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Houston

July 2013


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{contents}

cover by Sonia sellers

16 6

4

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06 Sun Protection 08 Arthritis & Your Pet 10 Special Pals 14 Puppy 101 The Science of Dog Training

16 Centerstage 18 Beach Tips Chic Chica

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publisheR Shannan Parker Tel: 281.781.4727 info@texascatsanddogs.com

editor Tiffany Robinson tiffanyrobinson99@gmail.com

DESIGNER Fran Sherman 314.275.2208 fran@shermanstudios.com

Contributing Writers Tricia Fagan Monica Schmidt Texas A&M Nadine Joli-Coeur Amy Kelley Elizabeth Trick Jan Barnett Connie G.

8 20 24 26 photographer

Sonia Sellers Photography

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Chinese Theory and What We Feed

a Light on 22 Shining Laser Therapy Deogi, 24 Dougie Rescue Reporter

26 When Disaster Strikes 28 Find Your Furever Friend

{July 2013}

ADVERTISE WITH US!

281.781.4727 • Houston@TexasDogsAndCats.com Next Issue: August 2013 Advertiser’s Deadline: July 15th 2013

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{pethealth} By Amy Kelley, CVPM, Sunset Blvd Animal Clinic

sun

protection

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elcome to the summertime, Houston! With temperatures already into the upper 90’s and low 100’s, we all know that protection from the sun is such an important goal for our families, but we don’t want to forget our family members that may bark or meow. Sun protection is just as important for them, as they are prone to sun burns and skin cancers too! A few pieces of information to think about:

Like humans, pets should have sunblock (get a PET SAFE brand of sunblock) applied to sunsensitive areas such as tips of ears, nose the belly and groin areas that typically have less hair coverage and thinner skin. Remember, cats love to sunbathe and some dogs will too, belly up. Additionally, many people get “summer cuts” for their dogs and cats to keep their pets comfortable in the summer heat and reduce matting of their fur. Sunburn is a definite possibility! Of course, the availability of fresh water and 6

shade for those pets who are outdoors (even for short potty breaks) is an absolute must. Dogs LOVE their time outdoors, whether they are chasing a ball, running after a squirrel friend, lounging under their favorite tree, or romping on the beach, but they do NOT know when enough is enough. We, as pet parents, have to control their time in the heat, just as we would ourselves. Be mindful of your pet’s behavior and call it QUITS when you know it has been long enough with his favorite activities. Go out and enjoy the summer weather, but keep

your animal friends at a close distance to keep them safe. Let them pant and enjoy, but remember to call it quits LONG before they want you to. SPECIAL NOTE: How to spot a dog that is overheating: Thick drooling saliva, profuse and rapid panting, lack of coordination, bright red tongue, wide eyes with a glassy look, vomiting, diarrhea, and/or coma. If you notice any of these signs, get to your closest 24 hour emergency facility so that they can assist your dog in getting his temperature back to normal.

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Texas Direct Auto and Houston Humane Society Announces Goal of Finding Homes for 1,000 Animals Through ASPCA $100K Challenge The organization hopes to beat its own record of adopting out the animals it shelters with help from local partner

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his summer, the Houston Humane Society, with support from Texas Direct Auto, has the goal of adopting out 1,000 of its animals as part of the ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge, a national campaign designed to save as many animals’ lives as possible. As one of 50 shelters selected from across the country to participate in the $100K Challenge, the Houston Humane Society is competing to break its own record of saving animals’ lives in June, July and August. The Challenge offers a $100,000 grand prize, which could assist the Houston Humane Society in sheltering even more of the City’s animals and in finding them forever homes. The Houston Humane Society is ecstatic to have found a partner in Texas Direct Auto, the “World’s Largest Independent Dealership,” for the Challenge. In addition to selling cars and offering exceptional financing, the dealership acts as an advocate for animals and recently opened the Texas Direct Auto Dog Park. Texas Direct Auto’s Director of Business Development Jessica DeMarr is thrilled to support the Houston Humane Society in the Challenge by donating water, promotional products and various items needed during the competition. “This is a great opportunity for both Texas Direct Auto and the Houston Humane Society to find homes for the wonderful pets located at the shelter,” DeMarr said. “I’m eager to work with the Houston Humane Society this

