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Through time and space: Pianist Conrad Tao Inside

Locally owned and independent

Friday, September 13, 2013

The New Mexi

can’s Weekly

Magazine of Arts,

Enter tainment

& Culture

September 13,

2013

www.santafenewmexican.com $1.25

Self-defense class for teens

Quick-study quarterback

IMPACT Personal Safety helps collegebound girls build confidence. gen next, B-5

St. Michael’s Keith Dominguez is the guy standing center stage.

Taliban strike U.S. Consulate in Afghanistan

SPORtS, B-1

LANL, other nuke labs under fresh scrutiny

The U.S. says embassy personnel are safe, but the attack this morning in western Afghanistan killed at least two Afghans. PAge A-2

New Mexico: Steady showers spur Colorado: Mountainside torrents rescues but help fill thirsty reservoirs wreak havoc, leaving at least 3 dead

‘Unbelievable’ rain

Critics say virtually every project under NNSA oversight is behind schedule and overbudget By Jeri Clausing and Matthew Daly The Associated Press

LOS ALAMOS — At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a seven-year, $213 million upgrade to the security system that protects the lab’s most sensitive nuclear bomb-making facilities doesn’t work. Those same facilities, which sit atop a fault line, remain susceptible to collapse and dangerous radiation releases, despite millions more spent on improvement plans. In Tennessee, the price tag for a new uranium processing facility has grown nearly sevenfold in eight years to upward of $6 billion because of problems that include a redesign to raise the roof. And the estimated cost of an ongoing effort to refurbish 400 of the country’s B61 bombs has grown from $1.5 billion to $10 billion. Virtually every major project under the National Nuclear Security Administration’s oversight is behind schedule and overbudget — the result, watchdogs and government auditors say, of years of lax accountability and nearly automatic annual budget increases for the agency responsible for maintaining the nation’s nuclear stockpile. The NNSA has racked up $16 billion in cost overruns on 10 major projects that are a combined 38 years behind schedule, the U.S. Government Accountability Office reports. Other projects have been cancelled or suspended, despite hundreds of millions of dollars already spent, because they grew too bloated. Advocates say spending increases are necessary to keep the nation’s nuclear arsenal operating and safe,

Please see nUKe, Page A-8

Taos hospital to lay off 44 Officials at Holy Cross Hospital say the change is necessary as the facility switches to more profitable services in the wake of funding cuts over the last four years. PAge C-1

Obituaries

Thunderstorms. High 71, low 56.

Capt. Robert H. Skamfer, Ret., 99, Santa Fe, Sept. 11 Erlinda (Arlene) Montoya, Sept. 10 Ross Alan Glaser, 31, Portland, Ore., Sept. 4 Barbara Jean Cawley, 81, Santa Fe, Sept. 6 Phil R. Lucero

PAge B-6

PAge C-2

today

Officials investigate the scene of a road collapse on Highway 287 near Boulder that sent three vehicles into the water after flash flooding on Thursday. Numerous roads and highways were washed out from floodwaters, and torrents poured into homes. At least a few buildings collapsed. CLIFF GRASSMICK/(BOULDER, COLO.) DAILY CAMERA

Over an inch of rain reported in Santa Fe

By P. Solomon Banda The Associated Press

LYONS, Colo. eavy rains sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides Thursday in Colorado, cutting off remote towns, forcing the state’s largest university to close and leaving at least three people dead across a rugged landscape that included areas blackened by recent wildfires. After a rainy week, up to 8 more inches fell in an area spanning from the Wyoming border south to the foothills west of Denver. Flooding extended all along the Front Range mountains and into some cities, including Colorado Springs, Denver, Fort Collins, Greeley, Aurora and Boulder. Numerous roads and highways were washed out or made impassable by floods. Floodwaters poured into homes, and at least a few buildings collapsed in the torrent. Boulder County appeared to be hardest hit. Sheriff Joe Pelle said the town of Lyons was completely cut off because of flooded roads, and resi-

