammate Caleb Sarff in the Jack and Jill” events. and Jill Relays.

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Unlike choresthe thatdifferent pile up strategies in the driveway, clutter We other will discuss available to help the put garage run wild front yard, financial yourorfinances in in linethe with both youryour shortand longUnlike chores that up the driveway, clutter situation isother a little less obvious. so important Unlike other chores that pile pileThat’s up in inwhy theit’s driveway, clutter term goals. Unlike other that in the driveway, clutter or run in the front yard, your the garage orchores run wild inpile theup front yard, your financial financial tothe takegarage advantage of wild our complimentary financial review the garage orlittle runless wild inpile theup front yard, your financial situation is a obvious. That’s why it’s so important Unlike other chores that in the driveway, clutter situation is a little less obvious. That’s why it’s so important at Unlike least once a year. To schedule yourof complimentary financial call other chores that pile up in the driveway, clutter situation is a little obvious. it’s so review, to advantage our review to take advantage of our complimentary financial review thetake garage or runless wild incomplimentary theThat’s front why yard,financial yourimportant financial or visit today. to take advantage of our complimentary financial review the garage or run wild in the front yard, your financial at least once a year. at least once a year. situation is a little less obvious. That’s why it’s so important Weat will different strategies available to help leastdiscuss once a the year. situation is aChris little obvious. That’s why it’s so important Mless Kieffer, AAMS® to take advantage of our complimentary financial review We will discuss the different strategies available help put your finances in line with both your shortand longWe will discuss the different strategies available to help Financial of Advisor to take advantage our complimentary financialto review We will discuss the different strategies available to help at least once a year. put your finances in line with both your shortand put goals. your finances in line with both your short- and longlongterm 200 Ace Road Suite 5 at least once a year. put your finances in line with both your short- and longterm goals. .

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term goals. 815-875-6565 will discuss the different strategies available tocall help ToWe schedule your complimentary financial review, To schedule your complimentary financial review, call We will discuss the different strategies available to help To schedule your complimentary review, call your finances in line with both financial your shortand longTo schedule your complimentary financial review, call orput visit today. or visit today. or putvisit yourtoday. finances in line with both your short- and longwww.edwardjones.com Member SIPC term goals. or visit today. ® Chris M Kieffer, AAMS® www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Chris M Kieffer, AAMS® term goals. Chris M Kieffer, AAMS® Chris Kieffer, AAMS Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Chris M Kieffer, AAMS® Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Financial Advisor 200 Ace Suite 200your Ace Road Road Suite 5 To schedule complimentary financial review, call 200 Ace Road Suite 55 5 200 Ace Road Suite Princeton, IL 61356 To schedule financial review, call Princeton, ILcomplimentary 61356 200your Ace Road Suite 5 IL 61356 815-875-6565 or visitPrinceton, today. Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-6565 Princeton, IL 61356 or visit815-875-6565 today. 815-875-6565 815-875-6565 .

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12 • Marketplace • Thursday, May 2, 2013

General Terms and Policies

- 200 Employment

The Bureau County Republican reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion.

228 • Help Wanted

LINE AD DEADLINES: • Tuesday, BCR deadline Monday 9 am • Thursday, BCR and BCR Journal deadline Tuesday, 12 pm • Saturday, BCR deadline Friday, 9 am We Accept 815-875-4461

-100Announcements 110 • Special Notices 2 CEMETERY PLOTS at Elm Lawn in Princeton. $500/both or best offer. Call 513-932-1136

Need To Get The Word Out? We Can Help You Get It Out Right Here! Give Us A Call 815-875-4461

FULL-TIME ASSISTANT MAINTENANCE COORDINATOR POSITION This job requires afternoon through evening position assisting in equipment maintenance and custodial activities. Some weekends worked as needed also. Experience with pool equipment, exercise equipment, HVAC, electrical and plumbing systems preferred. High school diploma required with past work references. Interested person needs to be self motivated and enjoy working with people. Good benefit package. Send resume to: Bureau County Metro Center, Attn: M. Anderson, 837 Park Avenue West, Princeton, IL 61356. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE DETASSELERS NEEDED! Check this site for upcoming training dates: www. bickettdonnerhelms.com Experienced CARPENTER Needed for building & remodeling. Must have own tools, transportation & drivers license. Reply to: Box 301- Bureau County Republican, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 NOW HIRING: General Labor; CNC; Assemblers; Material Handlers. Needed All Shifts Apply online www.trnstaffing.com

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

The Putnam County Public Library District has openings for a LIBRARY CLERK at the Condit Library located in Putnam, IL. Applicants should be a team player, enjoy helping people and have excellent typing and computers skills. Individual must own a reliable vehicle and be able to lift 20 pounds. Weekly schedules may vary and include some evenings and Saturdays and working at multiple branches. Library experience helpful. Contact the director at the Hennepin Headquarters: 815-925-7020. EOE

