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FEBRUARY 14 -16

ENVISIONING A FUTURE TOGETHER


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FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

START END EVENT

LOCATION

2:00 PM

8:00 PM

Registration Check-In/Information Table

BHC

4:30 PM

6:30 PM

Opening Session/Keynote #1

Miller Auditorium

7:00 PM

9:00 PM

Advisor Social

University Roadhouse

8:00 PM

10:30 PM

Entertainment

BHC

8:00 AM

4:00 PM

Registration Check-In

BHC

8:00 AM

8:00 PM

Information Table

BHC

8:00 AM

9:30 AM

Featured Speaker #1

BHC

8:30 AM

9:30 AM

Workshop Session #1

BHC/SAN

9:45 AM

10:45 AM

Featured Speaker #2

BHC

9:45 AM

10:45 AM

Workshop Session #2

BHC/SAN

10:00 AM

4:30 PM

Resource and Career Fair

SAN

11:00 AM 12:00 PM

State Meet-Ups

Refer to page 24

11:00 AM 12:00 PM

Advisor Roundtable

BHC 205

12:00 PM

1:00 PM

Lunch Break

1:00 PM

2:15 PM

State of the Region

BHC

1:15 PM

2:15 PM

Workshop Session #3

BHC/SAN

2:30 PM

3:30 PM

Featured Speaker #3

BHC

2:30 PM

3:30 PM

Workshop Session #4

BHC/SAN

3:45 PM

4:45 PM

Featured Speaker #4

BHC

3:45 PM

4:45 PM

Workshop Session #5

BHC/SAN

5:00 PM

6:00 PM

Keynote Session #2

Miller Auditorium

6:00 PM

7:00 PM

Dinner Break

7:00 PM

8:30 PM

Identity Caucuses

BHC/SAN

8:30 PM

10:30 PM

Drag Show (Doors open at 8:00 PM)

BHC

8:00 AM

12:00 PM

Information Table

BHC

8:00 AM

9:00 AM

Workshop Session #6

BHC/SAN

8:00 AM

10:15 AM

Featured Workshop #5

BHC BALLROOM

9:15 AM

10:15 AM

Workshop Session #7

BHC/SAN

Closing Session/Keynote #3

Miller Auditorium

10:30 AM 12:00 PM

Kay Ulanday Barrett

Kat Blaque

Saeed Jones

BHC = Bernhard Center SAN = Sangren Hall


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CONTENTS

STATE MEET-UPS

WELCOME MBLGTACC 04

SESSION ONE 26

ABOUT MBLGTACC

SESSION TWO 28

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CONFERENCE TIMELINE 08

SESSION THREE

WELCOME LETTERS

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SESSION FOUR 32

ABOUT WMU

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SESSION FIVE 34

PLANNING COMMITTEE 14

SESSION SIX 36

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS 16

SESSION SEVEN 38

FEATURED SPEAKERS 18

GENERAL POLICIES 44

ENTERTAINMENT 20

ACCESSIBILITY 45

RESOURCE AND CAREER FAIR

22

SHUTTLES/HOTELS/ RESTAURANTS 46

STATE OF THE REGION PANEL

22

GLOSSARY 48

IDENTITY FORUMS 22

MAPS 52

ADVISORS 23

EMERGENCY AND CRISIS INFORMATION

Conference Booklet Design: Art Direction: Paul Sizer, Nick Kuder, Design: Summer Hoang. The Design Center, Frostic School of Art, Western Michigan University

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WELCOME FROM THE INSTITUTE

On behalf of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, it is our distinct honor to welcome you to Kalamazoo, Michigan for the 28th annual Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. As we enter a new decade and reflect on the history of this conference, we’re reminded of the lifelong friendships that have been forged and the knowledge shared with peers across the region. In the fight for our collective liberation, sharing knowledge and uplifting the labor of those most held to the margins must be a priority. In Whose Story Is This? (2019), Rebecca Solnit writes: “If you think you’re woke, it’s because someone woke you up, so thank the human alarm clocks.” Our contemporary understanding of oppression and privilege is made possible by the labor of countless activists and thinkers before us. As we come together for a transformative weekend of relationship building, teaching, education, and empowerment, we thank those sharing knowledge in this space and those whose labor paved the way. As we envision the coming year, we anticipate candidates for public office will tokenize our community to pinkwash their campaigns while others will seek to deny our right to exist. This will be emotionally draining and necessitates all members of our communities supporting one another as energies ebb and flow. And through it all, we remind you: electoral politics is not the answer to our collective liberation. Throughout this weekend, we invite you to build connections across the region and expand your support network. We encourage you to open your mind to new possibilities and learn new strategies for organizing. We urge you to imagine a future of collective liberation and envision how we get there, together. With pride, R.B. Brooks Justin Drwencke Director of Operations Executive Director


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VALUES

ABOUT MBLGTACC VISION We envision an environment where the needs of historically and currently marginalized college students are met through recognizing intersections of identity. We work to encourage the assembly of a strong community that advocates, educates, and empowers through connection.

EDUCATION Upholding a community that fosters self-education and learning through the sharing of experiences.

COMMUNITY Cultivating a sense of family or togetherness in which each individual feels comfortable and welcomed.

MISSION We work to: • Educate a diverse group of college students in creating growth and change within their communities • Empower attendees to advocate for themselves and others

INCLUSION Actively developing a space of belonging in order for everyone to be recognized and valued.

• Encourage cohesive dialogue and work to develop open communication through an intersectional lens. AFFIRMATION Providing a home where all are honored and appreciated for their identities and boundaries.

ACCESSIBILITY Creating a universal environment that recognizes and provides for all types of intellectual and physical abilities.


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Asexual


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WELCOME TO MBLGTACC 2020: ENVISIONING THE FUTURE TOGETHER For the first time in 28 years, we welcome you with open arms to Western Michigan University and our lively home of Kalamazoo! The past two years have been full of miles of text message threads, hundreds of emails, countless meetings, and the occasional pet picture, all so we could provide you with this historical and impactful experience. Recently, we entered into a new decade. New years, and new decades even more so, are seen as a time for restarting, for introspection, and for making yourself into the best person you can be. By attending MBLGTACC 2020, we hope you can continue this process of change, whether professionally, emotionally, academically, any combination of the three, or in some entirely different way. We want this conference to serve as a reminder that you are not alone as you begin this new decade and you will not be alone when it ends. Throughout this weekend, it is our goal to help you gain a sense of belonging stemming from new connections with people from across the Midwest, and the new knowledge and memories you share. No matter what challenges may be thrown in your direction this next decade, we hope the friendships you form at this conference will help you to overcome them, and will remind you that you are loved, you are valid in your identity, thoughts, and feelings, and that you must always be truthful to yourself. This weekend, we are dedicated to providing a safe, accessible space where you are welcome to not only be your authentic self, but to also use that freedom to facilitate growth in your communities, your hometowns, and your universities. As long as we stand in solidarity, we can change the world for the better; and we sincerely wish that MBLGTACC 2020 can help you envision a future together. SINCERELY, THE MBLGTACC 2020 PLANNING COMMITTEE

ABOUT WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY Western Michigan University (WMU) was founded as Western State Normal School in 1903 as a teacher-training facility until 1957. Now as a public research university, WMU ranks in the top 34% of Midwest schools for LGBTQ inclusion and in the top 10% within the state of Michigan. Former WMU students and alumni include actor Terry Crews, Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib, and singer/ songwriter Luther Vandross.

In 1989, WMU’s Office of LBGT Student Services was created and became the second oldest college office in the state of Michigan and tied for sixth oldest in the nation. Through the Office’s Student Advisory Council, students have successfully advocated for preferred name and an LGBT living/ learning community (Spectrum House). The Office of LBGT Student Services has provided more than $10,000 in tuition scholarships (since 2015) and more than 70 students to attend conferences (since 2013).

In 1970, gay and lesbian students came together The 2019-2020 academic year has been a to create the “WMU Alliance for Gay and Lesbian remarkable year for the Office of LBGT Student Support.” Although the Alliance for Gay and Lesbian Services including: Support is no longer active, student groups such • Celebrating the Office’s 30th anniversary during as OutSpoken (2001) and the National Gay Pilots Homecoming Weekend Association (2016) continue to thrive and provide • Receiving a grant from the Kalamazoo community outside of the Office’s doors. Community Foundation to work with area high school gay-straight alliances (GSAs) • Hosting MBLGTACC 2020 VOLUNTEER INFORMATION Looking for a way to contribute to the MBLGTACC 2020 experience? We are still looking to fill a few volunteer slots throughout the weekend. Stop by Volunteer Headquarters in Room 3149 Sangren to signup. If you’ve already signed-up, thank you! Check-in prior to your assigned time in Volunteer Headquarters.


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MBLGTACC CODE FOR INCLUSION By attending the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference, you agree to the following Code for Inclusion:

• Consider how your identities impact the space you’re in. There are numerous intersections of identities present and it is vital to give room to those who are often denied the ability to take up space. • Be sure to obtain permission before posting and/ This policy has been created for the greater safety or tagging pictures of other attendees on social and access of all guests and attendees. media. Avoid using bright or flashing lights whenever possible. • We have zero-tolerance for harassment of any • We ask attendees to use scent-free products or kind, including but not limited to: stalking, offensive limit/forego the excessive use of scented hygiene verbal comments, non-consensual photography or products while at the conference. recording, bathroom policing, unwelcome physical attention, intimidation, physical or sexual assault, Everyone is responsible for their own behavior in and/or inappropriate physical contact. this space. While we wish for everyone to be able to • We encourage anyone engaging in sexual activity express themselves, explore, and learn in their own to do so safely and consensually. We encourage the way, this code for inclusion sets an expectation that use of condoms, dental dams, lubricant, or other all attendees be considerate and careful of those forms of protection. While this is a sex-positive around them. Failure to adhere to these necessary space, be courteous to those who do not wish to guidelines could result in removal from the event engage in sexual activity, or those who may be sex- at the Institute’s discretion. If you have questions repulsed. Inversely, do not shame or judge those or concerns about this policy, please contact R.B. who engage in sexual activity, especially those who Brooks, the Institute’s director of operations, at participate in kink communities. Your body, your roze@sgdinstitute.org choice. • Consent should be received for any sexual and/ ABOUT OFFICE OF LGBT or physical contact. Consent is ongoing and STUDENT SERVICES enthusiastic and can be given or taken away at any This fall at Homecoming, the Office of LGBT time. Student Services victoriously celebrated their 30th • Provide content and/or trigger warnings whenever anniversary of supporting inclusion and diversity possible. Allow others to name their triggers when at Western. It was founded in 1989 as the second they arise and determine how to move forward LGBT organization in Michigan, and the sixth in the without causing additional harm or dismissing the nation.  As our office has a rich history as well as incident. active involvement in the community on a statewide • Be mindful of your language. While we are all and national scale, we offer a pioneering program learning and you may not be aware of certain of its time. phrases that others may find offensive, be receptive to being informed by attendees, reflect when Numerous programs and activities are made addressed, and adjust accordingly. This includes available to students such as Registered Student honoring people’s pronouns and names and avoiding Organizations like Outspoken, which focuses on ableist language. support, advocacy, education, and empowerment, • If you encounter someone with a service, as well as the National Gay Pilots Association assistance, or guide animal, you should NOT touch, (NGPA) which is popular in WMU’s nationally offer food to, or interact with the animal in any way acclaimed Aviation program.  We offer bi-weekly unless otherwise explicitly stated by the owner. identity meetings such as Bi-Weekly Pan, People Service animals can sometimes be identified by a of Shades Exclusively (POSE) for queer people of vest or other article of clothing indicating they are color, and Trans Thursdays. WMU has consistently assisting. ranked in the top lists of LGBTQ+ affirming • Please honor any accommodation or accessibility campuses, according to Campus Pride. We are needs provided to attendees. Do not inhibit the proud to distinguish our history of being an inclusive assistance provided to and/or used by attendees university and contribute to the collegiate LGBT+ such as ASL interpreters, reserved seating, service community by hosting MBLGTACC. animals, or other types of services/equipment.