summer and get the community just as excited as we are to help reach the goal of adopting 1,000 animals into loving homes.” To help achieve its goal of adopting out 1,000 animals this summer, the Houston Humane Society is planning multiple summer events, including movie nights, dog washes, animal adoption speed “dating” and much more. Furthermore, the organization hopes that Houstonians and other surrounding communities will participate in the Challenge not only by adopting but also by spreading the word and encouraging others to visit the facility to meet the adoptables. Sherry Ferguson, Executive Director of the Houston Humane Society, believes these initiatives are imperative for the organization to reach its goal. “I’m thrilled the Houston Humane Society is involved in the ASPCA $100K Challenge,” Ferguson said. “Our goal is and always has been to provide the highest quality of care and find homes for the animals we shelter. The Challenge will help bring awareness to this and through our summer events, the community will be able to get involved, have fun and find forever friends!” For questions regarding the $100K Challenge and the events surrounding the summer campaign, the organization’s partnership with Texas Direct Auto or more information about the Houston Humane Society, please visit the organization’s website at www.houstonhumane.org.

Photos by E&E Animals Professional Pet Photography

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{pethealth} Reprinted with permission from Texas A&M

arthritis

& your pet

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he Aggie family lost a beloved member when Reveille VII, the retired mascot of Texas A&M University, died last week. Ever since her arrival in Aggieland, Reveille VII, a female American Collie, had been receiving the best care available at the Small Animal Hospital at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Science (CVM). Stacy Eckman, a lecturer at the CVM, had been treating Rev for arthritis since last August, when Rev’s caregivers, Tina and Paul Gardner, noticed that she was having trouble sitting down like she normally would.

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“Arthritis can attack bones and joints in animals the same way the disease does in humans,” said Zachary Goodrich, veterinary resident instructor at the CVM. “However some animals, especially dogs, can be affected by arthritis at a much younger age than humans generally are. Some pets will be affected by arthritis before they are even one year old.” Reveille VII was twelve and a half. Although there is no certain way to prevent arthritis in pets, owners can help stave off arthritis by making sure their dog has a good, healthy diet and gets plenty of exercise. “Dogs that are overweight tend to be more affected by arthritis,” Eckman said. Reveille VII did not have that problem. “Tina Gardener did a great job keeping Reveille slim and fit, even with her reduced activity level in retirement,” Eckman said. “Consistent low-impact exercise such as walking and swimming helps maintain good muscle mass as well as keeping your pet at an ideal body weight,” said Goodrich. “The more extra weight your pet carries around, the higher the stress being placed across its joints which may worsen the

arthritis or affect your pet’s quality of life.” There are several signs for pet-owners to look for if they suspect their animal is suffering from arthritis. “The most obvious sign is decreased activity level, “said Goodrich. “The animal may not want to go as far as it used to on a walk or may not want to walk at all. Other signs can include stiffness when rising, especially after sleeping, and varying degrees of lameness.” It is also important to have your animal examined. A veterinarian can take x-rays

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of the affected joints to diagnose arthritis. However, xray images can’t determine the disease’s severity. “Their signs on x-rays don’t necessarily coordinate with their physical findings,” Eckman said. In other words, a lack of change in the x-rays doesn’t mean your pet’s arthritis isn’t getting worse. Although there is no cure for arthritis, there are a number of treatments available to help your arthritic pet feel better. These treatments vary depending on the severity of the case. Early detection—before the disease has progressed too far— is important to help maintain your pet’s ability to walk, run, and play. “There are several surgical and medical treatment options available depending on which joint is affected,” said Goodrich. “Joint replacements are performed on a case-by-case basis. Arthroscopy is also routinely used to evaluate and treat the joint in a minimally invasive manner.” A veterinarian may give your dog steroid injections to help relieve inflammation. Drugs, such as polysulfated glycosaminoglycan injections, help protect cartilage with minimal side effects. “Medical options include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, of which there are several on the veterinary medical market,” said Eckman. “Most of them are actually formulated for osteoarthritis.” However, never give your pets human medications such as ibuprofen or aspirin, as they can cause serious harm to your pet’s stomach, kidneys, and liver. “When you use the drugs together, you can actually use less drug overall because they complement each other,” 10

said Eckman. Physical therapy, such as work on a water treadmill, is very important. “Treatment for arthritis sometimes requires multiple types of therapy,” said Jacqueline Davidson, clinical professor at the CVM. “Reveille was given several different types of oral medication for pain and inflammation and received injections of a joint lubricant and a steroid into several of the more severely affected joints. She also received injections of a medication in the muscle to help with joint pain and inflammation.” Reveille’s diet was also controlled throughout her therapy to make sure that she stayed at a lean body weight, and she took several different dietary supplements for her joints, one of which was an omega-3 fatty acid, to help reduce pain associated with inflammation. “Being overweight results in more stress on the joints because they are supporting more weight,” said Davidson. “In addition, excess body fat promotes inflammation in the body and can worsen the signs of arthritis.” Reveille came to the TAMU veterinary physical rehabilitation service several times weekly. Her treatments included electroacupuncture and laser therapy for pain and she exercised regularly in the underwater treadmill. “Walking in water is helpful for

