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ALL ROADS LEAD TO

26TH ANNUAL

FEBRUARY 16-18, 2018

Hosted by the UNO MBLGTACC Student Planning Committee


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY, FEB. 16

LOCATION

1:00 - 9:00 P.M.

Registration & Information Booth

WEITZ CEC

4:00 - 5:30 P.M.

Dinner/Break on Your Own

On-campus food options. See page 25.

4:30 - 6:00 P.M.

Advisor’s Social

Criss Library 105

5:30 - 6:00 P.M.

River City Mixed Chorus

Sapp Fieldhouse

6:00 - 7:00 P.M.

Opening Ceremony

Sapp Fieldhouse

7:00 - 8:00 P.M.

Keynote: CeCe McDonald & Joshua Allen

Sapp Fieldhouse

8:00 - 10:00 P.M.

Entertainment: Pride Players Entertainment: Free CeCe, Movie Screening

Sapp Fieldhouse CPACS 101

7:30 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.

Registration & Information Booth

WEITZ CEC

8:00 - 9:00 A.M.

Session #1

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

9:15 - 10:15 A.M.

Session #2

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.

Resource and Sexual Health Fair

WEITZ CEC

10:30 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.

State Forums

Various locations. See page 41.

11:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.

Identity Forums

Various locations. See page 42.

11:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.

State of the Region Panel

CPACS 101

12:30 P.M.

Lunch/Optional Break on Your Own

On-campus food options. See page 25.

1:00 - 2:00 P.M.

Keynote: Dylan Marron

Sapp Fieldhouse

2:15 - 3:15 P.M.

Career Fair

WEITZ CEC 101 / Atrium

3:30 - 8:00 P.M.

Oversight Committee Meeting

MBSC 228/226

3:30 - 4:30 P.M.

Session #3

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

4:45 - 5:45 P.M.

Session #4

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

6:00 - 7:00 P.M.

Session #5

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

7:00 - 8:00 P.M.

Dinner/Break on Your Own

On-campus food options. See page 25.

8:00 - 8:45 P.M.

Entertainment: Tori Grace Nichols

Sapp Fieldhouse

9:00 - 10:00 P.M.

Drag Show hosted by Jujubee

Sapp Fieldhouse

10:00 P.M. - 12:00 A.M.

Dance

MBSC Ballroom

7:30 A.M. - 2:00 P.M.

Information Booth

WEITZ CEC 116

8:00 - 9:00 A.M.

Session #6

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

9:15 - 10:15 A.M.

Session #7

WEITZ CEC / CPACS / H&K / MBSC

10:30 - 11:30 A.M.

Keynote: Blair Imani

Sapp Fieldhouse

11:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.

Closing Ceremony

Sapp Fieldhouse

SATURDAY, FEB. 17

SUNDAY, FEB. 18


CONTENTS 5

24

44

6

26

48

7

27

54

INSTITUTE WELCOME

ABOUT MBLGTACC

MBLGTACC YEARS

8

OVER A QUARTER CENTURY OF MBLGTACC

11

PLANNING COMMITTEE WELCOME

RESOURCES

GENERAL INFO

EMERGENCY AND CRISIS INFO

28

ACCESSIBILITY INFO

30

SPEAKER AND ENTERTAINMENT BIOS

SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

SESSION 2 WORKSHOPS

SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

60

SESSION 4 WORKSHOPS

66

SESSION 5 WORKSHOPS

70

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32

SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

14

38

SESSION 7 WORKSHOPS

16

40

SPECIAL THANKS

INTERSECTIONALITY

PLANNING COMMITTEE

ABOUT THE ADVISORS

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SPONSORS

20

ABOUT OUR UNIVERSITY

22

CODE OF INCLUSION

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

ADVISOR TRACKS

RESOURCE AND CAREER FAIR

41

STATE FORUMS

42

IDENTITY FORUMS

43

STATE OF THE REGION / OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MEETING

76

82

83

LETTERS OF SUPPORT

90

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

94

NOTES

98

CAMPUS MAPS


On behalf of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, it is my distinct honor to welcome you to the 2018 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference! This weekend marks the 26th time that LGBTQ students from across the Midwest—and the nation—have come together for a weekend of learning and coalition building. Your presence in this space is radical and revolutionary. Thank you for making the choice to be here. Our gathering this weekend comes at a time when fear and pain abound. We find this fear and pain in our own community, in the communities of other marginalized groups, and across the nation. It is profoundly disheartening that in the year 2018, we still must fight external forces for our basic rights and freedoms. However, even as we fight for those rights and freedoms, let us not forget the injustices and harm that take place every day within our very own community. We must learn to confront oppression. We cannot be complicit in the oppression of others. We must unite, and we must resist. This weekend, your charge is simple. Resist oppression. Connect with one another. Build relationships. Celebrate in community. Learn. Challenge assumptions. Find strength to overcome adversity. Empower yourself and others to move forward in the world and create sustainable change. We hope you enjoy your weekend. But even more, we hope this weekend uplifts you, liberates you, and empowers you.

With pride,

Justin Drwencke Chief Executive Officer Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity 5


ABOUT MBLGTACC The Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC) is an annual conference held to connect, educate, and empower LGBTQIA+ college students, faculty, and staff around the Midwest and beyond. It has attracted advocates and thought leaders including Angela Davis, Robyn Ochs, Janet Mock, Laverne Cox, Kate Bornstein, Faisal Alam, and LZ Granderson; and entertainers and artists including RuPaul, Todrick Hall, Margaret Cho, J Mase III, Chely Wright, and Loren Cameron. Learn more about MBLGTACC.

MISSION STATEMENT The mission of MBLGTACC 2018 All Roads Lead to Intersectionality is to educate queer and trans Midwest college students to empower and celebrate their identities, while enabling them to resist oppression and develop resiliency against personal and societal injustices.

OUR PILLARS CELEBRATION We need to allow ourselves moments of joy and laughter, especially in safe spaces amongst our community. Happiness drives us all in different ways and can always be enjoyed together.

RESISTANCE We encourage challenging the institution, in whatever form or direction it may take, endlessly and fiercely using our community resources and personal strengths. Giving up is not an option.

EMPOWERMENT One of the most detrimental effects of marginalization is the theft of personal agency. Our community has been silenced for too long, and we must strive to find the power to advocate for ourselves.

EDUCATION Knowledge is an invaluable resource to further our cause and can never be taken away from us. Lifelong learning is critical for the betterment of ourselves, our community, and our movement.

RESILIENCY Overcoming societal obstacles and adversity is a fundamental aspect of our community’s identity. We seek to cultivate inner strength and resolve, as they are the key to building stable foundations and facilitating growth.

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MBLGTACC YEARS Earlham College (Indiana) Greetings from the 90’s...Wish You Were Here Queer

Beloit College (Wisconsin) Building Queer Success in the Midwest

University of Illinois at Chicago Across the Fruited Plain

Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota) Making Waves Into the New Millennium

Michigan State University Still Moving Forward

Iowa State University Speak Up! Speak Out!

University of South Dakota Painting the Rainbow: Celebrating Unity Through Diversity

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Voting for Change: Liberty and Justice For All University of Wisconsin-Madison Get Real! Confronting Privilege, Provoking Dialogue and Building New Foundations

Iowa State University The Butterfly Effect: Evolution to Revolution

University of Missouri Kansas City Jazzin’ It Up

Purdue University Introspection at the Crossroads

University of Nebraska at Omaha All Roads Lead to Intersectionality

1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Iowa State and Drake Universities

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale Building Queer Success in the Midwest

Indiana State University We’re Here! We’re Queer! We’re Fabulous!

University of Wisconsin-Madison Moving Forward, Looking Back

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Out and About: Breaking Silence, Boundaries, Labels

The Ohio State University Loving With Pride

Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota) Building The Bridge To Bring It All Together

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Alphabet Soup: No Matter The Letter We Stand Together

Indiana University Bloomington Living Out Loud: Examining Our Past to Enhance Our Future

University of Michigan-Anarbor Justice or Just Us? Achieving Liberty for All

Michigan State University Mosaic: Putting the Pieces Together

Illinois State University Narrating A New Normal DePaul, Loyola Chicago, and Northeastern Illinois Universities United in Solidarity

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WELCOME TO MBLGTACC 2018: ALL ROADS LEAD TO INTERSECTIONALITY! Every single member of the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference 2018 Planning Committee is overjoyed that you are here with us at the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s campus for this historic weekend. We could not be more proud to say that this is the biggest conference that UNO has ever hosted on its campus. This is also the first time in MBLGTACC’s 26-year run that it has been hosted in the great state of Nebraska. Countless hours, tears, emails, texts, weekends, meetings, meetings, and more meetings went into MBLGTACC 2018. We are thrilled that our moments of both failure and triumph have led us to right now as we share the magic of MBLGTACC with you. For some of you, this might be the first time you have been in a crowd and amongst people who can begin to understand who you are and what you are about. This will be a breathtaking, special, and truly individual experience for you. For others, this weekend will become one of many other fond memories of MBLGTACC you keep in the back of your mind to play over and over for years afterward until it frays around the edges, like a classic movie or a favorite photo you always keep close. Whether it is both, neither, or something in between, the hope of MBLGTACC 2018 is to facilitate every attendee’s growth. Whether it is personally, academically, professionally, or a combination of all of those things, we are dedicated to you. Now is a time when we need to tell ourselves the truths that we know deep down and that society denies us. The truth is that you matter. The truth is that you are completely valid just as you are. The truth is that you are loved, and that we love our communities and what we stand for. The truth is that life is incredibly, unspeakably hard sometimes, more so for some than others, but that we cannot and will not stop being true to ourselves and fighting back. The truth is that we can - and will - build a better world together and that MBLGTACC 2018 could be the next step to something bigger.

Sincerely Yours, MBLGTACC 2018 Planning Committee

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INTERSECTIONALITY

In 1989, Kimberlé Crenshaw coined the term “intersectionality” to encompass the idea that individuals have multidimensional, interlocking identities and consequently people experience layers of oppression. We at the University of Nebraska at Omaha deeply believe that intersectionality is the foundational part of our lives. Advocacy and activism of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans spectrum, queer spectrum, intersex, asexual, non-binary, and/ or gender nonconforming (LGBTQIA+) people is something that must be supported, educated about, and valued. We know that thoughtfully supporting the intersectional identities of individuals allows people to engage with the complications and the multifaceted lives that we lead. The UNO planning committee purposefully proposes and directly focuses on Intersectionality as the most integral part of our mission for MBLGTACC 2018. We hope to bring awareness, empowerment,

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and resources to the complications and contradictions inherent within interwoven identities that you, the conference participants, experience. Our team recognizes that conference-goers have varying degrees of knowledge related to entanglements of intersectionality. We are deliberate in supporting all levels of experiences so each student is able to grow and learn to be reflective of their own identities along with others. Education is a lifelong process that we want participants to continuously evaluate and is one of our pillars because of this. Also, we strive for all participants to recognize how they live every day existing within society’s idea of their many identities and thus we are using this conference to honor their experiences. Our hope is that by allowing participants to hear from others,


to meet new people with different life stories, and to speak their own truths, those of you who are attending MBLGTACC 2018 in Omaha, Nebraska, will leave feeling as though your own lives are honored. We at UNO want to assist students in celebrating their strength and individuality by shining a light on their experiences and demonstrating to them that they and their insight is valuable. With this in mind, we developed our theme. Building off of our intersectional entry point to our work, we developed the following theme for MBLGTACC 2018: All Roads Lead to Intersectionality. As the Midwestern conference for queer and trans college students, we are highlighting our Midwestern identities through our roadway systems that connect us and span across arbitrary lines. The highway and roadway systems are fluid and interwoven and symbolize our intersectional identities. There are times when we exist in spaces and drive into new adventures, but all our experiences on those roads are real and visceral. This proposed theme is expansive and reflective of our Midwestern queer and trans identities.

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PLANNING COMMITTEE

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Gina Comstock (They|Them|Theirs) is a third-year student majoring in Neuroscience with minors in Sociology and LGBTQ Studies. They hope to conduct research on gender and sexuality from a queer, non-binary perspective. Gina enjoys over thinking, making horrible puns, screen-shotting pictures of other peoples’ pets, and napping in the QTS office.

Jasmine Flores (They|Them|Theirs) is a first year student at UNO, currently in the pre-education program. Their goal is to be a high school history teacher. Jasmine is a Ravenclaw, an INTP, and a Virgo, in that order, and they’re excited to educate and empower all of the humans attending MBLGTACC.

Matthew Dooley (He|Him|His/ They|Them|Theirs) is from a small town outside of Omaha, Nebraska. While attending UNO they’ve gotten involved with UNO’s Queer and Trans Services, MBLGTACC, and other various aspects of the UNO community.

Rachel Pruch (She|Her|Hers) is an International Studies and Political Science major with minors in Islamic Studies and Human Rights. She is Vice President of the UNO Ballroom Dance Club and a member of the Racketball Club. She is a queer-identified woman who is a member of UNO’s Queer and Trans Services.

Ren Drincic (They|Them|Theirs) is a disabled, autistic, and gendervague student studying Psychology at UNO. In addition to being on the MBLGTACC team, they are also on UNO’s MavRecovery and Queer Trans Services boards, and are the president of NESAAP, a nonprofit devoted to creating safer spaces in Nebraska communities.

Alicia Reil (She|Her|Hers) is a Scorpio who belongs in Slytherin. She studies Emergency Management with concentrations in Leadership & Administration and Planning & Preparing for Urban Hazards. She loves hiking, climbing, and being stuck in nature for long periods of time. She celebrates the opportunity to be involved in MBLGTACC planning and the friendships she has built from it.


Fiona Smith (She|Her|Hers) is a third-year student studying English and Sociology. She loves poetry and short stories, and wants to be an anthology editor. INFP, Gemini, Ravenclaw.

Peyton Wells (She|Her|Hers) is a white, bisexual, working-class cis woman. ENFP. Capricorn. Ravenclaw. Secondary Education (English Language Arts) and French. Halfling rogue and Dragonborn paladin.

Alex Theos (They|Them|Theirs) is a student in the Secondary Education program at UNO specializing in English. Alex volunteers at many student organizations. Alex works as a Diversity Champion at a Child Development Center and loves teaching youngins.

Irene Zaiter (She|Her|Hers) chose to come to UNO, from Queens, NY, to live her authentic, queer life. Having lived in Omaha for three years, she considers this home. Irene is majoring in Sociology with a minor in queer studies in hopes of becoming a counselor for queer youth.

Torie Walenz (She|Her|Hers) is a first year Pre-Secondary Education major with a history endorsement and is minoring in women’s and gender studies. She is an INTP Ravenclaw who enjoys reading, rugby, and rambunctious dogs. Her life goals are to become a professor and own a corgi.

Special thanks to all the past committee members who have graduated or who are no longer part of the current committee. Your work was truly valuable and this conference would not have been possible without your dedication and contributions over the last three years.

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ABOUT THE ADVISORS

Pictured from left to right Ani Solomon, Anne Heimann, Tyler Micek, Kati Kough, Nikola Halcyone Zaporowski, Andrew Aleman, Jay Irwin, and Jessi Hitchins. Bari Lisa Marshall not pictured.

Andrew Aleman (He|Him|His) has been a part of UNO’s campus community for several years, first as a student and now as an employee. He currently serves as UNO’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator/Investigator. As a member of UNO’s Safe Space Committee, Andrew provides Safe Space Trainings both on and off campus, and advises an on campus QTPOC student group, Melanated Queerations. As a fellow queer person, Andrew tries to remain connected to Omaha’s queer and trans community, including opportunities to support and empower queer and trans youth/young adults.

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Nikola Halcyone Zaporowski (She|Her|Hers) has worked at UNO Multicultural Affairs & the UNO Gender & Sexuality Resource Center since December 2015. She earned her “15 year undergrad” in 2016 and is currently pursuing her Masters from the Grace Abbott School of Social Work. She’s a white, queer, cis woman with a neurological chronic pain condition who uses a wheelchair; was born, raised, and is currently a practicing Nichiren Buddhist who has been working locally in trans + queer advocacy, education, and activism for 15 years. She has huge crushes on Rachel Maddow and Sen. Cory Booker, is really a Gryffindor, knows Jean-Luc Picard is the best Captain, and believes nothing else matters when babies are around.


Anne Heimann (She|Her|Hers) serves as the Director of Accessibility Services Center (ASC) at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. As the advisor for the Accommodations Committee, she empowers the committee members to develop their skills and knowledge of inclusive design to build an accessible conference from planning to implementation. Outside of work, Anne is an Oreo enthusiast and is trying all of the Limited Edition Oreos. She also enjoys spending time outdoors and with family & friends.

Bari Lisa Marshall (She|Her|Hers) serves as UNO’s Assistant Director of Student Involvement. Bari has worked in higher education for eight years and has experience in housing, student involvement and student affairs. At each institution, she has worked to establish herself as a resource for contracts and negotiations. Having used these skills throughout her life, she was very excited to join the Programming Committee for the conference.

Jessi Hitchins, Ph.D. (She|Her|Hers) is the founding director of the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center at University of Nebraska Omaha. She has a decade of practitioner experience in higher education and community outreach through various roles in women, gender, sexuality/ LGBTQIA+, and victim/survivor advocacy centers, reproductive justice health work, and multicultural offices. In her spare time, she enjoys reading sci-fi young adult books, hair braiding, musical theater, and puggle snuggling.

Tyler Micek (He|Him|His) is the Resident Manager at Scott Housing at UNO and identifies as bisexual. Tyler is a proud Maverick alumni who has been working for Scott Housing for the last 3.5 years. When he is not at work, Tyler enjoys spending time with his family, painting, and traveling. Tyler loves to tell people that he was recently able to feed a wild monkey in Morocco.