ST. JOSPEH'S HOME Care & Commitment are ageless. Looking for a fresh start? St. Joseph's home is the place for you. We are looking for qualified individuals to help us continue our growth. *Nursing Department RN's; LPN's; CNA's we need you! Please apply in person, by email, or fax: St. Joseph's Home, 401 Ninth Street, Lacon, IL 61540. Phone: 309-246-2175, ext 12; Fax: 309-246-2299. Email: zmurphy @stjosephnursinghomelacon.com

Frontier Communications is looking for a strong leader to fill the position of TECHNICAL SUPERVISOR in Princeton Illinois. Potential candidates will manage a team of technicians with the purpose of providing innovative and reliable communications products and services to our local customers. A background in technology and previous experience managing people are true plus's. If interested please visit our website & apply at: www. frontier.com/careers

SALES MANAGER HEALTHCARE. Colonial HealthCare and Rehabilitation Centre, Princeton, IL is seeking a Part-time Sales Manager. This position drives census, payor mix, generates quality referrals from key accounts, with a heavy focus on new business. The ideal candidate will have experience in health care sales, high energy, with a proven track record in ability to increase referrals. Candidate must be a team player and have organizational skills. No phone calls, please. 2 ways to apply: Bring resume and fill out an application at Colonial or send resume to: Ljackson@ managcare.com. All potential applicants will be contacted for an interview

230 • Work Wanted

Gateway Services, Inc. has an opening for a parttime REGISTERED NURSE 15-20 hours per week. Position involves working with adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Duties would also include monitoring and training staff. The successful candidate must have 2 years nursing experience within hospital, nursing home, home health, or private practice. Selected candidate must have strong record keeping skills and be highly organized. Pre-employment physical and drug screen required. Applications can be obtained at www. gateway-services.org or by visiting our office at 406 South Gosse Blvd., Princeton, IL. EOE/EEOC DELIVERY DRIVERS; WAIT STAFF. All part-time. Apply in person: Belluccio's, 115 South Main, Sheffield

FIND IT RIGHT HERE!

NEED EXTRA CASH?? Routes are available delivering the Bureau County Republican in Princeton, Sheffield, Spring Valley, Tiskilwa and Walnut. Delivery days are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings by 7:00 am. No Collecting Involved. Ask About Our $25 Sign-On Bonus. For more information, please call Tom Long, District Manager (815) 875-4461 Ext. 235

HARD TO FIND THAT RIGHT PERSON FOR THAT JOB OPENING? The Bureau County Republican Classified can reach just the right person you are looking for to fill that job opening. Call 815875-4461

Are you tired of cleaning your home or office? Let me do it for you! Time for Spring Cleaning. Call 815-483-6554 High School Student looking for Yards to Mow in the Thompson/South Church/Park Avenue area of Princeton. Call 815-878-5257 MICHAEL'S CARPENTRY If you are ready to have some work done this spring, I am a local General Contractor with over 25 years experience. Room Additions, Siding, Remodeling, Roofing, Garages, Pole Buildings, & much more. Call Mike, 815-718-9050 for a quote

231 • Childcare Stay at Home Mom has Openings for 3 children, full-time. Many years experience. References available. 815-303-6846

232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Bureau County Republican Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Bureau County Republican Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 300 Services 320 • Misc Services ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICES RIGHT HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

320 • Misc Services

We Remove and Recycle all appliances, farm equipment & vehicles. Please Call 815-9156374

- 400 Merchandise 441 • Wanted to Buy

*WANTED* Old barns to dismantle for the lumber. Over 200 barns taken down in the area. Experienced, insured. Call anytime 815-303-7658

WANTED: Cattle squeeze shoot with head gate. Call 815-223-7883

LIBERTY VILLAGE OF PRINCETON

Service Technician

JOB FAIR

140 North 6th St., Princeton, IL 61356 (815)875-6600

May 7, 2013 Open Interviews 7am-7pm. Full Benefit Package. www.simplythefinest.net

WANTED: Chest freezer in good condition. Call 815-646-666

For Tractor Repair Experience preferred, but will consider entry level individual. Send resume or contact:

Diller-Rod

701 E. Peru St. Princeton, IL 61356

WANTED – Full Time Accountant for an Equipment Dealership • Associates/Bachelors in Acctg. or eq. experience required (BA preferred) • Proficiency with Windows and Microsoft Office • Responsibilities include: - Internal and external accounts receivable - Interface with retail customers - TEAM player that works with all departments - General office duties, filing, answering phones • Health benefits and 401k • Willingness to learn a new business system, comfortable working with customers, proactive in solving problems. Email resumes to jobposting61540@gmail.com Resumes can also be mailed to: Job Posting 61540 PO Box 13, Lacon, IL 61540