arthritis because the buoyancy of the water reduces stress on the joints, allowing for more comfortable movement,” said Davidson. “In addition, the water provides some resistance, which helps promote leg strength.” The TAMU Small Animal Hospital also provides nonmedical treatments to help with pain, such as dry needling, laser, high-energy wave therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electroacupuncture. A veterinarian can give recommendations for various dietary supplements and a home exercise plan, as well as provide dietary counseling to choose the most appropriate diet to maintain lean body weight in your pet. “There is no one right recipe for every dog,” Eckman said. “You have options, and you have to determine what works and what doesn’t work.”fleas,” said Diesel.

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special pals S

by Elizabeth Trick, MA

pecial Pals has served the greater Houston area for over 30 years. We started out in the Bellaire area, but we moved to our current location in 1991. Our shelter sits on 3.5 acres and can accommodate up to 150 dogs and cats. We are located in West Houston but are not positioned in a high traffic area. Originally, we only offered adoption to the community, but in the last 6 years we have increased our scope of services. We depend heavily on marketing and PR efforts to spread the word about our services to the community. Without the support of donors and major gifts, we would not be able to continue our mission as a no-kill animal shelter. We offer an alternative to euthanasia by providing treatment to animals with health conditions, in addition to providing care for healthy animals. This increases the financial strain, but helps provide a better quality of life to animals that may have been euthanized at other shelters. Furthermore, we provide essential services, including low cost vaccines, spay & neuter, boarding, and adoption. Just in the Greater Houston area alone, there are an estimated 1.2 million homeless animals (BARC, 2012). Our goals for the next few years include expanding our volunteer program, starting a foster program, increasing the volume of animals served in our low cost vaccine and spay and neuter clinic, as well as increasing the number

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of homeless animals we are able to rescue, rehabilitate, and adopt. Our facility is at a critical point for renovations and repairs and in order to continue housing animals and providing services, we must begin to make repairs to our building. In 2012, we received a private donation to install heaters in the dog kennels. This has helped our dogs feel more comfortable during the cold months, in addition to cutting costs by saving time when shutting down the kennels. We have also received 2 grants to be used towards our facility renovations, but we will be starting an official building campaign in order to come up with the remaining funds needed for a full renovation. We are currently undergoing a change in leadership and we are looking forward to all the changes ahead. We are able to take on some of the cost of daily opera-

tions by continuing our services to the community, but it has become increasingly expensive to operate the shelter on a daily basis. As we continue to carry out our mission as a no-kill animal shelter, we will continue to need the support of donors and from the community. Please don’t hesitate to come by the shelter for a tour.

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Science of Dog Training

by Tricia Fagan

{puppy101}

a brief history of the

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he first big scientific breakthrough in the area of animal behavior was accidentally discovered by Ivan Pavlov. Pavlov was a Nobel prize-winning physiologist. While attempting to study digestion, he discovered the phenomena now known as classical conditioning. Pavlov’s original experiment involved measuring the quantity of a dog’s saliva.

Much to Pavlov’s consternation, the dogs began to salivate before the food was actually given. The dogs had learned to predict when food would appear. Intrigued, Pavlov changed his experimental goal, and began to investigate a new idea. This new idea was that an external conditioned stimulus could be used to elicit an involuntary response. To validate his new idea, Pavlov began to use his now-famous bell as the conditioned stimulus. Pavlov would ring the bell, and then give the dogs food. The dogs quickly learned to salivate at the sound of the bell. While Pavlov’s classical conditioning is a powerful tool in the animal trainer’s toolkit, the most important discovery was yet to come. The “biggest hammer” in the animal trainer’s box is operant conditioning. B. F. Skinner did the pioneering research in operant conditioning. Skinner discovered that behavior was mostly a result of consequences. If you touch a hot stove and are burned, you are unlikely to touch a hot stove again. If you work hard at your job and are handsomely rewarded for it, you are likely to continue to work hard. If you sing in public and are praised for your singing, you are more