Jay Irwin, Ph.D. (He|Him|His) is an Associate Professor of Sociology and the Director of the LGBTQ/Sexuality Studies program at University of Nebraska at Omaha. He is also a facilitator for TRANScend, the UNO trans specific social support group on campus. He grew up in Alabama.

Ani Solomon (She|Her|Hers) is a Residence Hall Director at UNO. She also oversees the Gender Inclusive Housing communities at UNO and works to connect students to resources across campus and the local community. Her favorite part of her job is getting to work with students and plan fun programs for them to attend.

Kati Kough (She|Her|Hers) is the Graduate Assistant and Programming Coordinator for UNO’s Gender and Sexuality Resource Center. She is currently pursuing her Master’s of Arts in Sociology, in which she researches societal influences and how they affect sexuality and gender. When she is not working, writing, or reading, she loves to cross stitch, knit, weave, and cook. She adores her cat babes more than anything else in the world.

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SPONSORS The MBLGTACC 2018 Planning Committee would like to thank the incredible organizations and people that have supported the conference through direct and in-kind donations. The conference would not have been possible without the level of support they have given the planning team over the past two years.

D T R A NS SE

R

NT

ST

UD

S

QTS

CE

QU E

AN

VI

ER

PLATINUM SPONSORS:

ENT ME GOVERN

UNO GENDER AND SEXUALITY RESOURCE CENTER UNO MIDLANDS SEXUAL HEALTH RESEARCH COLLABORATIVE UNO OFFICE OF CIVIC AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY UNO CRISS LIBRARY UNO NEW STUDENT AND FAMILY PROGRAMS

GOLD SPONSORS:

UNO COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNO GRACE ABBOTT SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

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PURPLE DONOR:

SILVER SPONSORS:

DR. JESSI HITCHINS GREEN DONORS:

UNO SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY

UNO COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION, FINE ART AND MEDIA UNO COLLEGE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE BRONZE SPONSORS:

ROSE AND STEVE CRATE YELLOW DONORS: LINDY HOYER SHANNON A. WITHERSPOON DR. TAMMIE M. KENNEDY DR. DAN SHIPP ORANGE DONORS: CATHY PETTID AND FAMILY KATHERINE KEISER AND FAMILY ANTHONY M. HUGHES RANDY HAGER

Option 1 Logo without text Color

SARA WOODS RED DONORS: CRISTINA LAMAS SEAN B.C. TONI BONSERA MADISON LARIMORE AND WEI HUA TYLER MICEK

MAVERICK SPONSORS: COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT AKSARBEN VILLAGE

RESIDENCE INN BY MARRIOTT AKSARBEN VILLAGE

ELIZABETH BLANCO RODRIGUEZ NICKI WELLS AND DONALD WEINDORFF PEYTON WELLS

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ABOUT OUR UNIVERSITY For 109 years, the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) has served as Nebraska’s point of access for excellence in higher education. UNO delivers to students a personal yet robust learning experience. Located in the heart of Omaha, UNO’s roads wind through city parks, neighborhoods and business districts, creating an experience few universities offer. UNO’s four strategic priorities are student centered, academic excellence, community engagement, and institutional quality. We are proud to have the most diverse collegiate body in the region with over half of all students of color in the University of Nebraska system attending UNO. Around a third of the students are first generation and ethnically diverse. We pride ourselves on being one of the most affordable institutions in the region. With a student body of over 15,500, UNO ranks in the Top 20 nationally for best online bachelor degrees and received the national Economic Opportunity Award as the highest honor a school can receive by the U.S. government for commitment to volunteering, service learning, and civic engagement. UNO is the only institution in the nation to have a stand-alone building that is solely for the purpose of community engagement and hosts local/state nonprofits. Given that the city of Omaha has truly become part of the campus with a population of 1.2 million people in a 50 square mile radius, student opportunities are unlimited. Illustrating this is Omaha’s ranking as the #1 city to work in America (Smart Asset), the #2 city to find a job (Fortune), and the #2 city for a college student (Online Colleges). Home to four Fortune 500 companies, the nation’s best zoo and major events such as the NCAA College World Series, Omaha is the definition of unique as it rests in America’s heartland. The Office of Student Affairs has a well established inclusion sub-division made up of the Accessibility Service Center, the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center, Multicultural Affairs, and the Office of Veteran and Military Affairs which integrates intersectionality into programming and services. Additionally, UNO currently is the only university in the state to have staffing to program and serve our native population.

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UNO QUEER AND TRANS COMMUNITY There has been important progress and momentum in addressing identity and expression here in the Omaha community. UNO has shown a history of providing resources and support for the LGBTQIA+ population from the inception of the Women’s Resource Center in 1976, to the establishment of the group that is now known as the Queer and Trans Services Student Agency in the early 1990s, to the formation of the professionally-staffed Gender and Sexuality Resource Center in 2015, which serves all students. This year, UNO received the distinction of Best College for LGBTQ Students in Nebraska from BestColleges.com. There is no better example than the tenure of Meredith Bacon, Ph.D. Serving as faculty president three times, Dr. Bacon is the first openly trans woman to serve in this position in the nation. Progress continues through the development and implementation of gender and sexuality-inclusive resources, services, and programs on campus. This includes, but is not limited to: • Gender inclusive bathrooms and locker rooms • Options for name and gender change internal to the campus • Inclusive non-discrimination notice • Gender-inclusive housing • Welcome week LGBTQIA+ socials • Lavender graduation • OUT @ UNO (a site that makes visible the out faculty, staff, and graduate assistants on campus) • Queer Omaha Archive at the UNO Criss Library • Safe Space • Lez Bi Real Queer (weekly social support group for anyone in the LGBTQIA+ community) • Melanated Queerations (weekly social support group for LGBTQIA+ People of Color) • TRANScend (weekly social support group for trans-spectrum community)


CODE OF INCLUSION Everyone is responsible for their own behavior in this space. While we wish for everyone to be able to express themselves, explore, and learn in their own way, this code for inclusion sets an expectation that all attendees be considerate and careful of those around them. This policy has been created for the greater safety and access of all guests and attendees. Failure to adhere to these necessary guidelines could result in removal from the event at the Institute’s discretion. By attending the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC), you agree to the following Code for Inclusion: *TRIGGER WARNING*

We have a zero-tolerance policy for harassment of any kind, including but not limited to: • stalking • offensive verbal comments • non-consensual photography or recording • bathroom policing • unwelcome physical attention • intimidation • physical or sexual assault • inappropriate physical contact

If you have any questions or concerns about this policy, please contact: R.B. Brooks, Chief Operations Officer of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity at roze@sgdinstitute.org.

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SEXUAL RESPONSIBILITY We encourage anyone engaging in sexual activity to do so safely and consensually. We encourage the use of condoms, dental dams, lubricant, or other forms of protection. While this is a sex-positive space, be courteous to those who do not wish to engage in sexual activity, or those who may be sex-repulsed. Inversely, do not shame or judge those who engage in sexual activity, including those who participate in kink communities. Your body, your choice.

CONSENT Consent should be received for any sexual and/or physical contact. Consent is an unambiguous, enthusiastic, and voluntary agreement to move forward with a specific sexual request or act. Consent cannot be obtained from individuals who are asleep or who have a temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity, including as a result of drug or alcohol use. Consent is an affirmative act, not a lack of action; resistance from a person is not required to demonstrate lack of consent. Intoxication is not an excuse for failing to ask for or obtain consent. Consent is on-going and can be given and taken away at any time. Sexual assault is defined as performing any sexual act with or on a person who has not given, has denied, or is unable to give consent.


TRIGGER WARNINGS Provide content and/or trigger warnings whenever possible. Allow others to name their triggers when they arise and determine how to move forward without causing additional harm or dismissing the incident.

CONSIDERATION FOR OTHERS Consider how your identities impact the space you are in. There are numerous intersections of identities present and it is vital to give room to those who are often denied the ability to take up space.

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE Be mindful of your language. While we are all learning and you may not be aware of certain phrases that others may find offensive, be receptive to being informed by attendees, reflect when addressed, and adjust accordingly. This includes honoring people’s pronouns and names and avoiding ableist language (ex: “crazy,” “lame,” “crippled”).

SERVICE ANIMALS If you encounter someone with a service animal, you should NOT touch, offer food to, or interact with the animal in any way unless otherwise explicitly stated by the owner. Service animals can sometimes be identified by a vest or other article of clothing indicating they are assisting.

ACCESSIBILITY AWARENESS Please honor any accommodation or accessibility needs provided to attendees. Do not inhibit the assistance provided to and/or used by attendees such as ASL interpreters, reserved seating, service animals, or other types of services/equipment.

NETIQUETTE Be sure to obtain permission before posting and/or tagging pictures of other attendees on social media. Avoid using bright or flashing lights whenever possible.

ALLERGIES & SCENT SENSITIVITY We ask attendees to use scent-free products or limit/forego the excessive use of scented hygiene products while at the conference.

Are you a person of color and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender? Join others like you who are queer people of color! Melanated Queerations is a group by, for, and about queer people of color in the University of Nebraska at Omaha Community. EVERY TUESDAY 12:00 P.M.

For more information, contact the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center at 402-554-2890 or unogsrc@unomaha.edu.

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RESOURCES HOTELS

TRANSPORTATION

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT AKSARBEN VILLAGE

CONFERENCE SHUTTLES & TRACKERS

1625 South 67th Street, Omaha, NE 68106 402.951.4300 Accessible Transportation Available 1.3 Miles From Conference

RESIDENCE INN OMAHA AKSARBEN VILLAGE 1717 S 67th St, Omaha, NE 68106 402.551.8000 Accessible Transportation Available 1.3 Miles From Conference

COMFORT INN AND SUITES GROVER 7007 Grover St, Omaha, NE 68106 402.934.4900 Accessible Transportation Available 2.9 Miles From Conference

THE HOTEL RL 3321 S 72nd St, Omaha, NE 68124 402.393.3950 Accessible Transportation Available 2.9 Miles From Conference

VISITOMAHA.COM Discover all that Omaha, Nebraska offers, including restaurants, things to do, and events from the Omaha Visitors Bureau. Omaha visitor guides are available at the registration and information area (Weitz CEC 116).

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MBLGTACC 2018 will have free accessible buses available from the hotels at which we have room blocks. The shuttles will run during Friday the 16th from 2:30 P.M.–11:00 P.M., Saturday the 17th from 7:00 A.M.–11:55 P.M., and Sunday the 18th from 7:00 A.M.–1:30 P.M. There will be trackers on the shuttles that stream to our mobile app. Please wait for your shuttle 5-15 minutes in advance of when you need it to ensure you catch it on time.

METRO BUS SYSTEM Information about the accessibility of the Omaha Metro Bus System can be found at ometro.com. The website also includes a schedule and map of the bus routes, a trip planning guide, and a Spanish language assistance area.

HAPPY CAB (TAXI) If you would like to arrange a taxi, please call Happy Cab at 402.292.2222 and speak with an operator. The typical wait time for cab arrival is 5–20 minutes but is liable to change on a caseby-case basis, so plan accordingly. They offer accessible vans on a first-come-first-serve basis. Visit their site to see fares and other information at happycab.com.

PARKING The campus has an open parking policy starting Friday through Sunday for the conference. Additional accessible parking is available for attendees at the Weitz CEC (Lot E). See the campus map on page 98 for parking lots and structures across the campus.


THIRD FLOOR

MILO BAIL STUDENT CENTER FIRST FLOOR

SECOND ENTRANCE

FOOD

ENTRANCE

Gluten-free and vegetarian options are available.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY, 16, 2018 DURANGO’S GRILL | 4:00 P.M.–6:00 P.M.  AVERICK DEN / C-STORE M 7:00 A.M.–7:00 P.M. (GRILL OPEN UNTIL 7:00 P.M.)  ILO BAIL STUDENT CENTER FOOD COURT M 4:00 P.M.–6:00 P.M. FIRST FLOOR MAVREC CAFÉ | 7:30 A.M.–2:30 P.M. ENTRANCE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY, 17, 2018

ENTRANCE

QUIET ROOM SECOND

FLOOR

ELEVATOR

ENTRANCE

DURANGO’S GRILL | 11:00 P.M.–2:00 P.M.  AVERICK DEN / C-STORE M 7:30 A.M.–8:00 P.M. (GRILL OPEN UNTIL 8:00 P.M.)

HEALTH AND KINE BUILDING

 ILO BAIL STUDENT CENTER FOOD COURT M 11:00 A.M.–2:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.–8:00 P.M. MAVREC CAFÉ | 7:30 A.M.–2:00 P.M.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY, 18, 2018

ENTRANCE

DURANGO’S GRILL & QUIET ROOM ELEVATOR MILO BAIL STUDENT CENTER FOOD COURT CLOSED  AVERICK DEN / C-STORE M 7:30 A.M.– 2:00 P.M. (GRILL OPEN UNTIL 12:00 P.M.)

H&K

FIRST FLOOR ENTRANCE

FIRST FLOOR

MAVREC CAFÉ | 7:30 A.M.–12:00 P.M.

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GENERAL INFO WIFI: UNOGUEST

PHOTOGRAPHY POLICY

No password is required. If your campus is a part of the “Eduroam” system, please use your campus credentials to log in.

The Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity (“the Institute”) or authorized licencees of the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference (“MBLGTACC”) will be photographing common spaces, keynotes, and entertainment during MBLGTACC weekend (“the Event”), and any onstage discussions thereafter. The goal of this photography is to share the best moments of the event with alumni, supporters, and other community members, to celebrate our community, and to enhance the visibility of the Institute and the Event in the Midwest and nationally.

SOCIAL MEDIA: @MBLGTACC Track our social media over the weekend for important updates and announcements! Facebook @mblgtacc Instagram @mblgtacc Twitter @mblgtacc Snapchat MBLGTACC Use #mblgtacc2018 and #mblgtacc to share your experience. Want to help MBLGTACC do better next year or make sure we continue to do things well, let the conference committee know your thoughts by using #MBLGTACCCARES. Give us feedback about how we can make MBLGTACC a welcoming, learning space for all.

CONFERENCE APP: MBLGTACC 2018 Download the Guidebook app and use passcode mavpride2018 to access MBLGTACC 2018 conference information online.

REGISTRATION DESK The registration desk will be located near the main entrance on the first floor of the Weitz CEC throughout the conference. Volunteers will be able to assist you with any conference questions you may have.

VOLUNTEERS If you have questions regarding volunteering, please visit our registration desk and someone will be able to assist you.

SMOKING POLICY Smoking and the use of other tobacco products or smoking instruments are prohibited on the UNO Campus, both indoors and outdoors, at all times.

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The Institute respects, protects, and centers the rights of students who do not consent to be photographed. To that end, MBLGTACC and the Institute: • Will offer intentional spaces where photography by attendees is welcome and encouraged; • Will offer wearable “do not photograph” markers for attendees; • Will not share on its website or social media any photographs featuring attendees with “do not photograph” markers; • Will not tolerate non-consensual photography by attendees and guests; • Requires that all attendees and guests obtain permission before posting photos of others taken at the conference to social media; and • Requires that all attendees and guests obtain permission before tagging someone in a post at the conference on social media. By attending the event, you acknowledge that the commissioned photos and recordings belong to the Institute, and you will not receive payment or any other compensation in connection with the pictures and recordings. You further release MBLGTACC and the Institute from any and all liability that may or could arise from the taking or use of the pictures. This policy has been created for the greater safety and access of all guests and attendees. If you have any questions or concerns about this policy, please contact Nick Pfost, Chief Marketing Officer of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, at nick@sgdinstitute.org.


EMERGENCY AND CRISIS INFO DURING THE CONFERENCE

EMERGENCY

CRISIS

On campus emergencies: call 402.554.2911 or 911

24-Hour Crisis Hotline: call 402.980.9050

An emergency is defined as a life-threatening situation and requires an immediate intervention or response.

This line will only be staffed during the conference, but is available 24/7 throughout the conference for immediate support or to speak with a crisis advisor.

Examples of an emergency include, but are not limited to: • Fire • Suicidal/homicidal thoughts • Intent, or plans, or life-threatening behaviors • Immediate medical needs

Staffed by trained professionals that can help attendees navigate mental health, sexual violence, dating violence, and stalking. These professionals are acutely aware of LGBTQIA+ intersectional needs. Please note this not a confidential line. Title IX concerns: call 402.980.9050

CONFIDENTIAL RESOURCES TrevorLifeline (24/7): 866.488.7386

Use this line for questions, assistance, or to report misconduct. We encourage all survivors or witnesses to report misconduct both on and off campus.

Trans Lifeline: 877.565.8860

POST CONFERENCE Title IX reports: call 402.554.2120 To make a Title IX report after the conference. We encourage all survivors or witnesses to report misconduct.

TESTING If you would like a complimentary HIV or STI screening, please visit the Nebraska AIDS Project booth located near our registration desk.

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ACCESSIBILITY INFO If you have general questions or concerns about accessibility, please see the information below or visit the Accessibility FAQ’s on the conference app. If you have specific questions about accessibility, please visit our accessibility desk located near the registration desk in the Weitz CEC.

VISUAL ACCESSIBILITY

AUDITORY ACCESSIBILITY

Our developers created all electronic content with visual accessibility software web and electronic accessibility in mind. Programs will be available on the app and accessible to screen readers and other assistive features. We will also be sending information to all presenters about how to make their presentations accessible.

There will be ASL interpreters for all Keynote speakers, featured entertainment, and the drag show. We will also be sending information to all presenters about how to make their presentations accessible.

A limited number of large print programs will be available for on-site registration. However, we cannot guarantee that all sessions will be accessible for all attendees.

MOBILE ACCESSIBILITY

Please inquire at the registration table with any accessibility requests or questions, such as ASL interpretation, personal assistants, and large-print programs.