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STUDENT PLANNING COMMITTEE AIDAN MCLOGAN (he/him-they/them) Aidan is a psychology major with a minor in gender and women’s studies. They are the logistics chair on the MBLGTACC 2020 planning committee. MBLGTACC has contributed to their education in the queer community and they want to help continue that tradition through their involvement in the planning committee. In their free time, Aidan enjoys facilitating a car enthusiasts club, spoiling their ferret Beemo, and collecting distasteful memes. AJ JANNENGA (they/them) AJ (they/them) is majoring in secondary education with a focus in English and minoring in secondary education with a focus in political science. They are the social media coordinator for MBLGTACC 2020. They became interested in MBLGTACC because they wanted to be more involved in working with the local LGBTQIA+ community. They hope to see MBLGTACC grow larger and bring even more of the community together. Outside of this, AJ enjoys being with friends and tweeting. ALEX CHESTER (any pronouns) Alex is a first year master’s student in behavior analysis at Western Michigan University (WMU) and is involved in logistics for MBLGTACC as well as helping in any way she can. Alex joined MBLGTACC because she wanted to be more involved in the alphabet community (TABLIG) here in Kalamazoo since recently moving from Detroit. One goal Alex has for MBLGTACC is to help others feel that they have a safe space to be themselves. Alex loves yoga, gardening, and verbally smacking TERFs and anyone else with a divisive purpose.  AUSTIN RUSSELL (he/him) Austin is a business management major. He is the show director for the 2020 MBLGTACC drag show. He is excited to bring the annual WMU drag show to the attendees of MBLGTACC. A highlight of LGBTQ+ visibility and outreach here at WMU, it seems only natural to bring it to the attendees of MBLGTACC. His main goal for the 2020 MBLGTACC drag show is to uplift and provide entertainment, all while supporting local drag talent. When not working on the show, Austin is a local drag entertainer under the name Irita B. Syndrome.

CESAR DOMINGUEZ (he/him) Cesar is a WMU graduate with a Master of International Development Administration. He is a volunteer for MBLGTACC 2020. MBLGTACC is important for Cesar, as it will be the very first time he interacts with a major event for the LGBTQ+ community at-large. MBLGTACC also serves as a great platform to interact with members of the community and queer-friendly employers. DANIELLE KROPVELD (they/them) Danielle is a WMU graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in theatre studies with a concentration in directing and a minor in gender and women’s studies. They are a co-committee chair and the public relations chair on the MBLGTACC 2020 planning committee. Danielle is absolutely thrilled to be working on a project that creates dialogue and creativity within the queer and trans community. They hope to continue this dialogue and even add some words of their own. Outside of MBLGTACC, Danielle enjoys reading, writing, and baking banana bread. ELI PERCICH (they/them) Eli is a political science major. They are the MBLGTACC volunteer coordinator. MBLGTACC is important to Eli because it was their first experience being surrounded by other members of the LGBT+ community. By being a part of the planning committee, they hope to create an educational and enjoyable conference for all who attend. In their free time, Eli enjoys playing with their cat, Duck and their rabbit, Anora. EMILY REEVES (they/them) Emily is a WMU graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in comparative religions with a minor in English with a concentration in writing. They are the development chair of the MBLGTACC 2020 planning committee. According to past attendees, MBLGTACC has been an incredible opportunity to build community and have valuable conversations within the LGBTQ+ community. Emily is honored to be a part of planning this event and hopes to facilitate these important experiences for attendees to the best of their ability. In their free time, Emily enjoys cooking and playing with their cat, Duck.


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JAX STROH (she/her) Jax is double majoring in psychology and gender and women’s studies. She is the programming chair for the MBLGTACC 2020 planning committee. Jax decided to join the MBLGTACC planning committee because she wanted to get more involved with LGBT activities on campus and she hopes that everyone feels welcome at MBLGTACC. In her spare time, Jax enjoys watching bad reality tv, hanging out with friends, and modeling.

ADVISOR NATHAN NGUYEN (he/him/his) M. Ed., Educational Leadership, University of North Florida, 2012 B.S., Communications, University of North Florida, 2007 B.A., Music, University of Kansas, 2004

Nathan Nguyen is the current director of LBGT Student Services at WMU and newest board member for Fire Historical Arts Collective. Prior to WMU he worked at NC State University KATHERINE PLIER (she/her) (2014-2016), University of North Florida (UNF Katherine Plier studies jazz performance 2010-2013), Northeast Florida AIDS Network and leadership and business strategy at (NFAN 2013-2014), and the Jacksonville Area WMU. She has also studied abroad at Sexual Minority Youth Network (JASMYN Kingston University in London, during which 2007-2010). During his tenure at NC State, he she witnessed Pride week abroad and was was the assistant director for the GLBT office inspired to contribute to more LGBT+ events. but was also instrumental in organizing more She is proud to work on developing and the than a dozen Asian/Asian American student program guide for MBLGTACC, and hopes interest groups to come together to create this conference changes lives and empowers community and advocacy. While at JASMYN, all those who take part in it. he was an HIV tester and counselor in addition to assisting with case management, youth KELSEY STATON (she/her) development, and Centers for Disease Control Kelsey is a film, video, and media studies (CDC) grants for HIV prevention. major with a minor in theatre. She is the program guide coordinator for the MBLGTACC Nathan has served in various organizations 2020 planning committee and is excited to be including: National Advisory Committee for a part of a conference that fosters creativity the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity and education within the LGBTQ+ community. in Higher Education (NCORE), Asian Pacific This will be Kelsey’s first MBLGTACC!  She Islander committee for NCORE (co-chair), can’t wait to gain the knowledge and the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT experiences that she has heard so much Resource Professionals (people of color about from her peers! Kelsey’s other interests committee co-chair), Organizations United include horror movies, stand up comedy, Together (OUT Jacksonville), and as a music cooking, and traveling. instructor for both girls rock North Carolina, and girls rock Jacksonville (FL). He has NICK HILTUNEN (they/them-he/him) presented at multiple conferences including Nick  is majoring in secondary education with NCORE, Creating Change, Union of North a focus on earth and integrated sciences American Vietnamese Student Associations with a minor in American Sign Language. (UNAVSA), and Mid-Atlantic Union of They are both a co-committee chair and the Vietnamese Student Associations (MAUVSA). finance chair. Nick helped create the 2020 Nathan is a current doctoral student in higher planning committee after attending the 2018 education leadership and hopes to research conference and bidding to host MBLGTACC how Asian American LGBTQ students 2020 at WMU. They hope that MBLGTACC navigate predominantly white institutions 2020 will inspire others to speak up, speak (PWIs) that lack institutional support. out, and truly make them feel at home within the community. In their free time, Nick enjoys I’m involved in MBLGTACC because when I playing video games, listening to podcasts, was an undergraduate student at KU (2000and watching youtube. 2004) I thought my options as an LGBT person were limited and I did not see any visible Special thanks to: Autumn Graves, Makenzie queer Asian Americans to look up to. I Marts, and Lilly Mazzone. hope that through the continuous work of MBLGTACC and our peer institutions that we can provide possibilities and opportunities for LGBTQ students.


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KEYNOTE SPEAKERS KAY ULANDAY BARRETT FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14 5:30 – 6:30PM MILLER AUDITORIUM

Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, performer, and cultural strategist. K. has featured at The Lincoln Center, Symphony Space, The Poetry Foundation, The Poetry Project, Princeton University, Tucson Poetry Festival, NY Poetry Festival, The Dodge Poetry Foundation, The Hemispheric Institute, and Brooklyn Museum. They received fellowships and residencies from Lambda Literary Review, VONA/ Voices, The Home School, Macondo, Drunken Boat, and Monson Arts. Their contributions are in The New York Times, Academy of American Poets, Asian American Literary Review, them., PBS News Hour, The Advocate, NYLON, Huffington Post, Raceforward, and more. They have two books: When The Chant Comes (Topside, 2016) and More Than Organs (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2020).


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KAT BLAQUE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 5:00 – 6:00PM MILLER AUDITORIUM

Kat Blaque is an animator, illustrator and YouTuber from Southern California who has been openly blogging about her life for the past 10+ years on YouTube. She playfully refers to herself as “intersectionality salad” as she embodies various identities and experiences. As a black woman, she is invested in starting conversations about white supremacy and how it’s impacted her own life as well as various others. As a Trans woman, she believes that speaking about her growth and acceptance of self is vital in a world where trans people aren’t seen as valid and their possibilities are often seen as limited. She currently contributes to Everyday Feminism, Pride.com, the Huffington Post and has appeared on Buzzfeed, MTV News and MTV’s “Decoded”.

SAEED JONES

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16 10:30 – 11:30AM MILLER AUDITORIUM

Saeed Jones was born in Memphis, Tennessee, and grew up in Lewisville, Texas. His debut collection, Prelude to Bruise, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and was awarded the 2015 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The collection also received a starred review in Publishers Weekly, which described the book as, “a fever dream, something akin to magic.” His poems engage themes of intimacy, race and power, and often incorporate elements of mythology. In a 2014 interview for PEN America, Jones stated, “I’m obsessed with manhood as a brutal and artful performance. My mind always finds its way back to the crossroad where sex, race, and power collide. Journeys, transformation as well as dashed attempts to transform, fascinate me as well.” In 2019, Saeed released his highly anticipated memoir, How We Fight for Our Lives. A review from NPR writes, “Jones’s voice and sensibility are so distinct that he turns one of the oldest of literary genres inside out and upside down.” In this memoir, Saeed has developed a one-of-a-kind style that is as beautiful as it is powerful, and he has cemented himself as an essential writer of our time. Saeed has received a Pushcart Prize and fellowships from Cave Canem and Queer/Art/Mentorship. He lives in Columbus, Ohio, a city he advocates for with ferocity.


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FEATURED SPEAKERS TRANSPARENCY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 8:00 – 9:30AM BERNHARD CENTER BALLROOM

The program begins with each panelist presenting short readings of their letters from the book and/or their personal essays. It then transitions into a conversation among the panelists about issues faced by themselves and other transgender people, which includes access to basic health care, counseling, community support, experiences with law enforcement, why trans people are so vulnerable to assault and how justice for a trans person experiencing violence can be illusive, thereby leaving them vulnerable to repeated violence and assault. The conversation shifts to the deeply personal as panelists address relationships with their own transitions, and everyday life changes which take many forms, such as: taking hormones, changing one’s name, choosing their pronouns, expressions in clothing, physical and emotional changes, and more. At the core is maintaining autonomy over their own bodies and stories. A lively Q and A and extended conversation follows with the audience.

PANEL DISCUSSION SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 9:45 – 10:45AM BERNHARD CENTER BALLROOM

Join keynote and featured speakers Kay Ulanday Barrett, Kat Blaque, Romeo Jackson, and Robyn Ochs for a panel discussion. Facilitated by planning team advisor, Nate Nguyen, the panel will discuss this year’s theme, Envisioning the Future Together, from a variety of lenses and life experiences.

