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Boys BasketBall • sports, B1

Monday, February 25, 2013

awards roundup • nation, a2

Barbs hope to keep current streak going in regional

Micah Fagerstrom

Anne Hathaway, Christoph Waltz win at Oscars

Anne Hathaway

Suicide attempts a growing problem Mental health, family life contribute to dangerous trend in DeKalb County By JEFF ENGELHARDT jengelhardt@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Jason Nicol sees a disturbing trend sweeping DeKalb County that is going largely unnoticed: suicide at-

dencies and self injury – an observation supported by county statistics. In 2010, DeKalb police responded to 110 suicide attempts. In 2012, that number increased to 162. Countywide,

tempts. Nicol, executive director of the Youth Service Bureau in DeKalb, said two of the top three concerns his staff has identified in the area’s youth and families are suicidal ten-

successful suicide attempts doubled from five in 2010 to 10 in 2012. Nicol said a variety of factors from mental health issues to the increase in fractured families are causing the increase.

He said in each of the past three years, 27 percent of the youth that come to his organization for counseling suffer

Has depression ever affected your life? Vote online at DailyChronicle.com.

See SUICIDE, page A7

DeKalb nears deal on homes

REGIONAL SPELLING BEE

King bee crowned

Voice your opinion

Sycamore student heads to D.C. competition next

Public hearing set for today By DAVID THOMAS dthomas@shawmedia.com

show for more than a year of contract talks to replace one that expired eight months ago. Negotiators are expected to sit for another round of talks this week. But if progress continues to elude them,

DeKALB – An annexation agreement for Irongate, a 1,000plus unit housing development on the north side of DeKalb, could be reached as early as March, city officials said. City Manager Mark Biernacki said that since a Jan. 29 special meeting on the topic, a lot of progress and compromise has been made between Irongate developer ShoDeen Construction, city staff, and DeKalb’s school and park districts. “I’d characterize the plan being 90 percent – to the point where it meets Mark all of the coun- Biernacki cil’s objectives,” City manager Biernacki said. “There will be some issues the council will be asked to amend their opinion on.” A public hearing on Irongate is scheduled for today’s DeKalb City Council meeting. Annexation of any new housing developments requires the approval of at least six aldermen. Despite some unresolved issues, Biernacki said he feels confident that the progress that has been made could lead to a first vote on the annexation at the council’s March 11 meeting. “It’s conceivable that there could be final or formal action at one of the two meetings in March,” Biernacki said. Plans for Irongate in November called for 1,053 singlefamily homes on lots ranging from 50 to 80 feet wide, a special housing development for

See STRIKE, page A7

See HOMES, page A7

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Matthew Rogers, 12, of Sycamore Middle School, reacts after correctly spelling “megalopolis” Saturday in the 14th round to win the DeKalb County Spelling Bee at Kishwaukee College in Malta. To view video from the competition, visit Daily-Chronicle.com. By ERIC JOHNSON news@daily-chronicle.com Megalopolis. M-e-g-a-l-o-p-o-l-i-s. Megalopolis. Merriam-Webster dictionary defines it as “a very large city.” It also was the final word that won 12-year-old Matthew Rogers the 2013 annual Daily Chronicle/DeKalb County Regional Office of Education

Regional Spelling Bee. And, aptly, a very large city – Washington, D.C. – is where the Sycamore Middle School seventh-grader is headed to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee at the end of May. “It hasn’t really sunk in yet,” Rogers said. “But I’m very excited.” Twenty-one third- through eighth-grade students from surrounding DeKalb County schools

gathered at a Kishwaukee College auditorium in Malta on Saturday to put their spelling prowess to the test. “We were happy to see representation from all of our public schools and three private schools,” said Amanda Christensen, regional superintendent of DeKalb County schools.

See COMPETITION, page A7

Strike threat raising stakes in state union talks By JOHN O’CONNOR The Associated Press SPRINGFIELD – The emerging threat of at least 30,000 Illinois state employees striking might seem extreme, but union leaders say they’re seriously considering the prospect as contract talks

have stalemated amid an overall state government financial picture that is equally extreme. Illinois remains mired in a fiscal quagmire that includes a crushing $96 billion deficit in public-worker pension systems and a festering $9 billion backlog of unpaid bills to

service providers. That’s the backdrop for ongoing negotiations between Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn and the state’s largest union, the American Pat Quinn Federation of

State, County and Municipal Employees, which often finds itself on the defensive at a time when organized labor across the country has suffered losses. AFSCME has futilely fought against facility closures, appealed to the courts to enforce raises promised in 2011 and has little to

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MORNING READ

Page A2 • Monday, February 25, 2013

8 DAILY PLANNER Today

Big Book Study AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Overeaters Anonymous: 10 a.m. at Senior Services Center, 330 Grove St., DeKalb. 815-758-4718. Free blood pressure clinic: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital, 1 Kish Hospital Drive, DeKalb. www.kishhospital. org/programs; 815-748-8962. Sycamore Food Pantry: Noon to 7 p.m. at Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. 815-895-9113. Winter coats are available October to February. Feed My Sheep Food Pantry: 3 to 5 p.m. at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St., DeKalb. All are welcome. New Hope Baptist Church Food Pantry: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the church, 1201 Twombly Road, DeKalb. 815-756-7706. Kiwanis Club of DeKalb: 5:30 p.m. at the Dekalb Elks Lodge, 209 S. Annie Glidden Road. Contact Tarryn Thaden, club president, at tthaden@gmail.com; 815-751-4719; dekalbkiwanis.org. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 5:45 p.m. weigh-in and 6:30 p.m. meetings, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 13N535 French Road, Burlington. 847-833-6908 Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. DeKalb Chess Club: 6 to 8 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. Free, open chess game play. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Equipment is provided but attendees are welcome to bring their own. info@ dekalbchess.com or visit www. DeKalbChess.com. DeKalb County Chapter of Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays: 6 to 8 p.m. at DeKalb Unitarian Universalist Church, 158 N. Fourth St. All are welcome. Contact Patricia at 815-375-3212 or pflagdekalbcounty@ yahoo.com. DeKalb Rotary Club: 6 p.m. at Ellwood House Museum. 815-7565677. 12 & 12 AA(C): 6 p.m. at Salem Lutheran Church, 1145 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. 12 Step & 12 Traditions AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 321 Oak St., DeKalb. www. firstumc.net. Back to Basics AA(C): 7 p.m. at Union Congregational, 305 S. Gage St., Somonauk. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. DeKalb Festival Chorus: 7 to 9 p.m. rehearsals in Room 171, Northern Illinois University Music Building in DeKalb. dekalbfestivalchorus.org. Adults can schedule an audition. festivalchorus@gmail.com or 630-453-8006. Expect A Miracle AA: 8 p.m. open meeting, United Methodist, Third and South streets, Kirkland. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. We Are Not Saints AA(C): 8 p.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Kishwaukee Amateur Radio Club: 9 p.m. at 146.73 megahertz. For information, call Bill Itter (N9EWA) at 815-895-2020. Tuesday Kishwaukee Sunrise Rotary: 7 a.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital, 1 Kish Hospital Drive, DeKalb. Contact: Becky Beck Ryan, president, 815-758-3800. Weekly Men’s Breakfast: 8 a.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Cost for these men-only events is $4 for food and conversation, along with bottomless cups of coffee or tea. Easy Does It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 9:30 a.m. weigh-in, 10 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 5:30 p.m. meetings at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. Networking for Families: Noon to 1 p.m. at DeKalb County Health Department, 2600 N. Annie Glidden Road, DeKalb. Nonprofits, social-service agencies and educators focus on community improvements. Contact Elaine Cozort at elaineco@kishwaukeecollege.edu or 815-756-4893, ext. 226. Open Closet: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 300 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. Clothes and shoes for men, women and children. 815-758-1388. Safe Passage Sexual Assault adults’ support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Hinckley Big Book Study AA(C): 6 p.m. at United Methodist Church, 801 N. Sycamore St., 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com.

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

8 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT DAILY-CHRONICLE.COM?

Yesterday’s most-commented stories:

Yesterday’s most-viewed stories:

1. Leoni takes charge of housing bureau 2. Our View: Point taken: Grady treated differently 3. O’Reilly: Head Start program is big government con

1. Our View: Point taken: Grady treated differently 2. Leoni takes charge of housing bureau 3. Spartan wrestlers take third at state

Yesterday’s Reader Poll results:

Today’s Reader Poll question:

When carrying concealed weapons becomes legal in Illinois, will you seek a permit? Yes: 56 percent No: 34 percent Not sure: 10 percent

Vol. 135 No. 48 Main Office 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb 815-756-4841 Toll-free: 877-688-4841 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Customer Service: 800-589-9363 Customer service phone hours: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 7 a.m.-10 a.m.

Has depression ever affected your life? • Yes, it affects a friend/family member • Yes, it affects me • No

Total votes: 444

Vote online at Daily-Chronicle.com

8 TODAY’S TALKER

Hathaway, Waltz win supporting-acting Oscars By DAVID GERMAIN

PUBLISHER Don T. Bricker dbricker@shawmedia.com NEWSROOM Eric Olson Editor eolson@shawmedia.com News: ext. 2257 news@daily-chronicle.com Obituaries: ext. 2228 obits@daily-chronicle.com Photo desk: ext. 2265 photo@daily-chronicle.com Sports desk: ext. 2224 sports@daily-chronicle.com Fax: 815-758-5059 ADVERTISING Karen Pletsch Advertising and Marketing Director kpletsch@shawmedia.com Display Advertising: ext. 2217 Fax: 815-756-2079 Classified Advertising: 815-787-7861 Toll-free: 877-264-2527

AP photo

Anne Hathaway accepts the award for best actress in a supporting role for “Les Miserables” during the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

On the Web To view a complete list of Oscar winners, visit Daily-Chronicle.com.

said. The Scottish adventure “Brave,” from Disney’s Pixar Animation unit, was named best animated feature. Pixar films have won seven of the 12 Oscars since the category was added. “I just happen to be wearing the kilt,” said “Brave” co-director Mark Andrews, who took the stage in his trademark Scottish garment. The upbeat musical portrait “Searching for Sugar Man” took the documentary feature prize. The film follows the quest of two South African fans to discover the fate of acclaimed but obscure singer-songwriter Sixto Rodriguez, who dropped out of sight after two albums in the 1970s and was rumored to have died a bitter death. “Thanks to one of the greatest singers ever, Rodriguez,” said “Sugar Man” director Malik Bendjelloul. There was a rare tie in one category, with the Osama bin Laden thriller “Zero Dark Thirty” and the James Bond tale “Skyfall” each winning for sound editing.

Oscar host Seth MacFarlane opened with a mildly edgy monologue that offered the usual polite jabs at the academy, the stars and the industry. He took a poke at academy voters over the snub of Ben Affleck, who missed out on a directing nomination for best-picture favorite “Argo,” a thriller about the CIA’s plot to rescue six Americans during the Iranian hostage crisis. “The story was so top secret that the film’s director is unknown to the academy,” MacFarlane said. “They know they screwed up. Ben, it’s not your fault.” William Shatner made a guest appearance as his “Star Trek” character Capt. James Kirk, appearing on a giant screen above the stage during MacFarlane’s monologue, saying he came back in time to stop the host from ruining the Oscars. “Your jokes are tasteless and inappropriate, and everyone ends up hating you,” said Shatner, who revealed a headline supposedly from the next day’s newspaper that read, “Seth MacFarlane worst Oscar host ever.” The performance-heavy Oscars also included an opening number featuring Charlize Theron and Channing Tatum, who did a classy dance while MacFarlane crooned “The Way You Look Tonight.” Daniel Radcliffe and Joseph Gordon-Levitt then joined MacFarlane for an elegant musical rendition of “High Hopes.”

8GOVERNMENT MEETINGS Send a schedule of meetings to be included in this weekly column to news@ daily-chronicle.com, with “Government Meetings” in the subject line, or send a fax to 815-758-5059. Please provide committee name, date, time and location with the complete address.

Copyright 2013 Published daily by Shaw Media. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Daily: $.75 / issue Sunday: $1.50 / issue Basic weekly rate: $5.25 Basic annual rate: $273

The Associated Press LOS ANGELES – Anne Hathaway has gone from propping up leaden sidekick James Franco at the Academy Awards to hefting a golden statue of her own with a supporting-actress Oscar win as a doomed mother-turned-prostitute in the musical “Les Miserables.” Christoph Waltz won his second supporting-actor Oscar for a Tarantino film, this time as a genteel bounty hunter in the slave-revenge saga “Django Unchained.” Hathaway, whose perkiness helped carry her and the listless Franco through an ill-starred stint as Oscar hosts two years ago, is the third performer in a musical to win supporting actress during the genre’s resurgence in the last decade. “It came true,” said Hathaway, who joins 2002 supporting-actress winner Catherine Zeta-Jones for “Chicago” and 2006 recipient Jennifer Hudson for “Dreamgirls.” Hathaway had warm thanks for “Les Miz” co-star Hugh Jackman, with whom she once sang a duet at the Oscars when he was the show’s host. Hathaway’s Oscar came for her role as noble but fallen Fantine in the big-screen adaptation of the Broadway smash that was based on Victor Hugo’s epic novel of revolution, romance and redemption in 19th century France. In a choked voice, Waltz offered thanks to his character and “to his creator and the creator of his awe-inspiring world, Quentin Tarantino.” Waltz also offered gracious thanks to his supporting-actor competitors, who included two-time Oscar winner Robert De Niro and Oscar recipient Tommy Lee Jones, who had been considered a slim favorite over Waltz for the prize. A veteran performer in Germany and his native Austria, Waltz had been a virtual unknown in Hollywood when Tarantino cast him as a gleefully evil Nazi in 2009’s “Inglourious Basterds,” which won him his first Oscar. Waltz has since done a handful of other Hollywood movies, but it’s Tarantino who has given him his two choicest roles. Backstage, Waltz had a simple explanation for why the collaboration works. “Quentin writes poetry, and I like poetry,” Waltz said. The foreign-language prize went to Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke’s old-age love story “Amour,” which had been a major surprise with five nominations, including picture, director and original screenplay for Haneke and best actress for Emmanuelle Riva, who turned 86 on Sunday and would be the oldest acting winner ever. The top prize winner at last year’s Cannes Film Festival, “Amour” follows the agonizing story of an elderly man (Jean-Louis Trintignant) tending his wife (Riva) as she declines from age and illness. Haneke thanked his own wife for supporting him in his work for 30 years. “You are the center of my life,” Haneke

Missed paper? We hope not. But if you did and you live in the immediate area, please call Customer Service at 800-589-9363 before 10 a.m. daily. We will deliver your Daily Chronicle as quickly as possible. If you have questions or suggestions, complaints or praise, please send to: Circulation Dept., 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. To become a carrier, call ext. 2468.

Shabbona Road. Indian Creek School District Community Concern for Children parent organization: 7 p.m. at Indian Creek High School, 506 S. Shabbona Road, Shabbona. Kaneland School District 302 Board: 7 p.m. at Kaneland High School, 47W326 Keslinger Road, Maple Park. MONDAY Sandwich City Council: 7 p.m. at the DeKalb City Council: 6 p.m. in room 212 Sandwich City Hall Annex, 128 E. Railroad at the DeKalb Municipal Building, 200 S. St. Fourth St. Shabbona Village Board: 7 p.m. at DeKalb County Board Law and JusShabbona Village Hall, 206 S. Blackhawk. tice Committee: 6:30 p.m. at Administration Building, conference room east, TUESDAY south entrance, 110 E. Sycamore St., Genoa-Kingston School District 424 Sycamore. Board: 7 p.m. at Genoa-Kingston High Cortland Town Board: 7 p.m. at CortSchool, 980 Park Ave., Genoa. land Town Hall, 59 S. Somonauk Road. Sycamore Park District Board: 6 p.m. Hiawatha School District 426 Board: in the board room at 940 E. State St. 7 p.m. at Hiawatha Middle School, 410 S. Clinton Township Board: 7 p.m. at the First St., Kirkland. Clinton Township Building, 315 W. Adams, Indian Creek School District Waterman. 425 Board: 7 p.m. in the Indian Sycamore School District 427 Board: Creek High School Media Center, 506 S. 7 p.m. at the Sycamore School District Ad-

CIRCULATION Kara Hansen VP of Marketing and Circulation khansen@shawmedia.com BUSINESS OFFICE Billing: 815-526-4585 Fax: 815-477-4960

8CORRECTIONS Accuracy is important to the Daily Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-756-4841, ext. 2257; email, news@daily-chronicle.com; or fax, 815-758-5059.

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Sunday Pick 3-Midday: 1-9-0 Pick 3-Evening: 0-1-2 Pick 4-Midday: 3-2-6-1 Pick 4-Evening: 6-8-4-5 Lucky Day Lotto: 2-13-19-22-30 Lotto (Sat.): 11-17-29-36-43-48 Lotto jackpot: $3.35 million

Mega Millions Mega jackpot: $13 million

Powerball Saturday’s drawing Numbers: 2-5-31-39-41 Powerball: 29 Powerball jackpot: $90 million

8BRIEF ministration Building, 245 W. Exchange St.

WEDNESDAY DeKalb-Sycamore Area Transportation Study Policy Committee: 3 p.m. at the DeKalb Municipal Building, 200 S. Fourth St. DeKalb County Board Planning and Zoning Committee: 7 p.m. in the Administration Building’s conference room East, South entrance, 110 E. Sycamore St., Sycamore. DeKalb Plan and Zoning Commission: 7 p.m. in council chambers at the DeKalb Municipal Building, 200 S. Fourth St. Malta Village Board: 7 p.m. at Malta Municipal Building, 115 S. Third St. Hinckley-Big Rock School District 429 Board: 6:30 p.m. in the Hinckley-Big Rock High School Library, 700 E. Lincoln Highway, Hinckley.

THURSDAY DeKalb Landmark Commission: 7 p.m. at the DeKalb Municipal Building Annex, 223 S. Fourth St.

Feds: Meth found in chicken buckets in Ariz. TUCSON, Ariz. – Authorities said two women aboard a commercial shuttle van in Arizona have been arrested after Border Patrol agents found methamphetamine hidden in two buckets of chicken. Border Patrol said the agents discovered the drugs Thursday during a stop at an Interstate 19 checkpoint near Nogales. Authorities said the drugs weighed about six pounds and were valued at more than $58,000. The suspects have been held pending federal prosecution, and the methamphetamine has been turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration. The identities of the suspects were not immediately released.

– Wire report


LOCAL

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Monday, February 25, 2013 • Page A3

G-K artists sell mugs for charity By DOUG OLESON doleson@shawmedia.com

Doug Oleson – doleson@shawmedia.com

Hugs and Mugs participants include (from left) Colin Broderick, Breea Rogallo, teacher Lisa Beynon, Travis Hughes and Justin Johnson. The student fundraiser at Genoa-Kingston High School will benefit the school’s art program and Hope Haven.

GENOA – There are yellow ones and blue ones and black ones and many with speckles. There are ones with smiles and hearts and wings and even animals at the bottom. “People drink and there’s a duck starring back at you,” Lisa Beynon said with a laugh. Beynon teaches the GenoaKingston High School art class which is sponsoring the fourth annual Mugs and Hugs fundraiser. It will be held in the high school library from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday. Mugs made by the Art 150 class will be sold

If you go n What: Mugs and Hugs n When: 4 to 7 p.m. Friday n Where: Genoa-Kingston High

School library n Information: Mugs made by the Art 150 class will be sold for $5 each. Proceeds will be divided equally between the GKHS art department and Hope Haven. for $5 each. Half the money will go to the art department and the other half to Hope Haven of DeKalb County. Beynon said the ceramic mugs are food-safe and can serve any number of purposes: drinking, decoration, pen

holder, paperweight. “The kids really enjoy doing this,” she said. “It’s a good cause.” “This is a way to give back to the community, which is really important,” junior Travis Hughes said. “We get great training and we get to help people at the same time,” sophomore Breea Rogalla added. Junior Colin Broderick said students were asked to donate at least one of the mugs they made in class. The rest they could keep. Rogalla said if she could, she would also donate some of the other items she made in class, including coasters, trinket boxes and pinch

pots. Hughes said he plans to give the rest of his mugs to family and friends as gifts. Justin Johnson said he’ll probably give his to his parents. “Just to get some brownie points,” Johnson joked. All the students said they enjoyed working with clay, which they’ve done since the holiday break, but also the art class in general. “[Beynon] makes class enjoyable,” Broderick said. “I think she’s a fun teacher,” Johnson agreed. “She’s really into art.” In the past, Beynon said, the fundraiser has generated about $400 each year.

