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CHRONICLE SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23-24, 2013 | $1.50 | KCCHRONICLE.COM

APPRECIATIVE APPETITE

FOX VALLEY FOOD FOR HEALTH PROJECT PROVIDES HEALTHY MEALS FOR THE SICK. PAGE 7

Sandy Bressner – sbressner@shawmedia.com

Mary Fremgen (center), a registered dietician and co-founder of Fox Valley Food For Health, helps Geneva High School student Maddie Horton (far left) with a dish as Stephanie Condon, also a student at Geneva, stirs a soup in the kitchen of the Roquette Center in Geneva.

IN NEWS

IN SPORTS

HUMANS, ANIMALS BOTH LIKE TO SNACK

ALL HEART The Mooseheart boys hoops team defeats Hinckley-Big Rock, 55-38, in a regional title game. Page 18

Page 4 Vol. 24, Issue 41

i n k i n g of se l l i n g your d i a monds?

Since 1881.

Where to find it Classified: 46-47 Comics: 36-37 Puzzles: 38

HIGH

Obituaries: 9 Opinion: 14 Sports: 17-30

LOW

29 16 Complete forecast on 5

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| GETTING STARTED

2

‘Putting a face on food allergies’ Kane County Chronicle photo editor Sandy Bressner forwarded me an uplifting email last week. It was from Ann-Marie Burke, mother of kindergartner Connor Burke. Both Ann-Marie and Connor were featured in a story about food allergies that ran in the Feb. 12 edition of the Chronicle. “Hi, Sandy. Thank you for the wonderful pictures of my son Connor Burke in today’s paper,” Ann-Marie wrote. “Thank you for helping to relate his story and the story of other young children who are challenged with food allergies every day. Putting a face on food allergies can only help others to understand this issue.” Thanks for the feedback, Ann-Marie. And thanks for allowing Sandy and reporter

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK Kathy Gresey

Nicole Weskerna to tell your family’s story. Additional reader feedback we’ve recently received includes an email from Laura Machin of Campton Hills. Chronicle reporter Brenda Schory wrote a story about Laura that appeared in the Feb. 9 edition of the newspaper. The story highlighted how Laura – who was adopted at birth – recently found several of her biological siblings. “Brenda! Thanks for the great article in the paper!” Laura wrote. “I sure didn’t expect my face to be on the front page! I think we have

successfully told the story in respect to letting other adoptees know what is now possible in their search for their birth parents. Thanks again.” We appreciate the email, Laura. And finally, this touching email to news editor Al Lagattolla came in earlier this month from Dave and Rita Campbell. Al had written a story for our Feb. 6 edition about a memorial service for Rita’s twin brother, Ralph Umbdenstock, a U.S. Air Force veteran who died Dec. 31 at age 61. “Al, we read your article on Ralph’s memorial service today, and we were very pleased with what you wrote,” the email stated. “It was a nice tribute to Ralph, and my wife especial-

ly was touched by it. When a local paper does an article like this, it shows their community involvement and that they pay attention to what is happening, even in a small town like Maple Park, which some papers would feel isn’t worth bothering with. “It was very kind of you to do this, and once again thank you from us and the rest of Ralph’s family.” It was kind of Dave and Rita to send us their feedback. Thoughts and story suggestions can be sent to me anytime using the contact information below.

• Kathy Gresey is editor of the Kane County Chronicle. Contact her at kgresey@shawmedia.com or 630-845-5368.

Random acts of kindness honor couple killed in crash By JILLIAN DUCHNOWSKI jduchnowski@shawmedia.com Dawn Weber had pizzas delivered to Sycamore’s fire stations Friday night for the shifts on duty when her daughter, Lexi, and Lexi’s boyfriend were killed in a crash two years ago. It was among the random acts of kindness she performed this week in honor of Timothy Getzelman’s and Lexi Weber’s memory. The pair were both 21 years old when they were killed Feb. 21, 2011, at the intersection of Peace Road and North Main Street. A vehicle driven by Patricia L. Schmidt of Sycamore collided with Getzelman’s vehicle; witnesses said Getzelman had the right of way. Getzelman was from Sycamore, Weber from Maple Park. Instead of hosting a blood drive, as they did on the first anniversary of the couple’s death, Dawn Weber and Tamara Getzelman, Timothy’s mom, reached out to their family and friends – and complete strangers on Facebook. They asked them to do something nice for someone else in their children’s memories. With help from Dawn Weber’s niece, Meghan Dienst, they created a Facebook event

and watched Thursday as one person after another admitted to committing random acts of kindness. “It helped us a lot,” Tamara Getzelman said. “I really enjoyed reading all the posts. I’ve had people text me today and say, ‘I did this today. I feel so good.’ ” The anniversary was tinged with sadness, not only because of the unexpected loss of their children, but because criminal charges against Schmidt remain pending, with a trial scheduled to start Sept. 30. Schmidt, 48, is charged with reckless homicide, aggravated reckless driving and aggravated driving under the influence of drugs. An analysis of Schmidt’s blood by the Illinois State Police crime lab showed the presence of mul-

tiple prescription drugs, including the anti-anxiety drugs lorazepam and phenobarbital, the sedative mephobarbital, and three others at the time of the accident, authorities have said. The lingering court case extends the grieving process, sometimes leaving Getzelman weary at the end of an emotionally trying day. Thoughts of her son tend to come around 5:05 p.m., the last time she talked on the phone with him. It was about 25 minutes before the crash. Some of her friends have told her they don’t know what to say to take away her pain, but she’s grateful for her faith in God and the support her family and the Webers have received from the community.

“Our lives have totally changed,” Getzelman said. “We’re trying to acclimate to this new way of being. It’s really hard. Sometimes it doesn’t feel like your life.” The families attend court for Schmidt’s routine status hearings, but Getzelman knows watching the trial will be more stressful. The trial is scheduled to start just weeks before Getzelman’s daughter is to be married in November. For her random act of kindness, Tamara Getzelman took donuts to Sycamore firefighters Thursday. Dawn Weber, aside from making pizza delivery plans, also bought chair massages for several coworkers Friday. The Facebook event page is available at shawurl.com/isq.

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS A story on page 10 of the Feb. 22 edition of the Kane County Chronicle included incorrect information. What’s Your Consignment, 12 E. State St., Geneva, will be opening in the space formerly occupied by Bicycle Heaven. The Mill Race Cyclery, 11 E. State St., is open for business. The Chronicle regrets the error. •••

Accuracy is important to the Kane County Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 630-845-5355; email, editorial@kcchronicle.com

DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Pick 3 Midday: 6-2-2 Pick 3 Evening: 3-8-1 Pick 4 Midday: 0-7-8-5 Pick 4 Evening: 2-0-3-8 Lucky Day Lotto: 8-20-21-27-35 Lotto jackpot: $3.2 million Mega Millions Mega Millions: 9-13-24-38-49 Megaplier: 30 MegaBall: 3 Est. jackpot: $12 million Powerball Est. jackpot: $80 million

8CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS • Mystery Diner is a blog written by a Kane County Chronicle employee. The diner visits a different restaurant each week and then reports on the experience.


CONTACT US

FACE TIME WITH MARK BUKOVSKY

Where did you grow up? Darien Who would play you in the movie of your life? Will Ferrell First job? Newspaper route As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? I wanted to play center field for the Cubs. I haven’t yet, but I’m still working on it. A movie you’d recommend? “The Blues Brothers” Favorite charity? Montini Catholic School in McHenry

Do you speak another language? I speak Spanish. Hobbies? Baseball memorabilia Favorite local restaurant? Riganato Old World Grille in Geneva What is an interesting factoid about yourself? I saved someone from drowning in the ice in Algonquin when I was a kid, about 10. The ice broke under another kid. I threw him a rope and pulled him out. Anything else? I was one of the best chess players in the country in 1978 when I was in the eighth grade. I played against a Russian in a national tournament. I lost, of course, but then he defected.

and

Kane County Chronicle staffers pick the best of what to do in your free time

Fitness demo day at Geneva Park District WHAT: The Geneva Park District’s Persinger Recreation Center will offer a chance to try group fitness classes at fitness demo day. Registration begins March 12 for residents and March 19 for nonresidents. Participants can pick from eight different, free-to-the-public classes to find their perfect fitness fit. The demo classes include hoops at 9 a.m., turbokick at 9:30 a.m., piloting at 10 a.m., pilots at 10:30 a.m., yoga at noon, spin at 12:30 p.m., rumba at 1 p.m. and spin at 1:30 p.m. Registration is not required. WHEN: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 9 WHERE: 3507 Kaneville Road, Geneva. INFO: To find out more, call 630-232-4501 or visit the front desk.

Rules of the Road set for March 6 in Batavia WHAT: A Rules of the Road Review Course will be available for all Batavia residents. The purpose of the course is to help participants pass an Illinois driver’s license renewal exam by preparing applicants for the general written and

road exams. The course also provides information on vision screening. The course is offered by Secretary of State Jesse White and that Batavia Park District’s Eastside Community Center. WHEN: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. March 6 WHERE: Batavia Park District’s Eastside Community Center, 14 N. Van Buren St. in Batavia

NIU Steelband to perform March 2 at Norris center WHAT: The Northern Illinois University Steelband will present an eclectic mix of music covering a variety of genres when it makes its third concert appearance. WHEN: 7:30 p.m. March 2 WHERE: Norris Cultural Arts Center, 1040 Dunham Road, St. Charles INFO: Tickets cost $10 for adults and $5 for students and can be purchased at www.NorrisCulturalArts.com or by calling 630-584-7200.

Blood drive today at Hosanna! Lutheran WHAT: Hosanna! Lutheran Church will partner with Heartland Blood Centers for a blood drive.

Appointments are appreciated, but walk-ins are welcome. This drive is in cooperation with Rejoice and Bethlehem Lutheran churches. WHEN: 7:30 to 11 a.m. today WHERE: 36W925 Red Gate Road, St. Charles INFO: To schedule a donation appointment, please visit www.Heartlandbc.org. For information, contact the church office at 630-584-6434, email to Welcome@HosannaChurch.com or visit www.HosannaChurch.com.

Newsstand price 50 cents Tuesday Friday, $1.50 Saturday. Basic annual rate: $182 Tuesday - Saturday.

Office hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 630-232-9222 Customer Service

800-589-9363 subscriptions@shawmedia.com 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday 7 a.m. - 10 a.m. Saturday (Requests for same-day redelivery of the newspaper are accepted until 10 a.m. each day)

Classified Sales Phone: 800-589-8237 Email: classified@shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 Legal notices: 630-845-5219 Newsroom Phone: 630-845-5355 Email: editorial@kcchronicle.com Fax: 630-444-1641

Two Guys and Free Spaghetti event WHAT: Two Guys and Free Spaghetti will provide a free homemade spaghetti and meatballs dinner with beverage, salad, garlic bread and homemade dessert to anyone who attends the event. Carry-out is available, and the building is handicapped accessible. WHEN: 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday WHERE: St. Charles Episcopal Church, 994 N. Fifth Ave., (Route 25) in St. Charles INFO: For information, call Joe at 630-8906586.

TODAY’S WEB POLL

YESTERDAY’S WEB POLL RESULTS

What is the best way to avoid illness?

When will the last significant snow fall in the area this season? Mid-March (43%) Early March (20%) By the end of February (20%) In April (17%)

VOTE ONLINE | Voice your opinion at KCChronicle.com. Follow us at twitter.com/kcchronicle, or become a fan on Facebook.

Publisher J. Tom Shaw jtshaw@shawmedia.com Editor Kathy Gresey kgresey@shawmedia.com News Editor Al Lagattolla alagattolla@shawmedia.com Advertising Director Mike Harvel mharvel@shawmedia.com Promotions Manager Kelsey Rakers krakers@shawmedia.com

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

Out About

All rights reserved. Copyright 2013 The Kane County Chronicle. Published since 1881

3

GETTING STARTED | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

St. Charles resident Mark Bukovsky, 46, was at Me and Dad’s Toys in Geneva when he answered 11 questions for the Kane County Chronicle’s Brenda Schory.

The Kane County Chronicle and KCChronicle.com are a division of Shaw Media, 333 N. Randall Road, Suite 2, St. Charles, IL 60174.


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| LOCAL NEWS

4

Carnivores feasting on ‘snacks’ this winter The other night my friend, Suzi, hosted a 31 Bags party. And while of course the focus of the evening was, for most people, the wonderfully functional bags and their different uses, I couldn’t quite get my mind off one thing: the array of delectable appetizers and snacks Suzi had set out in the next room. Veggies and hummus – yes! Trader Joe’s Wild Blueberry and Vanilla Goat Cheese – yum! Jumbo shrimp, and cocktail sauce – yay! And, my favorite, bagels and vegetable-flavored cream cheese from Jake’s Bagels and Deli in Aurora – a mound of heavenly, doughy deliciousness. Yippee! There’s no doubt, sometimes it is fun to have appetizers and snacks instead of a full meal. Which is exactly how a lot of our local carnivores are sustaining themselves this winter. Our lack of snowcover has meant a lack of hiding places for mice and voles – nature’s snacks and appetizers. Instead of scurrying around in the relative safety of the subnivean layer, that open space that lies between the ground and the snow, rodents such as white-footed mice and meadow voles have had to forage out in the open, day after snowless day. Even this past week’s heavy dusting didn’t make much of a difference. I saw a vole on Friday chugging along beneath the white coating left by “Winter Storm Q” Thursday night. If you can envision a kitten cavorting beneath a blanket, you’ll have a good vision of the commotion this little guy created. Subtle, he was not. To remain undetected, subtlety, and even stealth, are of the essence. But, let’s face it, most rodents are anything but. Some animals use speed as a survival tactic, but this, too, is a no-go for rodents. Their scampering may make them look fast, but it’s not a sustainable

VIEWS Pam Otto pace. A few quick dashes, and they need to rest. When their resting place is the middle of an open field or yard – places that offer little or no cover – it usually means hasta la vista, little herbivore. Then there’s the way rodents feed. The main part of their diet is seeds and plant material, which they consume while digging and scratching about. This foraging technique is effective, but hardly invisible – nor inaudible. Once they’ve found something edible, they have to chew it. If even our secondrate human ears can detect a mouse or vole gnawing on nut shells or seed husks, just imagine how loud that nibbling must sound to a coyote, fox, hawk or owl – creatures whose hearing is up to 10 times as sensitive as our own. With an abundance of easy-to-find snacks and appetizers – er, natural prey – available, local carnivores have had a relatively easy go of it this winter, at least as far as food supplies are concerned. Also on Friday, not long after I saw the tunneling vole, a handsome and hefty

Photo provided

A coyote sniffs out a snack near the Hickory Knolls Discovery Center in St. Charles. red-tailed hawk swooped past by office window, perhaps in pursuit of the little burrowing beastie. And my coworker Jeanette informed me of a coyote that had come sniffing around the birdfeeders just an hour or two before my vole sighting. Bistro Rodentia is open for business. I’m hoping to make time this weekend, while we still have a wee bit of snow on the ground, to get out and look for more signs of hunting activity. Following fox

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or coyote tracks to a vole runway is fun; even better is finding wing imprints from a hawk or owl that swooped down in pursuit of prey. But first, I think I’ll have a snack.

• Pam Otto is the manager of nature programs and interpretive services at the Hickory Knolls Discovery Center, a facility of the St. Charles Park District. She can be reached at 630-513-4346 or potto@stcparks.org.

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Seven-Day Forecast

Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

TODAY

SUN

Mostly cloudy and cooler; some p.m. sun

Mostly sunny and warmer

29 16

34 26

MON

TUE

Cloudy with a Mostly cloudy and breezy; rain/ chance of snow snow late

35 27

WED

THU

FRI

Cloudy, breezy and chilly with flurries

Cloudy, breezy and chilly with flurries

Mostly sunny and chilly

31 22

30 22

31 20

33 23

Tri-Cities Almanac

Harvard

31/16 McHenry Statistics through 4 p.m. yesterday Belvidere 30/18 Temperatures Waukegan 31/17 30/17 High/low ....................................... 33°/24° Normal high ......................................... 37° Rockford Crystal Lake Deerfield Record high .............................. 61° (1984) Algonquin 30/17 29/16 30/21 30/17 Normal low .......................................... 22° Hampshire Record low ............................... -2° (1978) Schaumburg 31/18 Elgin 31/20 Peak wind ........................... SW at 18 mph 30/18 DeKalb Precipitation 29/16 Tri-Cities Chicago 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ........... 0.06” 29/16 31/21 Month to date ................................... 1.93” Normal month to date ....................... 1.25” Oak Park Year to date ...................................... 5.04” 32/23 Aurora Normal year to date .......................... 2.93” Dixon 32/16

UV Index

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

30/17

Sandwich 32/19

Orland Park 32/22

10 a.m.

Noon

2 p.m.

4 p.m.

0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme

Air Quality Reading as of Friday

City Arlington Hts Aurora Deerfield Des Plaines Elgin Gary Hammond Janesville

Today Hi Lo W 31 21 c 30 17 pc 30 21 c 31 21 c 30 18 c 32 22 c 36 22 pc 30 16 c

Sunday Hi Lo W 34 26 pc 36 27 pc 34 27 pc 34 27 pc 35 27 pc 38 31 pc 43 30 pc 33 25 pc

Today Hi Lo W 34 22 pc 30 17 c 32 20 pc 32 22 pc 32 23 c 32 19 c 32 22 c 30 17 c

City Kankakee Kenosha La Salle Morris Munster Naperville Tinley Park Waukegan

Sunday Hi Lo W 40 29 pc 33 25 pc 38 30 pc 39 30 pc 38 30 pc 36 29 pc 38 30 pc 33 26 pc

Fox River Stages 0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous Source: Illinois EPA

Weather History A blizzard on Feb. 23, 1936, in Donner Pass, Calif., trapped more than 750 motorists; seven died. The automobile made travel through the western mountains less hazardous, but it is still dangerous.

Fld: flood stage. Prs: stage in feet at 7 a.m Friday. Chg: change in previous 24 hours. Station Fld Prs Chg Station Fld Prs Chg Algonquin................. 3....... 1.31..... +0.04 Montgomery........... 13..... 11.59...... -0.18 Burlington, WI ........ 11....... 7.69..... +0.30 New Munster, WI .... 19....... 9.43...... -0.48 Dayton ................... 12....... 7.53...... -0.98 Princeton .............. 9.5........ N.A..........N.A. McHenry .................. 4....... 2.56..... +0.32 Waukesha ................ 6....... 3.47...... -0.28

Sun and Moon Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset

Today 6:38 a.m. 5:36 p.m. 3:47 p.m. 5:02 a.m.

Sunday 6:36 a.m. 5:37 p.m. 4:50 p.m. 5:34 a.m.