ROMEO JACKSON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 2:30 – 3:30PM BERNHARD CENTER BALLROOM

Hailing from the southside of Chicago and the grandchild of Gracie Lee Fowler, Romeo Jackson is a first generation, Queer, Non-Binary Femme, and a Black descended of the estimated 11 million Africans who were kidnapped and sold into enslavement. They are a feminist dedicated to intersectional justice and cross movement building. Currently, Romeo is the inaugural LGBTQ and gender program coordinator at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Their research, writing, and practice explores race/ ism, settler colonialism, gender, and sexuality within a higher education context with an emphasis on the experiences of Queer and Trans Students of Color. Named one of the 100 Black and LGBT-SGL leaders to watch, Romeo is committed to uplifting and empowering queer and trans people of color through a black queer feminist lens.


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ROBYN OCHS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 3:45 – 4:45PM BERNHARD CENTER BALLROOM

Robyn Ochs is an educator, speaker, grassroots activist, and editor of Bi Women Quarterly and two anthologies: the 42-country collection Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and RECOGNIZE: The Voices of Bisexual Men. An advocate for the rights of people of ALL orientations and genders to live safely, openly and with full access and opportunity, Robyn’s work focuses on increasing awareness and understanding of complex identities and mobilizing people to be powerful allies to one another within and across identities and social movements. Robyn was recently named by Teen Vogue as one of “9 Bisexual Women Who are Making History.”

CREATING FROM PAIN: A WRITING WORKSHOP ON STORYTELLING AND OUR BODIES SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16 8:00 –10:15AM SANGREN 1910

Creating From Pain: A Writing Workshop on Storytelling and Our Bodies is an interactive, experimental writing experience led by panelists from TRANSparency. The workshop uses storytelling, visual art and light-movement to access new ways to explore and write about our unique experiences in our own bodies, especially for survivors and trans people who often struggle to find safety within themselves. Participants will also have the space to acknowledge who they are outside of their relationships and labels, nurtured by mutual time for individual and group listening, self reflection and sharing. The workshop is open to all gender expressions.


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ENTERTAINMENT


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RESOURCE AND CAREER FAIR

SANGREN 1ST AND 2ND FLOOR LOBBIES SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH, 10:00AM – 4:30PM We’re proud to offer more than 45 tables for attendees to visit this year! With a record numbers of tables, this year’s Resource and Career Fair offers attendees the opportunity to check out the academic areas of colleges and universities from throughout the Midwest, LGBTQIA+ vendors, business and corporate LGBTQIA+ affinity groups, HIV/STI testing, non-profits, and so much more. Check out the Resource and Career Fair on Saturday!

STATE OF THE REGION PANEL

BERNHARD CENTER BALLROOM SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH, 1:00−2:00PM, State of the Region is a yearly opportunity for the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity to reflect on and highlight major issues facing queer and trans individuals in the Midwest. We will be focusing on the theme “Beyond the Ballot: Strategies for Change that Supplement, Surpass and Usurp Electoral Politics.” Join members of the Institute and invited guests as we engage with attendees about ways to achieve our collective liberation and uplift efforts in the Midwest.

IDENTITY FORUMS SATURDAY, SAN 1710 SAN 1730 SAN 1740 SAN 1750 SAN 1910 SAN 1920 SAN 2710 SAN 2720 SAN 2730 BHC 204 BHC 205

FEBRUARY 15, 7:00−8:30 PM Identity Forum Gay Identity Forum Asexual/Aromantic Identity Forum Non-Binary Identity Forum Lesbian Identity Forum Queer and Trans Black, Indigenous, People of Color (QTBIPOC) Identity Forum Trans/Umbrella Identity Forum Polyamorous Identity Forum Communities of Faith Identity Forum DIY Identity Forum Disability Identity Forum Bi/Pan/Polysexual

Identity Forums are designated spaces for communities to gather around similar or shared experiences. Facilitators are not assigned to these spaces. We strongly assert that only individuals who align with the identity centered in each space attend the forum. We will operate on a good faith system that attendees will select spaces in which they are not visitors or guests. As a reminder: Identity Forums are not ally spaces. Here are some general ideas and guidelines for forming your discussions in the identity forums: • Determine if one or two people are presenting workshops on the identity area and are available • We acknowledge that to participate in the identity forums, we may be asking you to choose between multiple experiences. This is NOT to indicate that any of your experiences are more salient or important than others. Feel free to switch forums as needed, just be mindful of how you enter into spaces in progress. • Don’t spend the entire time going around doing introductions. Instead, have folks introduce themselves when they speak. • Be mindful of the space you’re consuming. • Be willing to break up your larger group into smaller clusters to talk about various topics or allow more folks to contribute. • Do not police or challenge folks’ identities in the space. If you have concerns about someone’s presence in a space, please connect with a conference volunteer or staff person. • Please refer to the Code for Inclusion for additional guidelines.


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ADVISORS

Advisor events area designed specifically for advisors, graduate students and higher education professionals. We recognize the vital role these attendees play in supporting the growth and development of students and invite these attendees to engage with any of the programming detailed below. ADVISOR SOCIAL: FRIDAY FEB. 14 7PM Connect and mingle with other advisors/grad students/higher ed folks at University Roadhouse located at 1332 W. Michigan Ave. Kalamazoo MI. 49006. Some drinks and light refreshments provided. Check the MBLGTACC app for updates about shuttle transportation to this event.  ADVISOR ROUNDTABLE SATURDAY FEB. 15    11AM–12PM ROOM 204 BHC Participate in a casual discussion among other higher education practitioners. Share your experiences, ruminate on challenges, and connect with others doing this work across the country. Facilitated by Jeff Gibson and Tegra Myanna, regional representations with the Consortium of LGBT Higher Education Professionals.  RECOMMENDED SESSIONS While these sessions are open to all conference attendees, the content is highly relevant or provided by higher education practitioners.  WORKSHOPS All recommended advisor workshops will be in room 205 of the BHC  What’s Solidarity Got to Do with It? How QTPOC Folks Navigate Divergent Communities to Create Inclusion by Nathan Nguyen and Romeo Jackson (Session 1) Queering the Boundaries with LGBTQ Advisors by TK Morton (Session 2)

The Importance of Queer Resiliency Groups on College Campuses by Jeff Gibson (Session 3) Gender Inclusive Housing Policy Round Table by Cheyanne Kramer (Session 5) Racialized Gender Roles: Hose the Intersections of Racism and Sexism Impact the LGBT Community by Nathan Nguyen (Session 6) The Campus Gay Agenda: Strategic Planning for LGBTQIA+ Initiatives by Danielle Stamper (Session 7)

FEATURED VOICE: ROMEO JACKSON

BERNHARD CENTER BALLROOM SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH, 2:30-3:30PM

This year’s advisor programming was made possible by the growing relationship between the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity and the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals. The Consortium is an organization that envisions higher education environments where LGBTQ people, inclusive of all of our intersecting identities, are fully liberated. For more information, check out lgbtcampus.org


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STATE MEET-UPS

SATURDAY FROM 11 AM TO NOON

North Dakota SAN 3510

Minnesota SAN 1730 Wisconsin SAN 1920

South Dakota SAN 3510

Nebraska SAN 2730

Michigan SAN 1910 Iowa SAN 1710 Illinois SAN 1750

Kansas SAN 4705

Missouri SAN 1740

Indiana SAN 2720

Ohio BHC 204

Kentucky SAN 3310

Outside the Midwest SAN 2710

State Meet-Ups provide attendees from a particular state/area of the region to connect and network. Here are some recommendations for getting the most out of your state meet-up: Reflect on current issues impacting your state and ways you can mobilize across your areas to make change  Discuss ways the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity can support you goals and efforts in your area. Take notes and share them with us after your meetup!  Highlight recent events and projects. Share your small wins and major successes! Name what support or needs you have in your respective areas. 


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THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS APPLE BLOSSOM

$5,000+

COPPER $2,500+

PAINTED TURTLE

$1,000+ WMU STUDENT AFFAIRS

BERGAMONT $500+ ANONYMOUS

AMERICAN ROBIN WMU HONORS COLLEGE WMU COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS HMHF GROUP WMU COLLEGE ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES

$200+


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SESSION ONE SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15TH 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

RELATED HISTORIES: COMMONALITIES BETWEEN NATIVE AND TRANS ACTIVIST MOVEMENTS SAN 1710 JAC Stringer

The history of our communities have an impact on who we are today. We carry the pains and joys from those who came before us in our bodies, in our experiences, and in our identities. This is the foundation of historical trauma and it appears in all oppressed communities. The Native activist movement and the trans activist movement are full of commonalities including cultural, institutional, and medicalized violence, segregation, and normalization. This workshop is a space to hold, discuss, and understand how historical trauma takes shape within and around our communities and how we can continue to heal and grow.

CO-LIBERATORY SOCIALISM: VISIONING OUR LIBERATORY FUTURES SAN 1730 Sariah Metcalfe

Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Classism, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Other (Provide) This workshop offers an introduction to leftist theory from an intersectional feminist lens. During this w o r k s h o p p a r t i c i p a n t s w i l l b e i n t ro d u c e d t o s o m e f o u n d a t i o n a l re a s o n s w h y l e f t i s t a n a l y s i s m u s t b e p a i re d w i t h g e n d e r a n d r a c i a l j u s t i c e . A f t e r a s h o r t p re s e n t a t i o n p a r t i c i p a n t s w i l l b e i n v i t e d to take part in a visionary organizing letter writing exercise to participate in discussion about how to connect our liberatory visions to our revolutionary present.

NAVIGATING RELATIONSHIPS 101: WHAT YOUR HEALTH CLASS DIDN’T TEACH YOU SAN 1740 Gabrielle Villar

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal) This workshop is an introduction to the emotional labor that comes with being physically intimate with someone. This is meant to be broad in order to include many kinds of physical acts.

LOOK WHO’S TALKING: GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND THE VOICE SAN 1750 Brandon Merritt

Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism A person’s speech and voice convey an immense amount of information about them to others, whether intended or not. Our voices allow others to construct a mental image of us, including age, race and ethnicity, personality, and physical characteristics. Gender is an especially notable feature of the voice to which listeners are sensitive. Gender cues in speech are particularly important for trans and gender non-conforming individuals, whose voices may, at times, feel at odds with their gender orientation and identity. In this workshop we’ll explore the many ways our identity is coded i n o u r v o i c e s , h o w o u r i d e a s o f “ t y p i c a l ” v o i c e s d e v e l o p , s t r a t e g i e s f o r w o r k i n g t o w a rd a c h i e v i n g an authentic voice, and the role of trans and non-binary identities in shaping the future of communication technology. After the presentation we will open to a round of discussion on our own experiences with voice and identity.


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GENDER, SEX, AND THE BINARY: MOVING BEYOND A “GENDER SPECTRUM” SAN 1920 Tonie Bear

Sexism and Misogyny, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism This workshop will discuss gender from a variety of angles, including biological, sociological, and cultural. PowerPoint slides will prompt thought and discussion with participants. We will discuss what gender is, gender across cultures, ways to work with the gender binary, and ways to move beyond the binary.

