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ILLINOIS

MB

STATE

LGT ACC 2 015


sunday

saturday

Friday

Schedule at a Glance Time

Event

location

2:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Registration\Information

Brown Ballroom, BSC

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

What’s Happening Orientation

Prairie North, BSC

7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Opening Ceremony

Braden Auditorium, BSC

8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Keynote #1 - Laverne Cox

Braden Auditorium, BSC

9:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

Cupid Ain’t @#$%!

Braden Auditorium, BSC

9:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

Vagina Monologues

Prairie North, BSC

Time

Event

location

7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Registration\Information

Old Main, BSC

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Session #1

Various Rooms, SH

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Session #2

Various Rooms, SH

10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Exhibitor Fair

Circus Room, BSC

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Keynote #2 - Identity Panel

Braden Auditorium, BSC

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Brown Bag Identity Forums

Various Rooms, SH

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

State/Regional Caucuses

Various Rooms, SH

3:45 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Oversight Committee Meeting

Room 375, SSB

3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Session #3

Various Rooms, SH

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Session #4

Various Rooms, SH

8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Entertainment Event - Kit Yan

Braden Auditorium, BSC

9:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

Drag Show

Braden Auditorium, BSC

10:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.

Dance

Brown Ballroom, BSC

Time

Event

location

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Session #5

Various Rooms, SH

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Session #6

Various Rooms, SH

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Keynote #3 - Dr. Jamie Washington Braden Auditorium, BSC

12:15 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Closing Ceremony

Braden Auditorium, BSC

building legend BSC - Bone Student Center

SH - Schroeder Hall SSB - Student Services Building

The Bone Student Center will open at 7 a.m. on Saturday and 8 a.m. on Sunday.

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Table of contents Welcome MBLGTACC 2015 Planning Team About Illinois State and Pride at ISU Special Thanks Donors Letters of Support Etiquette for Inclusion Etiquette Glossary MBLGTACC Best Sellers Conference History Conference Purpose and Theme Resources Safety Information and Gathering Spaces Shuttle, Parking and Volunteer information Shuttle Schedule What’s Happening Orientation Opening Ceremony Keynote: Laverne Cox Entertainment: Cupid Ain’t @#$%! Entertainment: Vagina Monologues Voices Legend for Workshops Workshops Schedule Workshop Session 1 Workshop Session 2 Keynote: Identity Panel Exhibitor Fair Brown Bag Identity Forums State Caucuses and Oversight Committee Workshop Session 3 Workshop Session 4 Entertainment: Kit Yan Drag Show and Dance Workshop Session 5 Workshop Session 6 Keynote Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington Closing Ceremony Advisor Track Maps 2

3 4 7 8 9 10 14 16 21 22 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 38 42 46 47 48 49 51 55 59 60 61 65 68 69 71 76


welcome Welcome! The 2015 Planning Team is thrilled to present the 23rd annual Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference. The weekend we have anxiously waited for the past two years has finally arrived! We thank you for giving us the privilege of planning this conference. Our team has grown immensely since 2013, not just in size but in knowledge and character as well. Our hope is that you have just as great of a time participating in this event as we had planning it! This weekend is a chance to meet new people, listen to fantastic speakers, have a few laughs, learn during workshops, and so much more! Our conference theme: Narrating a New Normal, is all about YOU, the people sitting here and reading this program. Narration is important because everyone has a story to tell and everyone has their own personal experiences that influence everything that they are and everything they want to be. Instead of connecting to an ideology, our goal is to connect to you on a personal level. Working with you as individuals, using your experiences to shape all that you want from the conference, and everything you want to give to it—that’s our mission.

Despite the many differences we may have, this conference is our time to share our own stories and see how they fit in with other voices to create the narrative of our community. Over the past two years we have seen amazing progress in the fight for marriage equality, however, there is still a long journey for all of the other members of our community. This weekend, take advantage of the safe space we’ve created here in Normal to come together, grow, learn, and explore! The 2015 Planning Team is thrilled to have you here at Illinois State University, and we hope you leave excited to change the world with the knowledge you have gained!

Top row: Jill, Angela, Rick, Kristy, Stephen, Robert, Tyler, Mary, Tracy, Tommie Bottom Row: Elise, Maddy, Katie, Khamille, Andy, Ryland, Megan, Cassie

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MBLGTACC 2015 PLANNING TEAM Robert Alberts

- Conference Director

Robert is a Social Work major in the School of Social Work. In addition to planning the conference, Robert also is the Director of ISU’s Alternative Breaks program and an intern with Project Oz working with at-risk youth who have runaway, are locked out, homeless or on the verge of homelessness. Robert also spends his time playing video games and hanging out with friends.

Khamille De Lara

- Director of Finance

Khamille is a double major in International Business and Finance. She was born in the Philippines and then lived in the Middle East for seven years before moving to the States. She is fluent in four languages: Tagalog, Arabic, French, and English. She loves catching up on American Horror Story, Game of Thrones, Sherlock, and House of Cards.

Tyler Eilts

- Director of Logistics

Tyler is an Interpersonal Communication Studies major with an added minor in Psychology. He is involved with ISU’s Pride, is the secretary of ISU’s Show Choir and has a part time job at Milner Library. Tyler loves interacting with friendly people, performing, listening to records and Zen meditation.

Katie Gennrich - Director of Finance Katie is a native Michigander. She is an Accounting and Philosophy major. She works part time in the Advancement Department at Illinois Wesleyan University just down the street. Katie is also the Secretary and Treasurer of the Illinois State Philosophical Society. After hours, Katie enjoys cuddling with her blind pug Roxie and watching the Hobbit.

Andy Swick

- Director of Marketing and Public Relations

Andrea is a Web Application Development major in the School of Information Technology. She is the Web master of Tau Beta Sigma, and works part time at Student Affairs Information Technology as a Web Application Developer. When not being a complete band and tech geek, Andrea likes watching Gilmore Girls and camping.

Ryland BeDell - Assistant Director of Entertainment and Disabilities Liaison Ryland is a Philosophy major with a minor in Women and Gender Studies and Sociology. He is involved with the Lambda Psi Omega as the Elder of Education. He loves watching football and is a Baltimore Ravens fan. He loves seeing new movies and reading as much as he can. He also loves to use American Sign Language to communicate with some of his good friends.

Tracy Conoboy

- Assistant Director of Design

Tracy is a Visual Communication major and Sociology minor. Along with designing the program guide for the conference, Tracy recently worked as the Historian/Photographer for Pride at ISU and is currently a member of The Indy, a campus newspaper. In the summer, she works at The Cubs Store in Wrigley Field, hangs out in coffee houses and plays with puppies.

Mary Dougherty - Special Events Coordinator Mary is a Criminal Justice Science major. They have also been a member of Pride at ISU’s executive board for three years and is a founding member of Lambda Psi Omega. They also work as a life drawing model for the school of art. When Mary isn’t in meetings, they spend time playing video games, hanging out with friends and enjoying the day.

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Frank Hopper

- Volunteer Coordinator

Frank is in the last semester of his senior year as a Public Relations major at Illinois State. He is a selfproclaimed news nut and nerd. So when he is not hip deep in headlines or homework he can be found reading, hiking, traveling or eating. He has interned for the U.S. Senate, a Washington D.C. communications firm as well as a couple other offices around ISU.

Kristy Moon

- Special Events Coordinator

Kristy is currently pursuing a degree in Art Education with a focus in painting and hopes to open their own studio to teach youth art classes. Kristy also uses their spare time to knit or spend time with friends.

Stephen Ramberg

- Workshop Coordinator

Stephen is a Ceramics major with a minor in Art History. His time is primarily occupied by his duties as a Resident Assistant, lengthy meals with friends, and long hours in the studio. Stephen’s idea of a good time consists of hiking, dancing, climbing trees, anything to do with the Lord of the Rings, laughter and super powers.

Maddy Reid

- Assistant Director of Social Media

Maddy is our Social Media Chair. She is a senior studying Mass Media Management, Promotion, and Sales. Maddy spends most of her time as a paid intern with Radio Bloomington. She works part time at Family Video where she watches movies and talks to people all day. After graduating in May of 2015, she hopes to pursue a career in radio.

Elise Robertson

- Assistant to the Planning Chair

Elise is a Senior English major with a minor in French. She enjoys writing creatively, reading fantasy and has a particular weakness for horror movies and video games. She is also a founding member of ISU’s queer frarority, Lambda Psi Omega, and is active in Pride at ISU.

Kayla Tyson

- Volunteer Coordinator

Kayla is a recent graduate of Texas A&M's Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education. At Texas A&M, she planned their inaugural Lavender Graduation, a ceremony to celebrate LGBTQI graduates. Her research interests include Queer Students of Color, the intersection of culture and sexual orientation, and feminism in relation to gender identity and expression. She is now the Assistant Director of Residential and Student Life at Lincoln College-Normal in Normal, IL.

Darren Will

- Volunteer Coordinator

Originally from Kharkov, Ukraine, Darren is a multi-disciplinary nerd currently working towards an undergraduate degree in biology. His interests include math, computer science, philosophy, social issues, and companion animals. When not studying, Darren enjoys traveling, listening to music, and watching documentaries or irreverent comedies on Netflix. In the future, Darren plans on doing graduate work in neuroscience and owning a quaint home full of cats.

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planning team cont. Scott Clanin

- Assistant Director of Design

Scott graduated from Illinois State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations. While at ISU, he worked with Pride as their PR Coordinator and has hosted workshops on social media and branding development at MBLGTACC. He is the Marketing Manager for a property development and management company based in Champaign, IL. Scott designed the logo, shirts and signage for the conference.

Cassie Burningham

- Graduate Student Advisor

Cassie is a 2nd year Graduate Student in the CSPA program. She is also the Bystander Intervention and Programs Graduate Assistant with the Health Promotion and Wellness Office, and is a House Director for a local sorority. She spends her free time reading, writing, and watching American Horror Story and NOVA specials.

Aminah Woods

- Graduate Student Advisor

Aminah is a 2nd year graduate student in the College Student Personnel Administration program at Illinois State University. She has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Sociology from Maryville University in St. Louis. Aminah has done undergraduate and graduate work in multicultural programs, retention programs, and student conduct.

Jill Benson

- Advisor

Jill Benson is an Associate Dean of Students at Illinois State University. She has worked at Illinois State for 20 years, all in student advisement and student advocacy roles. She has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, a master’s degree in Counseling from Indiana State University, and has completed master’s level coursework in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at Illinois State University.

Angela Davenport

- Advisor

Angela is the Coordinator for Diversity Advocacy, a unit of the Dean of Students Office. Originally from Chicago, Angela has worked at Illinois State University for the past 10 years. In her spare time she enjoys working out, watching movies, and spending time with friends and family.

Rick Lewis

- Advisor

Rick has worked in higher education for more than 29 years. He received a bachelor of arts degree at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina and a masters of science degree from ISU, where he completed 18 hours post-master’s studies in education administration. Rick worked in university residence halls for more than 15 years in a variety of positions and served two years as director for multicultural affairs prior to his current position as Associate Dean of Students.

Tommie Peckenpaugh

- Advisor

Tommie is a Residence Hall Coordinator for Manchester Hall, has worked at ISU for 3 years and loves what he does. He facilitates Safe Zone, chairs a committee for Gender Inclusive Housing and looks to update the University Housing Services policy. He recently was a Leaders of Social Change trip advisor. He is working toward a graduate certificate in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department with a focus on GLBT Studies.

Megan Rolfs

- Advisor

Megan is an Illinois State alum and works as the Marketing Coordinator in the Dean of Students Office. She also serves as an Inclusion Practitioner in the Division of Student Affairs. Megan enjoys baking, traveling, and spending time with her husband and two young boys.

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ABOUT ILLINOIS STATE The founding of Illinois State Normal University came as a direct result of the bill Governor William Bissel signed on February 18, 1857. This bill created a public teaching college and established the Board of Education as it’s governing body. Jesse W. Fell was pivotal in obtaining the financial backing needed to bring the institution to the Bloomington area. In the spring of 1857, Jesse W. Fell helped to found Illinois State Normal University as the first public university in Illinois. At the time, “normal” was the general term describing teaching institutions based on the French teaching schools. For the first few years, classes were held in downtown Bloomington while the campus was being built. By 1861 the all-purpose building, Old Main, was completed and Illinois State Normal University had a permanent home. For the next hundred years Illinois State continued to grow and prosper, adding programs, buildings, and students eventually receiving the full accreditation of University status. In the summer of 1958 Old Main was torn down due to advanced deterioration in the brick and woodwork. The building stood for 98 years and was a proud symbol of education and opportunity for the people of Illinois. In 1964 as ISNU moved toward a full service University, “Normal” was dropped from the Illinois State University name. Illinois State University is one of 12 public universities in Illinois. Currently there are over 160 undergraduate programs, and over 40 graduate and doctoral programs offered. While Illinois State is the leading teaching school in Illinois it is also well known for the Mennonite College of Nursing, the College of Fine Arts, and our College of Business programs.

ABOUT pride at isu ISU Pride was founded in 1971 under the name “Homophile ISU.” The organization was founded two years after the Stonewall Riots, which sparked the modern gay-rights movement. In the fall of 1971, a bulletin was placed in the Daily Vidette (the campus newspaper) advertising the first meeting, which drew a crowd of a dozen or more. About a year after the founding, the group changed the name to “Gay People’s Alliance” (GPA) and registered as an official student organization. Through the years, the name of our organization was changed again to “Gay and Lesbian Alliance” (GALA) then finally, changed to “Pride.” We are fortunate to have a rich history and take pride in continuing the presence of an LGBTQIA student organization at Illinois State University. We are proud to say that our organization is one of the oldest LGBTQIA student organizations in the country. Pride’s mission is to provide a safe, social, and educational atmosphere for people of all gender identities and sexual orientations at Illinois State University through meetings and events catered towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, asexual, ally, intersexual, curious, and pansexual identities. We incorporate our nondiscrimination policy on the basis of sexual orientation, race, color, religion, sex, gender identity, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, disability, and military or veteran status.

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SPECIAL THANKS Barb Dallinger, who has helped us in a variety of roles from conference logistics and planning to assisting in facilitating our conference in the Bone Student Center.

Natalie Richardson, for helping us keep our

Brittany Stokes for being our first main advisor

all of our silly questions.

and setting us off in the right direction.

Danny Mathews, for being one of the first

people to help us develop our bid proposal and even stood by us when we went to bid at Michigan State.

Daena Ramos, for serving as one of the graduate students who was extremely helpful in the logistics for the conference. Steve Klay, for being with us from the beginning and standing by us while we presented at Michigan State.

momentum over the 2014 summer break.

MBLGTACC 2013/2014 Planning Teams, for your great advice and your answers to Student Affairs IT at ISU, for helping us with anything and everything we needed technology wise. Dean of Students Staff, for helping us in

this long process. We couldn’t have asked for a more helpful and dedicated group of professionals who lent a great deal of their time, energy and skills to make this conference all that it is.

Illinois State University Community, for always finding a solution to our questions and providing support from many different departments and areas of campus.

You! Thank you to the students who keep coming back year after year. Thank you to the first time attendee who is thinking, “what did I get myself into?” Thank you to the students who worked with administrators to get here. Thank you to the students who fund-raised when funding didn’t come through. Thank you to those allies who came to support their friends and loved ones. Thank you to the advisor who makes it possible for students to come back year after year. Without each and every one of you this conference could not happen. Without you this conference would not continue to grow and prosper. So we thank you for traveling to Illinois State University to be with us this weekend!

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DONORS Gold: $5,000-$9,999

Silver: $2,500-$4,999

Bronze: $1,000-$2,499

Redbird: $250-$999 WGS.IllinoisState.edu

Red and White/Gifts in Kind Illinois State University Health Promotion and Wellness and the Student Wellness Ambassador Team (SWAT)

Dr. Janet Krejci

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As one of Illinois State’s values,

Diversity is core to the culture of Illinois State and guides how we do our work and fulfill our mission:

Illinois State University affirms and encourages community and a respect for differences by fostering an inclusive environment characterized by cultural understanding, ethical behavior, and social justice. The University supports a diverse faculty and staff who mentor a diverse student population. The University endeavors to provide opportunities for all students, staff, and faculty to participate in a global society.

Welcome to Illinois State University! We are proud to sponsor the Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, and Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC).