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16TH ANNUAL MADISON Alliant Energy Center. ANTIQUE SHOW. Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4. May 4-5, 2013. $6 Admission. $5.00 with Ad. Alliant Energy Center. Madisonantiqueshow.com Over 50, recommend. Sat. Sun. 10-4.appraisals. HEALTH $1.009-5, verbal antique / FITNESS Easy to do at home. $6 Admission.Smalls $5.00 only. with Ad. coloncancerselfscreeningtest.com Madisonantiqueshow.com HELP WANTED Over 50, recommend. AUCTIONS $1.00 verbal antique appraisals. Easy DRIVERS to do at home. Smalls only.BROS. RITCHIE UNRESERVED PUBLIC

AUCTIONS EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS

Thurs, May 30 (Chicago) & RITCHIE BROS. Fri, May 31 (Joliet). UNRESERVED PUBLICLarge equipment/ truck selection, 800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS no minimum bids. 815-875-4461 Fax 815-875-1235 Thurs, May 30 (Chicago) & 815.941.6400 / rbauction.com Fri, May 31 (Joliet). Large equipment/ truck selection, BOATS no minimum bids. THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & 815.941.6400 / rbauction.com Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 BOATS theboatdock.com

TanTara Transportation HELP WANTED is now hiring OTR Company DRIVERS Flatbed Drivers and Owner

Operators. Competitive Pay TanTara Transportation is Home Time. Call us nowand hiring OTR Company @ 800-650-0292 or apply Flatbed Drivers and Owner online at www.tantara.us Operators. Competitive Pay and Home Time. Call us @ 800-650-0292 or apply online at www.tantara.us

Company Drivers: $2500 Sign- $.40 ALL MILES! MACHINERY On Bonus! Super Service is HAULERS. Flatbed, Stepdeck, ALL MILES! Company Sign-RGN.$.40Practical hiring solo Drivers: and team$2500 drivers. milesMACHI paid HAULERS. Flatbed, Ste On Bonus! Super Service Great hometime options. isweekly! $1000 sign-on bonus. Practical Class miles hiring required. solo andCallteam drivers.PaidRGN. CDL-A 888-471health insurance! A $1000 Great or hometime 7081 apply online options. at CDL.weekly! Call Dawn at sign-on 309-946- b www.superservicellc.com or health apply insurance! online atC CDL-A required. Call 888-471-3230Paid CDL. Call Dawn at 30 7081 - One or Cent apply Driver Raiseonline after 6 atwww.tennanttrucklines.com

3230 OFFERS or apply CDL-A onlin www.superservicellc.com and 12 months. $0.03 AVERITT www.tennanttrucklines.co Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. a Strong, Stable, Driver - One Cent Raise after 6Drivers Daily or Weekly Career. OFFERS Experienced C AVERITT and 12 months. Pay, $0.03Profitable Hometime and Recent Grads -S Drivers a Strong, Enhanced Options. QuarterlyCDL-A, Bonus.Drivers 3 months OTR exp. 800-414- Excellent Benefits, Weekly Profitable Career. Exper Daily or Weekly Pay, 9569 www.driveknight.com Hometime, Paid training. Hometime Options. CDL-A, Drivers and Recent Gr 888-362-8608 & Flatbed Company Excellent Benefits, W 3Tanker months OTR exp. 800-414-AverittCareers.com Drivers / Independent Hometime, Paid tr 9569 www.driveknight.com Equal Opportunity Employer Contractors! Immediate Tanker & Flatbed Company Placement Available Drivers / Independent Best Opportunities in the Contractors! Immediate Trucking Business Available CALLPlacement TODAY 800-277-0212 Best Opportunities in the or www.primeinc.com Trucking Business “Partners In Excellence” CALL TODAY OTR Drivers APU800-277-0212 Equipped or www.primeinc.com Pre-Pass EZ-pass

888-362-8608

LEGAL SERVICES AverittCareers.com

Equal Opportunity Employ

LEGAL SERVICE

TRAINING/EDUCATION passenger “Partners In policy. Excellence” 2012 & Newer equipment. OTR Drivers APU Equipped ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE 100% NO touch. from Home *Medical, *Business Pre-Pass EZ-pass Butler Transport TRAINING/EDUCAT *Criminal Justice *Hospitality. passenger policy. 1-800-528-7825 Job placement assistance. 2012 & Newer equipment. ATTEND COLLEGE ON Computer and Financial Aid 100% NO touch. from Home *Medical, *Bu if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Butler Transport *Criminal Justice *Hospi Call 888-336-5053 1-800-528-7825 Job placement assistan www.CenturaOnline.com

Computer and Financia if qualified. SCHEV autho Call 888-336-5053


Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • Marketplace • 13

442 • Lawn & Garden

450 • Under $1000

460 • Garage Sales

460 • Garage Sales

460 • Garage Sales

TWIGGY'S TREE FARM *White Pines *Arbors *Norway Spruce *Colorado Blue Spruce *Serbian Spruce 3' Average, in nursery pots. Your Choice $15. While they last! 815-303-8158 TWIGGYS TREE FARM Maple Tree Special *October Glory *Autumn Blaze 4' in nursery pots. $20. While they last! 815-303-8158