Full

Last

New

First

Today Hi Lo W 28 20 sn 60 40 r 45 33 r 37 24 sn 41 24 c 38 34 c 52 39 r 31 21 c 42 25 pc 58 40 pc 46 19 pc 32 21 pc 81 69 c 70 45 pc 38 26 pc 32 23 s 64 42 pc 67 50 pc

Sunday Hi Lo W 29 17 sn 66 48 pc 48 29 pc 39 19 c 41 26 c 38 30 sn 63 41 pc 34 28 pc 48 31 pc 73 40 pc 37 15 sn 37 30 pc 80 68 s 69 49 t 45 30 pc 44 26 c 55 39 pc 71 50 s

City Louisville Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Francisco Seattle Washington, DC

Today Hi Lo W 46 27 pc 83 71 pc 30 18 c 30 9 pc 54 29 pc 67 51 r 43 36 r 48 32 pc 32 20 pc 86 65 pc 44 36 r 66 47 s 42 25 c 36 27 pc 36 21 sn 58 42 pc 48 38 r 46 37 r

Sunday Hi Lo W 53 35 pc 85 71 pc 33 24 pc 31 20 pc 57 38 pc 68 55 t 45 32 sn 59 36 s 36 22 c 83 64 t 47 32 pc 65 42 pc 38 25 c 50 35 pc 31 17 sn 60 44 s 49 40 r 52 33 pc

Sunday Hi Lo W 66 55 s 73 52 s 47 26 pc 36 32 sn 83 57 r 75 56 s 38 25 pc 59 48 pc 83 56 pc 39 32 c 45 27 pc 89 77 pc

City Mexico City Moscow Nassau New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Toronto

Today Hi Lo W 90 45 s 22 10 s 84 71 pc 71 51 t 34 27 pc 85 72 sh 55 45 r 39 24 s 88 78 sh 81 68 r 47 35 pc 36 24 c

Sunday Hi Lo W 81 45 s 25 17 s 84 71 s 72 51 c 37 31 sf 87 74 s 50 34 sh 39 24 pc 85 76 r 86 70 pc 46 32 s 33 21 sn

World Weather City Athens Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Manila

Today Hi Lo W 64 50 s 72 49 s 52 32 s 28 27 sn 84 66 pc 73 53 s 38 22 c 58 47 r 86 55 s 37 28 c 45 25 s 90 77 pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Feb 25

Mar 4

Mar 11

Mar 19

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

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• Saturday, February 23, 2013

Regional Weather

City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Boise Boston Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Dallas Denver Des Moines Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

5

WEATHER | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Bill Bellis Chief Meteorologist

National Weather


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| LOCAL NEWS

6

BLACKBERRY TOWNSHIP

Referendum will seek funds for roads By STEPHANIE KOHL editorial@kcchronicle.com When Blackberry Township voters hit the polls in April, they’ll be asked to nearly double the taxes they pay to the township’s road district for road maintenance. The April 9 referendum will include a question on whether to approve raising the limiting tax rate for the township road district from 16.5 cents per $100 of equalized assessed valuation to 30.26 cents. Highway Commissioner Rodney Feece said he knows the economy hasn’t been the greatest and it still isn’t, but he said he has to try something. “If I do not somehow create some revenue here, our roads

are going to start crumbling,” he said. Similar referendums were “narrowly defeated” in 2003 and 2004, Feece said. In 2012, Blackberry Township’s Highway Department collected $843,290 through property taxes. By law, they were required to give $142,840 to the villages of North Aurora and Elburn for the roads that lie in those villages. This left Feece with $698,601 to run his entire department, including roadwork, plowing services and payroll. Blackberry Township is responsible for 58 miles of roads. With its current budget, Blackberry Township has been able to resurface between a mile and 1.5 miles per year, at a cost of about $100,000 per

For information Two meetings are scheduled to provide residents with information and answer questions about the Blackberry Township road maintenance referendum. They are 7 p.m. March 11 at Rejoice Lutheran Church, 0N377 N Mill Creek Drive, Geneva, and 7 p.m. March 14 at Township Hall, 43W390 Main St., Elburn. mile. “[We’re] starting to see a lot of deterioration to the roads,” Feece said. “... We’re just going to get further and further behind.” If the referendum is passed, the department would go from an $843,290 budget to nearly

$1.6 million, less the amount due to North Aurora and Elburn, netting them about $1.3 million. Feece said in order to keep up with deterioration, between 4 and 4.5 miles of roadwork need to be completed per year, something he sees as feasible with these additional funds. For taxpayers, the implications of passing the referendum would mean that for every $100,000 their home is valued, they would pay an additional $46.67. A homeowner with a $300,000 home would pay about $140 more per year. Feece said the department

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has tried other avenues to increase revenue for roadwork, like applying for grants, but have so far been unsuccessful. If the referendum is not passed, the department will “just continue to do the best we can,” Feece said. “But there will be a lot of patchwork instead of doing the whole road.” Two meetings are scheduled to provide residents with information and answer questions. They are 7 p.m. March 11 at Rejoice Lutheran Church, 0N377 N Mill Creek Drive, Geneva, and 7 p.m. March 14 at Township Hall, 43W390 Main St., Elburn.


Fox Valley Food for Health Project provides sick with nutrient-packed meals By ASHLEY RHODEBECK arhodebeck@shawmedia.com

G

Donations may be sent to Fox Valley Food for Health, P.O. Box 532, Geneva, IL 60134. Email info@fvffhp.org or visit Fox Valley Food For Health Project on Facebook for information. next four months, they said, noting the project has been supported by local businesses as well as a grant from Cadence Health. Many of the recipes come from the Ceres Community Project in Sebastopol, Calif. – the organization Fox Valley Food for Health is modeled after and was trained by last year, Leigh said. That organization has delivered about 150,000 meals in about five years, she said. By the end of this week, Leigh said, Fox Valley Food for Health will have delivered about 730 to 740 meals in the last six weeks. Chris Schmidt, who is undergoing treatment for Hepatitis C she got from a blood transfusion, is among the recipients. The St. Charles resident and her husband have received meals since late last fall, she said, describing the program as a lifesaver. “The crew has made sure that we had dinners on the table when I was unable – either too sick or too tired – to do it myself, and making my husband carry that responsibility day after day made me feel even worse,” Schmidt said in a testimonial for the project.

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Sandy Bressner – sbressner@shawmedia.com

Mary Fremgen (center), a registered dietician and co-founder of Fox Valley Food For Health, helps Geneva High School student Maddie Horton (left) with a dish in the kitchen of the Roquette Center in Geneva.

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

ENEVA – Standing side-by-side in a bright kitchen, 16-year-olds Stephanie Condon and Amy Haboush worked to prepare two soups full of fresh, nutritious ingredients. “We’re soup buddies today,” Amy said, chopping an onion. She and Stephanie regularly cook in the Roquette Innovation Center kitchen in far east Geneva. As volunteers for the Fox Valley Food for Health Project, the Geneva High School juniors are among other teens who together prepare a week’s worth of meals for medically challenged patients and their families. “We really wanted to get the kids cooking,” project co-director Susan Leigh said. “They’re really learning how to eat well, too.” Leigh, who trained at Ballymaloe Cookery School in Ireland, said Fox Valley Food for Health dishes up meals packed with as many vegetables and organic ingredients as possible. Providing nutrient-rich meals to cancer patients – who account for many of the project’s clients – is important because malnutrition is a common problem among them, co-director and dietitian Mary Fremgen said. When you’re ill, Fremgen said, “You need all these nutrients.” The Fox Valley Food for Health Project spends about $400 to $500 a week on food, the co-directors said. It has enough money for about the

To help

COVER STORY | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

COOKING KINDNESS

7


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| 8


8OBITUARIES Born: Aug. 10, 1924 Died: Feb. 19, 2013; in St. Charles

RAYMOND ALLEN KALIGIAN III Died: Feb. 17, 2013 HOUSTON, Texas – Raymond Allen Kaligian III, 28, of Houston, Texas, and formerly from Raynham, Mass., and Geneva, Ill., died unexpectedly Sunday, Feb. 17. His little dog, Willie, died at the same time by his side. Ray started his life in Massachusetts where, at a young age, he had already won a golf chipping contest and was MVP of his baseball team. He moved to Geneva in the third grade and attended Geneva schools, graduating in 2003 from Geneva High School. He was a gifted athlete, leader and scholar. He played travel baseball with the Fox Valley Royals until freshman year when he started playing for Geneva High School. He also played all four years on the golf team. He was All Conference Golf Champion in 2002 and All Conference Baseball his junior and senior years. He was also a National Honor Society member and Key Club member and secretary. He received the honor of Science Student of the Year and Athlete of the Year at the end of his senior year. The city of Geneva awarded Ray the Ben Franklin Science Award in a special ceremony held at the Geneva City Hall upon his high school graduation. Ray went to the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana and graduated in 2007 with a degree in chemical engineering. He was very proud to be an alumnus of the University of Illinois, but his heart and soul was found in the Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) fraternity. He finally had “brothers” for life to confide in, play with and dream about their futures together. He was also a proud member

10

of the professional chemical fraternity, Alpha Chi Sigma. He was hired in January 2008 by the Phillips 66 Company straight from the University of Illinois to participate in their Selective Leader Development Program. During this program, Ray fulfilled multiple roles at the Phillips 66 headquarters in Houston and then completed a field sales assignment in West Virginia. He was recently promoted during the summer of 2012 to become director of Base Oil Sales located in Houston, Texas. In this role, Ray was the key liaison with global suppliers that Phillips 66 conducted business with. Jim Gigante of Phillips 66 wrote, “I don’t ever recall a young man that has touched the hearts of so many. I will always see that gleam in his eye, that ever yearning to learn and somehow there was a bit of innocence that set him apart from others. He was a rising star of Phillips 66.” Ray’s first love was baseball, but it was his golf game that set him apart from others. He travelled with his father to Myrtle Beach for their annual “guy’s golf week.” He had become a scratch golfer and was used by friends, business associates and his father’s friends as their secret weapon to win golf tournaments. Last summer, he won three tournaments in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Ray’s creative talents and his determination to always be the best at whatever he tried to do led him to master the guitar. He loved classic rock and his guitar interpretations were special. In the last couple of years, Ray’s passion for adventure and joy for excitement expanded to include mountain biking and white water river rafting with his close college buddies. He also had started traveling for enjoyment, having spent a great time in Ireland last year with his good friend, Jeff

Shaw. He had plans to travel to Germany this fall to participate in Oktoberfest. Everyone and anyone who knew Ray loved and respected him. He was the best loyal friend you could have. He was the greatest gift every day of his life to his parents, friends and family. Ray was the beloved only child of Ray and Bobbie (Barron) Kaligian. He was preceded in death by his maternal grandparents, Thomas and Barbara Barron; his uncle, Bill Kaligian; and his childhood dog and companion, Patrick. He is survived by his grandmother, Carmela Principe of Abington, Mass.; grandfather, Ray (Ann) Kaligian of Laconia, N.H.; and many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends in Texas, West Virginia, Illinois and Massachusetts; and the family dog, Fenway. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m., Monday, Feb. 25, with a service at 7 p.m. in Houston, Texas, at Earthman Funeral Directors, 8303 Katy Freeway, Houston. A Memorial Service will be at 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at Yurs Funeral Home, 1771 W. State St. (Route 38) in Geneva. A memorial visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. A Memorial Mass also will be at noon Saturday, March 2, at the Chapel of Our Savior Shrine, 475 Westgate Drive, Brockton, Mass., with a luncheon immediately following at Thorny Lea Golf Club, 159 Torrey St. Contributions may be made in Ray’s name to his favorite charity, Rebuilding Together Houston, P.O. Box 15315, Houston, TX 77220, or to Willie’s animal shelter, Houston SPCA, 900 Portway Drive, Houston, TX 77024. For information or to leave an online condolence, call 630-232-7337 or visit www.yursfuneralhomes. com. Please sign the guest book at www.legacy.com/kcchronicle.

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• Saturday, February 23, 2013

A Commonwealth Edison equipment operator for more than 30 years, Frank L. Bruno enjoyed an even longer part-time career as a musician, playing saxophone and clarinet in a number of Chicago area big bands, including those of Anthony “Dick” Sarlo and Vito Buffalo, eventually leading his own orchestra, The Jolly Corks (aka The Starlighters), after his retirement from Commonwealth Edison. Born to Frank and Ida Bruno (Berrettini), he was raised in Melrose Park along with his older brother, Louis, and younger brother, Nick, and also began a personal and professional relationship of 87 years with his devoted childhood friend, Anthony “Dick” Sarlo. Frank and Dick literally started kindergarten together and both attended what is now Proviso East High School before briefly going their separate ways during WWII. During the earlier part of his service with the 691st Army Air Force Band, Frank was stationed at Love Field in Dallas, Texas, where he first met Virginia (Wilmarth), his future wife of more than 63 years. They were separated when Frank was shipped to the European Theater, but were later re-introduced by Jean Di Marco, who was working part-time at Oak Park Cleaners during high school where Virginia was also working along with her aunt Dorothy after relocating to the Chicago area in 1946. Frank was playing in the band for Jean’s high school prom and she was rattling off the names of the band members when Virginia recognized Frank’s name. They were married in 1949. Frank continued his career as a musician after leaving the service, working in bands under Ralph Willoughby, Elmo Tanner, Orrin Tucker and Allan Dewitt. Wanting a steadier source of income than a career as a musician could provide, Frank went to work for Commonwealth Edison in 1951, shortly before the birth of his first son, Frank Jr.

That did not end his career as a musician. He continued to play in a number of big bands, including regular gigs at the Pick Congress in the bands of his friend Dick Sarlo, and later with the Vito Buffalo Orchestra. The gigs did not just provide extra income for his family, which soon grew to include sons Paul and Michael, but a host of lifetime friendships and a creative outlet that lasted into his 80s. Frank traveled extensively with his family, visiting nearly every national park in the continental United States, giving his children a great appreciation of the outdoors and open spaces. Frank retired from Commonwealth Edison in 1983, spending more of his free time in the business he loved and serving as president of the Elgin chapter of the American Federation of Musicians. He died Feb. 19 at Pineview Care Center in St. Charles, surrounded by his family. Frank is survived by his wife, Virginia; sons, Frank Jr., Paul and Michael; daughters-in-law, Mary and Debbie; grandchildren, Paul Jr. “Tony” and his wife Colleen, Viginia (Ginny) and Adam; brother, Nick Bruno; sister-inlaw, Mary Bunn; and the nieces and nephews of his brother, Lou. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, March 9, at St. Peter’s Catholic Church, 1891 Kaneville Road in Geneva, with Father Michael Chernetzki as celebrant. A funeral luncheon will follow at Salerno’s on the Fox, 320 N. Second St. in St. Charles. Burial will be private A memorial visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 8, at Malone Funeral Home, 324 E. State St. (Route 38) in Geneva. For information, call 630-2328233 or visit www.malonefh. com. Please sign the guest book at www.legacy.com/kcchronicle.

LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

FRANK L. BRUNO

9


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| 10


• MEALS Continued from page 7

Kathy Jankovic Geneva High School culinary arts instructor Food for Health is giving her students. Not only are they learning and applying their skills at both places, she said, but they also are giving back to their community. “It’s important for them to see what’s going on beyond the classroom,” Jankovic said. “It’s a great situation for us.”

Sandy Bressner – sbressner@shawmedia.com

Geneva High School student Amy Haboush stirs soup Monday in the kitchen of the Roquette Center in Geneva Monday as part of Fox Valley Food For Health.

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

Clients, who are received by referrals or direct contact, receive 12 weeks of free food, Fremgen said. They are reassessed at 10 weeks and, if everything is going well, they come off the program, she said. A handwritten sign in the kitchen lists the set of principles guiding the project. They address teamwork, responsibility, positivity, honoring commitments, maintaining a caring and welcoming environment, helping where help is needed and putting passion and love into the food. “Our work is heart centered, loved based,” the sign states. Schmidt can attest to that. She said she’s become friends with the volunteers, including the man who delivers her meals, and she has exchanged cards with the students. “I can’t say enough about these people,” Schmidt said. Monday, six students carried out their assigned tasks as aromas of various foods filled the kitchen and empty cans of ingredients began cluttering the countertops. Amy and Stephanie stood opposite each other as they stirred their pots of soup. “Is your arm tired?” Amy asked her friend. St. Charles resident Jack Creamer, who supervises the teen cooks, peered into the steaming pot of mushroom barley soup and chatted with the girls. Creamer – who trained at the Culinary Institute of America in California after retiring from an executive position at McDonald’s Corporation – teaches the teens cooking techniques and other food-related topics, such as proper food storage. He’s been with Fox Valley Food for Health since the beginning, he said, noting he didn’t think twice about volunteering. One of his friends receives the meals, he said. “She’s very appreciative,” Creamer said. “They all are.” Geneva High School culinary arts instructor Kathy Jankovic also appreciates the opportunity Fox Valley

“It’s important for them to see what’s going on beyond the classroom. It’s a great situation for us.”

COVER STORY | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Geneva students active in Fox Valley Food for Health

11

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Nicole Weskerna – nweskerna@shawmedia.com

Fourth-graders from St. Patrick Catholic School perform a puppet show Friday about the construction of their new school on Crane Road in St. Charles. ter.” She pointed out that the new school’s hallways are more open, the cafeteria is brighter, and the school has large classrooms, science labs and computer labs. Those features will reward generations to come, she said. Others were recognized for their efforts in building the school, including Linster’s assistant, Kathy Becker, and Lee Lochmann, who chaired the building committee. The fourth-grade class performed a puppet show, which

depicted people who played a big role in constructing the school, including Linster. The show outlined the different phases of construction. Home and School Board President Vicky Rullo presented a brick would be placed in the school’s Rosary Garden, likely in the fall, in Linster’s honor. After receiving a statue of St. Patrick, students sang the school’s Memorare as Linster’s final gift. Linster said the school’s construction taught him two

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important lessons. “You are only as good as the people that surround you,” he said, adding that he could not have done what he did without the help of Becker and Lochmann. The second lesson he learned was that “when God is with you, you will always succeed,” he said. “It’s been a pleasure; it’s been a delight; it’s been a blessing,” he said before receiving a standing ovation from students, teachers and administrators.

What is Plan!t?

ELBURN – A vote on the longdiscussed plans for the Elburn Station development is possible on Monday night, as a special Village Board meeting has been planned for 7 p.m. at Village Hall, 301 E. North St. The meeting will take place before the regularly scheduled Committee of the Whole meeting. Village President Dave Anderson has said he would plan for such a meeting, as the board and officials from developer ShoDeen have worked to hammer out details for the project, which would bring 2,200 new homes into the village over 20 years in the area near the Metra station. Discussions have centered around limiting the number of rental units, sharing the cost of a planned pedestrian bridge and establishing that ShoDeen could not start work on a new phase of the project until the previous one was essentially complete. At the Committee of the Whole meeting, board members are set to review building permit fees, impact fees and water and sewer connection fees, as well as discuss the possibility of lifting the village’s ban on video gaming.

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ST. CHARLES – In a show of appreciation for his integral role in helping to build the new St. Patrick Catholic School, students and school leaders recognized Monsignor Joseph Linster Friday morning with letters of thanks, gifts and a puppet show. Friday’s program, “Building to do God’s Work,” celebrated the spacious new school on Crane Road that opened in August 2011. Letters from three student representatives conveyed students’ appreciation for Linster’s role in helping to complete the school. “If it weren’t for your leadership, we would still be at the old school,” said eighth-grader Samantha Woodrich, who was referring to the former school in downtown St. Charles. Eighth-grader Edison Hurh said in his letter that Linster is an inspiration to everyone at the school. He said Linster was a “spiritual constant” for students, and extended his thanks on behalf of himself and fellow students. In her letter, seventh-grader Sarah Foley said while she liked the old school, she said “the new school is so much bet-

13

LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Monsignor lauded at St. Patrick’s

Station vote likely Monday


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| SPORTS

14

OPINIONS OUR VIEW

The awesomeness of art Whether it’s a child’s first finger painting or an expensively-framed work of renown, art plays a powerful role in life. Most all of us can remember dabbling in art as children – using crayons to draw, clay to sculpt or over-sized brushes to paint. Some stick with art and continue to hone their skills as they get older, while many others let that specific outlet for creativity fade from their day-to-day existence. But even those who don’t consider themselves artists still tend to retain an unmeasurable appreciation for art, a connection that was highlighted in this week’s Kane County Chronicle series on local artists and artwork. In fact, the benefits of art are fundamental to humanity and have the power to transform a person’s life, according to the Americans for the Arts organization, a nonprofit group that has been advancing the arts and art education since 1960. Just check out these statistics from the Americans for the Arts website, www. artsusa.org. • Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have shown that when a city has a high concentration of art, civic

engagement increases, social cohesion is amped and poverty rates are lowered. • According to a study titled “Arts & Economic Prosperity IV,” the arts can create jobs, boost tourism and lead to government revenue – no matter the size of a town. • And students who attend schools that champion art have higher grade-point averages, lower drop-out rates and better attitudes about community service. So, how does a person in Kane County take advantage of all art has to offer? Fortunately, the area has placed a huge emphasis on art. Public art – including large, colorful murals and impressively detailed sculptures – can be seen across the county. And art-focused organizations and events abound. Water Street Studios in Batavia, the Fine Line Creative Arts Center in St. Charles, and the the Geneva Fine Arts Fair are just a few local art outlets. In addition, Waubonsee Community College and Elgin Community College offer an array of educational art opportunities. And, of course, people young and old can start right in their own home. All it takes is a pencil, pen – or even a crayon – to get started.

WRITING TO US The Kane County Chronicle welcomes original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the editor. Letters can be emailed to letters@kcchronicle.com, faxed to 630-444-1641 and mailed to Letters, Kane County Chronicle, 333 N. Randall Road, Suite 2, St. Charles IL 60174.