SHARING STORIES: EMPHASIZING LGBTQ+ PERSPECTIVES AND EXPERIENCES SAN 2710 Abigail Starcher

Sexual Assault/Rape, Sexism and Misogyny, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Slurs A workshop sharing my experience working to create a way for LGBTQ+ voices to be shared in my local community through an alternative to the VDAY presentation of The Vagina Monologues. My local Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) worked together to approach the same topics but endeavored to include various perspectives instead of a primarily cis-gender point of view. Therefore, I want to share the experience I had, explain how to create an individual monologue, offer the opportunity to share some monologues, and to inspire participants to start initiatives in their communities.

DEALING WITH INSURANCE FOR HRT SAN 2720 Lilliana Davis

Mental Illness and Ableism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Classism, Other (Provide) Insurance companies can seem complex, but follow a basic set of rules. This session will cover some basic terminology, understanding your insurance policy, and understanding the different ways to access HRT through the medical field. This session is built on my experiences, which include both getting an endocrinologist and informed consent. The endocrinologist part will cover getting the referral to an endocrinologist to insurance, ensuring the referral was given fair consideration, and appealing the decision. The informed consent portion will focus on how to get an appointment at Planned Parenthood and what happens at the appointment. There will also be a chance to ask any questions you may have.

CRUSHING CONVERSION THERAPY IN 2020: THE TREVOR PROJECT AND YOU BHC 204 Sam Brinton

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Suicide/Suicidal Ideation In the past few years, laws protecting LGBTQ youth from conversion therapy have been passing at breakneck speed. With thousands of lawmakers in cities, states, and countries recognizing the harms of conversion therapy - the next step is massive public education. From the New York Times op-eds to Playboy Magazine, from the United Nations to testifying before Congress, come learn about the world’s largest campaign to end conversion therapy and save lives with The Trevor Project.

WHAT’S SOLIDARITY GOT TO DO WITH IT? HOW QTPOC FOLKS NAVIGATE DIVERGENT COMMUNITIES TO CREATE INCLUSION. BHC 205 Romeo Jackson and Nathan Nguyen

Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Classism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism Queer and trans people of color (QTPOC) navigate communities at the intersections of identity. From LGBTQ spaces that are predominantly white, to racial and/or ethnic communities that are problematically cis and/or hetero. This workshop will engage in conversations about what it means to identify at the intersections, common issues, and how to create convergence of communities.


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SESSION TWO SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15TH 9:45 AM–10:45 AM “I’M NOT WHITE, I’M QUEER!”: WHITE ENTITLEMENT AND PRIVILEGE IN THE QUEER COMMUNITY SAN 1710 Shantelle Mogollon

Sexual Assault/Rape, Suicide/Suicidal Ideation, Death/Dying, Mental Illness and Ableism, Excessive or Gratuitous Violence, Racism and Racial Slurs, Classism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism This workshop will address the major issues within the Queer Community concerning Racism and White Entitlement/Privilege while discussing the multi-faceted issues that Queer People of Color face such as Racism, MicroAggressions, Fetishizing, and Hate Crimes. This session will describe strategies for going beyond Allyship and taking steps to uplift and support Queer People of Color.

THICKER THAN WATER: WHEN QUEER EXISTENCE OVERLAPS DISABLED LIFE SAN 1730 Rachael McCollum

Mental Illness and Ableism, Homophobia/Heterosexism With a focus on community ties and a search for support exter nal to the family that raised you, this workshop is meant to provide a place for participants to learn to compare and contrast queer experiences and disabled experiences. Given by a disabled queer person, this talk will showcase the similar situations and emotional responses a disabled person or a queer person may find themselves having, and ways that stereotypes about disabled people and queer people can overlap, with specific examples from the presenter’s own experiences.

ESAS IN LGBT SAN 1740 Beck Nelson

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Self Injury (self harm, eating disorders, etc), Mental Illness and Ableism There has been a rise in the need for emotional support animals in many colleges and they really do make a difference. The presenter himself has an ESA that has helped with his mental illnesses. This workshop will look at what an emotional support animal (ESA) is, including the difference between E S A’s , t h e r a p y a n i m a l s , a n d s e r v i c e a n i m a l s a re . We w i l l a l s o g o o v e r w h e re a n E S A i s a l l o w e d t o b e , w h a t t h e l e g i s l a t i o n a ro u n d t h e m i s , a n d h o w t o g e t o n e . We w i l l c o v e r m a j o r c o l l e g e s ’ ESA policies.


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HERE AND QUEER: RECLAIMING OF A HISTORIC SLUR SAN 1750 Leslie Zelinski

Slurs, Homophobia/Heterosexism This presentation is designed to help people understand the history behind the word queer, the current usage of the word, and how it has been reclaimed by some members of the community. Recognizing that there are mixed feelings about this topic, there will be an open discussion addressing the importance and impact of the language used in LGBTQ+ spaces.

ASEXUALS SURVIVING COLLEGE GUIDE SAN 1910 Joan Conte

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Sexism and Misogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism Asexual and Aspec people often discover themselves in college. Higher Education is a field of issues for young people. We all know the importance sex has in our society. Most of the LGBT+ community is focused on love and sex. What happens when asexual people are left out of the picture. How can LGBT+ offices on college campuses be more inclusive of aspec people? How can we as a community support aspec people and validate them?

TRAVELING WHILE TRANS: WHAT’S YOUR NAME, AGAIN? SAN 2710 Arden Tyree Kimme

Traveling while trans is intimidating, especially if your ID documents still bear an incorrect name! Arden has recently spent several months in southern Argentina and Chile and is here to share their experiences navigating new countries and a new language while trans. They will include advice for traveling prior to a legal name change, with a short section on trans Spanish

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO LESBIANS? SAN 2720 Stephanie Skora

Sexual Assault/Rape, Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Death/Dying, Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Slurs, Other (Provide) It’s often said that “lesbian” is a dying identity: non-heterosexual women have started identifying in other ways, and we lesbians have had a troubling history with the trans community. In many ways, it seems like we’ve lost queer politics in lesbian spaces. A journey through history and the roots of the divide between the lesbian and trans community, this lecture seeks to debunk the notion that transness and lesbianness are at odds, and explore the radical potentialities of new lesbian spaces!

P.S. I LOVE YOU (AND YOU, AND YOU): EXPLORING NON-MONOGAMY INSIDE THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY SAN 2730 Stephani Vargas

Homophobia/Heterosexism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Sexism and Misogyny, Racism and Racial Slurs Let’s dive into non-monogamy and the infinite ways LGBTQ+ people can experience love. In a society where heterosexual monogamy remains the default, we will discuss both the joys and challenges that stem from breaking societal norms of what a relationship “should” look like. This session will provide practical tools for non-monogamy, models of healthy relationships, and will end with time for facilitated discussion and sharing.

VALIDATION: A QUEER IDENTITY BHC 204 Annie Titus

As individuals seeking our identity, we eventually come to express interactions with others as validating, or perhaps, the exact opposite. The workshop is primarily rhetorical questions driven to help us discover what works for us. Many of us wander through life, not realizing what drives our particular engine, and by methodically working through where we have received validating experiences in the past, can help us to make plans for the future, without spending too much time in those experiences that leave us empty, rather than unleashing who we are, and who we want to be. This presentation was given last year in Wichita.

QUEERING THE BOUNDARIES WITH LGBTQ ADVISORS BHC 205 Advisor: TK Morton

Racism and Racial Slurs, Mental Illness and Ableism This session is designed to have LGBTQ+ advisors, leaders, and educators learn to support more of our community. We will be discussing direct action as an educator, how to support yourself, and how will you risk ethnically not putting the work on the most marginalized communities. To continue the process to unlearn the harmful ideologies, language, and doctrine as well as developing a higher level of risk that is vital in our lives that can’t be ignored.


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SESSION THREE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH 1:15 PM–2:15 PM

RAINBOW CAPITALISM IN HIGHER EDUCATION: HOW INSTITUTIONS RECRUIT US TO MAKE $$$ SAN 1710 Bee Taylor

Has anyone else noticed that recruitment materials from higher education institutions targeting LGBTQ+ students has increased dramatically in the last ten to twenty years? Campus Pride Index has become a common term on campus? Well, you’re not alone. Many institutions have begun marketing and recruitment campaigns to bring LGBTQ+ students to their campuses and the number of Campus Pride Index profiles has increased exponentially over the years. However, admissions data for sexual orientation and gender identity has remained consistently nonexistent. Why is there such a disconnect between these two areas? How can we anecdotally notice a push for LGBTQ+ student admission and recruitment at institutions, yet institutions do not choose to collect data about their identities? During this presentation, I will explore how the concepts of rainbow capitalism, academic capitalism, and lack of institutional requirement for admission and recruitment data collection have all interacted within the industry of US higher education to lead us to our current situation... Institutions being able o recruit and admit larger and larger numbers of LGBTQ+ students each year, while simultaneously not being required to report these identity groups in which these students exist, therefore not “outing” themselves as supporting or hosting LGBTQ+ students to donors or other institutional supporters who would disagree or disapprove of such.

BEYOND BUBBLE BATHS: SELF-CARE FOR STUDENT LEADERS SAN 1730 Hannah Thompson, Viengsamai Fetters

“Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” —Audre Lorde Student leaders, especially those who hold marginalized identities, have a unique position on their campuses. They often have to navigate not only the stress of everyday college life, but also face institutional and systemic challenges which can wear them down and burn them out. These students are also often held to higher standards than their peers for everything from essays to event planning. Join a student-advisor team for a workshop on surviving specific challenges of student activism through self-care that goes beyond bubble baths to dig into internalized oppression, navigating power, asking for help, creating support systems that work, and holding institutions accountable. Participants will come away with tools and resources for self-care and also have the opportunity to learn from one another.

RETENTION IN COLLEGIATE ORGANIZATIONS SAN 1740 Brooklyn Arizmendi

For Student Leaders by Student Leaders, Let’s talk student retention in LGBTQ+ Organizations! How do you attract students to your organization? How do you keep students invested and even striving for leadership positions? Together we’ll go over inclusion, advertising, creating engaging meetings, while being advocates for all LGBTQ+ students.

QUEER IDENTITY AND CHRISTIAN FAITH SAN 1750 Jaclyn Brett, Winston Lewis

Sexism and Misogyny, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Other (discussion of Jesus, the Bible, and potentially traumatic experiences within the church) This presentation is a safe space for discussing and understanding queer folks’ experiences with the church and Christian faith, reflecting on how their faith backgrounds influence them, and separating what in that is of value and what in that is harmful. It will include discussions of personal experiences in faith/religious contexts, reclaiming personal faith, and finding divine value in Jesus. It will contain presentations on shame, identity, and queering the Bible.

SHOWGIRL TO SOBRIETY: A QUEEN’S JOURNEY THROUGH TRAUMA, MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTION; COMING OUT FABULOUS! SAN 1910 Ben Hippensteel

Mental Illness and Ableism, Drug/Alcohol Use Working as an entertainer for over 20 years, Ben Hippensteel has had his ups and his rock bottoms. From early days of


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trauma as a young gay man in a small town, Ben escaped to the city. He struggled to find a way to accept his sexuality and lifestyle. ENTER: Candi, Wantsome? Ben’s alter ego was not just a drag queen, but a top entertainer in his big city community. But how to hide and cope with his mental health was still looming. After years onstage, he decided to work on his boy life and dove into the corporate world. Unknown to Ben, he had been taught by his own LGBTQ+ community howto celebrate, how to cope with sadness or even just a hectic day at work. He had been entrenched in a habit of using alcohol in excess, regularly. Everyone surrounding him was escaping through drinking. He knew the right people, attended the hottest social scenes, and ran with the hottest crowds but Ben’s corporate image began to crack alongside his showgirl side, Candi. His depression was running him into the ground and his drinking was on overload. Life started to fall apart; losing jobs, health problems, and having a serious car accident totaling his car but not remembering. Attempting to get help at his family’s request, Ben started to seek treatment only to relapse over and over. Ben packed up everything he could gather in two hours and left. At the age of 36, he traveled back to the small hometown setting and moved in with his parents. Still struggling, back in his small hometown Ben eventually crashed and was arrested, jailed, and things began to shift. Getting sober in the LGBTQ+ community is hard when we are conditioned to be those happy party rainbow people. The real journey began after Ben’s sobriety and into his recovery when he asked himself: “Where do I fit into my LGBTQ+ community anymore? A sober drag queen, does that exist?” It does now, come hear a tale of glitter, pain, and finding where you fit in even when you’re always standing out.