Sponsored by the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, and 12 the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs


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ETIQUETTE FOR INCLUSION MBLGTACC provides an opportunity for student leaders, higher education professionals, and community members to learn and grow through the knowledge and experiences of others. The conference weekend should serve as the ultimate safe space for all attendees. Ensuring that everyone feels a sense of support and security will ease the channels of communication, and ascertain that all attendees participate in a rich dialogue with their peers. To achieve these goals, attendees should focus on inclusion. The LGBTQIA community has the opportunity to set an example for all communities that work toward education and social justice. Please realize and respect that the experiences, realities, or perspectives of others may differ from your own. Though we understand that being challenged or evoked to reassess our own ideas can sometimes cause discomfort, this is a safe space established for educational purposes. It is still the best practice to not enforce opinions or judgments on those whose backgrounds or perspectives contradict or vary from our own. Be sure to keep an open mind. Practice good will, and assume goodwill. We are here to support and learn from one another.

Language, Pronouns, and Terms PGP: Preferred Gender Pronoun. Examples include she/her/hers and he/him/his, as well as gender-neutral pronouns such as ze/zir/zes, they/them/theirs, etc. We encourage participants to use inclusive language and avoid derogatory language. Be aware and considerate of pronoun usage. For example, if someone prefers gender-neutral pronouns, respect their wishes and use that type of pronoun when referring to them. If you are unsure about someone’s pronoun preference, simply ask. If you make a mistake, correct yourself and apologize. For most individuals, it is not a big deal if you slip up unintentionally. Also, diverse pronoun usage may be new and confusing to some, so be patient—this is a conference centered on learning. In general, if you are unsure of a particular term, please refer to the Etiquette Glossary of this program guide or Google it.

All Gender Restrooms All Gender Restrooms are available in the Bone Student Center as well as Schroeder Hall. Please respect that the all gender restrooms are for the use of anyone, no matter their sex, gender, or gender identity. Gendered restrooms are also available. If you encounter issues with restroom facilities during your conference stay, please notify a volunteer.

(Dis)abilities Be respectful of people with (dis)abilities, and forgo using words such as “retard(ed),” “cripple,” “gimp,” “downy,” “special ed,” “lame,” “crazy,” etc. in a derogatory way. Words like these have been used to bully and oppress individuals with differing abilities for many decades. Please consider the implications of your words and do not use these words casually. In addition, be respectful of people with mental, hearing, sight, or other invisible disabilities and/or disorders. For example, if someone doesn’t respond to you, they may not be ignoring you—they may not be able to hear you. Calmly gain their attention, be patient, and find a means of communication. Be courteous to those with limited accessibility. Don’t block ramps, unnecessarily use accessible restroom stalls/accessible seating, or be inconsiderate of people with mobility restrictions. Please be willing and prepared to move chairs to make room for people using wheelchairs. Ask and wait for a response before helping someone who may appear in need of help. What seems helpful may be disrespectful or even unhelpful.

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Service Animals When you encounter someone using a service/assistance or guide animal, it is expected you do not pet, offer food to, or interact with the animal in any way. The safety of their owner may depend on the dog’s ability to focus. You are supporting the independence provided by the service animal by not distracting them.

Allergies and Scent Sensitivity To promote a scent-safe environment for those with allergies or sensitivities, we ask that you use scent-free products or limit/ forgo excessive usage of perfumes, lotions, scented hair products, etc. while at the conference. Additionally, some people may have food allergies that are very severe, so be self-aware when eating food in workshops or public areas. Try to keep food contained, and don’t leave it lying around.

Anti-LGBTQIA Protesters With the size and visibility of MBLGTACC 2015, we can draw attention from people who do not support our identities or our cause. Our advice is to avoid interacting with anyone wishing to espouse negativity and ignore any provocation. If an instance occurs that seems threatening or dangerous, please notify a volunteer or a planning team member.

Sexual responsibility We encourage conference attendees who engage in sexual activity to be safe and responsible. We encourage the use of condoms (including female condoms), dental dams, water or silicone-based lube, or other forms of protection. Protection will be available for conference attendees from the G Spot on Friday and Saturday. The G Spot is Illinois State’s portable wellness gazebo that has been provided by Health Promotion and Wellness and the Student Wellness Ambassador Team. If consent from both or multiple parties is given, we encourage them to be safe and use protection to prevent HIV/AIDS, STI/STDs and/or pregnancy. Sexual assault is defined as performing a sexual act with or on a person who has not given, denied, or is unable to give consent. Consent, in regards to sex, is the voluntary approval of a person to engage in sexual activity. A person cannot give consent if they are severely intoxicated, unconscious, asleep, or severely physically or mentally disabled. It is in all parties’ interest to specifically ask or clarify before any sexual act. If you are sexually assaulted—or if you are the partner, friend, or family member of a victim—contact PATH at 309-827-4005 or 2-1-1 which has a 24-hour crisis response line for the McLean County area.

Networking Etiquette We encourage everyone to connect with attendees, make new friends and exchange information for contact after the conference weekend. However, please be cognizant of social media use and photography. This is a safe space and individuals may not be comfortable with being tagged in photos or other posts in an online format. Please get permission from someone before including them in social media.

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ETIQUETTE glossary We fully acknowledge that this glossary may not speak for the experiences, realities, or perspectives of all individuals. We have tried to be as inclusive as possible while simultaneously striving to be as descriptive and useful as possible to those this conference serves. We recognize that it is impossible to capture the full range of experiences within our community, and we encourage you to explore each of these terms in greater depth.

Ally: A person whose attitudes and behaviors challenge heterosexism, cissexism, homophobia, and transphobia, both on a personal and institutional level. Most commonly used for those who do not identify as LGBTQIA (A in this case meaning asexual), etc.—in other words, those who identify as straight and cisgender—however, anyone can be an ally.

Aromantic: One who lacks a romantic orientation or is incapable of feeling romantic attraction. Aromantics can still have a sexual orientation (e.g., “aromantic bisexual” or “aromantic heterosexual”). A person who feels neither romantic nor sexual attraction is known as an aromantic asexual.

Asexual/Ace: An individual who does not experience sexual attraction. Individuals may still be emotionally, physically, romantically, and/or spiritually attracted to others, and their romantic orientation may also be LGBTQIA (A in this case meaning ally). The prefixes of homo-, hetero-, bi-, pan-, poly-, demi-, and a- have been used to form terms such as heteroromantic, biromantic, homoromantic asexual, and so on. Unlike celibacy, which people choose, asexuality is intrinsic. Some asexual people do engage in sexual activity for a variety of reasons, such as a desire to please romantic partners or to have children.

Bigender: Refers to those who have masculine and feminine sides to their personality. This is often a term used by cross dressers. It should not be confused with the term two-spirit, which is specifically a term used by Native Americans.

Bisexual/Bi: An individual who acknowledges the potential to be attracted, romantically and/or sexually, to people of more than one sex and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree. “Bisexual erasure/ invisibility” refers to the tendency for some people to forget about those who are attracted to more than one gender. Butch: An identity or presentation that leans towards masculinity. Butch can be an adjective, (“she’s a butch woman”), a verb (“he went home to butch up”), or a noun (“they identity as a butch”). Although commonly associated with masculine queer/lesbian women, it’s used by many to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one identifies as a woman. CAFAB and CAMAB: Acronyms meaning “Coercively Assigned Female/ Male at Birth”. Sometimes AFAB and AMAB (without the word “coercively”) are used instead. No one, whether cis- or trans, has a choice in the sex or gender to which they are assigned when they are born, which is why it is said to be coercive. In the rare cases in which it is necessary to refer to the birth-assigned sex of a trans person, this is the way to do it. Cisgender/ Cis: A prefix of Latin origin, meaning “on the same side (as).” Cisgender individuals have a gender identity that is aligned with their birth sex and, therefore, have a self-perception and gender expression that matches behaviors and roles considered appropriate for their birth sex. For example, a person who is femininely-identified that was born female. In short, cisgender is the opposite of transgender. It is important to recognize that even if two people identify as men (one being cis and the other being trans), they may lead very similar lives but deal with different struggles pertaining to their birth sex. Cissexism: Synonymous with transphobia, this definition is associated with negative attitudes and feelings towards transgender people, based on the expression of their internal gender identity. Cissexism is also the belief that cisgender individuals are superior to transgender people and that a cisgender lifestyle is more desirable to lead.

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Crip: Increasingly used to refer to a person who has a disability and embraces it, rather than feeling sorry for themselves. Historically used as a disparaging term for a person who is partially disabled or unable to use a limb or limbs. It is similar to the word queer in that it is sometimes used as a hateful slur, so although some have reclaimed it from their oppressors, be careful with its use.

Cross-dressing: The act of dressing and presenting as the “opposite” binary gender. One who considers this an integral part of their identity may identify as a cross-dresser. Transvestite is an obsolete (and sometimes offensive) term with the same meaning. Cross-dressing and drag are forms of gender expression and are not necessarily tied to erotic activity, nor are they indicative of one’s sexual orientation. These terms are not to be used to describe someone who has transitioned or intends to do so in the future. Drag: Exaggerated and theatrical gender presentation and/or performance. Although most commonly used to refer to cross-dressing performers (drag queens and drag kings), anyone of any gender can do any form of drag. Doing drag does not necessarily have anything to do with one’s sex, gender identity, or orientation.

Femme: An identity or presentation that leans towards femininity. Femme can be an adjective (he’s a femmeboy), a verb (“she feels better when she femmes up”), or a noun (“they’re a femme”). Although commonly associated with feminine lesbian/queer women, it’s used by many to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one identifies as a woman.

Gay: A common word for a man who is physically, romantically, emotionally, and/or spiritually attracted to similarly-gendered individuals. It is often used in reference to anyone attracted to similarly-gendered individuals.

Gender: The set of social expectations for attitude, behavior, capability, dress, gender role, profession, etc. assigned to an individual at birth, usually based on sex. These expectations vary between cultures. While gender is said to be fluid, social expectations may be rigidly-defined, and those who violate these norms may face prejudice or discrimination.

Gender Binary: A system of viewing gender as consisting solely of two categories (termed woman and man) which are biologically-based (female and male) and unchangeable, and in which no other possibilities for gender or anatomy are believed to exist. This system is oppressive to anyone who defies their birth assignment, but particularly to those who are gender-variant people and do not fit neatly into one of the two categories. Gender Expression/Presentation: The physical manifestation of one’s gender identity through clothing, hairstyle, voice, body shape, etc., typically referred to as feminine or masculine. Many transgender people seek to make their gender expression (how they look) match their gender identity rather than their birth-assigned sex. Gender Fluid: A general term for non-binary gender identities. This term overlaps with genderqueer and bigender, implying movement between gender identities and/or presentations. Gender Identity: One’s internal sense of being a man or woman, neither of these, both, etc. Genderqueer: A general term for non-binary gender identities. Those who identify as genderqueer may identify as neither woman nor man may see themselves as outside of their binary gender boxes; may fall somewhere between the binary genders; or may reject the use of gender labels. Genderqueer identities fall under the “trans umbrella.” Gender Non-Conforming: A term for individuals whose gender expression is different from societal expectations related to gender.

GSM: Gender and Sexual Minority. This is a basic catch-all for people who are not cisgender and/or heterosexual, and is sometimes used as a shorter and more inclusive alternative to “LGBTQIA” etc.

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Hate Crime: Any act of intimidation, harassment, physical force, or threat of physical force directed against any person, or their property, motivated either in whole or in part by hostility toward their actual or perceived age, disability, gender identity, ethnic background, race, religious/spiritual belief, sex, sexual orientation, etc. Heteroflexible: Similar to bisexual, but with a stated heterosexual preference. Sometimes characterized as being “mostly straight.” Commonly used to indicate that one is interested in heterosexual romance but is “flexible” when it comes to sex and/or play. The same concepts apply to homoflexible. Heteronormative/Heteronormativity: A culture or belief system that assumes that people fall into distinct and complementary sexes and genders and that heterosexuality is the normal sexual orientation. A heteronormative view is one that involves alignment of biological sex, sexuality, gender identity, and gender roles.

Heterosexism: The assumption that all people are heterosexual and that heterosexuality is superior and more desirable than non-heterosexual identities. Heterosexism is also the stigmatization, denial, and/or denigration of anything non-heterosexual.

Homonormative/Homonormativity: The assimilation of heteronormative ideals and constructs into LGBTQIA culture and identity. Homonormativity upholds neoliberalism rather than critiquing monogamy, procreation, normative family social roles, and binary gender roles. It is criticized as undermining citizens’ rights and erasing the historic alliance between radical politics and gay policies, the core concern being sexual freedom. Some assert that homonormativity fragments LGBTQIA communities into hierarchies of worthiness: those that mimic heteronormative standards of gender identity are deemed most worthy of receiving rights. Individuals at the bottom of the hierarchy are seen as an impediment to this elite class of homonormative individuals receiving their rights. Because LGBTQIA activists and organizations embrace systems that endorse normative family social roles and serial monogamy, some believe that LGBTQIA people are surrendering and conforming to heteronormative behavior.

Homosexual: A person who is physically, romantically, emotionally, and/or spiritually attracted to a person of the same gender. Many prefer “gay”, “lesbian”, etc. because of the term’s origins as a medical term at a time when homosexuality was considered a disorder. Inclusive Language: The use of non-identity specific language to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions on others. For example, saying “you all” instead of “you guys” in order to not impose assumptions regarding a person’s gender identity. Intersex: Describes a person whose natal physical sex is physically ambiguous. There are many genetic, hormonal, or anatomical variations which can cause this (e.g., Klinefeller Syndrome, Adrenal Hyperplasia, or Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome). Parents and medical professionals usually assign intersex infants a sex and perform surgical operations to conform the infant’s body to that assignment, but this practice has become increasingly controversial as intersex adults are speaking out against having had to undergo medical procedures which they did not consent to (and in many cases caused them mental and physical difficulties later in life). The term intersex is preferred over “hermaphrodite,” an outdated term which is stigmatizing and misleading. Lesbian: A femininely-identified individual who is emotionally, physically, romantically, sexually, and/or spiritually attracted to femininely-identified individuals. LGBTQQIAAP: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex, Ally, Asexual, Pansexual (and more) communities. While the acronym may get a little exhausting, this list is not exhaustive!

Monsexual/Multisexual: Umbrella term for orientations directed towards one gender (monsexual) or many genders (multisexual).

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Passing: A term used by transgender people to mean that they are seen as the gender with which they selfidentify. For example, a transgender man (born female) who most people see as a man. Also a term used by non-heterosexual people to mean that they are seen as or assumed to be heterosexual.

Pansexual/Omnisexual: “Pan”, means “all”. Someone who is emotionally, physically, romantically, sexually, and/or spiritually attracted to all gender identities/expressions, including those outside the genderconforming binary. Similar to bisexual, but different in that the concept deliberately rejects the gender binary. Polysexual people are attracted to “many”, but not necessarily all genders. Polyamory: Having more than one intimate relationship at a time with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. It is distinct from both swinging (which emphasizes sex with others as merely recreational) and polysexuality (which is attraction towards multiple genders and/or sexes). People who identify as polyamorous typically reject the view that sexual and relational exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed, long-term loving relationships.

Queer: General term for identities, presentations, and sexual orientations that reject conventions and expectations. There’s a lot of overlap between queer and trans, but not all queer people are trans, and not all trans people are queer (many trans people do in fact conform to gender norms and expectations). The word queer is still sometimes used as a hateful slur, so although many have reclaimed it from their oppressors, be careful with its use. QPOC: “Queer People of Color” or “Queer Person of Color.” Romantic Orientation: A person’s enduring emotional, physical, romantic, and/or spiritual—but not necessarily sexual—attraction to others. Sometimes called affectional orientation. “Romantic orientation” is often used by the asexual community in lieu of “sexual orientation.” Safe Space: A place where people who identify within the LGBTQIA communities feel comfortable and secure in being who they are. In this place, they can talk about the people with whom they are involved without fear of being criticized, judged, or ridiculed. Safe spaces promote the right to be comfortable in one’s living space, work environments, etc. It is focused toward the right to use the pronoun of a significant other in conversation, and the right to be as outwardly open about one’s life and activities as anyone else.

Same-Gender Loving: A term created by the African-American community that some prefer to use instead of “lesbian”, “bisexual”, or “gay” to express attraction to and love of people of the same gender. SGL is an alternative to Eurocentric homosexual identities which may not culturally affirm or engage the history and cultures of people of African descent.

Sex: Sex refers to the biological traits, which include internal and external reproductive anatomy, chromosomes, hormones, and other physiological characteristics. The assignment and classification of people at birth as male or female is often based solely on external reproductive anatomy. Related terms: intersex, female, male.

Sexual Orientation: A person’s enduring emotional, physical, romantic, sexual, and/or spiritual attraction to others. Gender identity and sexual orientation are not the same. Trans people can be heterosexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual, queer, etc., just like anyone else. See affectional/romantic orientation.