ANOTHER VIEW

Childhood bullying linked to adult psychological disorders By EMILY BAZELON Slate A significant study from Duke, out this week, provides the best evidence we’ve had thus far that bullying in childhood is linked to a higher risk of psychological disorders in adulthood. The results came as a surprise to the research team. “I was a skeptic going into this,” lead author and Duke psychiatry professor William Copeland told me over the phone, about the claim that bullying does measurable longterm psychological harm. “To be honest, I was completely surprised by the strength of the findings. It has certainly given me pause. This is something that stays with people.”

I’m less surprised, because as I explain in my new book about bullying, “Sticks and Stones,” earlier research has shown that bullying increases the risk for many problems, including low academic performance in school and depression (for both bullies and victims) and criminal activity later in life (bullies). But the Duke study is important because it lasted for 20 years and followed 1,270 North Carolina children into adulthood. Beginning at the ages of 9, 11 and 13, the kids were interviewed annually until the age of 16, along with their parents, and then multiple times over the years following. Based on the findings, Copeland and his team divided their subjects into three

groups – people who were victims as children, people who were bullies, and people who were both. The third group is known as bully-victims. These are the people who tend to have the most serious psychological problems as kids, and – in the Duke study – they also showed up with higher levels of anxiety, depressive disorders and suicidal thinking as adults. The people who had only experienced being victims were also at heightened risk for depression and anxiety. And the bullies were more likely to have an antisocial personality disorder. Why does bullying have such far-reaching impact? Copeland and his team suggest the experience may change

Editorial board J. Tom Shaw, publisher Jay Schwab

Al Lagattolla

Kathy Gresey Kate Schott

kids’ physiological response to stress, and their ability to cope. This looked especially stark for the bully-victims. “It was definitely the case that chronic bullying led to worse outcomes, but much more the case that being a bully-victim was associated with really significant problems,” Copeland said. It’s important to point out that Copeland and other researchers don’t define bullying broadly, in a way that encompasses a lot of mutual conflict among kids, or one-time fighting. Bullying is physical or verbal harassment that takes place repeatedly and involves a power imbalance — one kid, or group of kids, making another kid miserable by lording

power over him. If the results of this study are dismaying because they indicate that bullying is permanently scarring, the findings also strengthen the argument for prevention. Copeland underscores this idea. “Consider me a reluctant convert, but I’m starting to view bullying the same way I do abuse in the home,” he said. “I honestly think the affects we’re observing here are just as potent.” • Bazelon is a Slate senior editor and writes about law, family and kids. Her new book is “Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Empathy and Character.” Find her at emilybazelon@gmail. com or on Facebook or Twitter.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. First Amendment, U.S. Bill of Rights


8SOUND OFF

Nice lady in Geneva It’s Presidents’ Day, and you’ll remember that George Washington said as a kid, he could not tell a lie. Here in Geneva, my wife had a similar experience. She went into a store,

• The Kane County Chronicle’s Sound Off number is 630-845-5240. • Please speak clearly and slowly. Keep messages to a maximum of 60 seconds. • Callers may speak on topics anonymously. • Because of the volume of calls to our Sound Off line, please limit yourself to one call a week. • We will not print attacks of a personal nature or those accusing persons of crimes or illegal conduct that have not been previously published or documented. • We will not print calls commenting on signed Letters to the Editor. • We reserve the right to edit comments for obscene, libelous and otherwise inappropriate comments, as well as for space considerations. • Sound Off comments are the opinions of our readers and, as such, should not be taken as fact.

and she was shopping and we came back to the car and we went to another place to pay a bill. She noticed she was missing a pretty good amount of money. She went back to the store, and someone at the store said a lady said she found some money and left her name and phone number. We called the person, and she met us in Geneva and would not take any kind of reward. I’m calling to thank Nancy in Geneva for being a good Samaritan. I think it’s time that we can stand a little more faith in human nature and the goodness in people. We

absolutely saw that in this nice lady named Nancy.

Honest and approachable In reference to last week’s Sound Off, I didn’t see that Chris Lauzen’s nose was out of joint at all. He asked for help from the board, in case he is asked to be in two places at once, instead of asking each person on the board each time something comes up. Someone would have just been assigned. The board denied it, and Lauzen moved on. It seemed to me just to be a suggestion that was denied.

AURORA – The Kane County Democrats will have the annual Harry S. Truman Dinner fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m. March 3, at Piper’s Banquets, 1295 Butterfield Road, Aurora. Tickets cost $80 each. The keynote speaker is Gov. Pat Quinn, and U.S. Rep. Bill Foster also will speak. For information, call 630-513-1588 or visit www. kanedems.org.

State’s outstanding senior volunteer sought The search is on for Illinois’ outstanding senior volunteer. The Salute to Senior Service program, sponsored by Home Instead Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, honors the contributions of adults 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes. Nominations

That’s not very fair I’m sitting here listening to President Barack Obama speak. All of his rules he wants to make. He’s so worried about gun control and the taxes and the pensions. One thing they aren’t looking at is all these kids he wants to give an opportunity to. Yet there are hundreds of thousands in these orphanages, and they’ll never have a chance in life because the adoption rules are too hard in this country. That’s why these people have to go out of the country. Why doesn’t he want to give those kids a chance, with every-

body else in the country? I think that’s not very fair.

Remove the phrase With more and more states legalizing same-sex marriages, I feel the only right thing to do is to remove the phrase, “under God,” from the Pledge of Allegiance and stop singing “God Bless America,” since we are ignoring His plans for marriage and many of his other commandments.

New ideas needed Last week, somebody called in about the potential new alderman for the city of Batavia. Batavia needs new faces. People should not be allowed on city or any government for more than 30 years. They become stagnant and too satisfied with what is going on and do not bring new ideas to city government.

GENEVA PLACE A Covenant Retirement Community Covenant Retirement Communities is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church.

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8LOCAL BRIEFS County Dems will host annual Truman fundraiser

I did not feel he was upset by that. And as far as pettiness, I think you have the wrong politician. I’ve known several politicians over the years, and Lauzen is by far the most honest and approachable politician I have ever met.

Covenant Retirement Communities does not discriminate pursuant to the federal Fair Housing Act.

for outstanding senior volunteers will be accepted through March 31. State winners then will be selected by popular vote. Online voting will be from April 15 to April 30. From those state winners, a panel of senior care experts will pick the national Salute to Senior Service honoree. To complete and submit a nomination form online, visit www.SalutetoSeniorService. com. Completed nomination forms also can be mailed to Salute to Senior Service, P.O. Box 285, Bellevue, NE 68005. For information about Salute to Senior Service or the Home Instead Senior Care network’s services, call 815-7541300.

Animal welfare league hosting fundraiser NORTH AURORA – The Fox Valley Animal Welfare League will host a “Pet Pictures with the Easter Bunny” fundraiser from 11

a.m. to 2 p.m. March 23, at the league’s office, 11 John St., North Aurora. Pet lovers can have their pet’s picture taken with the Easter bunny for a minimum $5 donation, as well as buy baked goods, jewelry and pet-friendly plants. Pet food donations also are welcome to supply the league’s pet food pantry. Donations help those who are economically challenged receive a supplemental bag of food. Items should be unused and non-expired. The fundraiser will support the Fox Valley Animal Welfare League spay/neuter clinic. The clinic provides services to low income clients, rescue groups and senior citizens. Tours will be available during the event. To volunteer, donate jewelry or supply bake sale items, contact Kaye at 630-552-5924 or kaye@ fvawl.org. Learn more at fvawl. org.

– Kane County Chronicle

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• Saturday, February 23, 2013

I’m responding to “Wage hike won’t help” and “Devastating effect.” I agree that the $10 minimum wage should be. How can anybody live on $7.25 an hour? The person stated that people should get a second job like others do. Well, not everybody is 25 years old. We’re 50 and older. Working two jobs? No. You’re going to pay more at the grocery store, anyway, whether it goes to $10 an hour. Look at the gas prices. It’s going up. I remember when it used to be $1.25 a gallon. Those days are long gone, aren’t they? Yes, raise it to $10. Let people make a good living. It’s time that people start getting paid what they are worth. And seniors, working two jobs? If you are 25, you can. If you’re almost 60, you cannot do two jobs.

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LOCAL NEWS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Pay people what they’re worth

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| LOCAL NEWS

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Q Center in St. Charles up for sale By BRENDA SCHORY bschory@shawmedia.com ST. CHARLES – The Q Center in St. Charles is for sale. The center, at 1405 N. Fifth Ave., is owned by former accounting giant Arthur Andersen as a training facility. It will not sport a “for sale” sign in front, Andersen spokeswoman Deb French said. Instead, CBRE, a commercial real estate firm, will seek interested investors and buyers and bring them to Andersen. “I have no idea what the asking price is or what they

are hoping to get for it,” French said. CBRE would be issuing a news release, French said. “This is the only property that Andersen actually ever owned,” French said. “Arthur Andersen is just exploring the options of trying to sell the property, to see if they can sell or get some investors to buy the business. And it’s the whole business.” According to its website, the Q Center has 1,042 hotel rooms and 150,000 square feet of space available for meetings and gatherings on 95 wooded acres on the Fox River.

Andersen bought the property from the Adrian Dominican Sisters, who opened a Catholic women’s college there from 1963 to 1970, when the college failed. St. Charles philanthropists Dellora and Lester Norris had donated the initial 57 acres to the sisters for the college, and Andersen later expanded it as a training center, according to a history of the site. It first was called the Andersen Center for Professional Education, then Arthur Andersen Worldwide Organization. Andersen collapsed in 2002 when it was convict-

ed of obstruction of justice in connection to shredding documents related to the company’s audit of the Enron Corp. What was left of the Andersen company renamed the campus the Q Center to be used for conferences and social events. French said Andersen was looking to get out of the hospitality business. “A lot of that stuff relating to Enron is winding … down on the legal side … and coupled with that is the commercial real estate market, which is starting to get a little better,” French said.

St. Charles Economic Development Coordinator Michael Mertes said the Q Center makes the city a destination. “The Q Center has served a great niche in the community – a destination as a corporate training center,” Mertes said. “It is really used beyond that both by organizations on an hourly basis over a week, and fills a great need here.” Mertes said the city’s hope is for it to continue as a destination place “and bring people into the community the way the Q Center has served.”

8LOCAL BRIEFS Presentation for women set in St. Charles ST. CHARLES – Jodi L. Manthi, principal with Invest Financial Corp. and partner in Riverstone Wealth Partners LLC, will reveal the five most important strategies women can’t afford to ignore at the American Association of University Women BataviaGeneva-St. Charles Branch Meeting on March 7, at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1145 N. Fifth Ave., St. Charles. Networking begins at 7 p.m., and the program starts at 7:30 p.m. Guests are welcome. For information, call Ann Morris at 630-584-6170 or Jean Mozzocco at 630-513-8427.

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– Kane County Chronicle

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The St. Charles East or North boys basketball teams could get one more game against Larkin, which has defeated both teams in the regular season, at the Class 4A South Elgin Regional. PAGE 23

LOG ON TO KCCHRONICLE.COM/PREPS THIS WEEKEND FOR COVERAGE OF THE FINAL DAY OF THE IHSA BOYS SWIMMING AND DIVING STATE MEET AND MARMION’S SHOWING AT THE TEAM WRESTLING DUAL STATE TOURNAMENT.

17

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

SPORTS

LOOKING FOR ANOTHER SHOT

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

Ramble on MOOSEHEART DOWNS HINCKLEY-BIG ROCK TO WIN CLASS 1A WESTMINSTER CHRISTIAN REGIONAL TITLE. PAGE 18 Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Mooseheart’s Makur Puou celebrates after a dunk in the first quarter Friday during the Red Ramblers’ 55-38 IHSA Class 1A Westminster Christian Regional championship over Hinckley-Big Rock at Judson University in Elgin.

Aiming high Jonathan Thielen (left) and Marmion, and the St. Charles North boys swimming team in position for top-10 inish after a strong start at the IHSA swimming and diving state meet. PAGE 21

Recovery is everywhere.

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| SPORTS

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IHSA CLASS 1A WESTMINSTER CHRISTIAN REGIONAL: MOOSEHEART 55, HINCKLEY-BIG ROCK 38

Ramblers rout Royals Mooseheart adjust on defense to win regional title By DENNIS D. JACOBS editorial@kcchronicle.com ELGIN – A much-anticipated rematch in the IHSA Class 1A Westminster Christian Regional championship game Friday at Judson University wound up lacking any real drama, and that was fine with victorious Mooseheart. The Ramblers (24-5) routed Hinckley-Big Rock, 55-38, to avenge an early-season loss to the Royals in Hinckley. “We learned from the first game,” Mooseheart forward Mangisto Deng said. “We knew if we didn’t play defense, we weren’t going to win.” The main thing the Ramblers learned from their 58-51 loss to Hinckley-Big Rock back in early December was not to play man-to-man defense against the Royals (24-5). “We ran the 1-3-1 [zone] better than we’ve ran it all year,” Mooseheart coach Ron Ahrens said. “We played defense really well.” The Ramblers held Hinckley-Big Rock to 4 points in the first quarter and built a quick 7-point cushion. Mooseheart closed the first half on a 7-0 run to take a 29-13 lead into the break. Deng, a 6-foot-7 junior, was a big part of that scoring spree. He found teammate Walli Sanni with a pass for an easy basket to start the run, then hit a long 3-pointer before closing the half with a mid-range jumper. He had 11 of his 18 points in the opening 16 minutes. The Royals tried to make a game of it in the second half, forcing the Ramblers into eight third-quarter turnovers and eventually cutting the deficit to 10 on a layup by Jared Madden after one of them. But Mooseheart scored the game’s next 10 points to take a 44-24 lead with 5:40 remaining in the fourth quarter. Hinckley-Big Rock managed to close the gap to 14 with 3:38 to play, but a thunderous jam by Makur Puou (17 points, 13 rebounds) with

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Mooseheart’s Makur Puou (center) controls a defensive rebound in the first quarter of the Red Ramblers’ 55-38 IHSA Class 1A Westminster Christian Regional championship win over Hinckley-Big Rock on Friday in Elgin.

More online Head to KCChronicle.com/ preps to see video highlights from Mooseheart’s victory over Hinckley-Big Rock in the IHSA Class 1A Westminster Christian Regional championship. less than two minutes left pushed the margin back to 18, ending whatever small doubt remained about the final outcome. “We’ve been watching their film and we know how to play [against them],” said Puou, a 6-10 junior. “That helped us a lot. We’re strong down low and they’re strong at shooting.” Puou, Deng, and 7-1 junior Akim Nyang are all from South Sudan. Hinckley-Big Rock expressed concern to the IHSA early in the season about A-HOPE, the organiza-

Class 1A Westminster Christian Regional Tuesday’s quarterfinals Mooseheart 74, Faith Lutheran 40 Westminster Christian 61, Elgin Academy 22 Wednesday’s semifinals Hinckley-Big Rock 44, Harvest Christian Academy 33 Mooseheart 45, Westminster Christian 30 Friday’s championship Mooseheart 55, Hinckley-Big Rock 38

tion that brought the trio to Mooseheart from Africa. While talking with pride about the 10 seniors on his roster after the game, Royals coach Bill Sambrookes could resist a thinly-veiled refer-

ence to the controversy. “It’s home-grown talent,” he said of his roster. “It’s guys that were with me in fifthgrade coming to camps, the whole 10 of them. … They all stayed together and accepted their roles. Nobody moved in and nobody moved out.” The only moving Mooseheart is concerned about now is the fact the Ramblers are moving on to sectional play for the first time in nearly half a century. The last postseason championship for Mooseheart in boys basketball was back in 1964. The Ramblers will take on Chicagoland Jewish of Deerfield on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at Mooseheart. “They’re another HinckleyBig Rock,” Ahrens said. “Fast, quick, guards that can play really well – the best shooting guard I’ve seen this year. The [Jake] Newlander kid. He’s incredible.”

WHAT TO WATCH Today’s lineup Men’s basketball Clemson at Maryland, 11 a.m., ESPN2 South Carolina at Georgia, 1 p.m., CBS Oklahoma St. at West Virginia, 1 p.m., ESPN2 Georgetown at Syracuse, 3 p.m., CBS North Carolina State at North Carolina, 3 p.m., ESPN Bradley at Illinois-Chicago, 3 p.m., CSN Detroit at Wichita State, 3 p.m., ESPN2 New Mexico at Colorado St., 3 p.m., NBCSN Baylor at Oklahoma, 4 p.m., ESPNU Creighton at St. Mary’s (Calif.), 5 p.m., ESPN Marquette at Villanova, 5 p.m., ESPN2 Nevada at San Diego St., 5 p.m., NBCSN Arkansas at Florida, 6 p.m., ESPNU South Dakota St. at Murray St., 7 p.m., ESPN2 Missouri at Kentucky, 8 p.m., ESPN Ohio at Belmont, 9 p.m., ESPN2 Golf PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, quarterfinal matches, 11 a.m., TGC; 1 p.m., NBC Pro hockey Winnipeg at Philadelphia, noon, CSN Sunday’s lineup Pro hockey Columbus at Blackhawks, 6 p.m., CSN Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m., NBCSN Pro basketball L.A. Lakers at Dallas, noon, ABC Memphis at Brooklyn, 6 p.m., ESPN Bulls at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m., WGN, ESPN Auto racing NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Daytona 500, 11 a.m., FOX Men’s basketball Illinois at Michigan, noon, ESPN Cincinnati at Notre Dame, 1 p.m., CBS Michigan St. at Ohio St., 3 p.m., CBS Northwestern at Purdue, 5 p.m., BTN Golf PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, semifinal matches, 8 a.m., TGC; championship match, 1 p.m., NBC


19

BOYS BASKETBALL: KANELAND 69, ROCHELLE 66

Kaneland wins NI Big 12 East Division title By JAY SCHWAB jschwab@shawmedia.com

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“We won the conference two years ago, we won a regional here – it always seems like we come to Rochelle and play a big game.” Brian Johnson, Kaneland boys basketball coach John Pruett

Matt Limbrunner

basket as the Knights quickly lopped five points off their deficit. Rochelle, already playing without leading scorer and four-year starter Grant Prusator (hip flexor injury), saw starting guard Luke Manning foul out with 6:42 left in the third quarter. Hubs coach Tim Thompson was hit with a technical foul shortly thereafter. The Knights ended the third quarter on a good note when sophomore guard Connor Fedderly drilled a corner 3-pointer to bring Kaneland within 47-46. The left-hander sparked the Knights with eight points off the bench. “We want him to shoot a lot,” Johnson said. “He has to get his feet set and get ready to score. He’s a very unselfish player. He’s really a nice

passer but he’s one of those kids that we need to spot up behind the arc, stretch out the defense and shoot the ball when he has open shots. He made some nice buckets.” The Knights grabbed their first lead since the first minute of the game when Limbrunner put back his own miss early in the fourth quarter for a 50-49 Knights lead. Kaneland junior point guard Drew David scored all 10 of his points in the fourth quarter – seven from the free throw line – to help put the Hubs (11-18, 4-6) in a hole, and the Knights remained in control in the late stages. Kaneland trailed 38-26 at halftime despite 12 first half points from Pruett. The foulprone Knights sent Rochelle to the free-throw line 15 times in the half, with the Hubs

sinking 12 of them. “It was turnovers, and they were just attacking us,” Johnson said. “We were playing with our hands and fouling everywhere. It was really important to have good possessions in the second half. We had to sit Matt a lot in the first half, and I think that was big, having him at full strength.” It all added up to another landmark win for the Knights against their friends to the west, much to Thompson’s chagrin. “Basically déjà vu to every Kaneland-Rochelle game since I’ve been the coach,” Thompson said. “It always seems like we get out, take a lead on them and they come out and play great defense in the second half and they make a run, and we can’t really stop the bleeding.”