There are several aspects of MBLGTACC 2018 that will go beyond ADA compliance. We are hosting the conference in buildings that are in relatively close proximity to each other— all of the buildings span a total distance of a quarter of a mile from end to end, with most buildings being around 200 feet from one another. If you are a part-time wheelchair user, please keep in mind that conferences typically involve a lot of travel. All of the hallways are wide enough to consider both the inevitable conference traffic as well as wheelchair accommodation. While there is an incline between the main floor of Sapp Fieldhouse and MBSC, the elevator in the Weitz CEC can be used to circumnavigate the hill.

SENSORY ACCESSIBILITY All keynotes and featured presentations will be live streamed into a separate sensory-considerate room. We also have scent-free seating mapped out for every event in Sapp Fieldhouse and the showing of Free CeCe. The Code of Inclusion for the weekend is located in the conference booklet (page 22) and includes sensory awareness information for all attendees to read and consider.

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SERVICE ANIMALS The ADA defines a Service Animal as “any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.” When it is not readily apparent that the dog identified by the individual with a disability is trained to do work or perform tasks for the person, conference staff, may ask the individual with the disability if the dog is required because of a disability and what work or task the dog has been trained to perform. However, the conference will not require documentation, such as proof that the dog has been certified, trained, or licensed as a Service Animal.

PROOF OF DISABILITY A doctors note or proof of disability is not required.


RESTROOMS Gender inclusive restrooms are located on the odd floors (1st, 3rd, etc) of each building being used for MBLGTACC. Gendered restrooms are located on the even floored (2nd, etc) of each building. Please note that buildings not being used for MBLGTACC may not have inclusive facilities.

LACTATION SPACES Lactation spaces are available in the Weitz CEC (1st floor), Milo Bail Student Center (1st floor), and H&K (2nd floor). These spaces are provided for individuals who are breastfeeding or pumping and include a sink, outlets, and privacy from others. Please note that these spaces are only available upon request from university staff. If you need to access one of our lactation spaces, please speak to the registration desk.

QUIET ROOMS Quiet room are located in each conference building. These rooms are non-staffed spaces to provide conference attendees with a quiet place to rest and rejuvenate. The rooms will be equipped with yoga mats, coloring books, fidgets, etc. Conference attendees can utilize these spaces during the time events are happening in those buildings. MBSC H&K CPACS WEITZ CEC

222 104S 125 221

Quiet Room Quiet Room Quiet Room Quiet Room

QUEER OMAHA ARCHIVES The newly established Queer Omaha Archives collects, preserves, and provides public access to materials documenting the diverse LGBTQIA+ people and organizations of the greater Omaha region along with their experiences and work. As the archive continues to grow, the library encourages community members to share their artifacts with the collection. Contact Archives & Special Collections for more information, to discuss donating materials, or to learn other ways you can support the Queer Omaha Archives. Amy Schindler, Director Archives & Special Collections Phone: 402.554.6046 Email: acschindler@unomaha.edu

queeromahaarchives.omeka.net

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER 1

CECE MCDONALD & JOSHUA ALLEN FRIDAY, 7:15–8:15 P.M. SAPP FIELDHOUSE SESSION 2 FEATURED SPEAKER SATURDAY, 9:15–10:15 P.M. CPACS 101

CeCe McDonald is an activist, speaker and icon in the LGBTQ community. Rising to international recognition after surviving a white supremacist and transphobic attack, CeCe has graced stages across the country where she uses storytelling to articulate the personal and political implications of being both black & trans. Now, one of the founders of the Black Excellence Collective and Black Excellence Tour, created with best friend Joshua Allen and solo engagements, she fosters important conversations around mass incarceration, sexuality and violence and is the star of the recently released feature length documentary about her life and story, Free CeCe!

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Joshua Allen (they/them/ theirs) is a black queer organizer and art maker whose work revolves around gender, race, and policing. An advocate for LGBTQ rights beyond the struggle for marriage equality, Joshua organizes against the violence that queer, trans and nonbinary people of color face every day. As an organizer and artist they have brought messages of queer empowerment to cities & countries throughout the world with direct action, visual art and public speaking. At a young age, Joshua is already widely regarded as one of the leading voices in conversations around gender, sexuality, and racial justice.


KEYNOTE SPEAKER 2

DYLAN MARRON SATURDAY, 1:00–2:00 P.M SAPP FIELDHOUSE SESSION 1 FEATURED SPEAKER SATURDAY, 8:00–9:00 A.M CPACS 101

Dylan Marron is an IFP Gotham Award and Drama Desknominated writer, performer and video maker. He is the voice of Carlos on the hit podcast Welcome to Nightvale, an alum of the New York Neo Futurists, and the creator of Every Single Word (Tumblr’s “Most Viral Blog” of 2016 and Short Award Nominee). In 2017 Dylan launched his Podcast “Conversations with People Who Hate Me” - in conjunction with Nightvale – where Dylan engages his internet trolls in a lively and funny way. The podcast has been a hit an racked up 2,000,000 downloads and a New York Times magazine profile of Dylan to boot. Dylan is a writer, correspondent, and the most recognized face of Seriously.tv, where he created the viral smashes Sitting in Bathrooms with Trans People, Shutting Down Bullsh*t, and his signature Unboxing series.

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER 3

BLAIR IMANI SUNDAY, 10:30–11:30 A.M SAPP FIELDHOUSE SESSION 6 FEATURED SPEAKER SUNDAY, 8:00–9:00 A.M. CPACS 101

Blair Imani is a black bisexual Muslim activist living in Brooklyn, New York. She is the founder and Executive Director of Equality for HER, a nonprofit educational platform for feminine identifying individuals. Today, Blair Imani is a writer and organizer specializing in youth engagement. She currently serves as the Civic Action & Campaign Lead at DoSomething.org, the largest tech company exclusively for young people and social change.

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FEATURED SPEAKERS JUJUBEE SESSION 3 | SATURDAY, 3:30–4:30 P.M. | CPACS 101 DRAG SHOW | SATURDAY, 9:00–10:30 P.M. | SAPP FIELDHOUSE Jujubee, also known as Airline Inthyrath, is an American drag queen and reality television personality from Boston, Massachusetts. She is best known as a contestant on Season 2 of RuPaul’s Drag Race and RuPaul’s Drag Race: All Stars where she reached top three in both her seasons.

TORI GRACE NICHOLS SESSION 4 | SATURDAY, 4:45–5:45 P.M. | CPACS 101 ENTERTAINMENT | SATURDAY, 8:00–8:45 P.M. | SAPP FIELDHOUSE Grace Nichols is the Cultural Organizing Fellow for Southerners on New Ground (SONG), a multi-racial, grassroots organization working towards queer liberation in the south. Apart from their work with SONG, they are a rising multi-medium, prismatic performance artist, utilizing poetry, skit, song, dance and drag to tell their story as a queer, genderqueer, transracial adoptee living with disabilities. Grace uses they/them pronouns and goes by Tori Grace when performing. Grace holds a degree in music therapy from Georgia College where they also served as the LGBT’ Program Coordinator and PRIDE Alliance Advisor for three years. Through their work as an educator and organizer, they have been given insight to the complex demands of our movements and our great need for healing. As a performance artist, they strongly believe in the power of the arts to create healing spaces in connection with each other, and that the restoration of this connection is critical to dismantling our many fear-based systems of oppression. They are enlivened when they can work within communities and with individuals who are as equally as passionate about creating programs and environments where people can feel whole.

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FEATURED SPEAKERS ROBYN OCHS SESSION 5 | SATURDAY, 6:00–7:00 P.M. | CPACS 101 Robyn Ochs is an educator, speaker, grassroots activist, and editor of the Bi Women Quarterly, and two anthologies: the 42-country collection Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and RECOGNIZE: The Voices of Bisexual Men. Her writings have been published in numerous bi, women’s studies, multicultural, and LGBTQ+ anthologies and she has taught university courses in gender and sexuality studies. An advocate for the rights of people of ALL orientations and genders to live safely, openly and with full access and opportunity, Robyn’s work focuses on increasing awareness and understanding of complex identities, and mobilizing people to be powerful allies to one another within and across identities and social movements.

ANDRE NUNEZ SESSION 7 | SUNDAY, 9:15–10:15 A.M. | CPACS 101 My name is Andre Nunez. I am 28 years old. My pronouns are They/Them and I am also reclaiming the word Bitch so I also use and prefer That Bitch or The Bitch. I am Two Spirit Trans Femme Warrior/Activist and my Lakota name translates to Standing Strong Buffalo Woman. I currently reside in Tucson, Arizona where I work as the logistic coordinator for an organization called No More Deaths. I am part of Two Spirit Nation that started at Oceti Sakowin resistance camp, and work as their outreach manager. While at camp, I was the head of security for the Two Spirit Nation. I am also a Long Walker. In February of 2016, I joined the Longest Walk 5 – War On Drugs and Domestic Violence in San Diego and walked with them to Washington, D.C. I have also rode on the Dakota 38 + 2 memorial ride, and walked halfway across the country with the Great March for Climate Action and participated in the Peoples Climate March in NYC in 2014.

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ENTERTAINMENT RIVER CITY MIXED CHORUS FRIDAY, 5:30–6:00 P.M. SAPP FIELDHOUSE The River City Mixed Chorus (RCMC) was founded in 1984 and is one of the longest-running lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and ally mixed choruses in the United States. As part of Omaha’s diverse arts community, the chorus creates exceptional musical experiences to support diversity, inspire change and empower communities. The chorus is currently in its 34th season and includes more than 100 performers.

PRIDE PLAYERS FRIDAY, 8:00–9:00 P.M. SAPP FIELDHOUSE Pride Players is an award-winning teen theater troupe from the Omaha Theater Company for Young People— a professional theater for young audiences. Now in its 19th year, the teen cast members, under the direction of three experienced theater educators, use improvisation to create original skits, scenes, parodies, poetry, songs, and true story monologues exploring the issues facing gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer and straight-allied teens. The troupe has been honored by many groups including The National Education Association, Heartland Pride, and American Alliance for Theater and Education.

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WORKSHOP SCHEDULE BUILDING / ROOM

SESSION 1

SESSION 2

CPACS 101

Featured Workshop: Dylan Marron

Featured Workshop: Featured Workshop: Cece McDonald & Joshua Allen Jujubee

SATURDAY, 8:00–9:00 A.M.

CPACS 132/132A

SATURDAY, 9:15–10:15 A.M.

SESSION 3

SATURDAY, 3:30–4:30 P.M.

Special Workshop: Robyn Ochs

GaySL: A Crash Course in LGBTQ Sign Language...

CPACS 220

The Erasure of Broken Colors

Queering Politics in Nebraska

Framing an Orientation: Kink to Queer

CPACS 221

How to Get Through DT45: Advice from BFFs...

Understanding Power and Privilege Under the Umbrella...

REVEL: Creating Safe(r) Queer Spaces

Being Both LGBTQIA+ and Disabled While Navigating...

Intimate Partner Violence: A Discussion of How to Improve...

Not A Monolith

Queering Femininity: Femme History, Identity, & Erasure

Representation of Marginalized Identities in Anime

Queering Abortion: Taking Back What is Ours

CPACS 222 CPACS 223

Discrimination Self Care: If, How, and When to Respond

H&K 112 H&K 206

The Water Closet: Ungendering Bathrooms

“Am I Trans Enough?” - Trans Bodies in the Media

Survival and Resistance: Trans and Queer Resiliency...

H&K 211

Race and Entertainment: the POV of a POC

Empowerment and Advocacy of Queer Sexual Assault Survivors

Intersectionality of Queer People of Color

What’s in a ‘Zine?: A brief History and Workshop on ‘Zines

The Double Standard: Perspective of a Trans Man

H&K 213

Let’s Get Physical! Being Queer and LGBT in the Gym

H&K 228 God Loves All: Discussing Christianity’s Views of Sexuality...

Growing Your LGBTQ+ Program, Office, and Resources

MBSC 301

Queering Development

MBSC 302/302A

Laughing Out Loud: Bridging Social Gaps Through Comedy

Defend Affordable Ypsi: Working Class Queers Fight Gentrification

MBSC 304

Steel Toes & Stilettos: Butch/ Femme History, Identity...

Too Cute to be Erased: Intersex/ Trans/GNC/POC Resist...

MBSC 306

No Walls Between Us: Queer and Trans People and the Movement...

Navigating Barriers to LGBTQ Healthcare

MBSC 308 (ADVISOR TRACK)

Let’s Go to Gay Camp: How to Create Meaningful Retreats...

Staying Grounded: Supporting LGBTQIA+ Students...

Not Just for History Month: Preserving and Sharing LGBTQIA+

Creating Community Through Dialogue

WEITZ CEC 127

Abuse & Sexual Assault in the Queer Community...

WEITZ CEC 201

A Declassified Guide to Starting a Reframing Risk: Toward an Inclusive QIPOC Organization Model for Safer Sex...

The Queer Revolution Begins in the Classroom

WEITZ CEC 205

The World is Alive: Coming Out and Being Publicly Trans...

Policy and Partnership: Strategies for Transgender Advocacy...

Inclusionism: Including Asexual-spectrum Identities...

WEITZ CEC 209

Bending Desire: Non-Binary Attraction and the Politic...

Navigating Coming Out in Professional Settings...

An Intersecting Journey of Faith & Sexuality

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Channeling Adversity and Writing #BlackGaySlay: Navigating the Our Existence... (room 209?) Intersections of Blackness...

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Queering Afrofuturistic Text


SESSION 4

SESSION 5

SESSION 6

SESSION 7

Featured Workshop: Tori Grace Nichols

Featured Workshop: Robyn Ochs

Featured Workshop: Blair Imani

Featured Workshop: Andre Nunez

Enrolling in K101: The Science of Kink and BDSM

Special Workshop: Andre Nunez

Sexual Health 101

Why Embracing Femininity is a Pivotal Act of Resistance...

Finding Connection: Support for Cis Partners of Trans...

Am I Doing It Right? Exploring Sexuality as Performative

Sisterhood Not CIS-terhood: Making the Movement About...

Centering the Narrative of TGNC Architects of Asylums Survivors: Community Approach...

Meeting at the Crossroads: Centering Persons of Color...

Related Histories: Communities between Native and Trans...

Engaging Community Through Theater: HOW to Begin...

Perceptions of Consent Based on Polysexuality and Asexuality

Addressing Sexual Violence Against LGBTQ People...

Ending Online Oppression: The LGBTQ Movement’s Role...

Taming the Fear Dragon Hiding Under Our Bed

Finding Ourselves in Biology

The Stories in Our Bodies: What Performance Mediums Can Do...

Collision: The Clash of Collective Cultures and Queer Identities

Binding 101

Sex, Work, and Feminism

From Campus to Candidate: Translating Your College...

Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud! Black PRIDE in History!

Hooking Up Outside the Lines: LGBTQIA+ Experiences Pursuing...

The Queer Intersections of Activist Disengagement

Empowerment Theory and Work Groups in the GSRM Community

Singing in a Safe Space with GALA Choruses

Makeup Your Mind

Collective Memory: Remembering and Reigniting Queer Liberation

Learning to Say No: Toxic Spaces, Overwork Culture, and Burn Out

Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body & Exploring Your Identity

Intersectionalities Between Autism and LGBTQIA...

Black Femininity: A Fragile State of Mind for Men of Color

Creating A Family

Considering a Career in Student Affairs or Higher Education

Want to be a Social Worker? Let’s How We Know What We Know: Talk about Pursuing Social Work... Survey Research on LGBT Issues

Drag 101! Today for You, Tomorrow for...?

Queering The Middle East

“Why do None of my Clothes Fit?!” Finding Your Style...

Resisting Oppression Through Alternative Spiritualities

Queertesian Dualism

Centering Disabled Voices

Self Care: Because This Work is Hard

Bodies and Nonconformity: At the Intersection of Transness...

Pride With Prejudice: Pinkwashing 101

50 Bills 50 States: The Trevor Project and the Fight Against...

Polyamory and Asexuality in the 21st Century: Everything...

How to Avoid Colonizing Intersectionality...

SATURDAY, 4:45–5:45 P.M.

SATURDAY, 6:00–7:00 P.M.

Identity Exclusive Social/ Support Groups on Campus

SUNDAY, 8:00-9:00 A.M.

SUNDAY, 9:15–10:15 A.M.

Discussions of Mental Health Through Body Art/Non-Surgical...

Secret Kindness Agents

Creating Action Plans to Challenge Intersectional...

Academic Disparities: Intersection Fake News, Real Consequences of QPOC in Higher Education

Debunking Myths and Challenging Stereotypes...

Pronouns and the Closet

Growing Up: Trans Man and Toxic Masculinity

Whose Bathroom? anyBODYs

Faithfully Yours, Signed You Writing a Letter to Yourself

From Closet to Conversation: Beyond ‘Coming Out’

Misogyny’s Impact On and Within the Queer Community

Queers on Campus: Student Organizations from 1969...

Arts-Based Resistance: (Re) Framing a Sense of Belonging...

Efficacy of Transgender Awareness in Social Work...

Queerness & Christianity

The First Amendment and the LGBTQIA+ Community

Power Mapping on Campus: A Guide to Enacting Effective...

Asexuality Among People with Disabilities: What’s the Reality...

What’s Happening in Berkeley? What we Can Learn...

Human Magnetism: The Variability of Attraction

Queering Virginity: Destabilizing the Virgin Binary...

37


ADVISORS

ADVISOR’S SOCIAL FRIDAY, 4:30–6:00 P.M. CRISS LIBRARY 105

Advisor events are specifically designed for graduate student and professional advisors. These sessions were designed specifically to support advisors and professional LGBTQIA+ campus advocates.

MBLGTACC will be hosting a wine and cheese social for graduate student and professional advisors. Come, mingle, and relax with your colleagues from across the Midwest.