New rear tire chains for IH Cub tractor, $40; 4'x4' lighted sign, $80; large flashing sign (no letters), $50. 815-646-4321

BUDA 438 High Street. Friday, Saturday, May 3, 4, 8am-4pm. Baby girl and boy nb-2t & adult clothes S-XL, most name brand (.50¢-$1), glider, stroller, Eddie Bauer baby seat/car seat, grill, tent, movies, a lot more baby and misc. stuff

PRINCETON 416 West Hudson. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, May 2, 3, 4; 8am-4pm. Bedding, throws, wired ribbon & many items never shown

RURAL PRINCETON 16025-2300 East Street. East on Route 6. Saturday, May 4, 8am-3pm. ONE DAY ONLY! Books, Records, Trundle Bed, Old Oak Table, 2 Old Chairs, Small Tools, Misc. Stuff

448 • Pets & Livestock 2 Elderly Felines searching for caring foster home, due to family relocation. Call 815-875-4170 DONATE NOW! “The animals are crying” Tri-County Humane Society. LaSalle, Bureau, Putnam Counties. Call 815-875-6145 or 815-872-9781 or send donation to: PO Box 1601, LaSalle, IL 61301

NEED PETS OR PET SUPPLIES? It’s right here in the Classified!

450 • Under $1000 2 pick up trucks with barn siding, some red/white/ naked, all cleaned. $850 or best offer. Call 815-875-1245 3 Hanging strap on deer stands. $75, $65, $50. Call 815-894-2884 40" Lawn Thatcher $50; Metal Cutting Table Saw $100; 195-75-15 tire $35. Call 815-664-2236 Beautiful small TV/Video Cabinet, 37”x21”x44”, $70. Could also be used as storage unit. Very good condition. 815-878-7525 John Deere L110 Kohler 18, 42”, great shape. $950. Call 815-875-1802 or 815-876-7394 Set of YOUTH GOLF CLUBS with stand up bag. $50. Call 815-875-1910

Patio set: table, chairs, base, umbrella. Excellent shape. $75. Putnam. Call 630-661-4729 Pella wood folding door 78"x86" $50; 15' chest freezer $300; 1 hp swimming pool pump, sand filter $300. 815-646-4361 Recliner rocker, tan.$85; yard machine 1650psi, new in box, $100. Or best offers. Call 815-663-1231 Sewing Machine Cabinet, $15. Call 815-875-3538 Solid oak table lion claw legs, $225; bag of 32 golf balls, $10; patio/porch table, 4 chairs, $80. Call 815-830-8153 Torro self propelled bagging mower, $100. 3-harrow sections, $150 each. push reel mower, $50. Call 815-303-9456 Ethan Allen Dining Table with 5 upholstered Queen Anne spoon leg chairs. Has 2 leaves plus pad for table $150. 630-341-1663 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 week. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. Go to: bcrnews.com, to place an ad. Use category merchandize and bargains or E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls! Washer/dryer, $200 both; kitchen cabinets & counter top $800. Call 815-878-9690

Need To Get The Word Out? We Can Help You Get It Out Here! 815-875-4461

MCNABB TOWN-WIDE GARAGE SALES (Including rural sites) Saturday, May 4; 8am - 3pm Bake Sale and Coffee Hour at McNabb Fire Hall. Maps Available. Restrooms NORTH UTICA 129 Wright Drive. Friday, May 3, 9am3pm; Saturday, May 4, 9am-2pm. RIEBE ESTATE SALE Antiques, curved glass china cabinet, military foot locker, hope chest, bead board fruit cupboard, wooden rocker, enamel ware, oak end table, misc. household items PRINCETON 1255 & 1250 Woodridge Court & 1530 Deerfield Road. Thursday, May 2, 2pm-6pm; Friday May 3, 4pm-7pm; Saturday, May 4, 7am-noon. Home decor/furniture, collectibles, holiday, outdoor gear, deer stand, maternity, baby gear, boy clothes newborn-18 month, girl newborn-6/9 month, baby gear, toys PRINCETON 128 Park Avenue West. Friday, May 3, 5pm-8pm; Saturday, May 4, 7am-12pm. Hardware items, teen age clothing, toys, games, household, bicycles, office supplies, furniture, display racks, misc. Rain Date: May 10 & 11th

PRINCETON 461 Griswold Street. Thursday, May 2 5pm – 8pm; Friday, May 3 8am – 2pm; Saturday, May 4 8am – 12pm. Lots of items, furniture, décor, adult, children, teen clothing & décor, jewlery, children & adult books. PRINCETON 701 Linnwood Drive. Friday, April 26, 8am-5pm & Saturday, April 27, 8am-3pm. Also on Friday, May 3, 8am5pm & Saturday, May 4, 8am–3pm. MOVING SALE. Larger size clothes, antiques, furniture, china/ display cabinets, misc. dishes, canners, jars, decorating items. Will be adding more as space opens up

r ber you Remem dchild, ran child, g ephew n niece or h t wi a

Jenna Seibert

E E R F . y hda ad 1st Birt

April 10, 2012 Love, Mommy and Daddy

-600Transportation 614 • Car Sales

To place your FREE Happy 1st Birthday ad in the Bureau County Republican please send us the following:

******* $$ CASH PAID $$ We pay top dollar for junk (cars, machinery, etc.)

• Birth Date:________________________________________

Call 815-878-9353

• Salutation:________________________________________

NEED A USED VEHICLE? The Bureau County Republican Classified is a great source to help you find your next vehicle.

