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Family matters: Zappa plays Zappa Inside, Pasatiempo

February 7, 2014

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Proposed Colo. stop adds millions to Chief route

Senate Republicans block new bid to restore jobless benefits

Santa Clara adult day care seeks aid

New Mexico governor remains leery about committing $40 million over 10 years to Amtrak project. LOCaL neWs, C-1

A measure that would provide unemployment assistance for three months for more than 1.7 million Americans failed by one vote. Page a-3

Pueblo officials see cultural benefits for center that serves the elderly. LOCaL neWs, C-1

Measure aimed at closing loopholes include home Breathalyzer test, tougher ignition interlock provisions

DWI bill suffers blow Russian President Vladimir Putin signs a wall while visiting the Coastal Cluster Olympic Village earlier this week.

Effects on groundwater, homes’ proximity to oil, gas wells raise concerns

ALEXEI NIKOLSKY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Putin in spotlight as games underway

By Staci Matlock The New Mexican

Russia’s leader keen to prove doubters wrong By Angela Charlton

The Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia — They’re designed to celebrate a millennium of Russian might and this country’s modern rebound, and kick off two weeks of extraordinary human endeavors and planetary sportsmanship. But the ceremony opening the Sochi Olympics on Friday, more than anything, will be about one man: Vladimir Putin. He charmed and strong-armed his way to hosting the games at a summer beach resort that he envisioned as a winter paradise. Ballet, man-made snow and avantgarde art will make an appearance at Sochi’s opening ceremonies, though as with all past opening ceremonies, the details are under wraps. They can’t really compete with the cin-

Please see PUTIn, Page A-6

On THe WeB u For more coverage of the Winter Olympics, go to www.santafenew mexican.com

Obituaries Charles M. Anderson, Jan. 30 Annie W. Granito, Feb. 4 Homer Charles McLaughlin Jr., Feb. 1 Alan K. Stoker, Jan. 24 Page C-2

The annual DWI March of Sorrow was held Thursday at the Capitol to remember victims of DWI crashes. The march coincided with DWI Awareness Day at the Roundhouse. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

By Anne Constable

The New Mexican

A

bill to plug what sponsors consider loopholes in the state’s DWI laws unexpectedly was tabled in a House committee Thursday morning, hours before several of the bill’s sponsors were scheduled to be recognized by Mothers Against Drunk Driving as “2013 Legislative Champions.” Rep. Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson, D-Albuquerque, said she was “extremely disappointed” and pointed out that the legislation,

which has bipartisan backing, passed the House last year by a unanimous vote. But its prospects this year are now greatly diminished. The House Democrats issued a news release after the vote, saying, “Efforts to stop drunk driving and protect the rights of victims suffered a huge blow in the House Transportation and Public Works committee this morning.” MADD New Mexico’s executive director, Ben Lewinger, called House Bill 10 “a well-crafted

Page a-8

Index

Calendar a-2

8,191: people convicted of DWI 357: convicted of a 4th offense 129: convicted of a 5th offense $95.49: Cost of incarcerating an inmate per day SOURCE: NEW MEXICO DWI CITATION TRACKING SYSTEM

InsIde u Minimum-wage bump nixed. Page a-4 u Dems block bill to trim drunkenworker benefits. Page a-4 u Budget measure splits House panel along party lines. Page a-6

Martinez staff ignores Stewart’s requests to halt recordings By Patrick Malone

Partly sunny and humid. High 41, low 23.

Please see dWI, Page A-6

2012 dWI COnvICTIOns

Due to concerns from residents and landowners in the community of Cebolla, the Bureau of Land Management has postponed oil and gas leasing on 13,300 acres in western Rio Arriba County so the agency can further study the potential impacts of new drilling operations. The 16 parcels are scattered around Cebolla, south of Tierra Amarilla, in an area crisscrossed with streams that feed into the Chama River. Most of the surface land is privately owned, but the oil and gas underneath are owned by other people or by the federal government, according to Dave Evans, the BLM’s Farmington District manager. The parcels were due to be offered for leasing by oil and gas companies in October. But for the second time in a year, the leasing has been deferred. Evans said residents around Cebolla have raised a number of concerns. “They’re concerned about the proximity of oil and gas wells to homes and community sites,” he said. “They’re very concerned about potential impacts on groundwater.” Some of the land that could be leased for oil and gas development is near Cebolla’s drinking water well, which is 2,610 feet deep. Residents and county officials are worried about potential contamination to the well from hydraulic fracturing, a commonly used technique in which fluids are forced into a well to crack open rock and release hydrocarbons. “We’re concerned about the comingling of water sources in addition to roads, dust, noise,” said Lucia Sanchez, Rio Arriba County’s planning

Please see LeasIng, Page A-6

Governor, Dem leader clash over webcasts The New Mexican

Today

New leases for drilling halted in Rio Arriba

A dispute over who has the right to videotape legislative committee hearings in the Capitol is sparking a political tussle between a House committee leader and Gov. Susana Martinez. Rep. Mimi Stewart, D-Albuquerque, who chairs of the House Education Committee,

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says she has tried repeatedly to stop the governor’s staff from recording her committee’s hearings. Stewart said she is concerned the Governor’s Office has political motivations for videotaping the proceedings. Enrique Knell, a spokesman for the governor, said the office is taping hearings to archive them on the governor’s website and make it more convenient for New Mexico

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residents to see what’s happening in the Roundhouse. Legislative staff members broadcast hearings live over the Internet but do not archive them. “New Mexico is a very large state, and traveling to Santa Fe for the session can be very challenging for many of our people,” Knell said. “That’s why it’s important to help bring the process to the people.” A proposal to archive webcasts is pending in the Legislature. Traditionally, those efforts

Rep. Mimi Stewart

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Four sections, 28 pages Pasatiempo, 64 pages 165th year, No. 38 Publication No. 596-440


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

NATION&WORLD

MarketWatch DOW JONES RUSSELL 2000

Police: Art thief among 3 held in violin heist

The Associated Press

T

Obama eyes another extension for insurance The Obama administration is considering an extension of the president’s decision to let people keep their individual insurance policies even if they are not compliant with the health care overhaul, industry and government officials said Thursday. Avalere Health CEO Dan Mendelson said Thursday that the administration may let policyholders keep that coverage for as long as an additional three years, stressing that no decision has been made. Health and Human Services spokesman Joanne Peters confirmed that the issue is under discussion.

Military dog captured by Taliban in Afghanistan In the annals of prisoner-of-war videos, this seems to be a first. A slightly befuddled Belgian Malinois appears on a tight leash, surrounded by heavily armed, bearded men boasting of their battlefield loot. Wearing a black protective vest, the dog wags its tail at certain points and appears more confused than terrified as its captors showcase specialized rifles and a global positioning device with a blinking light that they

Concertmaster Frank Almond plays a 300-year-old Stradivarius violin that was on loan to him during a concert in Milwaukee. Police said three people have been arrested in connection with the theft of the instrument. COURTESY MILWAUKEE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

He was shocked with a stun gun. His attacker grabbed the violin and hopped into a waiting vehicle. Police traced the stun gun to Universal Knowledge Allah, a 36-year-old barber, while a citizen’s tip led them to Salah Jones, the 41-year-old man convicted of stealing a $25,000 statue from a gallery at Milwaukee’s posh Pfister Hotel in 1995. Officers had the men under surveillance before arresting them Monday, along with a 32-year-old woman police have not yet identified. Police also have not said what role each suspect had in the heist. Milwaukee District Attorney John Chisholm said Thursday that he expected to charge at least one of the suspects Friday. He said charges were delayed while prosecutors negotiated with one suspect for the return of the violin. The suspect led police Wednesday night

to the home of an acquaintance, who had allowed the suspect to store a suitcase in his attic. It’s not clear what the suspects planned to do with the violin. Such high-value instruments are almost always well-documented with photographs and easily identified, said David Bonsey, a New York-based violin maker and appraiser who appears on the Public Broadcasting Service’s Antiques Roadshow. “There’s virtually no place that a violin like this can be taken and fenced,” Bonsey said. “You can’t take it to a pawn shop.” The violin, known in musical circles as the “Lipinski” Stradivarius because it was once played by Polish violinist Karol Lipinski, has been appraised for insurance purposes at $5 million. It has value as a musical instrument and as a work of art, Bonsey said.

say came attached to the canine. A link to the video was posted this week on the Twitter account of a user who often disseminates Taliban propaganda. A Taliban spokesman, Zabiullah Mujahid, said the dog was captured after a long firefight between coalition forces and Taliban fighters in late December. A spokesman for the international military coalition in Afghanistan confirmed Thursday the canine was attached to a British special forces unit.

Rebels free hundreds in attack on Aleppo prison

Calif. lab chided for role in Lusitania wreck film SAN FRANCISCO — A federal watchdog agency is blasting a national lab in Northern California for spending more than $80,000 in taxpayer money to help National Geographic with a documentary about the sinking of the ship Lusitania before World War I. Santa Fean Gregg Bemis, a venture capitalist, is the sole owner of the wreck 300 feet beneath the surface of the Atlantic ocean off southern Ireland, about 12 miles south of County Cork in territorial waters. Bemis conducted exploration dives to the wreck site. The Energy Department’s Inspector General says Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory improperly used its licensing and royalty fees to perform tests for the documentary. Lab spokeswoman Lynda Seaver says it followed correct procedures. Nearly 2,000 people died when a German torpedo sunk the ocean liner in 1915. The incident spurred the United States to declare war.

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MLK’s children battle over Nobel medal, Bible ATLANTA — A generation after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s death, his children are fighting again over control of his legacy. This time it involves two of his most cherished possessions: his Nobel Peace Prize medal and the Bible he carried. King’s daughter Bernice King has both items, and she says her brothers, Dexter King and Martin Luther King III, are demanding she hand them over so they can be sold. It is the latest in a string of disputes over the years that some historians have come to see as a sad and unseemly footnote to history that could damage King’s name.

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BEIRUT — A suicide bomber blew himself up at the gates of a Syrian prison Thursday and rebels stormed in behind him, freeing hundreds of inmates as part of an offensive aimed at capturing key government symbols around the northern city of Aleppo. Government forces, meanwhile, dropped crude “barrel bombs” in deadly airstrikes as both sides escalated their fight for the strategic city ahead of a second round of peace talks set for next week. Opposition leaders threatened to suspend the talks over the barrel bombings.

The Associated Press

BURBANK, Calif. — Jay Leno has said goodbye to The Tonight Show before, but not like this. The comedian became tearful and choked up Thursday as he concluded what he called the “greatest 22 years of my life.” “I am the luckiest guy in the world. This is tricky,” said an emotional Leno, stepping down for the second and presumably last time as host of TV’s venerable late-night program. Jimmy Fallon takes over Tonight in New York on Feb. 17. Leno shared that he’d lost his mother the first year he became Tonight host, his dad the second and then his brother. “And after that I was pretty much out of family. And the folks here became my family,” he said of the crew and staff of Tonight.” It was a tender finish to a farewell show that was mostly aiming for laughs, with traditional monologue jokes, clips from old shows and a wild assortment of celebrities helping to usher Leno out the door. Leno first departure came in 2009, when he was briefly replaced by Conan O’Brien but reclaimed the show after a messy transition and O’Brien’s lackluster ratings. In ’09, he was moving to a prime-time show on NBC; this time he’s out the door, and has said he’ll focus on comedy clubs and his beloved car collection. “You’re very kind,” he told the audience. “I don’t like goodbyes. NBC does.” Leno brought his show full circle with Billy Crystal, who was his first guest in May 1992 and his last guest Thursday. Crystal played ringmaster at one point, calling on Oprah Winfrey, Jack Black, Kim Kardashian, Carol Burnett and others for a musical tribute to Jay with a Sound of Music song parody. “So long, farewell, auf wiedersehen, goodbye. If Fallon tanks you’ll be back here next year,” sang Jack Black. The Big Bang Theory star Jim Parson’s contribution: “We’ve watched you when we’re weary. Your great success is called the big chin theory.” In a videotaped segment, celebrities offered career advice to Leno. “Why would I give an [expletive] about what he does. He’s a grown man,” said Mark Walberg. President Barack Obama, like other politicians a favorite target of Leno’s, struck back in his clip. “Jay, you’ve made a whole lot of jokes about me over the years, but don’t worry, I’m not upset,” Obama said, then said he was making Leno the U.S. ambassador to Antarctica. “Hope you have a warm coat, man.” Garth Brooks performed his touching song “The Dance” before Leno’s farewell remarks. “Now that I brought the room down,” Leno joked, he asked Brooks to lighten it up. Another Brooks’ song, “Friends in Low Places,” closed out the show. Leno, 63, said he plans to continue playing comedy clubs, indulging his passion for cars and doing such TV work as comes his way — other than hosting on late-night. Fallon, 39, starts hisTonight Feb. 17, with NBC hoping he rides the promotional wave of its Winter Olympics coverage the next two weeks.

On Thursday, Jay Leno, left, stepped down as host of The Tonight Show. Jimmy Fallon will take over as host on Feb. 17. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

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MILWAUKEE he mystery of what happened to a multimillion-dollar Stradivarius violin stolen in a stun gun attack was answered Thursday when Milwaukee police recovered the instrument and blamed the heist at least in part on an art thief who once stole a statue from a gallery and then tried to sell it back. The violin, which was built in 1715 by the renowned Italian luthier Antonio Stradivari and valued at $5 million, was found hidden in a suitcase in the attic of a man who police said was unaware the instrument was in his home. Three people have been arrested in the case, and Milwaukee Police Chief Ed Flynn said there was no evidence of other “shadowy” figures from the art world behind the theft. “It appears we had a local criminal who had an interest in art theft and was smart enough to develop a plan for a robbery,” Flynn said. “Beyond that, we don’t know what his motive was.” The violin, which police said appeared to be in good condition, was stolen late last month from a concert violinist Frank Almond, concertmaster for the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, as he walked to his car after a Jan. 27 performance at Wisconsin Lutheran College.

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Friday, Feb. 7 SENIOR OLYMPICS: From 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., local Santa Fe 50+ Senior Olympics Games Registration is open for adults age 50 and older through Friday Feb. 28. Registration is available at Mary Esther Gonzales Senior Center, 1121 Alto Street, Monday through Friday. Participate in one or more of 23 sports during March, April and May. Fee is $20. Call Cristina Villa at 955-4725. HEBREW ALPHABET: At the 7:30 p.m. Shabbat service at Congregation Beit Tikva, 2230 Old Pecos Trail, artist Gloria Abella Ballen, will discuss her book The Power of the Hebrew Alphabet and the Kabbalah Meaning of the 22 Letters. NANCY KING: The author celebrates the launch with a reading of Changing Spaces at 6 p.m. at Collected Works Bookstore, 202 Galisteo St. RENNAISSANCE TO GOYO: SPANISH PAINTING IN THE GOLDEN AGE: Illustrated talk by Barbara Anderson at 5:30 p.m. at St. Francis Auditorium, 107 W. Palace Ave. TGIF PIANO RECITAL: At 5:30 p.m., Bang Lang Do performs music of Honnegger, Rachmaninoff, and Messiaen at First Presbyterian Church,

Lotteries 208 Grant Ave. THE SHAPE OF MUSICAL TIME: At 3:15 p.m., Andy Kingston examines the role music plays in the writings of philosophers F.W.J. Schelling and Edmund Husserl and the dynamics of intersubjectivity at Peterson Student Center, St. John’s College, 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca. THE SOLDIER AND THE REFUSENIK: At 7 p.m., two Israeli activists will be in conversation at Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Santa Fe, 107 W. Barcelona Road. VALERIE PLAME: At 7 p.m., the author reads from and signs copies of Blowback, followed by an interview with Joan Livingston, Taos News managing editor, at Mabel Dodge Luhan House, 40 Morada Lane in Taos.

NIGHTLIFE

Friday, Feb. 7 ¡CHISPA! AT EL MESÓN: Three Faces of Jazz, revolving piano trio, 7:30 p.m., 213 Washington Ave. COLIN QUINN: The standup comic shares his political views in Unconstitutional at the Lensic, 7 p.m., 211 W. San Francisco St. COWGIRL BBQ: Gleewood, acoustic rock, 5 p.m.; Jay Boy Adams and Zenobia, with Mister Sister, R&B and soul, 8 p.m.,

319 S. Guadalupe St. DUEL BREWING: Rock band Anthony Leon and The Chain, 7-10 p.m., 1228 Parkway Drive. EL FAROL: Boom Room Collective, rock, 9 p.m., 808 Canyon Road. LA CASA SENA CANTINA: Best of Broadway, piano and vocals, 6-10 p.m., 125 E. Palace Ave. LA POSADA DE SANTA FE RESORT AND SPA: Nacha Mendez Trio, pan-Latin rhythms, 6:30-9:30 p.m., 330 E. Palace Ave. LODGE LOUNGE AT THE LODGE AT SANTA FE: Pachanga! Club Fridays with DJ Gabriel “Aztec Sol” Ortega spinning salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merenge, dance lesson, 8:30-9:30 p.m., 7 50 N. St. Francis Drive. MINE SHAFT TAVERN: DJ Sass-a-Frass, 5 p.m.; Gypsy dancers, 8 p.m., 2846 NM 14. PIANO AND VIOLIN RECITAL: Tim Schwarz and Daniel Weiser perform music of Copland, Amy Beach, and William Grant Still at Quail Run Clubhouse, 6:30 p.m., 3101 Old Pecos Trail. PRANZO ITALIAN GRILL: Geist Cabaret with pianist David Geist, 6-9 p.m., 540 Montezuma Ave. SECOND STREET BREWERY: Bill Hearne Trio, classic country and Americana, 6-9 p.m., 1814 Second St.

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Corrections The New Mexican will correct factual errors in its news stories. Errors should be brought to the attention of the city editor at 986-3035. SECOND STREET BREWERY AT THE RAILYARD: Broomdust Caravan, 7-10 p.m., 1607 Paseo de Peralta. VALENTIME: Benefit party for Warehouse 21; with DJs Feathericci and funk band The Sticky; includes speed dating event, food, and a raffle, 7 p.m., 1614 Paseo de Peralta. VANESSIE: Pianists/vocalists Doug Montgomery (6-8 p.m.); Bob Finnie (8-11 p.m.), 427 W. Water St. For more events, see Pasatiempo in Friday’s edition. To submit an events listing, send an email to service @sfnewmexican.com.


NATION

Senate blocks bill to help long-term jobless Democrats vow to call another vote

Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

GOP: Immigration reform unlikely House speaker blames stalemate on Obama’s policies

equating legal status with amnesty and resisting giving Obama a long-sought legislative victory. Republicans also worry about primary challenges from the right and fear that new By Donna Cassata Hispanic citizens will add to the The Associated Press Democrats’ voter rolls. Control of the Senate, RepubWASHINGTON — Speaker licans say, is within reach, John Boehner on Thursday all he is running around the coungiving them hope for greater but ruled out passage of immitry telling everyone he’s going leverage in negotiations on gration legislation before this to keep acting on his own.” immigration in 2015. But the fall’s elections, saying it would Just last week, Boehner and year leading up to the presidenbe difficult for the GOP-led other House Republican leadtial election could be a tough House to act on the issue that ers had unveiled broad prinPresident Barack Obama has ciples for immigration changes, one for making progress since Republican candidates tend to made a top domestic priority. including legal status for the In his most pessimistic comestimated 11 million immigrants move right to shore up support ahead of the primaries. ments, Boehner blamed the living here illegally, tougher stalemate on widespread skepti- border security and a shot at The latest unraveling on cism that Obama would propcitizenship for children brought immigration came quickly. erly enforce any immigration to the country illegally. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who reforms that Congress approved. National Republicans see the had advocated for action on The GOP leader didn’t menfailure to act on immigration immigration within his caucus, tion that his own members have as a political drag on the party said this past weekend that balked at acting on the contenafter 2012 presidential nominee passage of a bill was unlikely tious issue, which could enrage Mitt Romney captured just core conservative voters in the 27 percent of the Hispanic vote, midterm election year. and they are pressing for action “The American people, to moderate the party’s image. including many of our memThe principles endorsed last bers, don’t trust that the reform week were seen as a congreswe’re talking about will be sional jump-start for an issue implemented as it was intended that had been stalled since Sento be,” Boehner told reporters ate passage of a comprehensive, at his weekly news conferbipartisan bill last June. ence. “The president seems to But conservatives rebuffed Stressless®/Ekornes® change the health care law on a their leaders and questioned whim, whenever he likes. Now, the wisdom of acting this year,

John Boehner

“The American people don’t trust that the reform ... will be implemented as it was intended.”

in New Mexico have been losing emergency unemployment insurance that has helped them make ends meet while they By Davod Espo continue their search for work. The Associated Press More than 7,400 people across our state are worrying how they WASHINGTON — Senate will get by if Congressional Republicans narrowly blocked Republicans continue to stand the advance of legislation to in the way of an emergency restore benefits for the longextension,” U.S. Rep. Ben Ray term unemployed on Thursday Luján said in a statement after for the second time in less than the Senate vote. a month, and Democrats said “With nearly three job seekthey intended to call yet another ers for every job opening and vote on the issue. our economy in New Mexico “We’re one Republican vote still struggling to recover, now away from restoring unemploy- is not the time to stand idly ment benefits for 1.7 million by. Extending unemployment Americans,” Senate Majority insurance will help those hit Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said. hardest by the recession while The White House called the generating economic activity outcome disappointing. that provides a boost to local The measure called for a businesses,” he added. three-month renewal of an Speaking of Republicans, Sen. expired program that provided Jack Reed, D-R.I., said Democrats up to 47 weeks of federal benhad “met them more than halfefits when state-paid aid runs way” in proposing a bill that was out, generally after 26 weeks. fully paid for and in offering to The cost was estimated at give GOP lawmakers the opporslightly more than $6 billion tunity to make changes if they over a decade. It would have could round up enough votes. been offset by lowering pension Reed, who represents a state obligations for some compawith 9 percent unemployment, nies, a step that would have said some Republicans have increased their taxable income. called the long-term unemployed The vote was 58-40, two shy immoral, a description he said of the 60 that backers of the was “somewhat offensive.” measure needed to prevail. That One Republican critic of the understated the measure’s true bill, Sen. James Inhofe of OklaCOUNSELING support, because Reid sided with homa, issued a statement that for opponents at the last minute in said, “We can get Americans POSITIVE CHANGE a maneuver that will permit him back to work and our economy Most insurance, Medicare to have the issue reconsidered booming again, but this is not 110 Del Rio Dr. LP LISW | 986-8804 under the Senate’s rules. achieved by Washington turnRepublican Sens. Dean ing a temporary federal benefit Heller of Nevada, Susan Collins into another welfare program.” Do You Have Enough To Retire On? of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of At the time the old program Enough information, that is? Alaska and Kelly Ayotte of New expired at the end of the year, Hampshire sided with 52 Demoofficials said it cut off benefits Lynn Landis Financial Advisor crats and two independents on for 1.3 million long-term jobless. 218 East Marcy Street the vote. Since then, Democrats say the Santa Fe, NM 87501 The attempt to renew expired total has swelled to more than lynn.landis@raymondjames.com jobless benefits was the first 1.7 million. legislation that majority DemoThe New Mexican contribcrats placed before the Senate uted to this report. this year, and represents the RAYMOND JAMES & ASSOCIATES, INC. leading edge of their attempt to Let’s have a conversation: ©2013 Raymond James & Associates, Inc. member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC 505-982-1904 • 800-233-4108 Member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC gain support among economically strapped voters at a time PAPERBLANKS polls show that voters are conJOURNALS cerned about the gap between Sanbusco Center • 989-4742 rich and poor. www.santafepens.com In New Mexico, some 7,400 job seekers were receiving extended benefits, but another Now 9,000 are still looking for work Makes an and could qualify in the next six months if the program were extended. The state has one of the slowest economic recoveries in the country and has been last or near last for job growth every month. Now servicing “For more than a month, all makes & models long-term unemployed workers

this year and cited distrust of Obama. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who faces a primary challenge, said Tuesday that differences between the Senate and House were an “irresolvable conflict.” On Thursday, shortly before House members left Washington, Boehner said, “Listen, there’s widespread doubt about whether this administration can be trusted to enforce our laws. And it’s going to be difficult to move any immigration legislation until that changes.” Boehner said Obama has to rebuild that trust. White House spokesman Jay Carney dismissed that demand. “The challenges within the Republican Party on this issue are well-known, and they certainly don’t have anything to do with the president,” Carney said.

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

2014 Legislature

Dems block bill to cut drunken-worker benefits Opponents fear family would be penalized from job-related injuries By Milan Simonich

The New Mexican

Democrats in the state House of Representatives on Thursday blocked a bill to cut workers’ compensation benefits for drunken employees who are injured on the job. The proposal, by Republican Rep. Dennis Roch of Logan, was tabled on a 4-3 party-line vote of the House Labor and Human Resources Committee. House Speaker Kenny Martinez, D-Grants, led the opposition to Roch’s bill. Martinez said the measure would unfairly change the workers’ compen-

sation system and could penalize widows and children for the irresponsible actions of a family’s breadwinner. Roch’s bill was inspired by a decision of the state Court of Appeals. The court in 2010 said conflicting state laws on workers’ compensation benefits had enabled a drunken Las Cruces city worker to collect more than $100,000 in workers’ compensation benefits after he fell off his garbage truck. “An employer ought not be on the hook for the poor decision of an employee,” Roch said. Numerous business groups, including contractors and homebuilders, testified in support of his bill. Their representatives said it was an important step toward improving workplace safety. Opposition was just as heavy, com-

ing from trade unions and trial lawyers. “The bill comes down too hard on injured workers,” said Bob Scott, an attorney who handles workers’ compensation cases. Roch said he sponsored the bill because current state law allows drunken employees to collect up to 90 percent of workers’ compensation benefits if they are hurt on the job. That was what happened in the Las Cruces case. City worker Edward Villa arrived at work intoxicated on April 7, 2006, then skipped the usual check-in procedure, according to court records. Soon after, Villa fell off his truck while trying to dislodge a garbage bin from the hopper. He injured his head, wrists and a hip. Three hours after Villa’s fall, his

Webcasts: Archiving proposal pending Continued from Page A-1 have met resistance from lawmakers. Stewart said Thursday that on three recent occasions, she has invoked a House rule that gives committee chairpersons the discretion to limit the filming of hearings over which they preside, but the rule wasn’t enforced and the governor’s staff continued to make recordings. “I’ve come to believe that our House rules are unenforceable,” Stewart said. Martinez has a contract with a recording crew of three people during the legislative session. The crew uploads legislative meetings to the governor’s website. Stewart claims the Governor’s Office is stripping her of the power she holds as a committee chairwoman. She cites a House rule that reads: “photography, video or audio recording or transmission of committee proceedings may, upon request, be allowed with the permission of the chair.” The Legislature’s webcasting operation and the news media are exempt. But Knell pointed out, “there is nothing in the rules that would prohibit or disallow the Governor’s Office to be present at these public hearings, and provide the service of recording and archiving them to the public.” During a committee meeting Jan. 25, when more than 100 teachers and others involved with education filled the House chamber — largely to criticize the governor’s education ini-

House Education Committee Chairwoman Rep. Mimi Stewart is recorded earlier this week during a hearing. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

tiatives — Stewart said some feared reprisal over expressing their opinions, so she instructed the governor’s videographers to stop recording. “I did not feel it was appropriate that the governor videotape those educators from around the state,” Stewart said. “I said no. They basically ignored that.” She directed House Sergeant at Arms Gilbert Lopez to tell the governor’s video crew to stop. The videographer told guards he was just following orders, and Martinez’s chief of staff, former state Rep. Keith Gardner, got involved in the incident. When Gardner was serving in the Legislature, he had introduced the House rule that enabled webcasting of floor sessions. “He said that rule didn’t really

apply. I’m not in a position to argue it. I left it at that,” Lopez said. “There’s not much that I could do under the circumstances. I’m caught between a rock and a hard place.” The following Saturday, Stewart again objected, but the governor’s videographers continued recording. She says it happened again this week, and she will continue to object. “Now, because they have thumbed their nose at the rules, I don’t want them taping in House Education,” Stewart said, but she acknowledged the Governor’s Office may hold the cards. “The solution,” she said, “is for the governor to follow the same rules that all of us have to follow.” Contact Patrick Malone at 986-3017 or pmalone@sfnewmexican.com.

Panel nixes minimum-wage bump Democrats say increase not large enough By Milan Simonich

The New Mexican

A state Senate committee rejected a bill Thursday night to raise New Mexico’s minimum wage by 50 cents, to $8 an hour. Neither Democrats nor Republicans liked the measure, which was tabled on a 7-2 vote of the Public Affairs Committee. Democrats said the bill was insubstantial, even a step backward, because it would exempt employers with 10 or fewer workers from paying the increase. The statewide minimum wage is $7.50, though Santa Fe and Albuquerque have laws of their own requiring higher pay. Sen. Clemente Sanchez, D-Grants, sponsored the bill because he said it was a realistic attempt to help low-income people make a bit more money. Sanchez said he had come under attack for opposing a bill to raise the minimum wage through a constitutional amendment. This was

his attempt to tackle the problem of underpaid workers through a statutory change, he said. No one testified in favor of the bill, but clergy, labor and border groups opposed it. Like the citizenry, committee members were unenthusiastic about Sanchez’s proposal. Sen. Craig Brandt, R-Rio Rancho, said only 3 percent of the workforce makes minimum wage. He said teenagers already have a difficult time getting jobs, and a raise in the minimum wage would only hurt their chances of landing employment. “The minimum wage was never intended to be a living wage. It’s a starting wage,” Brandt said. He tried to amend the bill to keep 15- to 17-year-old workers at $7.50 an hour, but senators rejected that idea. Sen. Gay Kernan, R-Hobbs, voted to keep Sanchez’s bill alive, even though she said it would have no impact in her part of the state. Wal-Mart in Hobbs pays workers $15 an hour, Kernan said. But two-bedroom apartments run $1,200 a month or more, she said, so Sanchez’s bill would be irrelevant in an area where an oil boom has driven up

wages and prices. Sen. Bill O’Neill, D-Albuquerque, voted against the bill because he said it contained too low an increase and too many exceptions. He said people in his district would support making the minimum wage at least $9 an hour. State legislators last year approved a bill to raise the minimum wage statewide to $8.50. Democrats led that charge. Republican Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed the bill. This session, Rep. Luciano “Lucky” Varela, D-Santa Fe, is sponsoring a bill to raise the minimum wage to $10.10, and to continue increasing it based on changes in the U.S. Consumer Price Index. Sen. Richard Martinez, D-Española, is proposing the constitutional amendment for an increase, tied to cost-of-living increases. Martinez said he went that route to avoid another veto by the governor. Voters decide on constitutional amendments if the Legislature places them on the ballot. Contact Milan Simonich at 9863080 or msimonich@sfnewmexican. com. Follow his Ringside Seat blog at santafenewmexican.com.

Senate Public Affairs OKs proposal to ban e-cigarettes for minors A proposal to ban electronic cigarettes for minors has cleared an early hurdle in the Legislature. The Senate Public Affairs unanimously approved a proposal Thursday to prohibit the sale of e-cigarettes to those under 18. The proposed restrictions are similar to prohibitions on minors buying

cigarettes made of tobacco. Battery-powered e-cigarettes heat a liquid solution often containing nicotine to create vapor that users inhale. Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration backs the legislation. Supporters say the ban is needed because children may view e-ciga-

rettes as safer than tobacco cigarettes although the nicotine used in the devices is addictive and the risks of inhaling nicotine remains unclear. The bill goes to another Senate committee. A similar proposal is pending in the House. The Associated Press

blood alcohol level was measured as 0.12, well above the level for a drunken-driving conviction. The city fired Villa. But he sued and received nearly all of his workers’ compensation benefits. That was because of two state laws at odds on this issue. One law says a drunken worker is not entitled to benefits. But another says his workers’ compensation award can be reduced by only 10 percent if intoxication or the influence of drugs is “a contributing cause to the injury.” Roch’s bill sought to limit awards to drunken workers to between 25 percent and 75 percent. But Martinez said these penalties could be unfair if a worker was found to be only 5 percent negligent. Moreover, Martinez said, the case in ques-

tion was a rarity. Most workers’ compensation claims have nothing to do with an employee being intoxicated, he said. Martinez said the workers’ compensation system was structured to render quick findings in return for reduced benefits to injured workers. Roch’s bill would create a new system of law undercutting that compromise, Martinez said. As for Roch, he said he would be back next year with a another bill aimed at reducing awards to drunken workers injured on the job. It would be his fourth attempt to change the workers’ compensation laws. Contact Milan Simonich at 9863080 or msimonich@sfnewmexican. com. Follow his Ringside Seat blog at sfnewmexican.com.

Legislative roundup Days remaining in session: 13 No-show at racino hearing: Gov. Susana Martinez will not be attending a hearing dealing with The Downs Racetrack & Casino contract scheduled in the Senate Rules Committee on Monday, a spokesman says. Sen. Linda Lopez, D-Albuquerque, who chairs the committee, had invited Martinez, her political adviser, Jay McCleskey, and others to testify at the hearing. But when asked if the governor planned to be there, Martinez spokesman Enrique Knell said in an email, “Of course not.” He followed that with basically the same statement he gave The New Mexican last month for a story on The Downs deal, calling the hearing a “petty political sideshow” and pointing out that Lopez is running for the Democratic nomination for governor. Martinez’s opponents have said the administration gave an unfair advantage to The Downs — whose owners include large campaign contributors to the governor — when awarding the multi-million dollar contract in 2011. Martinez has denied the charge. Proponents of the deal have said a competitive bid wasn’t even required for the contract, which The Downs has held since the 1980s. The hearing is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 10. CYFD under scrutiny: The Senate passed legislation Thursday to study the state agency in charge of protecting children in hopes of avoiding tragedies such as the suspected abuse death of an Albuquerque boy in December. Senate Joint Memorial 3, sponsored by Sen. Michael Padilla, D-Albuquerque, encountered opposition from a handful of Republicans who consider it to be redundant to existing reviews and couldn’t justify its $60,000 cost. The memorial passed on a vote of 32-5, with Sens. Craig Brandt of Rio Rancho, John Ryan of Albuquerque, Pat Woods of Broadview, William Sharer of Farmington and Steven Neville of Aztec opposed. Next, it moves to the committee process in the House. Padilla’s proposal would require the Children, Youth and Families Department to report to the Legislature on three years worth of child abuse or neglect cases and would include workers’ average caseloads and salaries and seek to identify any obstacles to protecting children. Padilla said he was frustrated that CYFD returned $6 million in unspent funds last year while failing to complete its mission in some areas. The death of 9-year-old Omaree Varela, who previously had been the subject of a CYFD case and was allegedly kicked to death by his mother, was noted several times by supporters of Padilla’s proposal. “The department has simply had no answers to this point,” said Padilla, who, along with his sisters, grew up in the state’s foster care system. “We always said if there was ever anything we could do about this, that we would,” he said. In another piece of legislation sparked by Varela’s death, House Speaker Kenny Martinez introduced House Bill 333, which would require the CYFD to immediately take custody of children showing specific injuries from abuse. The bill also would require the parents, guardians or custodians to complete counseling before taking custody of a child in certain circumstances. The bill first will be heard by the House Judiciary Committee. Game poachers: People who kill big game for horns or antlers, wasting the carcass, and those who hunt outside of the legal season or without a valid license would be guilty of a fourth-degree felony under a bill by

Rep. Alonzo Baldonado, R-Los Lunas. HB 128 specifically includes bighorn sheep, ibex, oryx, Barbary sheep, elk, deer and pronghorn antelope. The state Department of Game and Fish has said that at least 100 such animals are killed for their heads, horns or antlers every year. “The waste of these beautiful animals is unacceptable,” Baldonado said in a news release. “We need to protect our wildlife from those who will not respect it. My hope is that stricter penalties will decrease the amount of big game killed for waste.” A fourth-degree felony carries a prison sentence of up to 18 months and a fine of up to $5,000 for those who are convicted. The House Health, Government and Indian Affairs committee gave the bill a unanimous do-pass recommendation Thursday. It goes now to the House Judiciary Committee. Egolf shaves: Rep. Brian Egolf, D-Santa Fe, admitted to his first mistake of the legislative session on Thursday. Egolf, who said he intended to grow his beard indefinitely, arrived at the Capitol clean-shaven. He said that, in the haze of being half-awake, he inadvertently chopped a swath of hair from his face while trying to trim his beard. After that, Egolf said, he had no choice but to take it all off. Land-grant fund grows: Executives of the State Investment Council on Thursday told a House committee that New Mexico’s Land Grant Permanent Fund is now worth $13.1 billion. The endowment grows through investments and royalties for use of state land, notably for oil drilling. The fund benefits public schools, and proposed legislation would tap more of the money for early childhood education programs. Looking ahead: Gov. Susana Martinez is scheduled to visit Presbyterian Española Hospital at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7, to talk about the shortage of health care professionals in Northern New Mexico, as well as discuss the various proposals she has put forward to expand the health care workforce. uThe annual House-Senate basketball game is scheduled to tip off around 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7, at the Capital High School gymnasium. Admission to “Hoops for Hope,” a fundraiser for The University of New Mexico Cancer Center, is $5 at the door. Retired New Mexico State University basketball coach Lou Henson will coach the House squad, while UNM baseball coach Ray Birmingham guides the Senate team. u On KNME-TV’s Report from Santa Fe, Sens. Sue Wilson Beffort, R-Sandia Park, and Bill O’Neill, D-Albuquerque, will discuss last year’s shake-up of the state’s mental health system and how it has affected the mentally ill. The show airs at 8 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 9, on KNME, Channel 5.1 Quote of the day: “This is wild and free, baby. What are you talking about?” — Sen. John Sapien, D-Corrales, to Sen. Bill O’Neill, D-Albuquerque. The curly-haired O’Neil had suggested that Sapien, who sports a “slicked-back” look, switch hairstyles with him so Sapien’s hair would be “wild and free.”

ON OUR WEBSITE u Follow legislative coverage at www.santafenewmexican.com/ news/legislature. u Read Steve Terrell’s blog, www. roundhouseroundup.com and Milan Simonich’s blog Ringside Seat at http://tinyurl.com/RingsideSeat u Subscribe to our updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thenewmexican.


NATION

Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

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Nasty wintry weather blamed on jet stream Thursday’s average national temp of 11 degrees low of year

INsIde

By Seth Bornstein

often, but it’s not that unusual, said Bruce Terry, of the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Md. Question: So how cold was Thursday? Answer: The national average temperature of 11 degrees is the coldest of this winter and likely will be the coldest of the season, according to calculations by Weather Bell Analytics meteorologist Ryan Maue. It was computed from tempera-

u Rare snowstorm batters Pacific Northwest and leaves one dead in Oregon. PAge C-3

The Associated Press

ERT AU HONDA

From Atlanta to the Northeast, Americans, including this pedestrian in Albany, N.Y., are dealing with being battered by cold and storms. Blame the extreme weather on the jet stream. MIKE GROLL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

northern U.S., going west to east in a somewhat straight line. But this winter it has plunged south, creating high pressure ridges and low pressure troughs and taking cold polar air south and east and leaving warm, dry weather to the west. “We are having an unusual jet stream that’s giving us crazy cold weather in the East and the ridiculously resilient ridge as it’s called in California,” said Weather Underground meteorology director Jeff Masters. Question: Why is the jet stream doing this? Answer: There are three different forces probably at work here, but scientists still need to do more research, said Derek Arndt, of the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. One is just the random natural variability of

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Question: Was this just a U.S. thing? Answer: No. Parts of South America and Australia have had much warmer than normal weather. Parts of Europe have been cold and stormy, others record warm. For much of January, Greenland was 8 degrees warmer than normal. Question: When will it end? Answer: Soon enough. In Northern California, heavy rains are coming. A predicted eastern winter snowstorm this weekend is looking less mighty than it did a few days ago. It’s not soon enough for the meteorologists who predict it. “I’m sick of it,” Terry said.

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daily weather. Another is a midlength weather feature called the Pacific Decadal Oscillation — think of it as a cousin of El Niño — that warms the northern Pacific and helps push the jet stream south. And finally, a new and controversial theory is that a warmer Arctic region and shrinking summer sea ice from man-made global warming has shifted jet stream patterns, making it wavier and bringing more unpredictable weather. Question: Is it unusual for the weather pattern to last this long? Answer: It doesn’t happen

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WASHINGTON — Cold and snow keep battering the Midwest and East, and even Atlanta was temporarily paralyzed. California has been bone dry. Alaska set heat records. A cold air mass swept across the upper Intermountain West, the northern Plains and the upper Midwest on Thursday as wind chill advisories were issued across a handful of states. The wild winter somehow became even more wicked Thursday morning when the national average temperature plunged to a brutal 11 degrees — the lowest temperature of a season of extremes Cut Bank, Mont., recorded a morning low of minus 34 degrees with a wind chill factor of minus 48 degrees, while Butte, Mont., recorded a morning low of minus 34 degrees. Snow flurries forced early school closures in Dallas and snarled traffic across the northern half of Texas. Oklahomans hunkered down indoors for the third time this week as icy roads and bitterly cold temperatures closed schools and government offices and canceled sporting events. A weather weary nation asks a simple question: Why? The answer is the jet stream, the river of air that dictates our weather. Normally the jet stream stays in Canada or the

tures at 7 a.m. EST in the lower 48 states. The lowest reading was minus 34 in Montana and several areas were minus 20, according to the National Weather Service. Question: Has this been a record winter? Answer: No. Given the unusual heat in the West and the cold in the East, they almost balance each other, Masters and Arndt said. So when the final monthly statistics come out, January in the U.S. won’t be near record cold. “When you compare it to the 20th century, it was still cold, but not dramatically cold,” Arndt said.