ADVISOR TRACKS | MBSC 308

Sponsored by UNO Criss Library

SESSION 2 SATURDAY, 9:15–10:15 A.M.

SESSION 4 SATURDAY, 4:45–5:45 P.M.

Let’s Go to Gay Camp: How to Create Meaningful Retreats for LGBTQIA Students

Identity Exclusive Social/Support Groups on Campus

Presented by Olivia Beres and Abbie Harville, Washington University in St. Louis

Presented by Jay Irwin, Alecia Anderson, Borin Chep, and KP Patrick, University of Nebraska at Omaha; and Andrew Aleman, University of Nebraska at Omaha and GLSEN Omaha

Every year Washington University in St. Louis hosts a queer retreat called Destination Q at a summer camp. Student leaders create a safe environment for students to meet folks who share their identities while challenging them to learn about themselves and others. Destination Q gives students skills to navigate queer spaces on campus and beyond. Learn about our planning, advertising, and implementation through sample activities and discussion. While we won’t have S’mores, you may forget you’re not at camp yourself! Participants will walk away with strategies for hosting a queer retreat on their campus. Let’s make Destination Q Destination YOU!

In this workshop, facilitators will discuss two identity specific groups - TRANScend, a group specifically for trans, GNC, and gender questioning individuals, and Melanated Queerations, a group specifically for LGBTQIA+ POC. Both groups are within 2 years of their origins at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Topics for discussion are as follows: why these groups were created, successes within these groups, and any push back received from either internal or external forces. We welcome the experiences of facilitators of other identity specific social/support groups on campuses, and questions/comments/reflection will be solicited throughout.

SESSION 3 SATURDAY, 3:30–4:30 P.M.

SESSION 6 SUNDAY, 8:00-9:00 A.M.

Staying Grounded: Supporting LGBTQIA+ Students While Practicing Self-Care

Secret Kindness Agents

Presented by Andrew Aleman, PLCSW, University of Nebraska at Omaha, GLSEN Omaha Advisors work tirelessly to create safe, affirming, non-judgmental, and educational spaces for LGBTQIA+ students. They navigate these spaces with their own experiences, challenges, and life happenings. This workshop will provide advisors the opportunity to discuss the challenge of building and maintaining these spaces, while also caring for themselves. Advisors will learn from others about pit falls and ways they have succeeded in staying grounded. Facilitator will provide ideas and examples for advisors to bring back as they continue the fight.

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Presented by Dr. Ferial Pearson, University of Nebraska at Omaha Moved by the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy, Ferial Pearson wondered if a simple act of kindness could change a life. She and her students became the Secret Kindness Agents. They not only changed the lives of those they met, they changed their own. Their hope, their hearts, and their hunger for happiness will inspire you to change your small corner of the world, in your own way, for the better. Let them show you how they did it, and how you can do the same.


Are you transgender, you transgender, genderAre expansive, gender expansive, genderqueer, gender fluid, genderqueer, gender fluid, bigender, hijra, Two Spirit, bigender, hijra, Two Spirit, or agender? Join in this or agender? Join in this trans spectrum space withwith trans spectrum space others others like you! like you! TRANScend is a group TRANScend is a group for,about and about by, for,by, and transtrans spectrum people in the spectrum peopleofinNebraska the at University University of Nebraska Omaha community.at Omaha community. EVERY THURSDAY 12:00 P.M.

EVERY THURSDAY 12:00 P.M.

For more information, contact the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center at 402-554-2890 or unogsrc@unomaha.edu.

For more information: Nicole Naatz, MS,

For more information, contact the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center at 402-554-2890 or unogsrc@unomaha.edu.

For more information: Nicole Naatz, MS,


RESOURCE AND CAREER FAIRS RESOURCE FAIR SATURDAY, 10:00 A.M.–6:00 P.M. WEITZ CEC ATRIUM

CAREER FAIR SATURDAY, 2:15–3:15 P.M. WEITZ CEC ATRIUM

MBLGTACC 2018 is seriously dedicated to supplementing the growth of every single attendee by providing LGBTQIA+ friendly resources within the local Omaha and larger Midwest communities. Hence, we planned and organized the MBLGTACC 2018 Career and Resource Fairs to connect college students and faculty with our sponsors to receive the information and opportunities they may need. This includes free on-site HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydia testing; face-to-face conversations with many different professionals about relevant job/internship openings, programming and services; fantastic LGBTQIA+ pride swag and related items for sale; and more. The fairs are located in the Weitz CEC Atrium which is to the immediate left of the building’s main entrance. The Resource Fair is open 10:00 A.M.–6:00 P.M. on Saturday, February 17. The career fair is open 2:15–3:15 P.M. on Saturday, February 17. Note: If you plan on speaking to potential employers, make sure to bring copies of your resume!

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STATE FORUMS SATURDAY, 10:30–11:30 A.M.

H&K 211 CPACS 132/132A MBSC 308

H&K 213

WEITZ CEC 230/231

MBSC 304

MBSC 302/302A

H&K 112

MBSC 306

WHAT IS A STATE FORUM? State Forums provide attendees from a particular state to connect and network with each other. It is recommended that state representatives elected at the previous year’s State Forums serve as facilitators of this session if possible. We also ask that your forum designate someone to take notes during your discussion to send along with your state representatives so they can share these notes during the Oversight Committee Meeting.

CPACS 222

CPACS 221

CPACS 220

H&K 206

State Forums do not have to follow a strict format, but we strongly encourage attendees to consider these options for maximizing time spent in this session: • Sharing current issues impacting your state and what ways you can mobilize to effect change. • Discussing highs and lows of the current conference. This is an opportunity to provide feedback for continuous improvement of the MBLGTACC experience • Highlight recent events or upcoming projects at your home institution. What’s working? What obstacles are you facing? What ways can your neighboring institutions support you?

ELECTION OF STATE REPRESENTATIVES: At some point during your State Forum, we as that you designate up to (2) representatives of your state to attend the Oversight Committee Meeting. The process of determining representatives is left to the discretion of the forum attendees.

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IDENTITY FORUMS SATURDAY, 11:30 A.M.–12:30 P.M. What’s an identity forum? Identity forums are safe spaces for people of a particular identity group. They are places for small, marginalized and/or invisible groups within the broad spectrum of LGBTQIA+ identities to come together to talk about issues of importance or concern and to support each other. It is very important that everyone feels welcome to attend any of these forums. Therefore, to foster inclusivity and learning environments, the identity forums are open forums, meaning that allies are welcome. All the identity caucuses, with the exception of the “DIY” forums, will have a facilitator. The DIY forum is a large space for several forums to be established. Materials will be available to the DIY forums assist in the progression of conversations.

NON-BINARY FORUM

WEITZ CEC 230/231

STATE OF THE REGION PANEL

CPACS 101

QUEER PEOPLE OF COLOR FORUM

CPACS 132/132A

QUESTIONING FORUM

CPACS 220

DISABILITY FORUM

CPACS 221

POLYAMOROUS FORUM

CPACS 222

MIDDLE SEXUALITIES FORUM

H&K 112

ALLY AND ADVOCATE FORUM

H&K 213

GAY FORUM

MBSC 304

TRANS FORUM

MBSC 302/302A

ACE FORUM

MBSC 306

LESBIAN FORUM

MBSC 308

DIY FORUM

MBSC Ballroom (2ND FLOOR)

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STATE OF THE REGION PANEL SATURDAY, 11:30 A.M.–12:30 P.M. CPACS 101 Photo from MBLGTACC 2017 State of the Region Panel

Join the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity as members of its leadership highlight some of the major issues facing queer and trans+ individuals in the Midwest. Through sharing of the leadership’s own various experiences, discussion of the current social and political climate, and engaging with attendees’ own perspectives, this session aims to educate, motivate, and empower.

OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MEETING SATURDAY, 3:30–8:00 P.M. MBSC 228/226 The Oversight Committee is comprised of representatives from each Midwest state: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Since the Committee’s conception in 2007, the group has evolved in its methods of ensuring the continuity of the conference. It is through this Committee that the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity was conceived.

This year’s Oversight Committee meeting will include: • A proposal for revamping the purpose, structure and scope of the Oversight Committee • In-depth consideration of accessibility, representation, and assessment of MBLGTACC • Selecting the MBLGTACC 2020 host institution(s) We encourage anyone interested in playing a vital role in the continued growth and integrity of MBLGTACC to run as a state representative of your State Caucus.

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1

SATURDAY, 8:00–9:00 A.M

SESSION

FEATURED SPEAKER

DYLAN MARRON CPACS 101

SESSION 1 1

The Erasure of Broken Colors

CPACS 220

Presented by Jazmin Simms, University of Missouri This workshop is meant to provide an intentional atmosphere surrounding the intersection of mental illness among queer and trans people of color communities. In our interactive discussion, we’ll not only dissect how our identities may combat one another and its significance in navigating our daily lives, but also how that influences our worldly and in-group interactions.

2

How to Get Through DT45: Advice from BFFs Who Withstood Dubya

CPACS 221

Presented by Nikola Halcyone Zaporowski, University of Nebraska at Omaha and Allen Ratliff, University of California Berkeley Join Allen & Niki, real life best friends, as we share personal stories and professional anecdotes highlighting the value of trust, respect, empathy, and communitybuilding. Best friends help us get through the darkest times, so join us in shining light on how friendship is an act of resistance and resilience. Bring your best friend, in person or spirit, and let’s talk about how to make it through this, together.


1 SESSION 1 3

Discrimination Self Care: If, How, and When to Respond

CPACS 223

Presented by Ari Leigh Were you ever in situations that left you feeling icky or unheard? Wondered if what left you feeling miserable was actually discrimination? This workshop will provide tools to identify when discrimination has occurred, and explore the different ways someone can respond to it. Recognizing that every person and situation is unique, our discussion presumes that everyone has the right to set their own boundaries in the activist work of discrimination response. Our goal is to offer tools, conversation, and space to help you decide which ways of responding to discrimination will best suit your individual needs and goals.

4

The Water Closet: Ungendering Bathrooms

H&K 206

Presented by Leslie Boker, Grand Rapids Pride Center Using the bathroom while trans is complicated by a history of gender policing and cis-sexist notions about who deserves to use public spaces. This workshop investigates the history of gendered bathrooms, the cultural narratives maintaining them today, and the machinations behind anti-trans bathroom bills — then turns to discussion about queer dreams of an ideal place to do your business.

5

Race and Entertainment: the POV of a POC

H&K 211

Presented by Brendan Brown, University of Nebraska at Omaha This open conversation is focused on the experience of a gay person of color in the performing arts community. The conversation will also include race, racism, and colorism in the entertainment industry. Lecture will be followed by dialogue and Q&A.

6

Queering Development

MBSC 301

Presented by Val Erwin, Southern Methodist University, Women & LGBT Center, Program Advisor In the last two years, our LGBT office has been working to enhance our donations in a couple of ways. This workshop will talk about some of the work we have done around development and the research in this area.

7

Laughing Out Loud: Bridging Social Gaps Through Comedy

MBSC 302/302A

Presented by Hayden Kristal and Jenn Snyder Join LGBTQ activists and comedians Jenn Snyder and Hayden Kristal in an honest and uproarious conversation about the role of comedy in social change. Jenn and Hayden candidly discuss their paths to comedy, their experiences as minorities within the comedy community, how humor is used as both a coping mechanism and a tool for change, and how LGBTQ activists can empower themselves and others through laughter.

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SESSION 1 8

Steel Toes & Stilettos: Butch/Femme History, Identity, and Community

MBSC 304

Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan and E. L. Krause, Northern Michigan University From factory work, to sex work, to activism, and organizing; butches and femmes have done it all. As a community we must learn from our history and we simply cannot do that without delving first into butch and femme identities across the gender spectrum. In this session we will discuss the co-evolution of butch and femme identity and community, the backlash against and erasure of these identities, and the resilience of the communities in present day.

9

Abuse & Sexual Assault in the Queer Community: The Difficult Struggle for Justice

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by David Cahya Elora Spero Emrys Abuse and sexual assault is a traumatic experience, and should one chose to, taking legal action is already extremely difficult. However, there are many more obstacles that a survivor can face when they are openly queer or are victimized by someone that would make the incident anything other than between a ‘man and a woman’. While getting justice for such a crime is already more difficult than it should be, an individual’s sexual orientation, gender identity, and the birth sex of both individuals can make the case excruciatingly difficult for a verdict to pass in the survivor’s favor. As a queer victim of sexual assault, I would like to talk about additional obstacles a survivor may face for being queer and how to work around them as well as provide necessary resources.

10

A Declassified Guide to Starting a QIPOC Organization

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by Brittany Stokes, Marissa Davenport Matt Lubega Kayla Cross and Automne Littlejohn, Augsburg University The goal of this workshop is to provide a framework for students and faculty to start and build a QIPOC organization. We will discuss the pros and cons of having a QIPOC organization, the challenges of starting and running a student organization, and will close with helpful tips for having a successful QIPOC student organization.

11

The World is Alive: Coming Out and Being Publicly Trans in the Worst of Times

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Marissa Alexa McCool, author and podcast host Marissa Alexa McCool came out as a trans woman in the midst of the 2016 election and kicked down the closet door by screaming in a hate pastor’s face and publishing a visceral reaction to the circumstances. In the last year, she has published five books, started a nonprofit for trans content creators, hosted podcasts, and has traveled all over the country. Even in the worst of times and the scariest of places, she has found that the world is alive. Here she will share that story of her transition during these times and her experiences thereof.

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1 SESSION 1 12

Bending Desire: Non-Binary Attraction and the Politic of Partnering

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by JAC Stringer In a culture where “sexy” is defined through feats of masculine or feminine perfection, how do we recognize desire that embodies all or none of these qualities? Attraction to androgyny is experienced in multiple spectra of sexualities, yet it’s still debated. Complex partnering dynamics formed by a variance of bodies, identities, and experiences make definitions for attraction difficult, if not impossible within traditional concepts of sexuality. In this workshop, we will discuss desire outside the binary including the language of attraction, gender normalcy’s influences, and how genderqueer and non-binary trans people continue to carve out spaces for sexual desire.

13

Channeling Adversity and Writing Our Existence: A Writing Workshop

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by A.J.K. O’Donnell, Author and Activist Attendees will be given a place where unrestricted and authentic expression is encouraged and heightened. We will reflect on our own triumphs and handling of oppression through the written word. We will spend sixty minutes celebrating ourselves, learning how resistance can come in the form of writing/speaking truths, empowering ourselves to acknowledge the roads which have built our journeys, and educate one another on the diverse and intersectional aspects of all our community’s livelihoods. Above all, we will recognize resilience as a beacon we must share with others. *This workshop includes a writing session, followed by an optional sharing experience.

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2

SATURDAY, 9:15–10:15 A.M FEATURED SPEAKER

SESSION

CECE MCDONALD & JOSHUA ALLEN CPACS 101

SESSION 2: SPECIAL WORKSHOP ROBYN OCHS

CPACS 132/132A

SESSION 2 1

Queering Politics in Nebraska

CPACS 220

Presented by Jodi Benenson, University of Nebraska Omaha; Taylor Bickel, Field Director; Melissa Breazile, New Leaders Council Omaha; Jay Irwin, Ralston Public Schools Board of Education; and Lacey Merica, Omaha Public Schools Board of Education This session brings together a group of LGBTQ-identified individuals and allies who are involved in Nebraska politics. The panel will involve a discussion around why it is important for LGBTQ individuals to get involved in politics and how to get involved in electoral politics as a candidate, staffer, and volunteer. The panel is sponsored by New Leaders Council Omaha (NLC); a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that engages a diverse, collaborative national network of progressive political entrepreneurs.

2

Understanding Power and Privilege Under the Umbrella: Intersectional Advocacy within the LGBTQIIA Community

CPACS 221

Presented by Dr. Ferial Pearson and Nikola Halcyone Zaporowski, University of Nebraska at Omaha Participants will learn about the “isms” that pertain to the different intersections of their own identities, how power and privilege are related to those, and how to be allies to those in the community who do not share their unique intersections.


2 SESSION 2 3

Being Both LGBTQIA+ and Disabled While Navigating Healthcare Services

CPACS 222

Presented by Kenneth Eymer, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Many LGBTQIA+ people with disabilities face discrimination and gatekeeping from medical professionals when seeking care. This workshop focuses on discussing many common issues faced by this intersection, as well as strategies for talking to a doctor and how to educate them if needed. It also will provide resources on how to find LGBTQIA+ friendly doctors and counselors.

4

Not A Monolith

CPACS 223

Presented by Sheree Haynie, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and JaCasta Rex As black creatives, we intend to introduce and break down the many identities in our perspectives, of which include Queer, Non-binary/Genderqueer, and our socioeconomic status. We were both raised underprivileged in a segregated community built on racism, disenfranchisement, and redlining, and now as creatives we plan to openly present our journey and our personal work. We invite and encourage others to join us in discussion of the experiences they have personally encountered. Our experiences are not monolithic, therefore we are eager to ask and answer questions, as well as listen to the stories of others.

5

Representation of Marginalized Identities in Anime

H&K 112

Presented by Dua Saleh, Augsburg College In this workshop, we will be watching and analyzing Japanese anime from the lens of marginalized identities. This workshop will address depiction of LGBTQIA+ characters, hierarchical distributions of power and wealth, and ways that race is constructed in different anime.

6

“Am I Trans Enough?” - Trans Bodies in the Media

H&K 206

Presented by Kai Cremisius Pavus and Katrine Sjovold, University of Minnesota, Morris LGBTQIA2S+ Programs This workshop is intended to point out issues with representation of transgender women and men in media. Even though there are increasingly more trans individuals being seen, the media only portrays those that are cis-passing and willing to follow gender roles. This practice feeds into a culture that believes that trans people must present in a more cisgendered fashion than cis people. This workshop is to showcase that the lack of portrayal of gender non-conforming trans identities is limiting and harmful to those whose don’t fit the perpetuated model.