Garage Sales? Advertise Here! 815-875-4461 EstatE aUCtION

FIREaRMs - sWORDs - KNIVEs CaP GUNs - DECOYs - aNtIQUEs

• Baby’s Name:_____________________________________

• Contact Name_____________ Day Phone:_____________ *Picture will be returned only if a self-addressed stamped envelope is included.

One Ad Per Child Please

800 Ace Road • P.O. Box 340 • Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 • www.bcrnews.com/classifieds

LAWN & GARDEN PUBLIC AUCTION The following items will be offered at Public Auction located at The Shed, 401 W. Main St., Wyanet, IL 61379 Look for this and upcoming auctions on RickRediger.com and AuctionZip.com

SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 9:30 A.M.

SHEFFIELD, IL Attorney for Seller: Jim Reese Ward, Murray, Pace & Johnson, P.C. 202 E. Fifth St., Sterling, IL 61081 815-625-8200 Not Responsible for Accidents • I.D. Required

LAWN MOWERS & COMPACT TRACTORS John Deere X748 Ultimate, 4x4, 60” Cut, Ser# A030404, 1780 Hrs *John Deere 316, 50” Cut, Ser# X010493, 2071 Hrs, Pull Type Bagger & Front Mount Thatcher *John Deere X485, 62” Cut * Dixon Grizzly Commercial ZTR, 350 Hrs *John Deere 300, 48” Cut *John Deere LX255, 42” Cut *John Deere 425, 54” Cut *John Deere 160, 38” Cut, Mounted Bagger *John Deere GX255, 48” Cut *John Deere LA145, 48” Cut *John Deere 757, 60” Cut *John Deere 410, 42” Cut *John Deere 345, 48” Cut *Cub LoBoy, Mower Deck, 3pt *John Deere 285 Mower *John Deere LX172, 38” Cut *John Deere 245, Snow Blade *2005 Scag Turf Tiger ZTR, 61” Cut, 121 Hrs on a New Motor *2006 Scag Turf Tiger, 72” Cut, Deck Replaced in 2011 *John Deere 400, 3pt Hitch *Simplicity Broadmore Mower, 44” Cut, 16 HP *John Deere 54” Deck for 425 Mower *John Deere 325, 48” Cut, NICE Mower *Massey Fergeson 1200, 4’ Belly Mower, VERY NICE Tractor *Toro Model 70 Reel Type Mower, 10 HP Kohler *Simplicity Broadmore, 44” Cut, 17HP *John Deere LT155, 42” Cut *John Deere 445, 54” Cut *John Deere 240, 44” Cut *Toro LX468, 42” Cut, 46” Front Mount Blade *Exmark Lazer Z, ZTR Mower *John Deere 850 Tractor, Diesel, 3PT, Turf Tires COMPACT & UTILITY TRACTORS 2010 Kubota BX2660 Tractor, Loader, 4WD, 60” Belly Mower *Yanmar 336 Diesel Tractor, 1286 Hrs, PTO, 3pt, 2WD *Yanmar YM240D Tractor, Diesel, MFWD, PTO, 3pt, Ser#01325 w/ Woods #59 Belly Mower *IH 544 Hydro, Loader w/ 60” Bucket *John Deere 2010 Tractor, Loader w/ 72” Bucket *Ford 3000 Tractor, Loader w/ 60” Bucket *Bobcat 542B Skidsteer, Gas IMPLEMENTS & ATTACHMENTS Woods SGT88 Tiller, 3pt, PTO, LIKE NEW *John Deere 272 3pt Mower, 540 PTO *Woods #72 6’ 3PT Mower, NICE *Stout HD72 Rock/Brush Open End Grapple Bucket, Twin Ram *Service 6’ 3PT Blade *International 4’ 3PT PTO Tiller *John Deere 405 3PT, 4’ Rotary Mower *Woods HD315 Batwing Mower VEHICLES—RECREATIONAL VEHICLES—TRAILERS 2000 Ford F350 Dually, 7.3L Powerstroke, 2 WD, Crew Cab, Long Bed, Lariat, Aux Fuel Tank/Tool Box Combo *1999 Ford F250, 7.3L Powerstroke, Crew Cab *1993 Ford F150, Reg Cab, Long Box, 301 CI Engine, 4x4 * 2006 Prowler Camper, 31’ w/ 15’ Slide Out, Bumper Hitch *2003 Cameo LXI Carriage 5th Wheel Camper, 35’ w/ Slide Outs *1992 Haulmark 24’ Enclosed Trailer, New Heavy Duty Axles *1974 Chevy Custom/20 Truck, 4WD, Elec Over Hydraulic Dump Bed* PJ Trailers, 18’ w/ 2’ Beaver Implement Trailer, 2 5/16” Ball, Mounted Ramps, Tandem 8 Bolt Axles, Mounted Jib Crane ATV’S--MOTORCYCLES 2005 Yamaha R6, Model YZFR6L, 600 CC, 16,600 MI, Vin# JYARJ06EX5A024956, Dynojet Power Commander, Yoshimira Carbon Fiber Pipe, NICE BIKE *Honda TRX400EX, 399 CC, 2WD, Aluminum Wheels, ITP Holeshot Tires 50% Fronts 90% Rears, Ser# 478TE230514103648, NICE ATV *Polaris 325 ATV *2009 Polaris Sportsman 500, On Demand AWD *Suzuki Quadmaster 500, 4WD, 48” Blade MISCELLANEOUS Homemade 2 Wheel Lawn Cart *Chainlink Fence *Landscape Timbers *Full Size Scaffolding, 7 Aluminum Planks, 9 Complete Sections *Earth Quake Rear Tyne Tiller, Like New *Garden Composter *Wheelchair Lift for Receiver Hitch, Jib Crane for Wheelchair *Little Rascal Scooter, Router w/ Table *Tool Shop Wood Lathe *Wheelbarrow *Yard Cart *Miscellaneous Outdoor Furniture and Yard Art STILL ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS CALL OR BRING THEM IN TO “THE SHED” This is a Partial Listing – Many More Items – Preview during business hours Number System Will Be Used – ID Required – CASH OR GOOD CHECK Not Responsible for Accidents