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

Putin: Russian leader puts pressure on country’s athletes to do well Continued from Page A-1 ematic splendor of the London Olympics or the pyrotechnic extravaganza of Beijing, but then again, the Winter Games are usually more low-key. No matter. All Putin needs is an event that tells the world “Russia is back.” It’s a message meant for millions around the world who will watch the show — and his countrymen, too. Russians will form the bulk of the spectators in Sochi for the Olympics, a people whose forebears endured centuries of oppression, a revolution that changed the world, a Soviet experiment that built rockets and nuclear missiles but struggled to feed its people. Russians who sometimes embrace Putin’s heavy hand because they fear uncertainty more than they crave freedom, and who, despite inhabiting the largest country in the world, feel insecure about their place in it.

They’re pinning especially high hopes on their athletes, once a force to be reckoned with and the pride of the nation. They were an embarrassment at the Vancouver Games in 2010, with just three gold medals and a string of doping busts. This year, Russia has cleaned up its game and is presenting hundreds of skaters, skiers and other champions in the arenas on Sochi’s seashore and in the nearby Caucasus Mountains slopes of Krasnaya Polyana. While the United States, Norway and Germany are seen as leading medal contenders, Russia will be pushing hard to bring home a bundle for the home crowd. Putin put on the pressure even as he tried to motivate them this week: “We are all counting on you.” If there was any doubt, it was erased on the first evening of competition, as a booming crowd of Russian shouted “heroes” at world champion pairs Tati-

ana Volosozhar and Maxim Trankov as they, along with men’s skater Evgeni Plushenko, pushed Russia into the early lead in the new competition of team figure skating. “It’s pressure, but this pressure helps us,” Volosozhar said. “They push us very hard,” Trankov added. It was a night on which competition and the athletes finally took a back seat to thoughts about terrorism, but they remain not far from anyone’s mind. A few hundred miles away lies Chechnya, the site of two wars in the past two decades. And Dagestan, childhood home to the two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings and where militants regularly mount attacks. And Volgograd, where two suicide bombs killed 34 people in December. A decade ago, extremists hid a bomb in a stadium in Chechnya during construction. Then when the Kremlin-

DWI: Bill did not address treatment Continued from Page A-1 piece of legislation that in my mind would save lives.” He pointed out that it was created with support from both Democrats and Republicans and had been vetted by numerous parties, including the Governor’s Office. But on Thursday, it seemed to run into a perfect storm. “Weird committee. Weird time [8:30 a.m.] Not enough legislators there,” Lewinger noted. A motion to forward the bill without a recommendation even failed for lack of a second. “It happened so fast. The bill is complicated. I don’t think they all understood it,” said Tom Starke, an ignition interlock advocate with Impact DWI. The mandatory ignition interlock, an emphasis on enforcement of DWI laws by police agencies and education campaigns have made parts of New Mexico safer, but drunken driving is still seen as a continuing problem. “We have some of the toughest DWI laws in the nation. However, we do have a number of loopholes,” said Stephanie Garcia Richard, D-Los Alamos, a sponsor of the bill. HB 10 has three major components: It would include felony DWI under the state’s Habitual Offender Enhancement statute; increase the requirements for removal of an ignition interlock device, which is designed to prevent a person from driving after consuming alcohol; and mandate home Breathalyzers for DWI offenders sentenced to house arrest. One of the targeted loopholes arises when an offender tries to avoid the expense and inconvenience of getting an ignition interlock, which is mandatory after a first offense in New Mexico, by saying, “I don’t have a car.” Requiring a home Breathalyzer instead is a cost-effective solution, Garcia Richard said, because “one day of jail time is the same cost as a month of house arrest.” The ignition interlock removal requirements are meant to increase the odds that the offender has learned not to drink and drive. The bill mandates no more than two breath readings above 0.05 and at least one test per week in the six months prior to reinstatement of a driver’s license. The bill also would make use of the data that interlock companies collect on the results of every “blow.” Currently, no one keeps track of how many times an interlocked driver tries to start his car while drunk. The bill, Thomson said, will help identify those

DWI-reLAteD bILLs

Dwayne Henio Sr. carries his daughter, Delshay, 4, while she holds a sign during the annual March of Sorrow at the Capitol. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

who need treatment. The Legislative Finance Committee’s fiscal impact report says the costs of enacting the bill would be “significant,” but “difficult to quantify.” The Breathalyzer requirement, it says, would increase the burden on a fund that pays the cost of interlocks for indigent offenders. It is presumed that fund also would be used by offenders who need home Breathalyzers. And the habitual-offender enhancement provision could ultimately increase the inmate population and the cost of incarcerating them. Currently, there are 242 people in custody who have felony DWI convictions. Starke,questioned whether the Legislative Finance Committee report took into account the fact that many offenders serve major portions of their sentences on lower-cost monitoring devices. He said the bill could end up saving money by deterring people from drinking and driving. The fiscal impact report also warns that judges have been reluctant to sanction interlocked drivers based solely on interlock test results because of false positives caused by perfume, paint, cough drops and even pizza. And there is no way to know for certain whether it was the interlocked driver who blew into the device or someone else in the car. One member of the Transportation and Public Works Committee, Zachary Cook, R-Ruidoso, raised concerns that the bill does not address treatment. But Lewinger pointed out, “There are other bills that deal with that. You can’t

u HB 16 would increase the annual distribution of the liquor excise tax revenue to the local DWI grant fund starting in fiscal year 2016. u HB 175 would increase the penalties and mandatory incarceration periods for offenders with four or more DWI convictions. The bill passed the House Judicary Committee on Thursday. According to the fiscal impact report prepared by the Legislative Finance Committee, increasing the penalty for a fourth DWI conviction would cost the general fund $12.5 million, if current trands continue. Increasing the mandatory sentence for subsequent offenses would cost an additional $8.2 million. And this burden would shift to the state because the inmates would be housed in prison instead of jail. u HB 190 would provide that the ignition interlock requirement only applies to offenders driving under the influence of alcohol, not drugs. It was referred to the House Judiciary and Transportation and Public Works committees. u HB 196 would make it a crime to cause a minor child to tamper with an ignition interlock device. It was referred to the House Judiciary and Appropriations and Finance committees.

have everything in one bill.” And there’s a difference between crime and disease. “Drunken driving is a choice,” Lewinger said. “Alcoholism is a disease. We need treatment for the disease, but you have to have punitive actions for DWI.” Garcia Richard, however, said she heard the committee’s concern about treatment. “I agree with that need, and if we don’t get it done this year, it’s something I’m committed to pursuing next year.” Thomson is not giving up, either. When she was a student on the Navajo reservation, she said, she “lost a whole lot of friends from drunken driving.” Back in the day, “nobody thought about it,” but the story of drunken driving in New Mexico, is “long and heartbreaking.” Besides Thomson and Garcia Richard, Tim Lewis, R-Rio Rancho, also is sponsoring the bill.

backed Chechen president showed up for a ceremony, the bomb went off, killing him and several others. Fear of terrorism have clouded the run-up, fueled Putin’s strict security agenda and brought U.S. warships to the region. And about 40,000 Russian security forces are working to prevent an attack on the games, and they stand watch in all corners of Sochi and its Olympic Park on the sea and builtfrom-scratch mountain ski resort. The world will be watching the entire Olympic machine in Sochi, and much as it did when Soviet-era Moscow hosted the Summer Olympics in 1980, it will use what it sees to sit in judgment of Putin’s Russia, where he has suffocated political opposition and ruled overtly or covertly for 15 years. Is it a has-been superpower that can’t keep the electricity on during a hockey game? Or a driver of the 21st century global economy? A diplomatic

middleweight with ties to despots that wields influence only via its veto at the United Nations? Or a fairy tale of prosperous resurrection from the communist collapse and its brutal aftermath? Who sits next to Putin on the VIP balcony might provide some clue. President Barack Obama and some other Western leaders are staying away, upset at a law that he championed barring homosexual “propaganda” aimed at minors that has been used to more widely discriminate against gays. But organizers say some 66 leaders — including heads of state and international organizations — are joining the games, including U.N. SecretaryGeneral Ban Ki-Moon. The opening ceremonies will gloss over these ugly bits as they hand over the games to the athletes who will spend the next two weeks challenging records and the limits of human ability.

Budget measure splits House panel along party lines Plan increases spending by about $280 million By Barry Massey

The Associated Press

State spending on public education and government programs would increase by 4.8 percent next year under a proposed budget heading to the New Mexico House with strong opposition from Republicans. The Appropriations and Finance Committee split along party lines Thursday in approving the $6.2 billion budget on a 10-7 vote. Republicans opposed the measure, saying it shortchanged GOP Gov. Susana Martinez’s education initiatives and didn’t leave much revenue available to offset possible economic development tax cuts. “I don’t see this budget as fiscally responsible,” said Rep. Paul Bandy, an Aztec Republican. But Democrats vigorously disagreed. “We worked hard to compromise,” said Rep. Christine Trujillo, an Albuquerque Democrat. “I think we came up with a very, very good budget.” The measure would increase spending by about $280 million in the fiscal year starting in July for programs ranging from courts and prisons to health care for the needy. The committee debate foreshadows a likely partisan split over the budget in the House, where Democrats hold a narrow majority but are missing two members because of health problems. Democrats will need to unify their ranks to muster the votes needed to approve the spending plan and send it to the Senate. It’s possible a House vote could happen as soon as Friday. Spending proposals for education and compensation for public employees could end up as two of the main areas of disagreement between Democrats and the Republican governor. The largest share of the budget goes to public schools, about $2.7 billion. That’s a $150 million or 5.8 percent increase. However, the governor and Republicans object that the vast majority of the money flows to the state’s 89

school districts through a formula that’s meant to help equalize educational opportunities across the state. School districts largely control how the money will be spent. Martinez wants to allocate more money outside of the formula for programs that she maintains will improve schools and student performance. Taking that approach gives her administration greater control over what schools receive the aid. The administration proposed $124 million for the Public Education Department and targeted education initiatives. The committee provided nearly $92 million, which is substantially more than the House Education Committee had recommended. One of the big differences is for a merit pay proposal. Martinez sought nearly $12 million for stipends to high-performing teachers and principals. The committee didn’t fund the proposal, but Democrats contend that school districts have the flexibility to reward their best teachers with compensation money flowing through the school funding formula. Many of the differences between Democrats and Republicans involve relatively small amounts. Martinez asked for $1.5 million for online systems in schools for parents to access information about their children’s classroom work. The committee provided no money. However, Democrats said some schools already have the online systems and others can use operational money in the proposed budget if they want to establish what’s called a “parent portal.” The committee budget provides nearly $111 million for public employee compensation, nearly $78 million above the governor’s recommendations. All government workers and educational employees would receive 3 percent average pay raises, with higher amounts for those in certain jobs such as judges, district attorneys and state police. The governor proposed no acrossthe-board salary increases in her budget recommendations.

Leases: More than 21,000 oil, gas wells already exist in county Continued from Page A-1 and zoning director. Fracking, as it is popularly called, has raised public concerns around the United States as the push for domestic oil and gas development, and the ability to tap into hydrocarbon reservoirs once thought marginal, has expanded the rate and spread of drilling. Rio Arriba County isn’t a stranger to oil and gas wells. Evans said there are more than 21,000 wells on private, state, federal and tribal lands on the county’s western edge, which is part of the hydrocarbon-rich San Juan Basin. Most of the wells are natural gas, although there’s interest now in drilling the Mancos Shale in the region for oil. But the area proposed for oil and gas leasing doesn’t have any active wells. “Development would be new to the area,” Evans said. He said the agency will continue to analyze the hydrology, geology, mineral potential and other factors in the area around Cebolla. He said agency staff could ask the New Mexico BLM Office director to withdraw some of

the land from oil and gas leasing. “That would require a change to the Taos Field Office Management Plan,” Evans said. Otherwise, he said, oil and gas companies will be free to nominate the parcels again for development. The nonprofit Chama Peak Land Alliance, made up of some of the largest landowners in Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico around the Chama Valley, don’t take a stand on oil and gas development.

But they are happy with the BLM’s decision to postpone leasing, said the group’s spokeswoman, Monique DiGiorgio. “They are conservationminded landowners,” she said. “We feel the more we can know about leasing and the potential impacts, the better. We applaud the BLM for taking a step back.” Much of New Mexico has split estates, in which the owner of the surface land might be different from the owner of the mineral rights. Often, the federal government owns the mineral rights and can lease them to companies. Under federal law, mineral rights supersede the rights of the surface land owner. The Western Environmental Law Center in Taos and the nonprofit river advocacy group Amigos Bravos also said the BLM had made the right choice to defer the leasing. The groups said the area is critical to protecting the headwaters of the Rio Grande and the Rio Chama, both of which are sources of drinking water for thousands of people downstream. BLM holds oil and gas mineral lease events periodically. The agency is in

charge of conducting environmental assessments before leasing land and for monitoring wells after they are drilled. The companies that lease oil and gas mineral rights pay royalties and taxes, with the money going to the federal, state and county governments. Oil and gas taxes, leases and royalties make up between one-fourth and one-third of the state’s general fund tax revenues, depending on how they are calculated. A recent report from the New Mexico Tax Research Institute calculates oil and gas production contributions at 31.5 percent of the general fund. Counties can establish ordinances regulating some impacts of oil and gas on surface land, proximity to wells and structures, and other measures. Several Northern New Mexico counties, including Rio Arriba, have ordinances specifically regulating oil and gas drilling. Santa Fe has one of the most restrictive ordinances. Mora County passed an ordinance last year effectively banning oil and gas drilling, but it has been sued by private landowners and oil conglomerate Royal Dutch Shell. Rio Arriba County was consider-

ing amendments to its existing oil and gas ordinance in 2011 when BLM announced the 16 Cebolla parcels would be up for lease. “We had to change gears and put all our focus on the leases,” Sanchez said. She said Rio Arriba County is going to resume looking at amendments to the oil and gas ordinance. “We can’t do an outright ban,” she said. “We’re 70 percent federal, state and tribal land. We know better. We’re not going to put ourselves in a position to get sued.” Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@sfnewmexican.com. Follow her on Twitter @stacimatlock.

On the Web u For more information about the Chama Peak Land Alliance visit chamapeak.org. u For information about oil and gas ordinances in New Mexico, visit www. oilandgasbmps.org/laws/new_mexico_localgovt_law.php#RioArriba. The site does not include Mora’s recent ban.


Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

OPINIONS

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The West’s oldest newspaper, founded 1849 Robin M. Martin Owner Robert M. McKinney Owner, 1949-2001 Inez Russell Gomez Editorial Page Editor

Ray Rivera Editor

OUR VIEW

Dump the guns? A Capitol idea

G LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Readers sound off on candidates I am a veteran and sixth-generation Santa Fean. At the mayoral forums, I have been amazed that Councilor Patti Bushee takes credit for everything good the council has done over the last 20 years and blames everyone else for any city problems. One thing I am particularly upset about was Bushee’s statement, after the Sierra Club endorsed Javier Gonzales, that she was responsible for the Buckman Direct Diversion project. The project reduces our dependence on our aquifer. Bushee must think no one in Santa Fe has any memory. Bushee actually voted against funding the Buckman project. If it were not for Mayor David Coss — who also endorsed Javier — breaking the tie, our aquifer would now be in very bad shape. This may be the reason why so few of the councilors and three mayors with whom Bushee has worked over the last 20 years have endorsed her for mayor.

Dennis Romero

Santa Fe

A force at NMSU We knew Javier Gonzales when we worked at New Mexico State University and he was a regent. Javier was different from other regents we had known. He was interested in how things worked and visited many units. We had not seen a regent do that before. He worked with other regents with different views, including Gov. Susana Martinez’s appointees. He brought people together, forged consensus and supported the start of programs that have been enormously helpful to NMSU. This is one of the reasons he has been endorsed by both teachers’ unions and three Santa Fe school board members. In a time of fiscal austerity, he led the regents to reduce energy consumption, begin a successful high school/college program for at-risk students and support faculty unionization. We need this kind of leadership in Santa Fe. Drs. Carmen Gonzales and Rick Scott

Santa Fe

Pets in her corner Animal rights in Santa Fe are inadequate, but they have a friend on the City Council. Patti Bushee is the moving force for animals in Santa Fe, single-handedly negotiating the land swap between the Bureau of Land Management and the city, resulting in the Santa Fe animal shelter’s new home. Here are a few of her other achievements for pets: u Sponsored sensitivity training for animal control officers, improving their relations with the public and animals. u Spearheaded the establishment of dog parks in Santa Fe.

u Introduced an ordinance requiring a bittering agent in antifreeze. u Introduced an anti-tethering ordinance outlawing chaining dogs outside in extreme weather, and requiring adequate leads and water otherwise. u Lobbied and testified for legislation to outlaw cockfighting in the entire state. Bushee has been the exclusive animal rights advocate on the council. Pet owners owe her a debt of gratitude. Vote for Patti Bushee for mayor for continued protection of our companion animals.

Terry Carlin

Santa Fe

Solid manager I toiled for several decades for a Legislature and in a bureaucracy. In all that time, I rarely served anyone who had both a progressive vision and the managerial capacity to make it happen. There was no end of candidates who promised both, but few who could follow through. That’s why Santa Feans have the good fortune this year to have a candidate for mayor who has a solid track record of both: Javier Gonzales. Gonzales was elected to two terms on the Santa Fe County Commission and accomplished a great deal. As for managing, he took on the toughest of management challenges as chairman of the Board of Regents at New Mexico Highlands University, and then as a regent at New Mexico State University. He persisted for the past nine years, bringing diverse interest groups together and meeting huge educational challenges. This is a rough sampling of Gonzales’ long record of promise and achievement. It is a rare opportunity to have a new great mayor. Javier brings far more than just promises. Michael Pertschuk

former chairman U.S. Federal Trade Commission Santa Fe

Solid in District 2 Joe Arellano’s campaign for City Council District 2 is what American politics is meant to be about. Joe wants to run for office to represent a vision for the city that will benefit everyone, but that also personifies generations of tradition. What’s important about Arellano being a native Santa Fean is that he understands the city. When you grow up in the school system, operate a small business, pay the living wage, meet and hire the people who live in the city, go to church in the city, experience the traffic patterns, you have a special value to the city. Add to that the fact that he’s a natural leader and a proven manager whose plat-

MAllARD FillMORE

Section editor: Inez Russell Gomez, 986-3053, igomez@sfnewmexican.com, Twitter @inezrussell

form includes entrepreneurial ideas like city-owned electric and serving the city’s homegrown businesses, what you get in Joe is a candidate with the experience to make the city a better place to live. He is a man of character who is not a career politician, who wants to work hard for his community and the interests of his family and yours — what more could any of us want in a city representative? Larry Shub

Santa Fe

Transforming politician Santa Fe is in the dawn of a profound transformation. The candidacy of Javier Gonzales for mayor has brought a new manner and level of discourse. Gonzales brings a maturity rarely seen from politicians of his age. As a 40-year resident of Santa Fe, I have never seen such a phenomenon. Against the long-standing economic devastation and the endless political and social unrest, Javier’s exemplary example of democracy at work is dramatically uplifting. I consider this campaign as important to Santa Feans as New Mexico’s next gubernatorial campaign, and even as important as the nation’s next presidential campaign. From Javier, I see an inclusiveness never before attainable and a sincerity never before expressed. Through Javier, I perceive a vision never before imagined and a Santa Fe never before achievable. Fellow Santa Feans: Treat yourself to Javier’s next event and experience the phenomenon. Laban Wingert

Santa Fe

A problem solver We are proud to support Patti Bushee for mayor. For the past 15 years, we have lived in a District 1 neighborhood that has suffered many problems. Though we are only a fraction of the citizens Bushee represents as councilor, she has always listened to our issues and worked to solve them with tact, integrity, intelligence and efficiency. Today, in no small part because of Patti’s efforts, our neighborhood is safer, cleaner and quieter; its modest residential character has been preserved. Clearly, Bushee is committed to our city and to each resident. As mayor, she will use those same personal, professional and intellectual skills to solve today’s problems as well as tomorrow’s. Santa Fe’s mayor is our representative to the rest of the nation. Patti Bushee will make us proud. We hope you will join us in giving her your vote. Rosemary and Bernie Minard

Santa Fe

otta love New Mexico. It’s fine to take a gun to the Capitol — whether concealed or carried openly — but gum is forbidden, at least for the remainder of the legislative session. As one wit said on Twitter, “they will pry my gum from my cold, dead mouth.” And so it goes. Halfway through the short legislative session, with little accomplished and much remaining to do — the sensible legislation to halt the carrying of weapons in the Capitol is on life support. The gun ban, to be fair, is more complicated than it might appear at first glance. Of course, a place where laws are discussed and emotions can run high is hardly a place for weapons, concealed or otherwise. We doubt that having armed citizens makes everyone safer, despite the claims of some law enforcement folks. Additionally, guns are an accident waiting to happen — someone will drop a weapon whose safety is off and a bullet will go wild. Still, one of the admirable features of the Roundhouse is its open nature. Citizens walk in and out, whether kids on a field trip or lobbyists with bills to push. They do not face metal detectors or searches. We like our open government. Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto, D-Albuquerque, is right to worry about a gun ban leading to too-restrictive security at the Roundhouse. We should be proud of how New Mexico’s Capitol is open to all. Yet, Sen. Peter Wirth and Rep. Brian Egolf, both Santa Fe Democrats, also were correct to sponsor firearm restrictions. The sight of weapons — guns were brandished during debates on background checks last year — is intimidating. Just because something is legal doesn’t make it right, or sensible. Gun enthusiasts don’t have much to worry about, though. Any proposed ban on guns faces a tough road ahead. The Senate Rules Committee already voted it down, and the House version has been watered down and barely made it out of committee. We say, take it in steps — watered-down restrictions are better than nothing (a long legislative session might be the place for the discussion.) Go for legislation that would ban the open carrying of guns in demonstrations outside the Capitol, in public spaces and during hearings. At least give witnesses the peace of mind that they can testify without gazing out on shotguns and rifles. Legislators might enjoy seeing fewer guns held by audience members as well. The Capitol is not the place for weapons. Lose the guns.

The past 100 years From The Santa Fe New Mexican: Feb. 7, 1964: It’s too late to register to vote in the Santa Fe school bond election, which is scheduled March 3. But if you are a resident of Santa Fe and a taxpaying property owner and meet all the other requirements to be a qualified voter — well, go ahead and vote. You don’t really have to be registered to cast a ballot in a school bond election. Feb. 7, 1989: Judging from the reaction of people on Santa Fe streets, getting an official cookie named for New Mexico will be a piece of cake. State legislators from Bernalillo County are sponsoring the bill in the New Mexico House of Representatives to name the bizcochito the official state cookie. Sixteen other representatives co-signed it.

We welcome your letters Letters to the editor are among the best-read features of The New Mexican. We do our best to get every opinion in the paper. It doesn’t have to agree with ours. In fact, the wider the variety of ideas on the Opinions page, the better our readers are served. We try to run them in their turn. They’re all edited — for language, spelling and length. To give all readers a chance to speak out, we limit letter submissions per individual to once a month. Please limit letters to 150 words. Please print or type your name, and give us your address and telephone numbers — home and work — for verification. We keep numbers and addresses confidential. Email letters to: letters@sfnewmexican.com.

DOONESBURy

BREAKING NEWS AT www.SANtAFENEwMExicAN.cOM


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

The weather

For current, detailed weather conditions in downtown Santa Fe, visit our online weather stations at www.santafenewmexican.com/weather/

7-day forecast for Santa Fe Tonight

Today

Partly sunny

Mainly clear

Saturday

Partly sunny

23

41

Sunday

Monday

Partly sunny

46/25

Mostly cloudy and breezy

51/31

Humidity (Noon) Humidity (Midnight) Humidity (Noon)

Tuesday

Mostly cloudy

52/26

Humidity (Noon)

Wednesday

Humidity (Noon)

Mostly sunny and chilly

48/21

Humidity (Noon)

Thursday

Mostly sunny

45/24

53/29

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

51%

66%

41%

45%

42%

40%

39%

34%

wind: WSW 8-16 mph

wind: NW 6-12 mph

wind: WNW 7-14 mph

wind: WNW 6-12 mph

wind: W 10-20 mph

wind: SW 6-12 mph

wind: NW 7-14 mph

wind: WNW 7-14 mph

Almanac

Santa Fe Airport through 6 p.m. Thursday Santa Fe Airport Temperatures High/low ......................................... 25°/10° Normal high/low ............................ 48°/22° Record high ............................... 63° in 2011 Record low .................................. 2° in 1899 Santa Fe Airport Precipitation 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace Month/year to date .................. 0.09”/0.09” Normal month/year to date ..... 0.11”/0.72” Santa Fe Farmers Market 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace Month/year to date .................. 0.06”/0.06”

New Mexico weather 64

40

The following water statistics of February 5 are the most recent supplied by the City Water Division (in millions of gallons). Total water produced from: Canyon Water Treatment Plant: 1.208 Buckman Water Treatment Plant: 3.050 City Wells: 1.325 Buckman Wells: 0.000 Total water produced by water system: 5.583 Amount delivered to Las Campanas: Golf course: 0.000, domestic: 0.085 Santa Fe Canyon reservoir storage: 63.6 percent of capacity; daily inflow 1.03 million gallons. A partial list of the City of Santa Fe’s Comprehensive Water Conservation Requirements currently in effect: • Irrigation water leaving the intended area is not permitted. Wasting water is not allowed. • Using water to clean hard surfaces with a hose or power washer is prohibited. • Hoses used in manual car washing MUST be equipped with a positive shut-off nozzle. • Swimming pools and spas must be covered when not in use. For a complete list of requirements call: 955-4225 http://www.santafenm.gov/waterconservation

Santa Fe 41/23 Pecos 38/25

25

Albuquerque 47/30

87

56

412

Clayton 41/25

Las Vegas 43/25

25

Today.........................................3, Low Saturday ...................................1, Low Sunday ......................................1, Low Monday.....................................3, Low Tuesday.....................................2, Low Wednesday...............................2, Low The AccuWeather Flu Index™ combines the effects of weather with a number of other known factors to provide a scale showing the overall probability of flu transmission and severity of symptoms. The AccuWeather Flu Index™ is based on a scale of 0-10.

54

40

40

285

Clovis 46/28

54 60

25

Today’s UV index

54 285 380

180

Roswell 56/30

Ruidoso 46/39

25

70

Truth or Consequences 55/33 70

180

Las Cruces 57/35

70

Hobbs 51/35

285

Sun and moon

State extremes

Thu. High: 43 ............................ Farmington Thu. Low -6 .................................... Melrose

State cities City Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Cimarron Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Crownpoint Deming Española Farmington Fort Sumner Gallup Grants Hobbs Las Cruces

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo W 37/18 pc 31/19 c 27/16 s 28/18 sf 28/19 pc 32/10 sn 27/7 sf 16/0 c 28/0 pc 21/-2 c 39/20 sn 42/18 pc 30/18 c 43/20 c 27/8 c 39/15 c 34/16 c 25/14 pc 40/21 pc

Hi/Lo W 56/32 pc 47/30 pc 34/16 c 58/41 s 60/34 s 33/16 sn 43/17 c 41/25 c 38/26 pc 46/28 pc 40/19 sn 57/31 s 46/29 pc 43/26 sn 53/31 pc 42/21 sn 42/27 c 51/35 pc 57/35 s

Hi/Lo W 60/32 pc 55/32 pc 38/14 pc 71/43 s 70/40 s 36/20 c 49/18 pc 54/19 c 46/14 pc 59/25 pc 47/22 pc 64/32 s 54/31 pc 48/30 c 62/29 pc 50/24 pc 50/29 pc 66/36 pc 62/38 s

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Las Vegas Lordsburg Los Alamos Los Lunas Portales Raton Red River Rio Rancho Roswell Ruidoso Santa Rosa Silver City Socorro Taos T or C Tucumcari University Park White Rock Zuni

Hi/Lo 35/3 41/25 28/11 36/20 23/2 16/2 19/1 34/16 30/15 32/5 28/3 36/14 38/22 34/14 37/23 24/3 42/21 30/13 39/20

W sn pc sf c c sf pc c sf c c pc pc pc pc c pc pc c

Hi/Lo W 43/25 pc 59/39 s 39/25 c 47/27 pc 48/28 pc 43/18 c 30/16 c 47/27 c 56/30 pc 46/39 pc 50/31 pc 52/33 s 50/33 pc 38/16 c 55/33 pc 50/29 pc 59/37 s 41/26 c 42/21 sn

Hi/Lo W 51/28 pc 63/42 s 46/28 pc 58/30 pc 61/28 pc 51/19 pc 36/12 pc 54/30 pc 70/33 s 54/44 pc 60/33 pc 58/36 s 61/36 pc 42/17 pc 61/37 pc 61/27 pc 64/41 s 47/29 pc 49/24 pc

Weather (w): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sfsnow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Weather for February 7

Sunrise today ............................... 6:59 a.m. Sunset tonight .............................. 5:38 p.m. Moonrise today .......................... 11:54 a.m. Moonset today ............................. 1:16 a.m. Sunrise Saturday .......................... 6:58 a.m. Sunset Saturday ........................... 5:39 p.m. Moonrise Saturday ..................... 12:39 p.m. Moonset Saturday ........................ 2:11 a.m. Sunrise Sunday ............................. 6:57 a.m. Sunset Sunday .............................. 5:40 p.m. Moonrise Sunday .......................... 1:26 p.m. Moonset Sunday ........................... 3:01 a.m. Full

Last

New

First

Feb 14

Feb 22

Mar 1

Mar 8

The planets

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 23/9 42/28 35/25 1/-28 7/-9 22/16 28/19 56/38 42/31 14/0 23/17 21/7 25/17 1/-16 20/2 21/13 34/16 79/68 39/33 11/3 10/-6 53/42 60/52

W sf c pc s pc sn pc pc pc pc sf sn sn pc sf sn sf sh c sf pc r r

Hi/Lo W 23/14 c 53/40 pc 38/24 pc 19/-3 c 12/-16 s 32/24 sn 30/16 pc 56/45 pc 54/35 pc 14/7 pc 20/11 pc 16/4 pc 36/27 i 36/20 pc 16/4 pc 8/-20 s 38/21 sn 80/69 sh 43/35 c 16/11 pc 20/16 s 60/46 pc 64/53 pc

Hi/Lo 24/6 57/42 33/26 10/-3 9/-16 43/35 29/22 60/43 50/36 23/12 31/23 24/16 59/33 41/18 20/12 -6/-31 47/24 78/68 63/45 28/19 32/9 63/48 66/53

W pc pc sn pc pc sn c r sh sn sn sn s sn sn s c sh pc sn c pc pc

Set 6:50 p.m. 3:08 p.m. 10:12 a.m. 5:00 a.m. 11:34 a.m. 9:41 p.m.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

National cities City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Fairbanks Flagstaff Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Rise 7:31 a.m. 4:38 a.m. 10:48 p.m. 2:31 p.m. 1:04 a.m. 9:17 a.m.

Mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Richmond St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Sioux Falls Trenton Washington, DC

Hi/Lo 23/21 28/22 84/72 8/1 4/-11 40/35 29/21 23/10 65/62 31/24 62/48 24/10 23/20 39/29 13/1 34/21 36/31 63/55 52/48 29/21 5/-10 28/21 38/30

W sf sn pc s s r pc sn sh c c sf sn c pc c c sh r pc s s c

Hi/Lo 26/20 34/29 82/74 16/9 12/-4 52/43 30/19 30/20 70/62 34/21 66/48 22/8 34/25 46/29 20/15 42/33 42/32 62/50 56/52 33/23 14/5 30/16 41/28

W pc c pc pc s pc pc sf c pc s pc sn pc pc c i pc r c s pc pc

Hi/Lo W 36/27 sn 42/34 pc 83/70 pc 21/10 sn 15/-4 pc 64/51 pc 30/25 sn 43/21 c 74/60 sh 32/27 sn 70/51 pc 28/22 sn 38/28 sn 39/36 i 34/17 sn 46/37 r 70/42 s 62/54 pc 59/51 r 37/27 sn 19/-10 sn 32/29 sn 38/34 sn

World cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

National extremes

(For the 48 contiguous states) Thu. High: 85 .......................... Tamiami, FL Thu. Low: -48 ......................... Wisdom, MT

On Feb. 7, 1861, the temperature plunged from 40 degrees above zero to 30 below in just 12 hours in Hanover, N.H.

Weather trivia™

When was the worst ice storm in the Q: United States? 28 to Feb 1, 1951; $100 million A: Jan. damage from Texas to New England.

Weather history

Today’s talk shows 3:00 p.m. KOAT The Ellen DeGeneres Show Talk-show host Steve Harvey; American Authors performs. KRQE Dr. Phil KTFQ Laura KWBQ The Bill Cunningham Show Families try to let go of anger and fix relationships. KLUZ El Gordo y la Flaca KASY Jerry Springer CNN The Situation Room FNC The Five MSNBC The Ed Show 4:00 p.m. KOAT The Dr. Oz Show Getting fat to devour itself; a pill to cheat on a diet but still lose weight. KTEL Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste KASY The Steve Wilkos Show FNC Special Report With Bret Baier 5:00 p.m. KASA Steve Harvey KCHF The 700 Club KASY Maury

FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 6:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC The O’Reilly Factor 7:00 p.m. CNN Piers Morgan Live MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show 8:00 p.m. E! E! News FNC Hannity 8:30 p.m. KNME Washington Week With Gwen Ifill 9:00 p.m. E! Beyond Candid with Giuliana Beneath the surface of Lovato’s Hollywood journey. FNC The O’Reilly Factor 9:30 p.m. KCHF Life Today With James Robison James and Betty Robison. 10:00 p.m. KASA The Arsenio Hall Show Drew Carey; Charlamagne Tha God; musician Don Felder sits in with the Posse.

10:35 p.m. KRQE Late Show With David Letterman Jimmy Dunn; Lauryn Hill performs a tribute to The Beatles. 11:00 p.m. KNME Charlie Rose KOAT Jimmy Kimmel Live Morgan Freeman; Anna Faris; Motley Crue performs. FNC Hannity HBO Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist P.J. O’Rourke; chef Tom Colicchio; writer S.E. Cupp; TV host Alicia Menendez. 11:05 p.m. KOB Late Night With Jimmy Fallon Actor Andy Samberg; The Muppets. 11:37 p.m. KRQE The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson Tom Lennon; Sarah Paulson; Yakov Smirnoff; Tony Deyo. 12:02 a.m. KOAT Nightline 1:00 a.m. KCHF The 700 Club FNC Red Eye

City Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Bogota Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Ciudad Juarez Copenhagen Dublin Geneva Guatemala City Havana Hong Kong Jerusalem Lima

Hi/Lo 48/42 55/41 55/34 90/77 59/45 31/19 50/32 68/45 70/59 64/50 85/70 43/22 41/34 45/41 46/34 73/61 86/57 72/65 50/35 81/68

W r r s pc s pc pc pc r s pc pc pc pc pc pc s c s s

Hi/Lo 45/39 57/49 59/40 91/74 54/48 31/23 47/34 63/47 81/68 66/50 87/73 59/41 42/37 44/40 43/32 79/53 87/63 75/62 53/39 82/68

TV

1

W sh r s pc s sn c t r pc t s r r sh pc s pc pc pc

Hi/Lo 48/41 62/51 61/41 92/74 58/45 39/17 47/38 66/49 82/70 66/46 88/73 64/38 40/37 48/40 43/36 74/56 86/64 69/65 55/38 82/68

W r pc pc s c s pc sh t s s s pc r r pc t r s pc

3

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 59/55 50/44 61/46 74/49 12/-7 25/17 78/52 52/41 45/30 91/77 59/46 84/55 36/21 88/73 34/32 73/64 43/32 34/14 41/32 52/37

W r r c pc pc pc pc r pc s s s pc c c pc pc pc i pc

Hi/Lo 55/52 48/41 48/43 75/46 19/9 27/21 74/52 51/42 43/33 91/77 59/49 82/54 43/30 86/75 38/32 81/66 45/30 33/21 47/37 44/31

W sh r c pc sf sn pc sh pc pc s s r c sn s pc c pc r

Hi/Lo 57/50 50/41 52/39 75/45 19/10 33/27 72/48 48/39 43/36 92/78 59/52 81/54 39/27 88/75 39/32 84/68 37/35 35/23 48/38 47/32

W r sh r pc pc c pc r pc s pc s sn t c s sn s c c

top picks

6:30 p.m. on NBC XXII Winter Olympics More than 2,500 athletes from 88 nations will stream into Fisht Olympic Stadium in Sochi, Russia, for the Opening Ceremony of the XXII Winter Olympics. Bob Costas will host NBC’s same-day delay coverage of this display of international unity, including the lighting of the Olympic flame. But don’t look for this event online, as NBC has said its pageantry will make this a TV-only broadcast. 7 p.m. on CBS Undercover Boss Mike Bloom, president and chief operating officer of Family Dollar Stores, must disguise not only his identity but his fear of heights when he goes undercover. One of the frontline jobs he takes in the discount retail chain requires him to ride a forklift 35 feet into the air. An invitation from a co-worker causes another sticky situation in “Family Dollar.” 8 p.m. on CBS Hawaii Five-0 Gunmen storm Five0’s headquarters after McGarrett and Wo Fat (Alex O’Loughlin, Mark Dacascos) escape from custody, compromising Kono and Adam’s (Grace Park, Ian Anthony Dale) Hong Kong hiding place and forcing McGarrett to take drastic steps to find Catherine (Michelle Borth). Chi

2

City Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Prague Rio de Janeiro Rome Santiago Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Vancouver Vienna Zurich

McBride guest stars as Capt. Lou Grover, a name fans of the original series might recognize, in “Aloha ke kahi I ke kahi” — Hawaiian for “we need each other.” 9 p.m. on CBS Blue Bloods Danny and Erin (Donnie Wahlberg, Bridget Moynahan) reopen a cold case: an attack on a girl by her wealthy boyfriend (Eric Mabius, Ugly Betty), who was never convicted. A friend of Jamie’s (Will Estes) sues a friend of Danny’s over an injury at a pickup basketball game in “Quid Pro Quo.” Tom Selleck and Amy Carlson also star. 9:30 p.m. on PBS American Masters The new episode “Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth” profiles the acclaimed author and activist, pictured above, who won a Pulitzer Prize for her novel The Color Purple, becoming the first black woman to win the Pulitizer for fiction. Filmmaker Pratibha Parmar uses news footage, historic documents and her own extensive interviews with Walker to tell her story.

4 5

NEW YORK large piece of stage backdrop autographed by the Beatles during their first live U.S. concert 50 years ago is headed to auction, where it could draw $800,000 to $1 million. Face caricatures accompany the signatures that the Fab Four penned between sets of their historic Ed Sullivan appearance on Feb. 9, 1964, which they opened with “All My Loving” in front of 700 screeching fans in the audience and 73 million television viewers. The current owner of the 4-footby-2-foot plastic wall section is Andy Geller, a longtime Beatles collector and television and film voice-over artist. It is being sold in New York City on April 26 through the Dallas-based auction house Heritage Auctions. A stagehand is responsible for getting the band members to sign the back of the wall section known as a hardwall traveler, which is rolled back and forth to reveal the next act. It’s believed to be the largest Beatles autograph. “It was a spur of the moment thing,” 81-year-old Jerry Gort said in a telephone interview from his Calabasas, Calif., home. “They came down from stage right from their dressing rooms, I gave them a marker and asked them to sign the wall.” The band signed vertically from the bottom up: John Lennon first, then Paul McCartney, who scribbled “Uncle Paul McCartney,” followed by George Harrison. Ringo Starr, shorter than the rest, couldn’t reach the top so “I put my arms around him and lifted him,” said Gort, simultaneously putting his foot on the wall to keep it from opening until Starr finished signing the piece. Gort said Starr then “made a mad dash to get to his drums,” and the band launched into “I Saw Her Standing There” and “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” The wall also contains the signature of other acts that followed later in the television season, notably from the Searchers, another British band, which signed “The Searchers Were Here with Kilroy 4/5/64.” At the end of the season, the wall was destined for the trash heap — but was saved by another carpenter for a young disabled Beatles fan. Geller said he purchased the wall privately for more than $100,000 in 2002 without knowing its history. According to Gort, his grandson called him excitedly in 2006 to say he had read an article in Rolling Stone magazine that mentioned a guy in Los Angeles who owned the Beatles-autographed wall that Gort so often talked about. The grandson located a telephone number for Geller’s agent and before long, Gort and Geller met. It turned out they lived only miles apart. The wall’s whereabouts between when the boy owned it and Geller purchased it remains a mystery. It’s rumored to have hung in a Baton Rouge bar once and was owned by another Beatles collector. But Geller said he dealt with a middleman and does not

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0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High; 8-10, Very High; 11+, Extreme The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

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Ed Sullivan Beatles’ item to be auctioned By Ula Ilnytzky

380

Carlsbad 60/34

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ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

The Associated Press

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380

Alamogordo 56/32

On Feb. 9, 1964, The Beatles appeared on U.S. television for the first time, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show.