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likely to sing in public again. If a captive dolphin jumps high out of the water and then receives a piece of fish, the dolphin is likely to jump high again. If your dog sits, and is rewarded with a piece of meat, he is likely to sit in the future. During World War II, two of Skinner’s graduate students, Marion and Keller Breland, worked with Skinner on the Navy’s first guided smart bomb. The bomb was guided by pigeons! While the pigeon guided bomb worked as designed, the navy admirals were reluctant to place it into production. Instead, they preferred to wait for the Manhattan project. Marion and Keller were so impressed with the technology of operant conditioning, they formed a new company, “Animal Behavior Enterprises”. Animal Behavior Enterprises, or ABE, trained animals for entertainment shows and commercial applications. Keller unfortunately had a heart condition and passed away at a young age. Marion turned to the U.S. Navy’s first director on animal training, Bob Bailey, to assist her in running ABE. The U.S. Navy hired Bob Bailey to head a multi-

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million dollar project (and this is in the ‘50s!) to teach dolphins to talk to people. Bob is quite a smart fellow, and quickly came to the conclusion that dolphins could not talk to people. Bob managed to convince the government to spend a small portion of this large budget to teach dolphins to find explosive mines in the water. Bob was quite successful in this endeavor. In fact, the U.S. Navy still uses dolphins to find explosive mines in the ocean. Years after Keller passed away, Bob and Marion married. Together Bob and Marion Bailey trained tens of thousands of animals to reliably perform numerous tasks. Some of these tasks were simply for people’s amusement. Other tasks, however, were more serious in nature. As an example of some of the “amusement” tasks, ABE designed a coin-operated game display in which chickens and ducks would “play baseball”. Another amusement, named “Bird Brain”, was a display housing a chicken that would play tic-tac-toe against a person. The “bird brains” were very good at tic-tac-toe. They would ei-

{July 2013}

ther win or draw (they never lost). On the more serious side, ABE trained dogs to find trip wires during the Vietnam war. In addition, both cats and ravens were trained to spy for the CIA. Similarly, gulls were trained to find military men lost at sea. One gull, returning to the ship with information about the lost seaman, was attacked by an eagle. The eagle’s talons pierced the bird lungs, yet the gull successfully completed his mission. This particular gull underwent surgery and was saved. All of these amazing feats made possible by the simple yet brilliant technology discovered by B.F. Skinner. We now know that dolphins do not talk to people, but chickens can play tic-tactoe, and win if you are not careful! Happy training! Tricia Fagan Certified Professional Dog Trainer – Knowledge Assessed DogS Gone Good www.dogSgonegood.com trainer@dogSgonegood.com (713) 557-1949 


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{centerstage}

chic

chica By Jan Barnett

D

uring those days in April when she languished in a high-kill shelter in Fort Worth, the tiny pit bull dreamed of freedom from the noise, the cold concrete floor, the stench of fear and pain and death. She wanted to rest her eyes on something besides the ugliness all around her.

She longed for good food and warm sunlight, for soft green grass under her paws, for a kind hand gentling her blue-gray fur, for play and fun things to do. She never knew how close she came to dying. Meanwhile, way south in Houston, on what well could have been 16

the dog’s last day to live, a woman looking at her computer screen saw the dog’s pictures in a plea for her rescue. She knew she could not allow her to die. The woman worked long all that day and into the night in a race against time to find a rescue group to get her out of the

shelter. At last she succeeded and soon brought her home to foster. Meet Chica. She has blossomed under her foster’s care. She became healthy and put on some much needed weight. Her beautiful gray eyes started to shine with joy.

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Chica is a party girl. She is all about playing and having fun. Her foster family calls her their energizer bunny because she keeps going and going and going. She loves going on long walks and is excellent on a leash but her favorite thing most of all is playing in the pool. Chica thinks it is so much fun to make splashes and bite them. She is a hoot. Chica has been professionally temperament tested by her trainer and plays well with other dogs. Her foster family has seven dogs of their own {July 2013}

and Chica has fit in nicely. She attends doggie daycare and has made a ton of new friends. Chica has completed a basic obedience class and was the shining star. Chica’s ideal home would be with a family or individual who is very active and energetic. She would love and needs a dog buddy or two to play with. Chica is no couch potato and needs her exercise. She would love a big yard to run in and play with her people. Chica would have no objections to a swimming pool either.

Although Chica loves children, due to her energy level, Chica would do best in a home with older children. Chica’s foster family has fallen in love with her. They have decided that if the PERFECT home doesn’t come along soon they will keep her. If you think you have the perfect home for Chica, please email her foster Jan at 2215airline@sbcglobal.net. She will be happy to set up your visit and give Chica a chance to steal your heart away.