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SESSION 2 7

Empowerment and Advocacy of Queer Sexual Assault Survivors

H&K 211

Presented by Megan Kennedy and Katelyn Melcher, University of Northern Iowa; and Kaylee Michelson, Riverview Center and University of Northern Iowa This workshop utilizes history and a review of literature regarding sexual violence in the queer community to help guide discussions outlining key issues related to queer sexual violence and advocacy. Issues related to effective advocacy to combat sexual violence in the queer community will be discussed. The presenters, who serve as sexual assault advocates, will also share personal experiences. This workshop will have a primary focus on sexual violence on college campuses, with emphasis on intersectionality and the importance of coalition building, policy change, and the use of language in empowering and advocating for sexual assault survivors on college campuses.

8

What’s in a ‘Zine?: A brief History and Workshop on ‘Zines

H&K 213

Presented by Devin Matznick and Constance Bougie, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh A workshop in two parts: first, a presentation on zines and their role in the queer community and its activism both historically and in the current day; second, a chance for participants to make their own zine. Come to find out more about this unique form of DIY activism and put your truth to paper like the punk you’ve always wanted to be! Bring writing utensils--pens, pencils, markers, etc--if you have them.

9

God Loves All: Discussing Christianity’s Views of Sexuality and Gender

MBSC 301

Presented by Tyler Yost, President, Alphabet Soup, Lakeland University; Connor Armstrong, President, Spiritual Life Council, Lakeland University; Dominique Lee, Secretary, Alphabet Soup, Lakeland University; and Rev. Alex Cade-White, Advisor, Alphabet Soup We will be exploring the need for the churches of Christianity to adopt the attitude of being open and affirming of the LGBTQ+ community. The LGBTQ+ community has repeatedly been subjugated by the church; this is counter to the values expressed within the context of the Christian Sacred Story. We will be sharing the hard facts surrounding the modern relationship between the LGBTQ+ community and Christian churches in the United States.

10

No Walls Between Us: Queer and Trans People and the Movement for Justice in Palestine

MBSC 306

Presented by Stephanie Skora, Brave Space Alliance Palestinian solidarity activism is quickly becoming a core part of queer and trans organizing spaces, and it is our responsibility to get educated! This workshop is an updated version of last year’s first-ever session on Palestine at MBLGTACC and provides a comprehensive introduction to Palestine solidarity activism for queer and trans individuals, and educates attendees on common topics and challenges within the movement for justice in Palestine. Among the topics discussed will be antisemitism vs anti-Zionism, a description of the major components of the movement for justice in Palestine, pinkwashing, and a condensed history of colonization in Palestine.

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2 SESSION 2 12

Not Just for History Month: Preserving and Sharing LGBTQIA+ History

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by Amy C. Schindler, University of Nebraska at Omaha As archivists and community members continue to address archival silences - the absence of some communities in archives - it is important for archivists and community members to work together to seek, preserve, and make available LGBTQIA+ histories. Did you find a box of photos, fliers, meeting minutes, scrapbooks, and other historical material? Do you want to ensure the files on your computer are available in the future? This workshop offers tools to care for and build your collection. Attendees will leave the session with practical ideas in hand and resources for further information.

13

Reframing Risk: Toward an Inclusive Model for Safer Sex and Healthy Relationships

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by Alyssa Watts, Planned Parenthood of the Heartland In this workshop we will work together to unpack the public health messaging about safer sex and healthy relationships. Using the frame of celebrating our LGBTQIA and other intersecting identities, we will learn from each other about what it means to have sex and relationships that are consensual, pleasurable and empowering, as well as how to talk about and manage risk. We will explore messaging that is inclusive and celebratory of different bodies, identities, types of sex and relationship styles.

14

Policy and Partnership: Strategies for Transgender Advocacy at the University Level

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Adam Davies and Kelly Schaefer, Northwestern University This workshop will provide participants with an introduction on how to work with administration at their universities to get policies related to the rights and needs of transgender students. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to use research and knowledge of policy to speak with administration and effect change. The workshop will include a presentation and a time for students to work in groups to brainstorm strategies to be used at their universities.

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SESSION 2 15

Navigating Coming Out in Professional Settings and the Job Search

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by Jen Skidmore, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Nobody is born knowing how to land a job. Not everyone has the opportunity to learn how to navigate the rigid expectations and etiquette within the Western concept of “professionalism.” This session aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills needed to navigate your career with confidence. This session will specifically address factors that impact one’s decision to come out or not in the job search; a discussion on how to dress professionally and validate your gender identity simultaneously; and assessing culture in an organization.

16

#BlackGaySlay: Navigating the Intersections of Blackness and Queerness

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by Tena Hahn Rodriguez and Danielle Powell, Inclusive Communities Inclusive Communities is a human relations organization that works to combat bigotry, prejudice, and discrimination through education. Join us for a thought provoking panel of black, queer people addressing their intersections, and providing participants with the opportunity to learn from their diverse identities and experiences. Then we will have an informal but facilitated, extremely honest conversation in small groups about how these various identities impact our communities and interactions with one another.

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WHAT’S NEXT? Move forward with your career, and your life.

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3

SATURDAY, 3:30–4:30 P.M.

SESSION

FEATURED SPEAKER

JUJUBEE CPACS 101

SESSION 3 1

GaySL: A Crash Course in LGBTQ Sign Language and Intersectionality

CPACS 132/132A

Presented by Hayden Kristal Come learn American Sign Language relating to the LGBTQ community and discuss the importance of intersectionality and accessibility in activism with speaker, activist, and stand up comedian Hayden Kristal! All levels of experience with ASL and the Deaf community are welcome and encouraged to attend.

2

Framing an Orientation: Kink to Queer

CPACS 220

Presented by Britney Newman-Lockhart, University of Wisconsin Superior Building on the works of Mari Ruti, Sarah Ahmed, Ivo Dominguez, as well as several other philosophers, my research explores what it means to not only inhabit space as a queer person, but how queer space functions and interacts with normative spaces. I apply my research directly to kink culture as queer space that is simultaneously rejected from queer space.

3

REVEL: Creating Safe(r) Queer Spaces

CPACS 221

Presented by Danielle Powell and Tena Hahn Rodriguez, REVEL This workshop is for individuals who are passionate about creating space, for and within their communities. REVEL is an Omaha, monthly event that was created as a response to the void of social activities catered to non-men and people of color within the queer community. Join co-founders, Tena and Danielle, as they share how it began, their purpose, and vision for the future.


3 SESSION 3 4

Intimate Partner Violence: A Discussion of How to Improve Survivor Support in the Midwest

CPACS 222

Presented by Talia Hughes, Women’s Center for Advancement Following an introduction on Intimate Partner Violence, its prevalence in the Midwest, and what survivor support currently looks like, we will have a round-table discussion on where support is lacking or failing, what areas need more focus moving forward, and ideas on how to put these improvements in action. Triggers: abuse, violence, institutional discrimination.

5

Queering Femininity: Femme History, Identity, & Erasure

CPACS 223

Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan, Northern Michigan University As an identity, femme is not homogeneous but, in fact, a thrilling mix of expression and experience. Femme can be a political statement, a way of life, an exploration of gender expression, or all of the above. The session will explore the history of femme identity, how femmes are systematically erased, who can identify as femme, and how femme has evolved to present day.

6

Queering Abortion: Taking Back What is Ours

H&K 112

Presented by Olivia Beres, Washington University in St. Louis The gendering of and the state’s grasp on abortion oppresses pregnant, queer, and trans folks. Abortion is ours and we’re taking it back. This session will work to queer abortion by 1) creating an inclusive reality where abortion isn’t linked exclusively to women’s rights in language and access and by 2) decoupling abortion from law, politics, and the healthcare industry. Information sharing and discussion will equip participants to envision and create a radically queer abortion framework. The session will provide concrete tactics for social change and practical knowledge about abortions.

7

Survival and Resistance: Trans and Queer Resiliency in the Flyover States

H&K 206

Presented by JAC Stringer As media suggests cultural attitudes are growing more liberal and progressive, trans and queer people’s experiences with safety and resilience are much more complex. The majority of trans and queer people live in the “fly over zone,” the central, Midwestern, and southern states where we are regularly isolated from resources and each other. Living in culturally conservative areas has a significant impact on how we form relationships, attend work and school, and navigate self-care. This workshop will discuss the varying avenues of activism and community building found among us, trans and queer people, in the face of struggle and resilience.

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SESSION 3 8

Intersectionality of Queer People of Color

H&K 211

Presented by Dante C. Hoelting, Sapphire Beverly, and Diamond Beverly, Tarleton State University, Gay-Straight Alliance “The essence of the beautiful is unity in variety.” – Felix Mendelssohn Message: This workshop aims to equip LGBT+ individuals and their allies from all minority groups and ethnicities with skills to create a more cohesive system of interaction between Queer POC both within and outside our respective communities. Methods: Using visual aids, interactive activities that can be taken to one’s own campus, and providing information and facts from credible and detailed sources. Mission: We aim to accomplish this by emphasizing our history, recognizing our struggles both past and present, and providing activities and information to support the growth of a resilient and truly inclusive LGBTQ+ community.

9

The Double Standard: Perspective of a Trans Man

H&K 213

Presented by Kai Cremisius Pavus, University of Minnesota, Morris LGBTQIA2S+ Programs In this workshop, I examine the double standard between men and women from a trans man’s point of view. This conversation will analyze the societal pressures on women, the exclusion of women in primarily cis-male dominated areas, and the privilege gain commonly experienced when an individual who was previously perceived as a woman is then acknowledged by society as a man. The goal is to initiate guided discussion about the double standard as evident from the experiences of trans men and how to address it—for it is only when a problem is acknowledged that it can be corrected.

10

Let’s Get Physical! Being Queer and LGBT in the Gym

H&K 228

Presented by Madie McLeod, St. Cloud State University Fitness IS for everyone, but how does it make you feel when you look around the gym and don’t feel represented? I’m here to tell you that weights AREN’T just for men and cardio ISN’T just for women, but I’m also here to provide a space to debunk common gym stereotypes and how to make the gym a fun and exciting space for LGBT and Queer folx! Join me as we spend half of our workshop in discussion and the other part doing a shortened Zumba class! *If you wish to participate in the Zumba portion, please bring clean active shoes and something that you are comfortable exercising in! :)

11

Growing Your LGBTQ+ Program, Office, and Resources

MBSC 301

Presented by Adrienne Conley, Mickey Capps, Maija Kittleson Wilker, Katrine Sjovold, and Chelsea Young, University of Minnesota Morris Four years ago the University of Minnesota Morris did not have a LGBTQIA2S+ Programs Office. In the last four and a half years, this office was able to obtain a dedicated professional staff member, expand gender and sexuality literacy workshops across campus, and visibly grow Queer representation amongst key student leadership positions. Within this timeframe, UMM rolled out an expansive gender-inclusive housing program, took the lead in the U of M system on preferred names, increased their Campus Pride Index score, and landed on the 50 Best Colleges for LGBTQ students. These successes did not come overnight! This workshop is geared towards schools who may not have their own LGBTQ+ center or office, may lack financial and/or institutional resources, or have a smaller-scale office that you would like to grow. We will share our office strategic plan and help you design your own.

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3 SESSION 3 12

Defend Affordable Ypsi: Working Class Queers Fight Gentrification

MBSC 302/302A

Presented by Jessica Milne, MPH Candidate, University of Michigan School of Public Health In Michigan, they say Ann Arbor is to Ypsilanti as Manhattan is to Brooklyn. This analogy is eerily accurate in terms of gentrification and displacement. In the small, working class town of Ypsilanti, Michigan, many low-income queer folks have a space to thrive. But the spillover effects of gentrification from the richer, whiter, neighboring town of Ann Arbor are harming Ypsilantians. Defend Affordable Ypsi is a majority-queer, horizontally-run collective of renters and allies fighting to build and preserve affordability. This is the story of working class queer struggle against gentrification.

13

Too Cute to be Erased: Intersex/Trans/GNC/POC Resist the Medical Industrial Complex

MBSC 304

Presented by Pidgeon Pagonis Working from Mia Mingus’, Eli Clare’s and my own definitions and critiques of the Medical Industrial Complex (MIC)—one which pathologizes and attempts to erase “others” in order to maintain existing power structures—participants will explore the ways in which marginalized communities have not only been oppressed by, but more importantly RESISTED, the MIC. I’ll also share insights about how I’ve recently worked with other intersex people and allies to orchestrate a protest outside of a hospital in Chicago that is still performing intersex genital mutilation surgeries. The workshop will close with a writing prompt and an optional group share.

14

Navigating Barriers to LGBTQ Healthcare

MBSC 306

Presented by Leslie Boker, Grand Rapids Pride Center The healthcare system as it exists now fails to properly care for LGBTQ people both interpersonally and institutionally. From my double perspective as a non-binary trans person and a relative insider to healthcare, I will name the problems and describe some in-progress solutions, ending in discussion of what an ideally informed and universally inclusive healthcare system might look like.

15

Staying Grounded: Supporting LGBTQIA+ Students While Practicing Self-Care

MBSC 308

Presented by Andrew Aleman, PLCSW, University of Nebraska at Omaha, GLSEN Omaha Advisors work tirelessly to create safe, affirming, non-judgmental, and educational spaces for LGBTQIA+ students. They navigate these spaces with their own experiences, challenges, and life happenings. This workshop will provide advisors the opportunity to discuss the challenge of building and maintaining these spaces, while also caring for themselves. Advisors will learn from others about pit falls and ways they have succeeded in staying grounded. Facilitator will provide ideas and examples for advisors to bring back as they continue the fight.

57


SESSION 3 16

Creating Community Through Dialogue

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by Jeff Gibson, University of North Dakota Community is created by individuals that share similar characteristics, interests, goals, experience, and so much more. For LGBTQ+ students on college campuses, finding a sense of community can be challenging. This workshop offers insight on how to build community through dialogue based on practices at the University of North Dakota such as the implementation of various discussion and affinity groups.

17

The Queer Revolution Begins in the Classroom

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by Laddie Arnold, Johns Hopkins University This workshop will discuss the various options for attendees to become teachers, an increasingly important career path in the current political climate. To fight back against Trumpism, white supremacy, xenophobia and the heteropatriarchy, our country needs teachers who recognize these structural oppressive forces and seek to dismantle them. For many, a traditional teacher education program is out of reach. Whether this is for financial reasons, timing reasons, or any number of other structural barriers, there are options available. In addition to traditional programs, this workshop will also go over alternative teacher education programs—distinguishing the legitimate ones from the scams and license mills, as well as giving tips for telling the difference.

18

Inclusionism: Including Asexual-spectrum Identities on the College Campus

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Devin Matznick, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh All too often, asexual spectrum identities and those who hold them are left out of many LGBTQIA spaces on college campuses. In this workshop, participants will discuss and share best practices for ensuring ace-spec students of all intersections are and feel included in organizations, events, and other aspects of campus life.

19

An Intersecting Journey of Faith & Sexuality

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by Domingo A. Coto and Grant M. Henry, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Faith and sexuality are often two identities which intersect, but are not discussed due to the polarizing lens placed upon them when discussed together. While acknowledging there can be difficulties in navigating these identities together, both presenters will facilitate a critical dialogue around their journeys surrounding faith, sexuality, and intersectionality. Using both research and personal narratives, we hope to create a safe and brave space for participants to engage in the critical dialogue, build resilience, recognize areas of empowerment, and reflect further on where they are in their journey regarding faith and sexuality, as well as where they are heading next in their journey.

20

Queering Afrofuturistic Text

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by Dua Saleh, Augsburg College Afrofuturism is a philosophical and historical exploration of time and space through an Afrodisaporic lens. This is a form of artistic self expression that emerged in the West by people in the Afro-diaspora; primarily emerging as a fantastical and experimental provocation of reality. This workshop is catered towards Black LGBTQIA+ people that are interested in exploring, critiquing, AND creating Afrofuturisitic art through a sociopolitically Queer lens.

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LGBTQ/SEXUALITY STUDIES LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer)/Sexuality Studies is an Interdisciplinary field that examines the identities, experiences, and social positions of queer and trans spectrum people. Sexuality and gender identity are an important distinguishing factor of our lives on par with race and social class. Through this minor, you will gain increased knowledge in the following: » Sexual identity, orientation, and behaviors, including heterosexualities, homosexualities, gay sexualities, lesbian sexualities, bisexualities, queer sexualities, etc. » Gender identities including transgender, genderqueer, trans man, trans woman, gender non-conforming, etc. » Intersectionality of sexuality with race, class, gender, religion, ability, nationality, and other social

characteristics Sexology, or the study of sex and sexual behaviors, and human sexuality broadly » Sexual health such as STIs, HIV, and sexual reproduction » Theories of identity development, queer theory, and other social theories related to sexuality » Diversity of human behavior and experience as it relates to sex and sexuality

This field includes topics such as: Identity formation of non-heterosexual sexualities, non-gender binary identities, health and wellbeing of sexual minorities, biological characteristics of sex and human sexual reproduction, subcultural groups, the politics of identity, and representations of queer lives in popular culture.


4

SATURDAY, 4:45–5:45 P.M. FEATURED SPEAKER

SESSION

TORI GRACE NICHOLS CPACS 101

SESSION 4 1

Enrolling in K101: The Science of Kink and BDSM

CPACS 132/132A

Presented by Jake Oster, Northland College and Samuel Brinton, Kink Underground Want to nerd out on the incredible science involved in the kink and fetish world? Well, here is your chance. In this class we will explore the thermodynamics of wax play, connection between Isaac Newton and impact play, and much more! With an interactive presentation of the equations in action, your instructors will make it the best college presentation you ever had! An open discussion on the intersections of kink and science will help us round out an epic session of naughty nerdiness.