Corn Fest returns to downtown Mom pushes for pedestrian Bittersweet moment as officials thank DeKalb airport By DAVID THOMAS dthomas@shawmedia.com DeKALB – With its return to the downtown this year, Corn Fest and the DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport are amicably parting ways. Shawn Lowe, the co-chair of the Corn Fest committee, personally thanked the advisory board of the airport for allowing them to host the festival there as construction took place downtown. If the airport hadn’t hosted Corn Fest for five years, the festival probably would have stopped, Lowe said. “If you guys hadn’t allowed this to happen out here in the first place,” Lowe said, “I don’t think we’d be having this discussion about having it back downtown after having that many years of not having it.” Lowe works for Shaw Media, which publishes the Daily Chronicle. Earlier this month, festival organizers announced that Corn Fest was returning to downtown DeKalb during this year’s Labor Day weekend. On Feb. 11, the DeKalb City Council signified its support by petitioning the Illinois Department of Transportation to

To learn more For information on events being held at DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport, call 815-748-2030.

have parts of Lincoln Highway closed during that weekend. Airport officials described it as a bittersweet moment. The festival and the crowds it drew interfered with the airport’s daily operations, but also exposed the airport to new people. Still, airport officials said they had expected the festival to return the downtown eventually. “I think it’s great,” airport manager Tom Cleveland said of the festival’s return. “We’ll miss it, but we’ll do some other things to promote the airport.” Because the airport receives federal funding, officials had to work closely with the Federal Aviation Administration to shut down part of the airport for Corn Fest, Cleveland said. Although nothing has been planned, Cleveland said airport officials are open to hosting another festival like it in the future. The airport does have sum-

mer events planned. Cleveland said it will host a number of promotional events with the Experimental Aircraft Association, a group of aviation enthusiasts who fly their own modified or home-built aircraft, including a breakfast on June 2. From May 31 to June 2, the airport will host biplane flyins, while children ages 7 to 17 will be able to fly for free June 8 and Aug. 17 as a part of the Young Eagles program, Cleveland said. Corn Fest-goers who attended the recent festival at the airport could pay to fly with the American Barnstormers – a group of pilots who fly aircraft that saw their glory days between 1918 and 1941. They could also fly in a replica of “Miss Mitchell” – a Northern American B-25J Mitchell Bomber that flew 151 combat missions and suffered no fatalities during World War II. Cleveland said they’ve had a number of inquiries from the same pilots about coming back and hosting rides again. No details have been set though. “We have all these opportunities to bring those aircraft down for the community,” Cleveland said.

safety after daughter struck By STEPHANIE HICKMAN shickman@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Amy Lantis was terrified when her 20-year-old daughter called her Tuesday evening crying after being struck by a dark red Chevrolet Venture. Lantis’ pregnant daughter, Katy, was walking in the crosswalk of Lincoln Highway and Seventh Street in DeKalb, when the van’s headlight hit her from the left side between 5 and 6 p.m. Tuesday. Lantis said the driver and passenger, who were both white and appeared to be in their 60s, looked at Katy and continued driving. “It’s disappointing to me that this was a couple in their 60s,” said Lantis. “I would’ve thought they would’ve come from a generation where no one would do something like that.” Lantis, a DeKalb resident, hopes her daughter’s case will inspire drivers to be more mindful. Lantis said Katy suffered

Can you help? If you have any information about Tuesday’s hit-and-run, call DeKalb police at 815-748-8400.

a knee injury from where she was hit, though the baby was unharmed. But Lantis said this incident sparked a major concern for the safety of not only her child, but for other pedestrians, as well. “No matter where you have to go, you cannot be in so big of a hurry that supersedes the value of human life,” she said. DeKalb Police Commander John Petragallo said the department had 14 cases of cars striking pedestrians in 2012. Not all of those were hit-and-runs. Although such incidents are not very common, he said it’s important to follow the appropriate steps when it does happen. First and foremost, Petragallo said to seek medical attention if there are injuries.

The pedestrian should also try to get as much information about the vehicle as possible. “If they are somehow struck, they need to get as much detail on the vehicle to police to conduct the investigation,” he said. Petragallo said if the pedestrian or a witness is able to take a photo of the license plates, that also can be helpful. Overall, he said, pedestrians and drivers need to be aware of what’s going on around them. Petragallo said leaving the scene of an accident is a criminal offense, but the extent of the offense depends on the situation. If there’s property damage or injuries, the consequences are more serious. To prevent an incident like Katy’s from happening in the future, he said, pedestrians should be careful at all times while walking. “I would recommend just being defensive when crossing the street,” he said. “Be aware of your surroundings.”

You are invited to…

Thursday, March 7th At the Egyptian Theatre, meet and greet with all candidates from 5:30 to 6:30pm. The races on stage will begin at 6:30pm. Make an informed choice on election day! Attend this program and speak with candidates. Contested DeKalb Candidates will be recognized on stage with opening and closing statements alternating between the candidates in attendance. City of DeKalb Mayoral and Aldermanic races, DeKalb Park District Commissioners, DeKalb School District #428 Board Members will be given time to present on stage. The DeKalb Township races and Kishwaukee College District #523 Trustee and any write-in candidates will have the option to be part of the meet and greet in the lobby beginning at 5:30pm. If you would like to submit a question for one of the candidates, email matt.duffy@dekalb.org with the question and which race the question is intended.

FIND OUR COUPONS IN THE

For more information contact the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce at 815-756-6306. Sponsored by:

ON MARCH 2, 2013

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why not treat the whole family?


LOCAL & STATE

Page A4 • Monday, February 25, 2013

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Candidates make final push for Jackson Jr.’s seat

GOP governors change tune Soften stance on health reform, immigration By KEN THOMAS and STEVE PEOPLES The Associated Press WASHINGTON – Many Republican governors who worked to thwart much of President Barack Obama’s first-term agenda are shifting gears and softening their rhetoric now that his run was extended for four more years and they’re facing their own re-election. These state leaders are offering greater cooperation on health care and skipping the tough talk on immigration, taking a cue from voters who in last November’s election expressed their opposition to partisan gridlock in Washington. For many governors, the new approach reflects not just the specific needs of their

AP photo

National Governors Association Vice Chairwoman Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma (left), with Chairman Gov. Jack Markell of Delaware, speaks Sunday during a special session of the National Governors Association winter meeting in Washington. states but also the realities of the political calendar: Nearly two dozen GOP governors elected in 2009 and 2010 could face the voters again. “People may agree or disagree with my position on this social issue or that social issue, but as long as I’m not rubbing it in their face all the time and instead talking about jobs and balancing the budget in a way that’s relevant to their

lives, that’s where the real focal point is,” said Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker in an interview during the weekend’s National Governors Association meeting. Walker, who survived a high-profile union-led recall challenge last year, said his marching orders are clear: “We’ve got to be relevant.” The shift is most pronounced on health care, where

seven states led by Republican governors are pushing to expand their Medicaid program under Obama’s health care law. Such a move once was considered anathema in the party. Under the terms of the deal, Washington pays the full cost of the expansion for the first three years, gradually phasing down to 90 percent. The changes would cover millions of low-income people, mostly uninsured adults. Last week, Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a former health care executive who rallied opposition to the law, became the latest Republican to make the move. He said the Supreme Court’s decision in the health care case and Obama’s re-election had made the president’s “health care mandates the law of the land.” Scott’s Medicaid decision followed similar pivots by Govs. John Kasich of Ohio and Rick Snyder of Michigan. Each leads a state that Obama won last year and each has struggled with approval ratings below 50 percent.

By SARA BURNETT The Associated Press CHICAGO – The candidates vying to replace former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. spent the weekend trying to mobilize their base as they head toward Tuesday’s special primary election. Fourteen Democrats and four Republicans are looking to face off for the 2nd Congressional District seat. Because the district – which stretches from Chicago’s South Side to parts of Will and Kankakee counties – is heavily Democratic, it’s likely the candidate who wins the Democratic primary also will take the April 9 general election. Three Democrats are considered front-runners: Chicago Alderman Anthony Beale, former Congresswoman Debbie Halvorson and former state Rep. Robin Kelly. Halvorson, of south suburban Crete, spent much of Sunday in Kankakee and Will counties – two more Republican areas she won in her failed attempt to unseat Jackson in the 2012 Democratic primary. Sean Howard, a spokesman for Halvorson, said the campaign “feels good” about turnout there in early voting. An unusually high number of voters are pulling Democratic primary ballots – a sign, Howard believes, that more conservative voters are bypassing the Republican primary to vote for Halvorson. “We know where our base is, and we’re encouraged by that,” Howard said. Beale, meanwhile, was

Looming federal budget cuts could hurt in Illinois The ASSOCIATED PRESS CHICAGO – The White House and Republicans kept up the unrelenting mudslinging Sunday over who’s to blame for roundly condemned budget cuts set to take effect at week’s end, with the administration detailing the potential fallout in each state and governors worrying about the mess. But as leaders rushed past each other to decry the potentially devastating and seemingly inevitable cuts, states such as Illinois are bracing for budget cuts that would

slash $85 billion in cuts from March-September from domestic and defense spending alike unless Congress acts by Friday. As to whether states could move money around to cover shortfalls, the White House said that depends on state budget structures and the specific programs. The White House did not have a list of which states or programs might have flexibility. Here are some examples of how the White House says automatic budget cuts could affect Illinois:

EDUCATION • Illinois would lose about $33.4 million in funds for elementary and secondary education. That would jeopardize 460 teacher and aide positions. • Head Start and Early Head Start services for about 2,700 children would be eliminated.

HEALTH • About 5,230 fewer children would receive vaccines for diseases such as whooping cough, influenza and measles. • Illinois would lose about $3.5 million in funds to prevent and treat substance

DIXON – An auction of jewelry that belonged to imprisoned former Dixon comptroller Rita Crundwell has raised about $258,000. In a press release, the U.S. Marshals said the highest bid in Saturday’s online auction was $12,300 for a men’s ring with a horseshoe motif. The gold ring has 14 diamonds and is engraved with Crundwell’s initials and the name of one of

her ranches. Other items on the auction block included watches, necklaces, loose diamonds and gold bar bullion. Prosecutors said they only expect the city to recover about $10.5 million of the $53 million Crundwell took.

Prime suspect ID’ed in Las Vegas shooting, crash LAS VEGAS – A 26-year-old man was being sought Sunday as the prime suspect in a predawn shooting on the Las Vegas Strip last week which led to a

fiery crash that left three people dead and several others injured. Las Vegas police Capt. Chris Jones said Sunday that investigators are working around the clock to sort through evidence and find Ammar Harris following the discovery Saturday of a black SUV used as a getaway car in the shooting and sixvehicle chain-reaction carnage on the neon-lit boulevard near the Bellagio, Caesars Palace, Bally’s and Flamingo resorts.

– Wire reports

8OBITUARIES HAROLD B. GIDDINGS Harold B. Giddings, 81, of Waterman, Ill., passed Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. Services will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at Nash-Nelson Funeral Home, 1001 W. Garfield St., Waterman. Visitation is from noon until the hour of service, Sunday, March 3, at the funeral home in Waterman. A complete obituary will follow at a later date. Arrangements by Nelson Funeral Homes & Crematory, www.NelsonFuneralHomes.com.

EDWARD W. HANSON Born: July 20, 1955 in DeKalb, Ill. Died: Feb. 21, 2013 in DeKalb, Ill. DeKALB – Edward W. Hanson, 57, of DeKalb, Ill., died Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, at his home. Born July 20, 1955, in DeKalb, he was the son of William E. and Elsie M. (Foiles) Hanson. Edward graduated Shabbona High School in the Class of 1973 and attended Illinois State University. He was a member of the Sycamore Moose Club and Sons of the American Legion. Edward was employed at Northern Illinois University Building Services for 18 years, was a loyal Cub fan and loved trivia. He is survived by his mother, Elsie (Eugene) Drake of Earlville; two sisters, Jeulee Lackey of Oconomowoc, Wis., and Wanda (Randy) Enburg of Rock Falls; two nieces; three nephews; his stepmother, Susan Hanson of Glendale, Ariz.; his half-brother, Todd Hanson of Glendale, Ariz.; and his half-sister, April Hanson of Scottsdale, Ariz. He was preceded in death by his

SOCIAL PROGRAMS • As many as 1,100 low-income children could lose access to child care. • A program that provides meals for seniors would lose about $764,000.

MILITARY AND POLICE • About 14,000 civilian employees of the Department of Defense would be furloughed, reducing pay by roughly $83.5 million.

Fourteen Democrats and four Republicans are looking to face off for the 2nd Congressional District seat. Three Democrats are considered front-runners:

Clockwise from bottom left, Robin Kelly, Anthony Beale and Debbie Halvorson. concentrating on getting out the vote in Chicago, spokeswoman Delmarie Cobb said. She said the highest turnout in the part of the district that’s in city has been in Beale’s ward and a nearby ward where Jackson’s wife, Sandi Jackson, served as alderman until she resigned in January. In the 2012 primary, more ballots were cast in those two wards than in the portions of the district that are in Will and Kankakee counties. “If they voted, we’re hoping certainly that they voted for [Beale],” Cobb said. Kelly’s campaign spokesman, Jonathan Blair, said she was splitting her time Sunday between the south suburbs and the city. He said Kelly, of south suburban Matteson, has widespread support and isn’t relying more on any one area than another.

8POLICE REPORTS

8BRIEFS Auction of Crundwell’s jewels raises about $258K

abuse, leading to about 3,900 fewer admissions to substance abuse treatment programs.

The candidates

father, William; and stepfather, Robert Reingardt. A memorial visitation will be from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, March 2, at Anderson Funeral Home, DeKalb. Cremation will take place at Anderson Funeral Home Crematory with burial of cremated remains at a later date at Johnson Grove Cemetery, Shabbona. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Edward W. Hanson Memorial Fund, sent in care of Anderson Funeral Home, P.O. Box 605, 2011 S. Fourth St., DeKalb, IL 60115. For information, visit www. AndersonFuneralHomeLtd.com or call 815-756-1022. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/dailychronicle.com.

RONALD ‘LARRY’ LANDERS Born: Nov. 18, 1939; in Mendota, Ill. Died: Feb. 23, 2013; in Sandwich, Ill. SANDWICH – Ronald “Larry” Landers, 73, of Sandwich, Ill., passed away Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013, in Valley West Community Hospital in Sandwich, surrounded by his loving family. Born Nov. 18, 1939, in Mendota, the son of Howard and Clara (Guilfoyle) Landers. He married Judith K. Todd on Feb. 9, 1963, in Lee. He was a member of St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church in Sandwich and St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Somonauk. He was an avid sports enthusiast,

loving the Chicago White Sox. He enjoyed coaching and officiating basketball, softball and volleyball. Larry coached at St. Mary’s Grade School for his children and numerous others. He retired from AT&T and Lucent Technologies after 30 years. His greatest love of all was his family. He is survived by his wife, Judy of Sandwich; two daughters, Denise (Chris Hewitt) Habbe of Sandwich and Kim (Tracy) Ahola of Naperville; four grandchildren, Kristin, Kelsie, Nick and Zack; one sister, Mildred Biederbeck of Peoria; two brothers, Richard (Janice) Landers of Hot Springs Villa, Ark., and Tom (Carol) Landers of Woodstock; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; one son, Timothy Landers; and two brothers, Charles and Robert Landers. Memorial Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church in Sandwich with the Rev. Andrew C. Hougan officiating. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at Turner-Eighner Funeral Home in Somonauk with a liturgical prayer service at 7 p.m. Memorials may be directed to St. Jude’s Children Hospital or the Alzheimer’s Association. A special thanks to Willow Crest Nursing Pavilion and Valley West Community Hospital. For more information or to sign the online guest book, go to www. eighnerfuneralhomes.com or contact Turner-Eighner Funeral Home, 13160 W. Route 34, Somonauk, IL 60552, 815-498-2363. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/dailychronicle.com.

Editor’s note: Information in Police Reports is obtained from the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office and city police departments. Individuals listed in Police Reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proven guilty in court.

DeKalb city Kathleen Hannemann, 24, of the 43W000 block of Hawkeye Drive in Elburn, was charged Friday, Feb. 22, with driving under the influence of alcohol. Mario D. Baxtrom, 29, of the 2000 block of Eves Court in DeKalb, was charged Friday, Feb. 22, with criminal damage to property. Mason J. Lovell, 19, of the 27000 block of Schafer Road in Clare, was arrested Friday, Feb. 22, on a failure-to-appear war-

rant for domestic battery. Zehra Hussain, 23, of the 200 block of Deerpath Lane in DeKalb, was charged Friday, Feb. 22, with retail theft. Nicholas R. Tucker, 20, of the 300 block of South Main Street in Steward, was charged Friday, Feb. 22, with driving under the influence of drugs. Filemon Sanchez-Maldonado, 32, of the 100 block of Gurler Road in DeKalb, was charged Saturday, Feb. 23, with driving under the influence of alcohol. Michael S. Dradi, 29, of the 1100 block of Rushmoore Drive in DeKalb, was charged Saturday, Feb. 23, with possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and battery. Gregory A. Sanders, 21, of the 1100 block of Northern Court in DeKalb, was arrested Sunday,

Feb. 24, on a failure-to-appear warrant for possession of contraband in prison.

DeKalb County Daniel A. Sender II, 20, of the 300 block of North Sixth Street in DeKalb, was charged Saturday, Feb. 23, with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver and possession of drug paraphernalia. Craig R. Shields Jr., 24, of the 10000 block of Duffy Road in Waterman, was charged Saturday, Feb. 23, with two counts of domestic battery, aggravated domestic battery and aggravated battery. Kassandra C. Fowler, 21, of the first block of North Lakewood Court in South Elgin, was charged Sunday, Feb. 24, with driving under the influence of alcohol.

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Feedlots, meatpackers dwindle as fewer cattle raised states have already been dismantled, and others are sitting empty. Operators say they don’t expect a recovery anytime soon, with high feed prices, much of the country still in drought and a long time needed to rebuild herds. The closures are the latest ripple in the shockwave the drought sent through rural communities. Most cattle in the U.S. are sent to feedlots for

By ROXANA HEGEMAN The Associated Press WICHITA, Kan. – Years of drought are reshaping the U.S. beef industry with feedlots and a major meatpacking plant closing because there are too few cattle left in the United States to support them. Some feedlots in the nation’s major cattle-producing

final fattening before slaughter. The dwindling number of animals also is hurting meatpackers, with their much larger workforces. For consumers, the impact will be felt in grocery and restaurant bills as a smaller meat supply means higher prices. Owner Bob Podzemny has been taking apart the 32,000head Union County Feed Yard near Clayton, N.M. It closed

in 2009 when a bank shut off its operating capital in the midst of the financial crisis, and Podzemny said he doesn’t see reopening after struggling through Chapter 11 bankruptcy. “There just are not that many cattle in this part of the country no more, and it is not profitable to bring them in and feed them, so it is shut down,” Podzemny said.

He’s now feeding a few cattle in another feedlot, buying them at about 450 pounds and growing them to 800 to 850 pounds. He then sells them to others who bring them to the typical 1,200- to 1,300-pound slaughter weight. “It is making a little money now on just growing feeders and selling them as feeders rather than finishing them all the way out,” Podzemny said.

“We do what we got to do to survive, you know.” Cattle numbers have been falling for years as the price of corn used to feed animals in feedlots skyrocketed. The drought accelerated the process, but many feedlots were able to survive at first because ranchers whose pastures dried up weaned calves early and sent breeding cows to be fattened for slaughter.

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Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Monday, February 25, 2013 • Page A7

Number of townhouses a sticking point in plan

Pope gives final Sunday blessing By FRANCeS D’eMILIO The Associated Press VATICAN CITY – Pope Benedict XVI bestowed his final Sunday blessing of his pontificate on a cheering crowd in St. Peter’s Square, explaining that his waning years and energy made him better suited to the life of private prayer he soon will spend in a secluded monastery than as leader of the Roman Catholic Church. On Thursday evening, the 85-year-old German-born theologian will become the first pope to have resigned from the papacy in 600 years. Sunday’s noon appearance from his studio window overlooking the vast square was his next-to-last appointment with the public of his nearly eight-year papacy. Tens of thousands of faithful and

AP photo

In this photo provided by the Vatican newspaper L’Osservatore Romano, Pope Benedict XVI delivers his blessing during his last Angelus noon prayer Sunday, from the window of his studio overlooking St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican. other admirers have already asked the Vatican for a seat in the square for his last general audience Wednesday. Perhaps emotionally buoyed by the warm welcome,

thunderous applause and the many banners reading “Grazie” [Thanks] held up in the crowd estimated by police to number 100,000, Benedict looked relaxed and sounded

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard a spokesman for the Guard as saying that its electronic warfare denies drone capture

captured tanks launched a fresh offensive on a government complex housing a police academy near the northern city of Aleppo on Sunday, while the government hit back with airstrikes to try to protect the strategic installation, activists said. If rebels capture the complex on the outskirts of Aleppo, it would mark another setback for President Bashar Assad. In recent weeks, his regime

energized, in sharp contrast to his apparent frailty and weariness of recent months. In a strong and clear voice, Benedict told the pilgrims, tourists and Romans in the square that God had called him to dedicate himself “even more to prayer and meditation,” which he will do in a monastery being renovated for him on the grounds behind Vatican City’s ancient walls. “But this doesn’t mean abandoning the church,” he said, as many in the crowd looked sad at his approaching departure. “On the contrary, if God asks me, this is because I can continue to serve it [the church] with the same dedication and the same love which I have tried to do so until now, but in a way more suitable to my age and to my strength.”