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

ROCHELLE – The possibility of Rochelle shifting to the Northern Illinois Big 12’s West Division surfaced earlier this week. The Kaneland boys basketball team would probably hate to see that happen. The Knights have made some sweet memories on the Hubs’ home floor, the most recent coming Friday as Kaneland rallied from a 12-point halftime deficit to defeat the Hubs, 69-66, in both teams’ regular-season finale. The Knights (15-11, 7-3 NI Big 12 East) needed the win to take the conference title outright with second-place Sycamore defeating DeKalb. The win was the Knights’ second conference title in three years, the other one also being clinched in a regular season finale at Rochelle. “We won the conference two years ago, we won a re-

gional here – it always seems like we come to Rochelle and play a big game,” Kaneland coach Brian Johnson said. Knights junior John Pruett (19 points) and senior Matt Limbrunner (16) were instrumental as Kaneland used a 10-0 run at the start of the third quarter to turn the momentum after trailing Rochelle, 38-26, at halftime. Kaneland entered the game having lost five of its past six, including a pair of conference defeats against DeKalb and Morris. Combined with the poor first half at Rochelle, it appeared the Knights would limp into next week’s IHSA Class 3A Illinois Math and Science Academy Regional. “It’s been rough,” said Pruett, sporting goggles after taking an inadvertent finger to his eye at practice earlier this week. “We lost five straight games after winning seven. We were used to winning for a good amount of time, and then we started losing. We wanted to get back on a winning streak, and we wanted to win conference, bad. That’s been our goal since the beginning of the year, and we wanted to get it done.” Limbrunner started the second half with a 3-pointer and Pruett added a driving

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Knights find their happy place again


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, February 23, 2013

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IHSA BOYS SWIMMING STATE MEET

21

By IAN MATTHEWS editorial@kcchronicle.com

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

WILMETTE – The pool at New Trier isn’t exactly conducive for setting personal records or fast times. The shallow depth and choppy waves create a tougher-than-usual go for swimmers. The enormity of the IHSA state finals and the talent on hand for Friday’s preliminaries made the state of the pool irrelevant as several records were shattered while times were faster overall. Area teams St. Charles North and Marmion set themselves up for Top-10 finishes today after each school qualified two of their three relay teams. Cadets’ coach Bill Schalz, whose team sits in seventh, hopes his swimmers don’t take a step back after putting the team in position for a high finish. “We swam great today but there are some things that we need to clean up,” Schalz said. “We definitely have a shot to be top-ten. We’re swimming in every relay against rivalries with Loyola and Fenwick. The tough thing about [today] is that there is that sigh of relief that you made it. But, you have to get back up and be ready.” Marmion put itself in a good position after finishing fourth in the 400-yard freestyle relay at 3:07.29, shaving nearly six seconds of their sectional qualifying time. Mike Burke, Robert Ramoksa, Josh Kanute and Jonathan Thielen comprised the relay which finished just behind Hinsdale Central, Lake Forest and New Trier. Thielen helped the Cadets’ 200 freestyle relay team advance to the finals with a fifthplace finish at 1:25.22. The Minnesota recruit will also compete in the 100 backstroke consolation finals after plac-

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

North, Marmion off to strong start

Sandy Bressner - sbressner@shawmedia.com

St. Charles North’s Spencer Gray celebrates after swimming the 500-yard freestyle during the IHSA boys swimming and diving state meet preliminaries Friday at New Trier in Wilmette. ing seventh. “I feel pretty good overall – I couldn’t have asked for much more out of our 200-yard free relay team,” Thielen said. “Not making it back to finals in the 100 backstroke is tough but I just shook it off and we swam great in the 400-free relay.” St. Charles North also finds itself in the mix for a top-five finish after qualifying two of its three relay teams. The North Stars saved their best for last, shaving four seconds of their qualifying time in the 400-yard freestyle relay with a 3:07.73. “We had a great day – I’m very proud of the boys and how they functioned,” North coach Rob Rooney said. “They

handled a little bit of adversity and we had ups and downs along the way. This meet is like a roller coaster ride. There are peaks and valleys along with fear and excitement. We need to come back [today] and swim faster.” The North Stars are in good standing thanks to their relays along with strong individual performances in the 500 freestyle where Kyle Gannon placed third with a 4:29.33, shaving six seconds off his sectional time. Gannon also qualified for the 200 freestyle consolation finals while being part of the North Stars’ 200 and 400 relay final qualifiers. “The vibe coming in was really good. The 200 free was

“We definitely have a shot to be top-ten. We’re swimming in every relay against rivalries with Loyola and Fenwick. The tough thing about tomorrow is that there is that sigh of relief that you made it. But, you have to get back up and be ready.” Bill Schalz, Marmion boys swimming coach

a tough race for them but they did an awesome job with it,” Rooney said. “We just have to get faster [today] and race and that’s what it’s all about. I’m excited to see where we’re at. We need Gannon and Spencer Gray to step up – they all need to step up and get faster [today].”

Meanwhile, St. Charles East failed to qualify any relays but Will Shanel will compete in the 200 individual medley consolation finals after the junior posted a 1:53.27. Mundelein senior Connor Black set state records in both the 100 butterfly (47.20) and the 50-yard freestyle (19.80).

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Regional breakdown

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL POSTSEASON PREVIEW

By JAY SCHWAB jschwab@shawmedia.com

T

Sandy Bressner – sbressner@shawmedia.com

St. Charles North’s Alec Goetz goes up for a shot during a game earlier this month against Batavia in St. Charles. been in some dogfights and lost some of them. And then [in addition to] not shooting well from the perimeter, you’ve got to dominate the glass. They’re not the biggest, they do have some size, but you have to hustle and get all over the offensive boards.” Before either St. Charles squad gets a potential third crack at Larkin, a likely fourth meeting between the crosstown rivals looms in a regional semifinal Tuesday. The third-seeded North Stars would need to defeat sixth-seeded South Elgin on Monday to set up an East-North showdown. The youthful Storm have had a subpar season and are likely to remain without injured standout Darius Wells, but their grind-it-out, defensive-minded style is capable of keeping them in games.

See BASKETBALL, page 28

Monday’s regional openers Monday’s regional openers Class 4A Batavia Regional (17) Batavia vs. (16) Plainfield East, 7:30 p.m. Wheaton Warrenville South Regional (12) Geneva vs. (21) Wheaton Warrenville South, 7:30 p.m. South Elgin Regional (3) St. Charles North vs. (6) South Elgin, 7:30 p.m. Class 3A IMSA Regional (4) Aurora Central Catholic vs. (5) Marmion, 6 p.m. (3) Kaneland vs. (6) IMSA, 7:30 p.m. Burlington Central Regional (4) Burlington Central vs. (5) GenoaKingston, 7:30 p.m.

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

here was a palpable buzz about basketball in St. Charles after St. Charles East and St. Charles North each stormed to the championship game of the Saints’ prestigious Thanksgiving Tournament. A few months later, a long season of ups and downs – not to mention, in East’s case, a critical injury – has stripped some of the luster from the teams’ seasons. But with the postseason beginning Monday, the Saints and North Stars know a banner week at the IHSA Class 4A South Elgin Regional could allow them to finish the season where they started – riding high. Neither team will be able to run far, though, from the skeletons in its 2012-13 closet – not with Upstate Eight Conference River champion Larkin likely to await one of the teams in Friday’s regional final. Larkin swept both St. Charles teams during conference play, taking the two games against North by an average margin of 161⁄2 points and handling East by an average of 11 points. Of those four games, the only one that was in single digits – a 61-53 Larkin win over the Saints in November – came before East lost Purdue recruit Kendall Stephens to season-ending labrum surgery. The Royals, explosive in the open floor and boasting multiple prolific shooters, exceeded the 60-point mark in all four of those victories. “What they have is a nice combination of not only can they get to the basket, but they can shoot the 3,” East coach Pat Woods said. “When you can do both of those, I always tell our guards, our younger guards especially developing their game, develop the handles, get to the basket, and be able to knock down the 3. We can’t guard you on both sides. You have to play one or the other. I think that’s what makes their guards so dangerous.” Both Woods and North coach Tom Poulin agree the Royals deserve the designation of clear favorite at South Elgin. If either St. Charles team is to turn the tables on Larkin at regionals, Poulin said the top-seeded Royals will likely have to inflict some of the damage upon themselves. “First of all, you have to hope their shooters aren’t on that night,” Poulin said. “We’ve scouted them when they haven’t shot the ball well and they’ve

Toughest regional: 4A Wheaton Warrenville South Regional. Despite flirting with 20 wins, Geneva would be a heavy underdog both against red-hot, fifth-seeded Hinsdale Central in a regional semifinal and in a potential regional final against fourth-seeded West Aurora, a bona fide threat to win the Bolingbrook Sectional. The Vikings have beaten quality foes such as Larkin and St. Viator, and would need similarly inspired efforts to have a chance against Hinsdale Central and/or West Aurora if they can first handle the host Tigers in Monday’s opening round. Best first-round matchup: Aurora Central Catholic vs. Marmion at 3A IMSA Regional. Neither of these teams has been consistent this season but that unpredictability is part of what makes this rivalry rematch a hoot waiting to happen. The teams split their conference meetings, with Marmion blowing out ACC in the more recent matchup. The Chargers have typically saved their best basketball for the postseason under coach Nate Drye. Best potential regional final: St. Francis vs. Wheaton Academy at 3A IMSA Regional. The Suburban Christian Conference rivals have duked it out with one another for conference and postseason supremacy in recent years, with the Spartans prevailing when the stakes have been highest in the postseason. St. Francis plays physical basketball but would be challenged by the Warriors’ formidable frontcourt, featuring Division I prospect Gordon Behr and rebounding dynamo Brandon Ruggles. Potential dark horse: Burlington Central at 3A Burlington Central Regional. The Rockets have played much better basketball as the conference season has unfolded and will be playing on their home floor. If Central tops Genoa-Kingston in the opening round, a shot at rival and top-seeded Hampshire in a regional semifinal would give the Rockets a prime opportunity to show how far they’ve come since starting the season 0-7. – Jay Schwab, jschwab@shawmedia.com

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

St. Charles East, North aim for another crack at Larkin

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Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

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LOCAL BRIEF BC boys basketball downs Richmond-Burton The Burlington Central boys basketball team knocked off Richmond-Burton, 60-42. The Rockets jumped out to a 22-6 lead after the first quarter and extended their lead to 34-13 going into halftime. Richmond-Burton outscored Burlington Central 15-10 in the third quarter, but trailed 44-28. Duncan Ozburn led Burlington Central with 16 points after hitting 7 field goals and hitting two free throws. Moter Deng added 13. Two of Deng’s field goals came from the 3-point line. He also went 5 for 7 from the free-throw line. – Kane County Chronicle

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PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Boys swimming: IHSA sectionals Wrestling: IHSA dual team state meet MONDAY Boys basketball: Batavia vs. Plainfield East at 4A Batavia Regional, 7:30 p.m.; Geneva vs. Wheaton Warrenville South at 4A Wheaton Warrenville South Regional, 7:30 p.m.; St. Charles North vs. South Elgin at 4A South Elgin Regional, 7:30 p.m.; Aurora Central Catholic vs. Marmion at 3A IMSA Regional, 6 p.m.; Kaneland vs. IMSA at 3A IMSA Regional, 7:30 p.m.; Burlington Central vs. GenoaKingston at 3A Burlington Central Regional, 7:30 p.m. Girls basketball: Burlington Central vs. Vernon Hills at 3A Hoffman Estates Supersectional, 7:30 p.m.

IHSA CLASS 2A WESTMONT BOYS BASKETBALL REGIONAL: AURORA CHRISTIAN 59, IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 57

Suttle delivers regional title for Eagles By MICHAEL GIBBS

Class 2A Westmont Regional

editorial@kcchronicle.com WESTMONT – The Aurora Christian boys basketball team did not want to go to overtime after giving up a 10-point fourth quarter lead to Immaculate Conception in the IHSA Class 2A Westmont Regional final Friday. Ryan Suttle made sure that didn’t happen, as he hit a short put-back off a rebound of Cory Windle’s missed 3-pointer at the buzzer to give the Eagles a 59-57 win. The Eagles (19-11), the regional’s third seed, move on to Tuesday’s Byron Sectional semifinal against Winnebago. Immaculate Conception, the top seed, ends its season at 22-6. “I was just waiting for the play to develop,” Suttle said. “I saw Cory go up for the shot, and I knew if he missed the rebound was going to be back-side. So I put myself in the right position at the right time. It feels great to hit the gamewinner. It means a lot to me and my team to be able to still be playing.” Knights coach T.J. Tyrrell said his team lost track of time in the final couple of seconds. “We force them into a bad shot, a 3 that was well behind the line,” he said. “That is good they shot that from there.

Monday’s quarterfinals Lisle 43, Westmont 38 Aurora Christian 80, Somonauk 44 Wednesday’s semifinals Immaculate Conception 52, Lisle 44 Aurora Christian 77, St. Edward 66 Friday’s championship Aurora Christian 59, Immaculate Conception 57

Kids tend to think, ‘They got the shot off, the horn is going to go.’ They tend not to play to the horn. We watched the shot go off, figured ‘He missed, we’re going to overtime.’ We got a little sloppy there, and it cost us.” Eagles coach Pat McNamara was relieved the game did not go to overtime. “IC played so well to come back, and they had the momentum at that point,” he said. “They were playing well at the end of the game.” The teams were tied at 11 after a quarter before Aurora Christian took a 27-23 lead at the half. The Eagles used a Wes Wolfe fourpoint play near the end of the third quar-

ter to take a 43-33 lead into the fourth quarter. However, Immaculate Conception rallied in the fourth, as freshman Rhaushaun Epting nailed three 3-pointers to help his team take a 51-50 lead with 3:45 to play. Johnathan Harrell answered for Aurora Christian with a basket for a 52-51 lead with a little more than two minutes to play. A pair of free throws and then another gave the Knights a 54-52 lead with 1:02 to go. Ryan McQuade made a 3-pointer to give the Eagles a 55-54 lead with 41 seconds left. Suttle hit two free throws with 21 seconds to play, extending the lead to 5754, but the Knights’ Demetrius Carr hit a clutch 3-pointer to tie the score at 57 with 14 seconds on the clock. “We knew IC wasn’t going to give up,” McNamara said. “They hit some long 3s in the fourth. That freshman [Epting] is a great player. “But we came through in the end. Suttle was great, hitting those two free throws late and then the game-winner. Definitely a big win for the Eagles.” Suttle led all scorers with 21 and McQuade added 11. Carr led the Knights with 18 and Epting had 15.

BOYS BASKETBALL: GENEVA 36, BARTLETT 34

Geneva caps regular season with win at Bartlett By AKEEM GLASPIE editorial@kcchronicle.com BARTLETT – The Geneva boys basketball team started fast and watched two potential game-tying shots fall short as the Vikings held Friday for a 36-34 win against Bartlett to cap the regular season. With 7 seconds left in the game, Bartlett junior Mitch Reid missed a jumper in the Hawks’ first attempt to tie the game. After Geneva senior Connor Chapman missed two free throws, Hawks junior Kevin Wantroba missed another jumper as time expired. Sophomore forward Nate Navigato scored his team’s first seven points as Geneva led, 9-1, early, and he led all scorers with 23. Navigato said he looked forward to the challenge of facing Bartlett guard Lance

Whitaker, who is a University of Illinois-Chicago recruit and one of the top guards in the conference. “Just knowing that he was one of the top players in the conference and the whole area, having a chance to play against those type of players is good,” Navigato said. Bartlett (19Nate Navigato 9 ) s t r u g g l e d with Geneva’s zone defense as the Vikings (19-8) forced the Hawks into 14 3-point attempts in the first half and 28 overall, of which they connected on seven. The Vikings also keyed on Whittaker, holding him to three points at the half and seven overall. Bartlett coach Jim Wolfsmith said the team’s inability to hit the open 3-pointer

and Geneva containing Whittaker on offense decided the Upstate Eight Conference crossover. “We had some jumpshots that didn’t fall.” Wolfsmith said. “ ... Lance did what you’re suppose to do against a team that face-guards you and does a box-and-1. … He was unselfish, shared the ball and set picks. We have other guys that can shoot, but we didn’t knock the shots down consistently enough to make them pay on defense.” Navigato had 13 of his 23 in the second as he and Chapman led the Vikings offensively. Chapman added nine points and several critical offensive rebounds, including a put-back lay-up with 3 minutes left in the game to give his team a two-point lead. Bartlett was led by senior Marcus Aluquin with 11 points.

Vikings and coach Phil Ralston said the win can help prepare his team for the playoffs. Geneva opens Monday against Wheaton Warrenville South in the IHSA Class 4A Wheaton Warrenville South Regional. “We wanted to look at this as a springboard into our regional. ... [We allowed] too many offensive rebounds, especially in the first quarter. Despite that, I thought we did a great job of covering shooters and we did a great job on Whitaker,” Ralston said. Ralston added that he was happy with how his young forward, Navigato, rose to the challenge against Whitaker and the Hawks. “He didn’t shy away when Whitaker was guarding him … he looked for his shot and he was patient,” Ralston said.


Do you feel like the season has flown by, dragged or somewhere in between?

How do you define your role with this team? What do you perceive your job to be?

I’d probably say somewhere in between. There was a stretch of games where things were actually going

Obviously I’m a backup point guard so if our starter, Mike Rueffer, is in foul trouble or having trouble

What have you guys been working on in practices to work through some of these scoring struggles you guys have had lately? Well, the coaches really have [stressed] getting up and down more in fast break situations. Sometimes we get so focused on our half-court sets … we’ve been playing a lot of competitive, going up and down plays instead of just focusing on our half-court sets.

Weekend Chit-chat with BATAVIA’S NATHAN TAGUE

or just needs a breather, I’ll come in and try to pick up the energy, try to be spark off the bench and not turn the ball over. I probably play a little faster than Mike, maybe a little less under control, but faster. It really helps when we get run and jumped on with backcourt traps, so sometimes if Mike is struggling to beat them I’ll come in and see if I can do something different to try to pick the speed of the game up.

How long did it take you guys to get comfortable with a new coach this year? Not too long, actually. We did some stuff over the summer to [get to know him] and everything. We were pretty comfortable with him right off the bat but the new offense maybe took a little longer to get down at the start of the season, but I think now we’re used to it. We even had morning practices … we were trying to spend more time, maybe more time than we would have if we were used to that offense. It was a lot thrown at us, so we were trying to get it all down.

What’s the team’s mindset about regionals next week? Well, obviously our goal is to win. We’re just going to take it one game at a time. We’ve got Plainfield East [on Monday] and then we know we’d have to play [top seeded]

Oswego in the second round but the goal is always to win regionals and move on to sectionals.

Is it hard not to gulp a little bit, though, when you see a team like Oswego in that bracket? Yeah, kind of. They are pretty intimidating but we’re solid defensively. I have faith in our defense that maybe we can upset a team like Oswego because we can rely on our defense so much. If shots start falling and we start playing, I think we can beat anyone.

What are you going to do with yourself this spring once basketball is over? I don’t know. … Maybe catch up on some homework and just relax for the first few weeks, but I’m not going to totally back off the game. Probably play open gyms. I don’t know, it’s going to be a weird feeling, though.

Postseason prowess hard for Central to forecast Mark Smith and his Burlington Central girls basketball players had something in common at the start of the season – no clue how the big picture of the Rockets’ season would shape up. The underclassmen-loaded Rockets roster had little idea what it might take to win a conference title, let alone a regional or sectional. And Smith, despite an extensive coaching background that included a stint as St. Charles North’s boys coach, was new to the Central girls program, along with the 3A competition in the Rockets’ regional and sectional. Wide-eyed as they might have been, here are Smith and the Rockets, preparing for Monday’s IHSA Class 3A Hoffman Estates Supersectional against Vernon Hills after Central whipped Sterling in Thursday’s Genoa-Kingston Sectional final. “I’m kind of like what the freshmen are I guess, the only difference is I’ve been around long enough, I know how hard it is to win a sectional,” Smith said Friday. “I think some of the younger kids are like ‘Let’s do this every year,’ which is kind of a nice idea, but it’s really hard to do. We keep telling them they have to be really

PREP ZONE Jay Schwab proud of what they’ve accomplished.” The Rockets have two freshmen (Kayla Ross and Shelby Holt) and a sophomore (Alison Colby) in their starting five, joined by seniors Camille Dela Cruz and Erica Haynes. All but three of the Rockets’ players are freshmen or sophomores. Throughout the season, the Rockets (27-4) have obscured their varsity inexperience with excellent, consistent play, but Central seems to have hit another gear lately, as evidenced by Thursday’s 23-point trouncing of Sterling. “Probably the two biggest things are just how unselfish we’ve been lately and how patient we’ve been offensively with waiting for a great shot,” Smith said. “I think those two things have finally clicked.” In Vernon Hills, Central is up against the defending Class 3A state runners-up. Vernon Hills is anchored by 6-foot-2 center Meri Bennett-Swanson, who recently was profiled by the Chicago Tribune for her joint basketball and oboe prowess. Bennett-Swanson

has committed to play college basketball at DePaul, where Smith’s daughter, former St. Charles North standout Kelsey Smith, plays. “Every time I say to Kelsey we’re playing Vernon Hills, she says ‘Oh, yeah, against that girl who plays the oboe,’ so yeah, she knows her,” Smith said. Despite the extensive postseason experience Vernon Hills brings and the Cougars’ snazzy 29-2 record, Smith said he doesn’t plan to play the underdog card too heavily leading up to Monday night. He’ll save that just in case the Rockets advance to Redbird Arena next weekend for the state semifinals. “We’re going to tell the girls they’re pretty good and stuff like that but I don’t view us as an underdog,” Smith said. “If we’re lucky enough to make the next step, if we play (threetime defending champion) Montini, we’d be an underdog there, for sure.” Volleyball commitments: A pair of area volleyball players have decided their college futures. St. Francis senior setter McKenna Kelsay, who helped lead the Spartans to the Class 3A state title, has committed to Illinois, St. Francis announced

Burlington Central’s Class 3A playoff run BURLINGTON CENTRAL REGIONAL Feb. 13 semifinal Burlington Central 36, Hampshire 26 Feb. 15 championship Burlington Central 38, Plano 34 GENOA-KINGSTON SECTIONAL Tuesday’s semifinal Burlington Central 54, Marian Central 29 Thursday’s championship Burlington Central 49, Sterling 26 HOFFMAN ESTATES SUPERSECTIONAL Monday’s game Burlington Central vs. Vernon Hills, 7:30 p.m.