2

Why Embracing Femininity is a Pivotal Act of Resistance in the Face of White Supremacy

CPACS 220

Presented by Michael Griffin, University of Nebraska at Omaha I am black. I am trans. We are taught that these two identities are mutually exclusive. That femininity is the antithesis of the black male. That a trans soul is undeserving of black excellence. That a black soul is unfit to witness trans liberation. This could not be further from the truth. I have learned to love the multifaceted beauties that my identities illuminate, from my earth-tone skin to my curves. My black identity reaffirms my trans identity. My trans identity reaffirms my black identity. I deserve to not only exist, but to thrive. On my terms.


4 SESSION 4 3

Centering the Narrative of TGNC Survivors: Community Approach to Sexual Violence Prevention and Intervention

CPACS 221

Presented by Nadia Valdez, Tevin Giles and Paige Baker-Braxton Psy.D, Howard Brown Health The transgender and gender-non-conforming (TGNC) community faces the highest rate of sexual violence. Moreover, TGNC survivors seeking medical/legal aid often experience discrimination and denial of care. Systems of oppression, rape culture, and transphobia create a narrative around sexual violence that excludes and erases TGNC survivors while perpetuating violence. This presentation will cover actionable steps to dismantle rape culture and shift the narrative of sexual violence to make visible the experience of TGNC survivors. Additional time will be spent reviewing intervention strategies and best practices for community members and providers responding to sexual harm against TGNC survivors.

4

Engaging Community Through Theater: HOW to Begin Creating Your Own Work

CPACS 222

Presented by Stephanie Jacobson, The Rose Theater Creating your own work is an incredible tool in engaging conversation and change in our community. Our world needs more creative LGBTQA voices shared in the theater. The goal of this session is to help build artists’ confidence with tools to create plays, poems, or puppetry. In this session attendees will work collaboratively and individually using writing prompts from the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center and The Rose Theater with creative drama activities to start exploring a creative process. Attendees will leave with a packet of writing prompts as a guide to creating work after the conference.

5

Taming the Fear Dragon Hiding Under Our Bed

CPACS 223

Presented by Annie Titus, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire The LGBTQIA+ community is habitually confronted with fear. Fears from within, coupled with shame and guilt are recurring nightmares that we try to adapt to, but succumb to them all too frequently. We are also regularly confronted with adorned comments that haunt and ridicule us as well. Being aware of the threats, how we process that fear, guilt and shame, and having strategies that we can tap into to tame the victim mentality will help us each of us in developing a buoyant perspective as we live productive, influential, and effective lives.

6

Binding 101

H&K 112

Presented by Melo Wood, Cai Newsome, Jhane Fletcher, and Jacen Moon, gc2b Members of the gc2b crew will be discussing safe binding tips and sharing about personal experiences surrounding gender identity and acts of resistance to steer this workshop into an open discussion about safe gender affirming apparel and treating one’s body well. This workshop centers people who bind, but can be helpful to friends and family who would like to learn more.

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SESSION 4 7

From Campus to Candidate: Translating Your College Involvement into Running for Office

H&K 206

Presented by Lacey Merica, University of Nebraska at Omaha / Omaha Public Schools Board of Education So you want to take your on-campus involvement to the next level… have you thought about running for office? In this workshop, we’ll talk about the basics of running for office and fundraising, including how to utilize and build from your oncampus involvement and established networks. Come hear experiences from current and former LGBTQ+ elected officials and discuss how to handle difficult situations on the campaign trail. We’ll also develop personal messaging statements you can use on-campus or during your first run for office!

8

Empowerment Theory and Work Groups in the GSRM Community

H&K 211

Presented by Jacob Dean and Samantha Shoemaker, Ball State University Department of Social Work An examination of the ways to use the multiple components of empowerment theory to further the goals of advocacy groups, support groups, and other work groups in the GSRM community.

9

Learning to Say No: Toxic Spaces, Overwork Culture, and Burn Out

H&K 213

Presented by Nikola Jordan Zaporowski, University of Nebraska at Omaha Self-care isn’t always bubble baths and candles; sometimes it’s breaking up with ‘friends,’ not attending an event, or finding another job. Unfortunately, those things aren’t easy and don’t often get their own memes with nature backgrounds. Join Nikola as she shares her personal story of giving herself permission to say no after being diagnosed with a neurological chronic pain condition, and work on your own boundaries & tools to protect yourself.

10

Creating a Family

MBSC 301

Presented by Samantha Carwyn M.A. You’ll be hearing about my journey through motherhood and the different roles I’ve had over the last ten years. I will share about being a single mom, part of a two mom household, the child I lost, being a foster mom, and my journey towards becoming an adoptive mom. I’ll provide practical considerations to make when choosing a donor, creating a family with a same gender partner, and adopting through foster care. Attendees will discuss their idea of family and what they can do to create a family of their own.

11

Drag 101! Today for You, Tomorrow for...?

MBSC 302/302A

Presented by Collin Warren aka Sonia, Mark Nelson, Vic Thomas,and Natasha Simmons, ICON History to Modern Drag, why we do Drag and why do you want to do Drag, as well as community involvement and charity work.

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4 SESSION 4 12

Queertesian Dualism

MBSC 304

Presented by José Álvarez, Rockford University Women today are constantly pressured to have a certain image, as perpetuated by the media. As stated by Margo Demello in her book Body Studies, “women have long been associated more with the body than men, who are more closely aligned with the mind.” This concept regarding the split between the mind and the body is not only visible in the larger heteronormative society, but in gay culture itself as well. This discussion will explore the concept of the mind and body dualism in gay culture via gender roles, sexual roles, and one sub-culture: the bear and twink culture.

13

Pride With Prejudice: Pinkwashing 101

MBSC 306

Presented by Stephanie Skora, Brave Space Alliance From Creating Change in 2016, to the Chicago Dyke March last summer, pinkwashing has played an ever-increasing role in the politics of queer and trans spaces. Unfortunately, conversations on pinkwashing are not often allowed to take place or flourish in LGBTQ institutional spaces. This session aims to combat that culture by giving a comprehensive introduction to pinkwashing and educating attendees on the topic. Topics discussed will include the definition of pinkwashing, pinkwashing’s main tropes, major pinkwashing organizations, how to combat pinkwashing, and more.

14

Identity Exclusive Social/Support Groups on Campus

MBSC 308

Presented by Jay Irwin, Alecia Anderson, Borin Chep, and KP Patrick, University of Nebraska at Omaha; and Andrew Aleman, University of Nebraska at Omaha and GLSEN Omaha In this workshop, facilitators will discuss two identity specific groups - TRANScend, a group specifically for trans, GNC, and gender questioning individuals, and Melanated Queerations, a group specifically for LGBTQIA+ POC. Both groups are within 2 years of their origins at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Topics for discussion are as follows: why these groups were created, successes within these groups, and any push back received from either internal or external forces. We welcome the experiences of facilitators of other identity specific social/support groups on campuses, and questions/comments/reflection will be solicited throughout.

15

Creating Action Plans to Challenge Intersectional Oppressions

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by Tammie M Kennedy, University of Nebraska at Omaha This workshop invites participants across all communities to work in small collaborative groups to develop political action plans that focus on issues surrounding white normativity, racism, misogyny, and queer lives. Participants will work on questions such as: How may queer folx recognize and disrupt normative whiteness? How may queer folx work towards undoing the racism(s) that persist in the US? How do queer folx effectively implement intersectionality into our 21st-c queer theories/practices? How do queer folx define and deploy anti-racist maneuvers to better serve as allies across all communities? How do white queer folx dismantle our own white privilege?

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SESSION 4 16

Pronouns and the Closet

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by musa bouderdaben, University of Chicago The question of where asking for pronouns fits in with many of our experiences of the closet can be a contentious issue for many trans people. This workshop will go over some of the major arguments happening around whether asking for pronouns in non-LGBT+ specific spaces is harmful or helpful to the trans community. After a brief presentation, it will open up into a round of discussion, prioritizing trans and gnc peoples’ voices. The aim is to be a safe, generative space for people to learn about others’ perspectives and process their own feelings on the problem.

17

From Closet to Conversation: Beyond ‘Coming Out’

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Ari Leigh Coming out is often the lens through which society views LGBTQ culture. Yet the singular ‘coming out’ narrative is inadequate for those whose identities are fluid, multifaceted, or complex. By delving into the history and cultural assumptions of coming out, we can build a bridge between out and not, breaking down the limitations of that false binary. Furthermore we’ll explore a host of tools on how to decide if, when, and how to invite those we care about to share our experiences. Whether you’re LGBTQ, an ally, or both, here is a space beyond binary assumptions about openness and ourselves.

18

Efficacy of Transgender Awareness in Social Work Education

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by James E. Taylor, Northern Kentucky University There is concern that social work education should be more inclusive of transgender-related issues within a classroom setting (Frediksen- Golden, Woodford, Luke, and Guitieerez, 2011). To address this gap the in the literature, the investigators administered a pre and post-survey to social work students enrolled in the respective undergraduate research course (at a regional University) based on a three-phase model. The purpose of this workshop is to discuss what the investigators learned during this process: our data/findings, challenges, limitations, critiques of the model, and possible ways to improve awareness and attitudes for transgender populations in social work education.

19

Asexuality Among People with Disabilities: What’s the Reality Behind the Stereotypes?

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by James Williams, Animecon.org Although people with disabilities are represented in all sexual orientations, stereotypes still persist within society that people with disabilities are, by definition, asexual. At the same time, some people with disabilities are in fact asexual, and sometimes aromantic. In this presentation, an asexual and aromantic individual with a disability will discuss how the realities of being asexual and aromantic with a disability differ from common societal stereotypes of the “disabled asexual,” and how this stereotype has hindered many people with disabilities in their efforts to pursue the same romantic relationships and friendships that people often desire throughout their lives.

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Are you lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, pansexual, asexual, omnisexual, demisexual, or queer? Join others like you! EVERY WEDNESDAY @ 12 PM FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT THE GENDER AND SEXUALITY RESOURCE CENTER AT 402.554.2890 OR UNOGSRC@UNOMAHA.EDU


5

SATURDAY, 6:00–7:00 P.M. FEATURED SPEAKER

SESSION

ROBYN OCHS CPACS 101

SESSION 5: SPECIAL WORKSHOP ANDRE NUNEZ

CPACS 132/132A

SESSION 5 1

Finding Connection: Support for Cis Partners of Trans and Gender Expansive Individuals

CPACS 220

Presented by Jen Skidmore, University of Nebraska-Lincoln First, this session will acknowledge that the challenges and oppression that trans and gender expansive people face are far greater than the challenges some of their cis partners might face. This session is designed to support and elevate the trans community by providing direct support and strategies for resilience for the cis partners of trans individuals. Attendees will connect in small groups to discuss questions posed by the facilitator to gather support and resources. Participants will walk away with better coping strategies, support resources, and a community of peers to support them beyond the session.

2

Architects of Asylums

CPACS 221

Presented by Nyk Robertson The workshop would begin by presenting language and identity theory around the link between language and identity. This discussion will not require previous knowledge of language theory. Then we will use examples from current performance artists who are working to create language and express their identities. Lastly, we will engage the attendees in working on pieces that express their own lived experiences and utilizing new language to share those experiences. By creating pieces to share collectively, the group will be able to not only learn how language affects identity, but how they can actively participate in this creation and defining of language.


5 SESSION 5 3

Perceptions of Consent Based on Polysexuality and Asexuality

CPACS 222

Presented by Madeline Moltzan, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire In the asexual spectrum and polysexual spectrum communities, there is a developing understanding of their social roles, or stereotypes, and consent. Individuals lose their personal autonomy through assumptions of their consent based on sexual orientation, that asexuals will never and polysexuals will always consent. These assumptions lead to social pressures that not only greatly affect consent decisions, but the individual and how they interact socially. I have conducted a qualitative research study to further understand this discrimination in the community, elevating the voices of those outside of the hetero-homo binary, exploring of the norms of sexual consent.

4

Finding Ourselves in Biology

CPACS 223

Presented by Sam Sharpe, Kansas State University This workshop will include a presentation discussing some common myths and inaccuracies about queer, trans, and intersex individuals perpetuated by the biological community and the popular media, as well as a counter-narrative of inclusion, curiosity, and educated uncertainty that respects and validates these identities in a biological context. The workshop will end with time for small group discussion among attendants and the opportunity to share feedback and personal stories.

5

Sex, Work, and Feminism

H&K 112

Presented by Dr. Jenny Heineman, University of Nebraska at Omaha This workshop will explore the holes in anglophone feminist theories as they pertain to marginalized populations within the sex industry. We will explore sex work through a queer, intersectional lens. This is a loose, open forum and safe space for queer folx, particularly folx engaged in stigmatized and marginalized labor.

6

Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud! Black PRIDE in History!

H&K 206

Presented by Ms. Yolanda Vivian Williams, Eastern Illinois University In this session, the lives, works, and experiences of LGBTQ+ African-Americans in history will be introduced to some and reintroduced to others. Significant times in history that will be discussed are the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, as well as the contemporary Black Lives Matter Movement. Black LGBTQ+ finding their “space” in white spaces like the Women’s and Gay Liberation Movements will also be a part of the discourse.

7

Singing in a Safe Space with GALA Choruses

H&K 211

Presented by Kerrin E. Packard, River City Mixed Chorus Expressing one’s self through music can be a part of your identity or a form of self-care. There are choirs throughout the Midwest and the world who make it part of their mission to change the world through song in order to make it a more accepting place for us and for all with the GALA Choruses. This workshop will go over the benefits of joining: safely enacting your SOGI identity, building networks, advocating for change, and the emotional and technical boons of practicing and refining your craft, as well as NON-SINGING roles within the choruses!

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SESSION 5 8

Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body & Exploring Your Identity

H&K 213

Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan, Northern Michigan University Mainstream culture has defined beautiful and healthy as thin and small. The queer community has tended to subvert this notion; however, fat-phobia is still prevalent. We will discuss loving ourselves and our bodies because they are fat not in spite of that fact, the history of body positivity and the intersection of queer and fat identities. The goal of the workshop is to give fat-identified folks a space to speak about their experience while at the same time giving fat allies a chance to listen and learn.

9

Considering a Career in Student Affairs or Higher Education

MBSC 301

Presented by TK Morton, Edgewood College Have you considered how you can continue your work with LGBTQIA2S+ advocacy? Are you interested in working in higher education administration or student affairs? Then you might want to attend this workshop to think about what this type of career could look like for you! We will discuss different functional areas in Student Affairs and Higher Education, such as LGBT+ programming, residential life, student leadership, academic advising, and more. We will also cover some basic tips for resume and cover letter writing, the interview process, prep for the graduate school application, and how to dress for success. Participants will walk away with learning more about the field of student affairs as a possible career option, takeaway some skill development around interviewing, discuss some options for graduate studies, and still have time to cover questions and engage in dialogue about this work.

10

Queering The Middle East

MBSC 302/302A

Presented by Yasmeen Mansour, University of Kansas Alumna In this interactive workshop, participants will have the opportunity to navigate Middle Eastern culture and how it intersects with their queerness. We will define these concepts and look at them in relation to how they exist in theory and how daily practices reinforce or create a divide between the two identities. The second half of this workshop will focus on creating a space for people who have ever felt like they need to choose between loving who they want to love and being who they are. We will connect with others, find a support system, and build change so we don’t ever have to choose between the two.

11

Centering Disabled Voices

MBSC 304

Presented by Brittany Stokes, Lexi Kimsey, Andy Anderson, and Bryce Eli, Augsburg University Centering Disabled Voices is an educational workshop. We would like to connect disabled queer people with their history and help them become better involved in the community while also discussing what it is like to be disabled in queer spaces. This will be a learning opportunity for everyone who attends, regardless of ability.

12

50 Bills 50 States: The Trevor Project and the Fight Against Conversion Therapy

MBSC 306

Presented by Sam Brinton

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Conversion therapy continues to severely harm the lives, hopes, and dreams of countless LGBTQ youth. By joining this workshop, you’ll learn the history of the torture and the important ways to advocate against it. The Trevor Project is fighting to make sure EVERY state bans conversion therapy and we need your help! (Plus, you’ve gotta see the stilettos...)


5 SESSION 5 13

Academic Disparities: Intersection of QPOC in Higher Education

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by Gabriela “Gabby” Vo An informational workshop on research skills required to conduct scientific research to analyze academic disparities against minority groups and what it implies for LGBTQ+ students of colors in higher education. The skills and data used in this workshop are based on my Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF).

14

Growing Up: Trans Man and Toxic Masculinity

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by Kai Cremisius Pavus, University of Minnesota, Morris LGBTQIA2S+ Programs This workshop explains how toxic masculinity affects childhood from the perspective of a trans man. This seminar is not meant to preach nor is it designed to falsely portray all men. Instead, it will be used to discuss how the pressure to conform to the roles, characteristics, and behaviors is almost impossible. I will talk about toxic masculinity in America, the constraints of gender expression, and the pressures to conform from family, strangers, and personal dysphoria. This is designed to engage the attendees and initiate deep thought about external and internal influences on identity from masculinity and gender.

15

Misogyny’s Impact On and Within the Queer Community

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Alexandria Hetzler, University of Toledo A look at how misogyny - a hatred of, contempt for, and/or devaluation of women, femmes, and femininity - influences the queer community. Topics to discuss include the hypersexualization of lesbians, masc for masc, accepted and cheered misogyny by gay men, and how TERFs use traditional misogyny as a gatekeeping device against trans women.