• HOMeS Continued from page A1 senior citizens, and 248 townhouses. The number of townhouses in the development has been a sticking point – aldermen are concerned that they will become rental properties. They want only 10 percent of the units in Irongate to be townhouses. The November plan called for 19 percent of the units to be townhouses. ShoDeen President Dave Patzelt previously criticized the council for setting an arbitrary limit on the number of townhouses in Irongate, but city documents for tonight’s meeting state that the townhouse percentage has been dropped from 19 percent to 11.9 percent. Biernacki said there’s also some resolution on the number of 50-foot-wide lots available. Aldermen wanted to reduce the number of those from 304 to 250; the revised plans for today call for 258 of these units. But some issues remain. One stumbling block between Patzelt and the council was the extension of Normal Road from its current terminus at Dresser Road north to Bethany Road. The aldermen wanted Normal extended, but want no devel-

8BRIEFS TEHRAN, Iran – Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard is denying it captured a foreign unmanned aircraft during a military exercise in southern Iran. A spokesman for the Guard, Yasin Hasanali, told The Associated Press the drone was actually being used during the drill as a supposed enemy aircraft. Iranian media Saturday quoted

unit had taken control of a foreign drone’s navigation system and forced it to land during the site of the military exercise. The Guard’s military exercise, code-named Great Prophet-8, ends today.

Syria rebels fight for police school near Aleppo BEIRUT – Rebels backed by

has lost control of key infrastructure in the northeast including a hydroelectric dam, a major oil field and two army bases along the road linking Aleppo with the airport to its east. Rebels also have been hitting the heart of Damascus with occasional mortar shells or bombings, posing a stiff challenge to the regime in its seat of power.

– Wire reports

opment along the extension near DeKalb High School. Patzelt opposed paying full cost for a road he cannot build on. Biernacki said he’s forwarding a proposal in which ShoDeen would pay a smaller road impact fee to offset the costs of extending Normal. Another unresolved issue is impact fees, which developers pay to governments to cover the estimated cost of providing new residents with public services such as roads, schools and parks. DeKalb’s development code spells out how impact fees are paid to the city, the school district and the park district. Although the city would receive money, school and park district officials have indicated that they want to receive more land than cash, which is allowed under the ordinance. The council shot down the idea to temporarily chop impact fees in half at the Jan. 29 meeting, which Patzelt wanted because that would reduce the overall cost of homes. Biernacki said there might be a consensus for a small reduction. “There appeared to be a consensus on ... 33 percent reduction for the first 300 units [built in Irongate],” Biernacki said.

Contest went on for 14 rounds

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Continued from page A1 The tension in the air was thick as the competition lasted 14 grueling rounds. As the pool of contestants continued to thin, the auditorium became increasingly still. “My heart was beating so fast,” said Hayeon Rogers, the winner’s beaming mother. “It’s very suspenseful.” Spectators spoke nary a word as the spellers took their turns at the microphone, except for the brief moments between rounds to share a commonly uttered, “I could never spell that” or “Even I didn’t know that one.” However, Matthew remained cool and collected as he rattled off each of his assigned words flawlessly. “I was a little nervous at first,” Matthew said. “But I settled quickly and had fun.” “We’re extremely proud,” said his father, Paul Rogers. “He put in a lot of time and effort. We practice every night for one and a half to two hours and watch every televised national spelling bee.” For the newly crowned champion, it is more than a showcase of an extensive vocabulary; it is a way of life. Matthew has been participating in spelling bees since he was in first grade, and his older brother, Mark, won the same event just two years ago. Along with the trip to compete at the national championship in the nation’s capital, Matthew won a copy of Webster’s Third New International Dictionary courtesy of Merriam-Webster, the Samuel Louis Sugarman Award Certificate, and a one-year membership to Britannica Online Premium donated by Encyclopedia Britannica. The runner-up was awarded with a certificate for Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition, donated by Merriam-Webster. Jeff Smith, assistant superintendent in the Regional Office of Education in DeKalb County and first-time pronouncer of the event, said he was very impressed with all the participants. “All the spellers handled themselves nicely,” Smith said. “They should all be very proud of their performance.”

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AP file photo

Union members, supporters and labor leaders protest Gov. Pat Quinn on Governor’s Day at the Illinois State Fair on Aug. 25 in Springfield.

State union offered to accept a 1-year wage freeze • STRIKe Continued from page A1 AFSCME leaders may decide it’s time to “call the question” and ask members to vote on authorizing a work stoppage, executive director Henry Bayer says. Union leaders raised the prospect of a strike in a letter to members last week. “People are getting to the point where they’re so angry and so frustrated that they think, what’s the use of sitting down with these folks every two or three weeks if nothing’s going to change?” Bayer said in an interview with The Associated Press. Since the 1973 advent of collective bargaining in Illinois, there’s never been a state employee strike, Bayer said. The prospect of a strike can be a classic negotiating tactic to pressure Quinn’s administration. How the governor responds may depend on more than the state’s financial woes; the Democrat traditionally has been seen as a progressive and a friend of unions, but he may decide that a tough stance is worth the risk if it means taxpayer support during next year’s reelection campaign. The governor would not answer an AP reporter’s question last week about his administration’s plan in case of a walkout, saying only, “Yeah, you’re always prepared.” Quinn, who AFSCME says

initially sought significant wage reductions, now wants workers to accept a multiyear wage freeze while swallowing changes in health care coverage that Bayer contends would cost each employee an additional $10,000 over a three-year contract. “It’s important that I push for the taxpayers of Illinois,” Quinn told reporters last week in Springfield. “Everyone knows we have a tough financial time in the state of Illinois, so we have to make some adjustments from what may have happened in the past, but I think the union understands that.” AFSCME has offered a oneyear wage freeze but wants Quinn to honor pay increases the union agreed to delay in 2011 to save the state money. Quinn has refused to pay 5.25 percent raise due to union employees in the fiscal year that ended June 30. A Cook County judge ordered the state to ante up, but Quinn’s office appealed that ruling in January. Union membership totals 40,000 – four-fifths of the state-employed workforce. Illinois law prohibits strikes by security workers – in AFSCME’s case, thousands of prison guards and officers at juvenile detention facilities. But a walkout could include thousands of child-abuse investigators, attendants who care for elderly and infirm military veterans and those who care for the developmentally disabled.

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ty Mental Health Board. Whelan said the board received an increase in funding for the first time in four years in 2012, but it was only a $15,000 bump to roughly $2.1 million overall. For an organization charged with funding more than 50 programs focused on mental and emotional disorders, alcohol or drug dependence, and developmental disabilities, it is hard to sufficiently support prevention programs for any one disease. Compounding the problem, Whelan said, is the lack of state support and closures of major resources such as the Singer Mental Health facility in Rockford and Kishwaukee Community Hospital’s psychiatric ward. Whelan said he would love to see more funding for mental health issues but it is unlikely because it would require a tax increase and some people still believe mental health diseases are made up and not true illnesses. “It’s really difficult to understand unless you know

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someone with a mental health problem,” Whelan said of the seriousness of such diseases. As resources decline, more responsibility falls on police officers, who are often the first people to contact a person threatening suicide. DeKalb Police Cmdr. John Petragallo said interacting with suicidal people has become a larger part of officer training because of the increase in calls. While officers do their best to defuse the situation and direct the person to resources such as counseling or hospital treatment, Petragallo said there is only so much that can be done when the available resources are stretched thin. “When we respond to the same house several times, that tells us the person is not getting [the] help they need,” Petragallo said. “We know there is a need in our community for these services. To see some of the cuts come about, that is on the officers’ minds.”

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from self injury, suicidal thinking or behavior, lack of self-esteem and depression. “It’s not a fun topic to talk about or to think about,” Nicol said. “But we need to find a nonprovocative way of keeping it in the forefront of people’s minds and educating them about the signs and symptoms.” Nicol said the message about suicide prevention and recognizing alarming signs needs to be directed at youth. He said people such as teachers and school counselors do a good job recognizing those at risk, but are not always as effective as breaking through to youth as their own peers. While the focus of suicide prevention needs to be on young people and adults, he said, efforts would be more effective by addressing the issues early in a person’s life. “Wejustdidapresentation at the YMCA where someone who struggled with suicidal thoughts talked about how she started cutting herself as a freshman in high school,” Nicol said. “Kids need to be educated about these issues so they are empowered to take action and get that person help.” Unfortunately, those resources are limited by the amount of financial support available, said Jeff Whelan, a member of the DeKalb Coun-

Here are some community resources. • Family Service Agency: 815-758-8616 • Ben Gordon Center (regular hours): 815-756-4875 • 24-hour crisis center hotline at the Ben Gordon Center: 1-866-2420111 • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 • The Ben Gordon Center has an online mental health screening tool at www.bengordoncenter.org • People can also reach out to local religious entities for help.

Contact Big Brothers Big Sisters of DeKalb County at 815.758.8616 or visit our website www.fsadekalbcounty.org for more information and to register your team!


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Page A8 • Monday, February 25, 2013

DEKALB COUNTY BUSINESSES ! h t l a e H t r a e H for DeKalb County’s American Heart Association Go Red For Women Committee and over 50 local businesses and 3,500 employees are participating in GO RED DAY, February 27, 2013 to bring awareness to the leading cause of death in women - heart disease. Go Red For Women encourages awareness of the issue of women and heart disease, and also action to save more lives. GO RED PARTICIPATING BUSINESSES NB&T Kish Health System DeKalb Chamber of Commerce Sycamore Chamber of Commerce City of Sycamore Kishwaukee College Sycamore CUSD 427 Monsanto Seed Production The Daily Chronicle/Midweek NIU Center for Black Studies Castle Bank Housing Authority of DeKalb County Sheedy Chiropractic Kishwaukee United Way First State Bank American Midwest Bank TBC Net, Inc. Creative Therapeutics Crum-Halsted Agency, Inc. DeKalb County Clerk and Recorder Provident Direct Mailing & Printing Momark Office Source B95 Radio Fox Valley Older Adult Services Elm Street Realtors CH3 Graphics, LLC The Fun Companies

DeKalb Park District Opportunity House, Inc. Culligan of Belvidere and DeKalb DeKalb Kiwanis Century 21 Elsner Realty Priority Promotions American Marketing & Publishing, LLC In Touch Home Care Braden Counseling Center, P.C. American Family Insurance Merry Maids Northern Rehab Physical Therapy Specialists DeKalb Area Retirement Center Spex Express High Definition Vision Center The Foster & Buick Law Group, LLC Dana’s Day Spa Illinois workNet Center Cracker Jax The Lincoln Inn Restaurant, Bakery & Catering DeKalb Clinic Raven’s Husky Haven & Rescue Associated Bank DeKalb Sycamore Moose Lodge 1506 Sycamore Rotary DeKalb County Convention and Visitors Bureau

7 Simple Steps to Heart Health

Life’s Simple 7 1.

Get Active

2.

Control Cholesterol

3.

Eat Better

4.

Manage Blood Pressure

5.

Lose Weight

6.

Reduce Blood Sugar

7.

Quit Smoking

Let’s Wipe Out Heart Disease Together Are you ready to jump in and join the fight? We hope so. Because together, we can put an end to heart disease. Join us on Friday, May 17, 2013 from 11:00 am-1:00 pm for DeKalb County’s 5th Annual Go Red For Women Luncheon to be held at Barsema Alumni & Visitors Center. Lunch, Shop, & Learn during this fun-filled event! For tickets or sponsorship information, contact the 2013 DeKalb County Go Red for Women Chair, Tami Armstrong at tarmstrong@banknbt.com.


Opinions

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A9 • Monday, February 25, 2013

8OUR VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

Washington needs more ‘Washingtons’

8VIEWS

We don’t all sin like Mark Sanford Most of us do bad things. We betray friends, make hurtful remarks, lie. Often an apology will suffice in restoring trust and respect. But some very successful people engage in patterns of nutty or nasty behavior that say more about them than the misdeeds themselves. Consider the case of disgraced former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford. Wanting to resume his political career, Sanford is taking the well-worn path of confessing his sins and asking the public to forgive him. But Sanford goes a step beyond the usual by portraying his uncommon failures as ordinary frailty. “I’ve experienced how none of us go through life without mistakes,” Sanford says in a new congressional campaign television ad. “But in their wake we can learn a lot about grace, a God of second chances, and be better for it.” We? What do you mean “we”? How is Sanford’s spectacular fall from grace about us, as opposed to about him? To recap: Sanford left office in 2009 after being caught in an affair in which adultery was the least of his missteps. He had been flying off to Buenos Aires, reportedly on the taxpayer dollar, to visit with an Argentine TV reporter. The escapade required a lot more away time than the average tryst at a Motel 6. So Sanford concocted an imaginative story about his hiking for several days alone on the Appalachian Trail

VIEWS Froma Harrop without means of contact. The web of lies blew up, as it had to. But suppose Sanford wasn’t lying about the nature walk and was really just counting azaleas common to the southern Appalachians. He still would have been incommunicado with the bureaucracy running the state of which he was chief executive. That’s not responsible leadership. This kind of cock-and-bull story insulted the intelligence of the electorate and put into question his own. How would he explain why no one spotted him, a state governor, on the well-traveled Appalachian Trail? (Guess he could have been wearing funny glasses with a big nose.) What a bad liar. Who does he think he is, Lance Armstrong? Four years have passed. Rep. Tim Scott, a South Carolina Republican, has been named to replace Jim DeMint, who has left his Senate seat for the Heritage Foundation. Sanford wants Scott’s open seat but must first counter questions about his character. So he’s out telling us that we will all be better human beings if we recognize that God wants Mark Sanford to have a second chance in politics.

In a similarly narcissistic vein, he told a skeptical Savannah Guthrie on NBC’s “Today” show that “our brokenness as human beings is ultimately our connectiveness, and that goes to a larger article of faith.” There remains a rather large chink in Sanford’s pious coat of armor: The wife took off, but the Argentine mistress remains in the picture. To get around that indelicate topic, Sanford explains to National Review Online that Maria is his “soul mate.” Furthermore, they plan to marry late this summer (just in time for the congressional race). And he frames his bizarre marital history as follows: “Tragically, a lot of people get divorced in the United States of America, and I suspect many of them have missteps along that path.” Don’t be modest, Mark Sanford. Your divorce was special. But for what it’s worth, I forgive you. Trouble is, lots of forgiven people have no business getting anywhere near the levers of power. You would be one. South Carolina voters may think otherwise. They must choose their own courts of judgment – moral, psychological, political. One thing they can agree on: When it comes to sinning, Sanford’s not like most of us.

• Froma Harrop is a member of the Providence Journal editorial board.

8VIEWS

More black men needed in U.S. schools By COURTLAND MILLOY The Washington Post Where are the African American male schoolteachers and administrators? It has been pretty obvious for years that if you really want to do something about high rates of truancy and suspensions among black students – to cap that “schoolto-prison pipeline” – put more black men in classrooms and principals’ offices. Bakari Ali Haynes is a case in point. He’s an assistant principal at Eastern Middle School in Silver Spring, Md. Seven years ago, he started an after-school group for African American and Hispanic boys called Gentlemen of Distinction. The boys are eager to spend extra time with Haynes, who is for many the first black male authority figure they’ve met. “When they come into my office, two things get their attention right away – my academic certificates and photographs of my family,” said Haynes, 36. “They won’t come right out and ask how you get those things, but you know that’s what they want, and it’s my job to show them what it takes to get it.” That’s the kind of insight that helps keep a student in school. It’s not that other teachers can’t be effective, but when students can see themselves in their teachers and vice

versa, it makes a difference. Some studies have even found that the test scores of black male students increase when they are taught by black men. “When you have a well-prepared African American man teaching black boys, the impact can be phenomenal,” said Brenda Townsend Walker, a lawyer and a professor of special education at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla. “I have interviewed African American male students who had pretty much written school off, whose teachers had given up on them, but whose lives were turned around when they got into a class with African American men. Generally speaking, they just have a better ability to relate to the students and mediate situations that others couldn’t handle.” In Montgomery County, Md., where Haynes works, there are 148,000 students enrolled in public schools. About 21 percent of the students, or 31,000, are black. And yet there are only 282 African American male teachers, 38 assistant principals and 19 principals, according to school officials. In 2010, 71 percent of students suspended for “insubordination” were black. Haynes knows there are better ways to handle disruptive students. “As much as they may curse you out or say they hate your guts, at the end of the day, what they are looking for is someone

who understands, someone who can say: ‘I’ve been where you are. This is how we’ll deal with it,’ “ Haynes said. “Sometimes they act out simply because they are hungry but don’t want to tell anyone.” In Fairfax County, Va., there are roughly 181,500 students in public schools, of which about 18,650 are black. Out of 14,728 teachers, only 231, or 1.6 percent, are black men. The suspension rate for whites in 2010 was 1.5 percent; for blacks, it was 7 percent. According to the U.S. Department of Education, black men make up 2 percent of the nation’s 4.8 million teachers. And black men make up only 1 percent of those enrolled in teacher development programs. When I first met Haynes in 2004, he was teaching English to ninth-graders at John F. Kennedy High School in Silver Spring. The black boys in his class weren’t just well behaved, they were enthusiastic – raising hands to answer questions, participating in discussions, helping one another in small groups and seeking him out during the school day for advice on personal matters. As an assistant principal at Eastern, he engages students as if the school were just one big homeroom class. “I’ve always wanted to be an educator,” he said. “It was like a calling.” Hopefully, one day soon, more black men will hear it as well.

Letters to the Editor Don T. Bricker – Publisher

Eric Olson – Editor

dbricker@shawmedia.com

eolson@shawmedia.com

Dana Herra – MidWeek Editor dherra@shawmedia.com

Inger Koch – Features Editor ikoch@shawmedia.com

Jillian Duchnowski – News Editor jduchnowski@shawmedia.com

We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

George Washington, “First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen,” was born on Feb. 22, 1732 – 281 years and a few days ago. For much of this nation’s history, Washington’s life was put forth as a positive example for his fellow Americans to follow. That emphasis, sadly, seems to have faded in the 21st century. In the U.S. capital city that bears Washington’s For the record name, politicians can’t seem to agree on how to solve the George Washington’s nation’s vexing problems principal claims to fame: – debt, deficits, taxation, • He commanded the sequestration, guns, immiContinental Army during the gration and so on. Revolutionary War (1775Their inability to com1783) that won indepenpromise is a poor tribute to dence for the 13 colonies. the “Father of our Country,” • He presided over the who endured many difficul1787 convention that wrote ties to help win freedom for the U.S. Constitution, which the 13 colonies, establish we still use today. the republic, and set lasting • He was elected the examples of how the governfirst president of the United ment ought to operate. States. Many of those problems required compromise, and entailed difficulties that today’s leaders can barely imagine. Washington’s principal claims to fame: • He commanded the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War (1775-1783) that won independence for the 13 colonies. • He presided over the 1787 convention that wrote the U.S. Constitution, which we still use today. • He was elected the first president of the United States; his leadership from 1789 to 1797 turned a government on paper into an actual working government. Along the way, he lost military battles but won enough victories that the fledgling United States prevailed over mighty Great Britain. He suffered hardships with his soldiers and risked his life and fortune. He endured betrayal by Benedict Arnold and the death of his stepson during the Revolutionary War. Through it all, he persevered. He set the nation on the right path. We are in his debt. Washington used smarts, diplomacy, perseverance and leadership to deal with the immense problems he encountered. Today’s problems are difficult, to be sure, but not any more insurmountable than those Washington faced. Today’s leaders would do well to continue learning from his example. Let there be more Washington-hearted men and women in Washington.