Stealth: Going stealth means for a trans person to live completely as their gender identity and to pass in the public sphere as that identity; when a trans person chooses not to disclose their trans status to others. This can be done for numerous reasons including safety, or simply because the person doesn’t feel others have the right to know. For transsexuals, going stealth is often the goal of transition.

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Trans*: Prefix or adjective used as an abbreviation of transgender, derived from the Greek word meaning “across from” or “on the other side of.” Many consider trans* to be an inclusive and useful umbrella term. Trans (without the asterisk) is often applied to trans men and trans women, and the asterisk is used more broadly to refer to all-cisgender gender identities, such as: agender, cross-dresser, bigender, genderfluid, genderfuck, genderless, genderqueer, non-binary, non-gendered, third gender, trans man, trans woman, transgender, transsexual, and two-spirit.

Trans Woman/ Trans Man: Also, transwoman and transman. Trans woman refers to a woman of transgender experience. She might actively identify herself as trans*, or she might identify as a woman and simply consider being trans part of her medical history. Some say it is better to include a space between trans and woman/man so that trans* becomes an adjective rather than an all-encompassing noun ( just as it is better to say “gay men” rather than “gays” or “a disabled person” rather than a “handicapped”). Using trans as an adjective allows trans to be simply one of many components of a person’s identity.

Transgender: An umbrella term for people whose gender identity differs from the sex or gender they were assigned at birth, and for those whose gender expression differs from what is culturally expected of them. The term transgender is not indicative of sexual orientation, hormonal makeup, physical anatomy, or how one is perceived in daily life.

Transition: The complex process of leaving behind one’s coercively assigned birth sex. Transition can include: coming out to one’s family, friends, and/or coworkers; changing one’s name and/or sex on legal documents; hormone therapy; and possibly (though not always) some form of surgery. It is best not to assume that someone will “complete” this process at any particular time; an individual’s transition is finished when they are finally comfortable with how their gender identity is aligned with their body, and may not include going through all of the aforementioned steps.

Transsexual: Similar to transgender in that it indicates a conflict between one’s gender identity and sex assigned at birth, but with implications of hormonal/surgical transition from one’s binary sex to the others. Unlike transgender, transsexual is not an umbrella term, as many transgender people do not identify as transsexual. “MTF” indicates a person who has or intends to transition in some way from Male-to-Female; “FTM” indicates a person who has or intends to transition from Female-to-Male. Two-Spirit: A contemporary term that references historical multiple gender transitions in many First Nations cultures. These individuals were sometimes viewed in certain tribes as having two spirits occupying one body. Two-spirits indicates a person whose body simultaneously manifests both a masculine and a feminine spirit. Many Native/First Nations people who are LGBTQIA or gender non-conforming identify as Two-Spirit; in many nations, being Two-Spirit carries both great respect and additional commitments and responsibilities to one’s community.

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1 9 93 Iowa State University and Drake University - Unknown 1 9 94 Earlham College (Indiana) - Greetings From the 90’s... Wish You Were Here Queer 1 9 9 5 Southern Illinois University at Carbondale - Building Queer Success in the Midwest 1996 Beloit College (Wisconsin) - Building Queer Success in the Midwest 1 9 9 7 Indiana State University - We’re Here! We’re Queer! We’re Fabulous! 1 9 9 8 University of Illinois at Chicago - Across the Fruited Plain 1 9 9 9 University of Wisconsin-Madison - Moving Forward, Looking Back 2000 Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota) - Making Waves Into the New Millennium 2001 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Out and About: Breaking silence, boundaries, labels 2002 Michigan State University - Still Moving Forward 2003 The Ohio State University - Loving With Pride 2004 Iowa State University - Speak Up! Speak Out! 2005 Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota) - Building The Bridge To Bring It All Together 2006 University of South Dakota - Painting the Rainbow: Celebrating Unity Through Diversity 2007 University of Minnesota at Twin Cities - Alphabet Soup: No Matter The Letter We Stand Together 2008 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Voting for Change: Liberty and Justice For All 2009 Indiana University Bloomington - Living Out Loud: Examining Our Past to Enhance Our Future 2010 University of Wisconsin-Madison - Get Real! 2 0 1 1 University of Michigan - Justice or Just Us? Achieving Liberty for All 2 0 1 2 Iowa State University - The Butterfly Effect: Evolution to Revolution 2 0 1 3 Michigan State University - Mosaic: Putting the Pieces Together 2014 University of Missouri Kansas City - Jazzin’ It Up 2 0 1 5 Illinois State University - Narrating A New Normal 2016 Purdue - Introspection at the Crossroads

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mblgtacc history 1994

1991 The Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay College Conference (MBLGCC), as it was initially called, was conceived at a conference in Des Moines, IA, in February 1991.

1992

Organizing conference held at Emporia State University in Emporia, KS.

1990

Earlham College, a small Quaker college in Richmond, IN had a population of 1,100 students. Two hundred and fifty queer college students – almost a quarter of the school’s population – came for the conference. The administration was supportive of the conference, but the board of trustees wasn’t. Many of the attendees were housed in the dorms by students – queer and allied friends of the organizers – who agreed to host them for the weekend. was added 1997 “Transgender” to the conference name.

1995

2000

1993 The first annual MBLGCC was held at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa in February 1993, and was a collaborative effort between Drake University and Iowa State University.

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2001 “Ally” was added to the conference name.

19951996 The theme for both conferences was “Building Queer Success in the Midwest,” which seems to indicate that this was actually meant to be the conference’s slogan – which eventually developed into a conference theme that changes every year.


2003 The conference hit 1,500 attendees for the first time at The Ohio State University.

2005 For the first time, conference hosts were selected two years in advance: at the 2005 conference, hosts for 2006 and 2007 were selected. However, shortly before the 2006 conference, the hosts for 2007 backed out, and the University of Minnesota at Twin Cities was later selected to replace them.

While the University of South Dakota is located in Vermillion, SD, the conference was actually held 60 miles north of the university at the Sioux Falls Convention Center in Sioux Falls, SD. The University of South Dakota promised institutional support for the conference prior to the students bidding for it, but later rescinded the support. The conference likely suffered as a result; attendance was 800 people, lower than previous years. The conference was organized entirely by three students, who used their own bank accounts to process transactions.

2006 2010

2015 2007

Because of the 2006 conference’s difficulties, the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee was created. With the help of a lawyer, students organizing the 2008 conference registered MBLGTACC as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Some universities do not extend their non-profit status to student organizations. The status is managed by the treasurer of the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee.

2007

2012

The conference returned to its origins at Iowa State for the 20th conference. Registrations doubled in the last week before the conference, and it broke a conference record by reaching 1,700 attendees.

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MBLGTACC

CONFERENCE

INTROSPECTION

AT THE CROSSROADS THE ROAD WE ARE ON AND THE ROUTE WE WILL TAKE.

FEBRUARY

19-21

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN

HOSTED BY PURDUE UNIVERSITY

mblg a c 2016 24lgtac

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

/mblgtacc2016

@mblgtacc2016

mblgtacc2016.tumblr.com


conference purpose For the past 23 years, MBLGTACC has changed considerably from 300 attendees in the early 90’s to over 2000 in 2013. The grass roots effort was created to give queers in the Midwest a voice that was missing from the largely coastalized movements of the 90’s. This conference has grown to become the largest LGBTQIA student conference in the country. MBLGTACC works to encourage and promote diversity, activism, and networking among all attendees. Every year MBLGTACC continues to have positive effects on the students and advisors who attend. Most importantly this conference gives attendees a sense of optimism and empowerment that may not necessarily be felt in their home states or campuses. This conference strives to motivate students and provide them with the tools to go home and make a difference on their campuses as well as create a foundation for the queer leaders of tomorrow.

conference theme Through the ages, the LGBTQIA community has worked towards equality and now we are beginning to experience more change than ever before. Narration is important because everyone has a story to tell. Just like there is no “I” in “Team,” our community is not made up of one voice but many. Everyone has their own personal experiences that influence who they are and who they want to become. Instead of connecting to an ideology, our goal is to connect you to each other on a personal level. By connecting to each other personally we can see how our stories and voices connect to create our community at large. “Normal” is something that is played around with a lot, especially at our University. Yes, we exploited the opportunity to use our town’s name in the conference theme, but “Narrating a New Normal” is even more accurate in society today than it was when we came up with it over two years ago. We see more representations of the LGBTQIA community in popular media. There are more celebrities “coming out,” and our push for equality and rights is gaining more momentum each and every year. With our theme we are trying to show a correlation between change and normalcy, that with changing ideals, attitudes and perceptions in our community, identifying as LGBTQIA is beginning to feel, well... more Normal.

host mblgtacc 2018 Do you love MBLGTACC? The MBLGTACC 2015 Planning Team encourages student leaders to think about putting together a bid to present at MBLGTACC 2016 to host MBLGTACC 2018 at your university. It comes up a lot faster than you think, so start thinking about it now! The conference can only be hosted by a Midwestern college or university. As stated in the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee’s constitution, the Midwest is comprised of 13 states: Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Hosting MBLGTACC is a great honor and a unique experience to develop leadership skills and for your university or college to showcase its outstanding student resources and academic programs. Feel free to contact any of the 2015 or 2016 planning teams for advice and information about putting a bid together for MBLGTACC. See you next year in Lafayette, Indiana at Purdue University!

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resources 24-Hour Crisis Line

Hotels

Providing Access to Help (PATH) began on the campus of Illinois State University in 1971 as a drug hotline. The service quickly expanded to provide crisis response and later to add community resources and referrals. PATH can be reached at 309-827-4005 or 2-1-1. For police, fire and medical emergencies, call 911.

Our conference hotels are listed below. These hotels will have shuttles running to and from campus for your convenience. Marriott Hotel and Conference Center 201 Broadway Ave Normal, IL

Service Animals

Double Tree 10 Brickyard Drive Bloomington, IL

Service animals are welcome on Illinois State University’s campus. If you have a service animal, please contact MBLGTACC 2015 at 309438-2008 so we can assist you further.

Hampton Inn and Suites 320 S Towanda Ave Bloomington, IL

Social Media

Holiday Inn Express West 1031 Wylie Drive Normal, IL

Stay connected with us! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram all weekend for updates. Keep up with the conversation and join in with the hashtag #mblgtacc2015.

Parke Regency 1413 Leslie Dr Bloomington, IL

Bone Student Center Food Vendors Hours of Operation Einstein Bros Bagels (1st floor) Friday: 7:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Saturday: 7:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Sunday: 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. McAlister’s Deli (1st floor) Friday: 11:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Sunday: 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Pizza Hut (2nd floor) Friday: 10:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Sunday: CLOSED Burger King (2nd floor) Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday: 7:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Sunday: 8:00 a.m - 9:00 p.m.

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Apps Guidebook: This app puts everything in this book on your phone for your convenience! Also stay up to date with last minute changes, meet other attendees, and give us feedback! Download the guidebook app from any major app store (including windows) and search for MBLGTACC 2015!

Double Map: This map allows you to receive information on where the city buses are located and what their real time transit location is in relation to where you are as well as what routes are available. This is not part of the shuttle service to and from the campus for the conference. Illinois State Virtual Tour: This app allows you to take a tour around the campus of Illinois State University. This could give you some insight into what the facilities are like and what you will need to know about navigating our campus.


safety information • Free safe walk escorts are available on campus 24 hours a day by calling (309) 438-WALK. • Stay alert to your surroundings and the people around you. Avoid wearing headphones, talking or texting on your cell phone, or anything which can distract you, including the excessive consumption of alcohol. • Travel in groups and avoid going out alone at night. • Plan the safest route to your destinations; choose well lighted, busy pathways and streets. • If someone is bothering or harassing you, tell the person in a loud voice to STAY AWAY. • If you are a victim or witness, call the police immediately and try to remember as many details as possible. Dial 9-1-1 or use an emergency blue-light kiosk on campus to request immediate assistance. Illinois State University Police Department Nonemergency: (309) 438-8631 Nelson Smith Building, Room 105 718 W. College Ave. Normal, IL 61761 www.Police.IllinoisState.edu

Bloomington Police Department Nonemergency: (309) 434-2700 305 S. East St. Bloomington, IL 61701 McLean County Sheriff’s Department Nonemergency: (309) 888-5019 Jail: (309) 888-5065 104 W. Front St. Bloomington, IL 61701

Normal Police Department Nonemergency: (309) 454-2444 100 E. Phoenix Normal, IL 61761 www.npd.org

Gathering Spaces The following rooms and spaces have been set aside for you to sit, relax, and meet with others and discuss the conference. Feel free to use these spaces for whatever you feel necessary including meeting with others to discuss specific LGBTQIA related issues.

Bone Student Center

3rd Floor East Lounge 3rd Floor West Lounge

Schroeder Hall Room 244

For those that would like a quiet space to relax during the conference, the following rooms have been set aside for this purpose.

Bone Student Center

Atrium

Schroeder Hall Room 246

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Shuttle informatIon A shuttle bus system will be provided for conference attendees running between the conference hotels to Illinois State University’s Bone Student Center. After the indicated starting time, shuttles will arrive in 15-30 minute intervals (time intervals will vary depending on distance between the hotel and ISU’s campus). Be sure to check the schedule for your specific hotel pick-up and drop-off times as buses will not run all day on Saturday, February 14th. Please note: • The shuttles are yellow school buses from Illinois Central. • Each bus will have a sign indicating the name of the hotel displayed near the front doors of the bus. • Buses will pick up and drop off on University Street, near the circle drive at the West entrance of the Bone Student Center. • ADA buses are available upon request. Please email mblgtacc2015@ilstu.edu to the attention of Ryland BeDell to make arrangements. Please make this request as soon as possible. • The shuttle service will end at Noon on Sunday, February 15th. Please plan to depart from the Bone Student Center as no return shuttles will be provided to the hotels.

Parking informatIon During the weekend, all Red and Green parking lots around campus are free. (*Goes into effect Friday at 7:00pm). No vehicles without permit are permitted until this time. If you choose to use the Bone Student Center parking lot, there is a $1 fee per hour. Parking in any of the lots overnight is prohibited and may result in the vehicle being towed at the owner’s expense. Full-sized buses may use lot G86 on Locust St. North of the Bone in the case of not using the shuttle system, however the shuttle is recommended. The circle-drive meters will be hooded for the entirety of the weekend for smaller passenger buses/vans to pick-up and drop-off. If you have any additional questions about parking, please visit our website.

VOLUNTEERS Looking for a way to contribute to the MBLGTACC 2015 experience? We are still looking to fill a few volunteer slots throughout the weekend. Stop by Volunteer Headquarters in the Spotlight Room of the Bone Student Center to sign-up. If you’ve already signed-up, thank you! Check-in prior to your assigned time in Volunteer Headquarters.

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Shuttle schedule Holiday Inn Express West To campus: 5:00 p.m. - 6:40 p.m.

Friday

Every 20 minutes (5:00, 5:20, 5:40, 6:00, 6:20, 6:40 p.m.)

From campus: 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. Every 20 minutes (10:00, 10:20, 10:40, 11:00 p.m.)

Double Tree

Every 50 minutes (4:30, 5:20, 6:10 p.m.)

From campus: 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. Every 30 minutes (10:00, 10:30, 11:00 p.m.)

Marriott

Varied times (4:30, 4:50, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30 p.m.)

From campus: 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Varied times (10:00, 10:30, 11:00 p.m.)

Holiday Inn Express West To campus: 7:20 a.m. - 7:25 p.m. Varied times (7:20, 7:40, 8:10, 8:30, 8:50, 9:10, 9:30 a.m., 1:00, 1:20, 1:40, 2:00, 2:20, 7:05, 7:25 p.m.)

saturday

To campus: 4:30 p.m. - 6:10 p.m.

To campus: 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

From campus: 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

From campus: 12:30 p.m. - 12:00 a.m. Varied times (12:30, 12:50, 1:10, 1:30, 6:10, 6:20, 10:00, 10:20, 10:40, 11:00, 11:20, 11:40 p.m., 12:00 a.m.)

Double Tree

To campus: No evening service Every 30 minutes (10:00, 10:30, 11:00 p.m.)

Parke Regency and Hampton Inn To campus: 7:20 a.m. - 7:20 p.m. Varied times (7:20, 7:40, 8:20, 8:40, 9:20, 9:40 a.m., 1:10, 1:40, 2:10, 2:40, 3:00, 7:10 , 7:20 p.m.)

From campus: 12:30 p.m. - 12:00 a.m. Varied times (12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 6:10, 6:20, 10:00, 10:20, 11:00, 11:20 p.m., 12:00 a.m.)

To campus: 7:20 p.m. - 7:20 p.m.