ISLAM AND THE LGBTQ+ COMMUNITY SAN 1920 Genevieve Labe, Zikra Fashir

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Suicide/Suicidal Ideation, Self Injury (self harm, eating disorders, etc), Death/Dying, Mental Illness and Ableism, Excessive or Gratuitous Violence, Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Hateful language towards religious groups (Islamophobia, antisemitism), Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Slurs, Other: Politics and Immigration Explore what Islamophobia is and how it shows up in the LGBTQ+ community. Understand the experiences of Muslim LGBTQ+ individuals in a global context. Learn what you can do to intervene when confronted with Islamophobia, how you can shift the narrative of Islam and LGBTQ+ Muslim people, and create spaces where Muslim LGBTQ+ people are seen and validated within the LGBTQ+ community.

“YOU LOOK LIKE A FREAK…” GENDER, SOCIETAL RECOGNITION, AND TRANS COMMUNITY POLITICS SAN 2710 JAC Stringer

As the “LGBT” movement moves further into the mainstream eye, trans and queer people are called to analyze our shifting position in society. In a modern context, trans and queer communities have teetered between a desire to achieve safety through normalcy and maintaining unique cultural identities. A culture’s interpretation of normalcy is the key determinant for societal recognition, but how does one normalize identities that by are definition queer and freak? Gender identity and sexuality directly relate to defining of who is “normal” which is enforced by intersectional systems of oppression. We carve out spaces for ourselves in different ways, but not without the influence of our communities’ oppressed histories. We develop defense mechanisms to negotiate our environments, some of which are relatively new frontiers in challenging heteronormativity and privilege. This workshop evaluates the cultural concept of normalcy, how historical trauma connects to how we negotiate our identities, and how systems of oppression impact the presentation and creation of freaks. Through a discussion of identity, culture, and history we may determine who enforces the rules of legitimacy, why we feel we have to follow them, and how we can break them.

THE WATER CLOSET: UNGENDERING BATHROOMS SAN 2720 Leslie Boker

Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Other (Provide) Using the bathroom while trans is complicated by a history of gender policing and cissexist notions about who deserves to use public spaces. This workshop investigates the history of gendered bathrooms, the cultural narratives maintaining them today, and the machinations behind anti-trans bathroom bills — then turns to discussion about queer dreams of an ideal place to do your business.

FAT IS NOT A BAD WORD: LOVING YOUR BODY AND EXPLORING YOUR IDENTITY SAN 2730 Stephani Vargas

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Sexual Assault/Rape, Self Injury (self harm, eating disorders, etc), Mental Illness and Ableism, Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Classism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Other (Provide) Exploring body positivity and the intersection of LGBT+ and fat identities, this workshop will discuss the history of the fat acceptance movement, fatphobia, and fat queerness. We will share tools for loving ourselves, and our fat bodies, regardless of what mainstream culture defines as “normal” and work to dispel common misconceptions about fatness. Everyone is welcome to attend; however, this workshop will be centered on fat-identified members of the community.

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32 SESSION THREE CONTINUED CREATING AN LGBT ADVOCACY PLAN BHC 204 Brooke Lindley

Sexual Assault/Rape, Suicide/Suicidal Ideation, Mental Illness and Ableism, Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Classism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal) OutFront Kalamazoo’s mission is to create a just, inclusive, equitable, and supportive environment in Southwest Michigan for all sexual orientations, gender identities and gender expressions. Throughout the last 32 years, OutFront Kalamazoo has been assisting businesses and individuals on how to create a safe space for the LGBT community. In this presentation, OutFront Kalamazoo will provide participants on how to create an advocacy plan to assist and empower the LGBT community to advocate for change, create change, and how to hold individuals accountable for public change. In this presentation, participants will develop an action plan to assist with marginalized communities. The Presentation does mention stats and stories of individuals that include: sexual assault, domestic violence, suicide rates, homophobia and transphobia, racism, classism and more. Please review the content warning prior to attending.

THE IMPORTANCE OF QUEER RESILIENCY GROUPS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES BHC 205 Advisor: Jeff Gibson

Finding a place to connect and share experiences with others can be challenging for Queer students in campus environments that are not the most inclusive or promote visibility. This presentation shares how OUTreach, a resiliency group at the University of North Dakota allows for the opportunity to connect students with one another and talk about issues and experiences relating to identity and how to build resiliency.

SESSION FOUR SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH 2:30 PM–3:30 PM UN-ERASED: EXPLORING THE FOUNDATION OF MODERN QUEER IDENTITY AND ACTIVISM SAN 1710 Chris Mattix

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Suicide/Suicidal Ideation, Death/Dying, Excessive or Gratuitous Violence, Hateful language towards religious groups (Islamophobia, antisemitism), Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Slurs, Other (Provide) Towards the end of the 19th Century and into the first quarter of the 20th, Germany saw an increase in interest “sexual science” and identity. Activists began to create terms to identify Queer people for the first time, institutes began to study gender and sexuality, and organizations began to gather to fight anti-Queer laws. Un-Erased will explore the foundations of this period of Queer German history, its dramatic end, and its influence on modern American activism and Queer identity. Participants will obtain an understanding of what it means to study Queer history, the daily life of Queer Germans through the rise of the Third Reich, and the lasting effects of this time period on modern Queer life.

BENDING DESIRE: NON-BINARY ATTRACTION AND PARTNERING SAN 1730 JAC Stringer

In a culture where “sexy” is defined through feats of masculine or feminine perfection, how do we recognize desire that embodies all or none of these qualities? Attraction to androgyny is experienced in multiple spectra of sexualities, yet it’s still debated. Complex partnering dynamics formed by a variance of bodies, identities, and experiences make definitions for attraction difficult, if not impossible within traditional concepts of sexuality. In this workshop, we will discuss desire outside the binary including the language of attraction, gender normalcy’s influences, and how genderqueer and non-binary trans people continue to carve out spaces for sexual desire.


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BETTER THAN NORMAL: NAVIGATING HOOKUPS, CELIBACY, AND SEXUAL SELF-WORTH SAN 1740 Makenzie Marts

In my experience as a sex educator I’ve noticed that people are, more than anything else, worried about whether or not their sex lives are “normal.” This workshop seeks to undermine the entire idea of a single, aspirational normalcy by examining the external forces that shape our ideas of what normal looks like and the internal forces that make us fearful of being different. With a quick and lighthearted overview and a sincere interest in participants sharing their thoughts and personal experiences, we’ll start deconstructing sexual norms and explore the messy, vulnerable world outside that rigid box. In this workshop we want to do better than normal and aim for genuine empowerment and positive sexual self-worth.

AUTISTIC AND PART OF THE ALPHABET SOUP HOW THE INTERSECTION OF AUTISTIC NEURODIVERSITY AND BEING LGBT+ SHAPES OUR LIVES; A COMMUNITY CONVERSATION SAN 1750 Shane Howe

Mental Illness and Ableism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism A discussion-based workshop run by and for Autistic people identifying as part of the LGBT+ community! Join us to experience a LGBT+ Autistic prioritized space, facilitated by an #ActuallyAutistic neuroqueer trans person. Learn about the prevalence of Autistic LGBT+ people, Autistic-centered Disability Justice, person-first vs identity-first language, and Autistic-specific queer and trans identities. We’ll discuss topics like Autistic asexuality and disability desexualization, ableism in queer spaces, the importance of stimming, Autistic transness and dysphoria, and more! We’ll also touch on why it’s vital to recognize self-diagnosis, as well as some of the problems with mainstream autism advocacy. There will also be time set aside to discuss how having additional marginalized identities (like race, citizenship, body size, bi+ and nonbinary identities, religion, disabilities other then being Autistic, polyamory, and class) affects our existence as Autistic LGBT+ people.

GAYSL: A CRASH COURSE IN LGBTQ+ AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERSECTIONALITY SAN 1910 Hayden Kristal

Slurs, Mental Illness and Ableism This highly-interactive and hilarious workshop led by Deaf queer activist and stand up comedian Hayden Kristal teaches its participants LGBTQ-related American Sign Language signs while fostering a broader group discussion about horizontal marginalization, intersectionality, and what it means to be intersectionally accessible. All levels of experience with ASL and the Deaf community are welcome and encouraged to attend!

RECOLORING A COLORLESS FLAG: THE RHETORIC AND DISCOURSE OVER THE BLACK AND BROWN STRIPE PRIDE FLAG SAN 1920 Rocky Roque, Micailah Nobles

Racism and Racial Slurs, Transphobia/Transmisogyny The pride flag has been a prominent icon for the LGBTQIA+ community. The flag was created to address racism prevalent in the community and give brown and black queers a symbol to protest the discrimination they have experienced. However, the flag received backlash for excluding white gay members of the community. This presentation seeks to inform the pride flag’s changing ideology, the use of symbols for protest, the discourse it has created, and implications for the future of the community. The purpose is to examine the rhetoric behind the black and brown flag.

NO WALLS BETWEEN US: AN LGBTQ PALESTINE SOLIDARITY 101 SAN 2720 Stephanie Skora

Other (Provide), Homophobia/Heterosexism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Hateful language towards religious groups (Islamophobia, antisemitism), Death/Dying, Racism and Racial Slurs The movement for justice in Palestine is currently reaching a pivotal point worldwide, and queer and trans people have a vital role to play! Whether advocating for change in our communities, working to quash Islamophobia or anti-Arab racism, or working on the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement, non-Palestinian queer and trans accomplices can make a huge impact in the push for Palestinian liberation. This lecture makes the case for broad queer and trans solidarity with Palestinians from a variety of social justice and historical perspectives, and introduces attendees to the ins and outs of Palestine solidarity organizing.

GET IT TOGETHER: INCLUSIVE LGBT+ ORGANIZING INSIDE HIGHER EDUCATION SAN 2730 Stephani Vargas

This workshop discusses ways in which one can build an effective and long-lasting organization that best serves the needs of LGBT+ students and the campus as a whole. Be it a new organization or one that can use an overhaul this session allows time to focus on both short and long-term goals and how the organization fits into campus culture.

LET’S GET BACK TO COMMUNICATING- LGBT COMMUNICATION 101 BHC 204 Krause

While we all love talking about gender, sex, and other queer stuff, it is important to learn about HOW to talk about these things. We will delve into some of the basics of communication to better understand how to listen and talk effectively to our partners, friends, and others.