8 LEGISLATIVE DIRECTORY State Sen. Tim Bivins R-45, Dixon 629 N. Galena Ave. Dixon, IL 61021 Phone: 815-284-0045 Fax: 815-284-0207 Email: senatorbivins@grics.net State Sen. Dave Syverson R-35, Rockford 200 S. Wyman St. Suite 302 Rockford, IL 61101 Phone: 815-987-7555 Fax: 815-987-7563 Email: info@senatordavesyverson.com State Rep. Tom Demmer R-90, Dixon 1221 Currency Court Rochelle, IL 61068 Phone: 815-561-3690 Email: tom@tomdemmer.com Website: www.tomdemmer.com State Rep. Robert Pritchard R-70, Hinckley 2600 DeKalb Ave., Suite C Sycamore, IL 60178 815-748-3494 Fax: 815-748-4630 Email: Bob@PritchardStateRep.com Website: www.pritchardstaterep.com DeKalb County Board Chairman Jeffery L. Metzger, Sr. Legislative Center 200 N. Main St. Sycamore, IL 60178 Phone: 815-895-7189 Fax: 815-895-7284 Email: jmetzger@dekalbcounty.org Website: www.dekalbcounty.org Gov. Pat Quinn D-Chicago 207 Statehouse Springfield, IL 62706

Phone: 800-642-3112 Email: governor@state.il.us Website: www.illinois.gov U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren R-14, Winfield 1797 State Street, Suite A Geneva, IL 60134 Phone: 630-232-7104 Fax: 630-232-7174 427 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C., 20515 Phone: 202-225-2976 Fax: 202-225-0697 Website: hultgren.house.gov U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger R-16, Manteno 628 Columbus Street, Ste. 507 Ottawa, IL 61350 Phone: 815-431-9271 Fax: 815-431-9383 Washington, D.C., office: 1218 Longworth HOB Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-3635 Fax: 202-225-3521 Website: www.kinzinger.house.gov U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin D-Illinois 309 Hart Senate Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-2152 Fax: 202-228-0400 Website: www.durbin.senate.gov U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk R-Illinois 387 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-2854 Fax: 202-228-4611 Website: www.kirk.senate.gov President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20500 202-456-1111 Website: www.whitehouse.gov

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


Scene

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A10 • Monday, February 25, 2013

KSO benefit to focus on movies A silent auction of painted violins will be one of the highlights of Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s benefit evening, “KSO Goes to the Movies!” at 7:30 p.m. March 8 in Boutell Memorial Concert Hall in the Music Building at Northern Illinois University. The hand-painted, salvaged violins are one-of-a-kind art pieces created by local and regional artists. Nancy Long, art teacher at North Grove Elementary School in Sycamore, painted a violin in the style of Vincent van Gogh’s painting, “Starry Night.” “I decided to do the ‘Starry Night’ theme because of the curves and swirls in the design of the violin,” she said. Sycamore Middle School art instructor Anna Zantout drew inspiration from a few of the movie theme selections being played in the concert. Her violin is painted

with the characters of Pink Panther, James Bond 007 and Spiderman. The auction also will include baskets and a table with items of children’s interest. All proceeds will benefit the orchestra, a 501(c)(3) organization. The family concert will feature music from movie favorites such as “Star Wars,” “Harry Potter,” “Lord of the Rings,” “Apollo 13,” “Les Miserables,” “The Pink Panther,” “West Side Story,” “Batman,” “Spiderman,” and more, with selected movie clips. Concert patrons are encouraged to dress in costume as their favorite movie characters. Tickets cost $15 and will be available at the door. They also will be sold in advance at Sycamore Antiques, Kar Fre Flowers, Sycamore Chamber of Commerce, The Hillside Restaurant and LePrint Express. A limited number of tickets are available.

Provided photos

Several violins painted by local and regional artists will be auctioned at Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s “KSO Goes to the Movies” concert auction to be held March 8. LEFT: Nancy Long drew inspiration from Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” for the one-of-a-kind violin she painted. RIGHT: Anna Zantout’s painted violin was inspired by some of the movie selections for the concert – “The Pink Panther,” “Spiderman” and James Bond.

8BRIEFS Child screenings scheduled in DeKalb DeKalb Community Unit School District 428, along with Community Coordinated Child Care, will provide screenings for children ages birth to preschool. The screenings are scheduled from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 14 and 8 to 11 a.m. March 15 at Tyler Elementary School, 1021 Alden Circle, DeKalb. To schedule an appointment, call 815-754-2361. This screening is free and includes educational and speech/language components, as well as vision and hearing screening.

Clubs to hold shrimp dinner fundraiser The Sycamore Kiwanis Club will sponsor the Key Club at Sycamore High School for its annual take-out Shrimp Dinner fundraiser. The event will be held March 8, with dinner pickup starting at 4:30 p.m. and ending at 7 p.m. A select crew of Kiwanis and Key Club members will prepare the meals in the school’s commercial kitchen. Each meal is packed and rushed to the pick-up area for customers to take home and enjoy. The dinners include six jumbo shrimp or white meat chicken breast strips, baked potato, coleslaw, sour cream, butter, shrimp sauce, potato roll and butter. The cost for both meals is $10 each, delivered to your vehicle. Pick-up will be in front of the cafeteria. The money raised is used for Key Club programs.

License services at NIU today Secretary of State Jesse White’s office services will be available on campus from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. today in the Holmes Student Center – Lower Level, 340 Carroll Ave., on the Northern Illinois University campus in DeKalb. On campus, the services include: • Driver’s license (renewal, replacement, corrections)

• State ID card (renewal, replacement, corrections) • Vehicle sticker sales • Passenger, B-Truck and motorcycles license plates • NIU collegiate license plates • Organ/tissue donor registration • Vehicle title and registration • Parking placard for persons with disabilities Motorists wishing to renew their driver’s license can do so up to one year in advance of their license’s expiration date. A complete list of acceptable forms of identification is available at www.cyberdriveillinois. com. Acceptable forms of payment include personal checks, cash, MasterCard, American Express and Discover credit and debit cards.

Agriculture webinar set for Thursday “Managing Crop Rotations in High Tunnels” webinar is part of a Small Farm Webinar series that will be offered from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday. “Although the first crop in a high tunnel is often easy, subsequent crops may become increasingly difficult,” Jeff Kindhart, University of Illinois Extension educator, said in a news release. “This webinar will cover options for rotation and also strategies for managing situations that often arise where crop rotation is not feasible.” The webinar also will include a discussion ranging from potential rotational crop options for those with movable high tunnels to addressing specific actions that can be taken by growers to avoid pitfalls they face with limited rotation practices. Participants can listen in from home, but University of Illinois Extension also offers the opportunity to join others at its Boone County Extension office at 205 Cadillac Court, Unit 5, Belvidere, IL 61008. There is no fee, but registration is required to ensure

adequate space and handouts. In addition, sessions may be cancelled for insufficient registration and attendees may be asked to consider an alternate location. To register, call 815-544-3710 or visit https://webs.extension. uiuc.edu/registration/?Registra tionID=7578.

Cornerstone hosts 3-on-3 hoops tourney Cornerstone Christian Academy will host its annual Nothing But Net 3-on-3 basketball tournament on March 23. Competition will begin at 9 a.m. in the following divisions: boys 12 to 13, boys 14 to 18, men 19+ and girls 12 to 18. Three-point and free-throw contests will begin at noon. This event features an entire day of competition, concessions, prizes and fun for the whole family. The top two teams in each division will be awarded medals and prizes. All events will be held at Cornerstone Christian Academy, 355 N. Cross St. in Sycamore. Teams can register at www. cornerstonechristianacademy. com until March 19. Registration by March 8 is $40 per team. After March 8, the cost to register will be $50. The ticket price for spectators is $2. Visit the website for more information or contact Julianna Ladas at 815-895-8522. All proceeds benefit Cornerstone Christian Academy Sports Boosters.

ceived his medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago. Kurien is a physician at the DeKalb Clinic and Rockford Cardiovascular Associates Ltd., as well as an assistant professor in the University of Illinois College of Medicine. To receive a VAC lunch at “Maintain a Healthy Heart,” RSVP by 10 a.m. Tuesday at 815-758-1678. Looking to learn more about macular degeneration? Family Service Agency Senior Services will hold presentations on this disease at the Genoa and DeKalb locations. Dr. Jeffery Frank from Spex Expressions will speak about the disease and the new technologies surrounding it. The presentation at the DeKalb location, 330 Grove St., will be at 12:15 p.m. March 4. The presentation at the Genoa location, 400 E. Second St., will be at 12:15 p.m. March 11. To receive VAC lunch at either of these locations, RSVP by 10 a.m. Friday for the DeKalb presentation or by 10 a.m. March 8 for the Genoa presentation at 815-758-1678 For more information about these presentations or to register, call 815-758-4718.

Humane Society

Teens can discuss ‘Fault in Our Stars’ Local teens are invited to read “The Fault in Our Stars” by popular author John Green and join the STEM Teen Read book discussion at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Graham Hall 223 at Northern Illinois University. Experts from NIU and the community will discuss the science behind the fiction in one of the few “young adult” books to enjoy a long ride on the New York Times bestseller list. Critics have described “The Fault in Our Stars” as “hilariously funny,” an unexpected accolade for a book about teenage cancer patients. The book’s characters bring ordinary teenage sensibilities, needs and humor to extraordinary

2250 Barber Greene Road DeKalb, IL 60115 (815) 75.TAILS www.tailshumanesociety.org

situations. Three commentators will provide background about the book’s themes. Ruth Wood from the Cancer Center at Kishwaukee Community Hospital will help teen readers understand issues faced by teen cancer patients and how to support friends and family members dealing with cancer. Narayan Hosmane will explain his research with boron, which he calls “a miracle element for cancer treatment.” Gaylen Kapperman will use lab equipment to demonstrate how a blind character in the book can read and play video games. Following the background talks, teens can enjoy snacks and discuss the book with each other. Advance registration is not required, and parking on campus is free after 7 p.m. Teens can access online discussions and a video interview and demonstration with Kapperman. STEM Outreach delivers off-campus programs and on-campus activities that increase science, technology, engineering and mathematics literacy and enthusiasm among pre-K-12 students, their families and educators.

Pet of the Week

Squirrel

Hi, my name is Squirrel. I am THE sweetest, loving, lap-lover you could ever meet! I love to be the center of attention, cuddled, brushed or anything that involves me. Toys are cool, especially jingle balls and play mice. I’m a young guy who lost his home because my owner wasn’t able to take care of me anymore. I used to live with a dog, cat and two adults. We all got along very well so a new home with cat-friendly pets would be fine with me! I’m a great little guy who is patiently searching for my FURever home. Could that be yours?

Family Service Agency plans health programs February is American Heart Month; so learn about heart health with Family Services Agency Senior Services’ presentation, “Maintain a Healthy Heart” with Dr. Shaun Kurien at noon Wednesday, at 330 Grove St in DeKalb. Kurien will discuss how to keep your heart healthy and easy ways to prevent heart disease. Cardiologist Kurien is board certified in Internal Medicine and ECHO cardiology. He re-

Family Service Agency is one of the oldest social service agencies in DeKalb County and devotes its focus to protecting and developing children and older adults through four distinct departments: Big Brothers Big Sisters, Center For Counseling, Children’s Advocacy Center and Senior Services. For information on any department, call 815-758-8616.

isit our adorable adoptables at the shelter or view photos online at www.tailshumanesociety.org

Royal Children’s Ball

THE YOUTH SERVICE BUREAU PRESENTS...

Please join us for an enchanted evening filled with family fun, music and dancing, crafts, and other royal activities that will surely captivate your princes and princesses!

When: Where: Tickets:

Friday, March 8th from 6-9pm Altgeld Castle on the campus of Northern Illinois University $15 per person; please contact YSB for group sales of 6 or more tickets

Available at the following locations: YSB - 330 Grove Street, DeKalb, IL Phone: (815) 748-2010 Online: www.dcysb.com YSB Events Presented By:


AROUND THE COMMUNITY

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com Monday Free blood pressure clinics: no registration required. • 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays in the Kishwaukee Community Hospital Roberts Conference Center, DeKalb. 815-748-8962 or visit www. kishhospital.org/programs. • 9 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays at Valley West Community Hospital, 11 E. Pleasant Ave., Sandwich. 815-7863962 or www.valleywest.org. • 9 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays at KishHealth Family & Specialty Care in Genoa. • 9 to 11 a.m. Thursdays KishHealth Family & Specialty Care in Waterman. Mom’s Time Out: 9 a.m. to noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at South Prairie School, Sycamore. 815-895-3202. Story Time at Panera Bread: 9:30 a.m. at 2476 Sycamore Road, DeKalb. Register online, call 815756-9568, ext. 250, stop by the Youth Desk, or email theresaw@ dkpl.org. Kiwanis Club of DeKalb: 5:30 p.m. at the Elks DeKalb Ldoge BPOE 765 at 209 S. Annie Glidden Road in DeKalb. 815-756-6912. www. dekalbkiwanis.org. DeKalb Chess Club: 6 to 8 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. info@dekalbchess. com or visit www.DeKalbChess.com. DeKalb Rotary Club dinner and business meeting/program: 6 p.m. at Ellwood House Museum, 509 N. First St. in DeKalb. Contact Jim Allen at 815-787-0800. Bedtime Story Time: 6:30 p.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Call Youth Services at 815-7569568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@ dkpl.org. Singles club dances: 6:30 p.m. at St. Charles Singles Club at Hilton Garden Inn, 4077 E. Main St., St. Charles, across Route 64 from Pheasant Run Resort. 630-340-6647 or visit www.stcharlessinglesclub. com. Yoga Classes in DeKalb: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday; 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday at DeKalb Area Women’s Center (men welcome), 1021 State St., DeKalb. www.bodyfirstmfr.com. Song Bird’s Nest: 7 p.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Contact Youth Services at 815-7569568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@

dkpl.org. Tuesday Kishwaukee Sunrise Rotary: 7 a.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital, 1 Kish Hospital Drive in DeKalb. Contact: Becky Beck Ryan, president, 815-758-3800. Tales for Twos: 9:30 a.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Program lasts 20 to 25 minutes. Call 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Big Hand Little Hand Activity: 10 a.m. today, 11 a.m. Wednesday, and 11:30 a.m. Thursday (bilingual) in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Networking For Families: Noon to 1 p.m. at the DeKalb County Health Facility in the Multi-Purpose Room, left side, at 2550 N. Annie Glidden Road, DeKalb. Story Time: 12:45 to 1:30 p.m. at Hinckley Public Library. Stories, songs and crafts. Sign up by phone or at the front desk. 815-286-3220. February Movie Day: 4 to 5:30 p.m. at Hinckley Public Library. Film will be “Gnomeo + Juliet.” 815-2863220. Teacher in the Library: 4 to 5:15 p.m. today and Wednesday in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. www.dkpl.org, 815-756-9568, ext. 250. Sharing of the Spirit Circle: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb. Art Attack Workshop – Wheel Throwing Pottery Classes: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays through April 2 at 215 W. Elm St., Sycamore. To register, call 815-899-9440. Free Homework Help Nights: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays and most Thursdays at Neighbors’ House, a nonprofit, faith-based, communitydevelopment organization, at the corner of Fifth and Pine streets in DeKalb. NeighborsHouse@frontier. com or 815-787-0600. Magic Muffins – Flying Popsicle Sticks: 6:30 p.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Limit of 12 tweens (between the ages of 10 to 14). Sign-up ends at 8 a.m. the morning of the program. Register in person, online, email darcyt@dkpl. org, or call 815-756-9568, ext. 250. DeKalb Area Toastmasters: 7 p.m. at the American National Bank,

corner of Route 23 and Bethany Road, lower level, in Sycamore. www.dekalbtoastmasters.org, email drey@microsoft.com or call 847452-8688. Genoa Community Women’s Club: 7 p.m. at the Resource Bank in Genoa, welcomes all women from Genoa, Kingston and surrounding towns. 815-784-2115. Muslim Journeys: 7 to 8 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Maham Khan, from the Interfaith Youth Core, will speak about bridging cultural divides and creating positive and engaging cooperative relationships. For more information, call 815-756-9568, ext. 280, or email stever@dkpl.org. Kishwaukee Valley Barbershop Chorus rehearsals: 7:30 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb. Contact: 815-895-5955 or 815-7563004. VietNow: 7:30 p.m. at Sycamore Veterans Memorial Home, 121 S. California St. herbh3@juno.com. Wednesday Master Networkers Chapter, Sycamore Business Network International: 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Midwest Museum of Natural History, 425 W. State St., Sycamore. 815793-1832. Story Time: 9:45 to 10:30 a.m. at Hinckley Public Library. Stories, songs and crafts. Sign up by phone or at the front desk. 815-286-3220. Toddler Time: 10:30 a.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. No sign-up necessary and walkins are welcome. Contact Youth Services at 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Kishwaukee Kiwanis: 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hopkins Park Community Room in DeKalb. www.KishKiwanis.org. Contact: Amy Polzin at APolzin87@yahoo.com. Sycamore Rotary Club: Noon at Mitchel Lounge, 355 W. State St. in Sycamore. www.sycamorerotary. org. Contact: Brian Adams at 815762-5946. Consumer Advocacy Council of DeKalb County: 3:45 p.m. at Ben Gordon Center’s Reality House, 631 S. First St. in DeKalb. Contact: 815756-8501. CACDC meetings are open to the public, mental health consumers and family members concerned about mental health. Yup’il Story Art – Bilingual: 4 p.m. in the Youth Services Depart-

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ment at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Contact Youth Services at 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Computer Help! Lab: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Practice new computer skills. No sign-up required. 815-756-9568, ext. 220, or email dkplref@dkpl.org. Chess Game Play: 6 to 8 p.m. at Sycamore Public Library, 103 E. State St., Sycamore. Free, open chess game play, all ages and skill levels are welcome. info@dekalbchess. com or visit www.DeKalbChess.com. Paper Players: 6 to 8 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. All paper crafters ages 16 and older are welcome to this new monthly scrapbooking and card-making club. Limit of 10 participants. For more information, call 815-756-9568, ext. 220, or email jenniferm@dkpl.org. Bingo nights: 7:15 p.m. at Sycamore Memorial Veterans Home, 121 S. California St. Contact: Robert Fleetwood at 815-895-2679. The public is invited. Greater Kishwaukee Area Band Rehearsals: 7:30 to 9 p.m. in the band room at Huntley Middle School, 1515 S. Fourth St., DeKalb. Contacts are Sue at 815-899-4867 or John at 815-825-2350. Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators: 7:30 p.m. in the lower level conference room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St., DeKalb. Visitors are welcome at these free monthly meetings. Contact Dr. Larry Vint of DeKalb at dekalbscbwi@yahoo.com. Thursday Bilingual Story Time: 11 a.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. For children of all ages. Contact Youth Services at 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl. org. Art Attack Workshop – Kids Hand building: 5 to 6 p.m. Thursdays through April 4 at 215 W. Elm St., Sycamore. $65. Earn pinch pots, slab, and coils and create many different pieces. All supplies are included. To register, call 815-8999440. Stitch Niche Club: 5 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Learn how to crochet or share your favorite pastime. Contact Emily at 815-756-9568, ext. 265, or email emilyg@dkpl.org.