16

Queerness & Christianity

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by Seth Dills, Kansas State University This workshop focuses on examining the “Clobber Passages” often used to deny LGBTQ+ people equality and acceptance from a “Traditional Christian” perspective. Coming from a Queer Christian, the goal of this workshop is to provide attendees (Christian and non-Christian) tools to engage in this conversation and understand alternative and affirming interpretations of Scripture and to provide resources for further study. CW: Heterosexism, Cisssexism, Spiritual Abuse

17

What’s Happening in Berkeley? What we Can Learn from the 2017 Siege on Academic Institutions

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by G. Allen Ratliff, MSW, LCSW, School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley University and college campuses have experienced increasing hate-speech and violence against vulnerable students. This workshop is an opportunity to consider strategies to resist alt-right violence, using the 2017 events at University of California, Berkeley as a case example. A short presentation will describe the events at UC Berkeley, starting in February 2017 and culminating in the “Free Speech Week” protests of September 2017, followed by a discussion and Q&A with the speaker. Understanding the strategies employed by the alt-right, counter-protestors, students, and university administration can provide attendees with valuable insight in the resistance to ongoing hate-violence on their own university campuses.

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6

SUNDAY, 8:00–9:00 A.M. FEATURED SPEAKER

SESSION

BLAIR IMANI CPACS 101

SESSION 6 1

Sexual Health 101

CPACS 132/132A

Presented by Genevieve Labe, M.Ed., Indiana University Are you ready to talk about sex?! You will learn about the different types safe sex products, sex toys and learn how to use them. There will be many interactive elements throughout this session consisting of games and demonstrations. We will also be discussing how sex relates to your overall physical and mental wellbeing. The purpose of this session is for you to empower yourself with your sexuality by being proactive about physical health. Free items will be handed out!

2

Am I Doing It Right? Exploring Sexuality as Performative

CPACS 220

Presented by Anthony W. Wilder and Ijaaz Cousin, Augsburg University Judith Butler theorized that gender is performative, citing that artifacts, behaviors, etc. are assigned to the performance of a gender. Additionally, feminist theory points out the limitations and oppression within a social/cultural context and empowers people to exist beyond the norm. Somewhat controversial, these theories have allowed for important discourse and dialogue around gender, gender norms and its social construction. This presentation begins to ask the question: is sexuality performative? This presentation will create a dialogue about the current state of sexuality and explore if society/culture dictates how we perform our sexuality and empower participants to exist beyond its confines.


6 SESSION 6 3

Meeting at the Crossroads: Centering Persons of Color in Queer Spaces

CPACS 221

Presented by Steven Johnson Jr., Complex Director, University of Kansas; and Christopher Hill, Resident Director, Creighton University This session will explore queer identity through the lenses of persons of color. Intersectionality explains “the interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender as they apply to a given individual or group, regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage.” We will explore the unique experiences of Queer Persons of Color (QPOC) compared to their majority counterparts and discuss ways to center these marginalized experiences in residential and broader campus environments. Attendees will leave with action-plans that allow them to create spaces and experiences for the QPOC students on their home campuses.

4

Addressing Sexual Violence Against LGBTQ People on College Campuses

CPACS 222

Presented by Tevin Giles, Nadia Valdez, and Paige Baker-Braxton Psy.D, Howard Brown Health For decades, student leaders have advocated and organized sexual violence prevention measures on college campuses where higher rates of sexual violence and a lack of accountability have become the social norm. While these efforts continue to be met with resistance, they also commonly do our communities a disservice by focusing on the experiences of cis-heterosexual women as survivors. In this workshop we intend to explore strategies for queering the lens of sexual violence prevention efforts on college campuses with the understanding that LGB and TGNC students are at higher risk of sexual violence than their cis-heterosexual peers.

5

The Stories in Our Bodies: What Performance Mediums Can Do for QTIPOC

CPACS 223

Presented by Elon Sloan, DePaul University This workshop is a place to think about what performance media, as mediums that work through the human body, can do for QTIPOC. We’ll talk about the attendees’ experiences as QTIPOC audiences and makers, as well as look at examples from TV, theatre, film, such as Moonlight, Open TV (Beta), and many others. The space will be largely discussion based and is open to everyone, but will center the experiences and voices of QTIPOC in the discussion. The space will be held by a queer Black non-binary playwright and theater student.

6

Hooking Up Outside the Lines: LGBTQIA+ Experiences Pursuing Sexuality in a Midwestern Rural Area

H&K 206

Presented by Emily Leeper, Wayne State College This workshop will be an interactive presentation of mixed-methods research that involved collecting surveys from 346 undergraduate students and conducting interviews with six LGBTQIA+ students. The main focus will be the interviews, with rich quotes that shed light on LGBTQIA+ student hookup culture. Following discussion of a theme, you will have time to add your thoughts on the findings, whether they be personal experiences, observations, or findings from your own research! You will get to learn a lot about qualitative research, reflect on LGBTQIA+ hookup experiences, and think of ways to empower all sexual orientations and genders to express sexuality!

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SESSION 6 7

Makeup Your Mind

H&K 211

Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan, Northern Michigan University Our society has a complicated stance on makeup: “Wear it.” “Don’t wear it.” “Don’t let me know that you’re wearing it.” For queer people specifically, makeup can be a tool used to show the world your identity and the rejection of makeup can be a declaration of breaking societal norms. Whether you’ve never worn makeup, or it’s part of your daily routine, makeup is a force in our society. Let’s dig in and talk about makeup as a tool of personal expression, a cultural influence, and a political statement.

8

Intersectionalities Between Autism and LGBTQIA Awareness and Advocacy: An Overview

H&K 213

Presented by James Williams, Animecon.org Unbeknownst to many people in both communities, advocates from the LGBTQIA community and autism community often promote awareness of similar issues within society at large. In addition, individuals with autism often share many social issues in common with individuals on the LGBTQIA spectrum. For example, both communities have fought for the accessibility of gender-neutral public restrooms due to social preferences. In this presentation, an openly asexual self-advocate with autism will discuss the intersectionalities between the autism and LBGTQIA communities. In doing so, he hopes to spread awareness of the issues that both communities share in common with one another.

9

Want to be a Social Worker? Let’s Talk About Pursuing Social Work School

MBSC 301

Presented by G. Allen Ratliff, MSW, LCSW, School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley and Liam Heerten-Rodriguez, MSW, Grace Abbott School of Social Work, University of Nebraska at Omaha Talk with two social work educators about the social work profession, social work graduate school, the importance of social work for queer and trans people, and the need for queer and trans social workers. This workshop will discuss how the social work profession has been complicit in queer and trans oppression and how the profession needs queer and trans social workers in order to transform it into a liberatory force. This discussion is intended for students interested in pursuing social work to frankly discuss the social work profession and how to prepare for social work education.

10

“Why Do None of My Clothes Fit?!” Finding Your Style in a Binary Fashion World

MBSC 302/302A

Presented by Emmett Sharp, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Finding clothes that fit your gender presentation, body type, and budget is trickier than it needs to be. The fashion world is challenging for folks who don’t present in traditionally gendered ways and especially for those whose bodies don’t conform to the gendered fashion world’s narrow size standards. Come by for a workshop focused on tips to find the best clothes for you! Topics covered will include: clothes for small bodies, larger bodies, as well as ways to make shopping for clothes safer and (hopefully) less stressful!

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6 SESSION 6 11

Self Care: Because This Work is Hard

MBSC 304

Presented by Jeff Knapp (He/Him/His), LCSW, and Borin Chep (He/Him/His), University of Nebraska at Omaha This workshop is designed for students who are endlessly engaged in positive work and change on their campuses. Often times, self-care is the last thing that one thinks of. This workshop is designed to help participants discuss the various aspects of self-care and leave with a self-care plan that can be implemented while they are still at MBLGTACC. Because this is a selfcare workshop, it will be interactive, up beat, and fun while still discussing real issues pertaining to self-care.

12

Polyamory and Asexuality in the 21st Century: Everything that Is and Isn’t a “Traditional” Relationship

MBSC 306

Presented by David Cahya Elora Spero Emrys While many know that polyamory is essentially an open relationship with multiple partners, polyamory isn’t often thought in reference to the ace community. This workshop will discuss what encompasses polyamory relationships, what they look like and how relationships or any kind of partnership can work for anyone in the ace community, particularly those that don’t involve sexual relationships.

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Fake News, Real Consequences

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by Erin Painter, Claire Chamley, and Monica Maher, Reference Associates, University of Nebraska at Omaha Criss Library Can you spot fake news? Searching the Internet accurate information can be overwhelming and frustrating. It can be hard to wade through resources when articles are passed around on Facebook, online forums, or other social media. How can we determine the reliability of a news source? Where can we find quality information to inform, inspire, and educate others? Empower yourself by strengthening your research skills in order to constructively respond to those who share fake news. The presenters will provide tips, fact-checking websites and other resources useful for learning how to assess sources, and improve the quality of conversation online.

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SESSION 6 14

Whose Bathroom? anyBODYs

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by Kendall Hart, Marla Wick, Adam Rosenberg, and Chelsea Ortiz, Grand Valley State University In order to make their campus more accessible and friendly to everyone, Grand Valley State University (GVSU) started to add single-user restrooms to numerous buildings around 2003. To increase campus awareness about the availability and location of these restrooms and to also advocate that anyone could use these restrooms, GVSU’s Milton E. Ford LGBT Resource Center partnered with Teaching Through Technology (T3), a non-profit faculty-student organization, in September of 2015 to develop anyBODYs. anyBODYs is a mobile application that contains campus-by-campus and building-by-building information to help students, faculty, staff, and visitors locate and access these single-user, universally designed bathrooms. The LGBT Resource Center and T3 worked together over the course of a year to compile information about availability and location of single-user bathrooms and present this information in a free, user-friendly interface. In September of 2016, the first major update to the app was released, adding Nursing Nests, rooms reserved for nursing mothers, to the application. We will share our experiences as students participating in this initiative and what we learned along the way. This presentation will cover the tools and design strategies we used in building and marketing the application. We hope that this may be helpful to conference participants who are either considering or currently working on a similar application on their campuses.

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Queers on Campus: Student Organizations from 1969 to Today

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Sylvia Regan, Northwestern University What can we learn about our own lives from those who came before us? In this workshop, participants will learn about UC Berkeley’s queer student organization, founded in 1969, and compare it to their own experiences. In hopes of inspiring participants to consider new approaches to activism and community, this workshop will celebrate the tenacity and bravery of Berkeley’s queer students from 1969 to 1993 as they struggled against homophobia, sexism, and racism. The days of gay disco fundraisers may be behind us, but the vibrancy of our campus communities persists in the face of oppression.

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The First Amendment and the LGBTQIA+ Community

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by Brynne S. Madway and Ari Cohn, Esq., FIRE In a time when hateful speech seems to be flourishing, the concept of free speech is a challenging one. But every major civil rights movement has relied on the fundamental principle of freedom of speech to spread its message. That principle is especially important on campus, where students find and learn to use their own voices. Unfortunately, many LGBTQIA+ students have found their voices stifled by administrators. We’re here to help—come learn about your right to speak up and out on campus, and how to stand up for speech.

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Human Magnetism: The Variability of Attraction

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by Logan Cason and Wade Jones, Fort Hays State University When you search the word attraction, it is guaranteed that definitions read similar to: “A force that pulls...” Whether that is a force between people or between objects, it is still a force. During this workshop, we will define the known attractions the human mind experiences. We will describe the major differences, factors, and common misconceptions that follow various types of attraction. Following the presentation, we will hold a brief open discussion about the topics covered.


GENDER AND SEXUALITY RESOURCE CENTER GSRC.UNOMAHA.EDU | UNOGSRC@UNOMAHA.EDU | MBSC 1st FLOOR

The Gender and Sexuality Resource Center welcomes and encourages people of all genders and sexualities to participate in the center’s offerings.

MISSION The mission of the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center is to foster and promote equity, access, and inclusion for all genders and sexualities through education, resources, advocacy, and activism. This office provides specific programs and services for women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer spectrum, trans spectrum, intersex, asexual, non-straight, and gender non-conforming (LGBTQIA+) peoples, and victims/survivors of sexual assault, dating/domestic violence, and stalking in the University of Nebraska at Omaha community. Additionally, this office advises and supports the missions of the Queer and Trans Services (QTS) and Women’s Resource Center (WRC) student agencies, which are immediately next to the Gender and Sexuality Resource Center on the first floor of the MBSC.


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SUNDAY, 9:15–10:15 A.M.

SESSION

FEATURED SPEAKER

ANDRE NUNEZ CPACS 101

SESSION 7 1

Sisterhood Not CIS-terhood: Making the Movement About All of Us

CPACS 220

Presented by Kaitlyn Ericksen, It’s On Us UNO Campus Organizer; Kyla Miller, It’s On Us UNO Prevention Captain; Chrissy Portwine, It’s On Us UNO Survivor and Ally Captain; Alex Duran, It’s On Us UNO Bystander Captain; Bri Jensen, It’s On Us UNO Digital Organizing Captain; and Sarah Hawkinson, It’s On Us UNO Consent Captain In the past, women’s organizations and the women’s movement in general have been traditionally centered around straight, white, cisgender women. This centering excludes women of color and LGBTQIA+ women. In this workshop, we want participants to acknowledge differences, brainstorm ways to be more inclusive, and address challenges faced by women and those in the LGBTQIA+ community face on campuses.

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Related Histories: Communities between Native and Trans Activist Movements

CPACS 221

Presented by JAC Stringer The history of our communities have an impact on who we are today. We carry the pains and joys from those who came before us in our bodies, in our experiences, and in our identities. This is the foundation of historical trauma and it appears in all oppressed communities. The Native activist movement and the trans activist movement are full of commonalities including cultural, institutional, and medicalized violence, segregation, and normalization. This workshop is a space to hold, discuss, and understand how historical trauma takes shape within and around our communities and how we can continue to heal and grow.


7 SESSION 7 3

Ending Online Oppression: The LGBTQ Movement’s Role in an Open Internet & Ending Government Surveillance

CPACS 222

Presented by Alex Forgue, Northern Illinois University What is net neutrality? And why does the issue come up so often? What are companies like Comcast and Verizon trying to do to the open internet? What does corporate control of the internet look like for LGBTQ users? Attendees will learn why net neutrality is an LGBTQ issue, and what they can do to protect it. The workshop will also discuss government surveillance online and its use to oppress the LGBTQ movement and LGBTQ individuals. The workshop will discuss what’s next in the fight for net neutrality and how it affects the LGBTQ community.

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Collision: The Clash of Collective Cultures and Queer Identities

CPACS 223

Presented by Thomas D’Aquila, University of Nebraska at Omaha Exploring the uneasy tensions of families of blood and chosen families, Collision seeks in addressing the specific discomfort that People of Color experience in the queer community, in particular those from cultures that value family structure. These circumstances have unique perspectives to eternal queer conflicts. Thus, unique approaches must be applied to ensure that LGBTQIA+ spaces are truly intersectional and can be affirming spaces of healing from intergenerational trauma of colonialism and imperialism.

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Discussions of Mental Health Through Body Art/Non-Surgical Body Modifications of College-Aged, Queer Students

H&K 112

Presented by Jakki Forester, Kansas State University This workshop will present research about how queer, college-age individuals in the Midwest communicate concerns and engagement with mental health through body art/non-surgical body modifications. With a variety in demographics of individuals who assisted with this research across ages, genders/gender identities, sexualities, races/ethnicities, socioeconomic statuses, and mental health diagnoses, the results spark a conversation about concerns with mental health and college-aged queer communities. This workshop will also discuss phenomenon occurring with mental health among queer, college-aged individuals and strategies and/or tactics for more queer-inclusive mental health practices and services.

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The Queer Intersections of Activist Disengagement

H&K 206

Presented by Kana Skay, University of Nebraska at Omaha A presentation and dialogue about the issue of disengagement from activism, why it happens, and how to potentially address it. In particular intersections of mental health (burnout and depression), social support, PoC status, and transness will be addressed with other intersections being open to dialogue. Part one will be a presentation on existing literature and perspectives in the topic as well as the facilitator’s own original research with part two being a facilitated dialogue on the topic both to understand it better and to develop plans of action to address the issue.

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SESSION 7 7

Collective Memory: Remembering and Reigniting Queer Liberation

H&K 211

Presented by Jamie Dowdy, Manchester University We will explore the concept of collective memory and the importance it has for the queer community. The current mainstream movement has lost much of the message with which it started. As a way for groups to create meaning for the past and present, collective memory plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of a queer movement that is intersectional and resilient. We will figure out actions we can take to improve our education of queer history and do better collective memory maintenance work.

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Black Femininity: A Fragile State of Mind for Men of Color

H&K 213

Presented by Rodney Jones A discussion of the negative stigma of minority men, specifically African American men, who can’t express their “femininity” or be “feminine” without being considered gay and also why there is so much negativity towards men of color expressing themselves outside of the general norm of how men are “supposed” to act.

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How We Know What We Know: Survey Research on LGBT Issues

MBSC 301

Presented by Kedzie Stark Survey research is one of the most important tools we have for studying LGBT issues—both in formal and informal contexts. Information gleaned from this research informs theory and justifies activism. The only problem--survey research can be tricky to get right. How do we write questions that will give us useful data? What are the best ways to access niche communities? This workshop will cover fundamental basics of surveys as a tool for social research, explore their history in gender/sexuality studies, and conclude with a discussion on best practices for conducting survey research.

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Resisting Oppression Through Alternative Spiritualities

MBSC 302/302A

Presented by Jeremy Sierra and Olivia Busby, Ohio University LGBT Center An open discussion on alternative spiritualities, such as Vodou, Santeria, Candomblé, and how they have been used to resist oppression and colonization of the body and mind. We will also be discussing how participants of the conference have used their spiritualities to combat oppression in their own lives.