Friday. Kelsay’s older sister, Kristen, also plays volleyball in the Big Ten at Michigan State. Kelsay, who dished 921 assists and 413 service points as a senior, was the Suburban Christian Conference’s Girls Volleyball Player of the Year. Meanwhile, St. Charles East senior Caitlyn Ballard has decided to continue her volleyball career at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla.

Ballard had options to play at larger schools but intends to follow in her family’s aeronautical tradition. Her father, Michael, and older brother, Joshua, are both air traffic controllers working at Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center in Aurora. Not so fast: Despite a report earlier this week from a Rochelle radio station that Rochelle will shift to the Northern Illinois Big 12’s West Division once Dixon and Streator leave the conference, that maneuver is a possibility, not a certainty, Rochelle athletic director Kevin Crandall said. Crandall said more discussions within the conference needs to take place before a course of action is solidified. If no other schools are added and Rochelle moves from the NI Big 12’s East to the West, the conference would have two, five-team divisions, effective the 2014-15 school year. “The tentative discussion was that the best alternative would be two five team divisions for now, but ... nothing had been decided,” Crandall wrote in an email. • Jay Schwab is sports editor of the Kane County Chronicle. He can be reached at 630-845-5382 or jschwab@ shawmedia.com.

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• Saturday, February 23, 2013

pretty good that seemed like it flew a lot more but sometimes when we go on those losing streaks, it seems more like a drag. I’d say a little bit of both.

SPORTS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Batavia senior Nathan Tague comes from a long time of basketball-playing brothers, with his older brothers Andrew and Ryan having already gone through the Bulldogs program. Tague, a senior guard and lifelong Batavia resident, is the first of the brothers, though, to play for new Bulldogs coach Jim Nazos. In this week’s Weekend Chit-chat with Chronicle sports editor Jay Schwab, Tague touches on the program’s new coach, the Bulldogs’ prospects at next week’s IHSA Class 4A Batavia Regional and more. The following is an edited transcript:


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

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Semifinal has potential to feature pair of intra-city rivalries • BASKETBALL Continued from page 23 “This is going to be a great opportunity for them to do something they can take with them as they go forward, if they can play a spoiler role as host,” Poulin said. “And then I think most importantly, [South Elgin coach Chaz Taft] does a great job. I think he’s one of the best coaches around, and I’m not blowing smoke. He’s going to have them prepared and they’re going to be difficult to prepare for because of his system and the number of sets that they run and how intensely they defend.” East (15-11) defeated North (16-10) in the championship game of the St. Charles East Thanksgiving Tournament before the teams split two conference meetings. The late-season emergence of sophomore 3-point shooter Jake Asquini has made the Saints especially dangerous on the perimeter, where skillful point guards Dom Adduci, a junior, and Cole Gentry, a sophomore, drive the team’s success. “I think making sure their shooters don’t have time to get off a clean look is huge,” Poulin said. “Forcing

“I hope South Elgin has a lot of crowd control because it could be an exciting night, depending how Monday plays out, obviously. There’s potential there for a great atmosphere for a semifinal. It’s got to be two of the best back-to-back games in the state, potentially.” Pat Woods Jeff Krage – For the Kane County Chronicle

St. Charles East boys basketball coach

St. Charles East’s Dom Adduci looks for a shot during a game against visiting Batavia on Feb. 9 in St. Charles. their shooters to put the ball on the ground, and when they do attack, not being forced to over-help and leave shooters open. They do a great job of seeing where you’re helping from and then finding the open man and making the extra pass.” If the seeds hold Monday, parking figures to be at a premium Tuesday night. The semifinal doubleheader would

feature a pair of intra-city rivalry showdowns: Elgin-Larkin, followed by East-North. “I hope South Elgin has a lot of crowd control because it could be an exciting night, depending how Monday plays out, obviously,” Woods said. “There’s potential there for a great atmosphere for a semifinal. It’s got to be two of the best back-to-back games in the state, potentially.”

Saints forward David Mason said East is not overlooking the semifinal round but acknowledged it would be fun to have another chance at Larkin after the Royals thumped the Saints in Elgin when the Saints were struggling to acclimate to Stephens’ loss. “It just gives us a little motivation to show that we can play on the same court as them, and show that [the blowout] was a fluke, show that we can compete with them,” Mason said.

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Batavia cheerleading takes first at ICCA Rockford East invite

Umpires needed for spring/summer season The Wasco girls fastpitch softball team is now accepting applications for 10U and 12U umpires for the spring/summer season. Games start the first week of May and continue until end of June. Weekday games start at 6 p.m. and Saturdays have games all day. Umpires need to 14 years old. Free training provided. For more information and an application, please visit our website at www.wascofastpitch.com, and click on Documents tab.

Cougars’ 5K upcoming

Photo provided

The Batavia varsity cheerleading team placed first Jan. 13 in the ICCA Rockford East Cheer Invitational. The team as pictured: Jordon Gunderson, coach Melendes, Kelly Fessler, Mariah Harden, Jessica Pierce, Austin VanKempen, Lily Garcia, Steven Hansen, Meagan Zeddies, Amy Gladis, Shannon McGee, Katrina Grendzinski, coach Aidikonis, coach Anselme, Lexi Esch, Olivia Leiferman, Mattie DeSimone, Brittany Bakkum, Maddy Adamski, Sammi McCool, Vanessa Jerger, Ashley Taus, Decker Cunningham, Katie Cervantes and Jordan Fuqua.

competitive runners as well as recreational walkers. The first 300 registrants will receive a commemorative race drawstring bag along with a complimentary ticket voucher for a Cougars game this season. The top three male and female finishers in 14 age divisions will win a customized race medal with the Ozzie’s Home Run and Walk logo.

Area businesses interested in race sponsorship opportunities are encouraged to email ozzie@ kanecountycougars.com. Registration is $25 for adults and $12 for children ages 5 through 12. A portion of race proceeds will be donated to Ozzie’s Outreach, the Cougars’ charitable arm that gives back to various causes each year in the community.

8)?0 8+>.$0 9,-- ,<$60 54-,>@0 :' ;+,?,3 )3 ?+$ !"1% $>3' (>' ?, 3+>6$ -)!$/3 34$=)>- *,*$1?3 ()?+ !6)$1@3 >1@ !>*)-'& ;,3? ',"6 4)=3 ?,@>'& 277+6,1)=-$0=,*#*'4+,?,3

Equestrian event in Elburn today, Sunday This year, for its fourth year, novice and experienced horse riders will gather at the Bull Run Equestrian Center for its Annual Boot Camp, which will be today and Sunday, beginning at 9 a.m. both days. Bull Runs Annual Boot Camp is for those interested in learning or improving their jumping

skills. Lynda Zema, professional trainer and Bull Run’s manager, leads the sessions in both flat work – the non-jumping skills riders and horses need for competition – as well as jumping. Three sections offer all levels of instruction, and participants do not need to own horses to take part. See BULLETIN BOARD, page 30

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

The Kane County Cougars organization will host the 2nd annual Ozzie’s Home Run and Walk 5K at 8 a.m May 18. Registration is now open for the event through kccougars.com and racetime.info. The start and finish for the event will take place at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark on the Cougars’ field with the finish line at home plate. Participants will be seen on the stadium’s videoboard through a live-feed camera and entrants will also receive a high-five from Ozzie T. Cougar on the final stretch of the race. Other surprises that day include door prizes and raffles featuring ceremonial first pitches, suite giveaways and more. The race is open to

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SPORTS NEIGHBORS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

SPORTS NEIGHBORS BULLETIN BOARD


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

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SPORTS NEIGHBORS BULLETIN BOARD

Miller at Baseball Assistance Team Banquet

• BULLETIN BOARD Continued from page 29 Section 1 is a novice group, ideal for the green horse or a nervous rider. Section 2 is for more seasoned horses and riders who are looking to polish their skills. Section 3 is for horses and riders who demand a challenge and are ready to move up to a bigger jump. The first day of instruction will cover flat work and gymnastic work, and the second day will include additional flat work as well as course work. Each day will end with a question and answer session with Zema. The cost of the boot camp is $85 for one day or $165 for the weekend. A limited number of stalls will be available upon request for $35 a night or $65 for the weekend. In addition, a limited number of Bull Run’s horses are available for lease for $50 a day or $90 for the weekend. All riders are asked to wear breeches, boots and half chaps, as well as an ASTM-certified helmet. For more details and an application, participants can contact Bull Run at 630-365-1376.

Wasco baseball registration now open Registration for Wasco Baseball is now open. Wasco Baseball offers opportunities for players ages 5 to 8 as of April 30, 2012. The season begins in April and concludes in June with a league banquet/picnic at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark, home of the Kane County Cougars. Games are played at field locations in the Wasco/St. Charles area. Your baseball experience will include: players clinic, enhanced coaching clinics and the opportunity to participate in All Star events. Register online today at www. wascobaseball.com, and click the Register Online link in the left margin. Regular registration closes Sunday. Space is limited. For more information, contact the Director of Registration at registration@wascobaseball.

Photo provided

Bob Miller of St. Charles (right) joined Juan Marichal, formerly of the San Francisco Giants, at the annual Baseball Assistance Team Banquet at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City.

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weekendlife Kane County Chronicle • Saturday-Sunday, Feb. 23-24, 2013 • Page 31 • KCChronicle.com

Just one of those days Mid-week melodrama leaves one mom wishing for the weekend Wednesday was a crummy day. My friend Becky, who apparently thought so, too, summed it up perfectly: “OK, this day could just end now and we’d all be better for it.” No kidding. I couldn’t have said it any better, myself. In fact, by the time I collapsed into my recliner and spotted her post on Facebook, I’d had my fill. You know, “Check, please?” My Wednesday began with an awkward encounter with one of my offspring in our upstairs hallway. I may have been bleary-eyed but easily recognized the unmistakable shape of a cell-phone concealed in a T-shirt, being carried by said-offspring. (The rule in my house from the get-go has been that cell phones and other such devices are to be charged in my bedroom overnight, eliminating any natural temptation to text with friends all night long.) “Hand it over,” I said, yawning. I admired his effort but mostly resented the fact that I was being forced to dispense consequences before consuming tea or even peeing. It’s ridiculous, but I digress. “You’ll get it back tomorrow.” One helping of adolescent angst

TALES FROM THE MOTHERHOOD Jennifer DuBose later (stir in one perimenopausal mama for a truly memorable moment), and the day was off to a great start. Then I learned that Noah still hadn’t found his winter coat. Say, have any of you seen it? No, really. It’s a black Columbia, adult small. Gosh, and to think I was so pleased with that purchase. I hate shopping, but when I do, I bargain-hunt. I recall that I managed – between coupons and good timing – to snag it for about 50 percent off its original price. If you know what brand-named outerwear goes for, these days, you’ll understand why I did a jig over that one. And Noah conveniently lost it during a cold-snap. Shoot. Then, after school, just to spice things up, Holly surprised us all when she knocked her big brother to the living room floor. “Holly, why’d you do that?” I asked,

trying to keep a straight face. Usually it’s Noah I’m lecturing, about wrestling a little too enthusiastically with her. He was laughing, too. “I wanted to say goodbye to Posey (our cat) before soccer practice but Noah wouldn’t let me near him so I grabbed him by the shoulders and pulled him off,” she said, shrugging and wincing. Nice. When I returned to the kitchen to finish washing the dinner dishes after sorting out the ruckus in the living room, I glanced outside at the our toddler-esque big-red-dog, Jake, and found him curiously licking the metal railing by the back door. Seriously? It was a mere 10 degrees, 10 below zero with the wind-chill. Jake’s as sweet as he can be, but he possesses about as much sense as young Flick – a friend of Ralphie’s who famously got his tongue stuck to a metal flagpole one bitterly cold day in “A Christmas Story.” For example, last Wednesday he puked something red and scary (on the living room carpet, of course). Upon closer inspection, I discovered it wasn’t blood, just the lower part of his once dashing red bandanna, which,

apparently, he’d chewed off and swallowed. Seems we failed to entertain him and he took it out on his bandanna. The proof was in the pudding, as they say. Not to be outdone, Posey puked on the runner in the kitchen immediately after I hauled Jake back inside. “Make it stop!” I thought. I couldn’t help but laugh as I watched him zip out of the kitchen like a hit-and-run driver. Nothing tragic happened on this day, of course, but it did remind me of one of my favorite picture books, Judith Viorst’s “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.” Yeah, some days are like that. Here’s hoping, dear Becky, that next Wednesday is better for both of us. Update: Found, one winter coat, by Noah’s soccer teammate who discovered that it had accidentally been placed (by Noah) in his soccer bag. Yay!

• Jennifer DuBose lives in Batavia with her husband, Todd, and their two children, Noah and Holly. Contact her at jenniferdubose@msn.com.

Kiss the Sky Records to host all-female songwriter showcase Sunday KANE COUNTY CHRONICLE spark@kcchronicle.com BATAVIA – Kiss the Sky Records in downtown Batavia will host an all-female songwriter night Sunday, Feb. 24. Local singer-songwriter Andrea Dawn will perform, and the concert will also feature Chicago songstress Ami Saraiya and local duo Limerance. The event will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. and will include a short intermission. Tickets cost $5 and can be purchased either in advance

at the store or by calling 630406-0086. The show will include hors d’oeuvres. BATV will film the show, which will streamed online. Dawn is performing after having recently released her new record “Theories of How We Can Be Friends.” Last summer, Dawn and her band did a 12-date U.S. tour traveling to cities such as Boston, New York City and San Diego. Dawn’s new album was ranked in the Top 100 albums of November for KALX Berke-

ley, Calif. For more information about the show at Kiss the Sky, 180 W. First St., Batavia, contact Steve at skykiss@sbcglobal. net.

About Andrea Dawn After being classically trained in piano and voice, Andrea was inspired by female songwriters of the mid’90s (Jewel, Sarah McLachlan, Alanis Morissette, and Fiona Apple) and began writing her own songs at age 10. Since then, she has played across Chicago and the U.S.

Andrea Dawn reverbnation.com photo


Bull Run to host equestrian boot camp

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

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WEEKEND LIFE BRIEFS Auditions Saturday for Steel Beam play

morgueFile photo

The Bull Run Equestrian Center in Elburn will host its fourth annual Boot Camp for novice and experienced horse riders to learn or improve their jumping skills from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, and Sunday, Feb. 24, at the center, 3N065 Anderson Road, Elburn. Lynda Zema, professional trainer and Bull Run’s manager, will lead the sessions. For more information, call 630-365-1376.

ST. CHARLES – Auditions for children ages 9 to 16 are set for the Steel Beam Theatre production of “Princess and the Moon.” Children are invited to audition for director Daina Giesler and will be seen on a first-come basis from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at the theater, 111 W. Main St., St. Charles. Beginners are welcome, but those with theater experience should bring a resume or a list of acting and performing experience along with a photo (a school picture or snapshot is acceptable). No preparation is needed. Those who audition will read from the script. Performances will take place Saturdays and Sundays from April 7 to 28. It is a tuition-based program ($295), which

includes two free tickets, script, costume, T-shirt and pizza lunch on the final day of rehearsal. For information, visit www.SteelBeamTheatre. com or call 630-587-8521.

‘Predict the Oscars’ contest ends Saturday ST. CHARLES – Ballot entries for the Classic Cinemas “Predict the Oscars” contest ends by end of the day, Saturday, Feb. 23. Patrons can complete and deposit their ballots in the lobby of any of the 13 Classic Cinemas theaters, including the Charlestowne 18, 3740 E. Main St., St. Charles. Entrants must be at least 16 years old. The contest rules appear on the back of ballots and are posted in theater lobbies. The grand prize winner will receive free movies for two for an entire year at any

Classic Cinemas theater location, along with a gift card valued at $200, good at any Chicago area Francesca’s restaurant. Each Classic Cinemas location will select one correct ballot for entry in the grand prize drawing.

Coffee jam, open mic event set for Saturday BATAVIA – A coffee jam and open mike event is set from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at Unity of Fox Valley, 213 Webster St., Batavia. The variety show includes pop rock, jazz, classical and contemporary presentations. There is no admission (donations of $10 will be appreciated) and refreshments are available. Those who sing, dance or play a musical instrument can call 630-879-1115. For information, visit www.unityoffoxvalley.org.

Open House to be held on Sunday, February 24th from 2-4 PM! Registration for Geneva Commons drawing during the event.

62 E. Abe, Plano This Art’s & Crafts period correct restored home located at 62 E. Abe Street is stunning in every detail all set on a half acre lot. Over 4, 60 sf of 3 story fully restored elegance. Original hardwood trim including walnut in dining room, birch in kitchen with 27 feet of counters-incredible floor plan perfect for entertaining. Live like royalty! Balcony’s, French doors, gardens, pond, private large lot. 2 story garage with office. Meticulously maintained! This home is offered at $400,000. All are welcome to come and enjoy this open house - questions please call Jeff Houtkooper at 630.803.0820 or email jeff@foxvalleyarea.com

JEFF HOUTKOOPER PRUDENTIAL STARCK REALTORS

For more information on this home: www.expertre.com/Listing/VirtualTour.ashx?ListingID=62370949

Both of these homes are seminal architectural homes. The chance to tour each of these homes in a single afternoon is a chance to not miss!

The

GRAND REOPENING!

Homestead here the past and present mingle for a moment.

“The Homestead” Bed and Breakfast is holding a Wedding Event Open House on Sunday, February 24th from 2-4 pm at 6 E. Main Street, Plano. lease note registration is required for the wedding event. To register please call 630.552.4322 or email marykay@thehomesteadbnd.com

For more information on the Bed and Breakfast Open House: www.thehomesteadbnb.com


33

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SAVEYOUR LIFE!TELLYOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS Get colon cancer screening. Beatable, Treatable, Preventable in most situations. S. from Geneva. “I am glad I had my colonoscopy done at the American Colonoscopy and Endoscopy center. I had some polyps removed and that will likely prevent a cancer. The facility was wonderful and it saved me money.”

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• Saturday, February 23, 2013

TARUN MULLICK M.D. Call today to make your appointment Geneva/Elgin 630-232-2025 or Sycamore 815-895-5252

| Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

LOSE WEIGHT NOW!


TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

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George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), composer; W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963), author/activist; Peter Fonda (1940), actor; Emily Blunt (1983), actress; Dakota Fanning (1994), actress. – United Feature Syndicate

HOROSCOPE By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association TODAY – You might have to shoulder more responsibilities in the year ahead than what you’re accustomed to handling, but don’t be dismayed – with enhanced duties come greater rewards. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – If you have a bad attitude, unplanned developments could become overwhelming. Try to roll with the punches and hope for the best. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – There is a strong chance that you could run into one of your least favorite people at a social gathering. If you allow your dislike to surface, the event is likely to lose its luster. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – A disagreement between you and your mate could turn into something serious if neither one of you shows a willingness to compromise. Be the one who offers the olive branch. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – Criticism of someone’s work will not necessarily help enhance his or her performance. To encourage this person, your comments must be constructive and positive. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – If you haven’t been too good about managing your money lately, you won’t have the funds you need to do or buy that something you want. Plan better for the future. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Any restrictions to which you might be subjected are not likely to be the fault of others, but will be a product of your own mismanagement. Be careful where you point the finger of blame. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – If you’re too self-involved, your efforts aren’t likely to bring you much satisfaction today. This malady can easily be cured, however, by putting the needs of others ahead of your own. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Allowing friends to pressure you into spending more money than necessary could cause you to resent them instead of yourself. You must be the one who has the willpower to abstain. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Because you’re likely to do everything the hard way, you may not be able to achieve all of your objectives. Try to use your time wisely. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Guard against a tendency to anticipate negative outcomes. If you think you might fail, you’ll make sure to find a way to prove yourself right. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Do not allow yourself to get into a situation that would put you in a bad financial position with another. Don’t start borrowing from friends if you’ll have trouble paying them back. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Be careful, because your colleagues could have a stronger influence over your doings than you’d like. Their aims might not be in harmony with yours.

Life in Stephenie Meyer’s world By MONICA HESSE The Washington Post Stephenie Meyer, the author of the “Twilight” series and “The Host,” was in Washington for approximately 19 hours this week promoting “The Host” film, which will premiere next month. A collection of scenes, observations and stray meditations marking the occasion: 1. What must it feel like to be Stephenie Meyer? Today, people have driven multi-hour radii – Buffalo, Richmond – to be in her presence. They arrive at 8:45 p.m. the night before the Thursday book signing, and they sleep in pastel comforters outside the Politics & Prose bookstore in Northwest Washington to ensure admission. What must it feel like to be on the sponge end of that much devotion? How many pounds of worship can one human body withstand before collapsing under the fervent, pawing weight? 2. Does it feel like an endless stream of sitting? Is that what it feels like to be her? She sits for a sneak-preview screening of “The Host” at the AMC Loews in Washington’s Georgetown neighborhood, and the next morning she sits in a Ritz-Carlton hotel room undergoing a steady drip of journalists, and then she sits at the book signing at Politics & Prose, where attendees are limited to two autographs at a time, but then loop through the line again and again and again. “It’s always interesting, the relationship between reader and writer,” she says at the hotel. “I spend a year working on a novel and another year editing it. They spend one day reading it, and they’re ready for more.” 3. At some point in the past five years, her hair got really good. Stunningly, shinily good. What is in her conditioner? Avocado? Also her skin. Up close and personal, it looks like the texture of semigloss paint. 4. This new movie, “The Host.” Is it good? It’s about a woman named Melanie, one of the last “wild humans” in a future society in which most people’s bodies have been taken over by an alien species. When Melanie also succumbs, she must fight for control over her own person and future. It stars Saoirse Ronan, with several achingly pretty boys –

Photo by Gage Skidmore

Stephenie Meyer speaks at the 2012 ComicCon in San Diego. two of whom have come to Washington with Meyer, and one of whom is Jeremy Irons’ son. It’s beautifully filmed, and infinitely more adult and more complex than any of the “Twilight” stories. At the screening, people want to talk about the “Twilight” stories. Is she ever going to finish “Midnight Sun,” the “Twilight” companion novel that she abandoned after it was accidentally leaked to the public in 2008? Everrrr? 5. Her fans are so pure. When she walks in a room, the fans go – oh, you already know what they go. Everybody already knows what happens at a Stephenie Meyer appearance. The fans go “Eeee!” or “Squeee!” or “Bleeee!”; the fans burst into tears and explain their obsessive love for “Twilight.” Sometimes a journalist who brags that he’s too smart for “Twilight” (even though he’s never read it) parachutes in to write a scene story about these women, and they open up their hopeful hearts because maybe this time he won’t make them look crazy. He always makes them look crazy. “I do a lot of deep breathing,” Meyer says. This is how she adjusts to the decibel level of a public appearance. She’s grown more used to it now. The public appearances used to make her nervous.

She used to pep-talk herself: “I am going to live through this. Nobody is going to kill you today.” 6. Does she realize how polarizing she is? Does she realize that her fans’ love for her work is equally balanced out by – “This passionate hatred that it spawns?” she suggests, in the Georgetown hotel room. She laughs. 7. Stephenie Meyer: “I don’t really consider myself much of a writer. I consider myself a storyteller ... . I can definitely agree with the critics, because I see all the flaws” in the stories. She wakes up in the middle of the night, agonizing over the word choices that are too late to change. To her critics, “I just want to say, trust me, guys. I know.” Nobody ever assumes that Stephenie Meyer knows. There’s a viciousness when her work is discussed in literary circles. A dismissive sneer, as though her books cannot be taken seriously simply because people enjoy reading them too much. An impulse to write rambling, blistering blog posts about her use of descriptive speech tags (She glowered). She is a victim of an interesting dichotomy. Her fans will always believe she can do no wrong. Her critics will always believe she can do no right. The truth must lie somewhere in between, but nobody wants to think seriously about Stephenie Meyer as a writer. It makes one feel indignant on her behalf. 8. But then, why would we ever feel sorry for someone whose net worth has been estimated at $170 million? 9. Really, will she ever write “Midnight Sun”? 10. How is the future going to look at Stephenie Meyer? The future, which seems increasingly incapable of viewing entertainment as just entertainment. Everything must be allegorical. Everything must be about chastity (“Eclipse?”) or abortion (“Breaking Dawn?”). Every book must be dissected until there is nothing left, nothing but valiant, bullied speech tags. 11. “There is a value in writing things that people just enjoy,” she says. “I don’t know what movie won the Oscar the year that ‘Star Wars’ came out, and I probably haven’t seen it. But ‘Star Wars’ has affected culture around the world. There is power in the masses, and in joy for enjoyment’s sake.”


DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips parents raised THEM and overreact when their children make mistakes. Because you haven’t been able to get through to your father, talk to a trusted adult relative about the fact that you would like to be closer to your parents but don’t know how. If they hear it from another adult, they might be more open to the message. Dear Abby: I am a 26-year-old mother of a 13-month-old daughter, “Lissa.” I am a “by-the-book” mom. I’m still breastfeeding and I am strict about what I allow my daughter to eat. She has just barely started to eat table food. I don’t want my child to have bad eating habits, so I try to give her only healthy items at dinnertime. Her dad, on the other hand, thinks it’s funny to give her junk, including sugar. I have told him I don’t like it,

but he doesn’t understand that I want to teach her good eating habits. Am I wrong in trying so hard? Or should I just give up and let her eat junk? – Trying My Best in California Dear Trying: Parenting is supposed to be a team sport and I’m more concerned about the fact that Lissa’s dad is undercutting you than what’s going into her mouth right now. You may need an impartial mediator to get through to Lissa’s father, and the perfect person to do that is your child’s pediatrician. Let the doctor tell Daddy that the more she is given sweets, the more she’ll crave them. The only thing about your approach that might be of concern to me is your calling yourself a “by-the-book” mother. A conscientious parent not only goes by the book and is consistent, but she also uses her head and listens to her heart. • Write Dear Abby at www. dearabby.com.

Red yeast rice is unregulated, little studied Dear Doctor K: My last two blood tests showed that my cholesterol is too high. My doctor wants me to take a statin drug, but I’d rather use a natural remedy. I saw an ad for red yeast rice that says it’s as effective as statins. What do you think? Dear Reader: “All-natural” products have an obvious appeal. “Natural” chemicals have been on earth for as long as we have – in fact, much longer. It seems logical that since we have coexisted forever that we should tolerate natural chemicals better than those humans have created in just the past century or so. Most pharmaceuticals fall into that category. Many of my patients think that if God put a chemical in our environment, it must be safe. But if clever humans put it there – maybe it’s dangerous. Maybe we’re not as clever as we think. It surely is true that most of the “unnatural” drugs created by humans can have side effects along with their benefits. But it also is true that many “natural” chemicals in our environment – such as arsenic – can be toxic. Red yeast rice is an example of a natural treatment that can have benefits ... and risks. It is formed

ASK DOCTOR K Anthony L. Komaroff by a chemical reaction between rice and a particular type of yeast. The reaction produces a family of chemicals called monacolins, which lower cholesterol by inhibiting the liver enzyme HMG-CoA reductase. That’s exactly what the cholesterol medicines, statins, do. Red yeast rice does, indeed, lower blood cholesterol levels. But it also could produce the same side effects as the statin drugs, including muscle damage and liver inflammation. Given that you need a statin to reduce your cholesterol and cardiac risk, should you get it from red yeast rice or a prescription medication? In my view, the answer is clear: Use a prescription statin. Because red yeast rice is sold as a dietary supplement, the FDA does not regulate how it is manufactured. No one besides the manufacturer is assuring that it is free of dangerous impurities that could lead to serious health problems. In addition, the monacolin content can vary from brand

to brand and batch to batch of red yeast rice. So, unlike a statin pill, you may be underdosing or overdosing – and you won’t know which. Either could adversely affect your health. Maybe more important, there are few scientific studies of the possible benefits and side effects of red yeast rice. Statins have been carefully studied in hundreds of thousands of people over many years. We have solid scientific evidence of their benefit, and a solid idea of how often they produce side effects. We just don’t have any such evidence with red yeast rice. And if cost is on your mind, consider this: Many insurance plans cover statins. I’m not against natural remedies; I’m against any type of treatment – natural or unnatural – that has not been scientifically validated. In the case of cholesterol, there are several natural remedies that have been solidly validated: diet, exercise and weight control.

• Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to send questions and get additional information.

Dr. Wallace: My mother has always thought of me as the perfect daughter. I get excellent grades and I’m the junior class secretary. My mother is a perfectionist, and she expects me to be the same. She constantly tells me that she has big plans for me to eventually join my father’s law firm. I’m blessed that my parents do not have financial problems. My mother doesn’t work and spends a lot of time attending club meetings. My parents belong to the country club, and I’m always introduced to other members, and my mother brags about me, which causes me some embarrassment. My mother always tells me that I am the love of her life, but I’m not so sure. When I do good, I get praise; if I win an award, I get special praise, but when I fumble, my mother throws a tantrum. Last week, my boyfriend and I split up because he wanted to date other girls. I could accept this, but it caused me to be distressed. The following day, I had a test in chemistry and got a C on the test. I’m getting an A in this class, but I just didn’t do well on the test because my mind was somewhere else. My mother was upset and said that I am letting my grades slip because of a “stupid” boy. My mother saw my test score because I must bring my tests home for my mother to evaluate. What upset her was the remark by the teacher that read: “This is unusual for you. I noticed that you

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace didn’t seem to be concentrating on this test. See me after class.” I did and explained what happened, and the teacher said for me not to worry because he was grading all the students’ papers as a quiz rather than an examination. I told this to my mother, but it didn’t matter. Please tell me what I can do to get my mother to accept me as I am, not what she wants me to be? – Nameless, Peoria, Ill. Dear Nameless: A parent must convey love to a teenager and be supportive in the good times, as well as the not so good times. A mother’s love must be unconditional all the time. But she must not live her life through that of her daughter. If you plan on being an attorney, that’s wonderful. But if you plan on being a teacher, a doctor, a writer or work in a health spa, that’s also wonderful. Regardless of your choice, your mother should be 100 percent supportive. She has made choices to do what she wanted; now it will soon be your turn to choose. Continue to do your very best in all your endeavors. In time, your mom will support you in the path you choose, but the main person you must please is yourself. Doing your very best will give you a great feeling of satisfaction. • Write Dr. Wallace at rwallace@galesburg. net.

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• Saturday, February 23, 2013

Dear Abby: I’m a 15-year-old student who reads your column every day, and I hope you can help me. I want to be closer to my parents. They yell at my siblings and me and call us names. It hurts me very much. If we make a mistake – even a little one – or forget our chores, we can expect to be insulted and yelled at. Years ago, I decided to talk to them about it, but that was seen as an act of defiance. My parents, especially my father, can’t take constructive criticism and respond with more yelling. Each of our arguments leaves me upset for days. Please, Abby, I don’t know what to do. Thank you for taking the time to read my letter. – Hopeful in New York Dear Hopeful: You have my sympathy. Harsh words can leave wounds that last longer than physical bruises. Some parents develop hair-trigger tempers when they are under financial pressure. Others, without realizing it, model their behavior on the way their

Mother should show love regardless of teen’s success

ADVICE | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

Parents’ anger keeps teen at a distance


Arlo & Janis

Garfield

Big Nate

Get Fuzzy is on vacation. Please enjoy this strip from Jan. 1, 2011.

Crankshaft

The Pajama Diaries

Stone Soup

Pearls Before Swine

Dilbert

Rose Is Rose

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, February 23, 2013

| COMICS

36


Beetle Bailey

37

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VISIT US ONLINE AT:

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Home Appliance Showroom ST. CHARLES LOCATION ONLY! 2716 E. Main Street (Next to Butera)

630-377-0088

• Saturday, February 23, 2013

10

%

COMICS | Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com

ONLY R E B M E M


CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

BRIDGE by Phillip Alder

Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| PUZZLES

38

An odds-against play works occasionally

CELEBRITY CIPHER

Carl Hiaasen, a columnist and novelist, said: “My books are shelved in different places, depending on the bookstore. Sometimes they can be found in the mystery section, sometimes in the humor department, and occasionally even in the literature aisle, which is somewhat astounding.” At the bridge table, we try to find lines of play or defense that are favorites to succeed. We accommodate likely distributions. However, occasionally we must allow for an unlikely scenario to maximize our chances. In this example, South is in three no-trump. West leads the heart queen. What is the best defense? How should South then try to make his contract? First, East must overtake with his heart king at trick one. South will duck, hoping the king is a singleton, but East returns his second heart. Let’s assume declarer plays low again. West wins and leads a third heart, East discarding a spade. South starts with seven top tricks: three spades, one heart, two diamonds and one club. The other two winners obviously will come from the club suit. But if West gets on play with the club king, he will cash his last two hearts to defeat the contract. Declarer must work to keep West off the lead. After winning the third trick, South should play a spade to the board, then lead the club queen, encouraging East to cover if he has the king. But when East plays low, South should put up his ace. If the king does not fall, declarer leads another club, hoping East has to take the trick. Here, though, the king tumbles (a priori, 6.22 percent) and declarer claims 11 tricks.


Saturday February 23, 2013

“Vail, Colorado” Photo By: Tom

Upload your photos on My Photos – Kane County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Kane County Chronicle Classified. Go to KCChronicle.com/myphotos

PART TIME POSITION AS ELDERLY COMPANION. 15 hrs. per week. References. Call Helene 630-263-3132

BATAVIA DAYCARE Near Butterfield and Kirk. FT/PT, M-F. CPR cert, former pre-school teacher. Fran 630-440-2017

CAN'T GET ENOUGH BEARS NEWS?

Driver

CARRIER ROUTES AVAILABLE IN KANE COUNTY Early morning delivery 5 days per week. No delivery on Sunday and Monday. Must sign a contract and have valid license and insurance.

Call 630-443-3607 PRODUCTION Wholesale greenhouse seeking energetic, assertive, organized person to work in production. Will provide training. Valid driver's license a plus. Call 630-365-6244

RN Part-time Provide medication training & supervision to direct care staff. Monitor health of adults with developmental disabilities & complete nursing documents in accordance with State regulations. 26 hrs/wk, which includes oncall. Min. 2 yrs RN experience. MS Office skills required. Apply on our website, www.ohinc.org or in-person at

Opportunity House, 202 Lucas St., Sycamore, IL, 815-895-5108 EOE

LPN INTAKE COORD. (FT) St Charles Lic LPN for intake, sched and coord of patient care. Need computer skills & exp. w/ elect med records. CPR, 1-2 yrs acute care exp in institutional setting, 2 yrs home health or med office exp a plus.

CovenantCare at Home

Call 630-845-0680 or apply online www.covenantcareathome.org/ employment

Get Bears news on Twitter by following @bears_insider

Receiving Assets Per A Q.D.R.O. Make sure you structure the assets properly. Call TRINITY FINANCIAL 815-288-5800 Or e-mail amber@trinityifs.com To schedule a free consultation

REPORTER

LOST: Shih-Tzu. White-ish Tan, Male lost 2/13 Sugar Grove Windstone Subdiv/Bliss Woods Subdiv. Last spotted near Jewel in Sugar Grove. Responds to Ziggy. If spotted, please call: 630-466-0155

Batavia Estate Sale 730 McKee St.

Friday 9-3 Saturday 9-3 #'s @ 8:30 Antiques, Furniture, Household Gentry Estate Sales Pictures @ estatesales.net

HUNTLEY 2 ESTATE SALES IN HUNTLEY! Fri-Sat 2/22 & 23 10-4

*Public Consignment*

Auction Antiques, Collectables, Art & Much More

13812 Burham 13337 Bittersweet

Sale is in Del Webb. No signs are permitted. Please use GPS. See Pics & Details at www.somethingspecial estatesales.com

DEKALB The Daily Chronicle, a 9,000 circulation six-day a week newspaper owned by Shaw Media that covers DeKalb County, is looking for a reporter to join our team as we forge ahead with the practice of 21st century journalism. The Daily Chronicle is an award-winning newspaper that tries to serve its community and do more than some might expect from a publication its size. DeKalb is about an hour west of Chicago, and is home to Northern Illinois University. We're seeking a person who understands that today's reporters cover stories and connect with their audience through more than just the written word. This reporter will be comfortable if they are asked to shoot video or still photos from a scene. The successful candidate will also understand and embrace the idea that newspapers are part of the 24hour news cycle. Ideal candidates will be willing to take on a broad range of assignments, from spot news and government meeting coverage to features, and must tell stories that show readers how the events and people are relevant to their lives. Our reporters are expected to generate their own story ideas and develop sources on their beat, as well as take assignments from the news editor. At least one year of professional experience preferred, but recent graduates with outstanding internship experience are encouraged to apply. Solid knowledge of AP Style and grammar required, as is ability to write clear, concise copy. Must have a valid drivers license, dependable transportation and proof of insurance. Experience with the Web and multimedia is a plus. Shaw Media offers a competitive salary, a comprehensive benefit package.

Interested candidates are invited to send their resume with six clips to: EditorialRecruitment@shawmedia.com or Apply now at: www.shawsuburbanmedia.com/careers Shaw Media is a Drug Free Employer. Pre-employment background check and drug screen required. This posting may not include all duties of position. EOE.

Exercise “Twister” w/folding handlebars $12.00 331-442-2146 Work Out Strider – Sharper Image Monitor – Used 20hrs – Brand New Look – Paid $200 (folds under bed) $100 630-217-2578

Items featured in this auction include . . . Baby doll crib, midcentury high chair, opera glasses, vintage dresser, baby buggy, vintage micro scope, Victor Victrola talking machine with records and additional collectables, china cabinet, Wind maker grain separator, McCaskey account register cabinet, Kodak film co. wooden box, Michael Andretti sign, Christian Fittipaldi sign, C. Carson prints, Turner Swan print in mirror Couture posters, Large framed World map, H. Hargrove print, P-51 Mustang R.C. plane, Helicopter remote control models, Hemi Model engine 1/4 scale, Tinker Toys, slide projector, amber refrigerator dish, misc. toys, 45rpm records, Nikolai Vodka display, HO train tracks and transformer. . . plus many more items to come.