Computer Help! Lab: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Practice new computer skills. No sign-up required. 815-756-9568, ext. 220, or email dkplref@dkpl.org. Teen Advisory Group: 6:30 p.m. at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. TAG is for area teens who love the library and want to make it better. www.dkpl.org; contact Steve Roman at stever@dkpl.org or 815-756-9568, ext. 280. Sycamore Lioness Club: Evenings at members’ homes. New members are welcome. For location and time, call 815-895-5926. DeKalb County Quilters’ Guild: 7 p.m. in the Parish Activity Center of St. Mary’s Church, 322 Waterman St., Sycamore. www.dcqg.org. Friday Game Days: During library hours today and Saturday in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Board and card games will be available. For information, email theresaw@dkpl.org, or call 815-756-9568, ext. 250. Zumba Gold Classes: 10:30 a.m. at Fox Valley Older Adult Services, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Cost is $2 per class. DeKalb Women’s Club: 12:30 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, Seventh and Franklin streets, DeKalb. Jen Conley, certified music therapist of DeKalb County Hospice, will present the program, “Music Therapy.” De De Roure is social chair of the day. For information of the activities and membership, call Margaret at 815-895-4329. Computer Help! Lab: 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Practice new computer skills. No sign-up required. 815-756-9568, ext. 220, or email dkplref@dkpl.org. Young Writer’s and Illustrator’s Club: 4:30 to 6 p.m. at Somonauk Public Library, 700 E. LaSalle St. www.somonauklibrary.org or 815498-2440. Elburn Lions Club Bingo: Doors open at 5 p.m. at 500 Filmore St. Early Bird Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m., followed by the first of four progressive raffles. Regular Bingo games start at 7 p.m. and include two split the pot games. Food and drink are available for purchase. 630-3656315. Bingo license B-04001. Peace vigil: 5 to 6 p.m. at Memorial Park at First Street and Lincoln Highway in DeKalb. The DeKalb

Interfaith Network for Peace and Justice Peace Circle follows at 6 p.m. 815-758-0796. Troop support rally: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at First Street and Lincoln Highway in DeKalb, across from Memorial Park. Nooks and Crannies – The Library Tour: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in adult services department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Come to a special after-hours library tour. No sign-up required. 815-756-9568 ext. 220, or email dkplref@dkpl.org. DAWC activities and gallery viewings: 7 to 9 p.m. at DeKalb Area Women’s Center, 1021 State St. in DeKalb. Contact: 815-758-1351 or dawc@niu.edu. Entrance with an accessible lift is near the alley north of the building. Free parking is located at 415 N. 11th St., a half block south of the center. Saturday AARP Tax-Aide Free Tax Help: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Bring photo ID, all tax documents and last year’s return. No sign-up required. 815-756-9568, ext. 220, or email dkplref@dkpl.org. “The Way” acoustic coffee house: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at DeKalb Christian Church, 1107 S. First St. Contact: 815-758-1833 or tomndcc@ aol.com. Sunday Adventure at the Library: 1 to 5 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Thrill to the twists and turns of a story that you help to create. No sign-up required. Register online, by email stever@dkpl.org or call 815-7569568, ext. 280. Coffeejam: 3 to 8 p.m. at Degroova Guitars, 132 N. Third St. in DeKalb. Sandwich Swings!: 4 to 6 p.m. at Plano American Legion Post 395, 510 E. Dearborn St., Plano. Singles welcome. Casual dress. Cash bar available. Admission costs $5 per person. 815-570-9004. Society for Creative Anachronism events: Visit www.carraigban. org/ or call 815-739-5788 or 815986-5403 for other information. • Armored fighting practice: 4:30 p.m. behind Stevenson North at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

8COMMUNITY SERVINGS DeKalb County Salvation Army food pantry: 9 a.m. to noon Monday to Thursday; 5 to 6:45 p.m. Thursday at Ninth and Grove Streets in DeKalb. For DeKalb County residents only. Call 815-756-4308 or email gary_billings@usc.salvationarmy.org. Sycamore Food Pantry: Noon to 4 p.m. Monday at Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. 815-895-9113. Feed my Sheep Pantry: 3 to 5 p.m. Monday and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St. in DeKalb. 815-758-3203. All are welcome. Feed’Em Soup Community Project Free Community Meals: 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at 122 S. First St., DeKalb. These meals are

free to anyone in need. People wishing to volunteer can visit www.FeedEmSoup.org and fill out a short contact form to receive updates about volunteer needs. Groups wishing to volunteer or spearhead events, such as food drives, for Feed’Em Soup Community Project, can send email to Info@ FeedEmSoup.org. WWII Combat Flyers’ breakfast: 9 a.m. Wednesday at Sycamore Parkway Restaurant, 605 E. State St. Contact: 815-756-2157. Anyone who flew combat in any capacity during World War II is welcome. NIU Knights of Columbus 5572 fish dinners: 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the Newman Center, 512 Normal Road, DeKalb. The entrees

are fish, Louisiana shrimp, fish and shrimp, grilled cheese and fries and macaroni and cheese. Salad, bread, vegetable medley, mashed potato, twice baked potato, baked potato, homemade desserts and coffee are also served with each entree. Beer, wine and pop also available. $8 – fish, $8 – shrimp, $10 – fish and shrimp, $5 – grilled cheese and fries and $5 – macaroni and cheese. Knights of Columbus Lenten Friday Night Fish Fry Buffets: 5:30 to 8 p.m. at 1336 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Open to the public. 815-758-4141. Cost: $10 for adults, $6 for children age 10 and younger. No carryouts. Buffet includes cod, walleye, shrimp, macaroni and cheese, soup, baked potatos,

8SUPPORT GROUPS Monday Big Book Study AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Overeaters Anonymous: 10 a.m. at Senior Services Center, 330 Grove St. in DeKalb; 815-758-4718. Job & Career Support Group: 2 to 4 p.m. in the Sycamore Public Library board room, 103 E. State St. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 5:45 p.m. weigh-in and 6:30 p.m. meetings, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 13N535 French Road in Burlington. 847-833-6908. Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group: 815-756-5228; www.safepassagedv.org. 12 & 12 AA(C): 6 p.m. at Sycamore Lutheran Church, 1145 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. DeKalb County Chapter of Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays: 6 to 8 p.m. at DeKalb Unitarian Universalist Church, 158 N. Fourth St. All are welcome to join PFLAG. Contact Patricia at 815-3753212 or pflagdekalbcounty@yahoo. com. Group Hope: 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the private dining room at Rochelle Community Hospital. 815-398-9628. 12 Step & 12 Traditions AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 321 Oak St. in DeKalb; www. firstumc.net. Back to Basics AA(C): 7 p.m. at Union Congregational, 305 S. Gage St., Somonauk. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Expect A Miracle AA: 8 p.m. open meeting at United Methodist, Third and South streets, Kirkland. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. We Are Not Saints AA(C): 8 p.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Tuesday Family Caregiver Support Group: 9 to 11 a.m. at Visiting Angels, 630 Plaza Drive, Suite 1, Sycamore. For information or reservations, call 815-895-0200. Easy Does It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com.

French fries, cole slaw, salad bar and rolls. NICE pantry: 8:30 to 11 a.m. Saturdays and by appointment other days at 346 S. County Line Road in Lee. Contact: 815-824-2228. Knights’ Saturday Burgers and More: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at DeKalb Knights of Columbus Hall, 1336 E. Lincoln Highway. Burger buffet: Noon to 2 p.m. Saturday at Genoa Veterans Home, 311 S. Washington St. Hamburger or cheeseburger with chips are available or sandwich and buffet. The buffet includes potato salad, macaroni salad and beans. Proceeds help fund community projects and scholarships. Monthly community family-style dinner: Seating times are 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. Sat-

urday at Kingston United Methodist Church, 121 W. First St. Donation for complete dinners with dessert is $9 for adults and $4 for children. Carry-outs and gift certificates are available. The meat will be swiss steak. Girl Scout Troop 1620 Spaghetti Fundraising Dinner: 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday at CrossWind Community Church, 13100 Cherry Road, Genoa. Spaghetti with meatballs, bread, salad, dessert and beverage. Help the Girl Scouts of Troop 1620 raise money for their BlueSpring Cavern overnight trip. Cost: $5 for ages 13 and older, $3 for ages 6 to 12, amd free for those younger than 5. There also will be a 50/50 raffle (one ticket for $1 or 5 tickets for $3). 815-762-6575.

For information about Alcoholics Anonymous closed meetings, call 800-452-7990 or visit www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 9:30 a.m. weigh-in, 10 a.m. meeting at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Safe Passage Sexual Assault adults’ support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Genoa Taking Off Pounds Sensibly: 6 p.m. weigh-in and 6:30 p.m. meetings at CrossWind Community Church, 13100 Cherry Road. 815-784-3612. Hinckley Big Book Study AA(C): 6 p.m. at United Methodist Church, 801 N. Sycamore St. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Sharing of the Spirit Circle: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb, Public is invited. www.myspace. com/pathsister; 815-739-4329 or bjoanwatson@hotmail.com. Women’s “Rule #62 Group”: 6 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore. For information, call Kathy at 815-756-6655. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Better Off Sober AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Alcoholics Anonymous Tuesday Night Fellowship Group(C): 7 p.m. at The Church of St. Mary, 244 Waterman St. in Sycamore. 815-7391950. Good Vibes Al-Anon group: 7 to 8 p.m. at First Lutheran Church, 324 N. Third St., DeKalb. Wheel chair accessible entrance is on N. Third St. Parking available in lot located on northwest corner of Third and Pine streets. Contact Mary Ann at 815-895-8119. Sexaholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. at 512 Normal Road, DeKalb (behind church in brick building). 815-5080280. Veterans Peer Support Group: 7 to 8 p.m. at Ben Gordon Center, 12 Health Services Drive in DeKalb; www.bengordoncenter.org. For information about the free group, call 815-756-4875 or 815-793-6972. Smoky Mirror AA(C): 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church. 33930 N. State Road, Genoa, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Narcotics Anonymous: 8 p.m. at 1201 Twombly Road in DeKalb;

www.rragsna.org; 815-964-5959. Program of Recovery AA(C): 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Wednesday Fresh Beginnings AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. New Beginnings AA(C): 10 a.m. at 120 Main St., Kingston. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. 24-Hour-A-Day Brown Bag AA(C): 12:05 p.m. at Newman Center, 521 Normal Road, DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 5 p.m. weighin, 5:30 p.m. meeting at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group; 815-756-5228; www.safepassagedv.org. Came to Believe AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Living After Loss: 6:30 to 8 p.m. at DeKalb County Hospice, 2727 Sycamore Road, Suite 1B, DeKalb. Living After Loss is a free child-loss group intended for parents who have experienced the death of a child, no matter the age. www.kishhospital.org/programs or call DeKalb County Hospice at 815-756-3000. North Avenue Pass It On AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at North Ave. Baptist Church, 301 North Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Narcotics Anonymous: 7 p.m. at United Church of Christ, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb; www.rragsna.org; 815-964-5959. Hopefuls AA(C): 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. Thursday Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group: 815-756-5228; www.safepassagedv.org. Back To Basics AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Breastfeeding Group: 10 to 11:30

a.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital Roberts Conference Center, 1 Hospital Drive, DeKalb. Mothers and babies are welcome at this free, drop-in group. www.kishhospital. org; 815-748-8962. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. weigh-in and 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. meeting at Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. Call Lydia Johnson, chapter leader, 815-895-4618. Keep It Simple AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. One Day Café AA(C): 6 p.m. at Waterman United Methodist Church, 210 W Garfield St. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. weighin, 6:30 p.m. meeting at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren support group: 6:30 to 8 p.m. at DeKalb Senior Center, 333 Grove St. Professionals are regularly called in to provide additional information concerning a problem group members face. John Wett will speak on attachment disorders. He will discuss the problems disruption in the family can cause and offer some home interventions. Wett is a youth and family therapist. For more information, call Family Service Agency, 815-758-8616. Friendship Night: 7 p.m. in Room 10 of the Elburn Community Center, 525 N. Main St. For adults grieving the loss of a loved one. Call Conley Outreach at 630-365-2880 for directions and monthly topics. Sandwich Steppers AA(C): 7 p.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. A Friend Of Bill’s AA(C): 8 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 33930 N. State St., Genoa, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. Closed Discussion AA: 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com.

Friday Sexaholics Anonymous-DeKalb: 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. at Christ Community Church, 1600 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. This 12-step recovery program is for Internet addiction. Contact: 815-508-0280. SA.org. Pass It On AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Beacon Counseling Support Group: 10 a.m. at 113 N. Genoa St., Suite A, Genoa. Walk-ins be available for everyone beginning Friday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 815-784-2362 for an appointment at other times. There is a Solution Too AA: 12:05 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. B.Y.O.B. Big Book – 12 & 12 Discussion AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. Big Book Discussion AA(C): 7 p.m. at Newman Catholic Student Center, 521 Normal Road, DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Fox Valley AA(C): 7:30 p.m. at Salem Lutheran Church, 1022 N. Main St., Sandwich. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. County Line Group Big Book AA(C): 8 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church, 121 N. Sycamore St., Maple Park. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. One Day At A Time AA(C): 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. There is a Solution AA(C): 8 p.m. at Kingston Friendship Center, 120 Main St. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. Day PAA(C): 9 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Saturday Overeaters Anonymous: 8 a.m. in the Youth Room at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore. www.oa.org; Contact: Marilyn at 815-751-4822. It Is What It Is AA(C): 9 a.m. at St. Catherine’s Church, 340 S. Stott

St., Genoa. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. As Bill Sees It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Learning to Live Al-Anon group: 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Newman Catholic Center annex, Normal Road in DeKalb; llc904@hotmail.com. Narcotics Anonymous: 10 to 11 a.m. at United Church of Christ, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb; www.rragsna. org; 815-964-5959. Group Hope: Noon to 1:30 p.m. at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 511 Russell Road in DeKalb. This free support and discussion meeting is for NIU students and DeKalb community residents. Community facilitators are sought to volunteer to help others. Contact Dr. Charles Smith, 815-398-9628 or visit www. grouphope.org or www.dbsalliance. org. Back to Basics AA: 6:30 p.m. at Cortland United Methodist Church, 45 Chestnut Ave., Cortland. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. AA Speaker Open Meeting: 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Saturday Night AA(C): 10 p.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Sunday 24 Hours a Day AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Steps And Traditions AA(C): 6 p.m. at Masonic Hall, Route 23, Genoa. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. No Longer Hopeless AA(C): 7:30 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor, DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com.


WEATHER

Page A12 • Monday, February 25, 2013

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy

3-6” of snow lasting into the night

Cloudy and breezy with lurries

Still cloudy, brisk and chilly

Mostly cloudy and breezy

Partly sunny and cold

Partly sunny

High pressure will bring a dry day across the area today. This is in advance of a large storm system which will bring a period of snow Tuesday into Tuesday night. Total snow accumulations are expected to be 3-6 inches. It will be cold and windy with lurries lingering into the middle of the week.

39

37

34

35

32

29

37

28

31

27

23

19

18

28

Winds: E 6-12 mph

ALMANAC

Winds: NE 15-30 mph

UV INDEX

Winds: NNW 12-25 mph

Winds: NNW 12-25 mph

Winds: N 10-20 mph

Winds: N 10-20 mph

Winds: W 6-12 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 31° Low .............................................................. 12° Normal high ............................................. 36° Normal low ............................................... 20° Record high .............................. 62° in 2000 Record low ............................... -11° in 1967

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ......... 0.00” Month to date ....................................... 1.71” Normal month to date ....................... 1.26” Year to date ............................................ 4.44” Normal year to date ............................ 2.74”

Feb 25

New

Mar 4

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

Rockford 39/28

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 38/28

Q:

When is the rainy season in California?

Joliet 38/29

La Salle 38/29

Evanston 39/30 Chicago 39/28

Aurora 38/27

WEATHER TRIVIA™

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 37/27

Arlington Heights 39/29

DeKalb 39/28

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

November to April.

Last

Lake Geneva 37/26

Streator 38/30

A:

Sunrise today ................................ 6:36 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 5:40 p.m. Moonrise today ........................... 5:55 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 6:06 a.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 6:35 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 5:41 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow .................. 7:01 p.m. Moonset tomorrow .................... 6:36 a.m.

Kenosha 37/27

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

Full

Janesville 39/28

Hammond 39/30 Gary 40/29 Kankakee 39/30

Mar 11 Mar 19

On Feb. 25, 1934, a storm centered in the Carolinas brought killer tornadoes to Georgia and Alabama while dumping up to 9 inches of snow from Richmond, Va., to Philadelphia, Pa.

Peoria 37/32

Pontiac 39/31

NATIONAL WEATHER

Hi 38 47 39 39 38 38 38 39 37 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 36 36 39 39 39 38 37 38 38

Today Lo W 27 pc 35 c 28 pc 27 pc 31 c 28 pc 29 pc 30 pc 28 pc 28 pc 29 c 30 pc 28 pc 29 pc 29 pc 30 c 27 pc 26 pc 28 pc 33 c 29 pc 28 pc 27 pc 28 pc 28 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 35 28 sn 45 32 sn 36 29 sn 37 29 sn 39 28 sn 36 29 sn 36 29 sn 38 30 sn 36 28 sn 37 30 sn 37 26 sn 37 29 sn 37 29 sn 36 29 sn 36 28 sn 36 27 sn 36 29 sn 35 26 sn 37 29 sn 38 29 sn 36 27 sn 37 29 sn 37 29 sn 36 29 sn 36 28 sn

RIVER LEVELS

WEATHER HISTORY

First

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Watseka 39/30

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

2.10 6.43 2.84

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

-0.19 -1.15 -0.15

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 52 46 48 41 35 61 53 39

Today Lo W 43 r 34 s 31 pc 31 s 24 pc 51 r 39 c 28 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 61 38 pc 48 43 r 45 38 r 40 35 pc 38 33 sn 72 47 t 57 35 r 37 30 sn

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 48 54 33 69 44 35 58 73

Today Lo W 35 pc 36 c 12 pc 40 t 33 pc 27 sn 42 pc 45 s

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 48 37 r 55 34 s 33 8 c 66 43 pc 41 33 r 34 26 sn 58 39 s 74 49 s

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Hi 55 85 33 76 49 48 49 48

Today Lo W 41 c 73 s 22 c 48 t 35 s 34 s 36 r 35 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 51 39 r 84 69 c 35 23 c 63 45 pc 44 38 r 48 39 r 50 36 r 48 42 r

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Snow Quinn, Jefferson Elementary School Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

IS YOUR HOME COMFORTABLE? We have the solution for • Allergies • Headaches • Nose & Throat Irritation • Dry Air • High Gas Bills

Call Us Today! (815) 517-0501 Nicor Contractor Circle Members

700 B North Peace Rd., DeKalb, IL www.1sourcemechanical.net Financing & Rebates Available Free Estimates

HEATING • AIR CONDITIONING • REFRIGERATION • PLUMBING • BACK FLOW TESTING


Sports

Corey Crawford made 28 saves and the Blackhawks stretched their point streak to 18 with a victory over the Blue Jackets Sunday at the United Center. PAGE B2

SECTION B Monday, February 25, 2013 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

8MORNING KICKOFF

SYCAMORE STATE WRESTLING

Spartan wrestlers take third at state By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com

AP file photo

Safety on everyone’s mind at Daytona 500 DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Raymond Gober parked his motorcycle outside Daytona International Speedway, climbed off and briefly considered bringing his helmet into the track. “I was about to wear it in, but I knew everyone would be laughing at me,” said Gober, a pastor from outside Atlanta. Maybe not. Safety was on everyone’s mind before and during the Daytona 500 on Sunday, a day after a horrific wreck in a second-tier NASCAR series race hurled chunks of debris, including a heavy tire, into the stands and injured nearly 30 people. With small spots of blood still soaked into the concrete seating area, the accident raised questions about the safety of fans at racetracks. Should fences be higher and sturdier? Should grandstands be farther from the track? NASCAR has long been a big draw because of its thrilling speeds, tight-knit racing, frantic finishes and the ability to get so close to the action. That proximity comes with some risk. And after Saturday’s 12-car melee on the final lap of the Nationwide Series opener, some questioned whether that risk outweighed the reward. Early in the 500-mile “Great American Race,” a nine-car wreck took out several top contenders. Three-time NASCAR champion Tony Stewart and 2007 race winner Kevin Harvick were knocked out. The wreck started when Kasey Kahne let off the gas to slow as they neared the first turn at Daytona International Speedway – not too far from Saturday’s near-disaster. Kyle Busch tried to do the same, but couldn’t avoid contact. –Wire report

8WHAT TO WATCH Pro hockey Edmonton at Blackhawks, 7:30 p.m., CSN The Hawks will try to extend their season-opening point streak to 19 when they host the Oilers at the United Center.

Also on tv ... Pro hockey Dallas at Nashville, 7 p.m., NBCSN

Men’s college basketball Syracuse at Marquette, 6 p.m., ESPN Kansas at Iowa St., 8 p.m., ESPN

Men’s college hockey Penn State at Wisconsin, 7:30 p.m., BTN

Women’s college basketball Michigan State at Ohio State, 5:30 p.m., BTN Baylor at Oklahoma, 6 p.m., ESPN2

8KEEP UP ONLINE Follow us on Facebook and Twitter Want the latest from the area’s prep sports scene? Follow our coverage on Facebook by searching for DC Preps or on Twitter at twitter.com/dc_preps. Follow our NIU athletics coverage on Facebook by searching for Huskie Wire or on Twitter at twitter.com/HuskieWire.

BLOOMINGTON – For the second time in three years, the Sycamore wrestling team earned a trip back up I-39 with a nice, big IHSA state trophy. The Spartans defeated Antioch, 45-19, in the third-place match of the IHSA Dual Team state finals at U.S. Cellular Coliseum Saturday. It’s Sycamore’s second third-place finish in the past three seasons, as the Spartans earned a trophy in 2011. “This is why we practice so Clark Brooks – For Shaw Media hard, to get here,” said SycaSycamore’s Dylan Foster rides Antioch’s Tyler Stephens as he tries to more 145-pounder Dylan Fosstand and shake him off Saturday during their 145-pound bout at the ter, who went 2-1 on the day. “I IHSA dual team championships in Bloomington. Sycamore won the mean, we didn’t get where we third-place match, 45-19. Foster won his match by a 5-4 decision. wanted, the championship. But

still, it’s something to be proud of.” Kyle Akins (113 pounds), Austin Armstrong (160) and Ren Swick (170) won by fall for the Spartans (19-5) in the thirdplace win. Sycamore gave Montini a battle in the semifinals, but the effort just wasn’t enough against the powerhouse Broncos, who got a 43-25 win. Montini won its sixth consecutive state title and 11th in the last 14 seasons by beating Geneseo, 4910, in the championship match. One big upset for the Spartans in the semis was senior Jake Davis beating state champion Anthony Ferraro by an 11-2 major decision at 195 pounds.

Brendan McGehee (126) and Christopher Malone (182) won by fall against the Broncos. For Davis, going up against Ferraro was something he was certainly looking forward to. “I just came in there with a clear head, and just told myself whatever happens, happens,” Davis said. “He placed ahead of me (at individual state), so I had to just go out there and do my best.” Sycamore finished third, but the Spartans wrestled Montini tougher than any other team in Bloomington. Unfortunately, it was a matter of Sycamore getting an unlucky end of the bracket.

See STATE WRESTLING, page B3

CLASS 3A/4A BOYS BASKETBALL REGIONAL PREVIEW

Fine-tuning the

gameplay

Barbs hope late-season success continues in regional quarterinal By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com ave Rohlman’s DeKalb Barbs caught a little bit of fire at the end of the regular season. Though DeKalb stands at just 7-22 entering tonight’s Class 4A Rockford East Regional quarterfinal against Belvidere North, the Barbs have won three of their last five contests. While DeKalb, seeded fifth, has to get by the fourth-seeded Blue Thunder (8-20), and then beat top-seeded Rockford Jefferson in the semis and either No. 2 Rockford East or No. 3 Huntley Friday night in order to take home a regional championship, the Barbs are certainly playing well at the right time. The main thing Rohlman points to is turnovers. DeKalb is averaging 22-23 turnovers per game on the season, but that hasn’t been the case during the current streak.