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beachtips vigilant and never leave them unattended in the water. The sun offers its own danger to both you and your pooch. Dangerous sun exposure can leave humans and canines alike with a nasty burn as a reminder of their fun. Dogs at the greatest risk for sunburn include those with pink skin, light fur, and short or shaved hair. Be sure your pet has access to plenty of shade, and apply a pet specific sunscreen (many human grade sunscreens contain ingredients that can cause gastrointestinal issues). A great product to look for is a sunscreen and mosquito repellent combo. A day at the beach is a lot of fun and a LOT of work. Make sure your dog takes a break in the shade in between bouts of swimming, running, digging (yes, the beach is the one place Fido can finally try to dig his way to China), playing fetch, and making new friends. Your pooch’s shady spot should always have fresh water available. It is important that both you and your pet stay hydrated. Pack enough fresh water for you and your dog, and consider investing in a ummertime is upon us, and that means it is time for some fun in the sun! If your summer plans include a trip doggy travel bowl to carry with you at all times. Remember, salt water is not to the beach, consider including your four legged friend good for you pooch! in the jaunt. But remember, not all beaches are dog friendly. Before you head home from the beach be sure to rinse off your pet. Most beaches offer shower areas. As Do your homework before you leave the house to find soon as you get home give Fido a bath to get off any out which beaches will welcome your dog. Be sure to remaining salt and minerals to limit damage to their check out the specific rules for each pet friendly beach coat and skin. as well. Some have regulations regarding what time of Wondering what you should have in your dog’s day dogs are allowed and specific on/off leash areas. It beach bag? Plan to include a beach towel of his own, is also important to obey all posted rules once you are waterproof nylon leash (and consider switching out his on the beach with your pooch. normal collar for a nylon style), sunscreen and insect It is a good idea to check in with a lifeguard, monirepellant (if needed), travel water bowl and fresh water, tor warning flags, and check posted boards to know treats/snacks, a doggy t-shirt to shield them from the the condition of the water. Just like humans, dogs are sun, and pet wipes. With a little bit of planning, your susceptible to sea lice, jellyfish, riptides and currents. furry friend can have a healthy, happy, and humane day The ocean can be a dangerous place for your pet so be out at the beach!

by Monica Schmidt – Houston Humane Society

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{pawz-itivelynatural} By Nadine Joli-Coeur

chinesetheory and what we feed T

his month’s article we are going to explore how chinese theory can influence what you feed your pet. For centuries the chinese theories have not only offered herbal solutions support health they also help on what to eat. Chinese theory is not simply addressing issues, but by balancing the body’s underlying disharmony. WE ARE WHAT WE EAT. Food is the foundation to life, it plays a key role in your pet’s health. Often we overlook what we feed our pet but rather look for a quick fix solution. In Chinese theory 20

every food has properties and actions in terms of how they affect your pet. I have seen it first hand the benefits on my personal pets.

DOGS cooling down your hot pet Hot dogs are often hot to the touch, they pant excessively (even at night), may have red eyes, red skin and have a tendency to be restless.

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What to feed? Stay away from feeding hot foods, (lamb and venison are considered the hottest proteins) as it will fuel the heat in their bodies. Look to feed cooling proteins like duck, rabbit or fish. When a pet is suffering from allergies, they are often hot to the touch and experience the same symptoms as a hot dog. Imagine a pot of water. If you the pot is boiling, you need to cool it down. Feeding your pet cooling protein does just that, it cools them down.

CHINESE HERBS Adding Chinese herbs in addition to food can help address specific problems. At Natural Pawz we carry Herbsmith products as we have been impressed with the quality of the treats and solutions. I have personally used all their solutions for my pets over the years and also worked with a local vet to have a prescription to help slow down cancer as well. Here are some commonly asked questions on Chinese theory and herbs.

COLD DOGS warming up a cold pet On the flip side a “cold dog” may show signs like general weakness, constant fatigue, poor appetite, shortness of breath, slow moving, arthritis and a preference to lay. This pet will seek out warmth. As a pet gets older they may get out of balance and may benefit from warming proteins.