H

By Staci Matlock The New Mexican

The third day of rain across much of New Mexico on Thursday led to helicopter rescues, evacuations, a closed national park and leaking roofs. The unusually steady rain helped quench the droughtstricken state a little too much in some places, causing floods along the Pecos River and prompting officials to issue hazardous driving warnings. Some areas of Central and Eastern New Mexico had received record-setting amounts of rain, according to the National Weather Service in Albuquerque. Santa Fe observers reported more than an inch of rain in

Pete Van Harvermaat III, left, and Pete Van Harvermaat IV, both of Los Lunas, shelter under their umbrella while watching the Demons’ soccer game against Los Lunas on Thursday at Santa Fe High School. For more coverage of the game, see Sports, B-1. LUIS SÁNCHEZ SATURNO/THE NEW MEXICAN

some parts of the city and county, while one La Cienega observer’s gauge collected almost 2 inches of rain. While Santa Fe precipitation records have been haphazard over the last half-century, meteorologists believe Santa Fe had already surpassed its average for the month. The

September average is around 1.68 inches, and the city had received more than 2 inches by Thursday evening. The estimated 6.68 inches of precipitation since the beginning of the year still leaves the city a couple of inches below its

See SHOWeRS, Page A-4

Please see tORRentS, Page A-4

No worries, late-nighters — eatery to keep wee hours Atomic Grill changes hands; new owner to reopen soon with sports theme Index

By Phaedra Haywood The New Mexican

The Atomic Grill has closed. But don’t worry, the downtown eatery is not slated to become a gallery, a bank or a high-end Western-wear store. The restaurant’s new owner, 29-year-old Lane Sanders, said the name and look of the grill will change, but it will still pro-

Calendar A-2

Classifieds D-1

Comics B-8

vide midrange-priced food into the wee hours. While “The Atomic,” as it was known, stayed open until 3 a.m. some nights, Sanders said his place — which will be called El-Evation, a play on Santa Fe’s altitude — will stay open until 2 a.m. weekend nights and 10 to 11 p.m. or midnight during the week.

Lotteries A-2

Opinion A-7

Sanders said El-Evation will be “sports-oriented” and feature a menu based on gourmet pizza and burgers as well as “some more high-end things, like grilled lamb chops and steak specials,” and quality salads. Sanders said believes in the “farm-to- table” concept and hopes to use fresh, local, in-season ingredients whenever

Police notes C-2

Editor: Ray Rivera, 986-3033, rrivera@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Cynthia Miller, cmiller@sfnewmexican.com

Sports B-1

possible. Sander said El-Evation will serve beer and wine — it will be several months before that begins — and will feature happy-hour specials, “slice-anda-pint” deals and theme nights such as “Wing Night” or “Taco Tuesday.” Sanders has lived in Santa Fe since he was 4 years old and

Please see eAteRY, Page A-4

Time Out B-7

Gen Next B-5

Main office: 983-3303 Late paper: 986-3010

A sign on the door to the Atomic Grill, 103 E. Water St., announces Thursday that the business will close. CLYDE MUELLER THE NEW MEXICAN

Four sections, 32 pages Pasatiempo, 72 pages 164th year, No. 256 Publication No. 596-440


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

NATION&WORLD

MarketWatch DOW JONES RUSSELL 2000

t -25.96 15,300.64 t -6.86 1,048.48

NASDAQ COMPOSITE STANDARD & POOR’S 500

t -9.04 3,715.97 t -5.71 1,683.42

Afghan Taliban attack U.S. consulate Scathing Two Afghans are dead; U.S. says all its personnel are safe By Amir Shah and Nahal Toosi The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan — Taliban militants attacked the U.S. consulate in western Afghanistan on Friday morning, using a car bomb and guns to battle security forces just outside the compound in the city of Herat. It was not entirely clear whether any attackers managed to breach the facility, but at least two Afghans died, while the U.S. said its personnel were all safe. The attack, which also injured several people and wound up leaving five alleged militants dead, underscored the perilous security situation in Afghanistan, where U.S.-led troops are reducing their presence ahead of a full withdrawal next year.