D

See REGIONAL PREVIEW, page B3

MENS BASKETBALL: EASTERN ILLINOIS 59, NORTHERN ILLINOIS 47

PREP BASKETBALL

‘February has been tough’ for Huskies Memories still fresh By ANTHONY ZILIS sports@daily-chronicle.com DeKALB – February has been a tough month for the freshmanladen Northern Illinois men’s basketball team. Around the time their high school seasons hit the final stretch, the six freshmen Huskies are slogging through the latter part of the conference season. Saturday’s 59-47 nonconference loss to Eastern Illinois was the Huskies’ sixth defeat in six February games, and coach Mark Montgomery is hoping the push toward the postseason will breath life into his team. “It’s been tough. February has been tough,” Montgomery said. “That’s when the young guys, your freshmen especially, kind of hit the wall. It’s part of college basketball.” NIU (5-20) is just two games out of a three-way tie for sixth place in the conference. If the Huskies finish eighth or better, they’ll host a Mid-American Conference tournament game. “[The freshmen] have just got to stay focused on the main goal, and that’s getting to [the second round of the MAC tournament in] Cleve-

of coach Jack Tosh

Up next Eastern Michigan at NIU, 7 p.m. Wednesday, AM-1360 land and going on a run,” said Abdel Nader, who scored a team-high 17 points. “It’s tough, but we’ll work through it.” But if they’re going to catch Kent State, Bowling Green or Eastern Michigan, the Huskies are going to have to make some major improvements from Saturday’s loss and the rest of their trudge through February. For starters, NIU has to put together a complete game, a constant issue this season. Against EIU, the Huskies took an early lead and trailed just 27-25 at the end of the first half. But the Panthers scored the first eight points of the second half, forcing the Huskies to play from behind for the rest of the game. “Eastern Illinois came out of the locker room a little better than us and went on an 8-0 run and I think that was the difference,” Montgomery said. “We have to play in threeminute segments, five-minute seg-

More online

By ROSS JACOBSON rjacobson@shawmedia.com

For all your Northern Illinois University sports coverage – including stories, features, scores, photos, videos, blogs and much more – log on to HuskieWire. com. ments, find a way to win it down the stretch and in the second half.” The Huskies struggled shooting from the perimeter, a season-long theme. NIU made just four of 20 three-pointers, and the Huskies’ 20 percent shooting from beyond the arc was only about eight percentage points below their season average. Montgomery knows teams will play a zone against his team in the coming weeks, and NIU will have to improve on its three-point shooting. In the 12 games they’ve shot 16 or more three-pointers this season, the Huskies have won just once. “I think it’s just about taking better threes, definitely,” Nader said. “There’s not really two ways about it.”

Jim Doner and Mike Vories weren’t familiar with their first-year coach Jack Tosh when the 1967-68 basketball season started at DeKalb High School. But by the end of the year, they both knew he was the right man for the job. “He was a good man and he was fun to play for,” Vories said. “He wasn’t a real screamer or anything, unless it had to be done. He was a fun guy to be around and really enjoyed life.” Tosh was the sophomore boys coach at Evanston High School before coming to DeKalb in 1967 to take his first position as a head coach. That year he helped lead the Barbs to a fourth-place finish at the state tournament, still the best finish a DeKalb boys basketball team has ever had. Tosh died Feb. 11, more than 40 years after the Barbs’ magical run to the state tournament. Yet the memories of that year, when the Barbs finished 29-4 and also tied for the Upstate Eight Conference title, are still fresh for many of those players. “I remember everything about the season,” Doner said. “He always told us to be ourselves. ... He wasn’t overly demanding, we had to follow certain rules of course and he’d kick you around the gym a little bit, but like most coaches was flexible with us.”

See HUSKIES, page B3

See TOSH, page B3


SPORTS

Page B2 • Monday, February 25, 2013

8UPCOMING PREPS SPORTS SCHEDULE TODAY Boys Basketball Kaneland vs. IMSA in IMSA Regional quarterfinals, 7:30 p.m. Genoa-Kingston vs. Burlington Central in Burlington Central Regional quarterfinals, 5:30 p.m. DeKalb vs. Belvidere North at Rockford East Regional quarterfinals, 7:30 p.m.

8SPORTS SHORTS Pistorius’ brother facing charge in traffic death JOHANNESBURG – The murder case involving Olympic star Oscar Pistorius took another unexpected turn Sunday with the news that his older brother, Carl, is himself facing charges for the death of a woman in a traffic accident. Carl Pistorius faces a charge of unlawful, negligent killing for a 2008 road death, “in which a woman motorcyclist sadly lost her life,” Kenneth Oldwage, the Pistorius family lawyer said on Sunday. The accident happened in Vanderbijlpark, south of Johannesburg. The charge of “culpable homicide” was dropped and then reinstated and will be challenged in court, the lawyer told The Associated Press.

No. 7 Michigan beats Illinois, 71-58 ANN ARBOR, Mich. – Trey Burke set up teammates to score and made a shot of his own in a pivotal stretch to help Michigan pull away to beat Illinois, 71-58, Sunday. The Wolverines (23-4, 10-4 Big Ten) shook off a sluggish first half with a strong second half to win consecutive games for the first time in nearly a month. The Fighting Illini (20-9, 7-8) had won five straight – a streak that started Feb. 7 by beating top-ranked Indiana – and looked like they might earn another impressive win when they led by eight points twice in the first half. In the second half, though, Illinois coach John Groce said Michigan was tougher and smarter.

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

BLACKHAWKS 1, BLUE JACKETS 0

NBA

Hawks go beyond impressive VIEWS Tom Musick CHICAGO – Forgive me if this sounds like a broken record. The Blackhawks shut out Columbus on Sunday to pick up two more points in the standings. The Hawks have played the first 18 games of the season without a loss in regulation, which is an NHL record. The previous record was 17, which was set by the Hawks two days earlier. Today’s Hawks will have a chance to make it 19, breaking the record set by Sunday’s Hawks. If all of this sounds ridiculous, that’s because it is. How long can the Hawks keep this up? In a game that features so many odd bounces and deflections, wouldn’t you think that they would lose by accident one of these nights? Second-year center Andrew Shaw shrugged and smiled as he spoke about the Hawks’ success. He scored the only goal in a 1-0 win against the Blue Jackets, which marked the Hawks’ second shutout in as many weeks after going approximately forever without one. “If we stick to our systems and support each other and just work for each other,” Shaw said, “I don’t know how long this thing can last.” It’s worth a closer look. If you include the end of the 2011-12 regular season, the Hawks have earned at least one point in 24 consecutive games. That is the third-longest streak in NHL history. The all-time points streak is 35 games, which was set by the 1979-80 Philadelphia Flyers. The second-longest

AP photo

Blackhawks’ Andrew Shaw celebrates his goal against the Columbus Blue Jackets during the second period Sunday at the United Center streak is 28 games, which was set by the 1977-78 Montreal Canadiens. It seems like a lot to ask the Hawks to keep collecting points for 11 more games. Then again, it seemed like a lot to ask the Hawks to begin the season 15-0-3. The Hawks’ red-hot start has surpassed impressive. Impressive is a dog that fetches the newspaper at the end of your driveway every morning. Impressive is being able to parallel park in a super-tight spot that barely fits your vehicle. But this? This is something else. This is historic. “We’re excited that were playing good hockey,” Hawks captain Jonathan

Toews said. “I think the last game to set that record was exciting for us. We know it’s nothing more than that. “We’ve got a long ways to go. There’s a lot of work left to do before we get to the playoffs, and that’s where we want to be. And that’s where, really, we have to perform. “But I think we’re improving on all of the little details of our game, every single game. It doesn’t matter who we play. We don’t take anyone for granted.” A hard-fought, 1-0 win against a familiar division rival was just the latest way for the Hawks to prove their worth. They have won some games with offense and others with defense. They have

won some games at home (7-0-1) and others on the road (8-0-2). They have won some games when they score first (9-0-0) and others when they don’t (6-0-3). One cool thing about a shortened regular season is the condensed schedule, which means that we won’t have to wait long to find out whether the Hawks can notch another record. Today, the Hawks will host the Edmonton Oilers. At 7-7-3, the Oilers no longer are a laughingstock. But the Hawks still have the better team, and they’ll be playing in front of 20,000-plus crazies at the “Madhouse on Madison.” After hosting the Oilers, the Hawks will travel to St. Louis on Thursday. The Blues are tough, and if recent history is any indication, the game could include as many skirmishes as goals. Then, the Hawks will return to the United Center to host the Blue Jackets again. At this rate, the Hawks would match the Flyers’ all-time record March 18 against the Colorado Avalanche. They could break the record March 20 against the Anaheim Ducks. OK, maybe I’m getting ahead of myself. Hawks players would cringe if they heard anyone discussing such scenarios. You know, take it one game at a time, blah, blah, blah. But those of us who don’t play for the team are allowed to look ahead. We’re allowed to daydream. We’re allowed to wonder with excitement at just how far this group can go. On that note, the Stanley Cup playoffs begin April 30.

• Northwest Herald shaw media sports columnist Tom Musick can be reached at tmusick@shawmedia.com and on Twitter @tcmusick.

DAYTONA 500

Johnson wins 2nd Daytona 500; Patrick finishes 8th By JENNA FRYER The Associated Press

Johnson, Purdue rout Northwestern, 74-43 WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Terone Johnson scored 22 points to help Purdue defeat Northwestern, 74-43, on Sunday night and snap a three-game losing streak. D.J. Byrd scored 13 points and Ronnie Johnson and Rapheal Davis added 10 each for the Boilermakers (13-14, 6-8 Big Ten), who shot 53 percent from the field and outrebounded the Wildcats 48-23. It was the second-largest victory margin of the season for Purdue and the worst loss of the season for Northwestern (12-15, 5-9). Purdue had lost five of six, and its last three losses had come by a combined 61 points. The Boilermakers were coming off an embarrassing 83-55 loss to No. 1 Indiana, and they had eight days to think about it. Tre Demps led Northwestern with nine points. Reggie Hearn, who scored 26 in Northwestern’s 75-60 win on Feb. 2, finished with eight. Northwestern (12-15, 5-9) has lost its past three games, all by 20 or more points.

Samardzija, Cubs win home spring opener MESA, Ariz. – Jeff Samardzija made a strong spring debut and the Cubs scored four unearned runs in the first inning against San Francisco Giants ace Matt Cain, then held on for a 4-3 victory Sunday at HoHoKam Stadium.

Greinke goes 2 innings, Dodgers tie White Sox 2-2 GLENDALE, Ariz. – Zack Greinke felt right at home in his new uniform. The right-hander pitched two clean innings in his Dodgers debut and Los Angeles tied the White Sox, 2-2, on Sunday in a Cactus League game that was called after nine innings. – Wire reports

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – A big first for Danica Patrick, but an even bigger second for Jimmie Johnson. Patrick made history up front at the Daytona 500 Sunday, only to see Johnson make a late push ahead of her and reclaim his spot at the top of his sport. It was the second Daytona 500 victory for Johnson, a fivetime NASCAR champion who first won “The Great American Race” in 2006. “There is no other way to start the season than to win the Daytona 500. I’m a very lucky man to have won it twice,” said Johnson, who won in his 400th career start. “I’m very honored to be on that trophy with all the greats that have ever been in our sport.” It comes a year after Johnson completed only one lap in the race because of a wreck that also collected Patrick, and just three months after Johnson lost his bid for a sixth Sprint Cup title to go two years without a championship after winning five straight. Although he didn’t think he needed to send a message to his competitors — “I don’t think we went anywhere; anybody in the garage area, they’re wise to all that,” Johnson said — the win showed the No. 48 team is tired of coming up short after all those years of dominance. “Definitely a great start for the team. When we were sitting discussing things before the season started, we felt good about the 500,” Johnson said, “but we’re really excited for everything after the 500. I think it’s going to be a very strong year for us.” Patrick is hoping for her own success after a historymaking race. The first woman to win the pole, Patrick also became the first woman to lead the race. She ran inside the top 10 almost the entire race, kept pace with the field and never panicked on the track. Her only mistakes were on

EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct Indiana 35 21 .625 Bulls 32 23 .582 Milwaukee 26 28 .481 Detroit 22 36 .379 Cleveland 18 38 .321 Atlantic Division W L Pct New York 33 20 .623 Brooklyn 33 24 .579 Boston 29 26 .527 Toronto 23 33 .411 Philadelphia 22 32 .407 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 40 14 .741 Atlanta 31 23 .574 Washington 17 37 .315 Orlando 15 41 .268 Charlotte 13 43 .232

GB — 2½ 8 14 17 GB — 2 5 11½ 11½ GB — 9 23 26 28

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 45 13 .776 Memphis 37 18 .673 Houston 31 27 .534 Dallas 25 30 .455 New Orleans 20 37 .351 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 40 15 .727 Denver 35 22 .614 Utah 31 25 .554 Portland 25 30 .455 Minnesota 20 33 .377 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 40 18 .690 Golden State 33 23 .589 L.A. Lakers 28 29 .491 Sacramento 19 38 .333 Phoenix 18 39 .316

GB — 6½ 14 18½ 24½ GB — 6 9½ 15 19 GB — 6 11½ 20½ 21½

Sunday's Results L.A. Lakers 103, Dallas 99 Golden State 100, Minnesota 99 New Orleans 110, Sacramento 95 Miami 109, Cleveland 105 New York 99, Philadelphia 93 Memphis 76, Brooklyn 72 San Antonio 97, Phoenix 87 Boston at Portland (n) Bulls at Oklahoma City (n) Today’s Games Washington at Toronto, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m. Boston at Utah, 8 p.m. Tuesday's Games Cleveland at Bulls, 7 p.m. Orlando at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Golden State at Indiana, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Brooklyn at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Results Denver 113, Charlotte 99 Cleveland 118, Orlando 94 Washington 105, Houston 103 Miami 114, Philadelphia 90 Indiana 90, Detroit 72 Atlanta 103, Milwaukee 102 L.A. Clippers 107, Utah 94

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 18 15 0 3 33 St. Louis 18 10 6 2 22 Detroit 19 9 7 3 21 Nashville 19 8 6 5 21 Columbus 19 5 12 2 12 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts Vancouver 18 10 4 4 24 Minnesota 17 8 7 2 18 Calgary 17 7 7 3 17 Edmonton 17 7 7 3 17 Colorado 17 7 8 2 16 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 16 13 2 1 27 Dallas 18 9 8 1 19 Phoenix 18 8 7 3 19 San Jose 17 8 6 3 19 Los Angeles 16 8 6 2 18

GF GA 58 35 55 52 57 54 39 43 40 56 GF GA 52 48 37 42 48 59 40 46 42 51 GF GA 57 42 47 48 50 49 41 39 40 39

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 19 13 6 0 26 65 48 New Jersey 19 10 5 4 24 48 49 Philadelphia 20 9 10 1 19 58 62 N.Y. Rangers 17 8 7 2 18 41 44 N.Y. Islanders 19 8 10 1 17 56 64 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 18 12 4 2 26 52 39 Boston 15 11 2 2 24 45 34 Ottawa 19 11 6 2 24 46 36 Toronto 19 11 8 0 22 53 44 Buffalo 19 6 12 1 13 48 63 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Carolina 17 9 7 1 19 50 51 Tampa Bay 18 9 8 1 19 69 58 Winnipeg 18 8 9 1 17 48 57 Florida 18 5 9 4 14 42 65 Washington 17 6 10 1 13 48 55 Two points for a win, one point for OT loss.

AP photo

Jimmie Johnson celebrates after winning the Daytona 500 Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla. pit road, where she got beat on the race back to the track, and on the final lap, when she was running third but got snookered by the veterans and faded to eighth. That’s going to stick with Patrick for some time. “I would imagine pretty much anyone would be kicking themselves about what they coulda, shoulda have done to give themselves an opportunity to win,” she said. “I think that’s what I was feeling today, was uncertainty as to how I was going to accomplish that.” There were several multicar crashes, but no one was hurt and none of them approached the magnitude of the wreck that injured more than two dozen fans in the grandstand at the end of the second-tier Nationwide Series race on the same track a day earlier. Daytona International Speedway workers were up until 2 a.m repairing the fence that was damaged in the accident, and track officials offered Sunday morning to move any fans who

felt uneasy sitting too close to the track. Several drivers said the accident and concern for the fans stuck with them overnight and into Sunday morning, and Johnson was quick to send his thoughts from Victory Lane. “I just want to give a big shout-out to all the fans, and I also want to send my thoughts and prayers out to everybody that was injured in the grandstands,” Johnson said. Dale Earnhardt Jr., whose father was killed in this race 12 years ago, was involved in Saturday’s accident but refocused and finished second to Johnson, his Hendrick Motorsports teammate. “Me personally, I was just really waiting to get the news on how everybody was, how all the fans were overnight, just hoping that things were going to improve,” Earnhardt said, adding that he “wasn’t really ready to proceed until you had some confirmation that things were looking more positive.” The race itself, the debut for

NASCAR’s new Gen-6 car, was quite similar to all the other Cup races during Speedweeks in that the cars seemed to line up in a single-file parade along the top groove of the track. It made the 55th running of the Daytona 500 relatively uneventful. When the race was on the line, Johnson took off. The driver known as “FiveTime” raced past defending NASCAR champion Brad Keselowski on the final restart and pulled out to a sizable lead that nobody challenged over the final six laps. Johnson and Keselowski went down to the wire last season in their race for the Sprint Cup title, with Johnson faltering in the final two races as Keselowski won his first Cup championship. Although it was a bit of an upset that stuck with Johnson into the offseason, it gave him no extra motivation when he found himself racing with Keselowski late Sunday for the Daytona 500.

Sunday's Games Blackhawks 1, Columbus 0 Boston 4, Florida 1 Detroit 8, Vancouver 3 Winnipeg 4, New Jersey 2 Carolina 4, N.Y. Islanders 2 Pittsburgh 5, Tampa Bay 3 Anaheim 4, Colorado 3, OT Calgary 5, Phoenix 4 Today’s Games Toronto at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Nashville, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Blackhawks, 7:30 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday's Games Dallas at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 6:30 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Results Edmonton 3, Phoenix 2, SO Washington 5, New Jersey 1 Philadelphia 5, Winnipeg 3 Los Angeles 4, Colorado 1 Detroit 4, Nashville 0 Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 2 Ottawa 3, Toronto 2 Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 N.Y. Islanders 4, Buffalo 0 Dallas 3, San Jose 1 St. Louis 2, Columbus 1 Calgary 3, Minnesota 1

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Regional titles are within reach for quarterfinalists Jacobson: The boys basketball regular season has ended and our last set of playoffs begin today as Genoa-Kingston, DeKalb and Kaneland all have regional quarterfinal games. Sycamore gets started Tuesday in their regional semifinals. It’s never easy to come out of a regional having to play three games. What are the chances that one of the three teams playing today can win a regional title? Nitz: It’s always going to be tough to win a regional by having to play a quarterfinal, but anything can happen in a one-and-done, knockout situation. I don’t think it’s out of the realm of possibility for any of the three teams you mentioned to claim a title Friday night. G-K, at 16-10, has a very good record for a fifth seed, and the Burlington Central Regional looks wide open. Kaneland won the Northern Illinois Big 12 East, and DeKalb has made a nice little move here at the end of the season. I think DeKalb has a decent shot to make a run. Belvidere

TAKE 2 Ross Jacobson and Steve Nitz face off North, the Barbs’ quarterfinal opponent, is certainly beatable. I honestly think Rockford Jefferson, the top seed at Rockford East, should have been seeded third. It wouldn’t shock me to see DeKalb take down the J-Hawks in the semis, and anything can happen in the final. Sure, the Barbs have had a disappointing season overall, but they did play a fairly tough nonconference schedule with some Class 4A teams on it. Maybe it pays off this week. Ross, which of these teams do you think has the best shot at a regional championship? Jacobson: All three have a shot. If I’m going to pick one though, I’ll go with the Cogs. G-K has played Burlington Central tough twice, coming out on the short end

each time. The No. 1 seed in that regional is Hampshire, which boasts a record of 22-4 coming out of the Fox Valley Conference Fox Division, but the Whip-Purs’ strength of schedule isn’t much to write home about. In games against opponents known around DeKalb County, Hampshire has beaten Burlington Central twice (by five and 11 points), Geneseo by two, and Newark by five. Guard play is always a key for me, and Mason and Tommy Lucca provide the Cogs with two dependable options. Just by virtue of Sycamore’s bye into the semifinals, I think it is the most likely team of our 3A and 4A teams to advance through to the sectional round. Sycamore

gets a tough matchup against Rochelle on Tuesday, though. What are your keys to that matchup after the two teams split their two regular-season games? Nitz: Rochelle loves to shoot the 3-pointer, and we both watched the Hubs light it up from beyond the arc in their 71-64 win Feb. 15 at Sycamore. If the Spartans can keep Rochelle’s shooters in check, they certainly have a shot. Sycamore beat Rochelle by 18 in December, but the Hubs were without their best player, senior point guard Grant Prusator. He had 26 points in the win on Feb. 15. He’s one player Sycamore has to hold in check. Jacobson: For me, I think it’s all on Sycamore. If they control the tempo, slow it down and execute in the half court, then they’ll come away with a win. It’s when the Spartans play a little bit out of control that things tend to go south. Turnovers are only exacerbated playing against Rochelle because the Hubs like to get up and down.