Marriott

Varied times (7:20, 7:40, 8:20, 8:40, 9:20, 9:40 a.m., 1:10, 1:40, 2:10, 2:40, 3:00, 7:10, 7:20 p.m.)

To campus: 7:20 a.m. - 8:25 a.m.

From campus: 12:30 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.

From campus: 10:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.

Varied times (12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 6:10, 6:20, 10:00, 10:20, 11:00, 11:20 p.m., 12:00 a.m.)

Holiday Inn Express West

sunday

Parke Regency and Hampton Inn

To campus: 7:40 a.m. - 9:40 a.m.

Varied times (7:20, 7:45, 8:00, 8:25 a.m) Every 30 minutes (10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30 p.m., 12:00 a.m.)

Parke Regency and Hampton Inn

Every 20 minutes (7:40, 8:00, 8:20, 8:40, 9:00, 9:20, 9:40 a.m.)

To campus: 7:40 a.m. - 10:05 a.m.

Double Tree

Marriott

Varied times (7:40, 8:10, 8:40, 9:05, 9:35, 10:05 a.m.)

To campus: 7:40 a.m. - 10:05 a.m.

To campus: 7:45 a.m. - 8:25 a.m.

Varied times (7:40, 8:10, 8:40, 9:05, 9:35, 10:05 a.m.)

Varied times (7:45, 8:15, 8:45, 9:15, 9:45 a.m.)

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What’s Happening Orientation Friday 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Prairie North

This session, which is hosted by members of the MBLGTACC 2015 Planning Team, is a new addition to the schedule this year! We asked past attendees what they would have liked to know before attending their first conference and compiled their answers into a presentation. Though this presentation is geared toward first time attendees, we welcome those returning to join us and give us your perspective. We will also briefly overview Illinois State University’s campus and give you some tips for getting around.

it’s always been about

BEING THERE

We know there is nothing more important than being there when it matters most. That’s why State Farm BankŽ is proud to support the MBLGTACC conference for 2015..

Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.ÂŽ

statefarm.comÂŽ 1001041.1

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CONNECTING STUDENTS. BU ILD ING RELATIONS HI PS. INSPIRING FUTURES. UNIVERSITY HOUSING SERVICES follows its mission by offering ways to get involved, experience and enjoy time in residence halls or apartment complexes.

HERE ARE JUST A FEW UHS ACTIVITIES/EVENTS: Association of Residence Halls Area Governments Diversity Coalitions Cultural Dinners Curb Birds Kick Offs Computer Labs/Study Areas

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Kick Outs Sustainability Programs Homecoming Activities Floor Dinners/Events Residence Assistant Opportunities Faculty Mentor Partnerships Contests Learn more at Housing.IllinoisState.edu


opening ceremony Friday 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

schedule Welcome Safety Tips Welcome Video Performance: Improv Mafia Introduction of the 2015 Planning Team

Featuring:

Improv mafia The Improv Mafia is Illinois State University’s first improv group, taking the ridiculous seriously since 1998. Mafia has since grown to become recognized as one of the best college improv groups in the country, winning more awards than any other collegiate improv team. In the heart of Illinois State’s campus in Normal, IL, the group provides improv shows every Tuesday night at 8:00 p.m. in CVA 145.

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Keynote Laverne Cox Friday 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

Ain’t I a Woman: My Journey to Womanhood Laverne Cox is a critically acclaimed actress who currently appears in the Netflix original series Orange is the New Black, playing the groundbreaking role of “Sophia Burset,” an incarcerated African American transgender woman. Laverne is the first trans woman of color to have a leading role on a mainstream scripted television show. Time Magazine named Sophia Burset the 4th most influential fictional character of 2013. Laverne is also a recipient of the Dorian rising star award for her work in Orange is the New Black. A renowned speaker, Laverne has taken her empowering message of moving beyond gender expectations to live more authentically all over the country. Her insights have been featured on CNN, MSNBC, ABC, NPR, HLN, VH1, FOX NEWS LATINO, among other national TV and radio networks.

In 2013 Laverne won Best Supporting Actress at the Massachusetts Independent Film Festival for her work in the praised film Musical Chairs, directed by Susan Seidelman (Desperately Seeking Susan). Laverne’s other acting credits include Law and Order, Law and Order: SVU, HBO’s Bored to Death, and the independent films Carla and The Exhibitionists. She also has roles in the forthcoming films 36 Saints and Grand Street. Laverne is the first trans woman of color to produce and star in her own television show, VH1’s TRANSForm Me, which was nominated for a GLAAD Media Award. Laverne is also the first trans woman of color to appear on an American reality television program, VH1’s I Wanna Work for Diddy, for which she accepted the GLAAD Award for Outstanding Reality Program. Laverne was named one of Out Magazine’s “Out 100,” one of the country’s top 50 trans icons by The Huffington Post, and one of Metro Source magazine’s “55 People We Love.” Laverne’s critical writings have appeared in The Advocate and The Huffington Post. A graduate of Marymount Manhattan College, Laverne holds a degree in Fine Arts.

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Entertainment Cupid Ain’t @#$%! Friday 9:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

Cupid Ain’t @#$%!: An Anti-Valentine’s Day Poetry Movement has been entertaining fans for 7 seasons. An international tour started in Philly that has since reached NYC, DC, London, Oakland, Detroit, among a host of other cities. Founded by J Mase III and co-curated by the infamous Regie Cabico, it features the bitterest of poets talking about failed relationships, love, sex and Cupid that devil himself. Cupid Ain’t @#$% uses humor and a quick witted political edge to create an alternative to Valentine’s day that is funny, sad and just a wee bit arousing. Intentionally multi-racial, intergenerational and laugh out loud raucous, it’s a night everyone can get into. To find out more, check Cupid Ain’t @#$%! out on www.awQwardtalent.com and Facebook (www.facebook.com/CupidAintShhh).

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Entertainment Vagina Monologues Friday 9:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

Prairie Room North

F.L.A.M.E. presents n s t te n ers t s

The

VAGINA

monologues V-Day is a global activist movement to end violence against women and girls. V-Day is a catalyst that promotes creative events to increase awareness, raise money, and revitalize the spirit of existing antiviolence organizations. V-Day generates broader attention for the fight to stop violence against women and girls, including rape, battery, incest, female genital mutilation (FGM), and sex slavery. Through V-Day campaigns, local volunteers and college students produce annual benefit performances of The Vagina Monologues; A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant and A Prayer; to raise awareness and funds for anti-violence groups within their own communities. Each year, thousands of V-Day benefit events take place produced by volunteer activists in the U.S. and around the world, educating millions of people about the reality of violence against women and girls. (Vday.org)

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voices legend for workshops As an opportunity to spotlight unique perspectives and experiences within the LGBTQIA community, the MBLGTACC 2015 Planning Committee has decided to include various highlighted workshops into the schedule. Tying into the theme of our conference, these workshops are referred to as “Featured Voices.” These sessions will include presenters from various fields and social justice lenses who will share differing perspectives on advocacy work.

V O

ocalize The story of change begins the moment we rise up and speak to the occasion. This pillar highlights the importance of actively addressing the many social justice issues we face today.

rganize To achieve the change we seek, we must coordinate our efforts in a manner that is most effective. This pillar emphasizes the need to help others understand the world of power, injustice, and social issues around them.

I

dentity Our story of LGBTQIA existence and experience would be incomplete without the presence and expression of identity. This pillar focuses on the stories of a person’s conception and expression of their own selfidentity along with others’ individuality or group affiliations.

C

ommunity A key concept to writing the story of change is the people with whom we write the chapters. This pillar addresses how we can put forth action in change by building power with others, rather than over them.

E

mpowerment Through empowerment as individuals and as a community, we hold active roles in writing the story and the future of change. This pillar concentrates on the ability to achieve and recognize the responsibility of making choices and acting towards change.

S

ensibility As we rewrite what it means to be LGBTQIA for ourselves, we must also recognize, acknowledge and implement the paths that innovate positive change for everyone. This pillar targets the significance of being able to understand and empathize with others, helping us to fight for justice and not just ourselves.

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workshops schedule Schroeder Hall

Workshop Session #1

Workshop Session #2

Workshop Session #3

Room 103

Gay-Identified Men Navigating Eating Disorders

The Gay "BFF" Complex

LGBT History in the US Part I (1900-1945)

Room 104

Access and Inclusion: Our Needs as LGBT...

Room 106

Diversify Me!

Self-Care as Warfare

#YesMeansYes: An Exploration of Sexual...

Room 108

Bending Desire: Non-Binary Attraction and the Politics...

Spaces and Asterisks: Trans Language Politics and You

The Bible and Homosexulaity 101...

Room 112

Gender Identity: Past, Present and Future

A Crash Course in Gay American Sign Language

Forgotten Pieces: Defragmenting Queer...

Room 114

Pronouns! What They Are & Why They’re Important...

The Bible Does NOT Say That!...

Being Me in the Job Search

Room 115

Coming Out of the Locker Room

Queer Coding in Children’s Cartoons

The Pink Wedge: Art and Russia’s Anti-Gay...

Room 117

Ally Training for School Teachers

Two-Spirits: Sacred Intersection of Gender...

A Is Not For Allies: Aromanticism...

Room 130

Featured Voice Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington

Featured Voice Sam Brinton

Room 138

Advisor Featured Voice Dr. Susan Rankin

Room 201

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Student Rights: The Role of Free Speech in Campus...

Facilitated Discussion with Danny Mathews

The Real Face of STIs...

Lowering the Water Line

Room 204

The Consenting Asexual

The A-Team: Asexuality and Aromanticism 101

Sex Toys for Every Body: A Practical and Theoretical...

Room 206

Situating Gender in GenderInclusive Housing

No Old, "No Fat," "No Fems:" Your Preferences...

The Ravens, The Ellens, and Everything In Between

Room 207

Library Que(e)ries

Defining "Out" of the Box: Coming Out, Homelessness...

Multimedia Tools for Trans Education

Room 212

Sense and Sensibility: Traveling Abroad

Math Enthusiast/Bad-A** MC: Respectability Politics...

Are LGBT Ads For LGBT People?

Room 214

Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body, Exploring...

So You're Dating a Trans Person...

Make Up Your Mind: The Politics of Makeup

Room 215

Domestic Violence in Same Sex Relationships

Room 236

The Intersectionality of Radical Feminism...

They Stood for Us at Stonewall...

Brown Pride: Latinos overcoming LGBTQ issues

Room 238

TransVisible: Finding Visibility on Campus

You're Not My Daddy: Explorations of Kink...

Undocuqueer: Stories of Struggle and Success

Room 242

KEYS: Unlocking the Secrets to a Successful Student...

Fight Back!: Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault...

Victories that Matter: Getting Transgender Healthcare...

The Classroom Closet: Queer (Future & Current)...

Light colored workshops indicate advisor track sessions.


schedule cont. Schroeder Hall

Workshop Session #4

Workshop Session #5

Workshop Session #6

Room 103

LGBT History in the US Part II (1945-1960)

LGBT History in the US Part III (1960-1980)

LGBT History in the US Part IV (1980-2000/10)

Room 104

Queer Self Care

Room 106

Diversity: Your Universities’ Rhetorical Choices...

Group Formation and Facilitation for Student...

Navigating Consent and Creating Safe Space...

Room 108

Are you Queer Enough: Horizontal hostility...

Queering Loteria in Chican@ and Latin@ Culture

Assessing The New Generation of Families...

Room 112

The Body As Testimony: Aerial Storytelling...

Navigating Sexuality: Shifting Culture...

People of PrEP

Room 114

Creating & Maintaining a Successful Organization

Media and Cultural Effects on Queer Identity Creation

Queer Women in Tech: Overcoming the Rainbow...

Room 115

Moving Out Of The Gayborhood

So You Might Be Trans: A Guide to Exploring Your...

Why Are We What We Are?

Room 117

Gender Roles in Greek Life

The New (and Queer) Mestiza...

Room 130

Featured Voice J Mase III & Reggie

Room 138

Advisor Featured Voice Dr. Jamie Washington

Room 201

The Bible and Homosexuality...

Featured Voice Andrew Morrison-Gurza Featured Voice Kit Yan Even My Writing is Queer

A Guide to Discourse with Homophobes...

Room 204

You Can’t Shave In A Minimart Bathroom

Title IX and Campus Safety: Why You Should Care

Continue the Narrative: Developing an Alumni...

Room 206

Let’s Talk about Class

Challenge and Support: Trans+ Student...

No Queers Left Behind

Room 207

Healthcare Challenges among the LGBT Community

Board Games to Build Conversation on Abuse

Do you wanna work in Student Affairs?...

Room 212

I’m Gay, Therefore I am

Working with our Student Groups...

Community College Pride

Room 214

LGBT* Peer Educators: How to make a more inclusive...

Job Search Tips for LGBTQ Students

Breaking Tradition at a Christian College...

Room 236

Bridging the Gap Between Trans* and Feminist...

What Does an Inclusive Campus Mean to You?

Thank You for Being a Friend...

Room 238

Brown Boi Self Love

Room 242

Buidling CommuniT: A Discussion...

Room 215

The Unspoken History of the American Trans Man Educate for Equality: Educating your Campus...

Light colored workshops indicate advisor track sessions.

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session 1 Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

FEATURED VOICE Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington Schroeder Hall Room 130 Got Privilege?: What are you doing with it? Understanding the concept of privilege as it relates to social identities is becoming more and more common in social justice circles. However, while the language is familiar, there still is a need to develop the skills and capacity to engage dynamics of privilege and internalized dominance. This session will offer an opportunity for real engagement and skill building.

Gay-Identified Men Navigating Eating Access and Inclusion: Our Needs as Disorders Trigger Warning: Eating Disorder LGBT and Disabled Participants

Schroeder Hall Room 103 America sees great value in meeting or exceeding unrealistic expectations of what is considered aesthetically appealing. Consequently, there are less-than positive repercussions on one’s mental, physical, and emotional well-being because of what society deems as culturally appropriate for thinness or muscularity. This session will speak to gayidentified men navigating eating disorders and address what strategies graduate students and professionals can utilize to navigate the conversation with the aforementioned identity group. Presented by Wayne Glass - Iowa State University

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Prairie Room North, BSC Starting from the social model of disability and the joined history of discrimination on the basis of gender nonconformity, disability, race, and immigration status, this workshop will model practical aspects of accessibility and advocacy for trans needs and a range of disabilities, and explore mindsets helpful to the positive inclusion of multiply-marginalized people. Please refrain from wearing perfumes or scents to this workshop. Presented by Leslie Boker - Grand Valley State University


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Diversify Me!

Schroeder Hall Room 106 The LGBT community spans every race, religion, political affiliation, and country of origin. This presentation is about exploring the expression and meaning of self, how to identify and celebrate the unique subcultures within the LGBT umbrella and how embracing these subcultures is an important part of connecting to other members within the community as well as bridge the gap to groups outside of the community. From Gaymers to Voguers to Deaf Drag Shows and beyond. Presented by David Yip - Rochester Institute of Technology

Bending Desire: Non-Binary Attraction and the Politics of Partnering

Schroeder Hall Room 108 In a culture where “sexy” is defined through feats of male/masculine or female/feminine perfection, how do we recognize desire for people with all of these qualities or none of them? The increasingly diverse spectra of bodies, identities, and experiences make it difficult, if not impossible, to define sexual attraction through traditional concepts of sexuality. In this workshop, we will discuss desire within non-binary communities, the language of attraction, relationship dynamics, and how gender normalcy influences partnering. Presented by JAC Stringer - Heartland Trans Wellness Group

Pronouns! What They Are & Why They’re Important to Everyone (Not Just Trans+ Folk)

Schroeder Hall Room 114 An interactive presentation about preferred gender pronouns (PGP’s), followed by a discussion about how important PGP’s are in society and how the use of them affects everyone (mhm, even YOU!) not just transgender people.