Frequently Asked Questions Q. How do I know if my pet is hot or cold and what foods are hot or cold? A. Look for the signs, such as panting looking for a cold or hot place. In addition check for heat or coldness by feeling their ears, back and limbs. Check out this website for a great list. http://www. herbsmithinc.com/Home/ Education/FoodCharts/ default.asp

What to feed? Feeding warming proteins can add in warming them up. Warming foods like turkey, chicken, squash, sweet potatoes and oats. Hotter proteins are Lamb or Venison. BALANCE The food we are feeding our dogs impacts their health, their mood and their general wellbeing. Improvement can happen just by changing the foods we feed them. The first step is feeding a less processed, the second is changing to the proteins. You can never go wrong with neutral foods. Foods like beef or salmon are great for any dog. Feeding less processed diets are a great way to start on the path to health. {July 2013}

Q. What do Chinese herbs do? A. Chinese herbs work to address the root causes of underlying disharmonies within the animal. Chinese herbs have been used successfully for thousands of years to support health. Common issues that can be helped with herbs are anxiety, allergies, joint issues, and immunity. Other solutions for overall wellness and great for a senior pets are bladder support, microflora plus (probiotics) and milk thistle (liver support).

Q. How do Chinese herbs work and how long does it take to work? A. Chinese herbs work using a system of observing signs/symptoms. This is then translated into a pattern, or more commonly, a series of patterns. These patterns correlate to specific conditions. The goal is to bring the state of the body into balance, resulting in relief. Once the body is in a balanced state, health is maintained. Typically you will see the results of the herbs within a few weeks. Results differ from Eastern medicine as you are Q. What if my dog/cat won’t eat the powder/tablets? A. For dogs that are finicky eaters, try tablets. If a dog is hesitant, simply try a pill pocket or wrap in something. With powdered solutions add a pinch of the powder during mealtime to gradually acquaint them with the blend. Slowly increase the amount given each day until they eat a full dose without hesitation. Be creative, you can mix with applesauce, yogurt, freeze dried food, cottage cheese or any other dense or moist food. For cats, it is typically easiest to give the tablets. However, it is possible to make a tea out of the powdered blend by steeping 1/4 tsp. powder in 1/4 cup of hot water. Then, mix 2 tbsp. of the tea in the cat’s moist food. Chinese theory and solutions are one way you can look to enhance the quality of your pets life. I encourage you to learn more about products and how proteins can help your pet.

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{meetthevet} By Connie G., Kingsland Blvd Animal Clinic

trouble with tucker:

lasertherapy shining a light on

Tucker: Mom, I heard you use lasers at the animal clinic now. That’s cool! Do you do light shows to rock music and stuff like that? Mom: No, Tucker, it’s not that kind of laser. We use laser therapy to help with pain, and heal wounds, and recover from surgery. Tucker: How can lasers heal? I thought laser beams were hot, and burned things? Mom: Not the new ones, Tucker. Let me explain. Lasers are nothing more than a beam of light that travels at a certain frequency that allows the laser to generate heat and penetrate tissue. La22

ser beams can be focused into very tiny spots, or they can be calculated to travel very long distances. They are used for everything from DVD players to surgical instruments to welding. At Kingsland, we use cold laser therapy. Cold laser therapy is a non-invasive

procedure that uses light to stimulate cell regeneration and increase blood circulation. The beam of the laser consists of wavelengths with photons that penetrate into the tissue. The photons are absorbed by cells that are not functioning properly due to injury or disease. We use it

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{July 2013}

to treat pets with arthritis, acute or chronic tendon or soft tissue injuries, sprains and strains, swelling due to back disc problems, and to promote wound healing, either due to trauma or post-surgery. It has a very long name, photobiotherapy, and it’s based on the idea that light is absorbed into the cells, and stimulates protein synthesis and cell metabolism, which improves cell health and functionality. The reproduction of healthy cells and the increase in efficiency of cellular function helps to alleviate pain, reduce soft tissue inflammation, reduce fluid trapped in body tissue, reduce bacteria in the area of treatment, and increase blood flow to the area. At the correct laser wavelength, pain signals are reduced and nerve sensitivity decreases. One of the reasons we use cold laser therapy is that it treats the surface of the skin, while hot laser treatments affect deeper tissues. Hot laser treatments come with greater risk of cutting and/or burning caused by the increased intensity of laser beams.

directly to the surface of the skin, or it can be held just above the skin surface if direct contact is too painful for the pet. We can usually administer a laser treatment without sedation because it doesn’t cause discomfort or involve restraint. We don’t have to shave the fur in the area. The laser can be set for shallow or deep tissue penetration and for different time periods of treatment depending upon the condition that is being treated. Because it stimulates a release of endorphins, the “feel good” hormones, most of our patients find laser therapy relaxing and enjoy the treatment. Depending on the condition being treated, a laser therapy session can last between 3 and 20 minutes. The number of treatments is based on the particular needs of the animal, and often will start out with several treatments per week, and then taper off, discontinuing them after a period for acute conditions or, for some pets, coming in every couple of weeks as maintenance.