Monday, February 25, 2013 • Page B3

Tosh remembered for kind personality • TOSH Continued from page B1 For one reason or another Jim Doner didn’t see much playing time under DeKalb’s previous coach. But when Tosh came to DeKalb, Doner saw it as an opportunity for a fresh start and a chance to get off the bench. Doner and Tosh hit it off and Doner became the Barbs’ starting guard. “He was just a very nice man, very nice gentleman,” Doner said. “He had the type of values that most of us in DeKalb at the time had.” Joe Hart never got a chance to play under Tosh after graduating from DeKalb in 1967, just months before Tosh began his coaching career at the high school. But Hart got to know Tosh in the following years, work-

Huskies still have quite a bit to play for • HUSKIES Continued from page B1

GOLF

Kuchar wins Match Play Championship By DOUG FERGUSON The Associated Press MARANA, Ariz. – Even in the most stressful form of golf, Matt Kuchar and his easy smile made the Match Play Championship look like a weekend game with his buddies. It was fun when he built a 4-up lead at the turn. And when Hunter Mahan threw his best golf at him during a wild back nine Sunday at Dove Moun-

tain, Kuchar never looked rattled, never felt as if the match belonged to anyone but him, and never lost the lead. Kuchar kept momentum on his side with four birdies on the back nine, the last conceded on the 17th hole for a 2-and-1 victory. He captured his first World Golf Championship and put his name in the conversation as among the most lethal players in match play. In his case, looks are deceiving.

“Match play I find to be such an amazing, unique format, so much fun to play and so much pressure,” Kuchar said. “It seems like each hole there’s so much momentum riding and so much pressure on every hole. To come out on top after six matches of playing the top 64 guys in the world, it’s an incredible feeling.” Mahan, trying to join Tiger Woods as the only backto-back winners of the Match Play Championship, had gone

G-K’s Jenkins thinks any team in regional has shot at crown • REGIONAL PREVIEW Continued from page B1 “We have finally limited our turnovers,” he said. “In all those (late season) wins we’ve had 12 or 13 turnovers. And I think our defensive focus has been better. Those are the two big things.” One reason for the Barbs’ success down the stretch could be sophomore point guard Rudy Lopez. Rohlman said the play of Lopez, who’s averaging nine points per game, has been steady. The sophomore said his confidence has been raised as the season’s gone on, and pointed to a number of things the Barbs have done well at the end of the year. “Defense, lack of turnovers, talking to each other,” Lopez said. “Sharing the ball, moving the ball on offense. Running our plays very well.” While DeKalb may be playing much better lately,

Rohlman knows it’s a tough regional, and said any of the top three seeds could have gotten the top spot. Jefferson was seeded first with a record of 17-12. East finished tied for second in the NIC-10 at 16-10, while Huntley had a final regularseason record of 17-8. “I think it’s a tough regional. Jefferson got the one seed, but Huntley’s very good and Rockford East is extremely fast,” Rohlman said. “It’s a pretty loaded regional.”

Burlington Central regional wide open: To Genoa-Kingston coach Corey Jenkins, every team in the Class 3A Burlington Central regional has a shot at taking home the crown. Jenkins’ Cogs are the No. 5 seed, but are 16-10 on the season. G-K faces Burlington Central in the first round. The Rockets beat the Cogs twice this season. Hampshire (22-5) got the top seed. Sycamore (17-10) is seeded second while Ro-

chelle has the third seed. “One through five can win this thing, we feel,” Jenkins said. “Being a small school we got a low seed with a good record.” Sycamore coach Andrew Stacy echoed Jenkins’ sentiments. Stacy’s Spartans lost to Rochelle, their semifinal opponent, 71-64, on Feb. 15., but defeated Rochelle by 18 in December. “Honestly, I think all five teams, if they’re playing well and things go their way, have a chance to win it, which makes it a lot of fun,” Stacy said. “There’s not going to be any easy games. Everything’s going to be a battle and whoever wins the regional will definitely earn it because I think all five teams are capable on any given night of beating anyone that they face.” Kaneland is seeded third at the IMSA Regional. The Knights take on sixth-seeded IMSA today at 7:30 p.m. in the quarterfinals.

Not a first-place finish, but Spartan wrestlers are holding heads high • STATE WRESTLING Continued from page B1 Foster felt the Spartans were the second-best Class 2A team Saturday. “For sure, it’s just how it draws out and what not,” he said. “I feel like we could have been there with Montini in the championship.” The Spartans guaranteed themselves a trophy by defeating Taylorville, 39-30, in the quarterfinals. The Spartans forfeited the last four matches with the match al-

ready clinched in order to keep guys healthy. C.J. Druck (120), Austin Culton (152) and Armstrong (160) won by fall for Sycamore. Davis (195) won by technical fall (15-0). “Druck started us out with a big fall right away in the beginning, and we never looked back from there,” Sycamore coach Alex Nelson said of his team’s opening win over Taylorville. “Our kids just straight out wrestled tough all the way through that dual meet. Like

I said, Druck got the fall and everybody kind of fed off that.” The Spartans weren’t able to reach their goal of coming back to Sycamore with a first-place finish, but they certainly weren’t ashamed of earning the school’s second state trophy. “It’s a great day to be a Spartan. I’m proud of those guys,” Nelson said. “They work hard all year and to be rewarded with a state trophy is something they definitely deserve.”

169 holes without trailing dating to the opening round last year until Kuchar won the fourth hole of the championship with a par. Mahan never caught up, though it wasn’t from a lack of effort. Every time he cut into the deficit, Kuchar answered the challenge – a 15-foot birdie putt on the 12th hole with Mahan in tight, and a 10-foot birdie putt on the 15th with Mahan poised to cut the lead to one hole.

ing for the Daily Chronicle as a sports reporter and talking with Tosh after DeKalb basketball games. The two would keep in touch even after both left the DeKalb area. “He was a very friendly guy, very approachable,” Hart said. “He had a great sense of humor and he really loved to sit around and tell stories, talk sports.” Tosh earned his undergrad and graduate degrees at Northwestern University. He played baseball there and also for the Marines. Tosh moved on to York High School in Elmhurst in the mid-1970s and retired in 1990 after serving as the school’s basketball coach and athletic director. He is an honored member of the Illinois Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame and is the namesake of the annual holiday “Tosh Tournament.”

Most of all, the Huskies need to realize that there’s quite a bit to play for over these last few weeks of the conference season. Even though NIU has no chance of reaching .500 in conference play, three wins in the Huskies’ last four games would, in all likelihood, earn the Huskies a home conference tournament game. Montgomery hopes the

thought of the postseason coming up will help his team climb out of the dog days of February. “We were hoping the excitement of March [being] right around the corner, there’s only four league games left. Hopefully that can get them over the top,” Montgomery said. “If you steal one Wednesday [against Eastern Michigan] and you find a way to win one against Central [Michigan on Saturday], you’re right back in it.”


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Page B4 • Monday, February 25, 2013

d r a o B Jo b s e t n u t r e nt Opp o m y o l p m E Lo c a l Retail

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Legal Secretary - FT DeKalb. Legal support services firm seeks Legal Secretary for M-F day shifts. Must be 18+, clea backgrou d, exceptio al writi g skills.

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REQUIRED: High school graduatio or equivale t PLUS three a d o e-half years of experie ce comparable to that of a machi ist appre tice i a approved trai i g program OR completio of a equivale t three a d o e-half year trai i g program as established by a employer served by the State U iversities Civil Service System. For additio al i formatio go to www.hr. iu.edu/Employme t

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REPORTER

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DEKALB The Daily Chro icle, a 9,000 circulatio six-day a week ewspaper ow ed by Shaw Media that covers DeKalb Cou ty, is looki g for a reporter to joi our team as we forge ahead with the practice of 21st ce tury jour alism.

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A derso Breco , formerly A derso Packagi g, has ma y ma ufacturi g job opportu ities due to the co ti ued growth of our busi ess. We offer a excelle t work e viro me t that is challe gi g, rewardi g, a d empoweri g. We are a i ovative a d growth-orie ted compa y, offeri g a diverse a d i clusive culture. We have temp to hire & direct hire positio s available o all shifts. Some of our curre t career opportu ities i clude:

The Daily Chro icle is a award-wi i g ewspaper that tries to serve its commu ity a d do more tha some might expect from a publicatio its size. DeKalb is about a hour west of Chicago, a d is home to Norther Illi ois U iversity.

A derso Breco , formerly A derso Packagi g, has ma y job opportu ities due to the co ti ued growth of our busi ess. We offer a excelle t work e viro me t that is challe gi g, rewardi g, a d empoweri g. We are a i ovative a d growth-orie ted compa y, offeri g a diverse & i clusive culture. Some of our curre t career opportu ities i clude:

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If you are i terested please specify the positio you are applyi g for a d e-mail a Word docume t to: careers@a derso breco .com EOE, M/F/D/V

We're seeki g a perso who u dersta ds that today's reporters cover stories a d co ect with their audie ce through more tha just the writte word. This reporter will be comfortable if they are asked to shoot video or still photos from a sce e. The successful ca didate will also u dersta d a d embrace the idea that ewspapers are part of the 24hour ews cycle. Ideal ca didates will be willi g to take o a broad ra ge of assig me ts, from spot ews a d gover me t meeti g coverage to features, a d must tell stories that show readers how the eve ts a d people are releva t to their lives. Our reporters are expected to ge erate their ow story ideas a d develop sources o their beat, as well as take assig me ts from the ews editor. At least o e year of professio al experie ce preferred, but rece t graduates with outsta di g i ter ship experie ce are e couraged to apply. Solid k owledge of AP Style a d grammar required, as is ability to write clear, co cise copy. Must have a valid drivers lice se, depe dable tra sportatio a d proof of i sura ce. Experie ce with the Web a d multimedia is a plus. Shaw Media offers a competitive salary, a comprehe sive be efit package.

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ADVICE & PUZZLES

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Monday, February 25, 2013 • Page B5

Loving grandfather hurt by silent treatment Dear Abby: My two adult granddaughters have rejected me, their doting grandfather. Their father gave me this explanation: “They are uncomfortable with the way you rub their shoulders and necks.” These girls and both parents have misinterpreted my innocent expressions of affection, which haven’t changed since the girls were little. The only change is in their perception of my actions. I am devastated. I asked twice to meet with these family members to discuss their concerns. It has been three months; no meeting time has been offered. There has been no contact, and neither girl has called me for any reason this year. I can’t just stop loving those with whom I have

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips forged a 20-year bond of affection. How can this rupture be repaired? – Grieving Granddad

Dear Grieving Granddad: Clearly, there is a need for some professional mediation here, provided your granddaughters and their parents are willing. If your touches have been regarded as inappropriate, you should have been warned about it years ago. Obviously something has made your granddaughters uncomfortable, and the rupture won’t heal until it can be discussed openly. Dear Abby: Lately I have

noticed that people are bringing their dogs shopping with them. I’m not talking about service dogs, but pets. The other day, a woman brought her dog into the grocery store. While I’ll admit the little thing looked cute sitting in the shopping cart, someone else’s food will be in that cart next, and who knows where that dog’s feet have been? Why does management allow this? I’m willing to bet money that if I were to bring my pit bull, “Bruiser,” inside the grocery store with me, I’d be stopped immediately. Talk about a double standard. I welcome your comments. – Askance in Poway, Calif. Dear Askance: You should speak to the store manager and ask why it was permit-

ted, because I was under the impression that health laws do not permit canines inside establishments that sell food – unless they are service dogs. “Bruiser” might be unwelcome not because of his size, but because there is concern about the breed’s reputation. Dear Abby: I am responding to your answer to “Lost, Alone and Worried in Urbana, Ill.” (Dec. 26), the young girl who is being made to teach her younger, learningdisabled brother how to read. You were right in advising her to talk to her school counselor. However, you should have emphasized strongly to her that it is a MUST. The school counselor is part of a guidance team that evaluates students with learning differences and strat-

egizes ways to support the student and family. The parents are part of the team and attend meetings requested by the teacher, counselor or the parents themselves. All conversations are confidential. This may help the sister understand that she will not be blamed for anything. She is in a difficult position, and you were right to suppose that the parents may be frustrated and looking for help. It may be exactly what this family needs to get back on track. – Louise B., Elementary School Counselor Dear Louise B.: I appreciate your input, and I hope the girl who wrote sees your letter.

• Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Exercise, stretching can prevent back pain Dear Dr. K: Every few months I throw out my back. Are there any exercises I can do to strengthen my back and prevent this from happening? Dear Reader: Exercise is a great way to prevent repeat episodes of low back pain. The right exercise program will help you build strong, flexible muscles that will be less prone to injury. Until about a century ago, most human beings were physically active most of the day. The great majority of U.S. citizens lived (and worked) on farms, and that involved a lot of walking and lifting. You may think of lifting as mainly involving the arms, but lifting something heavy involves using

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff the back, abdominal and leg muscles as well. Our muscles were built to support a life of frequent physical activity – particularly a lot of walking and lifting. But that’s a life few of us have today, so our muscles tend to get weak and stiff. Weak muscles – particularly weak back and abdominal muscles – cause or worsen many cases of low back pain. Stretching and strengthening both your back and abdominal muscles can help prevent a recurrence of the problem.

You’ll want to focus on exercises that strengthen and stretch the muscles that support your spine. Strong abdominal or flexor muscles help people maintain an upright posture. So do strong extensor muscles, which run up and down the full length of the back. They help maintain the alignment of the vertebrae, the bones of your spine. In addition, two long muscles that run from the lower vertebrae to the hips and the buttock muscles help support the back during walking, standing and sitting. I’ve put illustrations and descriptions of four backstrengthening exercises on my website. Stretching is equally im-

portant for a person plagued by back problems. Supple, well-stretched muscles are less prone to injury. Indeed, shorter, less-flexible muscle and connective tissues restrict joint mobility and increase the likelihood of sprains and strains. Stretch regularly but gently. Don’t bounce, as that can cause injury. Beginners should start by holding the stretch for a short time and gradually build up to roughly 30-second stretches over time. In addition to exercises that increase the strength and flexibility of your lower back, you should engage in regular aerobic exercise. It has many benefits for general health

and also helps prevent back pain. Choose activities that are low in risk and high in benefit for your back. Swimming, walking and bicycling lead the list. Talk to your doctor about working with a physical therapist. He or she can help design a safe and effective exercise program for you. And remember the golden rule about any exercise program: Stop if it becomes painful. Exercise is meant to help, not hurt. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about how to deal with any pain you’re having.

• Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to send questions and get additional information.

Teacher wants to help student who stutters Dr. Wallace: I teach high school speech and English. One of my speech students has a severe stuttering problem. I would really like to help him overcome this handicap. I have gathered some useful information, but I was told by my principal to contact you because he remembers reading about stuttering in your column. Is it possible that you might enlighten me on this subject? – Teacher, St. Louis, Mo. Teacher: Most of my information on stuttering comes from the Stuttering Foundation of America. This wonderful nonprofit organization has an abundance of

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace reference materials to help friends, parents and teachers with those who stutter. The following are recommendations they offer when working with someone who stutters: • Refrain from making remarks like “Slow down,” “Take a breath” or “Relax.” Such simplistic advice can be perceived as demeaning and is never helpful. • Maintain natural eye contact and try not to look

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – Although some past lessons might have been very painful, you will make sure in the year ahead that you begin to profit from them. Doing so will put you miles ahead of your colleagues. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Unless you plan very carefully, you may have little to show for your effort, regardless of how hard you work. You wouldn’t plan to build a bridge without a blueprint, would you? ARIES (March 21-April 19) – You’re likely to get an opportunity to show someone important that you’re willing to stand behind him or her even if others aren’t. Don’t miss this boat. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Unless you are extremely prudent, it’s not likely to be one of your better days for buying or selling anything, mostly because you’ll be indifferent to the outcome. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – If you hope to win the confidence and respect of your friends, you’ll need to have the courage to speak out for the things you believe in. However, do so in a respectful manner. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – Be careful about usurping an associate’s ideas. Chances are you could easily miss the most important point and lose the message in the translation. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – There is a strong chance that something that looks good on paper might not work too well in reality. Before getting too deeply involved, study the matter much more carefully. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – You’ll encounter far less opposition if you do what needs to be done without calling any attention to yourself. It’s OK to aim high, but do so behind closed doors or in the shadows. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – If an old, trusted friend tells you something in confidence that he or she doesn’t want revealed to others, make sure this person’s trust is justified – abide by his or her wishes. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Falling short of your mark might be traceable to your methods and not to the nature of the project itself. Working hard is part of the solution, but you must be smart as well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Wishful thinking will lead to repeating an old mistake, even if you know better. It’s foolish to believe that doing the same thing could lead to a totally different conclusion. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Certain things you should be taking care of personally you might unwisely delegate to others. Unfortunately, no matter how hard they try, their performance won’t be up to your standards. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – When negotiating an important agreement, know what you’re getting into and be mindful of the small details, especially if you know that you’ll be held to exacting terms.

embarrassed or shocked. Just wait patiently until the person is finished. You will be tempted to finish sentences or fill in words. Try not to do this. (You can relate to this one). • Use a relatively slow, relaxed rate in your own conversational speech, but not so slow as to sound unnatural. • Let the person know by your manner and actions that you are listening to what he or she says, not how they say it. • Be aware that those who stutter usually have more trouble controlling their speech while on the telephone. Please be extra patient

8SUDOKU

in this situation. If the phone rings and you hear nothing when you answer, make sure before you hang up that it’s not a person who stutters trying to initiate conversation. Please contact the Stuttering Foundation at the tollfree telephone number 800992-9392, or email at info@ stutteringhelp.org Write to them at P.O. Box11749, Memphis, TN 38111-0749. Dr. Wallace: I will be graduating from high school in a few months with high honors. My parents want to buy me a car for my graduation gift. They said they will spend $15,000 for it. Both of my parents are lawyers, so

they can afford it. I would rather have a $5,000 computer system, a $5,000 car and $5,000 in a bank savings account. They insist that I should get the $15,000 car because they don’t want me to have a lot of car problems. What do you think I should settle for? – Shelby, Philadelphia, Pa. Shelby: If you shop around, it’s possible to get a decent automobile for $5,000. I prefer your 5-5-5 plan. You are a very fortunate young lady. I wish all the teens in the world had a similar problem.

• Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@galesburg.net.

8CROSSWORD

BRIDGE Phillip Alder

Partner can help to guide the defense Will Rogers said, “People are getting smarter nowadays; they are letting lawyers, instead of their conscience, be their guide.” At the bridge table, defenders have gotten much smarter over the last couple of decades, letting their partners be their guide instead of guessing. In this example deal, how should West plan the defense against three spades after he leads the club ace: jack, two, five? Since South was vulnerable, had a relatively weak suit and 7-2-2-2 distribution, he opened with two spades, not three. No doubt North should have jumped to four spades, but that would have ruined the story. West needs to find five tricks. There are two logical ways to procure them: East has the heart ace and the defenders can take two clubs, two hearts and the spade king, promoted as a winner on the third round of hearts. Or East has ace-jack-third of diamonds, giving East-West two clubs and three diamonds. But how does West know which way to turn? Under the club king, East can play his nine or his four. Each can be used to send a suit-preference signal. Here, because East has the heart ace, in the higher-ranking of the other two side suits, he plays his club nine. Then West will know to cash his heart king and continue with his second heart. East will win with his ace and play a third heart, letting West score his spade king. Watch out for employing “useless” cards for suit-preference signals when attitude and count are either known or irrelevant.


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Monday, February 25, 2013 “Pretty Baby” Photo by: sue

Upload your photos on My Photos – DeKalb County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Daily Chronicle Classified. Go to Daily-Chronicle.com/myphotos

Beanie Baby Collection

41 Regulars, 32 Teanies, 4 Boxed commemoratives, Big Red (Bulls) Princess Diana boxed, all original tags in excellent condition! Starting at $80.00. 815-786-3283 309-238-4265 Sandwich area NIGHT STAND – Flowered Frosted Mirrored Glass Night Stand. Single drawer & 2 front doors. 27 1/2” h x 22” w x 16” d. $145. 847-515-8012 Huntley area

Kitchen Cabinets, Pine. Various sizes. $400. 630-552-8272

!!!!!!!!!!!