Gender Identity: Past, Present and Future

Schroeder Hall Room 112 This presentation is looking into the early history of Gender Identity and the challenges individuals faced and the strides made in advancing Trans* Identity. It will also look at the present day issues and those successes with the community. Lastly, we will challenge the participants to think about the future of Gender Identity and what we can do to continue the advancement of acceptance for the community. Presented by Ashley Kachlik & Tommie Peckenpaugh - Illinois State University

Coming Out of the Locker room: Intersections of Athletics and the LGBT community

Schroeder Hall Room 115 This session will examine the history, the impact and the significance that sports and athletics has and continues to play in shaping and defining the LGBT community. Using a brief historical overview with examples of modern LGBT athletes, this discussion based session will give ways to make LGBT athletes more inclusive on campus and to better understand sport’s role in the LGBT community. Presented by Adam Guenther - Iowa State University

Ally Training for School Teachers

Schroeder Hall Room 117 This session is an ally training for school teachers to better understand the LGBTQIA+ student population and some of the struggles they face. Presented by Matthew Lonski - Youth Outlook & 360 Youth Services

Presented by Charles Burt - University of Missouri - Kansas City

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The Consenting Asexual Trigger Warning: Sex, Sexual Assault, Rape, Drugs, Alcohol

Schroeder Hall Room 204 Asexuals who desire to develop a close relationship with someone that may include physical or sexual interactions often form these relationships with nonasexual people, given the small asexual population. However, current conversations about sexual consent in popular culture often exclude asexuality and consent within these “mixed” relationships (asexual and non-asexual participants). Our discussion will focus on rethinking and reshaping consent language and dialogues to be inclusive of the asexual community. Presented by Jo Teut - University of Cincinnati

Situating Gender in Gender-Inclusive Housing

Schroeder Hall Room 206 This session explores the demand for gender multiplicities in the construction and development of gender-inclusive housing programs in collegiate housing. We will explore the extent existing policies conflict in the accommodation of transgenderidentified students in existing LGBT housing. Presented by Chase Ledin - Ohio State University

Sense and Sensibility: Traveling Abroad

Schroeder Hall Room 212 Campuses across North America are encouraging and enabling students to travel abroad, whether for three weeks or a semester. Study – and working – abroad is no longer limited to cities like Amsterdam or London. Students travel to communities, small and large, in countries such as Cambodia, Ecuador, Morocco, and Rwanda, to name a few. This workshop addresses how LGBT individuals can best prepare themselves to travel abroad and get the most out of their experience while remaining safe and healthy. Presented by M Sheridan Embser-Herbert - Hamline University

Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body, Exploring Your Identity

Schroeder Hall Room 214 Exploring Body Positivity and the intersection of queer and fat identities, this workshop will discuss the history of the fat acceptance movement, fatphobia, and fat queerness. We will discuss loving ourselves and our fat queer bodies regardless of what mainstream culture defines as “normal” and “healthy”. Everyone is welcome to attend, however, this workshop will be centered on fat-identified members of the community. Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan - Northern Michigan University

Library Que(e)ries

Schroeder Hall Room 207 This session examines libraries and archives as opportunities to promote a more just society for all individuals, including queer-identified people. We will explore multiple areas of library practice: the collecting and preservation of queer history through archives; readers’ advisory for queer people of color (and ensuring such works are available); teaching media literacy; finding and accessing government information. Presented by Taylor Parks - University of Illinois

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The Intersectionality of Radical Feminism and Gender Movement

Schroeder Hall Room 236 “RadFem” has become a dirty word in the gender movement. However, Radical Feminism has a deep history that has a lot of intersectionality with the gender movement. Come and learn about what radical feminism really is and how we can use their history to further work in gender activism. Presented by Marina Frestedt-Latourelle - Concordia College


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Domestic Violence in Same Sex Relationships

Schroeder Hall Room 215 Domestic violence is a serious issue that affects many couples. Oftentimes, resources needed by victims in same-sex relationships are limited and in some cases aren’t recognized by some laws, government and community officials. Although there are many types of abuse under the umbrella of domestic violence, it’s important to realize that this issue must be addressed by individuals as well as by prominent community leaders. This session will give you an opportunity to learn about domestic violence warning signs, characteristics of violence in same-sex relationships, available resources, and what you can do to help victims to get out of unhealthy relationships. Presented by Quanisha Kumi-Darfour & Amy Fitzjarrald - Illinois State University

TransVisible: Finding Visibility on Campus

Schroeder Hall Room 238 Wondering how to find visibility on your campus for the trans community? Find out how to get started with this workshop that will take you through the steps of planning and hosting a kick-ass event geared specifically toward visibility for the trans community. Discuss exactly why these events are important for the trans community and learn what resources are available for you, as leaders, to make these events as successful as they can be. Presented by Kristopher Luce & Alex Lange - Michigan State University

KEYS: Unlocking the Secrets to a Successful Student Run LGBTQIA Organization

Welcome to Illinois State University! Schroeder Hall Room 242 Enjoy dining with us at any of these locations during your visit: *McAlister’s Deli *Pizza Hut Express *Burger King *Einstein Bros Bagels

Is your LGBTQIA organization struggling? Leveling out? Attendance Dropping? Executive Board Getting Feisty? This workshop session will give you a variety of “keys” to becoming and maintaining a successful student organization. These keys will allow you to unlock the hidden potential within your organization, your executive board and yourself in order to create lasting and impactful change within your campus communities. Presented by Beric Wessely - University of St. Francis

See menus and hours at: Dining.IllinoisState.edu Dining.IllinoisState.edu/facebook Dining@ILState

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session 2 Saturday 9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

FEATURED VOICE Sam Brinton Schroeder Hall Room 130 You Can’t Change What We Never Chose: Ending the Abuse of Conversion Therapy Since the passage of S. 1172 in California followed by similar bills in New Jersey and most recently Washington DC, the legislative possibility of ending the abusive practice of conversion therapy has taken great and powerful strides. This session will begin with the history of the abuse of conversion therapy followed by the efforts to ban sexual orientation change efforts that is currently taking place in over 15 states. The leader of this session will also share their experiences in conversion therapy to demonstrate the need for the abuse to end and the successes of the battles already won. If you want to end conversion therapy in your state - come to this session and help end the abuse.

The Gay “BFF” Complex

Schroeder Hall Room 103 “My best friend is gay, so I know what it’s like to be gay.” “Do you like Robyn?!” These phrases, among others, are items that have come out of individuals’ mouths, when referring to friends that happen to identify as male-bodied and gay. What are some issues with these words? How did they come to fruition? Each of these questions will be answered, among others as we navigate the gay “best-friend-forever” (“BFF”) complex. Presented by Wayne Glass - Iowa State University

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Self-Care as Warfare

Schroeder Hall Room 106 Come learn why treating yourself with love and respect is an act of revolution. How can people whose very bodies are sites of political warfare protect their emotional well-being on a daily basis? To some, the answer is self-care - attempting to thrive when you haven’t been given the tools to survive. In this workshop, we’ll start with a discussion on the importance of self-care and end with creating practical, personalized self-care plans. Presented by Jessica Draws - University of Wisconsin - Madison


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Spaces and Asterisks: Trans Language Politics and You

Schroeder Hall Room 108 As the trans(*) community gains recognition, the language used to discuss trans issues and identities is changing, growing, and getting really complicated. As the trans community diversifies, language politics have become an increasingly hot button issue. This workshop will discuss the role language plays in the trans community, the impact of social media and cultural visibility on community language, norms, and expectations, and how we can use language to build inclusive communities that actively combat oppression. Presented by JAC Stringer - Heartland Trans Wellness Group

A Crash Course in Gay American Sign Language

Schroeder Hall Room 112 Come learn LGBTQ-related signs and about the fascinating intersection of Deaf and Queer cultures from a Deaf, transgender drag queen! No prior knowledge of sign language is necessary. Presented by Hayden Kristal - University of Missouri - Columbia

Queer Coding in Children’s Cartoons Trigger Warning: Homophobia

Schroeder Hall Room 115 What does it mean to LGBTQ people when the villains in our favorite cartoons and movies are implicitly coded as queer? This workshop will entail a brief presentation of popular queer-coded villains and the tropes they embody, with a following open discussion about how these characters shape our identities and, possibly, dis/empower us. Presented by Halee Kirkwood

Two-Spirits: Sacred Intersection of Gender Roles & Identities

Schroeder Hall Room 117 In this session, we will trace the historic roots of the beliefs and identities that led to the adoption of the term “Two-Spirit.” Next, we will shed light on some of the commonly mysterious or misunderstood aspects of this non-binary identity. We will explore how fluid gender roles and gender identities are/were sometimes held in sacred regard in tribal community settings. Presented by Kat Werchouski & Heather Rickerl - Northland College

The Bible Does NOT Say That! Empowered to Respond to Religious Homophobia

The Real Face of STIs: Preparing for New Conversation on STIs and Social Stigma

Schroeder Hall Room 114

Trigger Warning: Rape

Scholars have known for at least a generation that, as Daniel Helminiak says, “taken on its own terms and in its own time, the Bible nowhere condemns homosexuality as we know it today.” So how can we make this the new normal? This workshop will empower participants’ responses to religious homophobia with enough knowledge to be active change agents, writing a new narrative of religion and gay, lesbian, trans*, bisexual, and queer people. Presented by Caryn Riswold - Illinois College

Schroeder Hall Room 201 Myth, misinformation, and social stigma surround STIs and those who have them. Though STIs are often taught as a scare tactic, this sex positive session aims to provide information on transmission, testing, and partner notification in order to reduce the stigma of contraction and to create a new conversation on living or dating someone with a sexually transmitted infection. Presented by Nicholas Weldon

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The A-Team: Asexuality and Aromanticism 101 Trigger Warning: Rape, Racism and Ableism

Schroeder Hall Room 204 What is asexuality? What is aromanticism? How is any of this possible!? Well, we have answers for you! Brought to you by a lovely ace/aro couple; this workshop will give an intersectional, in-depth look at asexuality and aromanticism. We encourage other aros and aces to join the discussion and share experiences! Presented by Stormy O’Brink & Xavia Publius - University of Northern Iowa

“No Old,” “No Fat,” “No Fems:” Your Preferences are Problematic

Schroeder Hall Room 206 Queer men often use personal preference to explain their romantic and sexual attractions to specific qualities in other men. This presentation will examine how those preferences are shaped by cultural standards of traditional masculinity and male beauty. Using the work of queer theorists and radical queer activists, this presentation will explore how our preferences are harmful to others and limiting for ourselves. Finally, this presentation will offer queer alternatives to attraction based on physical appearance. Presented by Kyle Shupe - University of Cincinnati

Defining “Out” of the Box: Coming Out, Homelessness, and LGBT Youth

Math Enthusiast/Bad-A** MC: Respectability Politics in the LGBTQIA Community

Schroeder Hall Room 212 During this session, participants will discuss respectability politics, the idea that those with marginalized identities should conform to the morals of the majority in order to be seen as a respected member of society. Participants will also discuss the intersectionality of professionalism with “nonrespectable” jobs, interests, and hobbies. How can we integrate our professional personalities with things such as performing as a drag king or queen, twerking, sex work, or body modification? Is it possible? Presented by Kayla Tyson - Lincoln College - Normal

So You’re Dating a Trans Person: A Guided Discussion

Schroeder Hall Room 214 This is a discussion centered on the experience of being a partner to a trans identified person. Discussion will involve being supportive when your partner shares their trans identity, navigating the changes involved with your partner’s chosen transition goals, and building support systems with other partners. The workshop will also provide a venue for partners to share their unique experiences with the group. Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan - Northern Michigan University

They Stood for Us at Stonewall, Now It’s Our Turn: Advocating for the Aging LGBTQ Community

Schroeder Hall Room 236 Schroeder Hall Room 207 What factors go into a person deciding to “come out?” Could it possibly be that people who identify as LGBT* but do not “come out” are just as brave as those individuals who “come out” to their family as well as their community? In this session we will discuss the answers to these questions as well as dive into what it means to be “out” in this community.

Those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it. What do you know about LGBTQ history? What issues are those who built that history, the aging members of our community, facing today? And who is working to change that? Join us for a brief overview of the history of our community, learn more about issues our aging community is facing, and develop ways to resolve them before we are facing them ourselves.

Presented by Katrine Weismantle - Michigan State University

Presented by Robert Waara

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You’re Not My Daddy: Explorations of Kink, BDSM, and Leather Community into the 21st Century

Schroeder Hall Room 238 Where, oh where have the leather bars gone? In this workshop, we will trace the significance of the BDSM/kink community and social space through queer history, and discuss the ways in which it has transformed or adapted for the millennial generation. We will then develop an understanding of the role of community in our own sexual practice and/or lifestyle. Attendees need not identify as kinky, but should have a basic understanding of BDSM practice and community. Presented by Scott Olson - Stonewall Resource Center

Fight Back!: Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault have no Gender Trigger Warning: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Rape

Schroeder Hall Room 242 Often times, men and individuals who identify within the queer community are left out of the media attention spotlight and discussions about domestic violence and sexual assault. Through an interactive presentation format participants will be able to gain an in-depth look at how these issues are not just exclusive to one gender. Fight back and learn how YOU can be the voice for someone who may have lost their own. Be the Change for all. Presented by Beric Wessely - University of St. Francis

Be who you are at Bloch. Be bold. Be inspired. Be encouraged. The Department of Public Affairs in the UMKC Henry W. Bloch School of Management shapes future leaders who aspire to make a difference. Let the Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) program, whose nonprofit management emphasis was named No. 15 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, propel your goals of working in the nonprofit, government or public sector. For more information on the Bloch School’s M.P.A. program, visit bloch.umkc.edu/MPA.

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Keynote identity panel Saturday 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

Dave Bentlin serves as assistant to the President at Illinois State University. He has been on staff in various positions at the university since 1984. He is among several alums who recently organized the ISU LGBTQA Alumni Network, the University’s official LGBTQ alumni affinity group. Bentlin is also on the board of the Prairie Pride Coalition, Bloomington-Normal’s LGBTQA human rights and community organization. He holds bachelor’s degrees in History and Mass Communication Journalism, both from ISU.

Robyn Ochs is an educator, speaker, award-winning activist, and editor of the Bi

Women Quarterly, the 42-country anthology, Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and the new anthology RECOGNIZE: The Voices of Bisexual Men. Her writings have been published in numerous bi, women’s studies, multicultural, and LGBT anthologies and she has taught university courses in gender and sexuality studies. An advocate for the rights of people of ALL orientations and genders to live safely, openly and with full equality, Robyn’s work focuses on increasing awareness and understanding of complex identities, and mobilizing people to be powerful allies to one another within and across identities and social movements.

J Mase III is a black/trans/queer poet and educator currently based in NYC. He is an

advocate of queering scripture, fierce scars and can often be found blogging for the Huffington Post, spitting poems around the world and running the first ever talent agency focused on trans & queer performers of color (www.awQwardtalent.com). To find out what J Mase is up to, track him on his website (www.jmaseiii.com), follow him on twitter @jmaseiii or like him on Facebook!

Andrew Morrison-Gurza is a Disability Awareness Consultant whose passion is “making disability accessible to everyone.” In his work, he highlights the lived experience of Persons with Disabilities to show that disability is a universal experience we can all embrace. Within the LGBTQ+ community, Andrew works to deconstruct our homo-normative, body beautiful ideals and show that Queers with Disabilities deserve representation. His goal is to welcome everyone into the conversation of disability. His written work has been highlighted in The Advocate, Huffington Post and The Good Men Project to name a few. He has been invited to present at a number of different universities and conferences, including the first workshop on Disability and Queerness for World Pride 2014 in Toronto. Andrew was the subject of a short film, “Bedding Andrew” which screened at Reeling Film Festival in Chicago last year. He has also been featured on MTVs, “1 Girl, 5 Gays” representing Queers with Disabilities for the very first time. He works to ensure that disability is accessible to everyone in the LGBTQ+ community. To find out more, and book Andrew for opportunities to make disability accessible to you, please visit: www.andrewmorrisongurza.com

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exhibitor fair Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Circus Room

in Bone Student Center

Visit the following vendors during our Exhibitor Fair. You can check out these great organizations during breaks or workshops!

MBLGTACC 2016 - Purdue University Bloomington-Normal Not in Our Town Campus Pride Delta Lambda Phi Social Fraternity Epic Foundation for Individual Rights in Education Human Rights Campaign Illinois Safe Schools Alliance Illinois State University - Office of Admissions Nielsen Northrop Grumman OUTMedia PFLAG Northern Illinois Council Program in Public Health at Michigan State University Western Michigan University - Office of Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Student Services

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Brown Bag Identity ForumS Saturday 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. Identity caucuses are safe spaces for people of a particular identity group. They are for marginalized, small and invisible groups within the LGBTQIA community to come together to discuss issues of importance or concern and to support one another. Please welcome everyone in attendance at any of these caucuses. To nurture inclusive and educational environments, the identity caucuses are open to anyone and everyone.