AccuWeather Flu Index

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Thursday’s rating ............................... Good Today’s forecast ................................. Good 0-50, Good; 51-100, Moderate; 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200, Unhealthy; 201-300, Very Unhealthy, 301500, Hazardous Source: EPA

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Taos 38/16

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Española 46/29 Los Alamos 39/25 Gallup 42/21

Raton 43/18

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666

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285

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Farmington 43/26

Area rainfall

Albuquerque 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.01” Month/year to date .................. 0.18”/0.18” Las Vegas 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace Month/year to date .................. 0.04”/0.08” Los Alamos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace Month/year to date .................. 0.02”/0.02” Chama 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.02” Month/year to date .................. 0.63”/1.00” Taos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.01” Month/year to date .................. 0.06”/0.07”

Air quality index

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Autographs by The Beatles are on a 4-foot-by-2-foot section of a backdrop wall from the New York theater where The Ed Sullivan Show took place. Between the group’s sets during their historic television appearance Feb. 9, 1964, the four Beatles penned their autographs and drew caricatures at the urging of a stagehand. Now that artifact, believed to be the largest Beatles autograph, is being sold April 26, 2014, by Heritage Auctions in New York, where it could go for $800,000 to $1 million. COURTESY HERITAGE AUCTIONS

know who had it before him. The 53-year-old Geller said the artifact was prominently displayed in his home in a framed picture box and was his most significant piece of Beatles memorabilia. He said he was selling it because “I’m not sure I’ll be here for the 75th” anniversary of the Beatles’ U.S. invasion. More practically, the father of three said he’s always used the excuse that he bought it as an investment. “Now I kind of get to prove that it is an investment,” said Geller, who has voiced trailers for such movies as Armaggedon and Finding Nemo. The wall is being sold with a signed letter from Gort and a letter of authenticity from noted Beatles autograph expert Frank Caiazzo. It will be on display in the window of Heritage Auctions’ Park Avenue gallery in time for Beatlefest, an autograph and memorabilia event at the Grand Hyatt New York that runs Friday through Sunday. The priciest Beatles collectible is John Lennon’s handpainted Rolls Royce Phantom V, which sold at a 1985 auction for $2.23 million. The most expensive Beatles handwritten lyric is for “All You Need is Love,” auctioned for $1.25 million in 2005. Heritage’s music memorabilia consignment director Garry Schrum called the wall “an amazing wild card,” which could go for “$800,000 to $1 million, maybe more.”


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

Scoreboard B-2 Prep scores B-3 Olympics B-4 Generation Next B-6

SPORTS

‘Invidia’ runs deep around these parts

PREP BASKETBALL

Española Valley boys head coach reinstated Investigation finds no evidence of Martinez bullying players

I

nvidia. In New Mexico, it’s a word that needs little explaining because its meaning easily translates across languages. And when Española Valley head volleyball coach Damon Salazar used it during the public participant segment of Thursday’s Española Public School board meeting, everybody in the room James knew what he Barron was referring to. Commentary Sure, it was in regards to the turmoil surrounding Richard Martinez and Española’s boys basketball team, but the roots of invidia run deeper than just this once instance. Invidia runs deep around these parts. If people aren’t taking shots at Martinez, then it’s the St. Michael’s athletic program (Well, because they win at everything. Oh, and they recruit. But you know that, right?) If it’s not St. Michael’s, then it’s those pesky private schools (see above). Whatever the circumstance, just know this: If you’re successful in this state, there are people just dying to knock you down a few pegs. In the case of Richard Martinez, who was placed on administrative

B

Play ball: Diamondbacks pitchers, catchers kick off spring training early. Page B-5

By James Barron The New Mexican

Española Valley head coach Richard Martinez directs his team at a Jan. 25 game against Capital at the Edward Medina Gymnasium in Española. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

ESPAÑOLA — Richard Martinez will return to the sidelines as Española Valley’s head boys basketball coach, as soon as Monday. Randy Trujillo, the superintendent of the

Española Public School District, informed the school board of the decision during its meeting on Thursday at Carlos Vigil Middle School before a crowd of about 75 people — many of them there in support of the embattled coach. Martinez, who has coached at the school for 11 years and led the Sundevils to the Class AAAA championship in 2011, had been on

Please see COACH, Page B-3

2014 WINTER OLYMPICS

LET THE GAMES BEGIN

Please see INVIDIA, Page B-3

Buffalo Sabres goalie Ryan Miller checks his glove after giving up a goal to the Colorado Avalanche in a Feb. 1 game in Denver. DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Germany’s Severin Freund makes an attempt in the men’s normal hill ski jump training Thursday at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. The Games kick off with tonight’s Opening Ceremony. MATTHIAS SCHRADER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIC HOCKEY

U.S. goalie eager to reprise his MVP role By John Wawrow

The Associated Press

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Ryan Miller’s freshly designed red, white and blue goalie mask — with Uncle Sam on one side and a soaring bald eagle on the other — has arrived. The flights have long been booked for himself, his wife and father. And Miller has already arranged for his mother and sister to take care of the family dog over the next two weeks. The U.S. goalie has done everything within his control in preparing to travel to Sochi for the start of the Winter Games. “Yeah, getting a little anxious to get

SochiOlympics

Please see MVP, Page B-4

MEDAL COUNT U.S. Russia China France Australia Japan S. Korea N. Zealand

G 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

What to watch for as the Olympics begin with tonight’s Opening Ceremony feet” — will brighten the TV coverage. Then, on Saturday, it’s finally go SOCHI, Russia time. (Except for the few dozen athime for the games to begin. letes who actually compete Thursday Thank goodness. in a handful of events that started To put it mildly, this has early due to a jam-packed schedule.) not been the most carefree Here are a few things to watch as of lead-ups to the Olympics. It has the action gets going in earnest: been roiled by security concerns, arguments about gay rights and the still-questionable hosting abilities Team skating of a country that spent $50 billion Can he or can’t he? Russian skatbut remained busy slapping paint on buildings only hours before the cauling icon Evgeni Plushenko won a dron was set to be lit. spot for a newly added event, team Snowboarder Shaun White pulled figure skating. It was based upon a out of slopestyle — one of the newest, performance seen by nobody outside most-anticipated events. of the country’s top skating officials. Lindsey Vonn never showed up. Dealing with back problems, PlushStill, there are in the neighborhood enko has hardly been seen in actual of 3,000 skiers, skaters, sliders and competition over the past year. The others getting ready to put on a show skater who has already won Olympic for the next 16 days or so. Most of gold and two silvers is hoping to add them will be at the opening ceremony another to his collection in an event Friday, where the long, time-filling designed to bring a sense of camarabarrage of fun facts about the 88 derie to a sport that has always been participating countries — “Yes, Bob, about individual performances. The there really is a mountain in Jamaica. men’s team long program is Sunday. Blue Mountain Peak rises to 7,402

By Eddie Pells

The Associated Press

T

WHAT TO WATCH B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

For complete Olympic coverage, go to www. santafenewmexican.com

6:30 p.m., NBC SAME-DAY TAPE: Opening Ceremony from Fisht Olympic Stadium Midnight., NBC SAME-DAY TAPE: Opening Ceremony encore from Fisht Olympic Stadium For complete listing of Olympic events, see B-2

Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford of Canada compete in the team pairs short program figure skating competition Thursday at the Iceberg Skating Palace in Sochi, Russia. VADIM GHIRDA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Breaking your own record In some circles, Ole Einar Bjoerndalen of Norway is considered among the best athletes of all time. He’s got a

record 11 Olympic medals in the taxing sport of biathlon. Still competing at 40, he’ll go for No. 12 on Saturday in the 10 kilometer sprint. While Ameri-

Please see GAMES, Page B-4

SOCHI HIGHLIGHTS

GOOD AS GOLD

Pre-opening events: Competition at the Sochi Olympics started even before Friday’s formal opening ceremony because 12 men’s and women’s medal events have been added since the Vancouver Games four years ago.

Hannah Kearney, U.S., women’s moguls: Kearney’s bid for another Olympic gold medal in women’s moguls is off to a flawless start. The defending champion cruised through qualifying, posting a score of 23.05, well clear of Canada’s Chloe DufourLapointe for the top spot. Justine Dufour-Lapointe took third and Maxime Dufour-Lapointe finished eighth.

Slopestyle: Slopestyle made its premiere as an Olympic sport, with Max Parrot of Canada backing up his win last month at the Winter X Games with a 97.5 — 2½ points short of perfect — in a qualifying run punctuated by a triple-flipping jump. Team figure skating: Looking right at home on the Sochi ice, Russia took the lead after the pairs and men’s short programs in the new team figure skating event. More on B-4

Sports editor: James Barron, 986-3045, jbarron@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Stephanie Proffer, sproffer@sfnewmexican.com

BREAKING NEWS AT WWW.SANTAfENEWMExICAN.COM


B-2

NATIONAL SCOREBOARD

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

BASKETBALL basketball

Nba eastern Conference

atlantic Toronto Brooklyn New York Boston Philadelphia southeast Miami Atlanta Washington Charlotte Orlando Central Indiana Chicago Detroit Cleveland Milwaukee

W 26 22 19 17 15 W 35 25 24 22 14 W 38 24 19 16 9

l 23 25 30 33 35 l 13 23 24 28 37 l 10 24 29 33 40

Pct .531 .468 .388 .340 .300 Pct .729 .521 .500 .440 .275 Pct .792 .500 .396 .327 .184

Western Conference

Gb — 3 7 91/2 111/2 Gb — 10 11 14 221/2 Gb — 14 19 221/2 291/2

southwest W l Pct Gb San Antonio 36 14 .720 — Houston 33 17 .660 3 Dallas 29 21 .580 7 Memphis 26 22 .542 9 New Orleans 21 27 .438 14 Northwest W l Pct Gb Oklahoma City 40 11 .784 — Portland 35 14 .714 4 Denver 24 23 .511 14 Minnesota 24 25 .490 15 Utah 16 32 .333 221/2 Pacific W l Pct Gb L.A. Clippers 34 18 .654 — Golden State 29 20 .592 31/2 Phoenix 29 20 .592 31/2 L.A. Lakers 17 32 .347 151/2 Sacramento 17 32 .347 151/2 thursday’s Games Brooklyn 103, San Antonio 89 Chicago at Golden State Friday’s Games Oklahoma City at Orlando, 5 p.m. Portland at Indiana, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Washington, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Denver at New York, 5:30 p.m. Utah at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

thursday Nets 103, spurs 89

saN aNtONIO (89) Belinelli 4-6 3-4 12, Green 6-11 2-2 17, Splitter 2-6 1-1 5, Joseph 5-12 7-7 18, De Colo 4-9 3-4 11, Ayres 0-1 1-2 1, Bonner 0-3 2-2 2, Mills 6-13 2-2 16, Brown 2-8 1-3 5, Baynes 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 29-73 24-29 89. bROOklYN (103) Johnson 4-10 0-0 8, Pierce 5-6 1-1 12, Garnett 4-9 0-0 8, Williams 7-14 1-2 16, Livingston 4-9 0-0 8, Blatche 5-12 0-0 10, Anderson 9-15 2-2 22, Kirilenko 1-3 2-4 4, Teletovic 4-10 0-0 8, Plumlee 3-4 1-1 7, Teague 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 46-93 7-10 103. san antonio 24 15 29 21—89 brooklyn 17 23 35 28—103 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 7-21 (Green 3-4, Mills 2-7, Belinelli 1-2, Joseph 1-3, Brown 0-1, Bonner 0-2, De Colo 0-2), Brooklyn 4-13 (Anderson 2-3, Pierce 1-1, Williams 1-3, Teletovic 0-1, Teague 0-1, Blatche 0-2, Johnson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— San Antonio 43 (Green 8), Brooklyn 56 (Garnett 9). Assists—San Antonio 14 (Green, Joseph 3), Brooklyn 29 (Williams 8). Total Fouls—San Antonio 12, Brooklyn 24. Technicals—San Antonio defensive three second, Brooklyn defensive three second. A—17,732.

Nba leadeRs

through Feb. 5 scoring G FG Ft Pts Durant, OKC 50 507 426 1550 Anthony, NYK 46 443 279 1256 James, MIA 47 454 268 1238 Love, MIN 47 392 312 1203 Curry, GOL 46 387 190 1118 Aldridge, POR 49 482 217 1182 Harden, HOU 42 301 312 999 Griffin, LAC 52 458 306 1231 Cousins, SAC 42 343 266 952 George, IND 48 372 230 1088 FG Percentage FG FGa Jordan, LAC 209 320 Bogut, GOL 187 294 Drummond, DET 269 440 Howard, HOU 334 577 James, MIA 454 787 Horford, ATL 238 420 Diaw, SAN 187 338 Wade, MIA 269 490 Faried, DEN 201 367 Rebounds G OFF deF tOt Jordan, LAC 52 221 509 730 Love, MIN 47 154 467 621 Drummond, DET48 251 362 613 Howard, HOU 50 166 452 618 Cousins, SAC 42 131 357 488 Aldridge, POR 49 119 450 569 Noah, CHI 46 173 350 523 assists G ast Paul, LAC 34 380 Curry, GOL 46 417 Lawson, DEN 43 382

NCaa basketball Men’s top 25

aVG 31.0 27.3 26.3 25.6 24.3 24.1 23.8 23.7 22.7 22.7 PCt .653 .636 .611 .579 .577 .567 .553 .549 .548 aVG 14.0 13.2 12.8 12.4 11.6 11.6 11.4 aVG 11.2 9.1 8.9

thursday’s Games No. 2 Arizona 67, Oregon 65 No. 7 Cincinnati 63, No. 22 UConn 58 No. 9 Michigan State 82, Penn State 67 Friday’s Games No. 6 Villanova vs. Seton Hall, 5 p.m. No. 12 Creighton vs. DePaul, 7:07 p.m. saturday’s Games No. 3 Florida vs. Alabama, 10 a.m. No. 4 Wichita State at Northern Iowa, 7 p.m. No. 5 San Diego State vs. Nevada, 8 p.m. No. 7 Cincinnati at SMU, 5:30 p.m. No. 8 Kansas vs. West Virginia, 2 p.m. No. 10 Michigan at No. 17 Iowa, Noon No. 11 Duke at Boston College, 4 p.m. No. 13 Saint Louis at La Salle, 3 p.m. No. 15 Texas at Kansas State, 11:30 a.m. No. 16 Iowa State vs. TCU, 2 p.m. No. 18 Kentucky at Mississippi State, 11:30 a.m. No. 19 Oklahoma State at Texas Tech, 7:30 p.m. No. 20 Virginia at Georgia Tech, 10 a.m. No. 21 Oklahoma vs. Baylor, 5 p.m. No. 23 Gonzaga at No. 24 Memphis, 7 p.m. No. 25 Pittsburgh vs. Virginia Tech, 10 a.m. sunday’s Games No. 1 Syracuse vs. Clemson, 4 p.m. No. 2 Arizona vs. Oregon State, 5 p.m. No. 9 Michigan State at Wisconsin, 11 a.m. No. 12 Creighton at St. John’s, 5 p.m. No. 22 UConn at UCF, 4 p.m.

Men’s division I

thursday’s Games east Bryant 79, CCSU 68 Marist 68, Rider 61 Mount St. Mary’s 73, Sacred Heart 60 NJIT 110, Wheelock 46 Robert Morris 65, LIU Brooklyn 56 St. Francis (NY) 78, St. Francis (Pa.) 52 Wagner 75, Fairleigh Dickinson 68 south Appalachian St. 54, The Citadel 45

Austin Peay 75, Tennessee St. 65 Belmont 99, Murray St. 96 Davidson 109, Samford 88 ETSU 64, N. Kentucky 50 Elon 72, UNC Greensboro 66 FIU 78, UAB 73 Florida Gulf Coast 100, Jacksonville 71 Georgia 91, LSU 78 Lipscomb 77, SC-Upstate 75 Louisiana Tech 66, Tulsa 61 Middle Tennessee 67, FAU 63 North Florida 54, Stetson 52 Northwestern St. 85, McNeese St. 74 Old Dominion 69, UTSA 61 Troy 79, South Alabama 74 UTEP 58, East Carolina 47 VCU 68, Rhode Island 52 Winthrop 92, Barber-Scotia 62 Wofford 74, Georgia Southern 61 southwest Abilene Christian 80, Houston Baptist 71 Cent. Arkansas 85, SE Louisiana 71 Georgia St. 68, UALR 57 Incarnate Word 82, Texas A&M-CC 78 Louisiana-Lafayette 92, TexasArlington 89 Oral Roberts 79, New Orleans 59 Rice 75, North Texas 70 SMU 75, Temple 52 Stephen F. Austin 93, Nicholls St. 64 Texas St. 65, Louisiana-Monroe 57 Far West Arizona 67, Oregon 65 E. Washington 79, Montana St. 50 Idaho 73, New Mexico St. 67 Idaho St. 73, N. Colorado 70 Montana 82, Portland St. 76, OT Utah 78, Washington 69 Utah Valley 79, Grand Canyon 68 Weber St. 84, North Dakota 72 Midwest Bradley 63, Loyola of Chicago 54 Cincinnati 63, UConn 58 Cleveland St. 92, Oakland 85 E. Illinois 91, UT-Martin 79 Michigan St. 82, Penn St. 67 N. Dakota St. 66, IUPUI 60 S. Dakota St. 79, IPFW 51 SIU-Edwardsville 93, SE Missouri 88, OT

Women’s top 25

thursday’s Games No. 2 Notre Dame 81, Florida State 60 No. 5 Duke 78, Clemson 51 No. 6 South Carolina 71, Mississippi St. 64 No. 8 Tennessee 77, Mississippi 65 Iowa 73, No. 9 Penn State 70 No. 10 Maryland 94, Pittsburgh 46 Georgia Tech 94, No. 13 North Carolina 91 No. 14 N.C. State 74, Wake Forest 69 No. 16 LSU 75, Missouri 58 No. 20 Gonzaga 86, Pepperdine 51 No. 25 Purdue 74, Ohio State 58 Friday’s Games No. 3 Stanford at Washington State, 7 p.m. No. 23 California at Washington, 9 p.m. saturday’s Games No. 17 West Virginia vs. Kansas State, Noon No. 20 Gonzaga vs. Loyola Marymount, 3 p.m. No. 21 Middle Tennessee vs. Rice, 1 p.m. No. 22 Nebraska vs. No. 24 Michigan State, 1 p.m. sunday’s Games No. 1 UConn vs. No. 4 Louisville, 11 a.m. No. 2 Notre Dame vs. Syracuse, 1 p.m. No. 3 Stanford at Washington, 1:30 p.m. No. 6 South Carolina vs. Arkansas, noon No. 7 Baylor vs. No. 12 Oklahoma State, 2 p.m. No. 9 Penn State at Ohio State, noon No. 10 Maryland vs. Clemson, noon No. 11 Arizona State at Arizona, 1 p.m. No. 14 N.C. State at Virginia Tech, noon No. 15 Kentucky at Florida, 10 a.m. No. 16 LSU at No. 19 Texas A&M, 12:30 p.m. No. 23 California at Washington State, 3 p.m. No. 25 Purdue at Michigan, 10 a.m.

Women’s division I

thursday’s Games east Boston College 69, Virginia 65 Buffalo 55, Ohio 43 Iowa 73, Penn St. 70 Manhattan 58, St. Peter’s 31 Marist 78, Siena 39 New Hampshire 46, UMBC 35 Rider 92, Iona 90, OT Syracuse 73, Virginia Tech 48 Towson 65, Hofstra 63 south Duke 78, Clemson 51 Florida Gulf Coast 70, ETSU 45 Georgia Tech 94, North Carolina 91 High Point 64, Campbell 59 Kennesaw St. 88, Lipscomb 79 LSU 75, Missouri 58 Liberty 64, Coastal Carolina 46 Longwood 71, Charleston Southern 59 Maryland 94, Pittsburgh 46 McNeese St. 59, Northwestern St. 57 N. Kentucky 72, Mercer 64 NC State 74, Wake Forest 69 Notre Dame 81, Florida St. 60 Presbyterian 53, Radford 46 South Carolina 71, Mississippi St. 64 Stetson 79, SC-Upstate 66 Tennessee 77, Mississippi 65 Troy 78, South Alabama 53 Winthrop 57, Gardner-Webb 52 southwest Abilene Christian 82, Houston Baptist 70 Arkansas 55, Florida 49 Cent. Arkansas 80, SE Louisiana 70 Nicholls St. 75, Stephen F. Austin 74, 2OT Oral Roberts 93, New Orleans 62 Seattle 75, Texas-Pan American 68, OT Texas A&M-CC 60, Incarnate Word 56 Texas-Arlington 73, LouisianaLafayette 54 Far West Cal St.-Fullerton 60, UC Riverside 57 E. Washington 81, Montana St. 66 Gonzaga 86, Pepperdine 51 Grand Canyon 66, Utah Valley 63 Idaho 75, New Mexico St. 66 Idaho St. 79, N. Colorado 71 Montana 65, Portland St. 55 Sacramento St. 99, N. Arizona 91 UC Irvine 78, Long Beach St. 58 Midwest Cent. Michigan 84, Ball St. 81, OT Drake 72, Evansville 57 E. Michigan 65, Kent St. 57 IUPUI 77, N. Dakota St. 53 Michigan 70, Northwestern 68 N. Iowa 78, S. Illinois 48 North Dakota 68, Weber St. 55 Oakland 80, Milwaukee 67 Purdue 74, Ohio St. 58 S. Dakota St. 77, IPFW 66 Toledo 73, Miami (Ohio) 65 W. Illinois 71, Nebraska-Omaha 65

THIS DATE ONON thIs date February 7

1882 — John L. Sullivan wins the world heavyweight bare-knuckle title by beating Paddy Ryan in a nineround bout in Mississippi City, Miss. 1949 — Joe DiMaggio signs his contract with the New York Yankees, making him the first baseball player to earn $100,000 per year.

Maple leafs 4, lightning 1

HOCKEY hOCkeY

Nhl eastern Conference

atlantic GP Boston 56 Tampa Bay 57 Montreal 58 Toronto 59 Detroit 57 Ottawa 58 Florida 57 Buffalo 57 Metro GP Pittsburgh 57 N.Y. Rngrs 58 Phily. 58 Columbus 56 Washington 58 Carolina 55 New Jersey 57 N.Y. Islndrs 59

W 36 32 31 31 26 26 22 15 W 40 31 29 29 26 25 23 22

l 16 20 21 22 19 21 28 34 l 15 24 23 23 23 21 21 29

Ol 4 5 6 6 12 11 7 8 Ol 2 3 6 4 9 9 13 8

Pts 76 69 68 68 64 63 51 38 Pts 82 65 64 62 61 59 59 52

GF 169 164 144 175 149 167 138 110 GF 183 151 160 167 168 138 133 162

Western Conference

Ga 123 143 141 181 159 184 178 172 Ga 134 143 166 156 175 153 142 195

Central GP W l Ol Pts GF Ga Chicago 59 35 10 14 84 207 161 St. Louis 56 38 12 6 82 192 132 Colorado 57 36 16 5 77 169 151 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 Dallas 57 26 21 10 62 162 163 Winnipeg 59 28 26 5 61 165 171 Nashville 58 25 23 10 60 144 175 Pacific GP W l Ol Pts GF Ga Anaheim 59 40 14 5 85 191 145 San Jose 58 36 16 6 78 172 140 Los Angeles 58 30 22 6 66 137 127 Vancouver 59 27 23 9 63 145 157 Phoenix 56 26 20 10 62 160 167 Calgary 57 22 28 7 51 136 177 Edmonton 59 20 33 6 46 152 197 Note: Two points are awarded for a win; one point for an overtime or shootout loss. thursday’s Games Calgary 4, N.Y. Islanders 2 Edmonton 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Philadelphia 3, Colorado 1 Washington 4, Winnipeg 2 Montreal 5, Vancouver 2 Ottawa 3, Buffalo 2 Toronto 4, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 3, Florida 1 St. Louis 3, Boston 2, OT Minnesota 3, Nashville 2, OT Columbus at Los Angeles Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 1 Chicago 2, Anaheim 0 San Jose 2, Dallas 1, OT Friday’s Games Edmonton at New Jersey, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. Florida at Carolina, 5 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 8:30 p.m. saturday’s Games Calgary at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Winnipeg at St. Louis, Noon Ottawa at Boston, 1 p.m. Vancouver at Toronto, 4 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 4 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m. Colorado at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Washington, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 6 p.m.

suMMaRIes thursday Flyers 3, avalanche 1

Colorado 0 0 1—1 Philadelphia 0 1 2—3 First Period—None. second Period—1, Philadelphia, Streit 8 (Lecavalier, Couturier), 6:21 (pp). third Period—2, Philadelphia, Raffl 7 (Couturier, Downie), 7:05. 3, Colorado, MacKinnon 21 (O’Reilly, Landeskog), 17:10. 4, Philadelphia, Giroux 19 (Simmonds, Coburn), 19:40 (en). shots on Goal—Colorado 14-8-17—39. Philadelphia 12-17-6—35. Power-play opportunities—Colorado 0 of 3; Philadelphia 1 of 5. Goalies—Colorado, Varlamov 28-11-5 (34 shots-32 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 23-14-5 (39-38). a—19,982. t—2:35.

Oilers 2, Rangers 1

edmonton 1 0 1—2 N.Y. Rangers 0 1 0—1 First Period—1, Edmonton, Smyth 8 (Perron), 2:56. second Period—2, N.Y. Rangers, Brassard 11 (Zuccarello, Pouliot), :22. third Period—3, Edmonton, Yakupov 11 (Gagner, Hall), 18:22. shots on Goal—Edmonton 8-1310—31. N.Y. Rangers 11-13-12—36. Power-play opportunities—Edmonton 0 of 1; N.Y. Rangers 0 of 0. Goalies—Edmonton, Scrivens 10-8-4 (36 shots-35 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Talbot 10-5-0 (31-29). a—18,006. t—2:24.

Flames 4, Islanders 2

Calgary 0 2 2—4 N.Y. Islanders 0 1 1—2 First Period—None. second Period—1, Calgary, Monahan 16 (Colborne, Russell), 14:15. 2, Calgary, Wideman 4 (Backlund, Brodie), 18:08 (pp). 3, N.Y. Islanders, Hickey 4 (Bailey, McDonald), 19:53. third Period—4, N.Y. Islanders, de Haan 2 (Tavares, Vanek), 7:31. 5, Calgary, Stajan 10 (D.Jones, Wideman), 14:28. 6, Calgary, Backlund 14, 19:57 (en). shots on Goal—Calgary 5-6-11—22. N.Y. Islanders 11-11-8—30. Power-play opportunities—Calgary 1 of 2; N.Y. Islanders 0 of 5. Goalies—Calgary, Berra 8-15-2 (30 shots-28 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Nabokov 10-11-5 (21-18). a—12,888. t—2:21.

Capitals 4, Jets 2

Winnipeg 1 1 0—2 Washington 1 0 3—4 First Period—1, Washington, Brouwer 12 (Johansson, Wellman), 4:56. 2, Winnipeg, Little 18 (Ladd), 13:02. second Period—3, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 13 (Setoguchi, Jokinen), 5:41. third Period—4, Washington, Wilson 2 (Brouillette, Wey), 3:38. 5, Washington, Ovechkin 40 (Backstrom, Alzner), 7:46. 6, Washington, Brouwer 13 (Johansson, Carrick), 15:15. shots on Goal—Winnipeg 14-16-6—36. Washington 11-7-12—30. Power-play opportunities—Winnipeg 0 of 1; Washington 0 of 4. Goalies—Winnipeg, Pavelec 18-22-4 (30 shots-26 saves). Washington, Holtby 16-13-2 (36-34). a—18,506. t—2:27.

senators 3, sabres 2

buffalo 0 0 2—2 Ottawa 0 1 2—3 First Period—None. second Period—1, Ottawa, E.Karlsson 15 (Da Costa, Conacher), 3:12. third Period—2, Ottawa, Michalek 9 (Spezza, Zibanejad), :10. 3, Buffalo, Ennis 13 (Stafford, Leino), 10:25. 4, Buffalo, Stafford 10 (Ehrhoff), 15:46. 5, Ottawa, Michalek 10 (Spezza, Neil), 19:37. shots on Goal—Buffalo 7-13-12—32. Ottawa 11-13-12—36. Power-play opportunities—Buffalo 0 of 7; Ottawa 0 of 3. Goalies—Buffalo, Enroth 1-12-5 (36 shots-33 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 19-11-8 (32-30). a—18,426. t—2:24.

toronto 0 1 3—4 tampa bay 0 0 1—1 First Period—None. second Period—1, Toronto, Raymond 15 (Kulemin, Rielly), 7:57. third Period—2, Toronto, McClement 3 (Clarkson, Lupul), 2:19. 3, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 23 (Gunnarsson, Kessel), 8:10. 4, Tampa Bay, Palat 12 (St. Louis, Johnson), 10:28. 5, Toronto, Bozak 12 (Kessel), 17:08 (en). shots on Goal—Toronto 12-10-14—36. Tampa Bay 9-14-11—34. Power-play opportunities—Toronto 0 of 1; Tampa Bay 0 of 1. Goalies—Toronto, Bernier 21-16-5 (34 shots-33 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop (22-21), Desjardins 0-1-0 (0:00 third, 13-11). a—19,204. t—2:38.

Red Wings 3, Panthers 1

detroit 0 2 1—3 Florida 1 0 0—1 First Period—1, Florida, Upshall 10 (Kopecky, Weaver), 19:34. second Period—2, Detroit, Alfredsson 13 (Abdelkader, Kronwall), 6:30 (pp). 3, Detroit, Nyquist 14, 13:22. third Period—4, Detroit, Lashoff 1 (Helm, Kronwall), 19:40 (en). shots on Goal—Detroit 11-12-10—33. Florida 2-6-16—24. Power-play opportunities—Detroit 1 of 7; Florida 0 of 3. Goalies—Detroit, Howard 12-12-9 (24 shots-23 saves). Florida, Thomas 1517-3 (32-30). a—15,623. t—2:20.

Canadiens 5, Canucks 2

Vancouver 0 1 1—2 Montreal 2 0 3—5 First Period—1, Montreal, Pacioretty 24 (Subban, Markov), 14:59 (pp). 2, Montreal, White 1 (Bournival, Weise), 16:02. second Period—3, Vancouver, Higgins 16 (Garrison, Schroeder), 2:31 (pp). third Period—4, Montreal, Pacioretty 25 (Desharnais, Gallagher), 4:45. 5, Montreal, Plekanec 17 (Desharnais), 8:14. 6, Vancouver, Edler 5 (Diaz, Burrows), 12:21 (pp). 7, Montreal, Pacioretty 26 (Gallagher, Emelin), 18:52 (en). Missed Penalty shot—Pacioretty, Mon, 11:47 second, Pacioretty, Mon, 13:38 second. shots on Goal—Vancouver 12-1517—44. Montreal 9-8-12—29. Power-play opportunities—Vancouver 2 of 5; Montreal 1 of 1. Goalies—Vancouver, Luongo 19-15-6 (28 shots-24 saves). Montreal, Price 25-17-5 (44-42). a—21,273. t—2:37.

blues 3, bruins 2 (Ot)

boston 0 0 2 0—2 st. louis 1 1 0 1—3 First Period—1, St. Louis, Steen 28 (Schwartz, Bouwmeester), 15:48. second Period—2, St. Louis, Schwartz 18 (Jaskin, Pietrangelo), 3:32. third Period—3, Boston, Krejci 13 (Iginla, Lucic), 9:16. 4, Boston, Marchand 18 (Boychuk, Krug), 11:24. Overtime—5, St. Louis, Oshie 14, 3:29. shots on Goal—Boston 11-13-113—38. St. Louis 9-9-7-2—27. Power-play opportunities—Boston 0 of 4; St. Louis 0 of 3. Goalies—Boston, Rask 25-13-4 (27 shots-24 saves). St. Louis, Halak 248-4 (38-36). a—19,671. t—2:36.

Wild 3, Predators 2 (Ot)

Nashville 1 1 0 0—2 Minnesota 2 0 0 1—3 First Period—1, Minnesota, Brodin 8 (Niederreiter), 4:05. 2, Nashville, Smith 17 (Hutton), 5:50. 3, Minnesota, Parise 19 (Heatley, Pominville), 13:27 (pp). second Period—4, Nashville, Smith 18 (Bartley), 7:40. third Period—None. Overtime—5, Minnesota, Niederreiter 11 (Brodziak, Spurgeon), 2:16. Penalties—None. shots on Goal—Nashville 8-3-6-1—18. Minnesota 9-9-15-3—36. Power-play opportunities—Nashville 0 of 2; Minnesota 1 of 5. Goalies—Nashville, Hutton 13-8-4 (36 shots-33 saves). Minnesota, Kuemper 8-3-2 (18-16). a—18,766. t—2:26.

Nhl CaleNdaR

Feb. 9 — Olympic break begins. Feb. 12 — Olympic men’s hockey tournament begins: Sochi, Russia. Feb. 23 — Olympic men’s hockey gold-medal game: Sochi, Russia. Feb. 26 — NHL regular season resumes. March 1 — NHL Stadium Series: Pittsburgh Penguins at Chicago Blackhawks, Soldier Field. March 5 — Trade deadline, 1 p.m. March 10-12 — NHL general managers meeting, Boca Raton, Fla. April 13 — Last day of regular season. April 16 — Stanley Cup Playoffs begin. May 25-31 — NHL combine, Toronto. June 18 — Last possible day for Stanley Cup finals.

GOlF GOLF

PGa tOuR Pebble beach

thursday at Pebble beach, Calif. p-Pebble beach Golf links: 6,816 yards, par 72 (36-36); m-Monterey Peninsula Country Club, shore Course: 6,838 yards, par 71 (34-37); s-spyglass hill Golf Club: 6,953 yards, par 72 (36-36); Purse: $6.6 million; Note: 40 players did not finish due to weather. Partial First Round Andrew Loupe 31-32—63m Stuart Appleby 31-34—65m Jimmy Walker 33-33—66p Jim Renner 31-34—65m Scott Gardiner 31-34—65m Richard H. Lee 32-33—65m Robert Streb 32-35—67p Jordan Spieth 34-33—67s Paul McGinley 33-34—67p Brian Harman 31-35—66m John Huh 32-35—67m Dustin Johnson 33-35—68s Hunter Mahan 33-35—68p Will Claxton 34-34—68s Robert Garrigus 35-32—67m George McNeill 32-35—67m J.B. Holmes 33-35—68p James Hahn 33-36—69p Jason Bohn 36-33—69s Freddie Jacobson 32-36—68m Jason Day 35-33—68m James Driscoll 35-34—69s Michael Putnam 35-34—69s Josh Teater 34-35—69p Matt Jones 32-36—68m Sang-Moon Bae 35-34—69p Lucas Glover 31-37—68m D.H. Lee 32-37—69p Kevin Foley 34-34—68m Danny Lee 32-36—68m Alex Cejka 33-36—69s K.J. Choi 33-36—69p Martin Flores 34-35—69m Ted Potter, Jr. 35-34—69m Jim Furyk 35-35—70s Edward Loar 33-37—70p Bronson La’Cassie 36-34—70p Russell Knox 33-37—70p Pat Perez 34-35—69m Daniel Summerhays 33-36—69m Trevor Immelman 34-36—70s

Brendan Steele 36-34—70s Aaron Baddeley 35-34—69m John Senden 35-34—69m Brian Gay 36-34—70s Will MacKenzie 33-36—69m Roberto Castro 35-35—70s John Peterson 34-36—70s Chris Williams 36-34—70s Cameron Tringale 36-34—70p Troy Matteson 33-37—70m Graeme McDowell 36-35—71s Retief Goosen 36-35—71p Mike Weir 33-37—70m Daniel Chopra 39-31—70m Mark Wilson 35-36—71s Andres Romero 35-36—71s Ben Martin 35-36—71p Kevin Tway 35-35—70m Andrew Svoboda 36-35—71s Dudley Hart 37-34—71p Doug LaBelle II 36-34—70m Geoff Ogilvy 34-37—71s Scott Brown 31-39—70m John Mallinger 37-34—71s Chris Kirk 36-35—71s Hudson Swafford 35-36—71p Jim Herman 34-36—70m Chesson Hadley 37-34—71s Charlie Wi 35-36—71s Kris Blanks 35-37—72s David Duval 35-37—72p Kevin Na 35-37—72p Bo Van Pelt 36-36—72p Steven Fox 33-39—72p Justin Bolli 36-35—71m Kevin Kisner 35-37—72s Ryan Palmer 38-34—72s Ken Duke 35-37—72p Padraig Harrington 38-34—72p Brandt Snedeker 36-36—72s Jeff Maggert 33-38—71m Nicholas Thompson 38-34—72s Matt Every 33-38—71m Seung-Yul Noh 36-36—72m J.J. Henry 34-38—72m Tag Ridings 37-36—73s John Daly 37-36—73s Miguel Angel Carballo 35-37—72m Chad Campbell 38-35—73s Rod Pampling 35-38—73p Russell Henley 36-37—73s Tyrone Van Aswegen 34-39—73p Kevin Chappell 38-35—73s Bud Cauley 37-36—73p Max Homa 36-37—73p Fabian Gomez 34-38—72m Briny Baird 39-42—81p leaderboard sCORe thRu 1. Andrew Loupe -8 F 2. Stuart Appleby -6 F 2. Jimmy Walker -6 F 2. Jim Renner -6 F 2. Scott Gardiner -6 F 2. Richard H. Lee -6 F 7. Robert Streb -5 F 7. Jordan Spieth -5 F 7. Brian Davis -5 16 7. Rory Sabbatini -5 16 7. Paul McGinley -5 F 7. Brian Harman -5 F 7. D.A. Points -5 15 7. Phil Mickelson -5 15 7. Dicky Pride -5 17 7. Tim Wilkinson -5 15 AP-WF-02-07-14 0241GMT

ladIes euROPeaN tOuR ladies australian Masters

thursday at RaCV Royal Pines Resort Gold Coast, australia Purse: $337,820 Yardage: 6,647; Par: 73 (37-36) a-amateur First Round Jessica Korda, USA 36-32—68 Katie Burnett, USA 33-35—68 Valentine Derrey, Fra 36-33—69 Lorie Kane, Can 36-33—69 Cheyenne Woods, USA 36-33—69 Lee-Anne Pace, SAf 35-34—69 Stacy Lee Bregman, SAf 36-33—69 Line Vedel, Den 36-34—70 Kristie Smith, Aus 37-33—70 Sarah Kemp, Aus 37-33—70 Dewi Claire Schreefel, Ned 35-35—70 Yu Yang Zhang, Chn 36-34—70 Rebecca Artis, Aus 37-33—70 a-Minjee Lee, Aus 37-33—70 Rebecca Codd, Irl 35-36—71 Tiffany Joh, USA 37-34—71 Gwladys Nocera, Fra 35-36—71 Caroline Hedwall, Swe 38-33—71 Camilla Lennarth, Swe 37-34—71 Trish Johnson, Eng 34-37—71 Katherine Kirk, Aus 36-35—71 Melissa Reid, Eng 36-35—71 Cathryn Bristow, NZl 35-36—71 Amelia Lewis, USA 35-36—71 a-So Young Lee, Kor 37-34—71 Pamela Pretswell, Sco 38-34—72 Char Young Kim, Kor 38-34—72 Marianne Skarpnord, Nor 37-35—72 Chella Choi, Kor 35-37—72 Stacey Keating, Aus 38-34—72 Breanna Elliott, Aus 36-36—72 Ann-Kathrin Lindner, Ger 37-35—72 Minsun Kim, Kor 38-34—72 Bree Arthur, Aus 35-37—72 Sarah-Jane Smith, Aus 36-36—72 Felicity Johnson, Eng 35-37—72 Liz Young, Eng 38-34—72 Tania Tare, NZl 37-35—72 38-34—72 Nancy Harvey, Can Marion Ricordeau, Fra 38-35—73 So Young Kim, Kor 37-36—73 Laura Davies, Eng 36-37—73 a-Su-Hyun Oh, Aus 37-36—73 Caroline Martens, Nor 38-35—73 Marina Alex, USA 37-36—73 Maria Hjorth, Swe 38-35—73 Shin-Ae Ahn, Kor 37-36—73 Lindsey Wright, Aus 38-35—73 Yani Tseng, China-Taipei 36-37—73 Sophie Gustafson, Swe 37-36—73 Mi Hyang Lee, Kor 35-38—73 Charley Hull, Eng 37-36—73 Beth Allen, USA 34-39—73 Belen Mozo, Esp 38-35—73 Jia Yun Li, Chn 37-36—73 Linda Wessberg, Swe 36-37—73 Maria Hernandez, Esp 40-33—73 Connie Chen, SAf 37-36—73 Kelly Tan, Malaysia 36-38—74 Eleanor Givens, Eng 37-37—74 Courtney Massey, Aus 38-36—74 Karrie Webb, Aus 38-36—74

euROPeaN tOuR/ suNshINe tOuR Joburg Open

thursday at Johannesburg at Royal Johannesburg and kensington Golf Club Johannesburg e-east Course: 7,660 yards, par-72 (37-35) w-West Course: 7,225 yards, par-71 (36-35) Purse: $1.76 million Alastair Forsyth, Sco 30-34—64w Justin Walters, SAf 32-32—64w Edoardo Molinari, Ita 32-32—64w Craig Lee, Sco 34-31—65e Graham Van der Merwe, SAf 31-34—65w Edouard Dubois, Fra 32-33—65w James Heath, Eng 32-34—66e Hennie Otto, SAf 32-33—65w George Coetzee, SAf 32-33—65w Robert-Jan Derksen, Ned 33-32—65w Danie Van Tonder, SAf 32-33—65w Jin Jeong, Kor 33-32—65w also Jason Knutzon, USA 34-33—67w Charl Schwartzel, SAf 35-34—69e Daniel Im, USA 36-33—69e John Hahn, USA 36-35—71e Connor Arendell, USA 37-35—72e

OLYMPICS OlYMPICs

thuRsdaY’s u.s. OlYMPIC athletes FaRed

FIGuRe skatING team event Men’s short Program 7. Jeremy Abbott, Aspen, Colo., 65.65. Pairs’ Short Program 5. Marissa Castelli, Cranston, R.I., Simon Shnapir, Sudbury and Mass., 64.25. FReestYle skIING Women’s Moguls Qualifying Run 1 1. Hannah Kearney, Norwich, Vt., 23.05 (Q). 4. Eliza Outtrim, Hamden, Conn., 21.51 (Q). 14. Heather McPhie, Bozeman, Mont., 19.92. NR. Heidi Kloser, Vail, Colo., DNS. sNOWbOaRd Men’s slopestyle Qualifying (start position in parentheses) heat 1 Run 1 — 2. (10) Chas Guldemond, Laconia, N.H., 86.00. Run 2 — 14. (10) Chas Guldemond, Laconia, N.H., (86.00; 19.25) 19.25. heat 2 Run 1 — 5. (7) Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah, 86.50. Run 1 — 6. (14) Ryan Stassel, Anchorage, Alaska, 81.00. Run 2 — 6. (7) Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah, (86.50; 81.50) 81.50. Run 2 — 10. (14) Ryan Stassel, Anchorage, Alaska, (81.00; 28.75) 28.75. Final Ranking 5. Chas Guldemond, Laconia, N.H., (86.00; 19.25) 86.00 (QS). 8. Sage Kotsenburg, Park City, Utah, (86.50; 81.50) 86.50 (QS). 9. Ryan Stassel, Anchorage, Alaska, (81.00; 28.75) 81.00 (QS). Women’s slopestyle Qualifying heat 2 Run 1 — 1. (6) Jamie Anderson, South Lake Tahoe, Calif., 93.50. Run 1 — 6. (10) Karly Shorr, Milford, Mich., 45.00. Run 1 — 7. (11) Jessika Jenson, Rigby, Idaho, 34.00. Run 1 — 11. (1) Ty Walker, Stowe, Vt., 1.00. Run 2 — 2. (10) Karly Shorr, Milford, Mich., (45.00; 84.75) 84.75. Run 2 — 3. (11) Jessika Jenson, Rigby, Idaho, (34.00; 58.50) 58.50. Run 2 — NR. (6) Jamie Anderson, South Lake Tahoe, Calif., DNS. Run 2 — NR. (1) Ty Walker, Stowe, Vt., DNS. Final Ranking 2. Jamie Anderson, South Lake Tahoe, Calif., (93.50) 93.50 (QF). 4. Karly Shorr, Milford, Mich., (45.00; 84.75) 84.75 (QF). 7. Jessika Jenson, Rigby, Idaho, (34.00; 58.50) 58.50 (QS). 11. Ty Walker, Stowe, Vt., (1.00) 1.00 (QS).