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs 1990 & Newer

Certified Medical Assistant Clinical Experience Required Great Schedule Great Place to Work

Kishwaukee Medical Associates 954 W. State Street Sycamore, IL 60178 Send Resume or Apply in Person

Precious Moments Dated 1987 Club Figurine, "Love Is The Best Gift Of All", Great Condition, No box, $8, DeKalb Area. 815-739-1953. Precious Moments Wedding Figurine "The Lord Bless & Keep You" E-3114. Great Condition, No Box, $8, DeKalb. 815-739-1953.

Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

Couch – Upholstered – Antique – Exc. Cond. - Multi Color – 80”Long $350 – 815-787-1397 after 5pm

815-814-1964

OFFICE DESK CHAIR on Wheels With Arm Rests, Dark Green & Grey In Color, $15, DeKalb Area. 815-739-1953

815-814-1224

Wood Stand (Not Particle Board) With One Shelf Across Top And One Across Bottom,Great For Any Room, $12, DeKalb Area. 815-739-1953.

or !!!!!!!!!!!

A-1 AUTO

op ty 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-15992. I510073 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 4 & 11, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE

Legal Secretary - FT

JEWELRY BOX - Great For an anytime gift! Hanging Jewelry Box With Door To Display Photos In, Espresso Finish, New, $20. 815-895-5373. Sycamore.

DeKalb. Legal support services firm seeks Legal Secretary for M-F day shifts. Must be 18+, clean background, exceptional writing skills.

MIRROR - Jewel Case Lighted 3Drawer Mirror With 1X and 5X Magnification Mirror, New, $15. Great for an anytime gift! 815-895-5373. Sycamore

Send resume to: mda20131@gmail.com

RN Part-time Provide medication training & supervision to direct care staff. Monitor health of adults with developmental disabilities & complete nursing documents in accordance with State regulations. 26 hrs/wk, which includes oncall. Min. 2 yrs RN experience. MS Office skills required. Apply on our website, www.ohinc.org or in-person at

Opportunity House, 202 Lucas St., Sycamore, IL, 815-895-5108 EOE

Will BUY UR USED CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

Mower: Toro, used, self propelled, key start $30 815-787-1397 after 5pm

Grinder / Sander 8¼” Comb. Miter Saw – 10” Table Saw – Great Shape – w/Accessories $125 815-991-5149

Barn Heater – 50,000 BTU Kerosene $25 815-286-3502

China - Service for 24

7 piece setting, Crest Wood Bridal Rose Pattern incl platters, serving pieces, etc. Approx 150 pieces. $150 815-786-3283 309-238-4265 Sandwich area

MOST CASH WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 NO TITLE...... NO PROBLEM 815-575-5153

$$ WANTED $$ Cars, Trucks & Vans $500 Cash. Free Towing. 815-739-9221

DEER ANTLER RACK – 10 POINT $75. 847-515-8012 Huntley area

DeKalb Park District seeks Part-Time Building Custodian (10-15 hrs/wk) responsible for general custodial work & event set up. Apply at:

Hopkins Park (2nd floor) 1403 Sycamore Rd., DeKalb

PARTY SUPPLIES - Huge Lot, Car, Speed Racer incl Invites, Thank yous, Decorations, Party Favors, Confetti, Gift Bags, Tablecloths, Birthday Ribbon + a whole Lot More $20, DeKalb. 815-739-1953. Stove To Go, Prepare Meals On The Road, 12V Convenience for The Road, Max Burton By Athena, New, $18. 815-895-5373. Sycamore. Work Gloves – 360 Pair – New – White – Adult Size – Washable $120. 815-991-5149

RENTAL AGENT for Value Plus Auto Rental in Sycamore. Front desk duties include answering phone calls & questions & assisting customers. Light bookkeeping. Also car washing & detailing. Apply within with resume: 1582 DeKalb Ave, Sycamore.

Health Care Busy Orthopaedic practice with offices located in Sycamore, DeKalb, Sandwich & Rochelle, IL seeking highly motivated

TORO powerlite 16" single stage gas snowblower rebuilt carb runs well and folds to fit in trunk of car. $150. 815-675-2155

Fisher Price Ocean Wonders Kick & Crawl Gym For Ages Birth On Up, New, $15. 815-895-5373. Sycamore. Thomas & Friends Shining Time Station Knapford Station, Wellsworth Station & Turntable & Shed Plastic Connect A Sets, RARE & Long Retired, $45, DeKalb. 815-739-1953

PHYSICAL THERAPISTS.

Competitive salary and benefits. Qualifications: IL licensed or eligible. Send resume to: jobopening@m-o-i.com.

NURSES & CNAs Looking for dedicated & energetic Nurses & C.N.A's to join our new management team at Prairie Crossing Living & Rehabilitation Center. Please apply at: 409 W. Comanche Ave. Shabbona, IL 60550 815-824-2194

2002 DODGE DURANGO 164K miles, runs good, no rust. Leather, 3 seats, dual heat and a/c.

$2500/obo .

847-529-2693 2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee $8300. 847-479-0016

Need customers? We've got them.

PROM DRESS - Lilac, Size 8. Beading on top with a full skirt. Paid $400, asking $75 or best offer. Willing to send pictures to anyone interested. Call/Text 815-252-6514

Dryer. Maytag. Gas. White. Great condition. $299. 630-973-3528 Washer & Gas Dryer. Kenmore Elite, white, works perfect. King size cap+. Top loader. $750/both. 847-830-9725

Advertise in print and online for one low price. Call your classified advertising representative today!

800-589-8237

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee for J.P. Morgan Alternative Loan Trust 2007-A2 PLAINTIFF Vs. Oscar Cornejo; et. al. DEFENDANTS 10 CH 00336 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/13/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 4 OF FOURTH ADDITION TO NORTH CREST SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF A PART OF PARCEL 'A' OF THE ELLWOOD FARM PLAT ON SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN THE RECORDER'S OFFICE OF DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS, ON JUNE 15TH, 1966 AS DOCUMENT NO. 333404, SITUATED IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS PIN 08-14-129-001 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1830 N. Judy Lane Dekalb, IL 60115 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS Illinois Housing Development Authority PLAINTIFF Vs. Shawn P. Long; et. al. DEFENDANTS 11 CH 00661 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/13/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 08-22-405-006 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 624 Ellwood Avenue DeKalb, IL 60115 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-32920. I510072

12 CH 00378 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/1/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 08-22-457-013 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 803 S. First Street DeKalb, IL 60115 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-19997. I510074 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 4 & 11, 2013.)

Beautiful New and Pre-Owned Homes Available. Starting at $1000. 2 or 3 Bedrooms Immediate Occupancy Edgebrook Community 1801 DeKalb Ave Sycamore, Il 815-895-9144

BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb! Studios, 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $395 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

SYCAMORE Condo. 3BR, 1.5BA, gar, lrg deck, w/d. Recent upgrades! N/S. $950/mo. 815-739-0652 rentinsycamore@gmail

The Knolls Hot new deluxe townhomes. 2 & 3 Bedrooms. Garage, C/A, Basement. Pets?

CORLAND ~ 2BR DUPLEX

Starting at $645

Bsmt, appl, W/D hook-up, garage. No pets/smkg, $800/mo + lease, deposit & ref. 815-758-6439

815-757-1907

CORTLAND, Spacious 2 BR, W/D hookups, $750 or $775 w/garage. Plus utilities and security. No pets. Call Sue: 815-762-0781 Cortland: 3BR Townhouse D/W, A/C, W/D, 2 car gar. $1050. Cat allowed, add'l fee. Townsend Management 815-787-7368

DeKalb ~ The Knolls Sub.

Shabbona $750/mo 2BR Duplex Spacious & quiet, 2BA, avail 3/1. Full basement, 1 car garage. No pets/smoking. 815-766-0762

Stone Prairie 1 Bedroom, $540.00.

Hillcrest Place Apts.

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com

DeKalb - Large Quiet 2BR

Newly remodeled, near NIU. Parking/heat/water incl, W/D, C/A. 815-238-0118

DEKALB 1BR & 2BR

Available now, variety of locations. Appliances, clean and quiet. 815-758-6580

DeKalb 2BR 2nd Floor of House Laundry hook-up, storage. Off-St prkg, pets OK. $700+util, 1 st & sec. AVAIL NOW! 630-878-4192 DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

DeKalb Quiet Studio,1 & 2BR

2BR, 2BA APT. Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $760/mo.

Laing Mgmt. 815-758-1100 or 815-895-8600 SYCAMORE - Large 1 Bedroom + Off/Nursery in Historic area of Syc. New Kitchen and Hardwood floors thru-out No Pets 2 units available $785 & $850 per month inc. Heat, H20 & Gar. Ph 815-739-6061

Sycamore - Larger Upper 2BR 2 bath, W/D. Next to Park. No pets. $900/mo incl util + 1 st last & sec. 815-895-8526

Lease, deposit, ref. No pets.

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Immediatley! Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com

3BR ~ MUST SEE! New hardwood floors, new kitchen & baths, full bsmt, W/D, 3 car. No pets/smoke. $1150 815-762-4730 DEKALB - 2 Bedroom 1 Bath, All Appliances, A/C, Garage, Lawn Care and Snow Removal Included. No Smoking, No Pets. $900. 815-758-0591

DeKalb 3BR, Available March Garage, basement, W/D hook-up, patio, no pets/smoke. $885. 815-762-4730

DeKalb ~ 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Recently updated, appl, W/D 1 car garage, no pets. $900/mo, utilities not included. 630-470-2623

DeKalb/South Side 3BR, 1BA Enclosed patio, fenced yard. 1.5 car garage, full basement. No pets/smoking. 815-758-2365 DeKalb: 4BR, 2.5 BA basement. Close to NIU. Avail. Feb. $1350/mo. (815)762-0617 aazad2005@gmail.com JOHNSBURG HOUSE FOR RENT 3 bedroom 2 bath Ranch 1 car garage. Johnsburg area. $900 per month. 815-385-0767

PLANO SMALL 2 BEDROOM

815-739-5589 ~ 815-758-6439

Newly remodeled, 1.5 car garage. $800/mo + $800 sec dep + utilities. 630-546-2150

DEKALB UPPER 2BR

Newly decorated, lots of storage, great yard, NO PETS. $575/mo, utilities not incl. 815-751-2937

SYCAMORE 3BR, 1BA

Newly remodeled, no smoking. $1000/mo + security. 630-377-0242 Sycamore. 3BR, 1BA Ranch. 413 E. Lincoln. Fenced yard, garage. $1100/mo. Avail NOW! 630-247-2655

Dekalb ~ Clean, Quiet 1BR

2nd flr on So 1st St. Heat and water incl. No pets/smoking. Lease/Sec. $535/mo. 815-761-4598

DeKalb ~ Pardridge Place Modern 2BR, LR, A/C, D/W, lndry. Near I-88, $670 + 1st, last sec. Available April. 815-751-3806

DeKalb: STUDIO- Quiet, roomy, ideal for grad. student; $450/mo., includes basic cable, water, garbage; 151 W. Lincoln Hwy., Sec. Dep. No pets or smoking. Avail March 1, or sooner. 815-787-3519 or 815-739-1711

Newly remodeled 2 Bedroom CALL FOR DETAILS 815-245-6098 ~ 815-923-2521

Geneva Upstairs 1BR Country Apt. ¼ mile from town, available now. $599/mo + security deposit. 630-232-6429

Sycamore Quiet Area on 4 Acres Newly Renovated 2BR. $675/mo, pay elec only, W/D, no pets/smkg. 815-501-1378

GENOA ~ 1 BEDROOM No pets, $425/mo + security dep. Agent Owned 815-766-1513

Genoa~Country View Apts. Now leasing 1 & 2 Bedroom All remodeled, new appl, carpet. Large Apts, Country Lifestyle. 815-784-4606 ~ 815-758-6580

HINCKLEY 2BR, 1.5BA

Stove, fridge, D/W, W/D hook-up. NO PETS, $755/mo + sec. Water sewer, garb incl. 815-739-1250 KINGSTON - 3 BR / 2 BA, 2000+ sq. ft. Stove, frig, dishwsr, wash/dry hook-ups. First & Sec. $850 per month. Utilities not included. Av. Mar. 1. 815-784-2371

DeKalb - Furnished Room

Sycamore E. State St. AVAILABLE NOW!

Sycamore Spacious 407 W. State St., 2 Br. downtown. Very secure bldg. w/prkng. Some utilities, W/D & Sec. system incl. 815-761-3961

Sycamore Upstairs 2BR, 1BA 2900 DeKalb Ave. Laundry, non-smoking, all utilities except electrical, $675. 815-758-2911 Sycamore: 2BR Apts & Duplex Animals Allowed. Townsend Management 815-787-7368 Sycamore: Very nice, roomy 2BR all appl incl W/D, 1 car gar, C/A. Close to town. $750/mo+sec. No pets. Avail 3/10. 815-814-4177

Close to town, appliances, no pets. $385/mo + security + 1 yr lease. 815-975-4601

ROCHELLE LRG 2BR DUPLEX Clean and quiet. Basement, laundry, 1 car garage, no pets. $550/mo + sec. 847-809-6828

Paying Top Dollars For Your Manufactured Home Call Immediately 847-321-1674

Dekalb/South 3BR, 1.5BA Avail starting Feb. Lease, refs req. No pets. $900/mo + utils. More info & appt call. 815-751-2546

DeKalb: Available Now!

Kingston Upper 1 Bedroom DeKalb. Prime Rt 38 Location! 3 bay bldg w/office. $262,500. Adolph Miller RE. 815-756-7845

3 bedroom,1.5 bath, C/A, D/W. Garage, bsmt, $1025/mo + sec. Available March. 815-751-3806

New carpet, fresh paint, W/D hook-up. $595/mo,1 year lease. 815-751-4440

Daily Chronicle Classified and online at: www.Daily-Chronicle.com

SYCAMORE ROOM Available immediately. Utilities included. $75/Wk. 630-426-9806

Call us to help you find “lease” space for your business! Adolph Miller RE 815-756-7845 Sycamore Near courthouse. Furnished, attractive, large office space. Great for professionals. $575/mo incl utilities, shared kitchenette & reception area. 815-739-6186 Sycamore. 22X29' Shop/Storage 9' overhead door. $400/mo. Heat & Electric incl. J&A RE 815-970-0679

Sycamore. Prime. Brick. Very light. Newer. Handicap accessible. Kitchenette. Great storage. $750+utils. 815-895-2488.

Cortland Remodeled 3BR TH 2 bath, appliances, 2 car garage. No smoking, pets with deposit. $1200/mo+sec. 815- 981-8863

Rochelle ~ Spacious 2BR TH

JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS STUFF VEHICLES REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Student or employed male $370. includes utilities . Need References. 815-758-7994

DeKalb Approx 800 sq. ft. dowtown DeKalb on Lincoln Hwy. Lve. msg. 630-202-8836

CORTLAND- 2 Bed / 2 Bath Condominium for rent. $900/month plus utilities. For information contact Donna 708-277-3417. DEKALB 2.5BR, 2.5BA Townhome 2 car garage. Avail Apr 1. $1100/mo. 630-776-7234

DeKalb Golf Course Community 3BR TH, 2.5BA, gar, front porch. All appliances, very nice, no pets. $1050/mo. 815-761-8639 www.dekalb-rental.com

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS

DEKALB

LOOKING FOR A PRIME DOWNTOWN SYCAMORE BUSINESS BUILDING?

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 4 & 11, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a the Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS Inc., CWMBS Reperforming Loan REMIC Trust, Certificates, Series 2005-R1 PLAINTIFF Vs. Terry C. Bennett Jr. a/k/a Terry C. Bennett; et. al. DEFENDANTS

2 State St. Entrances, 2 Bathrooms, Parital Kitchen, Updated Mechanicals, Over 2000 sq. ft. CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR

815-739-9997

Immaculate 4,280 sq ft Office / Warehouse. Air conditioned office area and bathrooms Great location near airport & tollway in DeKalb.

815-754-5831


CLASSIFIED

Page B8â&#x20AC;˘ Monday, February 25, 2013 U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee for J.P. Morgan Alternative Loan Trust 2007-A2 PLAINTIFF Vs. Oscar Cornejo; et. al. DEFENDANTS 10 CH 00336 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/13/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 4 OF FOURTH ADDITION TO NORTH CREST SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF A PART OF PARCEL 'A' OF THE ELLWOOD FARM PLAT ON SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN THE RECORDER'S OFFICE OF DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS, ON JUNE 15TH, 1966 AS DOCUMENT NO. 333404, SITUATED IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS PIN 08-14-129-001 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1830 N. Judy Lane Dekalb, IL 60115 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Pl fe to

dge (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-15992. I510073 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 4 & 11, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS Illinois Housing Development Authority PLAINTIFF Vs. Shawn P. Long; et. al. DEFENDANTS 11 CH 00661 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/13/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: THE NORTH 25 FEET OF LOT 19 AND THE SOUTH 30 FEET OF LOT 20 IN BLOCK 4 OF TAYLOR'S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF DEKALB, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "B" OF PLATS, PAGE 104, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 08-22-405-006 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 624 Ellwood Avenue DeKalb, IL 60115 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORT-

(C) GAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-32920. I510072 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 4 & 11, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a the Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS Inc., CWMBS Reperforming Loan REMIC Trust, Certificates, Series 2005-R1 PLAINTIFF Vs. Terry C. Bennett Jr. a/k/a Terry C. Bennett; et. al. DEFENDANTS 12 CH 00378 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/1/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 11 IN TAYLOR'S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF DEKALB, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF ON DECEMBER 27, 1889 AS DOCUMENT NO 30460 IN BOOK "B" OF PLATS, PAGE 104, SITUATED IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 08-22-457-013 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 803 S. First Street DeKalb, IL 60115 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condi-

pr tion of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-19997. I510074 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 4 & 11, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE The Sheriff's Office is requesting proposals for a cost analysis and study of the Sheriff's Communication Center in Sycamore, IL. Specifications for proposal may be seen at the DeKalb County web site http://www.dekalbcounty.org/invitationtobid.html Deadline for RFP, March 15th, 2013.

y Og y Judicial Center 106 S. 5th Street, Suite 300, Oregon, IL 61061 on or before March 28, 2013, A JUDGEMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. Witness: February 21, 2013 Kimberely A. Stall (Clerk of the Circuit Court) By: L. Haas (Deputy) (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, March 4 & 11, 2013) TEXT ALERTS Sign up for TextAlerts to receive up-to-date news, weather, prep sports, coupons and more sent directly to your cell phone! Register FREE today at Daily-Chronicle.com

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on February 15, 2013 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of DeKalb County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as JANICE'S PERSONAL TOUCH CLEANING SERVICE located at 321 S. Hadsall St., Genoa, IL 60135. Dated February 15, 2013

/s/ John Acardo DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 18, 25 & March 4, 2013.)

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-481-8312 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice.*Hospitality Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized Call 888-3365053 www.CenturaOnline.com

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

DISH Network Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month(where available). SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-888-661-9981 GORDON TRUCKING CDL-A Drivers Needed! Up to $4,000 SIGN ON BONUS! Home Weekly Available! Benefits, 401k, EOE, No East Coast. Call 7 days/wk! TeamGTI.com 888-653-3304 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience Needed! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-877-649-3155 Call to advertise 815-455-4800

www.HuskieWire.com All NIU Sports... All The Time

AT YOUR YOUR SERVICE

In print daily Online 24/7

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 18, 19 & 25, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE

LOOKING FOR DBES! Curran Contracting Company is seeking IDOT approved DBE subcontractors, suppliers, & trucking companies for the 03/08/2013 IDOT letting! Plans & Specs are available at www.dot.state.il.us or email estimating@ currancontracting.com (815) 455-5100

Visit the Local Business Directory online at PlanItDeKalbCounty.com/business

Call to advertise 877-264-2527

K&J

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 26, 27, 28 & March 1, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE DeKalb Community Unit School District #428 Business Office 901 South Fourth Street DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (815) 754-2350 DeKalb Community Unit School District #428 is accepting Requests for Proposals for Financial Audit Services in connection with serving as the School District' s Certified Public Accountant for preparation of the annual financial audit. Vendors may pick up bid instructions and specifications on or after Monday, February 25, 2013 at the Education Center, 901 S. Fourth Street, DeKalb, IL 60115 or they may be requested via e-mail at cynthia.carpenter@dist428.org. All bids must be sealed and are due prior to 11:00 am on Monday, March 11, 2013 at the Education Center. Bids will be publicly opened that same day, Monday, March 11, 2013 at 11:00 am at the Education Center. (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 25, 2013.) STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 15TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OGLE COUNTY AMY LEDLOW Vs. CHARLES LEDLOW Case No. 2012D-000191 PUBLICATION NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN YOU, Charles Ledlow, defendants, that this case has been commenced in this court against you and other defendants, asking for a Divorce, and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the office of the Ogle County Circuit Clerk, Ogle County

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DDC-2-25-2013