REDIGER AUCTION SERVICE WYANET, IL 61379 – 815-699-7999 RICK REDIGER, AUCTIONEER

REDIGER AUCTION SERVICE WYANET, IL 815-699-7999 RICK REDIGER JON MOON JEREMY REDIGER

PRINCETON 1809 South Fletcher. Saturday, May 4, 8am-1pm. Multi-Family Sale. Lots of baby items, small animal stuff, books, Longaberger, Pampered Chef, bistro set, scrapbooking supplies & more

HAVING A GARAGE SALE? The Bureau County Republican can promote your garage sale. Just call 815-875-4461.

MEMORIaL DaY WEEKEND

MaY 25, 26 & 27, 2013

To Be Held At Tumbleson Auction Center Located At 1635 North Main, Princeton, IL

If you have any firearms or decoys please call today. Space is limited. We are buying any firearms. Please Call tumbleson auction Company

815-872-1852

REAL ESTATE AUCTION

The following described Real Estate will be offered at Public Auction located at the property, 136 N. Washington St., Sheffield, IL 61361 Look for this and upcoming Auctions on www.rickrediger.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 2013 5:30 P.M.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Located at 136 N. Washington, Sheffield, IL, Bureau County – Manufactured single story home on concrete block foundation. Approximately 1152 sq. ft. offering kitchen with dining area, living room, family room 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms, on a crawl space with concrete floor, gas forced air heat and central air conditioning. The roof was replaced in 2009. On the 80’ x 150’ lot there is also a 2 car oversized garage. City water and sewer. Tax I.D. number is 14-19-176006. Brief legal description is Sheffield-North Add. L 2 BLK 25. TERMS AND CONDITIONS: 1) The successful bidder will be required to enter into a standard real estate purchase contract with 10% of the purchase price due immediately following the auction. The balance will be due and payable on or before July 11, 2013. 2) The seller shall provide a title insurance policy in the amount of the purchase price of the subject property. 3) The property is being sold in “as is“ condition, with no warranties of any kind. 4) The information is believed to be accurate. However, we strongly urge all prospective buyers to thoroughly research all pertinent data and to draw their own conclusions. 5) All announcements made the day of the sale take precedence over any previously printed advertised terms or conditions. 6) To view the property contact Rick Rediger – Auctioneer at 815-6997999.

***OPEN HOUSE*** Tuesday, May 21st • 5 -6 P.M. Seller:

ART AND DONNA JOHNSON ESTATE,


14 • Marketplace • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Business Directory Marketplace

Ron SchafeR SeRvice and RepaiR appLiance RepaiR fuRnace & a/c

815-876-6135 BOB’S DRYWALL, PAINT, ETC CUSTOM SAWMILL SERVICES Native Hardwood Lumber Sales Carving Wood & Turning Stock Joe Murray 7544 1900 East Tiskilwa, IL 61368

815-876-6988

WYANET LOCKER, INC. 218 RAILROAD AVE. WYANET, IL

(815) 699-2208 Scott Sabin, Owner

Wholesale & Retail Meats

Pat Wood, Owner

wyanetlocker.com

Timber Falls Tree Service

•Tree Trimming & Removals •Stump Grinding •Lot & Land Clearing •Fully Insured •Seasoned Firewood •24 Hour Service