2014 WINteR OlYMPIC daIlY Friday

Opening Ceremony: 9 a.m. tV schedule NbC 5:30-9:30 p.m. — Opening Ceremony 11:05p.m.-3 a.m. — Primetime Encore

saturday

biathlon Men’s 10km Sprint, 7:30 a.m. Cross-Country skiing Women’s 7.5km/7.5km Skiathlon, 3 a.m. Figure skating Ice Dance Team short dance, 7:30 a.m. Women’s Team short program, 9:10 a.m. Pairs Team free program, 11:05 a.m. Freestyle skiing Women’s Moguls Qualification, 7 a.m. Women’s Moguls Finals, 11 a.m. Ice hockey Women Group A: United States vs. Finland, 1 a.m. Group A: Canada vs. Switzerland, 6 a.m. luge Men’s Singles (Run 1), 7:30 a.m. Men’s Singles (Run 2), 9:40 a.m. ski Jumping Men’s Individual Qualification (normal hill), 9:30 a.m. snowboard Men’s Slopestyle Semifinals, 10:30 p.m. Men’s Slopestyle Finals, 1:45 a.m. speedskating: Men’s 5000, 4:30 a.m. tV schedule NbC 12:30-4 p.m. — Men’s Ski Jumping Individual K-95 Competition; Men’s Biathlon - 10km Sprint Gold Medal Final; Men’s Speedskating - 5000 Gold Medal Final; Women’s Cross-Country - Skiathlon Gold Medal Final 6-9:30 p.m. — Figure Skating - (Team Event: Ice Dancing Short Dance, Ladies’ Short Program); Men’s Snowboarding - Slopestyle Gold Medal Final; Women’s Freestyle Skiing Moguls Gold Medal Final 10 a.m.-11 a.m. — Figure Skating - (Team Event: Pairs’ Free Skate); Men’s Luge - Singles Competition 11a.m.-2:30 a.m. — Primetime Encore NbCsN 1-3:30 a.m. — Women’s Hockey United States vs. Finland (LIVE) 3:30-7:30 a.m. — Women’s CrossCountry - Skiathlon Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Men’s Speedskating - 5000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 7:30-9 a.m. — Figure Skating - (Team Event: Ice Dancing Short Dance-LIVE) 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. — Figure Skating - (Team Event: Ladies’ Short ProgramLIVE, Pairs’ Free Skate-LIVE) 4-6 p.m. — Game of the Day: Hockey MsNbC 6-8:30 a.m. — Women’s Hockey Canada vs. Switzerland (LIVE) sunday, Feb. 9 alpine skiing: Men’s downhill, 12 a.m. biathlon: Women’s 7.5km Sprint, 7:30 a.m. Cross-Country skiing Men’s 15km/15km Skiathlon, 3 a.m. Figure skating Men’s Team free program, 8 a.m. Women’s Team free program, 9:05 a.m. Ice Dance Team free dance, 11:10 a.m. Ice hockey Women Group B: Sweden vs. Japan, 1 a.m. Group B: Russia vs. Germany, 6 a.m. luge Men’s Singles (Run 3), 7:30 a.m. Men’s Singles (Run 4), 9:40 a.m. ski Jumping: Men’s Individual (normal hill) First Round, 10:30 a.m. Men’s Individual (normal hill) Final, 11:30 a.m. snowboard Women’s Slopestyle Semifinals, 11:30 p.m. Women’s Slopestyle Finals, 2:15 a.m. speedskating: Women’s 3000, 4:30 a.m.


SPORTS PREP ROUNDUP

St. Mike’s triumphs over Sandia Prep The New Mexican

Alex Groenewold sat on the bench with a sprained ankle. Cristiana Gabaldon and Jocelyn Fernandez joined her with three fouls apiece. So, how did the St. Michael’s girls basketball team find a way to pull out a 47-39 win over Albuquerque Sandia Preparatory in a District 5AAA opener in Perez-Shelley Gymnasium on Thursday night? Well, the Lady Horsemen (13-7 overall) ran. With a 30-29 deficit staring them in the face entering the fourth quarter, St. Michael’s head coach Martin Romero felt it was time to change the tempo. “I called a timeout and we talked about the pace of the game,” Romero said. “We needed to pick it up and we were able to push the ball upcourt and get some layups we didn’t get earlier.” The Lady Horsemen outscored the Lady Sundevils 18-9 in the fourth quarter and also got to the free-throw line with that aggressive mentality — Gabaldon in particular. She scored all nine of her points from the stripe in the second half to overcome her foul trouble. With Groenewold, the team’s leading scorer, likely out for the rest of the week, St. Michael’s found a balanced offensive approach to offset her absence. Jackie Lara had 11 points to lead the Lady Horsemen, while Gabaldon and Eileen Mitchell each had nine. Forward Latysha Archuleta came off the bench and had seven points. Brianna Abeyta led Sandia Prep (14-7) with 13 points. MORA 68, PECOS 29 The Rangerettes didn’t make the same mistake twice against the Lady Panthers in a 2AA game in Sen. Joseph Montoya Gymnasium. A sluggish start in the teams’ first encounter — in the Northern Rio Grande

championship — allowed the Lady Panthers to stay in the game. This time, Mora (16-3, 4-0) jumped out to a 16-4 lead and upped it to 31-13 at the half. “We talked about getting off to a good start,” Mora head coach Mark Cassidy said. “We opened the window the last time we played them and we needed to get out to a good start and we did.” Destiny and Briana Pacheco each had 13 points and Gerty Herrera added 10. Pecos (7-14, 2-2) was led by Alexis CdeBaca’s eight points. MCCURdY 52, JEMEz VALLEY 49 The Lady Bobcats were ready to show nondistrict foe Jemez Valley they weren’t the same team that lost 85-35 in their season opener in November. Maybe a little too ready. Jemez took advantage of an overeager group to fashion an 18-8 lead after the first quarter, but McCurdy (16-6) took control in the third quarter, outscoring the Lady Warriors 17-2 to take a 37-32 lead into the fourth quarter. “We pressured them more in the halfcourt,” said Flavio Martinez, McCurdy head coach. “We were laying back in the first half and just needed to settle down. We were way up on them in the second half, and got a lot of turnovers.” Karla Santos and Alannah Sanchez each had 15 points for the Lady Bobcats, while Amanda Romero added 14. BOYS TIERRA ENCANTAdA 76, CORONAdO 43 The Alacranes made their introduction as a 4A member a memorable one, building a 46-24 lead at the half and cruising to their first district win in their first district game ever. It was memorable for Cesar Ferrer, who scored a career-best 16 points and showed

the ability his teammates saw all along. “We’ve been Cesar he needs to score,” Tierra Encantada head coach Mark Archuleta said. “It was just that we are practicing more and jelling. I knew he had that potential, and the kids knew. It was just a matter of putting up the points.” Andrew Vanderbilt paced the Alacranes (13-7) with 30 points, while Mikey Trujillo added 14 and Santiago Larranaga 12. Marcos Vigil led Coronado with 13 points. MORA 82, PECOS 61 Defense will make or break the Rangers’ season, and it’s made a 2-1 mark in 2AA so far. It helped Mora take a 43-26 lead at the half and cruise from there in the last district matchup in Mora between the two longstanding rivals. Pecos moves to Class AAA, while Mora stays in AA next fall. “When we dring our defensive intensity, we can be a very good team,” Mora head coach James Branch said. “When we don’t bring that intensity, we can struggle. I was very pleased with the energy and effort tonight.” The Rangers (8-12) spread the wealth offensively, with four players reaching double figures in points. Jerome Alcon had 19, while Casimiro Fresquez added 18. Emmerick Martinez and Jeremiah Olivas each had 12. Chris Vigil led Pecos (6-16, 1-3) with 14 points. LAS VEGAS ROBERTSON 62, POJOAqUE VALLEY 46 The Cardinals jumped out to a 17-6 lead after a quarter, then used a 16-9 scoring advantage in the third to expand upon a 28-22 lead in a 2AAA game in Ben Luján Gymnasium. Sebastian Gonzales led Robertson (9-13, 2-2) with 14 points, while Keith Romero added 13. Kevin Herrera led Pojoaque (10-12, 1-3) with 11 points, and Ryan Maestas had 10.

TOP 25 COLLEGE BASKETBALL

No. 2 Arizona barely holds off Oregon The Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. — Nick Johnson scored 18 points, Rondae Hollis-Jefferson had 14 points and 10 rebounds in place of injured starter Brandon Ashley and No. 2 Arizona grinded out a 67-65 victory over Oregon on Thursday. Coming off its first loss of the season,

Arizona (22-1, 9-1 Pac-12) labored offensively in its first game without Ashley, who is out for the season with a foot injury. NO. 7 CINCINNATI 63, NO. 22 CONNECTICUT 58 In Cincinnati, Sean Kilpatrick scored 26 points, and Justin Jackson led a second-half surge as Cincinnati won its 15th straight.

NO. 9 MICHIGAN ST. 82, PENN ST. 67 In East Lansing, Mich., Adreian Payne scored 12 points in his return from a foot injury, and Michigan State kept pace. Payne hadn’t played since Jan. 7 because of a sprained foot, but although he didn’t start Thursday, he did play 18 minutes, going 5 of 9 from the field.

Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-3

Northern New Mexico

SCOREBOARD

Local results and schedules ON THE AIR

Today on TV Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. All times local. BOXING 7 p.m. on ESPN2 — Middleweights, Norberto Gonzalez (20-2-0) vs. Roberto Garcia (33-3-0), at Chicago GOLF 7 a.m. on TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, second round, in Johannesburg (same-day tape) 10:30 a.m. on TGC — Champions Tour, Allianz Championship, first round, in Boca Raton, Fla. 1 p.m. on TGC — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, second round, in Pebble Beach, Calif. 3:30 a.m. on TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, third round, in Johannesburg MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. on ESPNU — Manhattan at Canisius 5 p.m. on FS1 — Seton Hall at Villanova 7 p.m. on ESPNU — Detroit at Valparaiso 7 p.m. on FS1 — DePaul at Creighton MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. on NBCSN — Maine at Notre Dame NBA 5 p.m. on ESPN — Portland at Indiana 7:30 p.m. on ESPN — Minnesota at New Orleans WINTER OLYMPICS In Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live 6:30 p.m. on NBC — Opening Ceremony 1 a.m. on NBCSN — Women’s Hockey - United States vs. Finland (LIVE) 3:30 a.m. on NBCSB — Women’s Cross-Country - Skiathlon Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Men’s Speedskating - 5000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE)

LOCAL TV CHANNELS FOX — Ch. 2 (KASA) NBC — Ch. 4 (KOB) ABC — Ch. 7 (KOAT) CBS — Ch. 13 (KRQE) ESPN — Comcast: Ch. 9 (Digital, Ch. 252); DirecTV: Ch. 206; Dish Network: Ch. 140 ESPN2 — Comcast: Ch. 8 (Digital, Ch. 253); DirecTV: Ch. 209; Dish Network: Ch. 144 ESPNU — Comcast: Ch. 261 (Digital, Ch. 815);

DirecTV: Ch. 208; Dish Network: Ch. 141 FOX Sports 1 — Comcast: Ch. 38 (Digital, Ch. 255); DirecTV: Ch. 219; Dish Network: Ch. 150 NBC Sports — Comcast: Ch. 27 (Digital, Ch. 837): DirecTV: Ch. 220; Dish Network: Ch. 159 CBS Sports — Comcast: Ch. 274; (Digital, Ch. 838); DirecTV: Ch. 221; Dish Network: Ch. 158 ROOT Sports — Comcast: Ch. 276 (Digital, 814); DirecTV: Ch. 683; Dish Network: Ch. 414

PREP SCORES

Boys basketball

Girls basketball

Atrisco Heritage 59, Valley 52 Gallup 69, Miyamura 64 Graceway Christian 59, NMSD 23 Grants 76, Belen 63 Jemez Valley 70, Foothill 47 Los Lunas 74, Valencia 59 Melrose 64, Logan 55 Mora 82, Pecos 61 Robertson 62, Pojoaque 46 Taos 84, Raton 41 Tierra Encantada 76, Coronado 43 West Mesa 81, Rio Grande 68

Cuba 68, Walatowa Charter 32 Evangel Christian 54, Santa Fe Waldorf School 17 Farmington 45, Aztec 38 Hope Christian 53, Santa Fe Indian 29 La Cueva 75, Eldorado 62 Melrose 64, Logan 55 Mora 68, Pecos 29 Navajo Prep 69, Crownpoint 33 Piedra Vista 46, Kirtland Central 44 Sandia 36, Manzano 25 Shiprock 86, Bloomfield 31 St. Pius 66, Moriarty 46

PREP SCHEDULE

Coach: Martinez to miss Saturday’s game Continued from Page B-1 paid administrative leave as the district investigated claims that the coach was abusive toward players. It ended a turbulent threeweek period in which Martinez faced criticism from some players’ parents for his treatment of players, some of whom felt it bordered on intimidation and bullying. The investigation found no concrete evidence to support the claims, and Trujillo said Martinez could continue coaching as soon as Friday. However, Martinez opted to start on Monday, meaning he will miss Saturday’s game at home against Santa Fe High. Martinez was adamant that he has not been abusive toward his players, and he sees what he does in a different light than his accusers. “They’ll call it bullying, and I call it constructive criticism,” Martinez said. “They’ll call it intimidating, and I call it perception. They call it weak, I call it mental toughness. It all

depends on the context of it.” Board member Ralph Medina said it was time to put the incident aside and for the community to rally around the basketball team, which is 11-10 overall and leading District 2AAAA with a 3-1 mark. “It’s time to let the players play and the coaches coach,” Medina said. “It’s time to move forward.” The decision was met with mostly cheers, and when the public participant segment of the meeting ended, most of the crowd filed out of the auditorium. Many passed by Martinez as he stood outside the door, taking congratulatory hugs, handshakes and even kisses from well-wishers. Former player Fabian Valdez, who was a member of the 201011 championship team, told Martinez that other former players — including Rodney Coles, Steven Cordova, Kyle Gaines and Anthony Lucero — expressed their support for Martinez. “There is a lot of support for Richard, just as there is sup-

port against Richard,” Valdez said. “The thing is, when we’re winning, we’re together. And it seems like when there is a little disruption, everything seems to fall apart. It’s nice there is a lot of people here to support him, and that they are on the same page.” However, Martinez has faced a bit of turmoil during his tenure. He has been fired twice, only to be reinstated as head coach. In 2010, his house was set on fire with his then-83-year-old mother in it, and she suffered from smoke inhalation from it. It later turned out a former student set the blaze. On Tuesday, a media report surfaced that an Española student claimed Martinez hit her during a physical education class that he teaches, something Martinez vehemently denied. “I don’t do those things,” Martinez said. “I just don’t do those things. As a teacher, it’s been embedded since the day you become an educator. … I don’t even hit my own kids. I’ve always kissed them and made

them cry by hugging them, I guess. That was very disappointing.” Valdez said when rumors swirled that Martinez would not return after the 2009-10 season, the players took the initiative and vouched their support for Martinez. They went on the radio and to board meetings, emphasizing they would only play for Martinez. He added that some of the strife comes from disputes, whether it is over over playing time, roles on the team or just personality conflicts. “It seems like in Española, there is jealousy sometimes,” Valdez said. “My kid is not playing enough, or he’s not scoring like he used to.” While Martinez said he felt vindicated by the decision, he admits to growing weary of the battles he has faced. He added that he opted to return to his job on Monday to reflect on things and get himself ready for what he calls “the next step.” “I just need a little bit more time,” Martinez said.

This week’s varsity schedule for Northern New Mexico high schools. For additions or changes, call 986-3060 or email sports@sfnewmexican.com.

Today Boys Basketball — Magdalena at Desert Academy (at GCCC), 5:30 p.m. Abq. Sandia Preparatory at St. Michael’s, 7 p.m. Abq. Hope Christian at Santa Fe Indian School, 7 p.m. Springer at Questa, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball — Magdalena at Desert Academy (at GCCC), 4 p.m. Springer at Questa, 5:30 p.m. Española Valley at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. Los Alamos at Bernalillo, 7 p.m. West Las Vegas at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m.

Saturday Boys Basketball — Des Moines at Santa Fe Waldorf (at Christian Life), 3:30 p.m. Mora at Peñasco, 3:30 p.m. Questa at Cimarron, 5:30 p.m. Coronado at Escalante, 7 p.m. Santa Fe High at Española Valley, 7 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at Raton, 7 p.m. West Las Vegas at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m. Monte del Sol at Santa Fe Preparatory, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball — Mora at Peñasco, 1 p.m. Des Moines at Santa Fe Waldorf (at Christian Life), 2 p.m. West Las Vegas at Raton, 2 p.m. Dulce at Pecos, 2:30 p.m. Questa at Cimarron, 4 p.m. McCurdy at Escalante, 5 p.m. Monte del Sol at Santa Fe Preparatory, 5:30 p.m. St. Michael’s at Los Lunas, 6 p.m. Ruidoso at West Las Vegas, 7 p.m.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Invidia: Coaching tactics evolve over time see Martinez get his comeuppance, and this week was as close as they have come to it. leave this week until Thursday as the But here’s where the “no” surfaces. school district investigated claims of bulNo, it’s not a full-blown case of invidia. lying and intimidation, can we blame it on What we have here is the growing struggle invidia? Well, yes and no. between the power of authority and the Yes, Martinez has become a target by changing nature of our culture. If this were some in the community because of the the 1970s and the 1980s, Martinez’s coachsuccess of his program (a 192-112 in 11 years ing tactics wouldn’t even be an issue. at Española, a Class AAAA title in 2011). Kids today know the stories of their dads While Martinez remains a valued mentor having their helmets yanked or jerseys to some of his former players, others are turned off by his personality and his intense grabbed by coaches who spew spittle in their faces or their arms bruised by the firm coaching style. hand of those same role models. They used He is confident, which some might construe as arrogance. But every coach admits language that might make current parents burn red with fury, but their parents didn’t to a tinge of arrogance — in fact, it’s pretty blink twice about it. much a requirement for the job because In fact, granddad probably told dad to you have to believe you’re better than the “toughen up” or tilt their head and reply, guy across the sidelines to win. “So?” Martinez’s gregariousness and passion Those old-school coaches wouldn’t have can be taken as self-indulgent in some corlasted a month today. Imagine the lawsuits, ners. Some of those factions would love to

Continued from Page B-1

the investigations, the media attention that would come from it. Maybe that’s a good thing. Points can be made without the need of rough hands, but what those coaches were trying to make are still relevant. In a world that people scream for order and discipline, coaches are an essential tool to help children and teenagers understand the importance of those qualities. Sometimes, it’s done with a firm, but calm voice. Other times, it’s done with a yell or a scream; a smashing of a clipboard or whiteboard; or the kicking of a ball or a trash can. It’s not done with hate or malice, but to emphasize a point that needs to be made. The point here is that discipline is needed and should be encouraged. Sometimes, there are different, but effective, ways in doing that. It’s just that, in this state, if you’re too effective, there are people waiting for you to fail. And loving it.

Running u The 10th annual Wood Gormley Panther Run is scheduled for April 26 at Wood Gormley Elementary School. Events include a 5-kilometer run, a 2-mile walk and a 1K kids fun run. Registration can be completed at www.newmexicosportsonline.com. All proceeds go to programs benefiting students at the school.

Soccer u Registration for the Northern Soccer Club spring season is underway for the spring season. The season runs from March 17-May 17 and is for ages 3-13. Cost is $75. The league is also looking for coaches for teams in the Under-6 through Under-13 divisions. For more information on the season, go to www.north ernsc.org or call Kristi Hartley-Hunt at 982-0878, ext. 1. For information about coaching opportunities, call Fernando Rodriguez at 982-0878, ext. 3, or email doc@northernsc.org.

Submit your announcement u To get your announcement into The New Mexican, fax information to 986-3067, or email it to sports@sfnewmexican.com. Please include a contact number. Phone calls will not be accepted.

NEW MEXICAN SPORTS

Office hours 2:30 to 10 p.m.

James Barron, 986-3045 Will Webber, 986-3060 Edmundo Carrillo, 986-3060 FAX, 986-3067 Email, sports@sfnewmexican.com


B-4

WINTER OLYMPICS

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

Some banned carry-on items make it through Russian security

Sochi sprawls across varied terrain TOP PLACES TO SEE IN SOCHI

Visitors to the Winter Olympics will experience Sochi’s disparate setting. Palm trees evoke a tropical seaside resort but the Black Sea is frigid. Move away from the sea and jagged, snow-covered mountain peaks rise nearby. Like New York City, Sochi is a sprawling municipality, incorporating four boroughs. One of the four is called Sochi.

Riveria Detail Park

MOUNTAIN CLUSTER EVENTS

2

The mountain cluster is about 45 minutes away from the coastal cluster. It's a more compact setup than previous games in Vancouver and Turin. Spectators can use a new train service to travel between the coast and the mountains.

Sochi map

SOC H I

Winter Theater

1 CrossCountry

Alpine Skiing

Snowboard

Freestyle Skiing

Biathlon

Ski Jumping

1 mi Nordic Combined

Luge

Skeleton

212 days

115

42 20

u as Cauc

Average high High 73

50

0

3

Dendrary Botanical Garden

Discovery World Aquarium

5

Homeland Security Dept. warns of possible terrorist threats on airlines

Stalin’s Summer Residence

M27

By Karl Ritter

The Associated Press

4

1km

Bobsleigh

1: Opera, drama and ballet are presented. 2: Popular public park with cafes, rides and tennis courts, www.park.riviera.ru. 3: See 1,800 species of plant and tree life from nearly each continent. 4: Part hotel, visitors can see items left by Joseph Stalin. 5: The largest aquarium in Russia with 30 aquariums inside the facility, http://en.sochiaquarium.ru/

SOCHI WEATHER FEB. 7-23 1996-2013 Adler averages Cloudy Rain Snow Sunny

R U S S I A

E97

tains o un M s

Krasnaya Polyana

75º 35

Low 23

A new railway with six tunnels connects the two sites. The 30-minute ride can move 8,500 people an hour.

Average low

COASTAL CLUSTER All the indoor venues and the stadium for the ceremonies are located in the Olympic Park in the coastal cluster. It's possible to walk or take a short shuttle bus between all the venues.

Sochi airport

Sochi

Adler

DETAIL EUROPE

ea Blac k S

ASIA Sochi

COASTAL CLUSTER EVENTS

N

IIHF Complex

Ice Cube Curling Center

Adler Arena Skating Center

Ice Hockey

Curling

Speed Skating

Iceberg Skating Palace

350 mi

AFRICA

350 km

TOP MEDAL PLACING COUNTRIES 1924-2010 Gold

Silver

Germany

120

123

Russia

123

92

93

308

Norway

107

106

90

303

United States

87

Austria 55 Finland 41

95 70

59

71 76

Bronze

Total

96

339

253

Bolshoy Ice Dome

156

Canada 52 45 48

145

Sweden 48 33 48

129

Switzerland 44 37 46

127

Italy 37 32 37

Short Track Speed Skating

Medals Plaza

201

56

Figure Skating

Training rink

Shayba Arena Fisht Olympic Stadium

106

SOURCES: IOC, ESRI, Weather Underground

SOCHI, Russia — Despite a temporary Russian ban on liquids in carry-on luggage, some air travelers heading to the Sochi Olympics through Moscow brought toothpaste and other toiletries past security checkpoints without any problems. Security concerns ahead of the Sochi Games were renewed after the U.S. Homeland Security Department warned airlines flying to Russia that terrorists may try to smuggle explosives into the country in toothpaste tubes. The ON THE WEB agency on Thursday banned all u For more coverliquids from carry-on luggage for age of the Winter nonstop flights from the U.S. to Olympics, go to Russia. www.santafenew Yet six Associated Press employ- mexican.com. ees arriving in Moscow from across the world or beginning their journey there passed through security without having to remove toothpaste, hand lotion or water bottles from their carry-on luggage. Another AP journalist, arriving in Moscow from Singapore, said a security official checked his deodorant and then returned it, but didn’t notice or make mention of a very small tube of toothpaste. Other air travelers heading to Sochi also said their experience of Russian airport security was surprisingly hassle-free. “It was pretty chill. I had an empty 1 ½-liter water bottle because I was hoping to fill it up on the plane but no one checked it,” said Matt Segal, an Australian tourist who traveled from Moscow to Sochi on Thursday. “No one has pulled it out and asked about it.” The no-liquids rule applies to anyone departing from a Russian airport, including transit passengers, said Russian Transport Ministry spokeswoman Nataliya Nesterova. She said it was up to airports to make sure it is enforced. The sporadic enforcement underscores the difficulty that governments face in ensuring that airport personnel in many places, screening thousands of impatient people in a compressed period of time, maintain consistent practices as they try to prevent attacks. And even if practices are consistent inside a single country, the many points of transit that travelers pass through en route to Sochi fall under the jurisdiction of multiple governments. An AP journalist starting a three-leg trip to Sochi in Detroit on Thursday had to leave his toothpaste and deodorant behind after an airline official told him he couldn’t bring those items to Russia in his carry-on luggage. Moscow airport officials didn’t return calls Thursday seeking comment about enforcement of the ban, which runs from January to April, well after the Olympics and Paralympics end. Russian deputy prime minister Dmitry Kozak had no comment on the toothpaste warning from Homeland Security in the U.S.

AP

MVP: No word from coach yet on who will start in net for U.S. Continued from Page B-1 things underway,” Miller said. What comes next is anybody’s guess for the player who became the face of U.S. hockey four years ago. Eager as Miller is for the opportunity to reprise the MVP role he played in leading the U.S. to a silver-medal finish in Vancouver, he concedes there is no guarantee he’ll get that shot in Russia. Selected as one of three goalies along with Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and Detroit’s Jimmy Howard, the Buffalo Sabres star is still awaiting word from U.S. coach Dan Bylsma, who has not yet revealed his plans on who will be the starter. It’s a decision that won’t be based on sentiment, is all Bylsma would say before the Pittsburgh Penguins’ 5-1 win over Miller and the Sabres on Wednesday night. That’s fine with Miller. “I’m just preparing as if I’m going to play,” he said. “That way I’ll be ready no matter what.” Miller then offered an amusing disclaimer when the topic of his MVP performance at Vancouver was broached. “It’s kind of like law firms: It doesn’t guarantee any future payouts or verdicts or anything like that,” Miller said. “It’s an experience that I will always cherish. But I can’t stack it in the net behind me. It’s not going to deflect pucks away.” Uncertain as his immediate future might be, including whether he’ll remain in Buffalo once his contract expires after this season, Miller is at least secure in knowing he’s not heading to Sochi on reputation alone. The 33-year-old Miller instead earned his ticket the hard way

by being the best player on the NHL’s worst team. The Sabres are 15-33-8 entering their game at Ottawa on Thursday night, and their record bears little reflection on Miller. At 14-22-3, Miller accounts for all but one of Buffalo’s victories, eight of which he’s earned in overtime or shootouts. What’s most impressive is Miller’s 92.3 save percentage, which ranks seventh among goalies with 30 or more starts. Sabres interim coach Ted Nolan made clear how impressed he was with Miller in the midst of a two-month stretch in which he went 9-4-3. Ryan Miller “Yeah, out of this world, Olympic goalie maybe,” Nolan said, last month. Bylsma and the U.S. braintrust couldn’t help but notice Miller in making their final selections. “He doesn’t have a lot of wins to go with how well he’s played,” Bylsma said. “He’s played really well in some difficult circumstances.” And it’s difficult to overlook what Miller accomplished four years ago. Aside from going 5-1 and allowing eight goals in six games at Vancouver, Miller went on to earn the NHL’s Vezina Trophy that season. Miller is no stranger to playing up to expectations, dating to his three seasons at Michigan State, where he set an NCAA record with 26 shutouts and won the 2001 Hobey Baker Award as the nation’s top player.

In 11 seasons in Buffalo, Miller holds the franchise record with 283 wins and 539 games played. For Miller, the Vancouver Games were a validation. “I thought it just kind of confirmed that I could play at a high level for a lot of people,” Miller said. “But I knew I could play that way.” Sochi, by comparison, provides Miller a chance to take care of unfinished business. Of the thousands of goals Miller has allowed since he first began playing net on the backyard rink outside the family home in East Lansing, Mich., the one that infamously stands out is Sidney Crosby scoring in overtime to clinch Canada’s 3-2 gold-medal victory. Miller lets out a big sigh knowing he’ll have a tough time avoiding seeing replays of Crosby’s goal on TV. “They’ll be probably replaying it for years to come,” he said. “You know, it’s one moment in a tournament and a defining moment. People like to reference that. But it is what it is. It went in.” Four years later, he gets the opportunity to change the narrative and settle the score. “You have to lose a game to get silver. You’re a breath away from gold. It can be a hard award,” Miller said. “It is a great tournament. But you want to be first. That’s what drives you.”

I’m just “ preparing as

if I’m going to play. That way I’ll be ready no matter what.”

A skier flies over a jump during a slopestyle freestyle ski training run Wednesday in Krasnaya Polyna, Russia. JONATHAN HAYWARD/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Games: McMorris to ride slopestyle course with injury Continued from Page B-1 cans may not appreciate biathlon in the same way Olympic fans on the other side of the Atlantic do, everyone loves watching a wily ol’ pro give it one more shot. Bjoerndalen will certainly make it worth watching. “For me, only first place counts, you can forget the rest,” he said.

Seeing double, and triple On the halfpipe, the Americans have the aptly named brother-sister team of Taylor and Arielle Gold. They compete next Tuesday and Wednesday. Meanwhile, Canada’s moguls team does them one better with three sisters from the Dufour-Lapointe family — Justine, Chloe and Maxime. Expect at least two of them to advance to the women’s moguls finals set for Saturday.

There’s still slopestyle White might not be there, but the slopestyle course is steep, tricky and brutal. The calculus for the event changes daily, once the injuries are added up. Once, Canada’s

Mark McMorris and White were expected to vie for gold. But McMorris broke a rib at the Winter X Games, meaning he’ll be riding in pain, and White is out so he can put all his energy into halfpipe. Canada’s Max Parrot won the X Games with a pair of triple corks, the toughest trick on the mountain. Another to watch in Saturday’s final: Canada’s Sebastien Toutant. American Jamie Anderson is the favorite for the women on Sunday.

Test pattern Let’s just say “hideous” is in the eye of the beholder. One set of the Norway men’s curling team’s pants look like a hopscotch layout gone wrong. Made by the same company that designed golfer John Daly’s pants (Google it if you must), they are red, then crisscrossed with thick blue and white stripes. Another pair has red, white and blue zig zags. Yet another is black and flowery. And there’s more to come — all top-secret surprises that viewers must tune in to see. Norway’s first match is next Tuesday. Do not adjust your set.


SPORTS

Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-5

MLB

Diamondbacks kick off spring training early

Arizona pitchers, catchers report for first workout today

The Diamondbacks are coming off consecutive 81-81 seasons and face the prospect, like the rest of the NL West, of trying to compete with the cash- and pitching-rich Dodgers. By Bob Baum Arizona wanted to add a vetThe Associated Press eran starter in the offseason and still may. SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — A person with knowledge of While much of the nation is the situation said Thursday that buried in snow, glazed by ice the Diamondbacks were talking or just plain shivering in the with representatives of Bronson cold, it’s time to play ball in the Arroyo with the possibility of desert. landing the 36-year-old rightSpring training officially hander. The person asked not to began Thursday when Arizona be identified because the talks Diamondbacks pitchers and had not been made public. The catchers reported, with their Dodgers and Baltimore Orioles first workout set for Friday. On the other side of suburban also reportedly have interest in Phoenix, in Glendale, Los Ange- Arroyo. If no changes are made, the les Dodgers pitchers and catchDiamondbacks’ rotation is ers report on Saturday. Full-squad workouts for both expected to include left-handers Patrick Corbin and Wade Miley teams begin next week. and right-handers Trevor Cahill The Diamondbacks and and Brandon McCarthy. Young Dodgers get an early start because they will open the MLB right-hander Randall Delgado and top minor league prospect season with a two-game series Archie Bradley could vie for the in Australia on March 22-23. other rotation spot. The rest of the teams begin Diamondbacks players went workouts next week at their through informal workouts in spring training haunts in Arirelatively chilly weather, at least zona and Florida. by Arizona standards, on ThursArizona’s reporting date day. Temperatures were in the signals the beginning of prepalow 60s but were expected to ration for a season that won’t end until the World Series eight rise to the high 70s over the weekend. months from now.

Arizona Diamondbacks’ Paul Goldschmidt, right, and Blake Lalli pick up baseballs after an informal workout with teammates Thursday at the Diamondbacks training facility in Scottsdale, Ariz. ROSS D. FRANKLIN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kirk Gibson is entering his fourth season as manager and earlier this week got an exten-

sion of his contract, which had been set to expire this year. He said the early start to spring

training will mean a larger gap between the start of full-squad workouts and the beginning of spring games. “We’ll come in on the 11th, and our first game’s on the 26th,” he said. “It gives us a challenge. We need to get our pitchers ready to be ready to go on March 22.” After the long trip to Australia, the Diamondbacks and Dodgers will come back to Arizona to complete spring training before their stateside regular-season openers. “The season’s going to be a little longer, ” Gibson said, “but if you look at the other people that have played abroad early, I think there’s 10 teams that went, and five of them have went to postseason play.” Even though it’s an early start to spring training, McCarthy said players are more than ready to get back at it. “In the last month is when you start to hit that boredom point,” he said. “You’re done with the offseason, you’re sick of your loved ones, you want to get out of your house. Now it turns real and you kind of get back to work.” The other significant addition to the Diamondbacks pitching staff is Addison Reed. The 25-year-old right-hander had

69 saves the last two seasons with the Chicago White Sox, 40 last year. Arizona acquired him from the White Sox for third baseman Matt Davidson. Reed hasn’t been anointed the Arizona closer yet, though, facing competition from the likes of J.J. Putz, David Hernandez and Brad Zeigler. “Obviously everybody knows that I want to close. It’s the only thing I’ve ever wanted to do,” Reed said, “but I’m here, and whatever they have me do is what I’ll do, and I’ll be happy to. As long as I’m out there throwing, I’ll be a happy guy.” McCarthy said that a core group of Arizona players plans to take a bigger leadership role in the coming year. “I think there’s a group of guys here that know exactly what they want,” he said. “Last year I think we were kind of getting there but we didn’t have that true leadership that really came through. It’s the one thing I’ve seen just in talking to guys so far, that here’s an idea of exactly what we want, and I think we know how to implement that now. “You’re going to see a clubhouse of guys that go out of their way to get things the way they want it, to set an attitude the way they want it.”

Nets pull away Cavs fire GM after sixth straight loss to stomp Spurs

NBA

“We’re going to see Mike Brown succeed this year INDEPENDENCE, Ohio — The Cleveland because I think that he’ll be Cavaliers made a big change with another seaable to do good things and I son falling apart, firing general manager Chris think this team will be able Grant on Thursday. to do good things,” Gilbert Grant was fired a day after the Cavs said. “I think they’re going to dropped their sixth straight game, an embarlook at each other and they’re rassing home loss to a Los Angeles Lakers going to look in the mirror Chris team that started with eight players and finand they’re going to rally.” Grant ished with five. Vice president of basketball Gilbert also was asked why operations David Griffin will serve as acting he decided to change his gengeneral manager. eral manager but not his coach. Owner Dan Gilbert made it clear he’s “Coach Brown has only been here over unhappy with what has transpired in a season half a season,” he said. “Chris Grant has been that began with hopes the Cavs would make here 8½ years. He’s been the general manager the playoffs after a three-year absence. almost four years. There’s a lot of talent on “This has been a very difficult period for this team. I think everybody knows that.” the franchise,” Gilbert said in a statement. “We Gilbert promised last spring the Cavs would have severely underperformed against expec- not return to the NBA lottery, but Cleveland is tations. Just as this is completely unacceptable 16-33 and has dropped six in a row — matchto our loyal and passionate fan base, season ing its longest losing streak of the season. The ticket holders and corporate partners, it is also Cavs are 5½ games out of the final playoff spot just as unacceptable to our ownership group.” in the weak Eastern Conference, and their Gilbert also met with reporters at the team’s only win in the last nine games came over Miltraining facility following the announcement. waukee, which has the league’s worst record. He expressed confidence that the Cavs can “Accountability starts with me,” Gilbert said. show improvement under coach Mike Brown “I take responsibility for where we’re at.” over the final 33 games. Grant was instrumenGrant’s tenure will be known for not being tal in the rehiring of Brown, who was fired able to rebuild the Cavs fast enough despite during his first stint with the team in 2010. having a slew of first-round draft picks, includGilbert was asked if Brown’s job was safe for ing two No. 1 overall selections. the rest of this season. Grant addressed the team’s poor play last The Associated Press

week, saying everyone in the organization was accountable, including himself. Grant took Anthony Bennett with the first pick last June and then signed free-agent center Andrew Bynum during the summer when no other team would offer the 7-footer a contract. Grant was able to unload Bynum in a trade with Chicago for Luol Deng, but the forward’s arrival has done little to invigorate the Cavs. Cleveland has been under .500 since the fifth game of the season, and the players have been slow to pick up Brown’s system on both ends of the floor. In a season that’s already had too many low moments, the Cavs hit rock bottom Wednesday. Not only did they fall behind by 29 points to Los Angeles, the Lakers played the final few minutes with five healthy players, including one who was allowed to remain in the game after committing his sixth foul because coach Mike D’Antoni was out of bodies. The Cavs were booed throughout the game and Brown, who has been unable to come up with any answers to stop his team’s skid, benched All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving and three other starters in the fourth quarter as Cleveland got back in the game before losing 119-108. The acquisition of Deng last month brought hope the season could be salvaged, but that proved to be temporary. The Cavs went 3-2 on a West Coast trip, but followed that with a 1-4 record on its longest homestand of the season.