Ally

Middle Sexualities

Schroeder Hall Room 117 Facilitator: Brittney Henson, Graduate Assistant in

Schroeder Hall Room 114 Facilitator: Robyn Ochs, Featured Voice

Diversity Advocacy, Illinois State University

Asexuality

Queer

Schroeder Hall Room 103 Facilitator: Jo Teut, Graduate Student in Women’s,

Schroeder Hall Room 201 Facilitators: Stephen Ramberg and Karly Enger,

Gender, and Sexualities, University of Cincinnati

students at Illinois State University

Disability Schroeder Hall Room 115 Facilitator: Hayden Kristal, student at University of Missouri

Queer People of Color Schroeder Hall Room 104 Facilitator: J Mase III, Featured Voice

Gay Schroeder Hall Room 112 Facilitator: Danny Mathews, Specialist in Diversity Advocacy, Illinois State University

Lesbian Schroeder Hall Room 108 Facilitator: Barb Dallinger, Associate Director of the Bone Student Center, Illinois State University

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Transgender Schroeder Hall Room 106 Facilitator: AP Prescott, Case Manager in University Housing Services, Illinois State University


State Caucuses and oversight committee Saturday 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. The purpose of the state caucuses is to accomplish three things: - To elect 2 state representatives to the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee - Give feedback on the 2015 conference - Network with other attendees from your state

The Oversight Committee:

MBLGTACC is a student-organized conference and is primarily organized by students at the host school. The Oversight Committee is the managing entity of MBLGTACC. It exists to select the hosts of future conferences, maintain an archive of previous conference records and control the official conference name. The OC comprises 2 representatives from the current (2015) and future (2016) conferences and 2 elected delegates from each Midwestern state. As stated in the OC’s constitution, the Midwest is comprised of 13 states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The conference can be hosted only by a Midwestern college.

Running the State Caucus Meeting (20 minutes)

Please begin your meeting by identifying the 1-2 current representatives for your state, which were elected at last year’s conference. Those representatives should facilitate the state caucus meeting and the election of new state representatives. If neither are present, select someone to facilitate your state’s meeting and to take minutes of the meeting and keep track of time. It may be easier if these are two separate people, but one person may do both. Begin by reading the oversight committee section above and ask if anyone would like to nominate someone or self-nominate for the 2 state representative positions on the OC. Once there are a number of nominations, have each person introduce themselves by name, school and reason that they would like to be part of the OC and would be a good representative. Have students vote for 2 candidates by raising their hands (or by voice if they are unable to do so). Tally the votes; the 2 candidates with the largest number of votes will be the new representatives. Please note that those elected during the 2015 conference will be subscribing to a full

year commitment.

Feedback About MBLGTACC 2015 (20 minutes) Discuss how the 2015 conference has been so far, including aspects that you like, dislike and/or would like to see in the future. (State representatives will bring this feedback to the OC.) Please refrain from repeating observations that have already been stated. The person keeping the minutes should record this feedback and remind attendees when there is 10, 5 and 0 minutes remaining. The facilitator should keep the discussion on track. We greatly appreciate all of your observations, comments and constructive criticism — we want the conference to keep improving! Please email the meeting minutes to us at mblgtacc2015@ilstu.edu. Please note which state the minutes are from in the subject line and within the body of the document. Thank you so much for your help!

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State Networking (20-30 minutes) If there are state-related issues or current campus issues that you wish to discuss, this is your time to do so! Feel free to discuss these topics in any order and in any way (going around the room, raising hands, pairing delegations together, or creating small discussion groups with one person from each school). Suggested topics include: - Talking about current issues happening in your state - Discussing issues/initiatives at your school and getting feedback from others - Sharing best practices for organizing groups or initiatives - Building statewide coalitions - Planning field trips to other schools

Oversight Committee Meeting: What to Expect So you were just elected to be a state representative. Now what? Up to 4 representatives from your state (2 elected at last year’s conference and 2 who were just elected) will attend the OC meeting following the state caucus meetings. We will go through the meeting agenda, which includes receiving feedback about this year’s conference; listening to presentation(s) from school(s) that are bidding to host MBLGTACC 2017 and making a selection; and discussing other topics related to the longevity of the conference. We look forward to meeting you! The oversight committee meeting will take place in the Student Services Building Room 375 from 3:45 - 8:00 p.m. Dinner will be provided.

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session 3 Saturday 3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Featured Voice Robyn Ochs Brown Ballroom, Bone Student Center Beyond Binaries: Identity and Sexuality This program explores the landscape of sexuality, and how we “map” sexual orientation. No two people are alike. Given that, how do we assign labels to our complicated and unique experiences? In this interactive workshop we will conduct an anonymous survey of those present, and look together at the data. Where do we fall on the sexuality continuum? How do we label? How old were we when we came to our identities and to our sexualities? In this fun and interactive program we explore different experiences of identity; the interplay between gender identity and sexuality; the complexities of attraction, and more.

LGBT History in the US Part I (19001945)

Schroeder Hall Room 103 This is an overview discussion of the history of the LGBT community in the United States during the 20th century. This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines and open discussion of important events to understand the history of the community. Presented by Dale Larson - University of Wisconsin - Platteville

Student Rights: The Role of Free Speech in Campus Progress

Schroeder Hall Room 104 Every major civil rights movement has relied on one fundamental principle to spread its message: freedom of speech. That principle is especially important on campus, where students find and learn to use their own voices. Unfortunately, many LGBT students have found their voices stifled by administrators. We’re here to help—come learn about your right to speak up and out on campus, and how to stand up for speech. Presented by Ari Cohn - Foundation for Individual Rights in Education

#YesMeansYes: An Exploration of Sexual Assault and LGBT College Students Trigger Warning: Sexual Assault, Rape

Schroeder Hall Room 106 Focus on sexual harassment and assault at college campuses have been on women, as studies have demonstrated one in four women are victims of sexual assault during their college experience. Several campus climate surveys have demonstrated that LGBT students yield a higher percentage of the population being sexually harassed and assaulted than women. This workshop will explore this data to help demonstrate methods of education and advocacy within higher education institutions that helps define consent. Presented by Tyler Bradley - Saginaw Valley State University

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The Bible and Homosexuality 101; “The Clobber Passages”

Schroeder Hall Room 108 Explore the Biblical texts used to condemn homosexuality with the historical-critical approach. Learn about the cultural contexts for the ‘holiness code’ in Leviticus and the lists of evil-doers in 1 Corinthians and 1 Timothy. Discover the real sin of Sodom and Gomorrah and what Paul meant by ‘unnatural relations’ in Romans. This workshop provides resources for many purposes, from participating in the ongoing debate with Christian fundamentalists to reconciling one’s own spiritual upbringing and journey. Presented by Gail Simonds - Weathervane Ministries

Forgotten Pieces: Defragmenting Queer Identities

Schroeder Hall Room 112 Queer identity has had a long history filled with a diversity of leaders and role models. Unfortunately, the representation of the queer community has almost exclusively focused on the sexualized, flamboyant, feminine, skinny gay male caricature. This workshop focuses on placing queer identities in the context of all identities, with focus on race. The goal of the workshop is to tackle the unconscious misconceptions and biases that arise from the skinny gay male caricature and explore avenues to increase selfawareness, self-respect, and self-confidence among all members of the diverse queer population by creating brave spaces. Presented by Jordan Victorian & Abhishek Saxena - Washington University in St. Louis

Being Me in the Job Search

Schroeder Hall Room 114 This session will help you learn how to find welcoming employers, weigh the pros & cons of being out in the work place & search process, and give you tips for how to handle the interview process. We will also send you with some helpful resources. Don’t miss this session! Presented by Heather Rickerl & Kat Werchouski - Northland College

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The Pink Wedge: Art and Russia’s Anti-Gay Propaganda Law Trigger Warning: Homophobia, Transphobia, Queerphobia

Schroeder Hall Room 115 While much of the discussion concerning Russia’s Anti-Gay Propaganda Law has focused on the effects of activism, there has been a growing concern of what this contentious piece of legislation means for Russia’s gay visual culture. Works of art, magazines, and film that express positive or neutral positions on homosexuality are seen as politically aggressive toward the new, post-Communist Russian identity. This workshop aims to understand these works in a gay Russian sensibility. Presented by Arik Gottleber - Saginaw Valley State University

A Is Not For Allies: Aromanticism and Asexuality 101

Schroeder Hall Room 117 What’s that “A” doing on our acronym? We will highlight the meaning, importance, and erasure of this little letter. This workshop will introduce asexual and aromantic spectrum identities, how a-spectrum individuals fit into queer culture, and the needs of our community. Presented by Katie Heveran & Ashley Palardy - Michigan State University

Lowering the Water Line

Schroeder Hall Room 201 From the day we are born, society pressures us to live a certain lifestyle, to act a certain way, and to be a certain person. We live every day of our lives hiding parts of us that we do not want our friends, families, and acquaintances to see. What does this do to our self image? This workshop will work to break down these barriers and lower our water lines, revealing who we truly are. Presented by Stuart Schmidt - Northland College


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Sex Toys for Every Body: A Practical and Theoretical Guide to Safe Exploration

Schroeder Hall Room 204 The wide world of sex toys can feel overwhelming, and in this unregulated industry, information on safety and materials can also be hard to find. Pulling from my background as a pornography and sexualities scholar and my work as a sex educator, I intend to teach you through a positive and nonjudgemental lens how to identify the right sex toys for yourself and how to go about using them safely. This is a gender and body inclusive space, and the information given attends to bodies of all shapes and sizes. This session is for anyone who’s interested in starting to use sex toys and applicable to those who have been using them for a long time. Presented by Sarah Stevens

The Ravens, The Ellens, and Everything In Between

Schroeder Hall Room 206 Do your organization’s programs go right over the heads of new members? Do they cater to the newbies and bore the members who have been there, done that? Join us for a discussion of the different stages of LGBT identity development and how your organization can create programs that are fun and educational for members at all stages. Presented by Shakivla Todd - Michigan State University

Multimedia Tools for Trans Education

Schroeder Hall Room 207 Experience firsthand how you can harness the power of personal stories to create intersectional dialogues via interactive activities, videos, and discussions in your community. Join us as we go beyond Trans 101 to discuss and act out the nuanced ways in which trans people experience health care in this workshop from I Live for Trans Education, our new grassroots multimedia curriculum. Presented by Melvin Whitehead & Andre Perez - Trans Oral History Project

Are LGBT Ads For LGBT People?

Schroeder Hall Room 212 Many advertisers have tried different approaches for advertising to the LGBTQIA+ community. Some resonate and some don’t. Ads featuring lesbian and gay people often portray a gay stereotype that is “comfortable” for straight consumer to see. Together we will discuss what has been done, what works, what doesn’t, and how we would like to see advertising to the LGBT community evolve. Presented by Rachel Willson - South Dakota State University

Make Up Your Mind: The Politics of Makeup

Schroeder Hall Room 214 Our society has a complicated stance on makeup: “Wear it.” “Don’t wear it.” “Don’t let me know that you’re wearing it.” For queer people specifically, makeup can be a tool used to show the world your identity and the rejection of makeup can be a declaration of breaking societal norms. Whether you’ve never worn makeup, or it’s part of your daily routine, makeup is a force in our society. Let’s dig in and talk about makeup as a tool of personal expression, a cultural influence, and a political statement. Presented by Stefani Vargas Harlan & Betsy Lehman - Northern Michigan University

The Classroom Closet: Queer (Future and Current) Educators

Schroeder Hall Room 215 Attention queer future K-12 teachers! This workshop is an opportunity to openly discuss experiences of being queer and in the education field. Topics that will be discussed include: being out in education, being in the closet in education, microaggressions experienced in education programs, and helpful resources for queer educators. Current and past queer educators are welcome as well for insight and advice. Presented by Sean VanAcken & Alyssa Reetz - University of Wisconsin - Whitewater

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Brown Pride: Latinos overcoming LGBTQ issues

Schroeder Hall Room 236 Latinos who identify within the LGBTQ+ spectrum often face hardships within their culture about their sexuality. The Latino culture often imposes a threat on ones individuality- something that can be painful and difficult to have in one’s life. Latinos often have to live up to standards that have been imposed to them from generation to generation. Presented by Leslie Delgado - Southern Illinois University

Undocuqueer: Stories of Struggle and Success

Victories that Matter: Getting Transgender Healthcare on Your Campus

Schroeder Hall Room 242 This workshop will help attendees become familiar with the skills and strategies necessary to obtain trans+ healthcare coverage on their college campuses. Attendees will learn to use their existing skills to create and maintain a campaign to obtain coverage for their campus by utilizing institutional and studentbased initiatives as well as pertinent federal legislation. Attendees will gain practical, tried-and-tested methods of obtaining inclusive healthcare for their campuses. Presented by Stephanie Skora - University of Illinois

Schroeder Hall Room 238 This workshop, facilitated by an undocuqueer student, is an introduction to the lives of undocumented and queer individuals in the United States. This is a two-part session which includes an informational presentation and discussion. Participants will be able to share their personal experiences and knowledge about the undocuqueer community, as well as develop an action plan to bring back to their institutions.

WELCOME TO NORMAL The Prairie Pride Coalition is a McLean County, Illinois not-for-profit organization dedicated to equality for gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender people (the GLBT community).

Presented by Laura Munoz and Princess Clemente - Student Speakers, LLC.

Facebook.com/PrairiePrideCoalition

COMING OUT  SURVEY     What  were  your  experiences  in  coming  out?  Researchers  in  the  Illinois  State   University  Psychology  Department  are  conducting  a  survey  to  better  understand  the   experiences  of  students  with  an  LGBTQlA  identity  and  the  process  of  sharing  this   identity  with  others.  Please  help  us  by  completing  this  short  online  survey:     https://survey.lilt.ilstu.edu/TakeSurvey.aspx?SurveyID=88538pm2        

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session 4 Saturday 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Featured Voice J Mase III and Regie Cabico Schroeder Hall Room 130 Even My Poems are Revolutionary Performance poetry is a powerful vehicle for social justice. In just a few minutes time, a poet has the power to educate their audience on a new topic, make them sympathize with another’s struggle and/or give them an opportunity to laugh as part of a communal experience. This workshop will serve as a platform for participants to focus on creating one or more works that will speak to the movements they wish to build. Using movement, voice and writing exercises, workshop members will be given space to create performance poetry with a social justice framework.

LGBT History in the US Part II (1945-1960)

Queer Self Care

Schroeder Hall Room 104

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Queer folks face an incredible amount of stress in their daily lives; from the stress that comes from living out, This will be an overview discussion of the history of the to intersectional minority stress, to life as an activist and beyond. Often times it leads us to burn out or LGBT community in the United States during the 20th worse and it isn’t until that point that we realize we century. This presentation will use documentary clips, needed more time for ourselves. This workshop will historical timelines and open discussion of important discuss LGBTQ stress, will identify self care strategies events to understand the history of the community. and will provide participants the tools they need to find balance in their daily lives. Presented by Dale Larson - University of Wisconsin - Platteville

Presented by Anthony Doubek

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Diversity: Your Universities’ Rhetorical Choices in Inclusion

Schroeder Hall Room 106 One university promotes a diversity statement that is constrained to racial and ethnic communities. When an outsider is looking in through windows of the digital world, it’s important that the rhetorical choices behind these statements enable inclusion. This workshop will focus on the importance of inclusion in public documentation within student organizations and administration, as well as the rhetorical choices that create a more inclusive environment. Presented by Tyler Bradley - Saginaw Valley State University

Are you Queer Enough: Horizontal Hostility and Policing in the Queer Community

Schroeder Hall Room 108 Within the queer community, policing each other’s expression of identity can intensify internalized oppression and act as a barrier to solidarity. This interactive workshop intends to critically discuss markers of queerness and the navigation of expectations associated with identity categories. As a culture that has had to rely on signifiers, individual expression of queerness can be policed into invisibility or hyper visibility. Presented by Lindsay Greyerbieh & Tawny Gilley - Grinell College and Amy Flores - Stonewall Resource Center

Creating & Maintaining a Successful LGBT2QAI+ Student Organization

Schroeder Hall Room 114 In this session, we will give you a chance to write down and discuss what hasn’t worked, what has worked, and brainstorm new ideas for your organization. We will provide suggestions on leadership structure, meeting structure, event and program development, outreach strategies, and dealing with the “hard stuff”. Presented by Heather Rickerl & Kat Werchouski - Northland College

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The Body As Testimony: Aerial Storytelling and Dancing for Advocacy

Schroeder Hall Room 112 This session will look at the Midwest Burlesque/Aerial Dance community and will focus on the St. Louis Acrobatic Pole Dancing Extravaganza presented by Michelle Mynx Academy, an event that has featured students and performers of all skill levels, body types, gender expressions, sexual identities and adult ages for the past seven years and annually has raised thousands of dollars for the Sexual Assault Victim’s Unit of Call For Help in St. Louis, Missouri. Presented by Jhani Miller - University of Illinois

Moving Out Of The Gayborhood

Schroeder Hall Room 115 Gay neighborhoods have historically provided a safe space and sense of community. But today, as LGBT identified people find more acceptance in general society and the internet provides an alternative to physical spaces, gayborhoods are aren’t attaching as many LGBT individuals as they once were. Join us as we explore the trends happening in LGBT America today and discuss what these shifts mean for the community at large. Presented by Daniel Olsen - DePaul University

Gender Roles in Greek Life

Schroeder Hall Room 117 Based on data collected at BGSU Greek Life and gender roles, this workshop explores these results in a dialogue as way to talk about how to make Greek chapters and Greek Life more inclusive of trans* and gender non-conforming individuals. Presented by Jeffrey Devereaux - Delta Lambda Phi Social Fraternity Inc.