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SESSION FIVE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH 3:45 PM–4:45 PM NAVIGATING LGBTQ CIVIL RIGHTS: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND MOVING FORWARD SAN 1710 Glenn Miller and Riley Walworth

Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Slurs In the 70s and 80s, queer people fought back to secure anti-retrovirals, access to condoms, the right to live and love openly, and we pied Anita Bryant in the face. In the 90s, Ellen came out, but Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and Defense of Marriage Act were signed into law. In the 2000s, we saw marriage equality spring up in Democratic states, however we saw state constitutions amended to discriminate. Marriage equality was sought so heavily, not just because it was another plank in the queer movement, but because it conferred many rights with one movement, second-parent adoption, hospital visitation, inheritance, insurance dependency, and power of attorney. But as marriage became law, so did Religious Freedom Restoration Acts, bathroom bills, and adoption limitations. Where are we at now in Trump’s America? How will the Supreme Court likely rule on the 3 cases presented on October 8, and what will that mean for us? Join in for a dialogue about where we came from and where we are going.

WITH THESE TIPS, TRANS INCLUSION IS PRETTY SIMPLE SAN 1730 Micah Morley

Transphobia/Transmisogyny Throughout this workshop we will discuss research into resources and policies regarding the inclusion of transgender students at Midwestern universities, focusing on both good and bad examples of said resources and policies. It will be presented in a predominantly lecture style with free range for questions and discussion throughout the presentation and at the end. Attendees are encouraged to participate and collaborate to help come up with innovative ways to be more inclusive of our transgender siblings at campuses across the Midwest.

HEALING ARTS FOR QUEER HEARTS: AN INFORMATIONAL AND INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP SAN 1740 Abbey Strausbaugh, Arahey Garay-Negrón, Waverly Eubank, and Malakhai Hasan

Mental Illness and Ableism This workshop will offer a brief presentation about the healing arts and how they are used for coping with internal struggles including emotional dysregulation and trauma. Following the presentation, there will be time for participants to get involved with a collage making project that will represent their identity, a struggle they are overcoming, or something important to them. During this time, participants will be free to talk softly with other participants and listen to soothing music. This workshop is meant to help relax the participants.


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QUEERING YOUR BODY: A POC PERSPECTIVE SAN 1750 Amarri Smallwood

Self Injury (self harm, eating disorders, etc), Mental Illness and Ableism, Racism and Racial Slurs, Classism This presentation will explore the complexities of queer and trans people of color’s relationship with mental and physical health. Our workshop will be open-ended discussion with the goal of having our audience critically think about how these issues affect queer and trans people of color’s lived experiences.

QUEERS, CARDS, AND STARS! SAN 1910 TK Morton

Welcome to Queers, Cards and Stars! This is a brief introduction into the world of Tarot Cards and Astrology. This is a way to know the basics of what your sun, moon, and rising is and how it plays out in the world. As well as diving into the basics of tarot cards with origins and knowing about different types of decks. Also, chatting about how spirituality and queerness intersect and how to not appropriate this work all through the experience of a new Black Trans mystic. Participants are encouraged to bring their own tarot decks for a show and tell. Come join us in squealing about Cards and Stars with Queers!

QUEERING THE CLASSROOM: MAKING EDUCATIONAL SPACES FOR LGBTQ+ STUDENTS SAN 1920 Rebecca Sawyer

Calling all future and current educators of all levels and content areas! Despite increasing resources and role-models for students, the classroom still remains a place where many feel they cannot be their authentic selves. This is due in large part to curriculum and practices that are still cisheteronormative. Luckily, there are steps that you (yes, you!) can take to make the classroom a brave space for your students. We’ll talk about setting norms, troubleshooting behaviors, queering the curriculum, and more! Be ready to be a change-maker at your school.

ENROLLING IN K101: THE SCIENCE OF KINK AND BDSM SAN 2710 Jake Oster, Sam Brinton

Sexual Assault/Rape Want to nerd out to the fantastic science of kink and BDSM? Now is your chance! In this class we explore Newton’s Laws and impact play, compare pups to Punnett, the physics of flogging, and much more! With an interactive and entertaining presentation and plenty of education, we will make sure you leave from one of the best science classes ever! An open discussion around the intersections of kink and science will help us round out a session of nerdy naughtiness.

FEMME AS F*CK: FEMME HISTORY, IDENTITY, AND COMMUNITY SAN 2730 Stephani Vargas

Sexual Assault/Rape, Racism and Racial Slurs, Sexism and Misogyny, Classism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism As an identity, femme is not homogeneous but it is a thrilling mix of expression and experience. Femme is an exploration of gender identity, which can be a safe haven, a political statement, a way of life, or all of the above. The session will delve into the history of femme identity, how femmes are erased, who can identify as femme, and how femme identity has evolved to present day.

FIGHTING THE GOOD FIGHT: SELF-CARE STRATEGIES FOR BLACK LGBTQI+ STUDENT ACTIVISTS BHC 204 Tangela Roberts, Tatyana Smoth and Shirlee Moore

Mental Illness and Ableism This session will focus on discussing experiences of Black LGBTQI+ student activists, including racial battle fatigue, how to detect signs of burnout and self care (when do you need it, when can you tell that others need it). We will also provide a description of related research on Black identity, racial justice activism, and mental health. We will also provide a space for participants to share both their experiences and how they take care of themselves. This workshop is for Black LGBTQ+ people to share their experiences, stressors, and vulnerabilities; therefore, it is requested that this be an affinity space for Black attendees only.

GENDER INCLUSIVE HOUSING POLICY ROUND TABLE BHC 205 Advisor: Cheyanne Kramer

Homophobia/Heterosexism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny This presentation is aimed toward facilitating a discussion about current best practices as it relates to Gender Inclusive Housing (GIH), and whether those best practices meet the needs of transgender, nonbinary, and gender nonconforming students. We will use Oakland University’s model as a core example, and facilitate an open discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of the current GIH models which many public universities use.


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SESSION SIX SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH 8 AM–9 AM CREATING ACCESSIBLE EVENTS AND ORGANIZATIONS SAN 1730 Lauren Corneliussen, Hawthorn Stabler

Mental Illness and Ableism Are your events accessible? How do you know? This workshop will lay the foundation for creating events and organizations, both on campus and off, that invite all to participate. We will review the basics of multiple types of access (physical, intellectual, psychological, financial) and common barriers to that access. Accessibility is not a destination, but an evolving process that we can all employ in our personal and professional lives.

ON THE HOOK: QUEER CODING AND QUEER BAITING SAN 1740 Cait McReavy

Homophobia/Heterosexism This presentation will define queer coding and queer baiting, explore the history of queer coding, provide examples of both in modern and historical contexts, teach attendees how to spot queerbaiting, and discuss the complexities of queer identity in the media.

GAYMING: PERSONAL ADVOCACY IN ONLINE GAMING SAN 1750 Kate Miller

Slurs, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Sexism and Misogyny Do you love online gaming, but not the toxic environment? How do you find supportive communities and communities that are willing to learn? This workshop will include conversations about personal advocacy in gaming, including techniques in connecting with groups that may have room to grow and teaching while still loving your gaming experience. From large groups to one-off, small events in your favorite games, let’s make sure you have an awesome experience and be true to you.

IT’S BEAUTIFUL BUT I DON’T LIKE IT: EXPLORING QUEER REPRESENTATION IN MEDIA SAN 1920 Waverly Eubank, Malakhai Hasan and Arahey Garay-Negrón

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Death/Dying, Racism and Racial Slurs, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism As LGBTQIA+ representation evolves, so must our way of looking at it critically. How are we represented and are we represented authentically? Are some of us represented at all? How are we expected to react to this? This discussion will unpack queer media and queer representation in mainstream media, and will leave the audience asking for more than what we are given with mainly white and gay representation.


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LET MY PEOPLE FUCK: A WORKSHOP ON TRANSNESS, FEMININITY, SEXUALITY, AND SEX SAN 2720 Stephanie Skora

Sexism and Misogyny, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Death/Dying, Suicide/Suicidal Ideation, Sexual Assault/Rape, Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Self Injury (self harm, eating disorders, etc), Mental Illness and Ableism, Racism and Racial Slurs, Slurs Sex and sexuality are often cornerstones of the queer and trans experience, but navigating sexuality while trans can be a doozy. Transmisogyny, slut shaming, body shaming, and the complex politics of existing as a human with a sexual or sexualized body are everywhere. This workshop presents a trans and genderqueer perspective on sex-positivity, and seeks to create a sex-positive culture that centers marginalized genders and sexualities, and creates true sexual liberation for all!

STEMming FROM TRANSPHOBIA: CREATING EQUITY IN THE SCIENCES SAN 2730 Skyler Eisert, Riley Sasse

Abuse (physical, mental, emotional, sexual, or verbal), Suicide/Suicidal Ideation, Sexism and Misogyny, Transphobia/ Transmisogyny, Child Abuse/Pedophilia/Incest STEMming from Transphobia: Creating Equity in the Sciences is a workshop featuring four case studies of transgender scientists. The objective of the workshop is to educate participants about the issues that people who transition in a STEM field face as well as what can be done to break down those barriers on both the individual and societal levels. Attendees will have guided discussions about the case studies in small and large groups, focusing on the obstacles each individual faced as well as the advantages each individual had. The case studies focus on individuals in several STEM disciplines of varying gender identities and ages across different time periods.

NAVIGATING QUEERNESS AND DISABILITY BHC 204 Dean Strauss

Mental Illness and Ableism Queer spaces are often made inaccessible and unsafe for disabled queer folks. We’ll look at how we organize and interact, how we exclude disabled queers and the resulting trauma, and how we can improve access and support disabled queer folks, focusing on lived experiences. Participants will discuss visibility and its impact on disabled and queer bodies and identity.

RACIALIZED GENDER ROLES: HOW THE INTERSECTIONS OF RACISM AND SEXISM IMPACT THE LGBT COMMUNITY BHC 205 Advisor: Nathan Nguyen

Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Sexism and Misogyny, Racism and Racial Slurs, Classism The riots of Compton’s Cafeteria and Stonewall were started by those who were on the margins of race, gender, and sexuality but LGBTQ rights continue to move forward while not having hard discussions about race, gender, and cissexism. Participants will engage in reflection exercises that break down historical and cultural aspects that continue to segment the work and the movement while interrogating their own privileges.


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SESSION SEVEN SUNDAY, FEBRAURY 16TH 9:15 AM–10:15 AM THE INTERSECTION OF QUEER IDENTITIES AND RELIGIOUS LEADERSHIP SAN 1710 Ellen Yope

Hateful language towards religious groups (Islamophobia, antisemitism), Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/ Heterosexism A presentation focusing on the intersection of queer identities and religious affiliations and how these intersections interact in individuals’ lives and the religious and LGBTQIA+ community. This presentation will address ways allies and queer identifying individuals can be leaders in religious communities to further efforts of acceptance.

WHAT IF I’M THE ONLY ONE? NAVIGATING TRANS AND QUEER COMMUNITY IN ISOLATED RURAL HIGHER EDUCATION SAN 1730 Stephani Vargas

Small town, small school, small resources. Let’s address the issues of being an LGBTQ student on a rural campus; from finding each other, to starting an organization from scratch, to battling small-town isolation and administrative kickback. This workshop will present educational components within a facilitated discussion on how trans and queer people experience the challenges of rural higher education while also thriving as students and as people.

BUILDING BRIDGES BETWEEN QUEER ACADEMIA AND D.I.Y. SPACES SAN 1740 Vivian Thompson

It often seems like there is something of a stratification in lgbtq communities, a divide between those working within the confines of academia and those who engage in art and activism outside of it. This panel will seek to draw connections between those two worlds, building a conversation to explore how methods of media distribution like hand-assembled zines and house shows can be powerful tools of communication, and to generate ideas for how this crosspollination can lead to stronger communities.