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Alan Anderson scored 19 of his 22 points in the second half, helping the Brooklyn Nets pull away from the short-handed San Antonio Spurs for a 103-89 victory Thursday night. Despite playing without Tony Parker, Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Kawhi Leonard, their top four scorers, the Spurs were still within five points early in the fourth quarter before the Nets pulled away for good. Deron Williams added 16 points and eight assists as Brooklyn ended a six-game losing streak to San Antonio with its first victory since March 29, 2010. So banged-up that at one point that they had two players on the court wearing facial masks to protect broken noses, the Spurs fell to 2-1 on their nine-game rodeo trip. The Spurs overcame all their challenges to pull out a 125-118 double-overtime victory at Washington on Wednesday, but didn’t have enough to beat an improving Brooklyn team. WaRRiORS 102, BullS 87 In Oakland, Calif., Stephen Curry had 34 points and nine assists, Klay Thompson scored 22 points, and the undermanned Golden State Warriors rallied from 16 down in the first half to beat the Chicago Bulls. With big men Andrew Bogut and David Lee sidelined with injuries, Golden State’s streaky backcourt tandem found its shooting stroke after falling behind 34-18 in the second quarter. Curry finished 13-for-19 shooting, and Thompson shot 8 of 16 from the floor to give the Warriors’ raucous fans a reason to cheer after losing five of their previous seven at home.

GOLF

Loupe finally gets a score he can savor at Pebble Beach By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Andrew Loupe knows how one week can change everything. He can only hope his 8-under 63 in the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am is the start of another one. Loupe had to wait three hours to tee off because of rain Thursday, and then he played bogeyfree on the Shore Course at Monterey Peninsula. That gave him the lowest score among those who finished their rounds.

Rain soaked the Monterey Peninsula in the morning, which was great news for an area desperate for rain, not so much for the tournament. Puddles quickly formed on the greens at Pebble Beach and Spyglass Hill, forcing play to be stopped on all three courses. Monterey Peninsula played the easiest, and Loupe took advantage. He never had to scramble for par, missed only one fairway and only two of his birdies were over 10 feet. This was his first trip to the area, and it was everything he imagined.

“This place is amazing,” Loupe said with a smile as wide as a fairway. The 25-year-old from Louisiana hasn’t made the cut in five starts his rookie season. Loupe might not even have a PGA Tour card except for his tie for sixth in the last event of the Web.com Tour Finals. He had missed the cut in his previous three “Finals” events. Stuart Appleby, Jim Renner, Richard Lee and Scott Gardiner had 65s at Monterey Peninsula. Phil Mickelson was at 5-under par through 15 holes when the

round was stopped because of darkness. Pebble Beach played the toughest, though the weather was not nearly bad enough to make that much of a difference with only a cool breeze and no rain the rest of the day. Jimmy Walker, already a two-time winner this season, got up-anddown for birdie on the 18th for a 66, the best score at Pebble. Jordan Spieth, playing with country singer Jake Owen, had the best round at Spyglass Hill at 67. He picked up birdies on all but one of the par 5s.

Andrew Loupe follows his drive during the first round of Thursday’s tournament. ERIC RISBERG THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

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PAGE B-6 THE NEW MEXICAN FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

n o i t ra

gen e

Teens under 18 must handle pain and parents to get body art legally, but they say it’s worth it

Tattoo you?

for and by teens

BOOKS

By Tilcara Webb

Rethinking the underdog

Generation Next

T

eenagers are getting tattooed. The tattoo — traditionally a way for humans to wear permanent art images on their bodies — has become a way for teens to express themselves. Artist Nikki Kemer at Talisman Tattoo in Santa Fe said teens get tattoos for various reasons in a culture where family and religion take a strong hold on teens. Gabe Moya, a Santa Fe High senior, got his first tattoo when he was 17 years old. The design is a compass surrounded by roses that points southwest to the word home. Moya said he got the tattoo because he planned to tour with a band. “I just wanted something to remind me of where I came from,” he said. Since that first tattoo, he has added to his collection, building a sleeve on his arm that he plans to expand to his chest, and a diamond tattoo behind his ear. And he’s not stopping there. His future plans include putting tattoos on his legs, chest, arms, hands, feet, fingers and maybe even his neck. He is not alone. Tonio Ramon, a senior at New Mexico School for the Arts, also has plans to decorate as much of himself as possible. “I will never really stop,” he said with a laugh. He said he used to wear fake tattoos when he was a kid and then decided early on that he wanted to get a tattoo in honor of his mother. His first experience, he said, went like this: “I felt really awesome because I was 17 and I was getting a tattoo professionally with my mom’s consent. … It was just a beautiful experience all around for me, really special.” That first tattoo, for his mother, is a rose. Since then, he added a tattoo drawing his sister made for him of a blue crescent moon and a star, as well as two lettered tattoos. All of them, he said, are dedicated to family members, and he doesn’t regret any of them. “I will never grow old of my family,” he said. Santa Fe Prep senior Wyatt Trevathan had a very different reason for getting his first tattoo. At the age of 9, he was diagnosed with diabetes and stopped managing the disease when he reached high school. At one point, he said, he was close to death and realized that he was the only one who could save himself. He was 16 years old when he decided to remind himself of this turbulent challenge in his life. His tattoo reads, “Nothing in this world worth having comes easy.” Moya, Ramon and Trevathan were all minors when they got their first tattoos, but most tattoo parlors in Santa Fe only tattoo legal — meaning 18-year-old — adults. State law declares it illegal to tattoo minors without parental consent. Kemer of Talisman Tattoo said, “Understand that everybody has their own values. … As a minor, I got tattooed when I was 16 years old in my boyfriend’s kitchen from a friend of mine. It was non-sterile … we were smoking cigarettes while we were doing it. And I’ve experienced so many young teens going out and doing that because they are being turned down by tattoo shops.” She said she would much rather see teens get tattooed in a professional, licensed environment than doing it by themselves. Local shops that do tattoo teens confirmed that those teens need parental consent and that both the teen and parent must display government-issued identification. Based on interviews, the average age of teens getting tattoos in Santa Fe is about 16 or 17. In case you’re wondering, the practice seems to be equally popular among both girls and boys.

By Austin Tyra

Generation Next

Owen Lostetter at the Lost Cowboy Tattoo and Gallery works on a tattoo for Mark Bradie. KEIFER NACE/GENERATION NEXT

It is a painful experience, say both tattoo artists and recipients. “It hurts,” Kemer said. “It’s a different pain level than you’ve ever experienced and myself, being a mom, I wouldn’t want the child to experience that until they’re old enough to walk in on their own and say, ‘I can do this. I am of age, and can do it on my own.’ ” The needle punctures the skin thousands of times per second. Both Moya and Trevathan described the feeling as a long cat scratch. Kemer said, “It feels like a burning sensation, as if you burned yourself with … an incense and you just slightly burned yourself over and over and over again.” As far as pricing goes, Ramon said that in his opinion, it’s not that expensive. So far he has spent $320 on his four tattoos. Most of Moya’s tattoos

Sofia Howard, New Mexico School for the Arts (NMSA) “I would get the Hubble space telescope on my arm because I like space!”

Jade Sandoval, Santa Fe High “Probably I’d get a corset on my arm because it speaks about how society wanted girls a long time ago to be perfect.”

TEEN PROFILE MOHIT DUBEY

Mohit Dubey works at the Santa Fe Children’s Museum. RAINA WELLMAN GENERATION NEXT

A love of science and music By Marco White

Generation Next

Tilcara Webb is a sophomore at New Mexico School for the Arts. Contact her at webb.gennext@gmail.com.

SPEAK OUT

What kind of tattoo would you like to have?

Poppy Wilder, Franklin High (Seattle) “I would get a tattoo of cupped hands on my ribs, because I feel an emotional connection to hands for some reason.”

cost $120 per hour, Moya said. Trevathan cautions anyone who is considering getting a tattoo to “make sure that it has a deep meaning to you, because if it has that meaning, you’re a lot less likely to regret it.” Before getting a tattoo, Moya suggests you get some rest, a lot of hydration and eat snacks to keep glucose levels up. “If you want it and you have … a solid reason to get it and it’s something meaningful to you,” Moya said, “it’s worth the pain and it’s worth the time to put into it, and the result is something that’s amazing.” He suggests you make sure you are going to a good tattoo artist and “respect that it’s gonna be there forever.”

River Coons, the Tutorial School “I would get the one that I have because I like it. It’s on my finger.”

Will Benson, NMSA “The first one I would get is a Gorillaz skull on my collarbone because it’s my favorite band.”

M

ohit Dubey, a senior at New Mexico School for the Arts, is already proving to be a man of many talents. Originally from California, Dubey grew up in Los Alamos, where both parents work for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Though Dubey has always been interested in science, he discovered a love for music at a young age. “Even though I was surrounded by a community of scientists, I somehow found an interest in music,” he said. By age 5, he was studying the violin, even though he recalls maintaining a childhood dream of becoming “either an ornithologist or an archaeologist.” In elementary school, Dubey

Section editor: Robert Nott, rnott@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Brian Barker, bbarker@sfnewmexican.com

Madison Goven, Santa Fe High “I would get a tattoo on my rib cage of a dragon because I like dragons.”

Sam Christensen, The MASTERS Program “I would get a tramp stamp. It would say ‘priceless’ in a bright purple font made of vibes with leaves coming off it like snap dragons. It’s something I don’t think is funny, but in 80 years I will.”

took part in science and math programs, including the supercomputing challenge, where students create science projects using supercomputers. He also took part in various science fairs. His father is a climate-change scientist, and Mohit said he shares his dad’s interest in environmental science. He also has an interest in astrophysics and cosmology and said he taught himself these complex subjects by “listening to a lot of lectures by [Richard] Feyman and [Albert] Einstein.” Once he entered middle school, Dubey learned to play guitar and became more involved in composing and recording his own music. He has worked with the Santa Fe

Malcom Gladwell is a nonfiction author with quite an eccentric hair style. He also manages to take some interesting standpoints on issues that the majority of the population may just find mundane. These standpoints form the basis of his books, which include Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking and The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Difference. In his newest book, David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants (Little, Brown and Company), Gladwell examines the science behind underdogs as well as the miscomprehension that surrounds the idea of advantage and disadvantage. Despite the name of the book, only the first chapter actually focuses on the biblical story of David and Goliath. Yet in just this one chapter, the author shocked me with some new insights about that battle while setting up the theme for the rest of the book. While Gladwell goes into great detail about the battle between David and Goliath, he also asks us to question whether David was really the underdog. As Gladwell explains it, David beats Goliath by using superior weaponry and military tactics and not through divine intervention. Gladwell continues bringing his theory forward into the modern age, talking about everything from basketball defense strategies to wishing dyslexia onto your children in order to give them a better chance of being successful. At first, these ideas might strike you as preposterous — and unrelated — but the author seamlessly ties them together and backs his ideas up with evidence to support his arguments. Perhaps the most interesting part of the book is when Gladwell talks about the advantages of going to a high-ranking college. As with his discussion of the conflict between David and Goliath, he asks, “Is this truly an advantage?” He interviewed two students who had straight A’s throughout high school and managed near-perfect college entrance exam results. One was accepted to Brown University and another went to Harvard University. Both pursued STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) degrees because they offer some of the most valuable degrees in today’s economy. Yet both students felt discouraged because they received their lowest academic grades while taking classes at Brown and Harvard. The reason is simple: The bar is set much higher at schools like Brown and Harvard that the A’s students make in high school might translate to B’s and C’s in college. Gladwell’s point is that someone who has made A’s their entire life will begin to feel discouraged as they see their grades plummet while others around them seem to continue succeeding. However, if these same students had attended other universities, they would mostly likely be at the top in their classes and thus feel more confident, giving them an advantage. (The student who attended Harvard went on to become a tax lawyer, which leads Gladwell to write, “Harvard cost the world a physicist and gave the world another lawyer.”) I enjoyed reading David and Goliath as its ideas made me think about the world around me and how society can misinterpret “advantages.” Malcolm Gladwell writes all this in an extremely fluid and easy-to-comprehend style. I recommend this book to anyone. It will leave you thinking about its arguments for days afterward. Austin Tyra is a senior at the Academy at Larragoite. Contact him at austintyra@gmail.com.

Youth Symphony for most of his high school career, playing the violin and composing for the symphony’s philharmonic. He draws musical inspiration from Bach, Mahler and Indian music (his father and mother are Indian and German immigrants, respectively). He also has an appreciation for American singers and songwriters and has taken up studying jazz piano. Recent Dubey worked to install “Play Me Pianos” in public spaces to encourage passersby to sit down and play a few notes on the piano. He unveiled the first of these welcoming instruments during a fundraising event at Sanbusco Market Center in early January. He plans another at DeVar-

gas Center and a third somewhere downtown. He also participates in a musical exchange program with a school in West Africa, which is where the fundraising “Play Me Piano” project comes in. He recently submitted a classical composition to the San Francisco Contemporary Player’s Compose Yourself contest for high school students. He intends to continue his dual interest in science and music, though it sounds like science may win out. “I hope to pursue a dual degree in either astrophysics or neuroscience,” Dubey said. Marco White is a senior at Santa Fe Prep. Contact him at marco whitesfnm@gmail.com.

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


Obituaries C-2 Police notes C-2 Time Out C-4 Comics C-5 Classifieds C-6

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

LOCAL NEWS

C Proposed Colo. stop adds millions to route Martinez administration leery about committing $4 million for 10 years to Southwest Chief project By Patrick Malone

The New Mexican

Legislation in Colorado seeking to add a stop along an endangered Amtrak route that passes through Northern New Mexico would add another $31 million to the estimated $200 million price tag, according to an economic study released Thursday. New Mexico, Colorado and Kan-

sas are considering a five-way costsharing agreement with Amtrak and track owner Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway to preserve the current route of the Southwest Chief passenger train beyond 2015. Colorado State UniversityPueblo released the economicimpact study focusing on the idea of extending the Southwest Chief route to include a Pueblo, Colo., stop before the route bends south

Help for forests: New projects aim to restore health to nation’s woodland habitats. Page C-3

to New Mexico, a proposal currently pending in the Colorado Legislature. The report, commissioned by the Pueblo Area Council of Governments, projects Colorado would reap $57 million in new economic activity over the course of one decade if the Pueblo stop was added. New Mexico Department of Transportation spokeswoman Melissa Dosher said the findings of the Colorado report are too geo-

Southwest Chief route

CALIF.

Chicago

A Colorado proposal calls for extending the Amtrak route to Pueblo, at a cost of $31 million.

Los Angeles

COLO.

Pueblo KAN.

Gallup

ARIZ.

IOWA

Raton Las Vegas Lamy

ILL.

Kansas City MO.

Albuquerque

Please see RoUte, Page C-2

THE NEW MEXICAN

Santa Clara Pueblo officials seek operating funds for adult day care center

Thieves strike again at heart of tombstone Widow says stone angels repeatedly stolen from husband’s grave at Rosario Cemetery By Chris Quintana The New Mexican

Twelve of the 19 residents at the Santa Clara Pueblo Regional Adult Daycare Center play bingo on Wednesday. The facility, which received its operating license in January, has turned to the Legislature for operating funds. PHOTOS BY CLYDE MUELLER/THE NEW MEXICAN

Safe place away from home By Uriel J. Garcia

The New Mexican

S

ANTA CLARA PUEBLO — After lunch with a friend at Santa Clara Pueblo’s adult day care center on a recent afternoon, Don Montoya made himself at home on a couch in a room featuring a large, flat-screen TV and an electronic reclining massage chair. Heart-shaped paper decorations hung from a wall, part of the staff’s preparations for an upcoming Valentine’s Day party. “This is an extension of their living rooms at their home,” said Norman Martinez, director of the Santa Clara Pueblo Regional Adult Daycare Center, which received its operating license for full services in January. The facility hopes to serve up to 50 residents of eight Northern New Mexico tribes, as well other residents of Santa Fe and Rio Arriba counties. It now has 19 seniors enrolled, with a paid staff of four people and three volunteers. The center provides care for older

adults who can’t care for themselves due to physical, emotional or mental conditions. Montoya, 71, a retired Ohkay Owingeh police officer, said he feels safe at the center. Montoya said he suffers from dementia, and if he weren’t at the center, he would be wandering around his home while his wife did chores. The Legislature in 2005 approved money to build the center, but its operating funds have come from other sources. Santa Clara Pueblo has provided $117,000 over the past two years, which Martinez said has been used to pay the staff. The center receives another $68,000 from the state’s Indian Area Agency on Aging. Pueblo officials have unsuccessfully lobbied lawmakers for additional operating funds in the past and are trying again during the current legislative session. A bill sponsored by Rep. Debbie Rodella, D-Española, would appropriate $207,000 to kick-start

Please see safe, Page C-2

This is an extension of their living rooms.”

Norman Martinez, Santa Clara Pueblo Regional Adult Daycare Center

A thief snatched an angel statue off the Rosario Cemetery tombstone of Anita Leivo’s husband twice within the past two months. Kenneth Leivo died at age 66 in October 2012, and Anita Leivo has tried to honor his memory the best she could. She spent months finding the granite tombstone, then choosing the language to adorn it. The tombstone’s base was covered in a thin layer of snow Thursday, and a barren tree towered over it. On either side of the tombstone is a granite vase filled with red and blue flowers. The site also is adorned with a picture of Kenneth, one of Anita Leivo, and a wedding photo. Leivo Anita Leivo reported pointed out the vacant spot that two stone angels where the angel had stood. she has placed on the gravesite of her late She and her children husband at Rosario first attached the statue to gravestone Dec. 22, and she Cemetery have been stolen within the past noticed that the angel had couple of months. gone missing Jan. 5. She JANE PHILLIPS asked the cemetery careTHE NEW MEXICAN takers to attach a second statue Jan. 30, but within a week someone had snagged the angel again. This time, she reported the incident to police. “It’s about the love and labor that went into selecting it,” Leivo said. “This isn’t about me. People should respect the cemetery, no matter who it is.” She said the foot-tall angel made of resin was the finishing touch for the tombstone. She also had one of her three sons paint it so it would match the granite. The most important feature, Leivo said, was the angel’s facial expression, which she said is “warm and watchful.” She spoke of her husband in the same way, calling him “kind” and relaying a tale of how he often gave food and

Please see tHieVes, Page C-2

Josephine Padilla marks a bingo card during a game at the Santa Clara Pueblo Regional Adult Daycare Center on Wednesday, when she was celebrating her 78th birthday.

Ruling protects Mount Taylor from uranium mining By Staci Matlock The New Mexican

In brief

Police mum about death probe Weeks after a 74-year-old man was found dead in his home in the South Capitol neighborhood, Santa Fe police have yet to make any arrests and are remaining quiet about their investigation. Officers who were called to the scene late Jan. 15 found Larry Roybal dead in the 800 block of Don Diego Avenue. Officers initially classified the death as suspicious and later said it was a homicide case. Police have offered few details about the man’s death, but said

in a news release shortly after the discovery that “investigators recovered a large amount of evidence during their nearly 24-hourlong investigation at the home.” Roybal’s death was the city’s first confirmed homicide of 2014. Neighbors and family members told The New Mexican that Roybal worked at a nearby CVS store and that he was a frequent volunteer at St. Anne Parish. Roybal had lived in the neighborhood for about 15 years.

Labs complete warhead testing Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories completed the first full-system mechanical test of a B61 nuclear warhead this week,

Section editor: Howard Houghton, 986-3015, hhoughton@sfnewmexican.com

one of many steps to refurbish and extend the life of the bomb. Testing included a series of shocks and vibrations to parts of the bomb without actually blowing it up underground, according to the National Nuclear Security Administration. The tests measure the ability of the warhead parts to withstand stresses that can occur with aging. NNSA is working with the labs to extend the life of the B6112, the latest iteration of the B61 bomb class, and safeguard the nuclear stockpile.

City sets event for summer jobs The city of Santa Fe is hiring lifeguards and youth camp coun-

selors for the summer. Applications will be accepted at a job fair from 3 to 7 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Applicants must be at least 16 years old and provide proof of age. “Come prepared to complete an application, interview for jobs [and] demonstrate your skills,” a city news release said. Lifeguard positions require certification. The city is offering a lifeguard training course Feb. 22. Youth camp employees must know how to swim and ice skate, said Mona Baca, youth program coordinator. “They swim and ice skate every day,” she said.

The New Mexico Supreme Court handed the pueblos of Acoma and Laguna a victory Thursday, upholding a state panel’s designation of Mount Taylor as a traditional cultural property. The ruling effectively protects the cultural resources on more than 686 square miles of land that includes Mount Taylor and nearby mesas. Though it isn’t clear what the designation means for existing activities, it does limit uranium mining in the area. Companies and permitting agencies will have to consult with tribes and pueblos before any mining is allowed, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. In a statement issued Thursday after the ruling, Acoma Gov. Fred S. Vallo Sr. said Mount Taylor, which his pueblo calls Kaweshtima, “is essential to our maintaining our cultural heritage and vital to providing the resources needed to sustain our Pueblo people. This has been the impetus for seeking the designation.” Mount Taylor was once mined for uranium, and companies have been exploring the possibility of new mining activity. While some local officials want

The New Mexican

Please see RULinG, Page C-2

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


C-2

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

House backs bill to speed logging of burned trees near Yosemite WASHINGTON — The House approved a wide-ranging public lands bill Thursday that would speed logging of trees burned in last year’s massive Rim Fire in California. The measure also allows vehicular access to North Carolina’s Cape Hatteras National Seashore, extends livestock grazing permits on federal land in the West and lifts longstanding restrictions on canoes, rafts and other “hand-propelled” watercraft in Yellowstone and Grand Teton

national parks. The House approved the bill, 220-194, on a largely party-line vote. It now goes to the Senate, where it is considered unlikely to pass. The White House opposes the bill but has not issued a veto threat. Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., said the Rim Fire left behind more than 200,000 acres of dead timber on federal land near Yosemite National Park last August. The timber could be sold to raise hundreds millions

of dollars that could then be used to replant and restore devastated forests, McClintock said. Timber sales also would help revive the economy of the stricken region, he said. “But time is already running out. Within a year, the value of the timber begins to decline rapidly as the wood is devoured by insects and rot,” he said. The Associated Press

Safe: Center might charge for services Continued from Page C-1 some programs the day care center proposes. It would use the money to provide transportation for center clients who are unable to drive. Martinez said the center also could use the money to hire more staff. Rodella’s House Bill 22 drew bipartisan support during a House Appropriations and Finance Committee hearing Thursday. Republican Rep. Sharon Clahchischilliage of Kirtland said an aunt had used the center’s services and was happy with

the facility. But as the House budget proposal stands, the committee’s staff told lawmakers there are not enough funds available in the state budget for the adult day care center. Lawmakers voted to table the proposal until they can finalize a budget bill. Eventually, Martinez said, the center could charge its clients for some services in order to become selfsufficient, but it’s hoping for funding to get started. Santa Clara Pueblo officials see a cultural benefit to an adult day

care center because of the respect it affords to tribal elders. “The elders are prized treasures in our communities,” Santa Clara Gov. Michael Chavarria told the panel of lawmakers Thursday. “It’s very important that we look out for them and give them the adequate care as needed.” And back at the center, Montoya said it’s a great place to spend the day “because they treat you right. It just keeps my mind busy.” Contact Uriel J. Garcia at 986-3062 or ugarcia@sfnewmexican.com.

Ruling: Tribes want protection Continued from Page C-1 the mining and the jobs it will bring, tribes and environmentalists have fought against uranium mining. The pueblos of Acoma and Laguna were among five tribes that asked the state Cultural Properties Review Committee in 2008 to protect the 11,305foot extinct volcano north of Grants. Zuni and Hopi pueblos and the Navajo tribes joined the request. The U.S. Forest Service had issued a report saying the mountain was eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, with archaeological sites dating to A.D. 500. Private property owners

opposed the designation, saying it could hurt their property rights and restrict their access to Mount Taylor. In 2009, the Cultural Properties Review Committee approved designating more than 430,000 acres as traditional cultural property. Private property owners, uraniummining companies, owners of the Cebolleta Land Grant and the state land commissioner appealed the order to the 5th Judicial District Court. In the same year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed Mount Taylor as an endangered historic place. The District Court overturned the committee’s decision, and the case went to

the state Supreme Court in 2011. Meanwhile, the Cibola National Forest began reviewing applications for companies to drill for uranium in the Mount Taylor area. On Thursday, the Supreme Court justices unanimously upheld the committee’s designation of Mount Taylor, saying the listing did not violate due process. The justices did, however, reverse the committee’s inclusion of 19,000 acres of the Cebolleta Land Grant as traditional cultural property, holding it is not state land. Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@ sfnewmexican.com. Follow her on Twitter @stacimatlock.

Thieves: Angel difficult to find Continued from Page C-1 clothing to the homeless. The gravestone is on the cemetery’s west side, less than a stone’s throw away from Guadalupe Street. In fact, Leivo said, she used to be able to see the angel from Paseo de Peralta and Guadalupe Street as she drove by.

The Rosario Cemetery staff was not available for comment Thursday. Leivo said the angel only cost about $100, but it took her months to find the right one, and she had it shipped from Illinois. “Why do they need it?” she asked of the thief. “Why would they take it a second time? It’s just disheartening to

experience someone desecrating the memorial.” She said she has one more angel waiting in reserve, but she said she’ll wait until the humidity drops and the temperatures warm before mounting it.

Paseo de Peralta reported that between 6:50 and 11:20 a.m. Wednesday, someone used his personal information to try to wire $22,500 to a business. u A woman reported that a former colleague was harassing her in the 1600 block of St. Michael’s Drive between 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. u A man ran out of Santa Fe Reflections, 60 E. San Francisco St., with a gold necklace while the clerk went to check the price on an item at about 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. u Nathan Gallegos, 26, 1105 Ave Codorniz, was arrested on a charge of aggravated assault against a household member. He was accused of pointing a firearm at a woman in another vehicle at about 10:48 p.m. Wednesday near St. Francis Drive and Mercer Street. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the following reports: u Someone broke into a car parked in the 100 block of Old Las Vegas Highway and stole electronics between 6 and 7 p.m. Wednesday. u County deputies responded to the unattended death of a 79-year-old woman at a home on Sunflower Drive sometime Wednesday. No foul play is suspected. A deputy wrote that the woman had been battling a lengthy illness.

u County deputies arrested Clifford Acuna, 25, in the 27000 block of E. Frontage Road sometime Wednesday after they found he had an active warrant on charges of armed robbery, resisting and conspiracy.

Contact Chris Quintana at 986-3093 or cquintana@ sfnewmexican.com.

Route: Lawmakers look at having an economic study “Part of the concern with the five-way cost split is the needs are significantly graphically specific to be related to New different in each state, as are the costs,” Mexico. Gov. Susana Martinez’s Cabinet Church said. “An appropriate study will secretary-designate for transportation, at least identify the actual costs.” Tom Church, applauded Colorado for An economic study by New Mexico its progress negotiating with Amtrak. State University focusing on the South“I believe New Mexico should do the west Chief is being considered by the same for the purpose of maximizing New Mexico Legislature and has the economic benefit,” he said. Martinez administration’s support. It The Colorado study made no precould consider factors such as a possible sumptions about how to pay for the constitutional barrier to supporting priadditional expense of adding Pueblo to vate enterprises with public funds and the route. “There’s still a lot of discussion about nuances in track repair unique to New Mexico’s landscape that could change that,” said Pueblo County Commiscost estimates for the work. sioner Sal Pace. Amtrak’s contract with BNSF on the It’s a discussion that reaches into New Southwest Chief route expires in January Mexico, where Martinez’s administra2016, when BNSF has said it will discontion has been leery of legislation seektinue track maintenance on the line. The ing to have the state contribute Northern New Mexico communities $4 million annually for 10 years, let of Lamy, Las Vegas and Raton could be alone the estimated 15 percent increase dropped from the Southwest Chief route in the overall cost of the project that the Colorado study projects. This week, unless the states and the railroads reach Church said the governor’s administraan agreement on track improvements tion favors waiting a year to further and maintenance. study the costs and benefits of keeping Contact Patrick Malone at 986-3017 the Southwest Chief’s historic route in or pmalone@sfnewmexican.com. Follow New Mexico before committing funds to the project. him on Twitter @pmalonenm.

Continued from Page C-1

Funeral services and memorials HOMER CHARLES MCLAUGHLIN JR. Passed away at noon on February 1, 2014. He was born on August 2, 1927 in Duncan, Oklahoma, to Homer Charles McLaughlin and Maurine Kendrick McLaughlin. Charles attended Duncan schools until he went to Oklahoma Military Academy in Claremore in the ninth grade for high school and junior college, graduating in 1945. He attended Oklahoma State University in Stillwater and earned B.S. and M.S. degrees with a major in organic chemistry. Charles served in the Army after he graduated, and after his term, he started work in the Research Lab at Halliburton. After retiring from Halliburton as a Senior Research Chemist, he attended Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma and received a B.S. with a major in business. For several years, he had a private practice as a licensed CPA, doing taxes and audits. Charles continued in the Army Reserve, reaching the rank of Colonel, and retired in 1987. His many professional affiliations included member of the Oklahoma Society of Certified Public Accountants, American Chemical Society, American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers, and Santa Fe Chapter of the Military Order of the World Wars. Charles was on the board of Santa Fe Pro Musica for over five years. He and Johnanna were patrons of the Santa Fe Opera for over 25 years. They were members of the Church of the Holy Faith, where Charles served as Treasurer and Senior Warden. He and his wife Johnanna bought a summer home in Santa Fe after Charles’ retirement and eventually moved here full time. Charles loved music (especially opera), astronomy, and chess. He spent most of his life playing chess, and he taught it to high school students in Duncan. Charles is survived by his wife, Johnanna Jones McLaughlin of Santa Fe, and daughter, Melody Maurine McLaughlin of Richardson, Texas. A memorial service is planned for April or May in Duncan, Oklahoma. More information will be available at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be sent to the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, 825 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104-9930.

Police notes The Santa Fe Police Department is investigating the following reports: u Someone stole checks and money orders from a drop box at Santa Fe Apartments Inc., 255 Camino Alire, between 6 p.m. Thursday and 4:30 p.m. Monday. u People responded to an attempted in suicide in the 4500 block of Santa Elena Street between 9:30 and 10:15 a.m. Thursday. u An iPad and a battery pack disappeared from a patient’s room at Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center between 6:30 p.m. Jan. 22 and 6:30 p.m. Jan. 23. u A man stole a laptop computer from Wal-Mart, 3251 Cerrillos Road. An officer was able to locate the suspect’s vehicle and pursued him along U.S. 84/285 until a commander called off the chase. u Assorted jewelry worth $12,000 was reported stolen from a home on Indian Circle at 1:35 p.m. Wednesday. u A thief took checks and money orders from a drop box at The Tuscany at St. Francis Apartments, 2218 Miguel Chavez Road, between Friday and 9 a.m. Wednesday. u City officers responded to an unattended death in the 100 block of Calle Katarina at 5:53 p.m. Wednesday. u A man in the 1600 block of

DWI arrest u County deputies arrested Chery Carvajal, 38, of Santa Fe on a charge of aggravated drunken driving in the 3900 block of Camino Juliana sometime Wednesday.

Speed SUVs u Mobile speed-enforcement vehicles are not in use as the city renegotiates its contract with Redflex Traffic Systems.

Help lines Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families hotline: 800-473-5220 St. Elizabeth Shelter for men, women and children: 982-6611 Interfaith Community Shelter: 795-7494 New Mexico suicide prevention hotline: 866-435-7166 Solace Crisis Treatment Center: 986-9111, 800-7217273 or TTY 471-1624 Youth Emergency Shelter/ Youth Shelters: 438-0502 Graffiti hotline: 955-CALL (2255)

Berardinelli Family Funeral Service 1399 Luisa Street Santa Fe, NM 87505 (505)984-8600 Please sign our guestbook for the family at: www.berardinellifuneralhome.com ALAN K. STOKER Alan K. Stoker, 69, of Iowa City, IA and Santa Fe, NM, died suddenly at home on January 24, 2014. Alan was born October 24, 1944 in Hollywood, CA to Irmgard and Marion Stoker. Shortly thereafter his family moved to Santa Fe, NM where he grew up and attended school and lived most of his life. Alan graduated from Occidental College with a degree in physics and attended graduate school at Stanford University, graduating with degrees in environmental engineering. Throughout those years and continuing throughout his entire lifetime, photography was his passion. Many of his other facets and interests included: opera, theater, film, physics, mathematics, music, hiking, skiing, dance, travel, woodworking, construction, teaching, ecology, hydrology and geology. His work in New Mexico and Iowa encompassed: photographer for the Santa Fe Opera, the Cedar Rapids Opera Theater, the University of Iowa Theater and Dance Departments, math and science teacher at Santa Fe Prep, environmental scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and many years as an independent art and architectural photographer. Alan is survived by his wife of 24 years, Rebecca Crutchfield, and their children, Francesca of Northfield, MN; Ian (Amy) and their children, Levi, Lena, Gavin, Dean of Rio Rancho, NM; Cameron (Jaime) and their children Andy and Sebastian of Albuquerque, NM; his sister, Sally Stoker (Paul Stevens) of Santa Fe, NM, and her son Alan C. Dessauer of Denver, CO; Alan’s sister-in-law, Mary-Jo McGrane (John) of Cedar Rapids, IA, and their daughter Emma of Ames, IA and son Tim (Jenny) and their son Landon of Cedar Rapids, IA. Alan was preceded in death by his parents. As a warm and patient father he spent many hours teaching music, math, physics, literature, craftsmanship and sledding to his children. He will be deeply missed. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, February 8, 2014 at the First Presbyterian Church, Iowa City, IA. A private burial in Santa Fe, NM will be held at a later date. Memorials may be directed to the Alan K. Stoker Memorial fund.

CHARLES M. ANDERSON Charles M. Anderson passed away on January 30, 2014. He was born on August 11, 1938, the only child of Merrill and Annabelle Anderson. He attended school in Port Arthur, TX and received his B.S. degree at Texas Tech. After graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, where he received training in radio communications. He attained the rank of Major. Charles retired from the State of NM, where he was employed as a radio engineer. He is survived by Riette Mugleston, longtime companion, and her children Leslie Porter (John), Jeff Mugleston, and Cheryl Mugleston; and Riette’s grandchildren Amanda and J.J. Porter. Private services will be held in the spring. Donations in his memory can be made to La Familia or Temple Beth Shalom Foundation. ANNIE W. GRANITO Of Santa Fe, passed away February 5, 2014. A Rosary will be recited at Santa Maria de la Paz Catholic Church on Monday, February 10, 2014 at 7 p.m. A Mass of a Christian Burial will be celebrated at Santa Maria de la Paz Catholic Church on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 10 a.m. with interment to follow at Memorial Gardens.

Rivera Family Funerals and Cremations 417 East Rodeo Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87505 Phone: (505)989-7032 Fax: (505)820-0435 santafefuneraloption.com

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LOCAL & REGION

Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

C-3

Women get more protection on tribal lands

Justice Department gives three tribes power to prosecute non-Indians By Felicia Fonseca The Associated Press

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Three American Indian tribes in the West soon will have the power to prosecute non-Indians for a limited set of crimes, becoming the first group of native communities to get such authority since a 1978 U.S. Supreme Court ruling forbade it. The ruling stripped tribes of any criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians on their reservations. But last year’s reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act allows tribes to bring cases against non-Indians for domestic violence crimes and viola-

tions of protection orders. U.S. Department of Justice officials announced Thursday that the Pascua Yaqui Tribe in Arizona, the Tulalip Tribes of Washington and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon have met requirements to implement provisions of the law starting Feb. 20 under a pilot project. Other tribes can implement the law starting in March 2015. The changes to tribal jurisdiction resulted from the high rate of domestic violence on reservations, and from an effort to give tribes more authority over crime, according to the Justice Department. American Indian women suffer from domestic violence at rates more than double national averages. Jurisdiction on reservations is split among tribes, states and the federal

Angel Fire Republican considers running for Congress as a write-in By Jesse Chaney

Sangre de Cristo Chronicle

ANGEL FIRE — Angel Fire Republican Jerald Steve McFall has not given up on becoming a U.S. representative, even though his nominating petitions lack the number of signatures required to put his name on the ballots. Instead, he said, he considers running for Congress as a write-in candidate. “I decided this in 2009,” he told the Sangre de Cristo Chronicle on Thursday. “It’s what I went back to school for, specifically to do this and take [Democratic U.S. Rep. Ben Ray] Luján out of his spot.” For his name to appear on ballots in the June 3 primary election, McFall needed at least 703 signatures from registered Republicans in the 3rd Congressional District by filing day, Tuesday. McFall said he started campaigning throughout the district the first week of January and collected about 550 signatures by the deadline. McFall said he lost many signatures to Tucumcari rancher Jefferson Byrd, the only Republican competing for the seat with ballot status. McFall said he believes many people supported Byrd before they knew another Republican was planning to run.

“Everybody I talked to wished they would have signed my petition instead of his. I just Jerald Steve got it in too McFall late,” McFall said. The deadline to file a notice of intent to run as a write-in candidate is March 18. “I’m almost certain I’m going to do it,” McFall said, adding, “It’ll cost more, and everybody’s got to learn how to spell my name.” McFall said Republicans in Los Alamos and Farmington have asked him to keep trying because “nobody thinks Byrd will do any better than he did last time.” “What took him really two years and four months he had to get signatures, I almost did in three weeks and made everybody sit up and pay attention,” McFall said. McFall said he was born in Raton. He is currently a ski tech at High Country Ski Rental in Angel Fire. McFall said he has never held an elected office but unsuccessfully ran for seats on the Angel Fire Village Council and Cimarron Municipal Schools Board of Education in past years.

In brief

The settlement came after an attorney for Jan Green, 51, filed a federal civil rights lawsuit a year ago, alleging Green was held in deplorable conditions on and off for two years and often denied treatment for her mental illness. The lawsuit says Green The hands-on experiment was kept in conditions so space and exhibit honoring New Mexican scientist David bad that a sock rotted into an open wound on her foot. Hawkins will be leaving the Santa Fe Children’s Museum Court papers also say Green was denied feminine hygiene on Monday, Feb. 10. Hawkins was instrumental products for lengthy stretches. County officials have in creating the first inquirydenied those allegations, and based science curriculum in county attorney David Pato the United States. The exhibit said there was no admission features panels describof wrongdoing as part of the ing the former philosopher settlement. and mathematician’s work in science education at the Hawkins Centers of Learning in Boulder, Colo. Hawkins also was the official historian of the Manhattan Project. ROSWELL — A 12-yearThe Santa Fe Children’s old New Mexico boy seriMuseum, 1050 Old Pecos ously injured in a school Trail, is open from 10 a.m. shooting last month has to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Friday been released from a Texas and Saturday It is open from hospital. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays, Officials with the Univerwith free entry for children sity Medical Center in Lubafter 4 p.m. The museum, bock, Texas, said Wednesday devoted to creative play, is that Nathaniel Tavarez was open from noon to 5 p.m. recently released after recovSundays. ering from injuries to his

Science exhibit closes soon

School shooting victim released

eyes, chest, face and heart. Officials would not say where the Roswell boy would go next for treatment or if he was headed home. ALBUQUERQUE — A A seventh-grader is woman who says she was accused of taking a shotgun kept in a filthy, isolated New to Berrendo Middle School Mexico jail cell for months at in Roswell and opening fire a time has reached a $1.6 mil- on Tavarez and another girl lion settlement with Valencia Jan. 14. County, attorneys for both Staff and wire reports sides confirmed.