Tucker: So, what is a laser treatment actually like? Does it hurt? Do the animals like it? How long does it take? Mom: In a typical laser treatment, the laser is applied

Tucker: Sounds awesome! I’d like someone to pamper me and make me feel better! Can someone just come in and request laser treatments for a pet?

Mom: No, Tucker, laser therapy is a medical procedure; it’s not like getting a massage. We need to find out what is wrong with the pet and where the problem area is. It could be anything from injury to degeneration to congenital malformation, and the treatment for each might be different. Before treatment begins, a pet will be given a full physical along with X-rays, if needed. The veterinarian will devise a treatment plan, including the recommended target area(s), the number and length of sessions, and the depth of penetration based upon the results of the tests conducted. The course of treatment may then be adjusted based on response. Laser therapy is only one component of pain management, and may be combined with diet, oral medication, supplements, and/or physical therapy. Many owners report, after laser therapy, they might see their pet go upstairs more often, play with a toy he’s not picked up in months or go back to getting on the couch for his nightly snuggle with family members or, for the cat, jump on the couch to see what’s cooking. And, when pets have better mobility, medications can often be reduced. Laser therapy won’t cause a pet any unwanted side effects. The laser used for this type of treatment will not burn your pet’s skin. I know other owners love their pets just like I love you, Tucker. Laser therapy can improve the quality of their pet’s life, and as a result, the quality of the owners life, because I know when you’re happy, I’m happy! 23


when

disaster strikes Reprinted with permission from Texas A&M

T

When a disaster suddenly strikes it can be frightening for everyone, including your pet. The best thing you can do for you and your pet’s safety is to be prepared, develop a plan for emergencies, and have it ready before the disaster strikes. Planning ahead is the key to keeping yourself and your pet safe before, during, and after a disaster.

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When preparing for a disaster, it is imperative that all of your pet’s vaccinations are current. “Before a disaster, it is important to insure that all your animals are identified within a system that will allow you two to be reunited if separated,” said Wesley Bissett, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). “Identification can come in a variety of ways, such as collars or microchips. Collars may be less expensive but they are much easier to lose, whereas microchips may be more expensive but provide the advantage of being permanently within the animal. You should also try to keep a photo of you and your pet together to verify ownership.” When preparing for a disaster, it is imperative that all of your pet’s vaccinations are current. “If you do not typically have your dog vaccinated for Bordetella, or kennel cough, consider doing so as storm season approaches,” said Bissett. “This is disease prevention in case your pet is checked into an animal shelter.” When packing emergency supplies for your pet remember to store at least a one-week supply of pet food to keep the pet’s GI tract from becoming upset, and enough water to meet {July 2013}

you and your pet’s needs for up to three days. If you must evacuate the area, make sure to grab your pet’s food & water bowls before leaving. “If your pet is on a prescription for a chronic illness, keep at least a two-week supply of medication as well as a copy of the pet’s medical records,” said Bissett. “It may be difficult to have prescriptions re-filled in an emergency situation. Also, make sure you have a kennel or crate to transport your pet in case of an evacuation.” During a disaster, it is important to follow a pre-written strategy to ensure you and your pet’s safety. This not only saves valuable time during the disaster but can also aid in remembering important details of the event afterwards. “It is also important to heed all evacuation recommendations and orders,” said Bissett. “If the number of animals that you will be evacuating will require multiple trips, plan ahead and leave early!” “If your pet is injured during a disaster immediately seek veterinary medical help, which in many cases is available as part of the local or state response,” said Bissett. “If help is not instantly available, perform first aid until help arrives.”

Doggie Daycare, Boarding, Grooming and Obedience Training 6434 Washington Avenue Houston, TX 77007 713-868-7555 deogi@deogidogspa.com

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{marketplace}

jumpin’july The PlayaPup pet line is perfect for those sun days! The super soft, breathable fabric blocks 97.5% of harmful UV rays keeping your little Fido fun being burned. Available at Natural Pawz!

Dogs will be thrilled to give these tough nylon squeaker toys a whirl. A great choice for active chewers. Available at Natural Pawz!