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You Can’t Shave In A Minimart Bathroom

Schroeder Hall Room 204 Coming out as Trans* can be tough. It’s even harder when you are a public high school science teacher! “Minimart” is my journey in coming out, finding my voice. And, no, you can’t shave in a minimart bathroom - the soap isn’t slippery enough. Presented by Shauna O’Toole - Greater Rochester Consortium

Let’s Talk about Class

Schroeder Hall Room 206 This workshop will facilitate a discussion on the dynamics of racial and class privilege within the queer community. Looking at current movements and struggles throughout the U.S. as examples, participants will learn the importance of creating racially and economically inclusive movements. Discussion and exercises will focus on recognizing intersections and subjectivities in order to strengthen solidarity and bring a racial and economic justice lens to our activism and the safe spaces we provide. Presented by Padraic Stanley - Loyola University Chicago

Healthcare Challenges among the LGBT Community

Schroeder Hall Room 207 Let’s talk about the disparities and inequities that the LGBT community faces when seeking healthcare! We will touch base on the healthcare challenges that those in the LGBT community have to tackle in order to obtain something everyone is entitled to: judgment-free healthcare. Possible solutions and steps to take to improve these problems as patients and healthcare professionals will also be discussed.

I’m Gay, Therefore I Am

Schroeder Hall Room 212 While participating in discussions about the arguments surrounding the ethics of homosexuality, we, as members of the LGBTQIA+ community and allies, are often put on the defending end and don’t truly get the opportunity to evaluate our arguments from a non-defensive standpoint. This workshop will allow for a safe environment to learn about and discuss arguments made for and against the ethical nature of homosexuality by ancient and modern philosophers as well as our own. Presented by Rachel Willson - South Dakota State University

LGBT* Peer Educators: How to make a more inclusive campus through student to student teaching

Schroeder Hall Room 214 This session looks at the newly developed program at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater called the LGBT* Peer Educator program. Staff working in LGBT* Centers are urged to come to learn about peers teaching peers in courses/events throughout the university about LGBT* issues through a formalized program. The session looks at what the program is, benefits of the program, how students & staff have responded to this program and implementation of this program on a campus. Presented by Sean Van Aacken & David Kroeze University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Presented by Michaela Seiber - University of South Dakota

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Bridging the Gap Between Trans* and Feminist Theories of Gender Identity Development

Schroeder Hall Room 236 Where does gender identity come from? Is it just a social construct, with strictly outlined and enforced boxes created within a certain cultural context, or are we “born this way?” This workshop aims to show that this is a false dilemma - that in order to have a fuller understanding of gender identity, it is necessary to understand both of these theories, as they are essentially two sides of the same coin.

Celebrate Who You Are On AND Off Campus Find & Add Gay-Friendly

Businesses & Events Near Your Campus Today!

Presented by Ashton Niedzwiecki - Wayne State University

Brown Boi Self Love

Schroeder Hall Room 238 “Caring for myself is not self indulgence, it is self preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” - Audre Lorde. Join an open space conversation on self-care, relationships, and healthy masculinity. This is an audience-directed discussion where we will share tools for self-care through the lens of race, gender, and sexuality. This session is specifically for students of color across genders and sexuality (multiracial and adoptee inclusive).

GayborhoodApp.com | Follow Us Registration is Now Open!!

Presented by T.J. Jourian - Brown Boi Project

For more information contact

Building CommuniT: A Discussion on How We Name Ourselves

Jason Jackson: jacks973@umn.edu Xay Yang: yangx957@umn.edu

Schroeder Hall Room 242 This workshop will provide attendees the opportunity to engage in a large-scale discussion of the internal politics of gender minority communities. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of the internal politics of gender minority communities, and the tools to hold discussions, both large and small, of their own. Discussion will include the use of the controversial asterisk, among other issues. Presented by Stephanie Skora - University of Illinois

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Visit our website!

"Accessing Ourselves"

http://tinyurl.com/umqipoc2015

A Space for Queer Indigenous and People of Color

http://tinyurl.com/fbumqipoc2015

April 10-12, 2015

Friday, April 10th, Welcoming Ceremony at the Marriott Courtyard From 7:30pm-11pm Saturday, April 11th and Sunday, April 12th Conference, Keynote, Registration in Coffman Memorial Union-3rd Floor

Like us of facebook!

About the Conference The Upper Midwest Queer Indigenous and People of Color (QIPOC) Conference ensures vital space is held for QIPOC Communities in the Upper Midwest to access and share their voices, lived experiences, and stories. The conference’s mission is to create a dynamic, learning space where queer indigenous and people of color can thrive.


Entertainment kit yan Saturday 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

Featured in HBO’s Asian Aloud, Kit Yan is a queer, transgender, and Asian American Brooklyn based slam poet from Hawaii. Kit’s work has been recently featured in Flicker and Spark and Troubling the Line, two new queer and transgender poetry anthologies and has a forthcoming book with Trans-Genre Press. Kit’s poetry has been reviewed in New York Magazine, Bitch, Curve, and Hyphen. His poetry has been taught all over the world and he has been seen on the SF Pride mainstage, National Equality March stage, the Department of Justice, and numerous international slam poetry stages. Kit’s poetry has been commissioned by the Census Bureau and national queer visibility campaigns such as OUTmedia and Campus Pride’s joint “Be Queer Buy Queer” and “Queer It Up” campaigns. Kit has toured internationally with Sister Spit, The Tranny Roadshow, and Good Asian Drivers. He is on both the Advocate and Campus Pride’s lists of recognized LGBT speakers. Some fun facts: Kit is the first ever Mr. Transman, and when he isn’t performing he is eating ramen, playing ukulele, and telling stories. Visit: OUTmedia.org for more information about the organization’s mission to increase the positive visibility of LGBTQQIA people and promote inclusive multiculturalism through the arts.

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drag show and dance Saturday 9:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

Hosted by and featuring the comedy of

Bianca Del Rio

Self-proclaimed as a ‘clown in a dress’, Bianca Del Rio emerged on the New Orleans’ gay entertainment scene in 1998 and almost immediately became a premiere nightlife entertainer. As an experienced costume designer, comic and theatrical performer, Roy seamlessly merged his multifaceted talents to create the beloved Drag Queen persona, Bianca Del Rio. The combination of her talents remains largely unchallenged; Bianca has been awarded some of the highest honors in her field. Appearing on major television networks including MTV, A&E and the Travel Channel she quickly was invited to perform at many national nightlife circuit and party events, and has become synonymous with gay Mardi Gras Events. As an experienced entertainer Bianca soon transplanted herself to NYC. Having worked in the city before, she immediately found acceptance and success at some of the most renowned gay and straight venues in the country. Bianca performs weekly at various NYC bars, clubs and eateries while continuing to travel nationally for special events. Bianca Del Rio’s impeccably quick-witted comedy, effortless fashions and unique ability to make audiences cry from laughter while she tatters their self-image to shreds, keeps everyone beckoning for more. Bianca won the sixth season of Rupaul’s Drag Race. Due to the nature of the content, this performance is for mature audiences only. Drag performers are MBLGTACC attendees who were selected based on their audition recordings.

MBLGTACC Dance Come to the Brown Ballroom to dance the night away after the Drag Show! For space and security reasons please do not bring bags into the Ballroom. Space for coats and bags will be available in the Circus Room. Please note, after 11:00 p.m. the Bone Student Center is locked down, if you exit the building after 11:00 p.m. you will not be readmitted. The dance ends at 12:00 a.m. (midnight).

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session 5

Sunday 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Featured Voice Kit Yan Schroeder Hall Room 138 Open Level Slam Poetry Performance and Writing Workshop Slam poetry is about inspiring and empowering yourself and others to also use their voices in creative and artistic ways to speak about issues that are important to them. This workshop is designed to help students gain the confidence to perform in front of crowds or audiences as an educational component to Kit’s slam poetry show. Students will engage in an interactive, educational, and fun workshop of learning tips from Kit, then performance techniques which they will practice with each other. Participants can opt to bring in their own original works of poetry to workshop or just come as they are. This workshop is intended for both beginners and also folks who have performance experience. Participants will work individually, in pairs, and as a group to understand and engage in performance and writing techniques.

LGBT History in the US Part III (19601980)

Schroeder Hall Room 103 This will be an overview discussion of the history of the LGBT community in the United States during the 20th century. This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines and open discussion of important events to understand the history of the community. Presented by Dale Larson - University of Wisconsin - Platteville

Group Formation and Facilitation for Student Leaders

Schroeder Hall Room 106 How do groups form? What makes them successful? This session will explore some group dynamics theories geared towards making student leaders more perceptive and proactive group facilitators. We will also participate in and come away with several group processing activities and initiatives to help participants take a more active role in their group’s evolution. Presented by Elliot Drake-Maurer

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Queering Loteria in Chican@ and Latin@ Culture

Schroeder Hall Room 108 This workshop describes the process of creating a co-facilitated workshop that incorporates cultural history, art, and LGBTQ identity, specifically, toward students who identify in the intersection of LGBTQ and Chican@ and Latin@ communities on your campus. It will illustrate an example, Queering Loteria, to productively challenge traditional norms of Chican@ and Latin@ culture to provide historical context and inclusivity of LGBTQ identities by different art forms. Presented by Ricardo Mora - University of Wisconsin - Madison

Media and Cultural Effects on Queer Identity Creation

Schroeder Hall Room 114 What does it mean to be gay? To be bisexual, lesbian, pansexual, or any other non-heterosexual orientation? Where do these identities come from, and how does culture affect them? What role does stigma play in creating queer identity? My research focuses on the experiences of queer college students. While their stories have many commonalities, their identities and narratives contain multitudes of differences. They paint a picture of queer life that is often contrary to dominant queer portrayals. Presented by Ben Walter - Clark University

So You Might Be Trans: A Guide to Exploring Your Gender Navigating Sexuality: Shifting Culture and Creating Sexually Healthy Campuses

Schroeder Hall Room 112 During this session the presenters will explore the successes and challenges faced by one mid-sized public institution in the Midwest in the effort to launch a sustained, coordinated effort to create a sexually healthy population of students, faculty and staff. The focus will be on the specific program effort of a reimagined health fair: our annual Sex Is Fun Fair, as well as some initial findings from a newly launched comprehensive bystander intervention campaign, and the method we use for coordinated service delivery. Presented by Jen Salamone - University of Michigan - Flint

Schroeder Hall Room 115 Feel like your assigned gender doesn’t fit you quite right? Second-guessing yourself in your gender exploration journey? Want to help out your gender questioning friend? This session will provide a number of tips and tricks for making the most out of exploring your gender, including how to deal with common insecurities, how to pick the perfect name and pronouns, and so much more. Presented by Jake Oakley - University of Chicago

The New (and Queer) Mestiza: Building Community and Coalition Across Borders

Schroeder Hall Room 117 Using Gloria Anzaldúa’s theory from “New Mestiza Nation,” this workshop will offer a new way for people with multiple identities to describe their experiences and will expand on ways to cross borders in order to build community and coalition, even amongst people who don’t have identical experiences. Presented by Kaylee Ja - Winona State University

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Even My Writing is Queer

Schroeder Hall Room 201 Creative writing within the queer community can be a powerful way to express intersectionality, to increase public awareness of gender and sexuality minorities, and to provide queer students with an opportunity to explore their identities. In this session, we will discuss fiction and poetry writing, writing as identities other than ones with which a writer may identify, and creating activities for queer students to engage with creative writing in a campus environment. Presented by Elizabeth Schoppelrei - Wright State University

Board Games to Build Conversation on Abuse Trigger Warning: Sexual, Emotional, Physical Abuse, Transphobia, Biphobia

Schroeder Hall Room 207 The workshop will involve playing a board game specifically designed to facilitate conversation on domestic abuse and unhealthy relationships. Participants will be able to role play individuals in these situations and engage in critical conversations about the systems that keep survivors oppressed. Presented by Peter Wonica - University of Texas - Dallas

Job Search Tips for LGBTQ Students

Schroeder Hall Room 214 LGBTQ students may have questions unique to them when conducting a job search. Questions may include what employers may be welcoming to them, or whether to include LGBTQ organization leadership roles, activities or experiences on a resume. This session will help students reflect on what you want out of your future as a young professional. Presented by Maureen Roach - Illinois State University & Pride Employee Resource Group at State FarmÂŽ

What Does an Inclusive Campus Mean to You?

Schroeder Hall Room 236 Most of our student organizations have some kind of mission or vision statement that we pull out when describing the goals of the organization, but what does that mission or that vision mean in concrete terms? Through personal reflection and group discussion, this workshop will give participants an opportunity to consider what a truly inclusive campus might really look like and how we, as individuals and organizations, can work to achieve that goal. Presented by Zoe Ashmead - Michigan State University

Educate for Equality: Educating your Campus in order to Create Change

Schroeder Hall Room 242 Come learn an innovative way to educate your campus and enlighten them on LGBTQIA related topics through the process of student driven speaker panels. You will learn how to establish an effective outreach program which is focused on peer to peer education within a multi-discipline classroom setting. Speaker panels try to educate and enlighten individuals on terminology, topics, and identity using individuals personal experiences along with educational resources and activities. Education is the key to change! Presented by Beric Wessely - University of St. Francis

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WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY

Welcomes MBLGTACC wgs.ilstu.edu facebook.com/ISUWGS

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Be

iNspired

APPLY

NOW! HRC.ORG/INTERN

W E LCO M E TO B LO O M I N G TO N - N O R M A L Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, & Ally College Conference

#INTERN1640

For more info contact the Bloomington-Normal Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

VisitBN.org \ 309.665.0033

Flexible apps for schools Build mobile guides for College orientations Student activities Alumni events Campus tours

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Guidebook powers more campus apps than anyone else.


session 6 Sunday 9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Featured Voice Andrew Morrison-Gurza Schroeder Hall Room 138 Introducing the Deliciously Disabled, Queer Cripple -- An In-Depth Discussion around the Lived Experience of Queers with Disabilities This workshop will introduce you to a part of the Queer Community we rarely discuss – Persons with Disabilities who identify as LGBTQ+ (The Queer Cripple). Queers with Disabilities are sorely underrepresented in our homo-normative, body beautiful culture, and I aim to change that. A combination of education and personal experiences will invite you into a conversation around the Queer Cripple, the lived experiences navigating both sexuality and disability (ie. What it actually feels like to be queer and disabled), and what they can offer the LGBTQ+ community overall. Participants will openly explore the mythology and fear around sex and disability, and consider why we are afraid to talk about disability in the LGBTQ+ community. Ultimately, through frank, open and honest conversations around disability, sexuality and queerness, the workshop will provide the tools to welcome the Queer Community into the conversation around disability and make it truly accessible to everyone under the rainbow.

LGBT History in the US Part IV (19802000/10)

Schroeder Hall Room 103 This will be an overview discussion of the history of the LGBT community in the United States during the 20th century. This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines and open discussion of important events to understand the history of the community. Presented by Dale Larson - University of Wisconsin - Platteville

The Bible and Homosexuality: Queering the Good Book

Schroeder Hall Room 104 Come read the Christian Bible with 21st Century queer eyes and retell the old, old stories. The alternative family constellation of Ruth, Naomi, and Boaz. The love triangle of David, Jonathan, and Saul. Ester’s coming out saves a nation. The Syro-Phonecian woman who schools Jesus of Nazareth. The great faith of the Roman Centurion. Join us as we reclaim the best of the Judeo-Christian tradition - radical hospitality, inclusion and love. Presented by Gail Simonds - Weathervane Ministries

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Navigating Consent and Creating Safe Space on College Campuses Trigger Warning: Sexual Violence

Schroeder Hall Room 106 What is consent? What does it look like? What does sexual coercion and sexual assault on college campuses within the LGBTQ community look like, and what are some barriers to reporting? We will navigate and define what consent looks like in our sexual relationships as well as discuss the campus reporting system and its effectiveness. Bring your experiences, questions and curiosity as we explore healthy relationships and consensual sex on campus. Presented by Ashley Schmuecker & Kimmie Andresen-Reed Riverview Center

People of PrEP

Schroeder Hall Room 112 Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) is a pill that is taken once a day to prevent HIV. As this becomes a widely discussed topic in the LGBTQIA community, this workshop aims to eliminate stigma associated with it along with educating those who have an interest, as well as shedding light on the experience of PrEP users. Presented by Noah Barth & Sergio Tundo

Queer Women in Tech: Overcoming the Rainbow Glass Ceiling Trigger Warning: Workplace Harrassment, Possible Secure Harrassment Discussion

Schroeder Hall Room 114 Assessing The New Generation of Families: Perceptions of Homosexual Parents and their Children

Schroeder Hall Room 108 Research has consistently found that negative attitudes toward homosexuals are prevalent. This prejudice can take form as internalized stigma associated with homosexual parenting. Though individuals may explicitly support LGBTQIA rights and believe that homosexual couples can be apt parents, they may still implicitly hold some negative prejudice. This presentation closely examines this negative prejudice, its implications for the LGBTQIA community, and what can be done to combat this social issue. Presented by Adam Hampton - Illinois State University

This discussion will be a roundtable event for queer women in technology. We’ll discuss key issues for and examinations of women in technology such as Lean In and the issues with focusing on engaging white, upper-class, heterosexual, cisgender women in technology while ignoring women who fall outside that focus. We’ll also discuss creating a community that’s inclusive of all different queer and female identities in the technology world. Presented by Toby Baratta - Grinnell

Why Are We What We Are?