Princeton, IL • 815-875-3100 Clint Hassler 815-303-8451 RT Piper 815-866-2637

Bob Cmolik

• Drywall • Paint • Texturing • Bathrooms • Plaster Repair • Remodeling • Tiling 19 Aztec Circle, Putnam, IL 815-342-1385 bcmolik@yahoo.com

Ron SchafeR SeRvice and RepaiR appLiance RepaiR fuRnace & a/c

815-876-6135 • Business Cards • Envelopes • Booklets • Forms • Pamphlets • Letterheads For all your printing solutions call

875-4461

800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 fax 815-875-1235

Blacktop Sealcoating Residential • Commercial • Sales • Installation • Service Sectional Steel Doors • Automatic Door Openers

Toll Free

AUTHORIZED DEALER

(877) 324-9517

(815) 872-2615

To

oil or water base patchwork hot rubber crack filling M. Dobbels 309-854-3813

add your listing to this page contact us at

Door to Door Stump Removal Tree Trimming & Removal

309.525.3327

William Murphy

Free estimates • Fully insured

T P.O. BOX 33 • Malden, IL 61337

815-866-6858

• Wedding Invitations • Napkins • Matchbooks • Thank You’s For Quality Carlson Craft Products See 800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 fax 815-875-1235

Kernans’ Lawn Service 815-303-9665 cell: 815-303-9664

Sign a 1 year contract, receive last mowing FREE Commercial & Residental Lawn Mowing & Lawn Rolling Free Estimates - Senior Discounts • Fully Insured 15% Off Seniors & New Customers

10% off items over We do Upholstery Work $20 with With 30 Years of Experience this ad! Specializing in Furniture, Old & New, Ornate & Carved

Grand Plaza Antiques, Etc. 531 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356 815-437-2856 • Th-F-Sat 12 pm-5pm

Rest of the week by Appointment by Luck or Chance

(815) 875-4461, Ext. 278


Thursday, May 2, 2013 • Marketplace • 15

- 700 - 800 856 • Apartment Rentals Real Estate For Sale Real Estate For Rent

3 Bedroom Ranch, vinyl exterior. 2 bath, kitchen, appliances, living room, family room, gas fireplace, 2 car unattached garage, patio, deck, corner lot 132x81. 815-488-2717 or 815-894-2715

DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO Sell? The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you find the right person to move in.

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

HENNEPIN PARKVIEW APARTMENT. LARGE 2 BEDROOM, CLEAN, SMALL QUIET TOWN, GARAGE, BASEMENT, SINGLE LEVEL, WASHER DRYER HOOKUP. CALL 815-925-7509 or 815-343-5018 HENNEPIN Unfurnished apartment for rent. Large, clean, 2 bedroom. Heat, water, hot water, garbage, stove, frig included. $525 a month. Call 815-9257509 or 815-343-5018 PRINCETON 1 & 2 bedroom, recently remodeled. Great neighborhood. Lease, deposit. $425 & $600. 810 South Euclid. Call 217-766-8497 PRINCETON 1 bedroom, recently remodeled. Great neighborhood. Lease, deposit. $425. 810 South Euclid. Call 217-766-8497 PRINCETON New Luxury Apartment. Very large, modern, 2 bedroom with walk-in closet, garage & appliances included. $795 a month + utilities. Must see! Phone 815-878-1984

DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO RENT? The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you find the right person to move in. YOU’LL FIND IT right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

426 N. Main • Princeton, IL www.SuccessRealtyOnline.com

OPEN HOUSES SatUrday

1-2 PM 1320 S. Church St. • 709 Eastmor Dr. 2:15-3:15 PM 9 S. Homer • 1019 S. 5th St. (815) 872-7653

Open HOuses saturday, May 4

1:00 - 2:00 PM Charter Hill Subdv. Princeton

2:15 - 3:15 PM 575 Anita Lane Princeton

Harvest REALTY

AND DEVELOPMENT

Ray Mabry, Broker

815-878-1981 • harvestrealtyprinceton.com

1st time on market! Custom built in 1980, 3-4 bedrooms, 3 fireplaces, walk-out lower level, wooded yard, Corian countertops, Viking stove, 5 minutes from Princeton. $219,500

Harvest REALTY

AND DEVELOPMENT

Ray Mabry, Broker

815-878-1981 • harvestrealtyprinceton.com

PRINCETON small, 3 bedroom home. 2 car garage, central air. $600 a month. Call 815-875-1923

Covered Bridge Realty

Open HOuse Sun. 1-3

WYANET beautiful remodeled 2 bedroom house. Available now! References & deposit required. No pets please. Can show anytime. Call 815 9945082, for application

128 n. Euclid

PROMOTE YOUR OPEN HOUSE The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you get you home sold. Call 815-875-4461

www.c21coveredbridge.com 815-872-7434 • 100 S. Main St., Princeton Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, May 4 • 11AM - 1PM

981 Elm Street, Princeton, IL $95,500

Gonet Realty & Land Co.