Woman settles jail cell lawsuit

government, depending on the crime and the race of the person involved. Tribes have civil jurisdiction over non-Indians but often are reluctant to go forward with a case when the penalty amounts to a fine and offenders have little incentive to pay. Federal authorities have jurisdiction over major crimes like homicide and assault resulting in serious bodily injury when the victim, suspect, or both, is American Indian. But not all domestic violence on reservations rises to the level of a federal crime. “By showing people that, in fact, if a non-Indian commits these acts, we’ll hold them accountable, it might encourage victims to come forward, speak out and seek help,” said Brent Leonhard, an attorney in the Umatilla Office of Legal Counsel. To become part of the pilot project,

the three tribes had to amend their legal codes, create jury pools that include non-Indians and ensure defendants receive the same rights offered in state and federal courts. The Violence Against Women Act also allows defendants to petition a federal court for review of a tribal court decision. The three tribes will have jurisdiction over non-Indians who live or work on the reservation and who are married to or in a partnership with a tribal member. Pascua Yaqui Chief Prosecutor Fred Urbina estimates that 1,000 non-Indians live or work on the southern Arizona reservation. He said nearly 270 of the more than 500 criminal charges filed against American Indians in the tribal court in 2011 stemmed from domestic violence. While the caseload won’t increase significantly with juris-

diction over non-Indians, he said the tribe can better send the message that justice for victims is possible. “You don’t really want one person being in that situation, being attacked and not having any kind of redress or justice,” Urbina said Thursday. “I see that as one of the primary roles of any government, local, state or federal, is protecting your people.” The tribes are required to report cases to the Justice Department as well as any changes in personnel needed to meet the requirements of prosecuting non-Indians, Urbina said. Most tribes believe constitutional challenges will arise from their new authority but say they are prepared to defend their justice systems. Subjecting non-Indians to prosecution in tribal courts was a major point of contention in Congress.

U.S. earmarks millions for forests Restoration projects in 12 states aim to improve habitat By Matt Volz

The Associated Press

HELENA, Mont. — The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday it will spend $30 million this year on forest restoration projects in 12 states to reduce the threat of wildfires, protect water quality and improve wildlife habitat for at-risk species. Those first 13 projects will be the start of a multi-year initiative to improve the health of forests and watersheds on public and private lands, Agriculture Undersecretary Robert Bonnie said. With longer fire seasons in recent years burning more areas, and beetle outbreaks devastating more than 40 million acres of forests in the West, the pace and scale of restoration need to be increased, he said. The work must extend to helping private landowners thin their trees, remove brush, protect habitat and improve watersheds along their properties, Bonnie said. “If we only worked on our national forests, it wouldn’t be enough to address this problem,” he said. Money to work with private landowners will come from the farm bill Congress passed this week, and the Forest Service will use its own funds to work on adjacent public lands. The Alliance for the Wild Rockies, a nonprofit that has filed several lawsuits to block logging projects in national forests in the Northern Rockies, was skeptical about the plan. Logging won’t help reduce wildfire risks or protect watersheds because areas thinned of trees allow the wind to blow through more easily, which could spread flames more quickly, executive director Mike Garrity said. The money would be better

Helena National Forest Supervisor Bill Avey, center, shows U.S. Department of Agriculture Undersecretary Robert Bonnie an area that has been logged near Helena, Mont., on Thursday. The U.S. plans to spend $30 million this year on forest restoration projects in 12 states. ELIZA WILEY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

used by helping landowners in wildland-urban interface areas remove trees and other fuels around their homes, he said. “If they are going to go out and log around the forests, that’s a complete waste of money and it’s corporate welfare for the timber industry,” Garrity said. Helena National Forest Supervisor Bill Avey said infrastructure protection is the first priority. Officials don’t plan to thin or log every acre, but will identify areas with the highest probability of fire moving through to get rid of the heavy fuels, he said. One of the first projects will be an $865,000 restoration of the watershed that provides most of the drinking water for Montana’s capital city of Helena. City officials have feared a wildfire could spread quickly through the surrounding forest, which is littered with dead

trees from a mountain pine beetle infestation. That would threaten the water supply system, and later, sediment from the burned landscape could taint the water, Helena National Forest officials said. Another project will involve reducing forest fuels over 30,000 acres in parts of California’s San Bernardino and Riverside counties that were devastated by wildfires in 2003. The initiative, called the Chiefs’ Joint Landscape Restoration Partnership, will be run by the agriculture department’s Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service. The effort, along with the Forest Service’s Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program, is part of a broader push to beef up restoration by working with local governments, landowners, environ-

mental groups and others with a stake in the health of forests, Bonnie said. The new initiative is part of President Barack Obama’s climate action plan to cut carbon pollution and slow the effects of climate change, USDA officials said. As carbon emissions increase, healthy forests are needed to counter those effects, Bonnie said. Other projects include: u Creating fuel breaks, thinning trees and improving the fire suppression infrastructure in the Middle Klamath River area of California. u Reforesting, reducing hazardous fuels and controlling invasive species at the Mississippi River headwaters in Minnesota. u Improving the quality of drinking water for New Hampshire residents served by private wells. u Treating wildfire-affected areas in New Mexico to protect water quality and supply. u Reducing forest fuels on the east face of Oregon’s Elkhorn Mountains, the habitat of several species of threatened fish. u Restoring woodlands and watersheds in western Arkansas, with the aim of doubling the conservation activity on private lands within three years. u Restarting a postponed project to restore Mississippi’s Upper Black Creek watershed, which is threatened by dumping, sewage runoff and invasive species. u Reducing the risk of wildfire in Kentucky’s Triplett Creek watershed. u Improving water supply and outdoor recreation in West Virginia’s Potomac River watershed. u Collaborating with governments, landowners and Indian tribes to restore eight watersheds in Wisconsin that feed Lake Superior. u Building buffers along New York’s Susquehanna and Chemung rivers to stem the effects of agriculture, erosion and development.

Rare snowstorm hammers Western Oregon By Tim Fought

The Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — A rare snowstorm hammered parts of the Pacific Northwest on Thursday, leaving one person dead in a massive traffic pileup on Interstate 5, causing multiple other wrecks, and closing schools and offices. Forecasters said several inches of snow could fall in Oregon’s Willamette Valley before the storm is over. The central part of the valley — near Corvallis and Albany — could see up to a foot of snow. The big pileup on I-5 that killed one person and injured others occurred across the Columbia River in Washington state’s Clark County. At least half a dozen tractortrailers were involved in the collision on the snow-covered freeway. The massive pileup happened around 10 a.m. near milepost 13. Washington State Patrol Trooper Steve Schatzel said several people were trapped in the wreckage. One suffered injuries described as critical

At least one person died in a series of collisions along Interstate 5 on Thursday as a snowstorm covered much of Western Oregon. OREGON DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

and two others suffered serious injuries. The exact number of people injured was not available Thursday afternoon. The snowstorm also caused a 25-vehicle pileup on I-5 near Albany. “It’s pure chaos,” Oregon State Police Lt. Steve Mitchell said as troopers struggled to reach trucks and cars that crashed along the freeway. “For all intents and purposes, it’s

shut down between Albany and Salem.” Traffic backed up for miles. A detour was set up, and a wreck blocked that route for a time, as well. By mid-afternoon, crews had opened one lane of traffic, but the state Department of Transportation said traffic was still slow. Only minor injuries were reported. Oregon’s largest city, Port-

land, was getting hit hard in snow Thursday afternoon. Cars were slipping and sliding as commuters left work early. A blizzard warning was posted for the Columbia Gorge, an hour east of Portland. The storm struck quickly Thursday morning, dumping an estimated 3 to 5 inches in the Albany region and then spreading north. Transportation officials urged motorists to stay off highways if possible to avoid the kind of traffic nightmare that occurred in Atlanta last week, when thousands of motorists were stranded. National Weather Service forecasters said the storm will be the most widespread snow event in the northern and central Willamette Valley since December 2009. The storm is developing, as moisture from the coast collides with an arctic air mass over the state. The cold is expected to last through the weekend, and a mix of snow and freezing rain could accompany moderating temperatures.


C-4 THE NEW MEXICAN

Friday, February 7, 2014

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

TIME OUT Horoscope

Crossword

The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Feb. 7, 2014: This year you open up to new ideas, and you are able to let go of your previously held restrictions. Gemini always is a delight, and he or she often makes you laugh. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You might want to take some of the heat off a close associate or loved one. Recognize your limits. Tonight: Get together with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You often tend to exaggerate a situation without realizing it. Certain facts really do stand out to you more than others. Tonight: Meet up with friends to celebrate. TGIF! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You could breeze through a lot of work and feel much freer for a while. Doublecheck everything you do right now, because there could be an error. Tonight: In weekend mode. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Do more listening and less reacting. You might not be happy with what you are hearing, but you will see a situation differently in the long run. Tonight: Head home. Do a vanishing act. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Listen to news more openly than you have in the past. You might conclude that a partner is less than helpful. Tonight: Just be yourself. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH How you deal with others and their complications could be exhausting. Some have expectations that you might not be able to fulfill. Tonight: Accept an offer.

Super Quiz Take this Super Quiz to a Ph.D. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Subject: ONE-WORD FILM TITLES: SIX LETTERS Each answer is a six-letter, oneword film title. (e.g., 1986: Ripley, the only survivor of the Nostromo, awakens. Answer: Aliens.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. 1960: A deranged motel operator is dominated by his mother. Answer________ 2. 1970: The career of a World War II general is depicted. Answer________ 3. 1985: In a future world, a man tries to correct an administrative error. Answer________ GRADUATE LEVEL 4. 1990: A novelist is “rescued” from a car crash by a fan. Answer________

5. 1982: A lawyer becomes a famed leader of Indian revolts. Answer________ 6. 1950: A man has an invisible friend resembling a rabbit. Answer________ PH.D. LEVEL 7. 1995: Two mobster friends clash over a gambling empire. Answer________ 8. 1996: A prince returns home to find his father has been murdered. Answer________ 9. 1962: A college professor is infatuated with a 14-year-old. Answer________

ANSWERS:

1. Psycho. 2. Patton. 3. Brazil. 4. Misery. 5. Gandhi. 6. Harvey. 7. Casino. 8. Hamlet. 9. Lolita.

SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? (c) 2013 Ken Fisher

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Your ability to see the big picture might be more significant than you realize. You are able to visualize an idea and see how to make it possible. Tonight: Meet a friend at a new spot.

Teen girl moves in with grandparents

Dear Annie: Our 14-year-old daughter is not a terrible kid — probably just a typical teenage girl. She can be rude and obnoxious, she talks back and curses, and she leaves her room an upside-down mess and is obsessed with her iPhone, constantly posting pictures of herself online and chatting with friends. We have another daughter five years younger. We were concerned she might model her behavior after her older sister, and so we set rules about cursing and using her cellphone. Our 14-year-old could not abide by the new rules, and after much fighting, she decided to move in with her grandparents, who are much more lenient. She’s been there for several weeks, and by all accounts, she is more responsible and respectful to her grandparents than she ever was with us, and they are happy to have her. Our home is a lot more peaceful now, too. It seems like a win-win-win situation, but it doesn’t feel normal not to have our daughter living with us. And one time, she even said she doesn’t consider us her parents anymore, but she still calls us when she needs something. Should my wife and I be concerned about this situation? — Daughter Dilemma Dear Dilemma: No. Some teenagers are more difficult than others, and the relationship with parents is often harder for them to deal with. What your daughter says is less important than what she does. If her behavior has improved because she no longer feels she has to rebel against you, that is a good thing. We do recommend, however, that you keep interacting with her in a positive way and not only when she calls asking for something. While she is away, we hope you will examine your parenting methods and determine whether there

Sheinwold’s bridge

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Listen to what someone shares. You might think that you are in a position to clear up a problem. Tonight: Be with a favorite person. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You have reason to feel popular, as others seek you out. Your ability to understand what is happening is a resource that people want to tap into. Tonight: The spotlight is on you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might want to approach an associate in a different way. Listen to what he or she has to say. Tonight: Finish up what you must. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You could be very forthright in your dealings over financial concerns and/or a creative project. You won’t be able to complete your agreement at this time. Tonight: Be a kid yourself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could be wondering what is happening with a family member who seems a bit out of sorts. This person might feel weighed down by responsibilities. ITonight: Make it early. Jacqueline Bigar

Cryptoquip

Chess quiz

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error. © 2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

WHITE TO PLAY Hint: Force checkmate. Solution: 1. Rh8ch! Kxh8 2. Qh6ch Kg8 3. Qg7 mate! If instead 1. … Kg6, 2. Rh6 (or Qh6) mate!

Today in history Today is Friday, Feb. 7, the 38th day of 2014. There are 327 days left in the year. Today’s highlight in history: On Feb. 7, 1964, The Beatles began their first American tour as they arrived at N.Y.’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, where they held a media conference while thousands of their fans were jammed inside the terminal.

Hocus Focus

is anything you could do differently to produce a better result. Both too lenient and too strict are not advisable. Your pediatrician can make recommendations, you can ask for books on parenting at your local library or bookstore, and you can also go online. Dear Annie: When my birthday, Mother’s Day or Christmas roll around, family members always ask, “What can I get you? You have everything.” The gift that pleases me most is their time. A phone call or visit would make my day. Mark your calendar to call Dad or Mom or Grandma. They would be so happy. And here’s the return gift: Seniors — stay busy. Your children and grandchildren are not responsible for your entertainment. There are senior centers, churches and clubs that you can join. Or volunteer. Your children have jobs, families and responsibilities. Don’t criticize them. They will ask for your opinion if they want it. And to each, remember to say I love you, especially if you haven’t said it for a long time. The first time may be hard, but oh, the wonderful feeling it will leave. — Happy, Active and Much Loved Senior Dear Happy: You have given wise advice to all age groups, including the idea to consider the needs of others instead of your own. It certainly explains your signature. Thank you. Dear Annie: Please tell “Perplexed in Pennsylvania” not to worry that her friend keeps forgetting her birthday. Mine is on September 11th, and my brother, sister, aunt, nieces and nephews do not acknowledge it, probably because they aren’t sure how to celebrate my birthday when it’s also a day of such sadness. I keep in touch with all of them, and that is what matters. — Happy in Connecticut

Jumble


WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

THE ARGYLE SWEATER

PEANUTS

Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

LA CUCARACHA

TUNDRA

RETAIL

STONE SOUP

KNIGHT LIFE

DILBERT

LUANN

ZITS

BALDO

GET FUZZY

MUTTS

PICKLES

ROSE IS ROSE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PARDON MY PLANET

BABY BLUES

NON SEQUITUR

C-5


C-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

sfnm«classifieds to place an ad call

986-3000 or Toll Free (800) 873-3362 or email us at: classad@sfnewmexican.com »real estate«

LOTS & ACREAGE

»rentals«

CONDOSTOWNHOMES Beautiful 1 bedroom, 1 bath Model home. Fully furnished and all utilities, project amenities, pets welcome. $1,000 monthly. Jim, 505-470-0932.

2014 Karsten 16x60 2 bed, 2 bath, Casitas De Santa Fe #21

5600 SQ.FT WAREHOUSE. 2 rentals, with live-in space. Southside. $295,000. 3.3 ACRES, LA TIERRA. Shared well, Paved access. $155,000. 505-470-5877

FSBO TOWNHOUSE, 3 bedroom, 2 baths, and garage. $179,900. Close to schools, available immediately. Owner - Broker. Please call 505-850-5005.

$850 monthly rent, $1,100 deposit. SECTION 8 ACCEPTED. Easy financing for PURCHASE available 505-699-2955

WE’RE SO DOG GONE GOOD! Using

We always Larger get results!

Type

CHARMING, CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, $800

Private estate. Walled yard, kiva fireplace. Safe, quiet. Utilities paid. Sorry, No Pets. 505-471-0839 FULLY FURNISHED STUDIO, $750. Utilities paid, charming, clean, fireplace, wood floors. 5 minute walk to Railyard. Sorry, No Pets. 505471-0839

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED

will help 986-3000 your ad

1425 PASEO DE PERALTA, 1 bedroom, full kitchen, bath. Tile throughout. Free laundry. $735 utilities paid. No Pets! 505-471-4405

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

2 BEDROOM, 1.5 BATH. Nice safe neighborhood. 900 squ.ft, yard. $795 monthly, not including utilities, no cats, dogs. Call, 505-470-0727.

get noticed

Now Showing Rancho Viejo Townhome $232,500

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

986-3000

2 BEDROOM, 1 bath. Tile floors, washer, dryer. New windows. Off West Alameda; good location! $750 monthly plus utilities. 575-430-1269

1 BEDROOM, 1 bath. $750 monthly. $750 damage deposit. No pets. Baseboard heat. 1 year lease. Owner Broker. 505-850-5005. 1 BEDROOM LA CIENEGIA AREA. Laundry hook-ups. Fenced yard. $650 plus utilities. Pets okay. $650 deposit. 505471-1022, 505-690-0986 EASTSIDE, WALK TO CANYON ROAD! Furnished, short-term vacation home. Walled .5 acre, mountain views, fireplace, 2 bedroom, washer, dryer. Private. Pets okay. Large yard. 970-626-5936.

HOUSES FURNISHED

HOUSES UNFURNISHED NEWLEY REMODELED M A N U F A C TURED HOME 2 1/2 ACRES . Lone Butte area. Quiet, clean, views, decks, porches. First, last, damage. Pets and horses welcome. $ 8 5 0 monthly. Available Now. 505-3165575.

EITHER MARCH 1- April 30-- OR-February 15- April 30. Mountain views. washer, dryer. Oriental rugs, hardwood floors, antiques. $1450 monthly. 505-670-3971

GUESTHOUSES SANTA FE

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

505-992-1205 valdezandassociates.com CONVENIENTLY LOCATED

2 bedroom, 1 bath, on-site laundry, close to parks $600 plus utilities

LOVELY CONDO

2 bedrooms and 1 bath, granite counter tops, washer, dryer, kiva fireplace, vigas, tile, carpet flooring, conveniently located. $850 plus utilities.

LOCATED AT THE LOFTS ON CERRILLOS

This live & work studio offers high ceilings, kitchenette, bathroom with shower, 2 separate entrances, ground, corner unit with lots of natural lighting. $1000 plus utilities

OLD SANTA FE CHARM

2 bedroom, 1 bath, fire place, wood floors Saltillo tile, carpet, washer. $850.00 plus utilities.

NEWLY REMODELED, CENTRALLY L O C A T E D . 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX . Large yard, front & back. $1150 monthly, utilities included, $1000 deposit. Prefer long term. Pets negotiable. CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 505-204-1685.

SPECTACULAR VIEWS on 6 acres, Huge 2 bedroom, with new bathroom and laundry with washer, dryer. Large living room with fireplace, 2 incredible sunrooms, large kitchen. pets ok. Located off of Old Pecos Trail and I-25. $1925 monthly, utilities included, available immediately. 505238-2900

LIVE IN STUDIOS

CHARMING CONDO

2 bedroom, 2 bath, granite counters, washer, dryer, upgraded appliances, access to all amenities $925 plus utilities

FULLY FURNISHED! SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS. CLOSE TO PLAZA. Indoor, outdoor fireplaces. Front and back patio. Non-smoking, no pets. Call for information. Jennie, 859-5127369, serious inquiries only.

5 PLEX CONVENIENTLY LOCATED ON CAMINO CAPITAN

this unit is a one bedroom loft, fireplace, and fenced back yard $650 plus utilities

LIVE-IN STUDIOS

S kylights, overhead doors, 2500 square feet, $975. 4100 square feet, 3 phase electric, $1175. La Mesilla. No dogs. 505-753-5906

rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

and independent

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

50¢

mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

l makers gril State law r gas crisis utility ove

out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations

CALL 986-3010

paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent

2 BEDROOM 360 degree views, Spectacular walking trails, Automated drip watering, Finished 2 car garage, 2 BDR, 2 ½ bath plus office.

575-694-5444

www.facebook.com\santafetown house STATELY OPEN C O N C E P T , 3400+ Sq.Ft. 1+ acres, unlimited water. Tennis court, hot tub, sauna, gazebo, fountains & ponds. 3+ Bedrooms, 2 Baths (master suite). Nichos, bancos, view. CHAPMAN REALTY: 505-983-8100.

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY COMMERCIAL LAND Prime location. 1.22 ACRES - ZONED C-1 Apartments, Live-Work, Offices $195,000 - $3.73 PSF Appraised at $5 PSF Paul Duran 505-310-5566

Hardwood floors, washer, dryer hookup, patio, carport, quiet, private fenced yard. Pet negotiable. Plus utilities. 505-471-1270, for appointment.

(3) 2.5 Acre Lots, Senda Artemisia, Old Galisteo Road, Close to town. Easy building sites. Views, utilities, shared well. Owner financing. No Mobile homes. $119,700- $129,700 each. Greg. 505-690-8503, Equity Real Estate. Moriarty. Two 40 acre Farm-Land Parcels with irrigation and domestic wells, water and mineral rights. Owner Finance. 505-471-0365, 505310-0566.

Griffin Street, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, washer- dryer hookups, fireplace, patio. $1000 monthly, year lease.

2014 KARSTEN 16X80 3 BED, 2 BATH FOR SALE $56, 062 + tax Move-in ready! Rancho Zia MHP Space #26

CUTE 1 BEDROOM DUPLEX, firplace 1875 Calle Quedo B off Pacheco. $750. No pets, year lease. Nancy Gilorteanu Realtor, 983-9302.

Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000

Can also be used as u n f u r n i s h e d a p a r t m e n t . $850 monthly. All utilities included. Reserved parking. Call 505-471-1238 additional details.

Easy Qualify 4.5% APR, 10 year payoff Call Tim 505-699-2955 Shown by appointment only

FARMS & RANCHES 146.17 AC. 1 hour from Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Electricity, views of Sangre De Cristo Mountains and Glorieta Mesa. $675 per acre, 20 year owner financing. Toll Free 1-877-797-2624 www.newmexicoranchland.net

INCREDIBLE SANGRE VIEWS! $935. ZIA VISTAS LARGEST 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATHROOM, large walk-in closets. Fireplace. Exceptional layout. Gated. Much more. 505-204-2210

OFFICE- STUDIO NEAR RAILYARD

Have a product or service to offer?

CHARMING 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. 2 stories, high ceilings, courtyard, yard, fruit trees, hot tub. 2 car garage. Red brick, carpet, washer & dryer, dishwasher, central heat, air. $1,550. 505-204-0421.

OUTDOOR PATIO. All tile floors. Washer, Dryer. Parking. Rent $925 including heat, water. Call Sheilah Motelet Realty, Cat considered. Santa Fe 505-660-7045.

OUT OF TOWN

COMMERCIAL SPACE

WANTED 25 +/- rural acres north of Santa Fe with trees, water, grazing, and view. I’m in New Mexico now. 716-361-3618

1,900 sq.ft. Warehouse, 600 sq.ft Office Space, reception area, two offices, kitchen, security, fenced yard, On-site parking. $1,500 plus utilities. 505-982-2511.

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded Others originated Page A-9 bin said. CITATIONS, Please see

The New

N

Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

Pasapick Art lecture

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow Constable With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating Matlock less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been Mexican Ellen Cavatoday, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put and his housemate, their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitin front of John Hubbard Near on Monday. plumbers huddled by noon stay warm. plea to to licensed naugh, were trying to on meters. out a message morning away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

By Staci The New

at tax agenc

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

y

OFFICES

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid A-12

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Index Managing

Calendar editor: Rob

A-2

Classifieds

Dean, 986-3033,

B-9

Comics B-14

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Cynthia

Opinion

m

Miller, cmiller@sfnewmexican.co

rdean@sfnewmexican.com

GREAT RETAIL SPACE! Water Street Store Front

Brokers Welcome. Call Southwest Asset Management, 505-988-5792.

ELDORADO New, Large 3 bedroom, 3 bath, Highend contemporary home: Super Energy efficient, hilltop views, 12.5 acres, paved access. 505-660-5603

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

Sunset Street Studio Apartment. Laundry facility on site. $499 monthly.

By Julie Ann

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

BRIGHT & SUNNY, 1 bedroom apartment, off-street parking, passive solar. $675 includes utilities plus $600 deposit. 505-471-5262 or 505-6700975.

MANUFACTURED HOMES RE

Keller Williams Realty 505-983-5151

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

CALLE LINDA, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage, private yard. $1200, Western Equities, 505-982-4201

1+ ACRE . Nice touches; tile in dining room, kitchen & baths; nichos; kiva fireplace; flagstone patio with portal; 2 car garage; fenced, pets ok. Convenient highway access for Albuquerque commuters. Available now. Open this weekend. $1600 monthly. 210-426-6366.

NEAR CAPITOL, New office space for lease at 444 Galisteo Street, large main room with separate office, kitchenette, parking, 888 sq.ft. at $23 per sq.ft. with year lease ($1700 monthly) obo. 505-983-2101

1 BEDROOM and 2 bedroom units available. 1 Bedroom unit is furnished. Great, safe, location. Walled yard, Fireplace, all appliances, TV and Wifi. references required. 303-908-5250.

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE

2 1/2 acre, 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Studio and horse barn. Lone Butte area. Beautiful, quiet country living. $1,250 monthly. $1,000 deposit. 505-6705998.

2 BEDROOM 1 bath. Fenced yard, $995 monthly. Please call 505-6901803. Available for showing Monday through Wednesday. 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH H O U S E , $950 plus utilities. Sunny, Hardwood Floors, Open Floor Plan, Fenced. Pet OK. San Marcos area. Available 2/10. Steve, 505-470-3238.

2 BEDROOMS 2 BATHS, double garage, washer, dryer. Breathtaking mountain view, trails, golfing, lake. South of Santa Fe. $875. 505-359-4778

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

MONTE AZUL LO O P , 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, washer- dryer hook-ups, fireplace, covered patio, large back yard. $1395 monthly.

MOVE-IN BONUS! 3 Office Suites available FOR LEASE. Utilities included in monthly rent. S T E - 2 0 8 : 2 Rooms, $400; S T E - 2 0 1 : 4 rooms + storage, $900; STE-205: 3 rooms, $460. Excellent location 5th St. off St. Michael’s Drive. CALL 505-629-0825 direct and cell. Phase One Realty, Inc. 505-988-3883 (no messages on office phone).

Great location and parking! $500 monthly includes utilities, cleaning, taxes and amenities. Move in incentives! IMMACULATE. 3, 2, 2, + office. 1920 sq.ft. Rancho Viejo. Corner Lot, front courtyard and backyard walled. Great Mountain Views, fireplace, multiple upgrades. $1,850 monthly. Rancho Viejo Estates, 505-780-0129. LA CIENEGA ADOBE. 1 Bedroom, 500 sq.ft., kiva, Shed, screened porch, enclosed yard. No laundry hook-ups. $660, deposit $400. 505690-7159 LOVELY LARGE 1 BEDROOM ADOBE for lease. Next to Acequia, overlooking Patrick Smith Park on Canyon Road. Available mid-February. 505989-8654

VILLAGE OF CERRILLOS. 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath. $900 monthly. Newly remodeled. Washer, dryer. First, last, plus deposit. Cat okay. 505-473-4186

Please call (505)983-9646. RETAIL SPACE FOR LEASE. EXCELLENT RETAIL LO CA TIO N : St. Michael’s and Llano. Available: 1,026 sq.ft., 1,215 sq.ft., 2,430 sq.ft. or 3,645 sq.ft. Rent at $12 per sq.ft, year lease + CAM about $2.80 per sq.ft year lease. Move-in bonus available. CALL 505-629-0825 Direct and Cell. Phase One Realty, Inc 505-988-3883 (no messages on office phone).

SEASONAL PLAZA RETAIL Month-Month Call Southwest Asset Management, 988-5792.

service«directory CALL 986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts to learn how we can help grow your business! CARETAKING

CLEANING

PART TIME In home care for family members and or pets. References available. Call Jean at 862-222-7500, 505-470-5609.

Clean Houses in and out. Windows, carpets. $18 an hour. Sylvia 505-9204138. Handyman, Landscaping, Roofing. FREE estimates, BNS. 505-3166449.

CHIMNEY SWEEPING DEPENDABLE & RESPONSIBLE. Will clean your home and office with TLC. Excellent references. Nancy, 505-986-1338.

FIREWOOD Dry Pinon & Cedar

Free Kindling, Delivery & Stack. 140.00 pick up load.

505-983-2872, 505-470-4117

HANDYMAN

HANDYMAN

PLASTERING

ROOFING

REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, PRO-PANEL ROOFS, PAINTING, FENCING, YARDWORK. MINOR PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL. 25 years experience. Consulting. Licensed. References. Free estimates. (505)470-5877

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE. Professional Plastering Specialist: Interior & Exterior. Also Re-Stuccos. Patching a specialty. Call Felix, 505-920-3853.

ROOFING EXPERIENCE. Shingles, Brai, Metal, TOP. 20 years experience. No job too small! Free Estimates. Licensed, bonded. 505-577-3605

ROOFING

LANDSCAPING E.R Landscaping

Using

Full Landscaping Design, All types of stonework, Coyote Fencing, Irrigation, sodding. 15% discount, Free Estimates! 505-629-2871 or 505204-4510. CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS is committed to protecting your home. Creosote build-up in a fireplace or lint build-up in a dryer vent reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. Call 505989-5775. Get prepared!

YOUR HEALTH MATTERS. We use natural products. 20 Years Experience, Residential & Offices. Reliable. Excellent references. Licensed & Bonded. Eva, 505-919-9230. Elena. 505-946-7655

AFFORDABLE HOME REPAIR

Housecleaning, garage cleaning, hauling trash. Cutting Trees, Flagstone Patios, Driveways, Fencing, Yard Work, Stucco, Tile.. Greg, Nina, 920-0493.

Larger Type

Only in the the SFNM Classifieds!

LESSONS INTRODUCTORY FLYING LESSONS. 3 HOURS GROUND SCHOOL, 3 HOURS FLYING. $250. LET’S HAVE FUN! PLEASE CALL 505-577-7552.

SELL IT, BUY IT, OR FIND IT...

ALL TYPES . Metal, Shingles, Composite torch down, Hot Mop, Stucco, Plaster. Free Estimates! Call Ismael Lopez at 505-670-0760.

will help your ad 986-3000 get noticed

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000


Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds ADMINISTRATIVE

STORAGE SPACE 10X30 MOVE-IN-SPECIAL , $180 monthly. Airport Cerrillos Storage. Wide, no swing, roll-up doors. U-haul Cargo Van. Professional, Resident Manager. www.airportcerrillos.com. 505-474-4330

A-Poco Self Storage 2235 Henry Lynch Rd Santa Fe, NM 87507 505-471-1122 12x24 for Only $195.00. Call to reserve yours Today!!! WAREHOUSES MAYBERRY PARK. 2356 FOX ROAD, UNIT 700. 1800 sq.ft. Warehouse with front office. Off Silar Road by Home Depot. $1350 monthly. 505-982-1255

Administrative Assistant

T h e New Mexico Suicide Intervention Project, a private non-profit organization, is looking for an experienced Administrative Assistant who enjoys working in a multi-person, multi-task office environment. This position requires a highly organized self-starter with excellent communication skills and advanced computer skills. This is a 10-month, part-time position, from August 15 through June 15 each year; 25-30 hours weekly. Send resume and cover letter to NMSIP, P.O. Box 6004, Santa Fe, NM 87502 or theskyctr@gmail.com attention Ex.Director.

FLEET SPECIALIST PRIMARY PURPOSE: Manages activities related to the vehicles and equipment of the Santa Fe Sheriff’s Office. Salary: $13.5644 hourly $20.3466 hourly. Position Closes: February 14, 2014. For a complete job description go to santafecounty.org or Contact 505-992-9880

to place your ad, call

986-3000

MEDICAL DENTAL

BUILDING MATERIALS

HYGEINIST, FULL-TIME for busy progressive office. Please send cover letter and resume to drparker@richardparkerdds.com

PLYWOOD. CABINET GRADE. 4’x8’ sheets. Never used. Different thicknesses. 505-983-8448

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS FULL-TIME MAID Needed for Santa Fe Estate To live on property Excellent salary and paid vacations 505-660-6440 SANTA FE AREA RANCH RESIDENCE CARETAKER

STEEL BUILDING Allocated Bargains. 40x60 on up. We do deals! www.gosteelbuildings.com Source# 18X. 505-349-0493

FIREWOOD-FUEL SEASONED FIREWOOD. Ponderosa $80.00 per load. Pinion or Cedar $120.00 per load. Tel# 508-4440087 Delivery free.

FURNITURE

Seeking full-time caretaker to manage and maintain residence (not ranch operations) on Santa Fe area large ranch for absentee West Coast owners. Compensation package (a function of prior experience) including health insurance, and superior separate on-ranch home. Send resumes and cover page via email to: ResidenceCaretaker@gmail.com

WAREHOUSE WORK SPACE AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 2000 sq.ft. Workshop, art studio, light manuafacturing. Siler Road area. $1470 monthly, $1000 deposit. 505670-1733.

»announcements«

SALES MARKETING Seeking Office Administrative Assistant. Must possess strong skills and experience in authorizations, billing, Medicaid, Medicare, Private insurances, scheduling, computer and good friendly customer services, bilingual a plus. Salary negotiable based on experience. Send resume to cmazon@cybermesa.com

NM’S 2ND largest insurer seeks entrepreneurial candidates with a strong desire to be successful and respected business owners in their community. Award winning training from the University of Farmers. Subsidy packages available for building your agency. For more information, please contact 954-1612.

EDUCATION

»merchandise«

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! PETS SUPPLIES

»garage sale«

MEET JETHRO

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT MOUSER? Or maybe you just want an independent cat with attitude? Consider Jethro. This big guy has been at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter since May and we would love it if he could have a home with you. Jethro is available as part of our Barn Cat Program because of his rough play and his bully behavior toward other cats. Find out more about him by calling our New Hope program at 505-983-4309, ext. 280 or newhope@sfhumanesociety.org.

Add a pic and sell it quick! Using

Larger Type

WE NEED A CARPET RESTORATION P E R S O N . Or person who wants to learn how to repair hand made rugs, carpets. 505-310-0660

C-7

ESTATE SALES Stephen’s A Consignment Gallery Liquidating a Million $ Estate Saturday, February 8th 9-3 1347 Tano Ridge Road. Exquisite Custom Furnishings, Art Work, workshop, worth the short drive! Go to www.stephensconsignments.com for detail & images

»cars & trucks«

will help your ad get noticed

BEAUTIFUL COUCH WITH LOVELY ACCENTS. FROM A SMOKE AND PET FREE HOME. $350. PLEASE CALL, 505-238-5711 TO SCHEDULE A VIEWING. SOUTHWEST OAK TABLE with beveled glass top. 4 regular chairs, 2 armchair, matching oak hutch. $1600 both, $900 each. 505-603-8767

986-3000 Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000 CLASSIC CARS

»animals«

Toy Box Too Full? CAR STORAGE FACILITY

VACANCY NOTICE

FOUND FOUND CAR KEY IN MAGNETIZED CASE, in Blue Corn parking lot 2/1 Saturday. Call to describe: 505-3160334

SANTA FE INDIAN SCHOOL IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR A HEAD FOOTBALL COACH. IF INTERESTED, SUBMIT AN APPLICATION, A LETTER OF INTEREST, RESUME, AND TWO REFERENCES TO THE HUMAN RESOURCE OFFICE, PO BOX 5340, SANTA FE, NM 87505. APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED UNTIL POSITION IS FILLED. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 9896353 OR FORWARD AN EMAIL TO: pguardiola@sfis.k12.nm.us. Website for application: www.sfis.k12.nm.us.

LOST HOSPITALITY LOST: SMALL SILVER SQUARESHAPED NECKLACE PENDANT, with purple stone in center. Sentimental value. REWARD! 505-670-0308

PUBLIC NOTICES

EXPERIENCED COOK-CAPABLE of all tasks to feed up to forty guests. Add’l days for cleaning guest rooms as needed and directed. Applications taken at Pecos Monastery 16 Guadalupe LN Hwy 63, Pecos, NM.

Portfolio Manager-Fixed Income

Biotest Plasma Center 2860 Cerrillos Road, Ste B1 Santa Fe, NM 87507. 505-424-6250

Book your appointment online at: www.biotestplasma.com NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

NM SENIOR Olympics is accepting cost proposals to host the Annual Summer Games for 30 individual sports for 900 participants between 2015-2018. For an RFP contact NMSO at nmso@nmseniorolympics.org or call 1-888-623-6676. Deadline 4/1/14

The New Mexico Educational Retirement Board seeks a portfolio manager for an investment grade bonds portfolio. Functions include portfolio management and analysis, trade execution, and risk management. CFA designation and 4+ years of fixed income portfolio management with demonstrable track record preferred. Salary range: $31.21-$55.49 per hour. Location: Santa Fe, NM. Apply on the State Personnel Office website: www.spo.state.nm.us (Portfolio Manager-ERB #10108634) by February 27, 2014. Santa Fe Railyard Stewards invites applications for the position of Executive Director. Visit www.railyardpark.org for more information and minimum qualifications.

BEAUTIFUL FOOTED Tub, in good condition ready to install. $650. 505-8986382 or 505-321-4064

ALFALFA BALES & ALFAFLA ORCHARD GRASS BALES. $9.50 each bale. 100 or more, $9.00 each. Barn stored in Ribera, NM. Call 505-473-5300.

MERRY FOSS, Latin American ETHNOGRAPHIC & ANTIQUE DEALER moving. Selling her COLLECTION, Household FURNITURE & EVERYTHING! By appt 505-7957222.

DOMESTIC

PETS SUPPLIES

FRONT OFFICE POSITION OPEN at DENTAL PRACTICE. At least one year of experience using Dentrix required. Call Lana, 505-629-8287.

PART-TIME DATA ENTRY FOR QUICKBOOKS. Basic office skills and good PR skills a must. Fax resume to 505-438-4775

HEAD DENTAL ASSISTANT Rare Opportunity!!! Progressive Taos Dental Office has immemdiate opening for Full-time certified head dental assistant, 575-7794532.

ESTATE-SIZE MOVING SALE!!!

Spanish-Colonial Crucifix, Art Deco + MidCentury Modern Art + Furniture: Clifford Pascoe, Danish rosewood table with 6 chairs, rare Ben Seibel; Paul Jacoulet prints, Japanese Step Tansu, pottery, hand-tinted albumen photo album; 4 Antique Anglo-Indian chairs, 40’s wrought iron door set; Rare Cache of Vintage European Couture Fabric, bolts, yardage + remnants: Italian silk, charmeuse, suede pelts, Belg. linen, Fr. brocade); Ethnic Textile Collection, quilts, Vintage plus Contemporary Women’s Clothing: casual + designer. (Escada, Valentino, Nipon, Chanel); mature indoor cactus collection, outdoor furniture, pots, ComposTumbler, humidifiers, queen mattress, great book + cd collection, frames, china, collectibles, curiosities + more! No silver, fine jewelry, or electronics.

ADORABLE MINIATURE P O O D L E . Purebred. 1 Female. 9 weeks old. Shots. Ready to Go to Loving Home! $450. mramirez120477@gmail.com 505-501-5433 505-474-0831.

2006 BUICK L U C E R N E CXL V6. Comfort and Convenience Package. Woodgrain trim. $13,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

VALENTINE’S DAY AKC REGISTERED BOXER PUPPIES. 6 females, 1 male. First shots, tails cut, dew claws removed. $750.00 Marissa or Robert 505-473-9733 2002 INDIAN Market blue ribbon winning painting by museum artist SHONTO BEGAY... 50x72 framed beautifully... have to sell, $7,450.00 firm... Santa Fe. 505-471-4316

2 days weekly. Monday and Wednesday. Knowledge of EagleSoft software helpful. Fax resume: 505995-0388.

DENTAL ASSISTANT OR STERILIZATION TECH wanted for busy practice. Full time, Monday - Thursday. Experience preferred. Salary DOE. Email resume to: admin@childs2thdr.com

ACCOUNTING

ART

ABSOLUTELY FANTASTIC FRONT DESK POSITION.

DENTAL ASSISTANT, Full time. Competitive salary & excellent benefit package. Experience required. Fax resume to 505-884-0479

TINY POMERANIAN PUPPIES, rare, exotic, registered, first shots $500$800. Tiny Designer PomChi Puppies, first shots, $350. Valentine Ready!! 505-901-2094, 505-753-0000.

DRYER, MAYTAG. Electric. White. Like new. $240. 505-983-5260

MEDICAL DENTAL

Busy eyecare practice is seeking experienced Optician and or Technician. Email resume to: info@accentsfe.com or fax to 505984-8892.

»jobs«

NO EARLY BIRDS PLEASE

FEED EQUIPMENT SERVICES

APPLIANCES

Please help us help those coping with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. New donors can receive $100.00 this week! Ask about our Specialty Programs! Must be 18 years or older, have valid ID along with proof of SS#, and local residency. Walk-ins Welcome! New donors will receive a $10.00 Bonus on their second donation with this ad.