Schroeder Hall Room 115 This workshop covers the history of scientific research about sexual orientation and gender identity in America. Theories such as the Exotic Meets Erotic, the Brain Organizational Hypothesis, and the Maternal Immune Hypothesis in conjunction with the Fraternal Birth Order Effect will be addressed in a sociological context. By learning about these theories we can create a better understanding of how the scientific community has both impacted popular media and in turn, shaped LGBTQIA+ culture. Presented by Kyle Simon - Ohio Wesleyan University

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A guide to discourse with homophobes (or, how to talk to a**holes)

Schroeder Hall Room 201 In attempting to create change, we all must deal with some unpleasant realities. One of those is that we must occasionally deal with homophobic people in our lives. This workshop is intended to provide some basic tools and skills for talking with homophobic people in a constructive manner. Presented by Austin Schopper - Emporia State University

Do you wanna work in Student Affairs? Queering Higher Ed

Schroeder Hall Room 207 This workshop is designed for those looking into Student Affairs as a career path. We will explore navigating the grad school and graduate assistantship search with an LGBTQ lens. Presented by Annie Weaver - Illinois State University

Breaking Tradition at a Christian College with LGBT Awareness

Thank You for Being a Friend: Queer Lessons from “The Golden Girls”

Schroeder Hall Room 236 The Golden Girls was a hit in the 1980s especially to the LGBT community. But what was/is the draw to the hilarious comedy? Come explore some important lessons of LGBT culture and community as we take a queering look at this sitcom. We will explore the concept of “queerness”, discuss “camp”, and have conversations surrounding gay icons. Presented by Zachary Neil - Western Illinois University

The Unspoken History of the American Trans Man

Schroeder Hall Room 238 Neglected by Hollywood and largely absent from even queer texts, trans male history is hard to come by. What is sometimes ascribed to a failure to do anything noteworthy in fact comes from history’s weak long-term memory. From 19th century folk heroes to modern activists, with detours into 20th century tales of scientific miracles, The Unspoken History of the American Trans Man will provide a foundation in understanding the heritage of an invisible queer minority. Presented by Tobias Gurl

Schroeder Hall Room 214 Attending a Christian affiliated University can certainly present challenges when it comes to “nontraditional” students, particularly those who identify with the LGBT community. This workshop will explore some of the challenges and ways to overcome these roadblocks that many students find in these types of environments. Faculty, staff, advisors and students have a responsibility to be advocates and push for changes that can positively impact the campus climate of their university. Presented by Sydney LeVan & Robin Walters-Powell

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keynote rev. dr. jamie washington Sunday 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Braden Auditorium Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington serves as the President and Founder of the Washington Consulting Group, a Multicultural Organizational Development Firm out of Baltimore, MD. He is also a senior consultant with The Equity Consulting Group of California, and Elsie Y. Cross and Associates out of Philadelphia. Dr. Washington has served as an educator and administrator in higher education for over 20 years He most recently served as the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). He has been an instructor in Sociology, American Studies and Education, and an Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies at UMBC.

As a native Philadelphian, Dr. Washington earned his B.S. degree in Therapeutic Recreation and Music from Slippery Rock State College, and a double Masters’ of Science degree from Indiana University/Bloomingtonin Higher Education Administration and Counseling, with a concentration in Human Sexuality. He holds a Ph.D. is in College Student Development, with a concentration in Multicultural Education from the University of Maryland College Park. Dr. Washington completed his Master of Divinity program at Howard University School of Divinity in May of 2004. Dr. Washington has held leadership positions in multiple organizations: ACPA, NASPA, ACHUO-I, MACUHO, MCPA, APA, NGLTF, The Campaign to End Homophobia and the National Black Lesbian and Gay Leadership Forum. Dr. Washington is a Lead faculty member with the LeaderShape Institute and the National Certified Student Leader Program, a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, Golden Key, Alpha Phi Omega, Phi Delta Kappa, education Honorary, and a Life member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated. He has over 30 years of experience in music ministry, is an ordained minister and currently serves as an Associate Minister at Unity Fellowship Church of Baltimore. Rev. Dr. Washington sees himself as an instrument of change. He works everyday to help people find the best in themselves and others.

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closing ceremony Sunday 12:15 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Braden Auditorium

schedule Entertainment: Clef Hangers 2015 Planning Team Closing Remarks Introduction of 2016 Planning Team

Featuring:

clef hangers Clef Hangers is the first mixed vocal a cappella group at Illinois State University founded in August 2008 by a small group of ambitious students who shared a passion for a cappella music. Since its formation, the group has lost and gained various members, each of whom has helped make the group what it is today. Clef Hangers is a performance ensemble consisting of male and female voices. There are currently three or four voices on each part (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass/baritone) and a beat boxer. The Clef Hangers is open to all majors, and auditions take place on a semester by semester basis. The mission of ISU Clef Hangers is to provide an open environment for students who wish to pursue musical excellence and form lasting relationships within the collegiate a cappella community.

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Tickets for MBLGTACC Participants are just $8

February 13 at 7:30pm February 14 at 2:00pm & 7:30pm February 15 at 3:00pm Illinois State University

Center for the Performing Arts

400 W Beaufort St, Normal 309.438.2535

T E R A B CA 70


ADVISOR TRACk SCHEDULE

sunday

saturday Friday

MBLGTACC 2015 believes that advisors and higher education professionals are essential to the success and progress of LGBTQIA student leaders on campus. We’ve created a special track of events just for you! All are welcome at these events though they were created with advisors in mind.

Time

Event

location

4:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Faculty & Staff Meet-and-Greet

Prairie South, BSC

Time

Event

location

8:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Professional Development Session with Dr. Susan Rankin

Room 138, SH

3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Facilitated Discussion with Danny Mathews

Room 138, SH

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Featured Voice Session with Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington

Room 138, SH

Time

Event

location

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Advisor Breakouts - Session #5

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Title IX and Campus Safety: Why You Should Care

Room 204, SH

Challenge and Support: Trans+ Student Development in the College Setting

Room 206, SH

Working with our Student Groups: a Choice or an Outcome?

Room 212, SH

Advisor Breakouts- Session #6 Continue the Narrative: Develop an LGBTQIA Alumni Network

Room 204, SH

No Queers Left Behind: The Importance of Intersectionality and Inclusion within LGBTQIA Community

Room 206, SH

Community College Pride

Room 212, SH

building legend BSC - Bone Student Center

SH - Schroeder Hall SSB - Student Services Building

The Bone Student Center will open at 7 a.m. on Saturday and 8 a.m. on Sunday.

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ADVISOR TRACk breakout sessions 1

2

3

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5

6

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Featured Voice Dr. Susan Rankin Schroeder Hall Room 138 Stormy Weather: The Influence of Campus Climate on Building Inclusive Communities As colleges and universities continue to more accurately reflect the diverse makeup of society, institutions have focused on the importance of creating a campus environment that not only includes, welcomes, and accepts people of difference, but also responds to the issues and concerns facing underserved constituent groups. Although colleges and institutions attempt to foster welcoming and inclusive environments, they are not immune to negative societal attitudes and discriminatory behaviors. Consequently, campus climates have been described as racist for students and employees of color (Harper & Hurtado, 2007; Rankin & Reason, 2005) “chilly” for women (Hall & Sandler, 1984; Hart & Fellabaum, 2008), and “hostile” for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer-spectrum, trans-spectrum, community members (Dilley, 2002; Rankin, 2003; Rankin, Weber, Blumenfeld, & Frazer, 2010). This presentation will focus on the influence of climate on “invisible” identities including queer-spectrum and trans-spectrum people. Dr. Rankin retired from the Pennsylvania State University in 2013 where she most recently served as an Associate Professor of Education and Associate in the Center for the Study of Higher Education. Dr. Rankin has presented and published widely on the intersections of identities and the impact of sexism, genderism, racism and heterosexism in the academy and in intercollegiate athletics. Dr. Rankin’s most recent publications include the 2010 State of Higher Education for LGBT People, The Lives of Transgender People, and the 2011 NCAA Student-Athlete Climate Study. Dr. Rankin has collaborated with over 120 institutions/ organizations in implementing climate assessments and developing strategic initiatives.

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Advisor Track Session 3 1

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Saturday 3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. Facilitated Discussion with Danny Mathews

Schroeder Hall Room 138 Danny currently serves as the Specialist for Advising and Leadership Development in Diversity Advocacy at Illinois State University. He is a social justice educator who has done civic engagement work as an American Red Cross HIV/AIDS educator in South Florida and in his previous role as LGBTQ Coordinator at Virginia Tech. Danny advises Pride at ISU and works with The LGBT/Q Studies and Services Institute at Illinois State to foster a campus community committed to continuing the discourse around gender and sexual diversity.

Advisor Track Session 4 1

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Saturday 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Featured Voice rev. Dr. jamie washington Schroeder Hall Room 138 Intersectionality: No more silos, engaging the whole person. The work we do in LGBTQIA‌. spaces is ever changing. We have come a long way from simply wanting to create a space where LGBT students feel comfortable to be themselves. We are now charged to engage the race, spiritual, class, gender identity, gender expression, age, ability and other identity dynamics that inform our students experience. Let’s talk about it. How do we become advisors equipped to address the intersections of identities that impact the lives of those we serve?

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Sunday 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Title IX and Campus Safety: Why You Should Care

Schroeder Hall Room 204 Title IX and sexual violence on college campuses is all over the news, but what are the facts? This session will provide participants with what they need to know about the history of Title IX, prohibited behaviors, and institutional requirements under federal law, as well offer an overview of how criminal processes work. Presented by Rick Olshak - Illinois State University

Challenge and Support: Trans+ Student Development in the College Setting

Schroeder Hall Room 206 Many theories in higher education are based on research conducted on majority groups—cis, white, heterosexual, and high-achieving students. As one may clearly see, not all students fit this mold. Trans+ and gender nonconforming students have different needs in both their challenges and their support. This session aims to deconstruct several common theories in student development and draw suggestions on how to better aid Trans+ and gender non-conforming students in the college and university setting. Presented by Roze Brooks - University of Kansas

Working with our Student Groups: a Choice or an Outcome?

Schroeder Hall Room 212 Barb has spent the past 18 years working with Pride at Illinois State, the LGBTQ Faculty/Staff organization and in the Bloomington/Normal community. Was this a decision she made or was it a result of past actions? This session will discuss the relationship between activism and advising, the responsibilities involved when working with LGBTQ college students and how their development may fit into your own personal journey. Presented by Barb Dallinger - Illinois State University

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Advisor Track Session 6 1

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Sunday 9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Continue the Narrative: Developing an LGBTQA Alumni Network

Schroeder Hall Room 204 Don’t lose touch with your LGBTQA students when they graduate! Help them maintain the connection with their alma mater by formalizing an LGBTQA alumni network at your school. Join us to see how a network can build a new, exciting relationship with your LGBTQA alums. This workshop will provide information on how you can begin to build a network that is beneficial to alums, current students, advisors, and educational institutions. Presented by Dave Bentlin - Illinois State University

No Queers Left Behind: The Importance of Intersectionality and Inclusion within LGBTQIA Community

Schroeder Hall Room 206 Have you ever been left behind? Have you ever left someone behind? Have you ever left students behind--and didn’t know it? Exploring the answers to these questions helps create more inclusive changes in our LGBTQIA campus communities. Upon introduction to the theoretical frameworks of social identity and intersectionality-and the relationship between these two topics--you will gather strategies to incorporate this model into your daily work at the intrapersonal, interpersonal and institutional levels. Presented by Josephine Boakye & Heather WilhelmRoutenberg - InciteChange!

Community College Pride

Schroeder Hall Room 212 This will be a facilitated discussion specifically for advisors from community colleges/two-year institutions. Acting as a round table of sorts, this workshop will be geared at confronting the problems community colleges face in creating and maintaining an active and progressive LGBTQ organization. Presented by Jennifer Woodruff - Heartland Community College

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Schroeder Hall MAPS SCHROEDER HALL Floor 2

Floor 1

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MAPS BOne Student Center 3rd Floor

1st Floor

2nd Floor


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Adelaide Soccer Field B3 Allen Theatre F6 Alumni Center A7 Atkin Hall E2 Bone Student Center C6 Braden Auditorium C6 Brown Ballroom C6 Bowling and Billiards Center C8 Campus Religious Center D9 Capen Auditorium D6 Cardinal Court B5 Carter Harris Building B5 Centennial East F7 Centennial West F6

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Visito (fee rer Parking quired )

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Center for the Performing Arts E7 Center for the Visual Arts F5 Chiller Plant C2, F2, and F9 Colby Hall F2 Cook Hall D6 DeGarmo Hall D5 Duffy Bass Field B4 Edwards Hall D6 Eyestone School Museum C1 Fairchild Hall D4 Feeney Dining Center E3 Fell Hall E5 Felmley Hall D7 Gregory Street Property A1 Gregory Street Complex A1 Hamilton Hall E3 Hancock Stadium C4 Hayden Auditorium D5 Haynie Hall C2 Heating Plant D5 Hewett Hall D10 Honors Program E10 Horton Field House C3

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Hovey Hall D8 Hudelson Building B5 In Exchange E8 InfoCentre C6 Instructional Technology and Development Center D3 John Green Food Service Building B6 Julian Hall D8 Kaufman Football Building C4 Kemp Recital Hall F6 Linkins Dining Center C2 Manchester Hall D10 Marian Kneer Softball Stadium B2 MCN Nursing Simulation Laboratory C7 Metcalf School D5 Milner Library C7 Motorcycle Driving Range A1 Motorcycle Safety Program Office C7 Moulton Hall D7 Nelson Smith Building C1 Office of Energy Management C8 Office of Residential Life Building E4 Office of Sustainability C8 Old Union E7

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Summit St.

44

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University Galleries F5 University High School B5 University High School Tennis Courts B5 University (President’s) Residence A3 Uptown Crossing E10 Vidette Building C6 Vitro Center B5 Vrooman Center D9 Watterson Dining Center E10 Watterson Towers E9 Weibring Golf Club A2 Westhoff Theatre F6 Whitten Hall E3 Wilkins Hall C2 Williams Hall E7 Wright Hall B2 209 N. Fell Avenue Apt. Building D10 211 N. Fell Avenue Apt. Building D10 211 N. University Street Building C5 300A Shelbourne Drive Building B10 302 N. School Street Apt. Building C9 608 S. Main Street Building F1

Š 8/2013 Illinois State University

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Parking and Transportation Building, Bill Waller B7 Parking Garage, North University Street C6 Parking Garage, School Street F8 Parking Garage, South University Street F4 Parking, Visitor C7 and F4 Planetarium D8 Professional Development Annex D3 Professional Development Building D3 Quad E6 Rachel Cooper D4 Rambo House D5 Redbird Arena C2 Ropp Agriculture Building C5 Schroeder Hall D6 Science Laboratory Building D9 Shelbourne Apartments B10 State Farm Hall of Business E5 Stevenson Hall E8 Stroud Auditorium B6 Student Accounts Building D2 Student Fitness Center and McCormick Hall E3-E5 Student Services Building C5 Turner Hall C3

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MBLGTACC 2015 Program Guide  

The 2015 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 13-15, 2015 at Illinois State University in Norm...

MBLGTACC 2015 Program Guide  

The 2015 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 13-15, 2015 at Illinois State University in Norm...

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