321 S. McCoy St. Granville 815-339-2411

12-062484 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF BUREAU PRINCETON, ILLINOIS MIDFIRST BANK ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) MARK PERRY A/K/A MARK W. PERRY; ) STATE OF ILLINOIS; UNKNOWN OWNERS) AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS; ) UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS ) Defendants, ) 12 CH 93 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on February 21, 2013, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, May 29, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. in the office of HB Wilkinson Title Co., 10 Park Avenue West, Lower Level, Princeton, Illinois 61356, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 21-12-477-016; 21-12-477-017. Commonly known as 320 Jefferson Street, Tiskilwa, IL 61368. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sale Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, FISHER and SHAPIRO, LLC, 2121 Waukegan Road, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015. (847) 291-1717. Refer to File Number 12-062484. I526044 Published in the Bureau County Republican Apr. 18, 25 and May 2, 2013.

OPEN HOUSES Sun., May 5 • 1:00 - 3:00 PM

815-872-0080

104 N. Main Princeton, IL

www.thepropertymerchants.com

236 W. Hideaway Dr. Princeton $189,900 LI NE ST W IN G!

304 E. Front St. Wyanet $69,500

815-875-4461

PRINCETON Nice home for rent. 3-4 bedrooms, 11/2 baths, near Logan. Available 5/15/13. Call 815-872-1727

637 Erickson Dr. Princeton $184,900

ho

856 • Apartment Rentals

We Can Show You How!

DEPUE Small, 2 bedroom house. 505 East Street. $450 per month. Call 815-664-2808

m

h es

.com • www.illin ow oi sv

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

New Listing! $114,000 New Listing! $215,000 4 BR, 2 bath, family room, Brick home, 4 BR, 3 baths, large yard, garage, screened finished lower level, 2 stone porch, hardwood floors. fireplaces, stainless steel Great looking house. Vinyl appliances. AC 2012, furnace siding. #08325146 2010. #08324923

Price Reduced! $217,500 Yard w/ perennials, peach tree, asparagus & grape arbor. Deck, patio, screened porch, gas FP, 2 BR. On culde-sac. #08290031

Price Reduced! $99,900 - Wyanet! Beautiful 3 BR, tri-level, hardwood floors, 21’x23’ FR, large corner lot, covered back patio. Furniture negotiable. #08185003

$69,000 - In Henry! Close $99,000 - With Fenced to Schools, large LR w/ Yard! 2 BR (possible 3 with woodburning FP, remodeled main level office room as kitchen, fenced backyard, BR), 2 car garage, 15’x20’ deck, patio, 3 BR plus living room w/ woodburning basement! #08130549 fireplace. #08227780

$59,900 - Great Location! $99,500 on Cul-De-Sac! Gingerbread trim, formal 24’x14’ Living Room, 17’x10’ living room & dining room, Kitchen, 4 BR (Upper BR is eat in kitchen, 15’x19’ family 29’x11’), screened porch, storage shed, basement room. Windows & siding partially finished. #08138426 upgraded. #07691003

1221 North Main – Princeton, IL

815-875-1221

www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com

0 2200 North Ave. Princeton

9096 - 2275 E St. Tiskilwa

Hunt & fish on almost 16 acres & build a new home $167,000

40 Acres! 20 Tillable, 20 Hardwoods MOL $476,000 LI NE ST W IN G!

768 • Homes For Sale

Looking for a new place to live? The Bureau County Republican Classified is a great source to help you find your next place to call home.

858 • Homes for Rent

www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisva lle y

PRINCETON 2 bedroom, central air, stove, fridge. No smoking, no pets. $570 a month. Call 815875-9900

Re Pr du ice ce d!

**************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

show.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com ome

852 • Mobile Home Rental

Sell Your Home Right Here!

h ley al

767 • Mobile Home Sales

PRINCETON upper, 1 bedroom, efficiency apartment. Utilities included. $425/month. Deposit required. Call Robin @ 815872-3456

Visit us at www.bcrnews.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY PRINCETON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. ) Plaintiff, ) -v.) MICHAEL B. ZNANIECKI A/K/A ) MICHAEL ZNANIECKI, et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 00061 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 21, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 AM on May 23, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 25366 1150 NORTH AVENUE, PRINCETON, IL 61356 Property Index No. 23-05-300-006. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-1218468. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-18468 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 00061 TJSC#: 33-4985 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I527996 Published in the Bureau County Republican Apr. 25, May 2 and 9, 2013.

Lot 19 Sunset Ct. Tom Christianson Broker Associate Princeton 1/3 Acre, Quiet Cul-de-Sac $20,000 PR NEW IC E!

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Call 815-878-3800


16 • Marketplace • Thursday, May 2, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

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