WORTH THE DRIVE + WINTER WEATHER!

ANTIQUES

MANAGEMENT

Changing Futures, One Person At A Time Become a Plasma Donor Today

10 VISTA GRANDE DR ELDORADO SATURDAY, 2/8 + SUNDAY, 2/9 8:30-5:00

Airport Road and 599 505-660-3039

MIGUEL MARTINEZ "Girl From Galisteo (1991)" Original oil pastel; Not a lithograph. Beautifully framed. $12,500, Offer. Serious inquires only. Approx. 40"x34". 505-690-1190.

Meet Jethro. Are you looking for the perfect mouser? Or maybe just want an independent cat with attitude? This big guy has been at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter since May and we would love it if he could have a home with you. Jethro is available as part of our Barn Cat Program because of his rough play and his bully behavior toward other cats. Find out more about him by calling our New Hope program at 505-983-4309, ext. 280, newhope@sfhumanesociety.org. PURE BRED RED STANDARD POODLE PUPPIES. $500. 4 WEEKS OLD . Bred for excellent temperament. Call or text 575-840-4771 or email: kros78v@yahoo.com for more info.

2013 CHEVROLET M A L I B U 2LT. 2.5L, 4 cylinder, certified CARFAX one owner vehicle. $22,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357. YORKIES, CHIHUAHUAS, POODLES, MINI DACHSHUNDS, DESIGNER MALTESE, YORKY-POOS, SHIHTZUS, DESIGNER SCHNAUZERS, MORKIES. Papers, shots, health guarantee, POTTY-PAD trained. Most hypo-allergic, nonshedding. PAYMENT PLAN. Debit, Credit cards or PAYPAL. $300 - $2,200. Call or text for pictures 575-9101818. cingard1@hotmail.com

www.furrysbuickgmc.com So can you with a classified ad WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000


C-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

sfnmÂŤclassifieds DOMESTIC

4X4s

to place your ad, call 4X4s

986-3000 IMPORTS

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! IMPORTS

IMPORTS

2010 BMW 335Xi - Another Lexus trade! Low miles, AWD, completely loaded with Navigation, still under warranty! clean CarFax $27,932 Call 505-216-3800.

2012 Infiniti M37x AWD - Just traded! Gorgeous and loaded, good miles, navigation & technology packages, local one owner, clean CarFax $34,281. Call 505-216-3800.

SPECIAL

2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO COUPE 1SS. Immaculate condition. 40,337 miles, new tires and brakes. Clean Carfax. $26,999 Schedule a test drive today.

2013 JEEP WRANGLER. 2 door hard top. Summer and winter fun! Be the star of the show. Only 5k miles. $26,995. Call 505-473-1234.

2006 FORD-F150 CREW CAB-XLT 4X4

Two Owner, Local, Carfax, Vehicle Brought up To Date With Services, Drive Ready, Most Options, Transport Crew Truck, Affordable $12,450. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2007 Acura MDX AWD

Sweet CarFax certified one owner, 75k miles. Gorgeous Nimbus grey metallic with ebony black leather, accident free, smoke free, all wheel drive. 3 month/3000 mile warranty included!! $19,995. Call 877-2322815.

sweetmotorsales.com

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Add an Attention Getter to make your ad stand out Call our helpfull Ad-Visors for details

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2011 DODGE CHARGER. Hemi power with charming elegance. 38k miles. only $25,499. Call 505-4731234.

2011 Land Rover LR2. Climate Comfort Package, Bluetooth, and Sirius Radio. 37,626 miles. New Brake Pads, and New Wipers. One Owner! $26,995. 505-474-0888.

2012 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. 3 piece Hardtop, Automatic Transmission. 15,077 miles. Excellent Condition! One Owner! $29,995. 505-474-0888.

2012 Toyota Tundra Double Cab 4x4, rare TRD Rock Warrior, new BFG A/T tires, good miles, 1 owner clean CarFax, HOT! $30,981. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 Audi Q7 3.6L quattro - Another pristine Lexus trade-in! Only 39k miles, AWD, well-equipped with panoramic roof, new tires, clean CarFax, significantly undervalued at $33,212. Call 505-2163800.

2010 BMW 535Xi AWD. Recent trade-in, factory CERTIFIED with warranty & maintenance until 3/2016, fully loaded, clean CarFax $24,432. Call 505-216-3800.

WE GET RESULTS! So can you with a classified ad

2010 Land Rover LR2 HSE SUV. 21,627 miles, Climate Comfort Package, Bluetooth, Sirius Radio. One Owner! The BEST 4X4 BY FAR! $25,995. 505-474-0888.

CALL 986-3000

2010 DODGE CHALLENGER COUPE RT. Certified CARFAX one owner. $28,750. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2004 BMW X3 AWD

2010 TOYOTA Tacoma Crew Cab SR5 4x4. Another 1 owner Lexus trade! Only 25k miles, NEW tires & NEW battery, clean CarFax $26,891. Call 505-216-3800.

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2012 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4WD Sport. certified CARFAX ONE owner vehicle. $33,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

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2010 AUDI-A5 QUATTRO CABRIOLET PREMIUM PLUS

Another One Owner, Local, Carfax, 29,537 Miles, Automatic, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Every Service Record, X-keys, Manuals, Extended Warranty, Every Option, Pristine, Sooo Intoxicating Beautiful. $31,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

Sweet Beemer at an affordable price!! 91k miles. Luxury all wheel drive, leather, power seats with memory, moonroof, CD and more. No accidents, clean CarFax. Price includes 3 month, 3000 mile warranty. $10,995. Call 877-232-2815.

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Classifieds Where treasures are found daily

Place an ad Today!

CALL 986-3000 2004 PACIFICA. Meticulously maintained, all records, always garaged. AWD, loaded, everything works. 127,000 miles. Clean CarFax. Reliable commuter. $6,900. 505-603-8079 2006 BOBCAT S220. Excellent condition! Includes bucket & brand new set of 48" forks. $19,999 OBO. John, 808-346-3635

4X4s 2008 JEEP W R A N G L E R 4WD Unlimited Rubicon. V6, 3.8L high output engine. $31,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

IMPORTS

GET NOTICED!

BOLD YOUR TEXT to make your ad stand out Call our helpfull Ad-Visors for details

2010 HONDA Civic Hybrid - Another pristine Lexus trade-in! Just 39k miles, leather, 45+ mpg, clean CarFax $15,741. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 Land Rover LR3

CALL 986-3000

Top of the line HSE V8. Excellent black exterior, luxurious wood and tan leather, 7 passenger seating, 96k miles, service history, Carfax, Free Warranty. $19,995. Call 877-232-2815.

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www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2009 HUMMER. Low miles only 46k, 4x4, sunroof, full power, pampered luxury, yet off road rugged. Only $23,995. Call 505-473-1234. 2010 ACURA RDX. Tech n ology package and only 45k miles. Pamper yourself! Yous for $21,995. $1,700 below NADA Retail! Call 505-473-1234.

2005.5 AUDI A4 3.2 QUATRO. 63k miles. One owner. Always garaged. No accidents. Leather seats, navigation, cold-weather package, sports package, Bose stereo, Xenon headlights. $13,250. 505-577-5342

2009 LAND ROVER LR3 HSE SUV. 77,640 miles. One owner, navigation, heated seats. LR3, the best all around 4X4! $27,995. 505-474-0888.

2001 ISUZU VEHICROSS. Unique Specilaty Car. Great condition. Ricarro leather seats. Loaded. Only 60,200 miles. $10,500. 505-670-6662

Local Owner, Carfax, 76,569 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, manuals, XKeys, Service Records, All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Pristine, Soooo Perfect $15,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2003 BMW X5 AWD. Automatic. Greyblue. No repairs or servicing needed. 100k miles. Excellent condition. Warranty included. $13,000. 505-471-2272, 660-4859. HONDA INSIGHT 2010 HYBRID. 44 mpg hwy mileage. One owner, well maintained. New tires under warranty. Great condition. 73,500 miles. Comes with Insight car cover! 505-501-2838.

2009 HONDA CR-V AUTOMATIC

BMW 320I x Drive Sedan 2014 $36,000. 6,700 miles. All Wheel Drive. Heated, power front seats, Hands-free Bluetooth, USB and more! Transferable 4 year, 50,000 mile warranty. 505920-6634

2008 Land Rover Range Rover HSE. Another Lexus trade-in! low miles, clean CarFax, must see to appreciate, absolutely gorgeous $31,921. Call 505-216-3800.


Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnmÂŤclassifieds IMPORTS

IMPORTS

to place your ad, call

986-3000

D-1

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

IMPORTS

IMPORTS

PICKUP TRUCKS

SUVs

2012 Toyota RAV4, V6 engine, 28k miles, sunroof, extra wheels & snow tires. $21,900. Call 505-6998339.

2011 Volkswagen Tiguan S 4Motion - Just 27k miles! AWD, new tires, 1 owner clean CarFax, turbocharged, truly immaculate! $19,971. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 GMC S IE R R A 1500 SLT. 4Wheel drive, very tough and durable. $35,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX AWD LTZ. Runs on either gasoline or E85 fuel. Schedule a test drive todday, 505-629-1357.

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SPECIAL

2011 Lexus CT200h - Recent Lexus trade! Factory Certified with 100k mile warranty, hybrid 42+ mpg, 1 owner clean CarFax, forget Prius for $23,841. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER-SPORT AWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, 84,000 Miles, Garaged, NonSmoker, Service Records, New Tires, Manuals, Seven Passenger, Moon-Roof, Loaded. Pristine, Soooo Beautiful. $19,750. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

SUVs

2004 LEXUS RX-330 AWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, 80,014 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Service Records, New Tires, Chrome Wheels, Moon-Roof, Loaded. Pristine. Soooo Beautiful, $16,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

SELL IT, BUY IT, OR FIND IT... Using

Larger Only in the the SFNM Classifieds! Type will help your ad 986-3000 get noticed

2009 Volkswagen Tiguan SEL AWD Turbo. Navigation, panoramic roof, NICE, clean CarFax. $15,932. Call 505-216-3800.

2007 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ - Recent trade-in, loaded, leather, buckets, moonroof, DVD, new tires & brakes, super clean! $17,851. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 TOYOTA VENZA Wagon V6 AWD. Tons of upgrades! $24,975. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357. 2012 BUICK ENCLAVE FWD. Luxury and safety. Leather interior. Back up camera. $36,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

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www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2004 Volvo XC90 - Another Lexus trade-in! Locally owned, low miles, obviously well maintained, rear DVD & well equipped, clean CarFax $9,871. Call 505-216-3800.

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000

2010 FORD EXPLORER 4WD LIMITED. Certified CARFAX one owner vehicle. $28,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2011 Toyota RAV4 - Just 27k miles! 4 cyl, 4WD, recently serviced with new tires AND brakes, 1 owner clean CarFax, pristine! $18,821. Call 505-216-3800.

2005 Mercedes-Benz C230 Sport

Absolutely cherry, 87k miles. Loaded, heated seats, moonroof, 6 CD changer, spotless inside and out. Clean title, no accidents, includes 3 month, 3,000 mile warranty. Sweet price only $10,900. Call 877-232-2815.

2013 SUBARU Impreza Limited Sport - REALLY, why would you buy new? Just 5k miles, heated leather, original MSRP $25k, clean CarFax. $21,871. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 BUICK ENCLAVE PREMIUM AWD. V6, 3.6L high output engine. Comfort, durability. $38,000 Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

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Sell your car in a hurry!

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2013 VW BUG. 11k miles. Run on beetle juice. Pass the gas station with a smile. Only $19,995! Call 505-473-1234.

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Place an ad in the Classifieds 986-3000

2010 Toyota Venza - Rare V6 AWD and fully loaded with leather and panoramic roof, low miles, clean CarFax $23,871. Call 505-216-3800.

2006 MINI COOPER-S CONVERTIBLE MANUAL

Another One Owner, Carfax, 51,051 Miles. Garaged, Non-smoker, Manuals, X-Keys, Service Records. Drive All Season, Pristine, Soooo Beautiful $14,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2010 SUBARU IMPREZA SEDAN 2.5I PREMIUM. Handles exceptionally in snow and ice. $24,500. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

PICKUP TRUCKS

2008 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL. V6, 3.6L engine, DVD, satellite radio, much more! $24,000. Schedule a test drive today. 505-629-1357.

2013 GMC Terrain AWD SLT. Conquer any rainy, snowy, or icy road conditions. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

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VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

www.furrysbuickgmc.com www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2008 TOYOTA CAMRY SOLARA C O N V E R T IBL E . V6, Automatic. Dependable and fun! $19,500. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

2008 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5I LIMITED. All wheel drive, lots of options! $18,000. Schedule a test drice today, 505-629-1357.

2007 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 Classic LS 4WD. 172,790 miles. One owner! Locally owned and loved! $13,999. Schedule a test drive today.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

Have a product or service to offer? 2010 NISSAN 370Z ROADSTER. Low miles and tons of fun! 18,598 miles. Manual transmission, high performance tires, $32,999. Schedule a test drive today.

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2010 CADILLAC ESCALADE EXT. AWD, Immaculate condition. Try to find one like this! 80,805 miles, $38,999. Schedule a test drive today.

Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000

VANS & BUSES

2004 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE 1500 4WD Crew Cab. Lots of options! $33,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2012 TOYOTA PRIUS-C HYBRID FWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, Records, Garaged, Non-Smoker, XKeys, 14,710 Miles, City 53, Highway 46, Navigation, Remaining Factory Warranty. $18,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICE!

2003 PORSCHE Cayenne S - WOW! merely 51k miles, recent local trade, AWD, loaded, perfectly maintained, clean CarFax $16,841. Call 505-216-3800.

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2004 PONTIAC AZTEK. A perfect mix of sport utility and a sedan. 67,298 miles. Unique look. Big attention getter! $8,995. Call 505982-1957.

2006 TOYOTA AVALON FWD LIMITED

Local Owner, Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, X-Keys, Manuals, Every Service Record, Moonroof, Navigation, Loaded, Affordable Luxury, Pristine, Sooo Manageable, $11,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

2013 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA LTZ AWD. Great all-around vehicle. Comfort, durability, and style. $25,500. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

1995 FORD F-250. 230,000 miles, 4WD, extra gas tank, tool box, snowplow, NEW clutch, bed liner, $3800 cash. 505-995-8830.

1991 CHEVROLET G20 VAN. 52,360 miles. Road trip! Only $4,999? We are practically giving it away! Schedule a test drive today.

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Find more low mileage, single-owner trade-ins at...

www.lexusofsantafe.com


D-2

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

sfnm«classifieds to place legals, call 986-3000 PRIMARY ELECTION PROCLAMATION

toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

Pursuant to the Primary Election Law, NMSA 1978 § 1-8-10 to 52 (1969, as amended through 2013), I, Susana Martinez, Governor of the State of New Mexico, by virtue of the authority vested in me, do hereby issue the following proclamation: That a Primary Election is called to be held throughout the State of New Mexico and in each county and precinct thereof on June 3, 2014; That a Primary Election shall be applicable to the following political parties: the Democratic Party and the Republican Party; and

That the Primary Election shall be for the purpose of permitting the Democratic Party and the Republican Party to nominate candidates for the following offices: FEDERAL OFFICES ONE UNITED STATES SENATOR

SIX-YEAR TERM

THREE UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVES District 1: TWO-YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 2 through 79, 81 through 83, 86 through 92, 94 through 99, 101 through 114, 116, 119 through 125, 131 through 144, 150 through 154, 161 through 166, 170, 171, 180 through 187, 191 through 197, 211, 212, 214 through 217, 221, 223 through 226, 241 through 246, 251 through 258, 271 through 275, 278, 281 through 287, 289 through 308, 311 through 318, 321 through 324, 326 through 333, 341 through 347, 351 through 358, 371 through 375, 381 through 387, 400 through 456, 461 through 466, 471 through 478, 480 through 500, 502 through 573 and 601 through 603; Sandoval county precincts 1 through 5, 28, 29, 38, 52, 55 through 57, 64, 74 and 76; Santa Fe county precincts 15, 73 and 84; Torrance county; and Valencia county precincts 6, 16, 22, 28 and Census tabulation block 3506119703031019 in Valencia county precinct 36, as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). District 2: TWO-YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precinct 93; Catron county; Chaves county; Cibola county; De Baca county; Dona Ana county; Eddy county; Grant county; Guadalupe county; Hidalgo county; Lea county; Lincoln county; Luna county; McKinley county precincts 26, 27, 29 and 30; Otero county; Roosevelt county precincts 3 through 6, 10, 11, 19 and all of Roosevelt county precinct 2 except for Census tabulation block 350410002001111; Sierra county; Socorro county; and Valencia county precincts 1 through 5, 7 through 15, 17 through 21, 23 through 27, 29 through 35, 37 through 41 and all of Valencia county precinct 36 except for Census Tabulation block 350611973031019 as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). District 3: TWO-YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 1, 80, 84, 85, 115, 117, 118 and 127 through 129; Colfax county; Curry county; Harding county; Los Alamos county; McKinley county precincts 1 through 25, 28, 31 through 50 and 52 through 59; Mora county; Quay county; Rio Arriba county; Roosevelt county precincts 1, 7 through 9, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 21 and Census tabulation block 350410002001111 in Roosevelt county precinct 2; San Juan county; San Miguel county; Sandoval county precincts 6 through 27, 30 through 37, 39 through 51, 53, 54, 58 through 63, 65 through 73, 75 and 78 through 86; Santa Fe county precincts 1 through 14, 16 through 72, 74 through 83 and 85 through 88; Taos county; and Union county as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). STATE, DISTRICT AND METROPOLITAN OFFICES ONE GOVERNOR ONE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR ONE SECRETARY OF STATE ONE STATE AUDITOR ONE STATE TREASURER ONE ATTORNEY GENERAL ONE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC LANDS ONE JUDGE OF THE COURT OF APPEALS

FOUR-YEAR FOUR-YEAR FOUR-YEAR FOUR-YEAR FOUR-YEAR FOUR-YEAR FOUR-YEAR

TERM TERM TERM TERM TERM TERM TERM

TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM

SEVENTY MEMBERS OF THE STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Districts 1-70, TWO YEAR TERM as defined in the Final Judgment and Order issued by the court in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). THREE MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION District 2: FOUR YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 303, 551 through 559 and 570 through 573; Chaves county; Colfax county; Curry county; De Baca county; Eddy county; Guadalupe county; Harding county; Lea county; Lincoln county precincts 1, 3 through 5, 12, 14 through 16 and 19; Mora county precincts 3 and 7 through 11; Otero county precincts 1 through 13, 19, 20, 22 through 33, 35 and 37 through 41; Quay county; Roosevelt county; San Miguel county precincts 1 through 22 and 24 through 28; Santa Fe county precincts 15, 18, 19, 73, 84 and 85; Torrance county precincts 1 through 9 and 11 through 16; and Union county as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). District 4: FOUR YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 31 through 38, 40 through 56, 58 through 67, 71 through 77, 88, 90 through 99, 101 through 106, 109, 122 through 124, 132, 133, 135 through 144, 214, 217, 221 and 223 through 226; Cibola county; McKinley county; Rio Arriba county precincts 24 through 27, 29 and 30; San Juan county; Sandoval county precincts 7 through 10, 14 through 27, 78 and 79; Santa Fe county precincts 12 and 72; Socorro county precincts 15 and 26; and Valencia county precincts 13 as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). District 5: FOUR YEAR TERM Catron county; Dona Ana county; Grant county; Hidalgo county; Lincoln county precincts 2, 6 through 11, 13, 17, 18, 20 and 21; Luna county; Otero county precincts 14 through 18, 21, 34 and 36; Sierra county; Socorro county precincts 1 through 14 and 16 through 25; Torrance county precincts 10; and Valencia county precincts 1 through 12 and 14 through 41 as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated). – SIX MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC EDUCATION COMMISSION District 2: FOUR-YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 289 through 302, 304 through 308, 316 through 318, 321 through 324, 328 through 333, 406 through 410, 413 through 430, 440, 447 through 454, 456, 461 through 466, 471 through 478, 480 through 500, 502 through 550, 560 through 569 and 601 through 603, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 7. District 3: FOUR-YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 2 through 19, 68, 69, 78, 79, 84 through 86, 89, 101 through 108, 116, 121 through 125, 131 through 133, 135, 150 through 154, 161 through 166, 171, 180 through 187, 191 through 197, 211, 212, 214 through 217, 221, 223 through 226, 241 through 246, 251 through 256, 271 through 275, 278, 281 through 287, 311 through 315, 326, 327, 341 through 347, 351 through 358, 371 through 375, 381 through 387, 400 through 405, 411, 412, 431 through 439, 441 through 446 and 455, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 8. District 4: TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM Bernalillo county precincts 1, 80, 87, 115, 117, 118, 127 through 129, 170, 303, 553 through 559 and 570 through 573; Los Alamos county; Sandoval county precincts 1 through 23, 27 through 76 and 78 through 86; and Santa Fe county precincts 11, 12, 15 through 19, 63, 72, 73, 80, 82, 84 and 85, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 9. District 5: TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM McKinley county; Rio Arriba county precincts 24 and 29; San Juan county; and Sandoval county precincts 24 through 26, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 10. District 6: FOUR-YEAR TERM Bernalillo county precincts 31 and 93; Catron county; Cibola county; Dona Ana county precincts 1 through 3, 60 and 95; Grant county; Hidalgo county; Luna county; Sierra county; Socorro county precincts 1 through 11 and 13 through 26; Valencia county, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 11. District 7: FOUR-YEAR TERM Dona Ana county precincts 4 through 59, 61 through 94 and 96 through 120; and Otero county precincts 1 and 41, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 12. TEN DISTRICT JUDGES 1st Judicial District, Divisions 1, 4, and 6 2nd Judicial District, Divisions 3 and 9 4th Judicial District, Division 1 5th Judicial District, Divisions 1 and 6 9th Judicial District, Division 3 12th Judicial District, Division 4

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ROOSEVELT COUNTY THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 3 District 4 District 5 ONE COUNTY CLERK ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE SAN JUAN COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE SIX MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Division 4 Division 5 Division 6 SAN MIGUEL COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 SANDOVAL COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE THREE MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 SANTA FE COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE FOUR MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Division 4

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Declarations of candidacy by pre-primary convention designation and nominating petitions for the office of United States senator, United States representative, governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state auditor, state treasurer, attorney general, commissioner of public lands and judge of the Legal No. 96403 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds PRIMARY ELECTION PROCLAMATION cont. Court of Appeals shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy for retention for one justice of the Supreme Court and three judges of the Court of Appeals for the General Election shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, February 4, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy for retention for all affected district judicial offices for the General Election shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for state representatives in multi-county legislative districts, district judges for partisan election, public education commissioners and public regulation commissioners shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for the five Bernalillo county metropolitan court judges for partisan election and state representatives in legislative districts wholly within one county or composed of only one county shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

to place legals, call

986-3000

Declarations of candidacy and filing fees or, in lieu thereof, pauper statements for probate judges shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for the magistrate judges shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy and filing fees or, in lieu thereof, pauper statements for all other elective county offices shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of retention for the fourteen Bernalillo county metropolitan court judges for the General Election shall be filed with the Bernalillo County Clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for candidates who seek, but fail to receive pre-primary convention designation for a statewide office or the office of United States representative or United States senator shall be filed with the Secretary of State either ten days following the date of the preprimary convention or on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., whichever is later. Declarations of intent to be a write-in candidate for the offices of United States

D-3

toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

representative, members of the legislature representing multi-county districts, district judges, public regulation commissioners, public education commissioners, and statewide offices shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of intent to be a write-in candidate for magistrate judge shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 18, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. No state convention for designating Primary Election candidates shall be held later than Sunday, March 9, 2014. Certificates of designation of Primary Election candidates shall be filed by political parties with the Secretary of State no later than 5:00 p.m. on the first Tuesday succeeding the state convention. SIGNED AT THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE THIS 27th DAY OF JANUARY 2014.

ATTEST:

WITNESS MY HAND AND THE GREAT SEAL OF THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO.

DIANNA J. DURAN SECRETARY OF STATE

SUSANA MARTINEZ GOVERNOR

Legal No. 96403 • Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican February 7th and 14th, 2014

LEGALS

LEGALS

not sufficient to pay the amount of this Judgment. Plaintiff and/or its assignee have the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or WELLS FARGO BANK, in writing. Plaintiff may apply all or any NA, part of its judgment to the purchase price Plaintiff, in lieu of cash. The sale may be postv. poned and reschedDARCIE B. JOHNSON, uled at the discretion of the undersigned et al., Special Master. Defendants. THE FOREGOING SALE Case No. D-101-CV- shall also be made to satisfy a Summary 2012-00512 Judgment rendered by the aboveNOTICE OF SALE -referenced Court in SALE TO BE CONthe above-entitled DUCTED ON MARCH and numbered cause 4, 2014 on October 23, 2013 in NOTICE IS HEREBY favor of defendant GIVEN that on March Los Alamos National ("LANB") 4, 2014, at the hour of Bank 10:00 a.m. MT, the un- against Ms. Johnson "Dedersigned Special (collectively, Master will, at the fendants"), being an action to foreclose a east entrance of Santa Fe County Court- Mortgage and all othhouse in Santa Fe, er security interests the aboveNew Mexico, sell all on property. the right, title and in- described terest of the above- LANB’s judgment is as of named Defendants in $67,619.62 and to the hereinafter March 4, 2014 which the outdescribed real prop- includes principal erty, improvements, standing balance, interest, late fixtures, attachattorney ments, and personal charges, and costs property to the high- fees, est bidder for cash. through that date, The property to be plus any remaining sold is located at 49 C attorney fees and Canada Del Rancho, costs accruing prior Santa Fe, New Mexico to the date of sale. 87508, and is situate The judgment bears in Santa Fe County, interest at the rate of New Mexico, and is 4.25%, with the Court more particularly de- reserving entry of final judgment against scribed as follows: Lot 305 of The Village Ms. Johnson for the Center at Rancho amount due after the Viejo, as shown on foreclosure sale, for Plat filed in the office costs and attorney of the County Clerk, fees, plus interest as Santa Fe County, New may be assessed by Mexico on October the Court. LANB will a deficiency 17, 2005 in Plat Book seek 604, page 34, as In- judgment for the difstrument No. 1403345, ference between any amounts realized INCLUDING ANY AND from the sale of the ALL IMPROVEMENTS, Property and the toFIXTURES, AND AT- tal amount of this if such TACHMENTS, AND Judgment, ANY AND ALL OF DE- amounts realized are not sufficient to pay FENDANT’S ABANDONED PERSONAL the amount of this LANB PROPERTY AS DE- Judgment. SCRIBED IN THIS and/or its assignee have the right to bid COURT’S JUDGMENT, at such sale and subtogether with all and mit its bid verbally or singular tenements, in writing. LANB may hereditaments, and apply all or any part appurtenances there- of its judgment to the to belonging or any purchase price in lieu wise appertaining of cash. LANB’s Mortthereto, and subject gage is subordinate to reservations, re- and inferior to Wells Mortgage, strictions and ease- Fargo’s which is a valid, first ments of record. priority lien. THE FOREGOING SALE shall be made to sat- NOTICE IS FURTHER isfy a Stipulated In GIVEN that the real improveRem Judgment For property, Foreclosure And Or- ments, fixtures, and conder Of Sale rendered attachments by the above- cerned with herein referenced Court in will be sold subject to the above-entitled any and all patent easeand numbered cause reservations, on January 14, 2014 in ments, all recorded favor of Plaintiff and unrecorded liens against defendant not foreclosed herein, Darcie B. Johnson and all recorded and special ("Ms. Johnson"), be- unrecorded ing an action to fore- assessments and taxclose a Mortgage and es that may be due. If all other security in- personal property of terests on the above- Defendant, its agents, described property. or its representaPlaintiff’s in rem tives, or of any other judgment is person or entity sep$317,245.36 as of Jan- arately ordered to vauary 14, 2014, which cate and quit possesincludes the out- sion of the Property standing principal remains on the real balance, interest, late property after entry charges, escrow ad- of the Order Approvvances, property in- ing Sale, such personspection fees, record- al property is deemed ing fees, attorney abandoned and the fees, and costs purchaser may disthrough that date, pose of the property plus any remaining in any manner purattorney fees and suant to applicable costs accruing prior law. Plaintiff and its to the date of sale. attorneys disclaim all The judgment bears responsibility for, and interest at the rate of the purchaser at the 6.75%, with the Court sale takes the propreserving entry of fi- erty subject to, the nal judgment against valuation of the subMs. Johnson for the ject property by the amount due after the County Assessor as foreclosure sale, for real or personal propcosts and attorney erty, affixture of any fees, plus interest as building or improvemay be assessed by ments to the land, dethe Court. However, activation of title to Plaintiff is not enti- any improvement to tled to a money judg- the property, if any, conment against Ms. environmental Johnson for any tamination on the property, if any, and amounts awarded violations herein, including a zoning deficiency judgment concerning the propfor the difference be- erty, if any. tween the amounts realized from the sale NOTICE IS FURTHER of the Property and GIVEN that the purthe total amount of chaser at such sale this Judgment, if such shall take title to the amounts realized are above described real property subject to STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

Continued...

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LEGALS

LEGALS

p p y j Defendant’s one- at the front entrance month right of re- of the First Judicial demption. District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa NOTICE IS FURTHER Fe, New Mexico, sell GIVEN that the pro- and convey to the ceeds of the foreclo- highest bidder for sure sale shall first cash all the right, tiapply to the costs of tle, and interest of sale, including the the above-named deSpecial Master’s fee, fendants in and to to be hereafter fixed the following describy the Court, for any bed real estate locatcosts incurred for the ed in said County and maintenance and State: protection of the property, including Lot 6, Block 3 of those not included in Candelero de Santa this judgment, then Fe, Unit 1, as shown to Wells Fargo for on plat filed in the ofjudgment as provided fice of the County above including the Clerk, Santa Fe Coununpaid balance, es- ty, New Mexico, on crow, late charges, July 28, 1977, in Plat costs, interest to and Book 55, Page 023, as including date of Document No. sale, attorney’s fees 406,036. and any other costs with interest to and The address of the including date of real property is 2188 sale, then to LANB in Candelero Street, accordance with Santa Fe, NM 87505. LANB’s Summary Plaintiff does not repJudgment. The bal- resent or warrant ance of proceeds, if that the stated street any, shall be deposit- address is the street ed into the Court Reg- address of the descriistry and applied as bed property; if the may be determined street address does by the Court. not match the legal description, then the NOW, THEREFORE, no- property being sold tice is hereby given herein is the property that in the event that more particularly desaid property is not scribed above, not sooner redeemed, the the property located undersigned will as at the street address; set forth above, offer any prospective purfor sale and sell to chaser at the sale is the highest bidder for given notice that it cash or equivalent, should verify the lothe real property, im- cation and address of provements, fixtures, the property being attachments, and sold. Said sale will be personal property of made pursuant to the Defendant described judgment entered on above for the pur- December 9, 2013 in pose of satisfying, in the above entitled the adjudged order of and numbered cause, priorities, the judg- which was a suit to ment described here- foreclose a mortgage in and decree of fore- held by the above closure together with Plaintiff and wherein any additional costs Plaintiff was and attorney fees, adjudged to have a costs of advertise- lien against the ment and publication, above-described real a reasonable receiver estate in the sum of and Special Master’s $434,225.87 plus interfee to be fixed by the est from September Court. The total 3, 2013 to the date of amount of the in rem sale at the rate of judgment due to 10.650% per annum, Plaintiff is $317,245.36 the costs of sale, inas of January 14, cluding the Special 2014, plus interest to Master’s fee, publicaand including date of tion costs, and Plainsale, and the total tiff’s costs expended amount of the judg- for taxes, insurance, ment due to LANB is and keeping the $67,619.62 as of property in good reMarch 4, 2014. Sale is pair. Plaintiff has the subject to the entry right to bid at such of an order of the sale and submit its Court approving the bid verbally or in terms and conditions writing. The Plaintiff of this sale. may apply all or any part of its judgment WITNESS MY HAND to the purchase price this 4th day of Febru- in lieu of cash. ary, 2014. /s/ Jay G. Harris At the date and time The Honorable Jay G. stated above, the Harris, Special Mas- Special Master may ter postpone the sale to 1021 5th Street such later date and Las Vegas, New Mexi- time as the Special co 87701-4333 Master may specify. Tel: (505) 454-0438 6625975_2 NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale Legal#96410 may be subject to a Published in the San- bankruptcy filing, a ta Fe New Mexican pay off, a reinstateFebruary 7, 14, 21, 28, ment or any other 2014 condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. FurSTATE OF NEW ther, if any of these MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE conditions exist, at the time of sale, this FIRST JUDICIAL sale will be null and DISTRICT void, the successful No. D-101-CV-2011- bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the 00534 Special Master and DEUTSCHE BANK NA- the mortgagee giving TIONAL TRUST COM- this notice shall not PANY, AS TRUSTEE be liable to the sucFOR ARGENT SECURI- cessful bidder for any TIES INC., ASSET- damages. BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFI- NOTICE IS FURTHER CATES, SERIES 2006- GIVEN that the real property and imM1, provements concerned with herein Plaintiff, will be sold subject to any and all patent v. reservations, easeMICHAEL C. TRUJILLO, ments, all recorded and unrecorded liens NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF not foreclosed herein, WORKFORCE SOLU- and all recorded and special TIONS WORKFORCE unrecorded TRANSITION SERV- assessments and taxICES DIVISION AND es that may be due. THE STATE OF NEW Plaintiff and its attorMEXICO DEPARTMENT neys disclaim all reOF TAXATION & REVE- sponsibility for, and the purchaser at the NUE, sale takes the property subject to, the Defendant(s). valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or NOTICE OF SALE personal property, afNOTICE IS HEREBY fixture of any mobile manufactured GIVEN that the under- or signed Special Mas- home to the land, deter will on February activation of title to a 26, 2014 at 11:00 AM, mobile or manufactured home on the

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property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

made pursuant to the judgment entered on November 21, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $123,535.50 plus interest from October 16, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 10.500% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 5011 Indian School Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87110 505-767-9444 NM12-02055_FL01 Legal #96493 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on Jnuary 31, February 7, 14 and 21, 2014. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT

At the date and time stated above, the No. D-101-CV-2012- Special Master may postpone the sale to 01718 such later date and WELLS FARGO FINAN- time as the Special CIAL NEW MEXICO, Master may specify. INC., NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale Plaintiff, may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a v. pay off, a reinstateROBERTA D. DALTON ment or any other FKA ROBERTA D. condition that would ANAYA AND THE UN- cause the cancellaKNOWN SPOUSE OF tion of this sale. FurROBERTA D. DALTON ther, if any of these FKA ROBERTA D. conditions exist, at the time of sale, this ANAYA, IF ANY, sale will be null and void, the successful Defendant(s). bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and NOTICE OF SALE the mortgagee giving NOTICE IS HEREBY this notice shall not GIVEN that the under- be liable to the sucsigned Special Mas- cessful bidder for any ter will on February damages. 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance NOTICE IS FURTHER of the First Judicial GIVEN that the real and imDistrict Court, 225 property conMontezuma, Santa provements cerned with herein Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the will be sold subject to highest bidder for any and all patent easecash all the right, ti- reservations, tle, and interest of ments, all recorded the above-named de- and unrecorded liens fendants in and to not foreclosed herein, the following descri- and all recorded and special bed real estate locat- unrecorded ed in said County and assessments and taxes that may be due. State: Plaintiff and its attorA Tract of land sit- neys disclaim all reuate in the Southwest sponsibility for, and 1/4 of the Southeast the purchaser at the 1/4 of Section 35, sale takes the propTownship 14 North, erty subject to, the Range 9 East, valuation of the propN.M.P.M., Village of erty by the County Galisteo, Santa Fe Assessor as real or County, New Mexico personal property, afand being more par- fixture of any mobile manufactured ticularly described as or home to the land, defollows: activation of title to a Beginning at the mobile or manufacSoutheasterly corner tured home on the of the tract herein de- property, if any, envicontamiscribed from whence ronmental the Northeast corner nation on the property, if any, and zoning of the Galisteo Grant bears S 72° 32’E, violations concerning 588.20 feet; thence the property, if any. from said point and place of beginning NOTICE IS FURTHER along the following GIVEN that the purbearings and distan- chaser at such sale shall take title to the ces: N 79° 09" W, 133.20 above-described real property subject to feet; rights of redemption. N 43° 48’E, 49.00 feet; S 76° 02’E, 114.75 feet; S 23° 54’ W, 45.85 feet; Jeffrey Lake To the point and Special Master Support place of beginning. Southwest Being Tract 2 as Group shown on plat enti- 5011 Indian School tled "Plat of Survey Road NE NM for Juanita Stallard", Albuquerque, by George Rivera, 87110 505-767-9444 dated January 2, 1970, Survey No. A2-242. NM12-01269_FC01 The address of the real property is 10 Via St, Galisteo, NM 87540. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be

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Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on February 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Lot 4, as shown and delineated on plat of survey entitled "Final Subdivision Plat Jaguar Village Lying within Section 7; T16N, R9E., N.M.P.M., Santa Fe County, New Mexico," prepared by Richard A. Chatroop, NMPS No. 11011, filed September 18, 2003 as Document No. 1290,992 and recorded in plat Book 542 Pages 004 - 007, Records of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico. The address of the real property is 4362 Village Loop, Santa Fe, NM 87507-1833. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on August 29, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $246,215.88 plus interest from March 31, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.500% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these Legal #96492 conditions exist, at Published in The San- the time of sale, this ta Fe New Mexican on sale will be null and Jnuary 31, February 7, void, the successful 14 and 21, 2014. bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and STATE OF NEW the mortgagee giving MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE this notice shall not be liable to the sucFIRST JUDICIAL cessful bidder for any DISTRICT damages. No. D-101-CV-2012NOTICE IS FURTHER 02320 GIVEN that the real and imGMAC MORTGAGE, property provements conLLC, cerned with herein will be sold subject to Plaintiff, any and all patent reservations, easev. ments, all recorded DARLENE E. HAFFNER and unrecorded liens AND DONALD W. not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and HAFFNER, unrecorded special assessments and tax-

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Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $352,451.47 plus interest from February 23, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.875% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any NOTICE IS FURTHER part of its judgment GIVEN that the pur- to the purchase price chaser at such sale in lieu of cash. shall take title to the above-described real At the date and time above, the property subject to stated rights of redemption. Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and Jeffrey Lake time as the Special Special Master Southwest Support Master may specify. Group 5011 Indian School NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale Road NE Albuquerque, NM may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a 87110 pay off, a reinstate505-767-9444 ment or any other condition that would NM12-01714_FC01 cause the cancellation of this sale. FurLegal #96489 Published in The San- ther, if any of these ta Fe New Mexican on conditions exist, at Jnuary 31, February 7, the time of sale, this sale will be null and 14 and 21, 2014. void, the successful bidder’s funds shall STATE OF NEW be returned, and the MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE Special Master and the mortgagee giving FIRST JUDICIAL this notice shall not DISTRICT be liable to the sucNo. D-101-CV-2009- cessful bidder for any damages. 02923 es that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

METLIFE HOME NOTICE IS FURTHER LOANS, A DIVISION OF GIVEN that the real property and imMETLIFE BANK, N.A., provements concerned with herein Plaintiff, will be sold subject to any and all patent v. reservations, easeSCOTT RAMSEY, ments, all recorded KENDRA RAMSEY AND and unrecorded liens BANK OF AMERICA, not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and NA, unrecorded special assessments and taxDefendant(s). es that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all reNOTICE OF SALE sponsibility for, and NOTICE IS HEREBY the purchaser at the GIVEN that the under- sale takes the propsigned Special Mas- erty subject to, the ter will on February valuation of the prop26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, erty by the County at the front entrance Assessor as real or of the First Judicial personal property, afDistrict Court, 225 fixture of any mobile manufactured Montezuma, Santa or Fe, New Mexico, sell home to the land, deand convey to the activation of title to a highest bidder for mobile or manufaccash all the right, ti- tured home on the tle, and interest of property, if any, envicontamithe above-named de- ronmental fendants in and to nation on the property, if any, and zoning the following described real estate locat- violations concerning ed in said County and the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER State: GIVEN that the purTract 4-C-2-A, as chaser at such sale shown on plat enti- shall take title to the tled "Minor Subdivi- above-described real sion of Lands of Ad- property subject to vantage Builder, Inc., rights of redemption. a New Mexico corporation, being Tract 4- Jeffrey Lake C-2 of Lands of Davis Special Master Support located in Section 26, Southwest T. 10 N., R. 7 E., Group N.M.P.M...", filed in 5011 Indian School the office of then Road NE NM County Clerk, Santa Albuquerque, Fe County, New Mexi- 87110 505-767-9444 co on October 28, 2004 in Plat Book 572, at page 028, Instru- NM00-00774_FC01 ment No. 1252443. Legal #96490 The address of the re- Published in The Sanal property is 40 Prai- ta Fe New Mexican on rie Wind Trail, Jnuary 31, February 7, Edgewood, NM 87015. 14 and 21, 2014. Plaintiff does not repNOTICE resent or warrant that the stated street Patients of Physiaddress is the street address of the descri- cians Plaza Surgery Center: bed property; if the street address does Plaza not match the legal Physicians description, then the Surger Center (PPSC) property being sold will cloe the facility herein is the property and cease operation more particularly de- located at 1631 Hospiscribed above, not tal Drive, Suite 100, the property located Santa Fe, New Mexiat the street address; co, 87505 on February any prospective pur- 28, 2014. A copy of chaser at the sale is your medical records given notice that it may be obtained with should verify the lo- written consent prior February 28th, cation and address of to the property being 2014. If you have any please sold. Said sale will be questions, made pursuant to the contact your Physijudgment entered on cian directly. February 22, 2013 in the above entitled Legal #96464 and numbered cause, Published in The Sanwhich was a suit to ta Fe New Mexican on foreclose a mortgage February 7, 21 2014 held by the above Plaintiff and wherein