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WE’RE BACK, BUTCHES: BUTCH HISTORY, IDENTITY, AND COMMUNITY SAN 1750 Krause

Bull dagger, tough kid, drag king, stone, boi, tomboy, butch; no matter what we call ourselves, our community has existed from the beginning. This session will explore the history of butch identity, how the term has evolved, and what the future could hold. Have you ever wondered- What does butch actually means? Who can identify as butch? What’s an old school butch and is there a new school? Come explore these questions and more during this guided discussion on identity, history, and community.

LIVIN’ ON A PRAYER: DIVERSIFYING QUEER FAITH SPACES SAN 1920 Stephanie Skora, Kimmi Awiszio

Classism, Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Homophobia/Heterosexism, Other (Provide) There is an ongoing problem in faith spaces on college campuses. All too often, faith spaces are segregated completely, or spaces that are labeled as “Interfaith” are explicitly centered on Christians. This workshop, intentionally led by a queer and trans Jewish-Muslim duo, aims to disrupt the idea of what faith spaces on college campuses can look like, and works with attendees to envision their ideal queer faith space.

IT’S NOT ME, IT’S YOU: BUILDING RESILIENCY AS A PRACTICE SAN 2710 Grace Davis

This workshop is an introduction to the idea of that resiliency is something you have to learn how to do not something you inherently have. We will discover the tools of being resilient, the environments that are not conducive to your resiliency practices, and end with breaking up with a situation that was toxic for you. Together through discussion, you will finally have the ability to tell someone (or something) It’s Not Me, It’s you.

INTERSEX 101 SAN 2730 Latitude Brown

Transphobia/Transmisogyny, Other (Provide) A basic introduction to intersex issues and an overview about a what Intersex Is.

THE CAMPUS GAY AGENDA: STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR LGBTQA+ INITIATIVES BHC 205 Advisor: Danielle Stamper

Tips, tricks and the logic behind strategic planning for LGBTQA+ Initiatives on your campus. During this session I will talk about how a large public Midwest university leveraged its campus and community resources to develop and implement a LGBTQA+ Strategic Plan for Diversity. Participants will engage in a power mapping exercise to identify campus partners and begin creating an action plan specific to their campus.


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GENERAL POLICIES FIREARM LAWS PHOTO POLICY We ask in the interest of everyone’s comfort and The Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender wellbeing that no firearms be brought into our Diversity (“the Institute”) or authorized licensees conference spaces. Though handgun laws in of the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Michigan permit open carry and licensed concealed Asexual College Conference (“MBLGTACC”) will carry, firearms or other deadly/dangerous weapons be photographing common spaces, keynotes, and will not be allowed at MBLGTACC at Western entertainment during MBLGTACC weekend (“the Michigan University as per campus policy. If any Event”), and any onstage discussions thereafter. attendee is observed carrying a firearm or weapon The goal of this photography is to share the best while participating in MBLGTACC, they will be asked moments of the Event with alumni, supporters, to leave the premises. and other community members, to celebrate our community, and to enhance the visibility of the MARIJUANA Institute and the Event in the Midwest and nationally. Marijuana, including medical marijuana, is not permitted on campus at Western Michigan University. The Institute respects, protects, and centers In Michigan, you must be 21 to possess marijuana. the rights of students who do not consent to be photographed. To that end, MBLGTACC and the TOBACCO AND SMOKING Institute: Tobacco is not permitted on campus at Western • Will offer intentional spaces where photography by Michigan University unless used in a personal attendees is welcome and encouraged; vehicle. Per Western Michigan University policy: “The • Will offer wearable markers for attendees to flag for use of tobacco products is not permitted indoors others that they do not consent to be photographed; or outdoors on any University property. Tobacco • Will not share on its website or social media any products are defined to include the following: photographs featuring attendees with “do not cigarettes, electronic-cigarettes, cigars, bidis, snuff, photograph” markers; snus, water pipes, pipes, hookahs, chew and any • Will not tolerate non-consensual photography by other non-combustible tobacco products.” Under attendees and guests; Michigan law, smoking is prohibited in all indoor • Requires that all attendees and guests obtain workplaces, including restaurants, hotels/motels, permission before posting photos of others taken and bars. at the conference to social media; and • Requires that all attendees and guests obtain MEDICAL AMNESTY permission before tagging someone in a post at the Per Western Michigan Policy: “To better ensure conference on social media. that minors at medical risk as a result of alcohol intoxication or individuals at medical risk of an By attending the Event, you acknowledge that the overdose of any controlled substance, including commissioned photos and recordings belong to the a prescription drug, will receive prompt and Institute, and you will not receive payment or any appropriate medical attention, the State of Michigan other compensation in connection with the pictures provides for medical amnesty to remove perceived and recordings. You further release MBLGTACC and barriers to calling for or seeking help.” the Institute from any and all liability that may or could arise from the taking or use of the pictures. This policy has been created for the greater safety and access of all guests and attendees. You may discuss this policy further with the Institute’s director of marketing and communications, Nick Pfost.


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ACCESSIBILITY SERVICE ANIMALS AND SERVICE ANIMALS-IN TRAINING Service animals are welcome at MBLGTACC. The ADA defines a service animal as “any animal that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.” Were the animal not readily apparent as a service animal, staff at the conference may ask the individual if the animal helps to mitigate a disability and what tasks the animal has been trained to perform. A service animal may relieve itself in any of the green areas available on-campus. Owners are reminded to clean up after their service animals.

QUIET SPACES We will have mindfulness spaces available for those who need a moment to center themselves. WELLNESS Quiet room are located in each conference building. These rooms are non-staffed spaces to provide conference attendees with a quiet place to rest and rejuvenate. The rooms will be equipped with yoga mats, coloring books, fidgets, etc. Conference attendees can utilize these spaces during the time events are happening in those buildings.

SCENTS AND SCENTED PRODUCTS There will be nearly 2000 students attending MBLGTACC. To keep shared spaces suitable for EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMALS those with scent sensitivities, we ask attendees MBLGTACC recognizes that ESAs serve an to use scent-free products or limit/forego the important role in many individual’s lives; however, excessive use of scented hygiene products while per WMU policy, ESAs are not permitted in campus at the conference. buildings, except for residence halls. Thus, we ask that you do not bring your ESAs to sessions on VISUAL ACCESSIBILITY campus. We recommend calling the hotel at which We strongly encourage presenters to ensure their you are staying to verify that ESAs are allowed in sessions are visually accessible to the fullest extent their building. Learn more here at the WMU ESA possible, and we’ll be sending information to all policy website. presenters on things they should consider. Largeprint programs will be available for all attendees AUDITORY ACCESSIBILITY who registered prior to the registration deadline, There will be ASL interpreters for all keynote sessions. and there will be a limited number produced for onIf you are an attendee who is deaf or hard of hearing, site registrants. We encourage you to make specific we invite and encourage you to request an ASL accommodations requests through the registration interpreter to accompany you to some or all of the process. We work in earnest to accommodate workshops you’ll be attending. To do this, please requests whenever and wherever possible; however, make your specific request through the registration we cannot guarantee that all components of all form, and a member of our team will follow-up with sessions will be accessible for all attendees. you. In addition to interpreter services, we will also be sending information to all presenters about how to make their presentations accessible. MOBILITY ACCESSIBILITY All sessions will be held in the host conference space. The facility is fully ADA compliant and has large spaces to accommodate the traffic peaks during session transitions. All sessions will be held in close proximity and adequate transition time will be allowed in the schedule. We ask all attendees who can use the stairs to do so—this will allow those who need to use elevators to do so with a minimum of disruptions, crowding, and wait-times.


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SHUTTLE INFORMATION A shuttle bus system will be provided for conference attendees running between the conference hotels and Western Michigan University’s Bernhard Center. An on-campus bus from Bernhard Center to Miller Auditorium will also be provided at select times. After the indicated starting time, shuttles will arrive in 30-60 minute intervals (time intervals will vary depending on distance and weather between the hotel and WMU’s campus). Be sure to check the schedule for your specific hotel pick-up and drop-off times. Please note: • The shuttles are Cardinal motorcoaches. • Each shuttle will have a sign indicating the name of the hotel displayed near the front doors of the bus. • Buses will pick up and drop off on Michigan Avenue in front of the Bernhard Center; there is a covered bus stop near the stop sign. • All buses are ADA compliant. • The shuttle service will end at noon on Sunday, February 16th. FRIDAY RADISSON To Campus: Every 30 minutes • First Shuttle: 2:00 pm • Last Shuttle: 11:00 pm To Hotel: Every 30 minutes • First Shuttle: 2:15 pm • Last Shuttle: 11:45 pm

SATURDAY RADISSON To Campus: Every 30 minutes • First Shuttle: 7:00 am • Last Shuttle: 11:00 pm To Hotel: Every 30 minutes • First Shuttle: 7:15 am • Last Shuttle: 11:45 pm

SUNDAY RADISSON To Campus: Every 30 minutes • First Shuttle: 7:00 am • Last Shuttle: 11:30 am To Hotel: Every 30 minutes • First Shuttle: 7:15 am • Last Shuttle: 1:15 pm

HOLIDAY INN WEST/EAST To Campus: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 2:00 pm • Last Shuttle: 10:00 pm To Hotels: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 2:30 pm • Last Shuttle: 11:30 pm

HOLIDAY INN WEST/EAST To Campus: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:00 am • Last Shuttle: 10:00 pm To Hotels: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:30 am • Last Shuttle: 11:30 pm

HOLIDAY INN WEST/EAST To Campus: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:00 am • Last Shuttle: 11:00 am To Hotels: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:30 am • Last Shuttle: 1:15 pm

DELTA To Campus: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 2:00 pm • Last Shuttle: 10:00 pm To Hotel: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 2:30 pm • Last Shuttle: 11:30 pm

DELTA To Campus: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:00 am • Last Shuttle: 10:00 pm To Hotel: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:30 am • Last Shuttle: 11:30 pm

DELTA To Campus: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:00 am • Last Shuttle: 11:00 am To Hotel: Every 1 hour • First Shuttle: 7:30 am • Last Shuttle: 1:15 pm

ON-CAMPUS: To Miller Auditorium: Every 10 minutes • First Shuttle: 3:00 pm • Last Shuttle: 7:40 pm To Bernhard Center: Every 10 minutes • First Shuttle: 3:10 pm  • Last Shuttle: 7:50 pm

ON-CAMPUS: To Miller Auditorium: Every 10 minutes • First Shuttle: 3:40 pm • Last Shuttle: 7:20 pm To Bernhard Center: Every 10 minutes • First Shuttle: 3:30 pm  • Last Shuttle: 7:30 pm

ON-CAMPUS: To Miller Auditorium: Every 10 minutes • First Shuttle: 9:00 am • Last Shuttle: 1:20 pm To Bernhard Center: Every 10 minutes • First Shuttle: 9:10 am  • Last Shuttle: 1:15 pm

PARKING INFORMATION Attendees should park in lot 41 (Sangren Hall) and lot 35 (Miller Parking Structure). Parking overnight in lot 35 (Miller Parking Structure) is prohibited and may result in the vehicle being towed at the owner’s expense. Do not park in metered spaces. If you have any additional questions about parking, please check our website.