Keep calm and chew on with this red, white and blue rope toy! Available at A Dogs Dream Pet Salon

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These all-natural Cool Treats are a favorite among pets everywhere! Available at Natural Pawz!

With swimsuit season in full-swing, it’s important to keep that stellar bod in shape. These fun Dumbell Dog Toys will make it look like your pup just stepped off Muscle Beach! Available at The Pawty Palace! Show your American pride with these adorable shirts! Available at WOOF Pet Bakery!

This fun standing feeders is a wonderful blend of design, function and versatility. Available online at www.thesecreatures.com

{July 2013}

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find your

furever friend All Texas Dachshund Rescue - www.atdr.org American Brittany Rescue - www.americanbrittany rescue.org Austin German Shepherd Dog Rescue-www.austingerman shepherdrescue.org Best Friends FurEver - www.furever.org Boston Terrier Rescue of Greater Houston- www. houstonbostonrescue.org

English Bulldog Rescue Network- www.bulldog rescuenetworktexas.blogspot. com

Miniature Schnauzer Rescue of Houston - www.msrh.org

Friends of Rescued Mastiffswww.mastiffrescue.org

Lone Star Shih Tzu and Lhasa Apso Rescue- www.shihtzu rescue.com

Greyhound Pets of America Houston - www.gpahouston. org

Noah’s Ark - www.noahsarksanctuary.org

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club of Greater Houston, Inc.www.cavalierrescuetrust.org Chesapeake Bay Retriever Relief & Rescue- www.cbrrescue. org

Gulf Coast Cocker Rescue - www.gulfcoastcocker spanielrescue.com

Chihuahua Rescue and Transport www.chihuahua-rescue.com

Houston Beagle Rescue www.houstonbeaglerescue. org

Corridor Rescue, Incwww.corridorrescue.org

Houston Cocker Spaniel Rescue - houstoncockerspanielrescue.com

Dachshund Rescue of Houston - www.dachshundrescue ofhouston.org Doberman Rescue Group - www.dobermanrescue group.org

Southeast Texas Labrador Retriever Rescue www.txlabrescue.org

Lonestar Boxer Rescue www.lsbr.org

English Springer Rescue America - www.springer rescue.org

Great Dane Rescue of Southeast Texas - saveadane.org Great Pyrenees Rescue Society - www.greatpyreneesrescue society.org

Dakota Rescue - www.dakotarescue.org

Husky Haven Inc www.huskyhaven.org

PugHearts, the Houston Pug Rescue - www.pughearts. com S.A.F.E. House Rescue & Adoption www.safehouserescue.org Save Our Strays - www.saveourstraysfortbend. org Second Chance Poms www.secondchancepoms.org

Texas Alaskan Malamute Rescue - www.texalmal.org Texas Collie Rescue www.texascollierescue.org Texas Great Pyrenees Rescue Group, Inc. - www.txpyrs.org Tiny Paws Chi Rescuehttp://tinypawsrescue.com/ Weimeranier Rescue of North Texas www.weimrescuetexas.org Yorkie and Small Dog Rescue - www.yasdr.org Yorkshire Terrier Club of Houston - www.ytcgh.com Zeke Fund Animal Rescue www.zfar.org

South Texas Aussie Rescue - www.southtexasaussie rescue.org

Houston Collie Rescue - www.houstoncollierescue. org Houston Lab Rescue www.houstonlabrescue.com Houston Sheltie Sanctuary www.houstonsheltiesanctuary. com

East Texas Cocker Spaniel Rescue- www.cockerkids.org

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• Petting dogs is proven to lower blood pressure of dog owners.

ACH BEACH MPING BIKINI T BOAT LY CAMPING SQUITO FAN NGLASSES NT Cross Puzzle

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• Small quantities of grapes and raisins can cause renal failure in dogs. Chocolate, macadamia nuts, cooked onions, or anything with caffeine can also be harmful. • The earliest European images of dogs are found in cave paintings dating back 12,000 years ago in Spain. • The oldest known dog bones were found in Asia and date as far back as 10,000 B.C. The first identifiable dog breed appeared about 9000 B.C. and was probably a type of Greyhound dog used for hunting. • The U.S. has the highest dog population in the world. France has the second highest

• Zorba, an English mastiff, is the biggest dog ever recorded. He weighed 343 pounds and measured 8’ 3” from his nose to his tail. • One survey reports that 33% of dog owners admit they talk to their dogs on the phone or leave messages on answering machines while they are away.

7/1/13 2:06 P

Feeling Beachy Across

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