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To place a Legal ad Call 986-3000


D-4

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

sfnm«classifieds to place legals, call 986-3000 PROCLAMACION DE ELECCION PRIMARIA

toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

PROCLAMACION DE ELECCION PRIMARIA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Conforme a la Ley de Elección Primaria, NMSA 1978 § 1-8-10 al 52 (1969,como Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS enmendado hasta el año del 2013),Yo, Susana Martinez, Gobernadora del Es- Distrito 5 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS tado de Nuevo México, por virtud de la autoridad otorgada a mí, por la presente UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS emito la proclamación a continuación: UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Que una Elección Primaria es convocada para que se lleve a cabo en todas partes del Estado de Nuevo México y en cada condado y precinto electoral del CONDADO DE CATRON mismo, el día tres de junio del 2014; DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Que la Elección Primaria será aplicable a los siguientes partidos políticos: el Par- Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS tido Demócrata y el Partido Republicano; y UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Que la Elección Primaria tendrá el fin de permitir que el Partido Demócrata y el UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Partido Republicano nominen candidatos para los cargos a continuación: CONDADO DE CHAVES CARGOS FEDERALES DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN SENADOR DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS PLAZO DE SEIS AÑOS Distrito 5 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS TRES REPRESENTANTES PARA EL CONGRESO DE LOS ESTADOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UNIDOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 1: PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 2 al 79, 81 al 83, 86 al 92, 94 al 99, 101 al CONDADO DE CIBOLA 114, 116, 119 al 125, 131 al 144, 150 al 154, 161 al 166, 170, 171, 180 al 187, DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO 191 al 197, 211, 212, 214 al 217, 221, 223 al 226, 241 al 246, 251 al 258, 271 al Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 275, 278, 281 al 287, 289 al 308, 311 al 318, 321 al 324, 326 al 333, 341 al 347, Distrito 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 351 al 358, 371 al 375, 381 al 387, 400 al 456, 461 al 466, 471 al 478, 480 al 500, UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS al 573 y 601 al 603; Condado de Sandoval precintos 1 al 5, 28, 29, 38,52, 55 al UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 57, 64, 74 al 76; Condado de Santa Fé precintos 15, 73 al 84; Condado de Tor- UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS rance; y Condado de Valencia precintos 6, 16, 22, 28 y el bloque de Tabulación DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS del Censo 06119703031019 en el Condado de Valencia precinto 36, según onsta División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS en la Decisión Definitiva Y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, Corte División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada). CONDADO DE COLFAX Distrito 2: PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Condado de Bernalillo precinto 93; Condado de Catron; Condado de Chaves; Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Cibola; Condado de De Baca; Condado de Doña Ana; Condado de Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Eddy; Condado de Grant; Condado de Guadalupe; Condado de Hidalgo; Con- UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS dado de Lea; Condado de Lincoln; Condado de Luna; Condado de McKinley UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS precintos 26, 27, 29 y 30; Condado de Otero; Condado de Roosevelt precintos UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 3 al 6, 10, 11, 19 y todo el precinto 2 del DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Roosevelt excepto por el bloque de tabulación del Censo División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 350410002001111; Condado de Sierra; Condado de Socorro; y Condado de Valencia precintos 1 al 5, 7 al 15, 17 al 21, 23 al 27, 29 al 35, 37 al 41 y todo CONDADO DE CURRY el precinto 36 del Condado de Valencia excepto por el bloque de tabulación del DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Censo 350611973031019 según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS asunto de Egolf Jr. et al. v. Duran, et al. Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial causa Distrito 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS num. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada). UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 3: PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 1, 80, 84, 85115, 117, 118, y 127 al 129; Con- DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS dado de Colfax; Condado de Curry; Condado de Harding; Condado de Los Ala- División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS mos; Condado de McKinley precintos 1 al 25, 28, 31 al 50 y 52 al 59; Condado División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS de Mora; Condado de Quay ; Condado de Rio Arriba; Condado de Roosevelt precintos 1, 7 al 9, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 21, y el bloque de tabulación del Censo CONDADO DE DE BACA 350410002001111en el Condado de Roosevelt precinto 2; Condado de San Juan; DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Condado de San Miguel; Condado de Sandoval precintos 6 al 27, 30 al 37, 39 Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS al 51, 53, 54, 58 al 63, 65 al 73, 75 y 78 al 86; Condado de Santa Fé precintos Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 1 al 14, 16 al 72, 74 al 83 y 85 al 88; Condado de Taos; y Condado de Union UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Duran, et al., Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa num. D-101-CV-2011-02942 UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS (consolidada). UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS CARGOS DEL ESTADO, DISTRITO Y METROPOLITANOS CONDADO DE DOÑA ANA UN GOBERNADOR PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO UN TENIENTE GOBERNADOR PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN SECRETARIO DEL ESTADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 3 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN AUDITOR DEL ESTADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN TESORERO DEL ESTADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN PROCURADOR GENERAL PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN COMISIONADO DE TIERRAS PUBLICAS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS SEIS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE LA CORTE PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS DE APELACIONES División 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 4 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS SETENTA MIEMBROS DE LA CAMARA DE REPRESENTANTES DEL ESTADO División 5 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 6 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distritos 1-70, PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. CONDADO DE EDDY Duran, et al., Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO (consolidada). Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 4 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS TRES MIEMBROS DE LA COMISION DE REGULACION PUBLICA UN ESCRIBANO DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 2: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 303, 551 al 559 y 570 al 573; Condado de TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS Chaves; Condado de Colfax; Condado de Curry; Condado de De Baca; Con- División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS dado de Eddy; Condado de Guadalupe; Condado de Harding; Condado de Lea; División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Lincoln precintos 1,3 al 5, 12, 14 al 16 y 19; Condado de Mora División 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS precintos 3 y 7 al 11; Condado de Otero precintos 1 al 13, 19,20,22 al 33, 35 y 37 al 41; Condado de Quay; Condado de Roosevelt; Condado de San Miguel CONDADO DE GRANT precintos 1 al 22 y 24 al 28; Condado de Santa Fe precintos 15, 18, 19, 73, 84 DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO y 85; Condado de Torrance precintos 1 al 9 y 11 al 16; y Condado de Union Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Duran, et al. Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS (consolidada). UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 4: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 31 al 38, 40 al 56, 58 al 67, 71 al 77, 88, División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 90 al 99, 101 al 106, 109, 122 al 124, 132, 133, 135 al 144, 214, 217, 221 y 223 División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS al 226; Condado de Cibola; Condado de McKinley; Condado de Rio Arriba precintos 24 al 27, 29 y 30; Condado de San Juan; Condado de Sandoval precintos CONDADO DE GUADALUPE 7 al 10, 14 al 27, 78 y 79; Condado de Santa Fe precintos 12 y 72; Condado de DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Socorro precintos 15 y 26; y Condado de Valencia precinto 13, según consta en Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al.,Corte Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada). UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 5: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Catron; Condado de Dona Ana; Condado de Grant; Condado de UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO Hidalgo; Condado de Lincoln precintos 2, 6 al 11, 13,17, 18, 20 y 21; Condado División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS de Luna; Condado de Otero precintos 14 al 18, 21, 34 y 36; Condado de Sierra; Condado de Socorro precintos 1 al 14 y 16 al 25; Condado de Torrance precinto CONDADO DE HARDING 10; y Condado de Valencia precintos 1 al 12 Y 14 al 41 según consta en la De- DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO cisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al. Corte del Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada). Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS SEIS MIEMBROS DE LA COMISION DE EDUCACION PUBLICA UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 2: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 289 al 302, 304 al 308, 316 al 318, 321 al División 1 324, 328 al 333, 406 al 410, 413 al 430, 440, 447 al 454, 456, 461 al 466, 471 al 478, 480 al 500, 502 al 550, 560 al 569 y 601 al 603, según están enumerados CONDADO DE HIDALGO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 7. Posición 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Posición 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 3: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 2 al 19, 68, 69, 78, 79, 84 al 86, 89, 101 al 108, UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 116, 121 al 125, 131 al 133, 135, 150 al 154, 161 al 166, 171, 180 al 187, 191 al 197, PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 211, 212, 214 al 217, 221, 223 al 226, 241 al 246, 251 al 256, 271 al 275, 278, 281 UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS al 287, 311 al 315, 326, 327, 341 al 347, 351 al 358, 371 al 375, 381 al 387, 400 al UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO 405, 411, 412, 431 al 439, 441 al 446 y 455, según están enumerados en las Leyes CONDADO DE LEA del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 8. DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 4: PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 1, 80, 87, 115, 117, 118, 127 al 129, 170, 303, Distrito 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 553 al 559 y 570 al 573; Condado de Los Alamos; Condado de Sandoval pre- UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS cintos 1 al 23, 27 al 76 y 78 al 86; y Condado de Santa Fe precintos 11, 12, 15 al UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 19, 63, 72, 73, 80, 82, 84 y 85, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011 UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS CUATRO JUECES MAGISTRADOS Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 9. División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 5: PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de McKinley; Condado de Rio Arriba precintos 24 y 29; Condado de División 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS San Juan; y Condado de Sandoval precintos 24 al 26, según están enumerados División 4 en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 10. CONDADO DE LINCOLN Distrito 6: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Bernalillo precintos 31 y 93; Condado de Catron; Condado de Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Cibola; Condado de Dona Ana precintos 1 al 3, 60 y 95; Condado de Grant; Con- Distrito 4 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS dado de Hidalgo; Condado de Luna; Condado de Sierra; Condado de Socorro Distrito 5 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS precintos 1 al 11 y 13 al 26; Condado de Valencia, según están enumerados en UN ESCRIBANO DE CONDADO UN TESORERO DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 11. DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 7: PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Condado de Dona Ana precintos 4 al 59, 61 al 94 y 96 al 120; y Condado de División 2 Otero precintos 1 y 41, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011, Primera CONDADO DE LOS ALAMOS Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 12. CUATRO CONSEJEROS DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS DIEZ JUECES DE DISTRITO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 1er Distrito Judicial, Divisiones 1,4, y 6 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 2do Distrito Judicial, Divisiones 3 y 9 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 4to Distrito Judicial, División 1 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN JUEZ MUNICIPAL 5to Distrito Judicial, Divisiones 1 y 6 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO 9no Distrito Judicial, División 3 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO CONDADO DE LUNA 12mo Distrito Judicial, División 4 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS CINCO JUECES DE LA CORTE METROPOLITANA DEL CONDADO DE UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS BERNALILLO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 7 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 8 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 13 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO División 14 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO CONDADO DE MCKINLEY División 15 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS FUNCIONARIOS EN LOS CONDADOS Distrito 3 PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS CONDADO DE BERNALILLO

UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3

CONDADO DE MORA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO CONDADO DE OTERO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 CONDADO DE QUAY UN COMISIONADO DE CONDADO Distrito 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE División 1 CONDADO DE RIO ARRIBA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO

DE DE DE DE DE DE

CUATRO CUATRO CUATRO CUATRO CUATRO CUATRO

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PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

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CONDADO DE ROOSEVELT TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 4 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 5 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ESCRIBANO DE CONDADO PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS CONDADO DE SAN JUAN DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS SEIS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3 División 4 División 5 División 6 CONDADO DE SAN MIGUEL DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 CONDADO DE SANDOVAL DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3

PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO

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CONDADO DE SANTA FE DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS CUATRO JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3 División 4

PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO

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CONDADO DE SIERRA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO

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CONDADO DE SOCORRO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO PLAZO

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CONDADO DE TAOS TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 Distrito 5 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 CONDADO DE TORRANCE DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 1 CONDADO DE UNION DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

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CONDADO DE VALENCIA TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Distrito 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO Distrito 5 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 2 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS División 3 PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Las declaraciones de candidatura por designación en la convención pre-primaria y peticiones de nominación para la Oficina de senador de los Estados Unidos, representante de los Estados Unidos, Gobernador, teniente Gobernador, secretario del estado, auditor del estado, procurador general del estado, comisionado de tierras publicas y juez de la Corte de Apelaciones serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes 4 de febrero, 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 pm. Las declaraciones para que sigan desempeñando un cargo de juez de la Corte Suprema, y tres cargos de Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones para la elección Legal No. 96403 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Friday, February 7, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds

to place legals, call

986-3000

juez magistrados serán presentadas en la oficina del respectivo escribano del condado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

PRIMARY ELECTION PROCLAMATION cont. presentados ante la Secretaria de Estado el martes,11de marzo 2014, entre las horas de 9:00 am y 5:00 pm. Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para representantes del estado, miembros de la legislatura de distritos en multiples condados, jueces de distrito para una elección partidaria, comisionados para educación pública y comisionados para regulación públicas serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m. Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para los jueces de las cinco cortes Metropolitanas para eleccion partidista en el condado de Bernalillo y representantes del estado para distritos legislativos localizados dentro de un condado o que consisten únicamente de un condado, serán presentadas en la oficina del respectivo escribano de condado el martes, 11 de marzo de 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m. Las declaraciones de candidatura y cuotas de presentación, o en vez de cuotas de presentación, declaraciones en forma pauperis para los jueces de sucesiones y testamentos serán presentadas en la oficina del respectivo escribano del condado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m. Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para los jueces

Las declaraciones de candidatura y cuotas de presentación, para todos los otros cargos del condado serán presentados en la oficina del respectivo escribano del condado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014, entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m. Las declaraciones de retención de los catorce jueces de la corte metropolitana del condado de Bernalillo el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m. Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para candidatos que aspiran a la designación pre-primaria, elección para cargos públicos dentro del estado o para el cargo de Representante en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos pero no la reciben, serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado ya sea diez días a partir de la fecha de la convención pre-primaria o el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m., lo cual de las dos sea posterior. Las declaraciones de la intención del candidato por escrito para los cargos de Representante en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos, miembros de la Legislatura de distritos en multiples condados, Jueces de Distrito, comisionados de regulación pública, comisionados de educación pública y cualquier cargo público del estado serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes, 18 de marzo 2014, entre las 9:00a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

D-5

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Las declaraciones de la intención del candidato por escrito para el juez magistrado serán presentadas con el respectivo escribano del Condado el martes 18 de marzo 2014, entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m. Ninguna de las convenciones del estado para designar candidatos para la Elección Primaria se llevara a cabo a más tardar el domingo 9 de marzo 2014. Los partidos políticos presentarán los certificados para designaciones de candidatos en la Elección Primaria en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado, no más tardar, a las 5:00 p.m el primer martes despues de la Convención. HECHO EN LA OFICINA EJECUTIVA ESTE DIA 27 DE ENERO, 2014.

DOY FE:

DANDO FE DE MI FIRMA Y EL GRAN SELLO DEL ESTADO DE NUEVO MEXICO.

DIANNA DURAN SECRETARIA DE ESTADO

SUSANA MARTINEZ GOBERNADORA

Legal No. 96404 • Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican February 7th and 14th, 2014

LEGALS STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101-CV-201300366 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CERTIFICATES, FIRST HORIZON MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES FHAMS 2005-FA8, BY FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, MASTER SERVICER, IN ITS CAPACITY AS AGENT FOR THE TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT, Plaintiff, v. SHEILA U. BERG, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHEILA U. BERG, IF ANY, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on March 5, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the abovenamed defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Lot 3 as shown on plat of survey entitled, "Land Division and Lot Line Adjustment for Ron Sebesta of Lot 1 Tract C and Tract D lying within Lot 14, Eldorado at Santa Fe...," filed for record as Document Number 809548, appearing in Plat Book 246, page 017, records of Santa Fe County, New Mexico. The address of the real property is 4 Calle Cristiano, Santa Fe, NM 87508. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on December 20, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $374,657.65 plus interest from November 25, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and

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LEGALS

LEGALS

g time as the Special described real estate Master may specify. located in said County and State: NOTICE IS FURTHER Unit Five (5) of the GIVEN that this sale Hacienda Cordova may be subject to a Condominiums, as bankruptcy filing, a shown on plat therepay off, a reinstate- of and floor plans ment or any other filed in the Office of condition that would the County Clerk, cause the cancella- Santa Fe County, New tion of this sale. Fur- Mexico, on February ther, if any of these 22, 1980, as Document conditions exist, at No. 454,133, and on the time of sale, this February 22, 1980 as sale will be null and Document No. void, the successful 454,142; as created by bidder’s funds shall Declaration for Habe returned, and the cienda Cordova ConSpecial Master and dominium, dated Febthe mortgagee giving ruary 22, 1980 and rethis notice shall not corded in Misc. Book be liable to the suc- 395 at page 508. cessful bidder for any damages. The address of the real property is 1000 NOTICE IS FURTHER Marquez Pl, Santa Fe, GIVEN that the real NM 87505. Plaintiff property and im- does not represent or provements con- warrant that the statcerned with herein ed street address is will be sold subject to the street address of any and all patent the described properreservations, ease- ty; if the street adments, all recorded dress does not match and unrecorded liens the legal description, not foreclosed herein, then the property beand all recorded and ing sold herein is the unrecorded special property more particassessments and tax- ularly described es that may be due. above, not the propPlaintiff and its attor- erty located at the neys disclaim all re- street address; any sponsibility for, and prospective purchasthe purchaser at the er at the sale is given sale takes the prop- notice that it should erty subject to, the verify the location valuation of the prop- and address of the erty by the County property being sold. Assessor as real or Said sale will be personal property, af- made pursuant to the fixture of any mobile judgment entered on or manufactured October 6, 2013 in the home to the land, de- above entitled and activation of title to a numbered cause, mobile or manufac- which was a suit to tured home on the foreclose a mortgage property, if any, envi- held by the above ronmental contami- Plaintiff and wherein nation on the proper- Plaintiff was ty, if any, and zoning adjudged to have a violations concerning lien against the the property, if any. above-described real estate in the sum of NOTICE IS FURTHER $148,773.06 plus interGIVEN that the pur- est from April 4, 2013 chaser at such sale to the date of sale at shall take title to the the rate of 4.250% per above-described real annum, the costs of property subject to sale, including the rights of redemption. Special Master’s fee, publication costs, Jeffrey Lake and Plaintiff’s costs Special Master expended for taxes, Southwest Support insurance, and keepGroup ing the property in 5011 Indian School good repair. Plaintiff Road NE has the right to bid at Albuquerque, NM such sale and submit 87110 its bid verbally or in 505-767-9444 writing. The Plaintiff NM12-03664_FC01 may apply all or any part of its judgment Legal#96413 to the purchase price Published in the San- in lieu of cash. ta Fe New Mexican February 7, 14, 21, 28, At the date and time 2014 stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to STATE OF such later date and NEW MEXICO time as the Special COUNTY OF Master may specify. SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISNOTICE IS FURTHER TRICT GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a No. D-101-CV-2009bankruptcy filing, a 04253 pay off, a reinstateWELLS FARGO BANK, ment or any other N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR condition that would THE CERTIFICATE cause the cancellaHOLDERS OF BANK OF tion of this sale. FurAMERICA ALTERNA- ther, if any of these TIVE LOAN TRUST conditions exist, at 2005-6 MORTGAGE the time of sale, this PASS-THROUGH CER- sale will be null and TIFICATES, SERIES void, the successful bidder’s funds shall 2005-6, be returned, and the Special Master and Plaintiff, the mortgagee giving this notice shall not v. be liable to the sucROBERT K. CASADOS, cessful bidder for any AMERICAN FURNI- damages. TURE COMPANY, HACIENDA CORDOVA NOTICE IS FURTHER HOMEOWNER’S AS- GIVEN that the real and imSOCIATION, INC., NEW property conMEXICO EDUCATION- provements AL ASSISTANCE cerned with herein FOUNDATION, A NEW will be sold subject to MEXICO NON-PROFIT any and all patent easeCORPORATION, THE reservations, UNKNOWN SPOUSE ments, all recorded OF ROBERT K. and unrecorded liens CASADOS, IF ANY AND not foreclosed herein, OCCUPANTS, WHOSE and all recorded and special TRUE NAMES ARE UN- unrecorded assessments and taxKNOWN, IF ANY, es that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorDefendant(s). neys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the NOTICE OF SALE sale takes the propNOTICE IS HEREBY erty subject to, the GIVEN that the under- valuation of the propsigned Special Mas- erty by the County ter will on March 5, Assessor as real or 2014 at 11:30 AM, at personal property, afthe front entrance of fixture of any mobile manufactured the First Judicial Dis- or trict Court, 225 Mon- home to the land, detezuma, Santa Fe, activation of title to a New Mexico, sell and mobile or manufacconvey to the highest tured home on the bidder for cash all the property, if any, envicontamiright, title, and inter- ronmental est of the above- nation on the propernamed defendants in ty, if any, and zoning and to the following violations concerning

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LEGALS g the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

LEGALS bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may Jeffrey Lake postpone the sale to Special Master Southwest Support such later date and time as the Special Group 5011 Indian School Master may specify. Road NE Albuquerque, NM NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale 87110 may be subject to a 505-767-9444 bankruptcy filing, a NM00-05749_FC01 pay off, a reinstatement or any other Legal#96411 Published in the San- condition that would ta Fe New Mexican cause the cancellaFebruary 7, 14, 21, 28, tion of this sale. Further, if any of these 2014 conditions exist, at the time of sale, this STATE OF NEW sale will be null and MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE void, the successful bidder’s funds shall FIRST JUDICIAL be returned, and the DISTRICT Special Master and No. D-101-CV-2011- the mortgagee giving this notice shall not 03522 be liable to the sucPNC BANK, NATIONAL cessful bidder for any ASSOCIATION SUC- damages. CESSOR BY MERGER WITH NATIONAL CITY NOTICE IS FURTHER REAL ESTATE SERV- GIVEN that the real and imICES LLC, SUCCESSOR property conBY MERGER TO NA- provements TIONAL CITY MORT- cerned with herein GAGE, INC. FUTHER will be sold subject to KNOWN AS NATIONAL any and all patent reservations, easeCITY MORTGAGE CO, ments, all recorded and unrecorded liens Plaintiff, not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and v. unrecorded special ANGELA POOLE, assessments and taxBRENT POOLE, es that may be due. DEVARGAS HEIGHTS Plaintiff and its attorTOWNHOUSE ASSOCI- neys disclaim all reATION AND WELLS sponsibility for, and FARGO FINANCIAL the purchaser at the sale takes the propBANK, erty subject to, the valuation of the propDefendant(s). erty by the County Assessor as real or personal property, afNOTICE OF SALE fixture of any mobile manufactured NOTICE IS HEREBY or GIVEN that the under- home to the land, designed Special Mas- activation of title to a ter will on February mobile or manufac26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, tured home on the at the front entrance property, if any, envicontamiof the First Judicial ronmental District Court, 225 nation on the properMontezuma, Santa ty, if any, and zoning Fe, New Mexico, sell violations concerning and convey to the the property, if any. highest bidder for cash all the right, ti- NOTICE IS FURTHER tle, and interest of GIVEN that the purthe above-named de- chaser at such sale fendants in and to shall take title to the the following descri- above-described real bed real estate locat- property subject to ed in said County and rights of redemption. State: Jeffrey Lake Lot 15, Block 2, of Special Master Support DeVARGAS HEIGHTS Southwest UNIT 2, Santa Fe, New Group Mexico, as shown 5011 Indian School and delineated on the Road NE NM plat thereof filed Jan- Albuquerque, uary 14, 1974, and re- 87110 corded in Plat Book 505-767-9444 33, Page 14, in the records of Santa Fe NM11-02169_FC01 County, New Mexico. The address of the real property is 2129 Calle de Sebastian, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on December 9, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $285,750.47 plus interest from August 19, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its

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Legal #96491 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on Jnuary 31, February 7, 14 and 21, 2014. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101-CV-201300672 BOKF, N.A., A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION D/B/A BANK OF OKLAHOMA, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY MERGER TO BANK OF ALBUQUERQUE, N.A., Plaintiff, v. ALICIA ARGUELLES DUNLAP AND RANCHO VIEJO NORTH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on March 5, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the abovenamed defendants in and to the following

Continued...

LEGALS g described real estate located in said County and State: Lot Sixty-five (65) of the Village at Rancho Viejo Unit 2, as shown on plat entitled "Subdivision Plat prepared for Rancho Viejo De Santa Fe Inc., creating The Village at Rancho Viejo, Unit 2..." filed for record as Document No. 1077,363 appearing in Plat Book 415, at pages 29-37, records of Santa Fe County, New Mexico.

LEGALS GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 5011 Indian School Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87110 505-767-9444 NM13-00261_FC01

Legal#96412 Published in the SanThe address of the re- ta Fe New Mexican al property is 66 Can- February 7, 14, 21, 28, ada Del Rancho, San- 2014 ta Fe, NM 87508. Plaintiff does not repSTATE OF resent or warrant NEW MEXICO that the stated street COUNTY OF address is the street SANTA FE address of the descriFIRST JUDICIAL bed property; if the DISTRICT street address does not match the legal No. D-101-CV-2013description, then the 01829 property being sold herein is the property FEDERAL NATIONAL more particularly de- MORTGAGE ASSOCIAscribed above, not TION, the property located at the street address; Plaintiff, any prospective purchaser at the sale is v. given notice that it should verify the lo- LARRY G. ELKINS, JR. cation and address of AND MORTGAGE the property being ELECTRONIC REGISsold. Said sale will be TRATION SYSTEMS, made pursuant to the INC., judgment entered on December 16, 2013 in Defendant(s). the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to NOTICE OF SALE foreclose a mortgage held by the above NOTICE IS HEREBY Plaintiff and wherein GIVEN that the underPlaintiff was signed Special Masadjudged to have a ter will on March 5, lien against the 2014 at 11:30 AM, at above-described real the front entrance of estate in the sum of the First Judicial Dis$421,433.34 plus inter- trict Court, 225 Monest from August 16, tezuma, Santa Fe, 2013 to the date of New Mexico, sell and sale at the rate of convey to the highest 5.375% per annum, bidder for cash all the the costs of sale, in- right, title, and intercluding the Special est of the aboveMaster’s fee, publica- named defendants in tion costs, and Plain- and to the following tiff’s costs expended described real estate for taxes, insurance, located in said Counand keeping the ty and State: property in good re- Lot 8, Hermosa Monpair. Plaintiff has the tana Subdivision, as right to bid at such shown on plat filed in sale and submit its the office of the bid verbally or in County Clerk, Santa writing. The Plaintiff Fe County, New Meximay apply all or any co, on February 28, part of its judgment 2002, recorded in plat to the purchase price book 495, page 006, in lieu of cash. as Document No. 1195073. At the date and time stated above, the The address of the reSpecial Master may al property is 28 postpone the sale to Serrania Drive, such later date and Edgewood, NM 87015. time as the Special Plaintiff does not repMaster may specify. resent or warrant that the stated street NOTICE IS FURTHER address is the street GIVEN that this sale address of the descrimay be subject to a bed property; if the bankruptcy filing, a street address does pay off, a reinstate- not match the legal ment or any other description, then the condition that would property being sold cause the cancella- herein is the property tion of this sale. Fur- more particularly dether, if any of these scribed above, not conditions exist, at the property located the time of sale, this at the street address; sale will be null and any prospective purvoid, the successful chaser at the sale is bidder’s funds shall given notice that it be returned, and the should verify the loSpecial Master and cation and address of the mortgagee giving the property being this notice shall not sold. Said sale will be be liable to the suc- made pursuant to the cessful bidder for any judgment entered on damages. December 12, 2013 in the above entitled NOTICE IS FURTHER and numbered cause, GIVEN that the real which was a suit to property and im- foreclose a mortgage provements con- held by the above cerned with herein Plaintiff and wherein will be sold subject to Plaintiff was any and all patent adjudged to have a reservations, ease- lien against the ments, all recorded above-described real and unrecorded liens estate in the sum of not foreclosed herein, $263,548.26 plus interand all recorded and est from November unrecorded special 30, 2013 to the date of assessments and tax- sale at the rate of es that may be due. 6.625% per annum, Plaintiff and its attor- the costs of sale, inneys disclaim all re- cluding the Special sponsibility for, and Master’s fee, publicathe purchaser at the tion costs, and Plainsale takes the prop- tiff’s costs expended erty subject to, the for taxes, insurance, valuation of the prop- and keeping the erty by the County property in good reAssessor as real or pair. Plaintiff has the personal property, af- right to bid at such fixture of any mobile sale and submit its or manufactured bid verbally or in home to the land, de- writing. The Plaintiff activation of title to a may apply all or any mobile or manufac- part of its judgment tured home on the to the purchase price property, if any, envi- in lieu of cash. ronmental contamination on the proper- At the date and time ty, if any, and zoning stated above, the violations concerning Special Master may the property, if any. postpone the sale to such later date and NOTICE IS FURTHER time as the Special

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LEGALS p Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

LEGALS al property is 74 Camino Don Fidel, Santa Fe, NM 87507-7932. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on December 9, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $619,887.02 plus interest from March 30, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.125% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this Legal#96414 sale will be null and Published in the San- void, the successful ta Fe New Mexican bidder’s funds shall February 7, 14, 21, 28, be returned, and the 2014 Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not STATE OF be liable to the sucNEW MEXICO cessful bidder for any COUNTY OF damages. SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL NOTICE IS FURTHER DISTRICT GIVEN that the real property and imNo. D-101-CV-2011provements con01706 cerned with herein BAC HOME LOANS will be sold subject to SERVICING, LP FKA any and all patent easeCOUNTRYWIDE HOME reservations, LOANS SERVICING, LP, ments, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, Plaintiff, and all recorded and unrecorded special v. assessments and taxALLAN R. LOPEZ, es that may be due. AGNES D. LOPEZ, THE Plaintiff and its attorFIRST NATIONAL neys disclaim all reBANK OF SANTA FE, sponsibility for, and THE UNKNOWN the purchaser at the SPOUSE OF ALLAN R. sale takes the propLOPEZ, IF ANY AND erty subject to, the THE UNKNOWN valuation of the propSPOUSE OF AGNES D. erty by the County Assessor as real or LOPEZ, IF ANY, personal property, affixture of any mobile Defendant(s). or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a NOTICE OF SALE mobile or manufacNOTICE IS HEREBY tured home on the GIVEN that the under- property, if any, envicontamisigned Special Mas- ronmental ter will on March 5, nation on the proper2014 at 11:30 AM, at ty, if any, and zoning the front entrance of violations concerning the First Judicial Dis- the property, if any. trict Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, NOTICE IS FURTHER New Mexico, sell and GIVEN that the purconvey to the highest chaser at such sale bidder for cash all the shall take title to the right, title, and inter- above-described real est of the above- property subject to named defendants in rights of redemption. and to the following described real estate Jeffrey Lake located in said Coun- Special Master Southwest Support ty and State: Tract 1-B, Lot 1-A, as Group 5011 Indian School shown on Lot Line Adjustment for Allan R. Road NE NM Lopez, filed in the Of- Albuquerque, fice of the County 87110 Clerk of Santa Fe 505-767-9444 County, New Mexico NM00-03318_FC01 on February 20, 1997 Legal#96415 in Book 356, Page 22. Published in the SanThe address of the re- ta Fe New Mexican February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014 Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 5011 Indian School Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87110 505-767-9444 NM12-01244_FC01

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D-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, February 7, 2014

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS

LEGALS

EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COUNTY OF TAOS STATE OF NEW MEXICO NEW MEXICO COUNTY INSURANCE AUTHORITY, administered by New Mexico Association of Counties, and TAOS COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, Plaintiffs, v. NUBIA ZEPADA and G U I L L E R M I N A DOMINGUEZ, Defendants. No. D-820-CV-201300307 NOTICE OF SUIT Defendants, Nubia Zepada and Guillerina Dominguez, are hereby notified that the above named Plaintiff, New Mexico County Insurance Authority, administered by New Mexico Association of Counties, and Taos County, New Mexico, by its undersigned attorney, has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being Complaint for Recovery of Monies Paid and Property Damage. That unless you file an answer or response to the Complaint in said cause, on or before 30 days from the last date of publication, a judgment by default will be entered against you. Name and address of Plaintiff’s attorney: Joseph L. Romero, Basham & Basham, P.C., 2205 Miguel Chavez Road, Suite A, Santa Fe, New Mexico

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LEGALS

87505. Joseph A. Romero, Esq. Basham & Basham, P.C. Attorneys for the Plaintiffs 2205 Miguel Chavez Road, Suite "A" Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 (505) 988-4575

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE NEW MEXICO MINING COMMISSION

The New Mexico Mining Commission will hold a special meeting at 9:00 A.M. Wednesday, February 12, 2014 in Porter Hall on the 1st floor of the Wendell Chino BuildLegal#96407 ing located at 1220 Published in the San- South Saint Francis ta Fe New Mexican Drive in Santa Fe, NM. February 7, 14, 21, 2014 The Mining Commission conducted a public hearing on a Notice of Meeting petition for rulemaking submitLEGAL NOTICE IS ted by Mineras Vitae, HEREBY GIVEN that a LLC on March 25, 2013 Regular Meeting of (13-01). Petition 13the Governing Board 01(R) requested of Santa Fe Communi- amendments to Minity College (SFCC) will mal Impact Operabe held on Tuesday, tions, 19.10.3.303(A) February 18, 2014 at and 19.10.3.304(A) 5:00 p.m. in the SFCC NMAC of the Mining Governing Board Act Rules. SpecificalRoom (223), 6401 Ri- ly, the proposed chards Ave., Santa Fe, changes included inNM 87508. The Gov- creasing the limit of erning Board will 10 acres of disturbed meet as a committee land to 60 acres for of the whole in a the mining of Work Session where humate. no action will be taken on Tuesday, Feb- The Commission will ruary 18, 2014 at 3:30 convene a special p.m. in the Presi- meeting to (1) apdent’s Conference prove the final Room (108). order/statement of reasons on Petition Board meetings are 13-01(R); (2) select a open to the public. If chairman, (3) readopt you are an individual the Commission’s with a disability who Open Meetings Act; is in need of any form and (4) consider such of auxiliary aid, serv- other matters apice or special assis- pearing on the agentance to attend or da. participate in the meeting, please con- A copy of the petition tact the President’s and the proposed Office at 428-1148 at regulatory change least 24 hours before can be obtained on the meeting. An the MMD website at agenda will be availa- http://www.emnrd.st ble from the Presi- ate.nm.us/MMD/NM dent’s Office 72 hours MC/MineCommPropo prior to the meeting. sedRuleChanges.html or by contacting John Legal#96409 Pfeil at 476-3400. A Published in the San- copy of the draft ta Fe New Mexican agenda for the February 7, 2014 meeting/ To place a Legal ad Call 986-3000

to place legals, call LEGALS

986-3000

LEGALS

g hearing will be available 72 hours before the meeting and may be obtained by contacting John Pfeil at 476-3400. If you need a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the hearing, please contact John Pfeil at 476-3400 at least 48 hours prior to the hearing. Public documents can be provided in various accessible forms. Legal #96463 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on February 7 2014

FLOYD LUJAN, IF LIVING, IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES OR LEGATEES OF FLOYD LUJAN, DECEASED AND THE UNKNOWN SURVIVING SPOUSE OF FLOYD LUJAN, IF ANY, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named Defendants Floyd Lujan, if living, if deceased, The Unknown Heirs, Devisees or Legatees of Floyd Lujan, deceased. GREETINGS:

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LEGALS

LEGALS

_ You are hereby notified that the abovenamed Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 996 Camino Consuelo, Santa Fe, NM 87507, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as:

Lot Numbered Eight (8), excepting the Northerly Two (2) feet in Block Numbered Twenty (20) of Dale J. Bellamah’s La Resolana Addition, Unit 6, an Addition to the City of Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, as the same STATE OF NEW is shown and desigMEXICO on replat COUNTY OF SANTA FE nated thereof filed in the FIRST JUDICIAL Office of the County DISTRICT Clerk, of Santa Fe Case No. D-101-CV- County, New Mexico on August 24, 1962, in 2013-02827 Plat Book 9, Page 77, Document No. SUNTRUST MORT- as 258,848. GAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v.

toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC

Plaintiff, Legal #96335 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on v. January 24, 31 and THE HEIRS OF GARY D. February 7, 2014. PLUM, THE MUNICIPALITY OF SANTA FE, STATE OF NEW MEXICO AND NEW MEXICO THE ZOCALO COUNTY OF SANTA ASSOCIATION, INC., FE FIRST JUDICIAL Defendants. DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF DAMIAN KNIGHT YEIDER CASE NO. D-101-CO2014-00137 NOTICE OF OF NAME

CHANGE

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 408-1 through Sec. 40-83 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Damian Knight Yeider will apply to the Honorable Sarah M. Singleton, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 1:00 p.m. on the 20th day of February, 2014 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Damian Knight Yeider to Damian Knight. Stephen T. Pacheco, District Court Clerk. /s/ Jill Nihk Deputy Court Clerk.

Legal# 96397 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican By: /s/ __Steven J. January 31, February Lucero__ Electroni- 7, 2014 cally Filed Steven J. Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, STATE OF NEW MEXICO Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL 87102 Telephone: (505) 848- DISTRICT 9500 No. D-101-CV-2013Fax: (505) 848-9516 02643 Attorney for Plaintiff NM13-02985_FC01

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SANTA FE COMMUNITY HOUSING TRUST,

Continued...

LEGALS g g Yepa, Abeita & Gomez, LLP P.O. Box 1447 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504-1447

You and each you are further notified that unless you enter your appearance in said cause or file a motion or other pleading within thirty (30) days from the AMENDED NOTICE last publication date OF PENDANCY OF judgment will be renSUIT TO THE dered against you in DEFENDANTS THE said cause by default HEIRS OF GARY D. and in accordance PLUM with the prayer of the Plaintiff’s Complaint You, and each of you, on file in said cause. are notified that there is pending in Witness my hand and the District Court of seal of said Court, the First Judicial Dis- this 28th day of Janutrict of the State of ary, 2014. New Mexico, within the County of Santa STEPHEN T. PACHECO Fe, an action in which CLERK OF THE the Santa Fe Com- DISTRICT COURT munity Housing Trust BY: Maureen Naranjo is Plaintiff and the Deputy Heirs of Gary D. Plum are among the De- Legal #96338 fendants in this case. Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on The general object of January 31, February this action is to fore- 7 and 14, 2014. close a mortgage by the Plaintiff upon that STATE OF land and real estate NEW MEXICO situate and lying and IN THE being within the City PROBATE COURT of Santa Fe, being SANTA FE COUNTY Unit #103-601 Circulo De Morelia of Zocolo, IN THE MATTER OF Condominium as creTHE ESTATE OF ated by CondominiMARIA ISABEL L. um Declaration filed ORTIZ, DECEASED. for record in the office the County Clerk NO. 2014-0005 of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, in Book NOTICE TO 2128 Misc. at Page CREDITORS 107, as amended and in plats recorded NOTICE IS HEREBY therein, and as GIVEN that the underamended, record signed has been apSanta Fe County and pointed personal repbeing the property resentative of this esdescribed in the tate. All persons havComplaint ing claims against this estate are reThe name and post quired to present office address of the their claims within Plaintiff’s attorneys two (2) months after are: the date of the first Ronald J. VanAmberg publication of this noVanAmberg, Rogers, tice, or the claims will

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Continued...

LEGALS be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at the following address" PO Box 1985, Santa Fe, NM 87504. Dated: January 27, 2014 Marcella O. Gonzales 7 Traviesa De Camilo E. Santa Fe, NM 87508 505-471-8329 Legal# 96398 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican January 31, February 7, 2014 The New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange (NMHIX) is soliciting responses from qualified offerors that are able to provide Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) services during the Design, Development and Implementation (DDI) of the NMHIX system. The Contractor should be able to assess whether NMHIX and its partners are on track to implement the requisite technology for the NMHIX in time for enrolling consumers into qualified health plans (QHPs) by October 1 2014, as well as meeting all the other specified requirements for Exchanges under the Affordable Care Act. More information can be found at: http://www.nmhix.co m / v e n d o r e m p l o y m e n t pportunities/vendoropportunities/. Legal#96255 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican January 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, February 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 2014

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