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LIST OF HOTELS We have secured discounted pricing partnerships with the following hotels for MBLGTACC attendees during the conference. Please use any applicable links or conference codes to lock in the special conference rate at your selected hotel. DELTA HOTELS: MARRIOTT 2747 South Eleventh Street, Kalamazoo, MI 49009 (3.9 miles from conference) HOLIDAY INN AND SUITES KALAMAZOO WEST 1247 Westgate Drive, Kalamazoo, MI 49009 (3.8 miles from conference) HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS AND SUITES KALAMAZOO WEST 1315 Westgate Drive, Kalamazoo, MI 49009 (4.1 miles from conference) RADISSON PLAZA HOTEL 100 W Michigan, Kalamazoo, MI 49007 (1.9 miles from conference)

NEARBY RESTAURANTS THAT DELIVER TO CAMPUS QUE BUENO (269) 775-1719 quebuenosmexgrill.com Mexican

INSOMNIA COOKIES (269) 220-6433 insomniacookies.com Cookies/Brownies

CAMPUS WOK (269) 552-9616 kzoocampuswok.com Chinese

DOMINOES (269) 343-3030 https://www.dominos.com/ Pizza

NICK GYROS (269) 888-2002 nicksgyroskzoo.com Greek, Gyros

TWO FELLAS (269) 492-9727 http://twofellasgrill.com Wraps

PITA PIT (269) 343-7482 order.pitapitusa.com Greek, Pita’s

JIMMY JOHNS (269) 381-8400 jimmyjohns.com Subs

SPICE N RICE (269) 381-8618 spicenricekalamazoo.com Chinese

WIFI Attendees are invited to use Western Michigan University’s guest wireless network for the duration of their time on campus. Connect to WMU Guest in your device’s WiFi settings. (When connecting on subsequent days, you can expect to be prompted to re-accept the Terms and Agreement for the first connection each day.)


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GLOSSARY OF TERMS By no means is this glossary to be considered a comprehensive or inviolable list of words commonly related to the LGBTQIA+ communities within the United States. Please keep in mind all of these identities exist on spectrums so this is not an exhaustive list or explanation of all possible identities. All terms used to describe identities are subject to varying interpretation by those who claim the identity, and no identity or definition should be imposed on another person. ABLEISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to have or actually have mental, emotional, and/or physical disabilities. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. AFAB / AMAB Stands for “assigned female at birth” and “assigned male at birth” respectively. Other variations of this abbreviation may substitute the initial A for a D (designated) and/or add a preceding C for coercively. AGEISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of their perceived or actual age. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. AGENDER Describes a lack of gender or a sense of self falling completely outside of the gender spectrum. ANDROGYNOUS Describes an identity or presentation that exists between or has elements of both what is typically defined as feminine and what is typically defined as masculine. ALLY Describes a person who does not identify as a particular marginalized identity but who actively works to support those who hold that identity and works against the oppression of that identity group. AROMANTIC Describes a person who does not experience romantic attraction or who experiences a varying degree of romantic attraction. “Aro” is another term used to describe an aromantic person. ASEXUAL Describes a person who does not experience sexual attraction or who experiences a varying degree of sexual attraction. “Ace” is another term used to describe an asexual person. BIGENDER Describes a person who has two or more distinct gender identities. Not necessarily within the gender binary, but can be. BISEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of varying genders. BIROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to persons of varying genders. CISGENDER Describes a person whose gender aligns with the sex they were assigned at birth. CISSEXISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of incongruence with one’s assigned sex at birth. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. CLASSISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of perceived or actual lower socio-economic status. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.


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COLORISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people within the same racial group on the basis of skin color and other external traits. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. DISCRIMINATION Describes the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their perceived or actual membership of a specific identity. Involves behaviors towards groups such as excluding or restricting members of one group from opportunities or resources that are available to another group. DRAG Describes exaggerated, theatrical, or performative gender presentation. Doing drag does not necessarily have anything to do with one’s gender or how one experiences sexual and/or romantic attraction. FAITHISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of their perceived or actual faith and/or religious affiliation. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. FEMME Describes an identity or presentation that leans toward what is typically defined as feminine. This term is not necessarily interchangeable with “woman,” “girl,” or “female.” GAY Describes a person whose sexual and/or romantic orientation is primarily toward those of the same or similar gender. This term has also been used/interpreted as an umbrella term for those within the LGBTQIA+ community. GENDER BINARY / BINARY GENDERS Describes the Western system of categorizing people as one of two genders (male/man, female/woman) which are defined as corresponding to a person’s anatomy. GENDER EXPRESSION / PRESENTATION Describes how one externally expresses gender, including but not limited to dress, mannerisms, and behaviors. GENDER IDENTITY Describes one’s own internal sense/interpretation of their gender. This may or may not correspond to one’s gender expression or assigned sex. GENDER NON-CONFORMING (GNC) Describes those whose gender expression exists outside the gender binary. NON-BINARY Describes a gender that exists outside the gender binary. GENDERFLUID Describes a gender that entails movement and shifting on the gender spectrum. Not necessarily within the gender binary, but can be. GENDERQUEER Describes a variety of genders that fall outside the gender binary. It can also be used as a synonym for non-binary, but not necessarily so. HETERONORMATIVITY Describes the assumption that all people are or should be heterosexual and conform to the normative gender roles of masculine men and feminine women. HETEROSEXISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually queer. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. HETEROSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of the “opposite” gender within the constructs of the gender binary.


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HETEROROMANTIC Describes a person whose primary romantic orientation is toward the “opposite” gender within the constructs of the gender binary. HOMOPHOBIA Describes the system of interpersonal oppression that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of those who are perceived to be or are actually queer. HOMOSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of the same or similar gender. Can carry negative connotations, but not necessarily so. INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE Describes the use of specific and purposeful language in order to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions on groups or individuals. INTERSEX Describes a person who is born with sex characteristics (including genitals, gonads, and chromosome patterns) that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies. LESBIAN Describes a feminine-aligned person whose primary sexual and/or romantic orientation is toward people of the same or similar gender. LGBT, LGBTQ, LGBTQIA+ Stands for the various identities within the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, and more communities. MASC Describes an identity or presentation that leans toward what is typically defined as masculine. This term is not necessarily interchangeable with “man,” “boy,” or “male.” MIDDLE SEXUALITY Describes a sexual orientation that involves attraction towards two or more genders. MISOGYNY Describes the interpersonal system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of femininity and feminine-aligned people. PANSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons regardless of gender. PANROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to persons regardless of gender. POLYSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to many, but not necessarily all, genders. POLYROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to many, but not necessarily all, genders. POLYAMORY Describes the practice of having more than one relationship at a time with the consent of everyone involved. Not to be confused with polygamy. QTPOC Stands for the various identities within the “Queer and/or Trans Person/People of Color” communities. QUEER Describes identities, expressions, and/or sexualities that reject or contrast normative gender and sexual conventions and expectations. Has historically had negative connotations, but many within the LGBTQIA+ community have reclaimed it for themselves. QUESTIONING Describes a person who is questioning or exploring their sexual orientation, romantic attraction, gender identity, and/or gender expression.


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RACISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually people of color. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. SAFE SPACE An ideal setting in which people within the LGBTQIA+ communities and/or those of other marginalized identities feel free to be their authentic selves. Inhabitants intentionally reject harmful social norms and expectations, and act and speak inclusively. SEX The assignment and classification of people based on a combination of their physical anatomy, chromosomes, and/or hormones at birth. SEXISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of a person’s perceived or actual sex. This applies to both trans people and cis women. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. SIZEISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of a person’s perceived or actual size, weight, and/or height. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. TRANS / TRANSGENDER Describes an umbrella term for all people whose gender differs from their assigned sex at birth and/or the binary gender system. Sowme trans people feel they exist not within one of the two standard gender categories but rather somewhere between, beyond, or outside of those two genders. TRANSITION Describes the process of developing a gender expression to match one’s gender. There are many forms of transitions. Transitions can, but does not always, include: coming out to one’s family, friends, and/ or co-workers; changing one’s name and/or sex on legal documents; hormone therapy; some forms of gender-affirming surgery and/or medical procedures. TRANSPHOBIA Describes the interpersonal system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually trans. DEADNAMING Describes the act of referring to a person, especially a trans person, with their birth name or “dead name” instead of their chosen name. Considered a form of transphobia. MISGENDERING Describes the act of referring to someone, especially a trans person, using a word, especially a pronoun or form of address, which does not correctly reflect the gender with which they identify. Considered a form of transphobia. TWO-SPIRIT Describes a large variety of LGBTQIA+ identities within indigenous communities. This term should be exclusively used by those who identify as indigenous. XENOPHOBIA Describes the system that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of those who are perceived to be or are actually from outside of a particular majority group’s culture.


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FIRST/GROUND FLOOR

SANGREN HALL MAPS


SECOND FLOOR

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THIRD FLOOR

SANGREN HALL MAPS


FOURTH FLOOR 55


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BERNHARD CENTER MAPS BRONCO MALL

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR


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WMU CAMPUS MAP

BERNHARD CENTER

SANGREN

MILLER AUDITORIUM


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EMERGENCY AND CRISIS INFORMATION CALL 911

An emergency is defined as a life-threatening situation and requires an immediate intervention or response. Examples of an emergency include but are not limited to: • Fire • Suicidal/homicidal thoughts, intent, plans, or life-threatening behaviors • Immediate medical needs ON CAMPUS EMERGENCIES WMU campus emergency information line: (269) 387-1001 WMU Department of Public Safety: (269) 387-5555 NEAREST HOSPITAL Bronson Methodist Hospital 601 John Street, Kalamazoo, MI 49007 (269) 341-7654 NEAREST PHARMACY CVS Pharmacy 2600 West Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49006 (269) 343-4232 NEAREST 24 HOUR PHARMACY Walgreens Pharmacy 5020 West Main Street Kalamazoo, MI 49009 (269) 345-8507 *Pharmacy hours: 7am-11pm EST, Store hours: 24/7 TITLE IX CONCERNS Felicia Taylor Crawford, MA, SPHR (269) 387-6316 Use this line for questions, assistance, or to report misconduct. We encourage all survivors or witnesses to report misconduct during or after the conference event weekend.

URGENT ASSISTANCE: (810) 666-1053 Use this line to reach 2020 Planning Committee Staff leader or the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity staff. You can call or text this number 24/7 during the conference. Please only use this line for crisis or emergency situations. Note that this line is not confidential. For general questions, please visit the information desk. Please notify a conference staff member or call this number to report an emergency situation, especially if 911 is called. CONFIDENTIAL CRISIS RESOURCES Trevor Lifeline (Available 24/7): (866) 488-7386 Or text START to 678678 Or online at www.thetrevorproject.org/get-help-now/ Trans Lifeline (Available 10am-4am EST): (877) 565-8860 National Suicide Prevention Hotline (Available 24/7): 1(800) 273-8255 Or online at suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/ 24/7 Crisis Helpline: (269) 381-4357 This line is available 24/7 and will immediately connect you with an expertly trained crisis advisor through Gryphon Place, our local crisis center. Calls are confidential and answered with respect, empathy, and compassion. Gryphon Place is fully certified by the American Association of Suicidology, and is part of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network. Quiet Rooms SANGREN 3110 BERHARD CENTER BROWN AND GOLD ROOM


MBLGTACC 2020 program guide  

The 2020 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. February 14-16, 2019 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Visit mblgtacc.or...

MBLGTACC 2020 program guide  

The 2020 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. February 14-16, 2019 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Visit mblgtacc.or...

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