Check out full listing and pictures on www.auctionzip.com I.D. #23035

February 23rd 2013 5:00 pm-ish sharp Location: 2S101 Harter Rd Kaneville, IL 60144

Dryer. Maytag Atlantis. Oversize cap. Intellidry. 240v. Gas. $198 OBO.630-277-1602 Dryer. Maytag. Gas. White. Great condition. $299. 630-973-3528 Stove – Roper – Gas – 30” w/Connector – Good Condition $75 630-208-0073 PM

Amish Quilt Stands. New! Oak. Shelves, Accent Tables & Kitchen Items. Priced to sell, $10-$80. 847-464-5492 ARMOIR / TV CABINET– FRENCH PROVINCIAL by Tom Price. 22” x 42” x 82”. Very good cond. Originally $2400 asking $299. 630-587-8388 Cabinet: wood, 36”Wx70”Hx32”D good condition, light knotty pine 331-442-2146 Desk: Roll Top, oak, $250 331-442-2146 Dining Table – Double Pedestal American Drew – Cherry – 42”x66 Plus 2 16” Leaves – 5 Queen Ann Side Chairs /1 Arm Chair $350 630-845-4797 Evenings

For handicap access, 12'Lx3'W. $25/ea. 331-442-2146

CUISINART

Scooters – 2 – Razor E 100 Electric – Need repair -$20 For Both 630-710-7651

(Werdin Community Center)

Cartop Carrier

No Bidder's Premium FREE beginners auction class at 4:30pm Auctioneer: R. Kyle Reed, St. Charles, IL LIC# 441.001706 Reed's General Merchandise Wake up with Kane County Chronicle 5 days a week. For Home Delivery, call 800-589-9363

Thule, 24”, $75. 630-337-2242

SPEAKERS (30)

Various brands and sizes, $5/ea. 331-442-2146

EXERCISE BIKE Health Rider, $60. 630-377-2242 Check us out online

www.KCChronicle.com

Vehicles; Trucks; Trailers; Tractors; Snow Blowers; Golf Carts; ATV's; Motorcycles; Mowers & Landscape Equip.; Tools; Boats; Bikes; Computers; Coins; Guns; Jewelry; Misc

www.ObenaufAuctions OnLine.com

847-489-1820 2 - COMMERCIAL BUILDING AUCTIONS THE FOLLOWING BUILDINGS KNOWN AS THE DEKALB CLINIC AND PARKING LOTS WILL BE OFFERED FOR AUCTION ON SITE LOCATED AT 217 FRANKLIN STREET AND 302 GROVE STREET, DEKALB, ILLINOIS. WATCH FOR ALMBURG AUCTION SIGNS.

THURSDAY MARCH 21ST 11:00 A.M. * 2 PARCELS WITH PARKING LOTS *

Writing Desk – Teakwood – Modern Style – Exc. Cond. - 4 Drawers 52”x23” Must See! $50 obo 630-406-9413

DLC7 PRO, needs bowl. Includes Washer & Gas Dryer. Kenmore all accessories. Strong Motor $35 Elite, white, works perfect. King size 630-710-7651 cap+. Top loader. $750/both. Custom Drapery. Off white sheer. 847-830-9725 Perfect cond, to fit picture window. 80X60” $100 OBO. 630-406-8676 Crock: “Western” 8 gal., good cond. $50 630-232-0183 Radial Arm Saw ~ Craftsman NIGHT STAND – Flowered Frosted 2.5HP, good working condition! Mirrored Glass Night Stand. $100 331-442-2146 Single drawer & 2 front doors. Saw – Skil – 6½ Worm Drive 27 1/2” h x 22” w x 16” d. $145. Model 367 $100 847-515-8012 Huntley area 630-740-0641 9am-5pm Saw: 5 ft., 2 man saw, good man cave wall hanger $25 630-232-0183

WOOD RAMPS (2)

OnLine Auctions Everyday

DEER ANTLER RACK – 10 POINT $75. 847-515-8012 Huntley area Floor Mat – Industrial 1½“ Thicl - 4'x6' $45 630-710-7651 Rug Hooking Supplies – 2 Cutters (Very Sharp) – Burlap – 2 Hooks Lots Of Wool $299 All 630-710-7651

THESE 2 BUILDINGS WERE IN THE DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS OF THE DEKALB CLINIC, THE MAIN CLINIC LOCATED AT 217 FRANKLIN ST IS ZONED CENTRAL; BUSINESS DISTRICT AND HAS 36,150 SQ.FT. THE BUILDING HAS A BASEMENT AND FULLY FUNCTIONING UTILITY’S WITH CITY WATER, SEWER AND 3PH ELECTRIC. THE BUILDING IS FULLY COMPLIANT FOR THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITY’S ACT AND HAS 3 PARKING LOTS. THE SOUTH LOT HOLDS 32 CARS AND MEASURES 66X156. THE NORTH LOT HOLDS 27 CARS AND IS 66X165. THE EAST LOT HOLDS 20 CARS. THE BUILDING HAS BEEN MAINTAINED AND IS FULLY OPERATIONAL. CALL AUCTIONEERS FOR A DETAILED SHOWING AND INSPECTION OF THIS 36,000SQ.FT FACILITY. THE EAST CLINIC BUILDING IS LOCATED AT 302 GROVE ST. AND IS 14,285 SQ.FT. WITH A PARTIAL UNFINISHED BASEMENT. THE ROOF IS IN NEED OF SOME REPAIR AS SOME LEAKING IS OCCURRING. THE BUILDING IS FULLY FUNCTIONAL AND HAS BEEN MAINTAINED SINCE THE MOVE OUT THIS BUILDING HAS A LARGE 80+ CAR PARKING LOT. THE BUILDING IS ALSO IN THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT WITH FULL CITY WATER, SEWER AND 3PH ELECTRIC. CALL AUCTIONEERS FOR A DETAILED SHOWING AND INSPECTION OF THE BUILDING. DOWNTOWN PROPERTIES OF THIS SIZE AND WITH PARKING LOTS DON’T COME ALONG VERY OFTEN. NOW IS THE TIME TO INVEST IN REAL ESTATE! TALK TO YOUR LENDER TODAY, COME WITH A VISION TO SEE WHAT YOU CAN DO WITH A PROPERTY LIKE THIS AND BID YOUR PRICE AT AUCTION! TERMS FOR AUCTION: $10,000.00 DOWN ON AUCTION DAY. BALANCE DUE ON APRIL 15TH 2013. A 10% BUYERS PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO THE FINAL BID TO DETERMINE THE FINAL CONTRACT PRICE. AUCTIONEERS WILL GLADLY COOPERATE WITH OTHER REAL ESTATE OFFICES OR BROKERS IF YOU REGISTER ANY BIDDER BEFORE THE AUCTION OR ON AUCTION DAY. PROPERTY BEING OFFERED AS-IS, WITH OUT ANY CONTINGENCIES TO FINANCING, APPRAISAL OR ANY OTHER TYPE OF CONTINGENCIES. SELLERS WILL PAY FOR DEED PREPARATION AND TITLE COMMITMENT FOR SELLERS. TAXES ARE TO BE PRO-RATED TO CLOSING DATE. ANNOUNCEMENTS MADE AUCTION DAY TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER ALL OTHER.

DEKALB CLINIC CHARTERED, OWNER KEITH FOSTER, ATTORNEY STEVE.ALMBURG@GMAIL.COM OR CALL 815-739-3703 TO SET UP VIEWING All our auctions with pictures are advertised worldwide @ www.almburgauctions.com

ppraisals Real Estate Liquidators 8 5-825-2727 Malta, IL


CLASSIFIED

Page 40 • Saturday, February 23, 2013

JUST ANIMALS LOW COST VACCINE CLINICS Sunday March 3rd 11am-3pm TRELLIS FARM AND GARDEN St. Charles, IL Cat & Dog Exams $10 Most Vaccines $12 Heartworm Tests & Microchips $20 By Appointment Only 815-830-6568 www.justanimals.org Pet Cage – For Med Size Pet Very Good Condition $35 630-710-7651

SWEET TIGER STRIPED TABBY CAT I am about 7 years old, female, I am a tiger striped tabby black & grey, I have had all my shots and I am spayed. I am very sweet and sociable with other cats and dogs. I am also polydactyl and boy am I cute! My owner passed away and I am looking for a new home. I am $20.00 please call my friend Susan 630 212-9550 for more info.

Bowling Ball – Ebonite 14lb – Drilled For Child Fingers – Exc. Cond. - Can Be Refitted - $20 630-710-7651

Loading Ramps – 2 – Heavy Gage Steel – For Pick Up Or Van – Great For Lawn Mower Or ATV $50 630-710-7651

A-1 AUTO

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs 1990 & Newer Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

Will BUY UR USED CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

MOST CASH WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 NO TITLE...... NO PROBLEM 815-575-5153

$$ WANTED $$ Cars, Trucks & Vans $500 Cash. Free Towing. 815-739-9221

815-814-1224

Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527 Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up? Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

$2500/obo

Beautiful New and Pre-Owned Homes Available. Starting at $1000. 2 or 3 Bedrooms Immediate Occupancy Edgebrook Community 1801 DeKalb Ave Sycamore, Il 815-895-9144

.

847-529-2693

Kane County Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

Have a photo you'd like to share? Upload it to our online photo album at KCChronicle.com/MyPhotos

FREE Money!

FREE Classified Ad! Sell any household item priced under $400. or use this handy form.

GENEVA NE corner Keslinger & Brundige. 1 - 25 acres of land, mixed use business park. Ready for immediate development, flexible lot sizes. Aggressive pricing. Located just West of Randall Rd.

Call Mike @ 630-776-0068

BATAVIA 1 BR starting at $760 2 BR starting at $950 3 BR TH starting at $1255

630-879-8300 VIEW APARTMENTS GENEVA 2300 GARY LN. 1 COUNTRY & 2 bd apts available. $550Cash flowing real estate investment $625 Clean Quiet country setting, opportunity.100% leased industrial close to downtown Genoa. Lots of property on 4.2 acres just East updates. Call 815-784-4606 of Randall Rd. Over $1 Million Kaneville: 2 BR, 1st floor, car port, of improvement to building for tenant. Long term triple net lease. $700/mo, Avail. March 1st. Only pay electric, Call Mike @ 630-776-0068 630-232-7411

PEPPER VALLEY APARTMENTS 2 BDRM ~ 2 BATH $1020 - $1030

Professional, full service, residential, commercial OREO property man- Fireplace, heat, gas, water incl. agement at reasonable rates. Our A/C, D/W, disposal, microwave, services often pay for themselves blinds, patios, clubhouse, pool. and always remove the burden of Garages available, small pets OK. day to day issues.

!!!!!!!!!!!

2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee $8300. 847-479-0016

Paying Top Dollars For Your Manufactured Home Call Immediately 847-321-1674

Visit KCChronicle.com/PlaceAnAd

GBRE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT "Our Mission is to Add Value to Your Investment"

or

164K miles, runs good, no rust. Leather, 3 seats, dual heat and a/c.

Beautiful 9.66 Acre Farm. Open floor plan, 5BR, many outbuildings including original 1940 cow barn which borders conservation park. $349,900. 773-425-7117

!!!!!!!!!!!

815-814-1964

2002 DODGE DURANGO

Marengo 20708 River Rd.

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com

Call Bill at (630) 253-9742 for information and services menu Gaffney Blanchard, LLC

630-232-7226 St. Charles - Newly Renovated

Headline:___________________________________________

Description:_________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ Asking Price (required):________________________________ Best Time To Call:____________________________________ Phone:_____________________________________________

1BR $650 and 2BR $820. NO PETS! 630-841-0590

NAME:_____________________________________________ ADDRESS:__________________________________________ CITY__________________________STATE_____ZIP________ DAYTIME PHONE:____________________________________ E-Mail:_____________________________________________

Upgrade Your Ad ! Add Bold $5 ! Add A Photo $5 ! Add an Attention Getter $5 ! ! !

Mail to: Free Ads P.O. Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250 ! Sell an item priced Email: classified@shawsuburban.com over $400 - $26

Ad will run one week in the Kane County Chronicle and on KCChronicle.com. One item per ad. Offer excludes real estate, businesses & pets, other restrictions may apply. We reserve the right to decline or edit the ad.


CLASSIFIED

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com

Saturday, February 23, 2013 • Page 41

g ting y y DAN BLACK pursuant to 735 ILCS 227 N. Fourth St., Geneva, IL business known as BEAUTIFUL /s/ John A. Cunningham /s/ John A. Cunningham 5/21-101 et seq. 60134. Specifications and bid YOU located at 1092 Annandale ST. CHARLES 1 MO FREE! Kane County Clerk forms may be viewed/obtained at Drive, Elgin, IL 60123. Kane County Clerk Lrg 1BR $769, Lrg 2BR from Dated February 21, 2013 at Au- Tree Towns Repro Service, 542 $829/mo. Incl heat, water, cook- rora, Illinois. (Published in the Kane County (Published in the Kane County Spring Road, Elmhurst, IL 60126. Dated: February 4, 2013. ing gas, Appliances & laundry. Questions regarding this project Chronicle, February 9, 16 & 23, Chronicle, February 16, 23 & 630-584-1685 March 2, 2013.) /s/ Rober J. Overton may be directed to Scott Ney at /s/ John A. Cunningham 2013.) Kane County Clerk Petitioner 630-463-3025 st st

St. Charles 1 Mo FREE!

Nicely Remodeled. 1BR. Oak floors, Cat OK.$815 includes heat, hot water & cooking gas. Broker Owned. 1330 W. Main. 630-688-7124

ST. CHARLES ~ 2 BEDROOM W/D in unit, all utilities and cable included. No pets, no smoking. $1150/mo + sec. 630-232-7535

(Published in the Kane County The Board of Education reserves (Published in the Kane County Chronicle, February 23, March 2 & the right to reject any and all bids Chronicle, February 9, 16 & 23, 9, 2013.) and waive any irregularities that are 2013.) in the interest of District 304.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING *** AMENDED ***

PUBLIC NOTICE

Kent Mutchler, Secretary Board of Education Geneva Community Unit School District 304

ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE

Amended notice is hereby given

Public Notice is hereby given

pets + security deposit. $875/mo. operative, Kane County, Illinois, 630-289-7484 that a Public Hearing will take place on Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 8:00 a.m. at the Mid Valley Special Education Cooperative's SYCAMORE 3BR, 1BA Administration Office, located at Newly remodeled, no smoking. 1304 Ronzheimer Ave., St. $1000/mo + security. Charles, Illinois, 60174. 630-377-0242 The purpose of this Hearing is to discuss and to receive any public comments about the possibly subSt. Charles 1 Mo Free Rent! contracting of the Occupational Shared bath & kit, $110-120/wk. and Physical Therapy Services proW/D, incl utilities, Wi-Fi, no pets. vided by Mid Valley Special EducaNo smoking. 630-232-7535 tion Cooperative to its member school districts: Batavia School ST. CHARLES ~ MEN ONLY District 101, Central School District Free utils., incl cable & internet 301, Kaneland School District (except phone). $120/week. 630-370-2823 or 630-377-2823 302, St. Charles School District 303, and Geneva School District 304.

County Clerk of Kane County, Illinois, setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as EKLECTIC EVENTS located at 2091 Best Pl. #3, Aurora, IL 60506.

ST. CHARLES, 2 bedroom, 1 by the Executive Advisory Board of (Published in the Kane County that on February 4, 2013 a certificate was filed in the office of the bath, laundry, air, heat incl. No Mid Valley Special Education Co- Chronicle, February 6, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE

Dated: February 4, 2013. Public Notice is hereby given that on February 19, 2013 a certifi/s/ John A. Cunningham cate was filed in the office of the Kane County Clerk County Clerk of Kane County, Illinois, setting forth the names and (Published in the Kane County addresses of all persons owning, Chronicle, February 16, 23 & conducting and transacting the March 2, 2013.) business known as 123 CORNERSTONE MAINTENANCE located at NEIGHBORS 89 Horne St., Lower, St. Charles, IL is news by readers, 60174. for readers, about readers. Have news to share? Dated: February 19, 2013. Send it to: neighbors@kcchronicle.com /s/ John A. Cunningham By: St. Charles Large 2BR, 1BA Kane County Clerk PUBLIC NOTICE Donald Schlomann, Chairman Apt to share - heat & water incl. Kent Mutchler, Secretary (Published in the Kane County Cable and pool available. ASSUMED NAME $525/mo + util. 224-856-1901 Chronicle, February 23, March 2 & PUBLICATION NOTICE (Published in the Kane County 9, 2013.) Chronicle, February 7, 2013.) Public Notice is hereby given PUBLIC NOTICE that on February 6, 2013 a certifiPUBLIC NOTICE cate was filed in the office of the County Clerk of Kane County, IlliASSUMED NAME St. Charles Paving and Site Work nois, setting forth the names and PUBLICATION NOTICE addresses of all persons owning, Off/Ware Space Geneva Community Unit School Public Notice is hereby given conducting and transacting the 1,568sf - 19,000sf. District 304 will receive sealed bids that on February 4, 2013 a certifi- business known as PAULY FAMILY Docks/Drive-Ins marked "Paving and Site Work at cate was filed in the office of the DENTAL GROUP located at 1940 Aggressive Move-In Package Multiple Sites" up to the hour of County Clerk of Kane County, Illi- West Galena Blvd, Suite 10, Auro2:00 p.m., March 21, 2013. Bids nois, setting forth the names and ra, IL 60506. 630-355-8094 will be opened and reported at that addresses of all persons owning, www.mustangconstruction.com time at the Administrative Offices, conducting and transacting the Dated: February 6, 2013.

GENEVA, ELGIN, OFFICE / WAREHOUSE, 1500 sf. 10x12 overhead door. For sale/lease, $1200/mo. Dearborn, 630-894-1277 ext 11

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT KANE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 13 MR 203 NOTICE OF PUBLICATION REGARDING NAME CHANGE Public notice is hereby given that on April 29, 2013, in Courtroom No. 110, of the Kane County Courthouse, 100 South Third, Geneva, Illinois, at the hour of 9:30 A.M. or as soon thereafter as this matter may heard, a Petition will be heard in said Courtroom for the change of name of ROBERT JORDAN OVERTON to ROBERT JOR-

E N N I U S A L T H E A O O F M E T

P O E M E N V Y G R E E N E L A N G R Y H T E I N S E N O E X T R A L O W P I E E W I L D A R N S T I C S H O R S T H E O G I N F B R O A I I I L A D M A D E L M O N Y C

G N U E L L S W O R T H

G R A N D P A I D E S

S D W I E M A R S

B A T A B E A S S O O T T G R Y H E B E A B R R G E E L L B O O E L D W E I E G S H O R T B O A H E E S A Y S H N E D M A D E A P L O P

J U S T I N T E F H O M A M P I P P O S P O I L E E A V E R B E D S N S T E R U P L I C E S T O R E N D H N U O W T H O S W O R L A S C I R E A M

ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on February 15, 2013 a certificate was filed in the office of the County Clerk of Kane County, Illinois, setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as T & T Contractor Services located at 2S375 Meadow Drive, Batavia, IL 60510.

Call to advertise 815-455-4800

Send your Classified Advertising 24/7 to: Email: classified@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 or online at: www.KCChronicle.com

Dated: February 15, 2013.

DEKALB

Immaculate 4,280 sq ft Office / Warehouse.

JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS STUFF VEHICLES REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Air conditioned office area and bathrooms Great location near airport & tollway in DeKalb.

Kane County Chronicle Classified and online at:

815-754-5831

KCChronicle.com

OPEN SUNDAY, FEB. 24 • 12 PM - 2 PM

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD S M I T A U D E G R E E K A T H C S I R I N G E X T R S T R O S H O U T S O B T H E M A N N A G O T L L O F F O B A U M I T S A T H E R A S S

PUBLIC NOTICE

L E S S R E E L T R Y S T

2275 Aurora Dr - Unit 25, Pingree Grove

D I S

Call Sue Englert

New on arket!! $69,900

• 2BR 2BA upper unit • Fresh paint throughout • Kitchen w/breakfast bar and separate dining • Laundry within the unit • Home Warranty available

Elm Street Realtors

8 5.970.45 3


CLASSIFIED

Page 42 • Saturday, February 23, 2013

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com

No. 0210 I HEARD YOU THE FIRST TIME By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz

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2

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Across

49 Somewhat redundant size?

10 Cricket club

55 Constitutional

6 Gray piece

54 Roof projection

13 Fair-minded

56 Bedtime preyer?

17 “Funeral Blues” writer

18 “Pity is for the living, ___ is for the dead”: Twain

19 Kaplan of “Welcome Back, Kotter” 20 Info from a debriefing

22 Somewhat redundant 1965 country song? 26 Journalist Couric 27 ___ Lang, Superboy’s love

28 1951 Cooperstown inductee

29 Increases, with “up”

30 Somewhat redundant Milton Bradley game? 35 Show featuring the L.V.P.D. 38 Oktoberfest collectibles

RELEASE DATE: 2/10/2013

39 Cotillion attendee 40 Power in sci-fi

41 Kneeler ’s offering 43 Ambient musician Brian 44 Org. that fines polluters

45 Chicken bred for its meat

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

57 “Nick News” host Linda 60 Song featured in “Animal House” 61 Bakery array

62 Reacted to a bad call

63 Mr. Bill appeared on it: Abbr.

64 Somewhat redundant 1960s spy series? 69 Sound of heartbreak 72 Picks up

73 Cartoon beagle 74 Hit the roof

78 Like some passages in a symphony

80 Elton John nickname

81 Deli appliance

82 O’Neill’s “___ Christie”

107 Clock face number

19 Will Geer ’s role on “The Waltons”

109 Core philosophy

23 Refined

106 Glinda’s creator

108 Repo justification

21 Minus

112 Extremely redundant 1963 caper film?

24 Animal whose head doesn’t make a sound?

118 “Ta-da!”