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Bodies and Nonconformity: At the Intersection of Transness and Disability

MBSC 304

Presented by Aaron Burbach, Carleton College The goal of this workshop is to explore the ways that being trans and having a disability are similar, different, and how those identities intersect. It will discuss the unique access needs of trans people with disabilities and how they can be better met by peers, caregivers, and medical professionals. Participants will gain an understanding of who exists at this intersection, how the two communities are similar and can be served best by uniting causes, and where they differ and their needs must be delineated.

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7 SESSION 7 12

How to Avoid Colonizing Intersectionality at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs)

MBSC 306

Presented by Prof. Peggy Jones, University of Nebraska at Omaha Workshop participants will do activities and exercises that explore:1) their multiple identities; 2) salience of identities; 3) what colonizing intersectionality can look like; and 4) how to avoid colonizing intersectionality at PWIs.

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Debunking Myths and Challenging Stereotypes About Asexuality

WEITZ CEC 127

Presented by Kiera Yard, Southern Illinois University Carbondale This workshop is designed to educate folks about asexuality, while still creating a space where people who identify as asexual can come together and discuss the stereotypes and myths that are put on us. We will focus on how harmful these myths can be for asexual identities as well as the larger LGBTQIAA+ community. Towards the end, we will be looking for ways to diminish these issues and improve the community. This space is open to all, no matter the level of understanding you have.

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Faithfully Yours, Signed You - Writing a Letter to Yourself

WEITZ CEC 201

Presented by Abbey Strausbaugh, University of Findlay, UNITED This workshop revolves around embracing individuality, overcoming challenges, and finding meaning in life. It is meant to engage individuals through the presentation of an insightful poem, life stories, personal reflection, and open discussion. Participants will also be encouraged to write letters as inspiration to be unique and true to themselves. Special emphasis will be placed on selfdiscovery, self-love and acceptance, forming and shaping relationships, mental health struggles, and coming out (or being outed) as lesbian, gay, or bisexual. The workshop shares experiences through the eyes of high school and college-aged students, but is inclusive of all individuals.

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Arts-Based Resistance: (Re)Framing a Sense of Belonging on College Campuses

WEITZ CEC 205

Presented by Ronan Kaiser, Gabriel Sonntag, and Katy Jaekel This highly interactive session examines how we created a space for underrepresented individuals on our campus to come together and(re)imagine inclusion through art. Using spaces on campus, we provided art supplies and the prompt: What would it look like if you were included on campus? Individuals then created posters, comics, and drawings depicting what inclusion would look like for their identities. This session will provide information on how we planned, implemented, and provided space for reflection on senses of belonging on campus. We will also provide art materials for participants to create their own pieces.

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SESSION 7 16

Power Mapping on Campus: A Guide to Enacting Effective Change

WEITZ CEC 209

Presented by Connor Terry, Oklahoma State University During this presentation, students will learn the differences between personal and civic agency, and be introduced to the concept of power mapping. Initially created to be used in political contexts, power mapping can be an important visual tool for students to use when searching for support and guidance in the change making process. Given LGBTQIA+ specific problems, students will use power mapping to generate a map of influence within a hypothetical campus and present their work to the larger group. Following this presentation, students will be better equipped to enact effective changed on their campus pertaining to LGBTQIA+ issues.

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Queering Virginity: Destabilizing the Virgin Binary and the Heteronormative Virgin Binary

WEITZ CEC 230/231

Presented by Makenzie Marts, Western Michigan University Nearly everyone knows whether or not they are a virgin, but how do we come to that conclusion? Especially when virginity is so often defined in straight, cisgender terms? Join us to discuss LGBTQ+ perspectives on what it means to be a virgin, the value assigned to queer sexuality, and possibilities for leaving the virgin binary altogether! (This panel contains non-explicit but open discussion of sexuality. Some participant feedback is STRONGLY encouraged, but nobody will be required to talk if they are not comfortable doing so).

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SPECIAL THANKS

Below is a compilation of thanks, gratitude, and appreciation for folks who have gone above and beyond in their efforts to make MBLGTACC 2018: All Roads Lead to Intersectionality a reality. The following statements were written by various members of the 2018 planning committee:

Thank you to the families, friends, spouses, and lovers who supported the committee through this three year process. Your support was truly invaluable and sustained us! Shout out to my bestie Matt for listening to me talk, vent, cry, and laugh about MBLGTACC for what can only be days on end all together at this point.

Thanks to Jimmy and Sierra for listening to my rambling about MBLGTACC even though you didn’t know what I was talking about. Peyton, thanks for sacrificing your time, energy, and part of your soul in order to see MBLGTACC succeed. You put in extreme effort and dedication, and for that I thank you.

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Thanks for literally everything, Kate. I can’t believe you don’t even get paid for this! #bullybuddies

Thank you to Troy for endless support through all the good and bad for the past 2 years. I couldn’t ask for a better partner.

I would like to thank my parents Rhonda and Larry for helping me on this journey.

Much love to my dad for staying up late to pick me up from lengthy conference meetings every week.

Jessi, thank you for all you do. You are a mentor to me. You made sure I got everything together. Your hard work is very much appreciated.

I would like to thank Jamie for their help in planning our transportation.

Serious thanks to my former debate coach and current friend Ian for helping and inspiring me to become a better LGBTQ+ activist both on and off campus. Thank you to my wonderful partner and beautiful cats. Without you, I would not have been able to accomplish so much. Kati, honestly why weren’t you paid for everything you did? This conference would not have happened if it were not for you. Thank you.

Andrew, your laughter and brains brought our committee together. Thank you for all you did for us.

Matt, thanks for leading our committee. We would be lost in the tech department if it weren’t for you.


January 8, 2018

Dear 2018 MBLGTACC Attendees, Welcome to the University of Nebraska Omaha (UNO). We are pleased to welcome students, faculty, and staff from across the Midwest and the nation to our campus—also known as Omaha! As one of the country’s premier urban, metropolitan universities, UNO is committed to advancing equity and inclusion in both principal and action. We value diversity in all its forms and are dedicated to supporting an inclusive community of learners from around the world. We are exceptionally proud of the student leaders who have organized and produced this year’s MBLGTACC conference. They are a bright and talented group that has worked hard over the past year to prepare for your arrival and develop an interesting and engaging conference program. It is our hope that you will make some new connections with other students and be able to apply what you learn in Omaha to both your studies and out of class experiences back at your college or university. Please enjoy your time with us at UNO and don’t hesitate to contact either of us during the conference if we can help to improve or better support your experience. Sincerely,

Dr. B.J. Reed Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs University of Nebraska Omaha breed@unomaha.edu

Dr. Daniel J. Shipp Vice Chancellor for Student Success University of Nebraska Omaha dshipp@unomaha.edu

6001 Dodge Street / Omaha, NE 68182-001 402-554-2779 / FAX: 402-554-2885

Dr. Reed welcoming attendees to UNO’s annual Lavender Graduation.

Dr. Shipp judging UNO’s annual Homecoming Drag Show.

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Dear MBLGTACC 2018 Attendees: I am beyond thrilled to welcome you to Omaha and to the University of Nebraska at Omaha! As a Ralston Board of Education member, a public school district located just South of Omaha, I am thankful to the MBLGTACC 2018 board for asking me to submit a letter of support and welcome for this monumental conference. As the first openly trans identified elected official in the state of Nebraska, I am excited to celebrate another first – the first time MBLGTACC has been hosted in the state of Nebraska. I’ve had the pleasure of attending MBLGTACC three times, 2014 in Kansas City, MO, 2016 in West Lafayette, IN, and 2017 in Chicago, IL. Each year I learn so much along side so many vibrant, excited students from across the Midwest, and I trust this year will be no different. Together you will challenge each other, grow in your advocacy work, and go on to impact policy and the social environment for LGBTQ+ people in your own community. I’m so excited to see the change each of you will enact with the help of skills, resources, and networks that you build in Omaha. Lastly, I’d like to personally call on each of you to get or stay involved in your local politics. Sometimes it’s easy to get fixated about what’s happening at the national level and forget about the real impact local leaders are having on our everyday lives. Volunteer for a campaign. Write your local officials. Show up at their offices. Organize on campus. Run for office. We are in desperate need of young and LGBTQ+ voices in local politics across the Midwest. Because remember, “if you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.” In solidarity and pride,

Jay A. Irwin, PhD Treasurer, Ralston Public Schools Board of Education

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS By no means is this glossary to be considered a comprehensive or inviolable list of words commonly related to the LGBTQIA+ communities within the United States. Please keep in mind all of these identities exist on spectrums so this is not an exhaustive list or explanation of all possible identities. All terms used to describe identities are subject to varying interpretation by those who claim the identity, and no identity or definition should be imposed on another person.

ABLEISM

BISEXUAL

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to have or actually have mental, emotional, and/or physical disabilities. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of varying genders.

AGEISM

Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to persons of varying genders.

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of their perceived or actual age. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

AFAB / AMAB

ALLY Describes a person who does not identify as a particular marginalized identity but who actively works to support those who hold that identity and works against the oppression of that identity group.

AROMANTIC Describes a person who does not experience romantic attraction or who experiences a varying degree of romantic attraction. “Aro” is another term used to describe an aromantic person.

ASEXUAL Describes a person who does not experience sexual attraction or who experiences a varying degree of sexual attraction. “Ace” is another term used to describe an asexual person.

BIGENDER Describes a person who identifying having two sides to their gender.

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BIROMANTIC

Stands for “assigned female at birth” and “assigned male at birth” respectively. Other variations of this abbreviation may substitute the initial A for a D (designated) and/or add a preceding C for coercively.

CISGENDER Describes a person whose gender aligns with the sex they were assigned at birth.

CISSEXISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of incongruence with one’s assigned sex at birth. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

CLASSISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of perceived or actual lower socio-economic status. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.


COLORISM

GENDER BINARY / BINARY GENDERS

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people within the same racial group on the basis of skin color and other external traits. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes the Western system of categorizing people as one of two genders (male/man, female/woman) which are defined as corresponding to a person’s anatomy.

DISCRIMINATION Describes the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their perceived or actual membership of a specific identity. Involves behaviors towards groups such as excluding or restricting members of one group from opportunities or resources that are available to another group.

DRAG

GENDER EXPRESSION / PRESENTATION Describes how one externally expresses gender, including but not limited to dress, mannerisms, and behaviors.

GENDER IDENTITY Describes one’s own internal sense/interpretation of their gender. This may or may not correspond to one’s gender expression or assigned sex.

Describes exaggerated, theatrical, or performative gender presentation. Doing drag does not necessarily have anything to do with one’s gender or how one experiences sexual and/or romantic attraction.

GENDER NON-CONFORMING (GNC)

FAITHISM

NON-BINARY

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of their perceived or actual faith and/or religious affiliation. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes a gender that exists outside the gender binary.

FEMME Describes an identity or presentation that leans toward what is typically defined as feminine. This term is not necessarily interchangeable with “woman,” “girl,” or “female.”

GAY Describes a person whose sexual and/or romantic orientation is primarily toward those of the same or similar gender. This term has also been used/interpreted as an umbrella term for those within the LGBTQIA+ community.

Describes those whose gender expression exists outside the gender binary.

GENDERFLUID Describes a gender that entails movement and shifting on the gender spectrum. Not necessarily within the gender binary, but can be.

GENDERQUEER Describes a variety of genders that fall outside the gender binary. It can also be used as a synonym for non-binary, but not necessarily so.

HETERONORMATIVITY Describes the assumption that all people are or should be heterosexual and conform to the normative gender roles of masculine men and feminine women.

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HETEROSEXISM

LGBT, LGBTQ, LGBTQIA+

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually queer. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Stands for the various identities within the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, + more communities.

HETEROSEXUAL

Describes an identity or presentation that leans toward what is typically defined as masculine. This term is not necessarily interchangeable with “man,” “boy,” or “male.”

Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of the “opposite” gender within the constructs of the gender binary.

MASC

MIDDLE SEXUALITY

HETEROROMANTIC

Describes a sexual orientation that involves attraction towards two or more genders.

Describes a person whose primary romantic orientation is toward the “opposite” gender within the constructs of the gender binary.

MISOGYNY

HOMOPHOBIA

Describes the interpersonal system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of femininity and feminine-aligned people.

Describes the system of interpersonal oppression that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of those who are perceived to be or are actually queer.

PANSEXUAL

HOMOSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of the same or similar gender. Can carry negative connotations, but not necessarily so.

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE Describes the use of specific and purposeful language in order to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions on groups or individuals.

Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons regardless of gender.

PANROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to persons regardless of gender.

POLYSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to many, but not necessarily all, genders.

INTERSEX

POLYROMANTIC

Describes a person who is born with sex characteristics (including genitals, gonads, and chromosome patterns) that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies.

Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to many, but not necessarily all, genders.

POLYAMORY LESBIAN Describes a feminine-aligned person whose primary sexual and/ or romantic orientation is toward people of the same or similar gender.

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Describes the practice of having more than one relationship at a time with the consent of everyone involved. Not to be confused with polygamy.


QTPOC

TRANSITION

Stands for the various identities within the “Queer and/or Trans Person/People of Color” communities.

Describes the process of developing a gender expression to match one’s gender. There are many forms of transitions. Transitions can, but does not always, include: coming out to one’s family, friends, and/or co-workers; changing one’s name and/or sex on legal documents; hormone therapy; some forms of gender-affirming surgery and/or medical procedures.

QUEER Describes identities, expressions, and/or sexualities that reject or contrast normative gender and sexual conventions and expectations. Has historically had negative connotations, but many within the LGBTQIA+ community have reclaimed it for themselves.

RACISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually people of color. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

SAFE SPACE An ideal setting in which people within the LGBTQIA+ communities and/or those of other marginalized identities feel free to be their authentic selves. Inhabitants intentionally reject harmful social norms and expectations, and act and speak inclusively.

TRANSPHOBIA Describes the interpersonal system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually trans.

TWO-SPIRIT Describes a large variety of LGBTQIA+ identities within indigenous communities. This term should be exclusively used by those who identify as indigenous.

XENOPHOBIA Describes the system that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of those who are perceived to be or are actually from outside of a particular majority group’s culture.

SEX The assignment and classification of people based on their physical anatomy at birth.

SEXISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of a person’s perceived or actual sex. This applies to both trans people and cis women. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

TRANS / TRANSGENDER Describes an umbrella term for all people whose gender differs from their assigned sex at birth and/or the binary gender system. Some trans people feel they exist not within one of the two standard gender categories but rather somewhere between, beyond, or outside of those two genders.

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CAMPUS MAPS WEST ENTRANCE

N

DODGE STREET

EAST ENTRANCE

UNIVERSITY DRIVE NORTH

MBSC

UNI

WEITZ CEC

CPACS

ALLWINE

UNIVERSITY DRIVE EAST

VER

SIT Y

DRI VE

WES T

CRISS LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY DRIVE SOUTH

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SAPP

FIELDHOUSE

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H&K

GENERAL

H&K

The UNO campus meets all ADA standards. This map provides additional information for navigating the campus.

• Massage chairs free and near CPACS and MavCafe

MILO BAIL STUDENT CENTER

ALLWINE • 14 accessible parking space between WEST ENTRANCE Allwine and CPACS • Steeper sidewalk incline near CPACS than the one nearest to Allwine

VE W EST

CPACS

NORTH DOOR • 5 accessible parking spaces • 10 minute accessible parking • Ramp

DODGE STREET

SOUTH DOOR • Accessible lactation room behind Maverick Den/C-Store

UNI

V ER

SIT Y

DRI

NORTH ENTRANCE • Ramps

WEST ENTRANCE • Flat entrance • 13ft. incline from H&K to CPACS

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CRISS LIBRARY • Accessible inclusive restroom, 2nd floor near study rooms

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TO 67TH & PACIFIC THROUGH ELMWOOD PARK (0.75 MILES)

UNIVERSITY DRIVE NORTH

MAP LEGEND EVENT BUILDINGS PARKING STRUCTURES

WEITZ CEC • 13ft. incline from H&K to Weitz CEC eastside UNIVERSITY DRIVE SOUTH • 15ft. incline from H&K to Weitz CEC westside

NON-EVENT BUILDINGS ACCESSIBLE PARKING AREAS GENERAL PARKING AREAS


CPACS: COLLEGE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE FIRST FLOOR ENTRANCE

132/132A 125

101

SECOND FLOOR

223 222 221 MAP LEGEND

220

EVENT ROOMS QUIET ROOM ELEVATOR

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CRISS LIBRARY FIRST FLOOR

ENTRANCE 105

SECOND FLOOR

ENTRANCE

MAP LEGEND ADVISOR’S SOCIAL ELEVATOR

100


H&K: HEALTH AND KINESIOLOGY BUILDING FIRST FLOOR

ENTRANCE

104S

112

SECOND FLOOR

206

211

MAP LEGEND EVENT ROOMS

213

228

QUIET ROOM MAVREC CAFÉ ELEVATOR

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MBSC: MILO BAIL STUDENT CENTER THIRD FLOOR MAP LEGEND EVENT ROOMS QUIET ROOM

301

MAVERICK DEN/C-STORE DURANGO’S GRILL MBSC FOOD COURT

302 302A 304

ELEVATOR

306 308

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

ENTRANCE

222

ENTRANCE

ENTRANCE

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WEITZ CEC: BARBARA WEITZ COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CENTER ENTRANCE

FIRST FLOOR

127

SECOND FLOOR 231 201

205 209

230

221

MAP LEGEND EVENT ROOMS QUIET ROOM REGISTRATION DESK ELEVATOR

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There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle, because we do not live single-issue lives. Without community there is no liberation. AUDRE LORDE

Program printed on 15% recycled paper 0405PRGMGSRC0218

MBLGTACC 2018 Program Guide  

The 2018 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 16-18, 2018 by the University of Nebraska-Omaha.

MBLGTACC 2018 Program Guide  

The 2018 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 16-18, 2018 by the University of Nebraska-Omaha.

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