119 Patron saint of sailors

120 Cut and collect

121 128-character set 122 Job title abbr.

123 Cooper Union’s location, briefly

124 Haute cuisine it’s not 125 Chews (out) Down

1 Not look perky, say 2 Visibility reducer

3 Skull session result 4 Comb row

5 Ancient Roman author Quintus ___

83 Somewhat redundant literary genre?

6 In accordance with

91 Brief laugh

8 A Waugh

88 Scrammed

92 Flamboyant stole

7 Goalie’s jersey number, often

9 Human speech mimickers

93 Machiavellian concerns

10 Shearing shed sound

95 Pink lady ingredient

12 Clearly low on patience

94 John of Salisbury

96 “The things I put up with!” 99 Buff

100 Somewhat redundant theater production?

11 Swallow, as costs

13 Peter Pan rival 14 Not as content

15 Percussive dance troupe 16 Musician’s rate

25 Common check box on surveys 31 MTV’s earliest viewers, mostly

23

35 Tangy salad leaves

30 36

37

41

36 Amendment guaranteeing a speedy trial

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71

44 South Dakota Air Force base

100

46 R&D sites

112

50 Wimbledon champ Gibson 51 Shakes up

52 Very impressed

53 Crystal Cave is one 58 Common middle name 59 E Day debuts

61 Emergency

62 Captain who says “Well, gentlemen, between ourselves and home are 27,000 sea miles” 65 Fill up on

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91 96

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115 120

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95 How bad news is often received

68 Overused

84 Athens’s home 85 1950s TV star Duncan

97 “Music for the Royal Fireworks” composer

87 Old World deer

100 End note?

70 “What a calamity!” 71 Inclination

75 Big East sch.

76 Proust’s “À la Recherche du Temps ___”

77 Sweet meet?

81 Hidden

96 Attests

86 Do as expected

98 Open conflict

89 Body blow reaction

101 Nickname of jazz’s Earl Hines

90 World capital situated in what was once ancient Thrace

111 117

119

79 Nabisco treats sold only seasonally

69 One way to go to a party

110

116

66 Perfume sampling spot

67 Roman calendar day

99 105

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118

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42 Mosaicist’s supply

48 Walk while dizzy

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61 65

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40

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47 Unchanging

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37 Part of the front matter

45 Not on deck, maybe

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38

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69

10

27

32 & 33 Plastic shields and such

34 Equal: Prefix

9 19

26

35

8

18

22

1 Wallop

7

102 Joins

103 Cheney’s follower

104 Slow on the uptake

105 “___ Body?” (first Lord Peter Wimsey novel) 110 Marine threat 111 Skinny 113 Satisfied 114 “Breaking Bad” network 115 Great Leap Forward overseer 116 BlackBerry buy 117 Slam


K C

CHRO ICLE Saturday, February 23, 2013

New Models coming soon to Sunset Views!

Large high end custom homes with all the bells and whistles. Starting in the $300’s

Directions: Rt 64 (W) to urlington Road (right) to Empire Road (left) to Sunset Views Subdivision.

Visit our website at:

www.lighthousebld.com

LIGHTHOUSE CUSTOM BUILDERS, INC. S T. C H A R L E S , I L L I N O I S

6 3 0 . 5 8 4 .1 9 7 7


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com • Saturday, February 23, 2013

| YOUR NEXT HOME

44

Want to see our home YYOUR featured on this page? Call Alex & Vicky Rullo at (630) 513-1771

DRAMATIC CUSTOM RANCH! Arched stone covered porch opens to an amazing open floor plan with 17ft ceilings, decorative trapezoid windows, skylights, glistening wide plank hickory flooring & much more! A massive stone fireplace, gorgeous wet bar loaded with built-ins and glass atrium doors leading to a large deck highlight the family room. Vaulted dining area with exposed brick opens to a 17x12ft screened porch with connecting gazebo. Lovely large kitchen has cherry cabinetry, granite counters, beamed ceiling & stainless appliances. Master bedroom suite with 2 walk-in closets, whirlpool bath & private balcony overlooking the lush property! Good size bedrooms throughout ~ note bdrm #4 is 19x18 and in a separate wing! Convenient 1st floor laundry, English basement and an impressive 1.4 acre park-like wooded lot complete with gardens, waterfall stocked pond and vistas all around!

St. Charles

Short Sale Expert, CDPE Alex and Vicky Rullo

$419,000

How much is your home worth? www.FoxValleyHomeValues.com It’s automated and it’s FREE! No need to speak to an Agent!

Great American North 630•513•1771

“THE RIGHT REALTOR MAKES A DIFFERENCE”

rullos@rullos.com • www.therulloteam.com

RE/MAX Top 20 Realtor in Illinois 16 Consecutive Years!

Scan this QR code with your Smart Phone for more!


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CLASSIFIED

Page 46 • Saturday, February 23, 2013

COVENANT !

Batavia Covenant Church, Preschool

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD !

Sanctuary 1S430 Wenmoth Rd. (630) 879-0785 www.sanctuaryag.com Sunday Service at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9:00 a.m. Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m. Bible studies and children’s Bible clubs for all ages

BAPTIST !

Faith Baptist Church at Mill Creek 01S455 S Mill Creek Drive, Geneva, IL 60134 Phone: (630) 845-2532 Website: www.fbcmillcreek.org E-mail: secretary@fbcmillcreek.org Sunday: Coffee & Fellowship - 8:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:00 a.m. Worship - 10:30 a.m. Pastor Grant Diamond

First Baptist Church of Geneva “Reach. Connect. Equip. Serve” East Campus (EC) 2300 South Street, Geneva Sunday: Traditional – 9:15 & 10:45 AM Worship Café – 9:15 AM West Campus (WC) 3435 Keslinger Road, Geneva Saturday Worship - 5:00 PM Sunday, Contemp. 9:15 & 10:45 AM Hand in Hand Christian Preschool: 630-208-4903 www.fbcg.com (630) 232-7068

CATHOLIC

1314 W. Main St., Batavia. (630) 879-3721 bataviacov.com Sunday Worship Hours: • 9:00 am Contemporary Worship Service • 10:00 am Coffee (Fellowship Hall) • 10:35 am Traditional Worship Service Preschool: (630) 879-3795

!

Holy Cross Catholic Church

2300 Main St., Batavia (630) 879-4750 Saturday Mass: 4:15 p.m. Sunday Masses: 6:30, 8:00, 9:45 & 11:15 a.m. Weekday Lenten Masses: 6:30 a.m., 8 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Holy Day Masses: 7:00 p.m. Anticipatory, 6:30 a.m., 12:10 p.m. & 5:00 p.m. Confessions: Sat. After 8:30 a.m. Mass & 3:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Mon.- Fri. 7:00 a.m. - 7:55 a.m. Tuesdays 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Chaplet of Divine Mercy: Tues. 8:30 a.m. & Sat. 4:00 p.m. Eucharistic Healing Service & Chaplet, Tues. 6:00 p.m. Rosary for Life: 1st Saturday of each month at 9:00 a.m. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament: Sun. to Sat. 1:00 p.m. Msgr Daniel Deutsch - Pastor

St. Patrick Catholic Church

(downtown) 408 Cedar St., St. Charles, IL 60174 Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & Noon (Crane Road) 6N491 Crane Rd. St. Charles, IL 60175 Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday, 8:00 a.m., 9:45 a.m., & 11:30 a.m.

St. Peter Catholic Church

1891 Kaneville Rd., Geneva (630) 232-0124 Weekday Masses Monday-Thursday 7AM & 8AM Friday during Summer 7AM & 8AM Friday during School Year 7AM & 8:45 AM Saturday 8AM Weekend Masses: Saturday 4:30PM Sunday 7AM, 9AM, 11AM, 5PM Holy Day & Holiday Masses Call the church for Mass times on these special days Confessions: Monday through Friday, 7:30 -7:55 AM Saturday, 8:30-10:00 AM & 3:15-4:15 PM

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com Geneva Lutheran Church “Serving Christ in the Heart of the Community” 301 South Third St., Geneva (630) 232-0165 www.genevalutheran.org Communion Worship Schedule Saturday – 5:30pm in Chapel Sunday - 9:00am in Sanctuary 10am - CoffeeHouse - free treats/beverages 10:15 am - Education Hour for ages 3 yrs.-adult Weekday Christian Ed. Program ages 2-5 yrs. M-F, 9:30AM-12:30PM or 10AM-1PM Building is ADA compliant.

LUTHERAN !

Bethany Lutheran Church 8 S. Lincoln St., Batavia (corner of Lincoln and Wilson) (630) 879-3444 www.bethanybatavia.org 9:00 am Traditional Service with Holy Communion on the 1st and 3rd Sundays, plus Festival Sundays 11:00 am Contemporary Service with Holy Communion on each Sunday Education Hour takes place between the two services from 10:00 am to 11:00 am for ages 3 years old-adult Nursery care is available throughout the Sunday morning. Monthly Last Friday Community Supper 5:00-7:00 pm Free to the Community

Bethlehem Lutheran Church 1145 N. 5th Ave. St. Charles, IL 60174 1 mile N. of Rt. 64 on Rt. 25, (630) 584-2199 www.bethlehemluth.org Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m./ 9:15 a.m./ 10:30 a.m. Adult Learning, Sundays: 9:15 am/10:30 am Worship on Saturdays 5:30 p.m. Uplift on Saturdays 6:30 pm Teen led Praise Gathering Bethelem Preschool Center: Full Day Child Care/Half dayPreschool 630-584-6027

Faith Lutheran Church LC-MS and full of Holy Spirit fire! Vibrant worship Sundays 9:00 a.m. Nursery open during worship Education Hour 10:30 a.m. 1745 Kaneville Rd., Geneva www.flc.geneva.org (630) 232-8420

Immanuel Lutheran Church and School (Missouri Synod) 950 Hart Rd., Batavia (630) 879-7163 - Church Office (630) 406-0157 - School www.ImmanuelBatavia.org Pastor Ronald Weidler Pastor William Beckmann Pastor Donald Moll Principal Glenn Steinbrenner Saturday Worship: 5:30 p.m. (Traditional) Sunday Worship: 8:00 & 9:30 a.m. (Traditional) 10:45 a.m. (Contemporary) Monday Night Worship: 7:15 p.m. (Traditional), June 13-August 15. Holy Communion will be celebrated the first and third weekends of the month at all services. Nursery Care Available Immanuel Lutheran School Preschool 3’s to 8th grade.

St. Mark’s Lutheran Church & Preschool (Missouri Synod) 101 S. 6th Ave., St. Charles (Just South of St. Charles Library) (630) 584-8638 The Rev. Timothy P. Silber, Sr. Pastor Saturday – Traditional Worship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday – Traditional Worship at 8:00 a.m. Sunday – Traditional Worship at 9:30 a.m. Sunday – Contemporary Praise Worship at 11:00 a.m. All services elevator access St. Mark’s Nurturing Center Preschool for ages 2 – Pre K (630) 584-4850 www.stmarksstc.org

METHODIST !

Baker Memorial United Methodist Church Fourth Ave. & Main St., St. Charles Join Us for Traditional Worship 9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. in the Sanctuary 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday School Nursery Care Available Senior Pastor: Rev. Ronni Sue Verboom 630-584-6680 www.bakermemorialchurch.org

NONDENOMINATIONAL !

Hope Community Church

Worship Sunday 10:00am Baker Community Center 101 S. Second Street, St. Charles, IL 630-263-5698 Current-Warm-Informal-Serious See us on the Web www.hope-online.com

PRESBYTERIAN !

Fox Valley Presbyterian Church (USA) A Welcoming Church 227 East Side Dr., Geneva (630) 232-7448 (1 blk. N. of Rt. 38.) (630) 232-7448 www.fvpres.com 8:30 a.m. Worship (informal) 10:00 a.m. Worship (traditional) 10:00 a.m. Church school Nursery Care Provided 8:30-11:00 a.m. Adult Breakfast Club 8:30 a.m. Confirmation (7-8th grd.) 4:00 p.m. Youth Group 7:00 p.m. The Growing Place Weekday Preschool We are a Stephen Ministry Church

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST !

Congregational Church of Batavia 21 S. Batavia Ave. (Rt. 31) Batavia 630-879-1999 www.congregationalchurch.org Interim Pastor, Greg Skiba Sunday Worship 9:00 & 10:30 am Nursery care available Sunday School 10:30 am for age 3-12th grade Wednesday 5-8 pm: LOGOS Children and Youth program Batavia Nursery School 630-879-9470


CLASSIFIED

Kane County Chronicle / kcchronicle.com

Saturday, February 23, 2013 • Page 47

PRE-OWNED ANDERSON BMW

RAYMOND CHEVROLET

BUSS FORD

MOTOR WERKS INFINITI

360 N. Rte. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

118 Route 173 • Antioch, IL

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

Barrington & Dundee Rds. • Barrington, IL

360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485

(866) 561-8676

815/385-2000

800-935-5913

888/682-4485

www.andersoncars.com

MOTOR WERKS BMW Barrington & Dundee Rds. • Barrington, IL

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

www.raymondchevrolet.com

REICHERT CHEVROLET 2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

SPRING HILL FORD

815/338-2780

800 Dundee Ave. • East Dundee, IL

www.reichertautos.com

888/600-8053 www.springhillford.com

KNAUZ BMW 407 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

TOM PECK FORD

847-604-5000

13900 Auto Mall Dr. • Huntley, IL

www.KnauzBMW.com

ST. CHARLES CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP 1611 East Main Street • St. Charles, IL

(630) 513-5353

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG BUICK Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

888/794-5502 www.garylangauto.com

REICHERT BUICK 2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

815/338-2780 www.reichertautos.com

www.bussford.com

www.stcharlescdj.com

ANTIOCH CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

847/669-6060 www.TomPeckFord.com

ZIMMERMAN FORD

www.clcjd.com

(630) 513-5353 www.stcharlescdj.com

ANTIOCH CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP 105 Rt. 173 • Antioch, IL

888/794-5502 www.garylangauto.com

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

130 Cedar Ave. • Lake Villa, IL

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG GMC

800/935-5923

815/385-7220

www.motorwerks.com

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG CHEVROLET Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

888/794-5502 www.garylangauto.com

AL PIEMONTE CHEVROLET 770 Dundee Ave. (Rt. 25) • Dundee, IL 847/426-2000

www.piemontegroup.com

www.sunnysidecompany.com

BULL VALLEY FORD/MERCURY

www.gregoryautogroup.com

800/407-0223

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

www.garylangauto.com

MOTOR WERKS HONDA Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

www.bullvalleyford.com

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG KIA

ANTIOCH CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP 105 Rt. 173 Antioch, IL

800-628-6087

800-935-5913

1400 E. Dundee Rd., Palatine, IL

847/202-3900

O’HARE HONDA

www.clcjd.com

847-604-5050 www.Knauz-mini.com

www.garylangauto.com

CLASSIC KIA 847-CLASSIC (252-7742)

CALL FOR THE LOWEST PRICES IN CHICAGOLAND

www.classicdealergroup.com

888-794-5502

1119 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL

RAYMOND KIA 119 Route 173 • Antioch

847/831-5980

www.raymondkia.com

www.libertyvillemitsubishi.com

www.knauzhyundai.com

LIBERTY NISSAN 920 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, IL

O’HARE HYUNDAI

www.libertyautoplaza.com

360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

GURNEE VOLKSWAGEN 6301 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL

847-855-1500 www.Gurnee V W.com

920 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, IL

375 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

www.knauzlandrover.com

ANDERSON VOLKSWAGEN

LIBERTY VOLKSWAGEN

Land Rover Lake Bluff 847-604-8100

www.classicdealergroup.com

www.andersoncars.com

847-680-8000

847-234-2800

847-CLASSIC (252-7742)

888/682-4485

(224) 603-8611

www.gregoryautogroup.com

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050 www.paulytoyota.com

LIBERTYVILLE MITSUBISHI 847/816-6660

490 Skokie Valley Road • Highland Park, IL

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

www.garylangauto.com

847-680-8000

GREGORY HYUNDAI

www.raysuzuki.com

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

920 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, IL

www.libertyautoplaza.com

888/446-8743 847/587-3300

CLASSIC TOYOTA/SCION

www.oharehonda.com

LIBERTY KIA

RAY SUZUKI 23 N. Route 12 • Fox Lake

515 N. Green Bay Rd. Waukegan/Gurnee, IL

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG MITSUBISHI

CRYSTAL LAKE DODGE 888/800-6100

409A Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

425 N. Green Bay Rd. Waukegan/Gurnee, IL

River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

775 Rockland Road • Lake Bluff IL 60044 (Routes 41 & 176 in the Knauz Autopark)

5220 Northwest Highway Crystal Lake, IL

888/794-5502

PAULY TOYOTA KNAUZ MINI

888-538-4492

KNAUZ HYUNDAI

MARTIN CHEVROLET

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

815/385-2000

www.arlingtonkia.com

www.antiochfivestar.com 5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

ARLINGTON KIA IN PALATINE

www.motorwerks.com

1611 East Main Street • St. Charles, IL

www.stcharlescdj.com

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

1107 S Rt. 31 between Crystal Lake and McHenry

ST. CHARLES CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP (630) 513-5353

www.st-charles.mercedesdealer.com

847/356-2530

847/356-2530

Route 120 • McHenry, IL

225 N. Randall Road, St. Charles

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG SUBARU

GREGORY JEEP

www.garylangauto.com

200 N. Cook St. • Barrington, IL

www.Knauzcontinentalauto.com

www.clcjd.com

866-480-9527

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY CHRYSLER DODGE

847-234-1700

888/800-6100

130 Cedar Ave. • Lake Villa, IL

MOTOR WERKS CADILLAC

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050

409 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

877/226-5099

GREGORY CHRYSLER www.gregoryautogroup.com

KNAUZ CONTINENTAL AUTOS

CRYSTAL LAKE JEEP

847/683-2424

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

PAULY SCION

www.antiochfivestar.com

206 S. State Street • Hampshire, IL

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG CADILLAC

www.knauznorth.com

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

1611 East Main Street • St. Charles, IL

888/794-5502

FENZEL MOTOR SALES

847-235-3800

847/628-6000

ST. CHARLES CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

630/584-1800

www.antiochfivestar.com

888/800-6100

2950 N. Skokie Hwy • North Chicago, IL

1320 East Chicago Street The Mazda Machine on Rt. 19, Elgin, IL

MERCEDES-BENZ OF ST. CHARLES

www.zimmermanford.com

KNAUZ NORTH

BIGGERS MAZDA

800-628-6087

800-628-6087

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

www.andersoncars.com

2525 E. Main Street St. Charles, IL 60174

105 Rt. 173 Antioch, IL

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER

www.motorwerks.com

ANDERSON MAZDA

MOTOR WERKS PORCHE

847-680-8000 www.libertyautoplaza.com

Barrington & Dundee Rds., Barrington, IL

815-459-4000

River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

800/935-5913

www.martin-chevy.com

888-553-9036

www.motorwerks.com

www.oharehyundai.com

RAY CHEVROLET

CALL FOR THE LOWEST PRICES IN CHICAGOLAND

847/587-3300

BULL VALLEY FORD/ MERCURY

www.raychevrolet.com

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

771 S. Randall Rd. • Algonquin, IL

800/407-0223

866/469-0114

www.bullvalleyford.com

www.rosenrosenrosen.com

39 N. Rte. 12 • Fox Lake, IL

ROSEN HYUNDAI

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

815/385-2000

BARRINGTON VOLVO MOTOR WERKS SAAB

200 N. Cook Street • Barrington, IL

800/935-5393 www.motorwerks.com

300 N. Hough (Rt. 59) • Barrington, IL

847/381-9400


Kane County Chronicle / KCChronicle.com â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, February 23, 2013

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KCC-2-23-2013