The insurgent strikes are no longer concentrated in the country’s south and east, but occur with troubling frequency in the north and west, which have been the more peaceful areas in years past. Friday’s assault — which was claimed by the Taliban — also followed a day and a half of exceptional joy in Afghanistan, as people of all backgrounds celebrated their nation’s first international soccer championship. Afghan and U.S. officials offered slightly different accounts of what happened. According to Herat province officials, the attack began around 6 a.m. with a powerful explosion caused by a suicide car bomber some 66 yards from the front gate of the consulate compound. Fellow militants then engaged in a firefight with security forces in the area. U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said the assault began around 5:30 a.m., when “a truck carrying attackers drove to the front gate,

and attackers — possibly firing rocket propelled grenades and assault rifles — commenced attacking Afghan Protective forces on the exterior of the gates and contracted security guards. Shortly after, the entire truck exploded, extensively damaging the front gate.” Gen. Rahmatullah Safi, the province’s chief of police, said U.S. special forces entered the area to secure the compound, and that no attackers managed to breach it. Harf’s statement said “American security personnel” were among the response team, and added that “it appears American and contract security personnel addressed any attackers who managed to enter the compound.” Footage broadcast on Afghanistan’s Tolo television network showed Afghan police dragging away a badly bloodied person from the scene, but it was unclear if he was dead or who he was. Rubble and twisted pieces of metal lay strewn in a seemingly wide area near the consulate, the footage showed.

In brief Ig Nobel awards tout weird discoveries CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — An experiment that proved people who think they are drunk also think they are attractive and another that showed lost dung beetles can use the Milky Way to find their way home were among the winners at this year’s Ig Nobel awards ceremony held Thursday. This is the 23rd year for the award, sponsored by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research and given out to honor weird and humorous scientific discoveries. The winners come from all over the world. Actual Nobel laureates announced the winners during a ceremony at Harvard University. Editor Marc Abrahams, who organized the ceremony, said the point is to make people laugh and then think. For the first time, the winners received cash prizes — $10 trillion, but in Zimbabwe dollars. So they’ll each get about four U.S. dollars. The winners will give short speeches Saturday at MIT.

Trader Joe’s opts for Obama care coverage NEW YORK — Trader Joe’s Co., the closely held grocery store chain, will end health benefits for part-time workers next year, directing them instead to new insurance marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act. Employees with fewer than 30 hours a week will no longer be given health coverage as of Jan. 1, and instead will get a $500 payment to help them buy insurance elsewhere, the Monrovia, Calif.-based company said today in an e-mailed statement. The move makes Trader Joe’s the latest U.S. employer to cut benefits or reduce hours in response to the 2010 act. The Associated Press

This frame grab from video provided by Fox 29 shows a raging fire in Seaside Park, N.J. on Thursday. The fire began in a frozen custard stand on the Seaside Park section of the boardwalk and quickly spread north into neighboring Seaside Heights. AP PHOTO/FOX 29

Fire strikes Sandy-hit N.J. town By Bruce Shipkowski and Wayne Parry The Associated Press

SEASIDE PARK, N.J. — A raging fire destroyed much of an iconic Jersey shore boardwalk that had just been rebuilt after Superstorm Sandy, but a last-ditch effort to halt its spread by ripping out boards that had yet to burn succeeded in saving the rest of it Thursday. The wind-whipped fire devoured eight blocks of boardwalk — four each in Seaside Park and Seaside Heights — and destroyed dozens of boardwalk businesses and caused millions in damages to the economic lifeblood of the twin tourist spots. The Hail Mary effort to save the remainder of the boardwalk began in the evening when public works crews ripped out a 25-foot swath of boardwalk to serve as a makeshift fire break, depriving the blaze of fuel. They then filled the void with

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The livelihoods of the two popular Jersey shore resort communities depend on summer tourism and they had just spent millions of dollars rebuilding their boardwalks, arcade games, pizza stands and bar and grills to be ready for the summer season. Koury said the fire caused several million dollars’ worth of damage. At one point, she said, flames jumped across Ocean Avenue, the oceanfront street, and ignited two or three small houses but firefighters quickly doused them. A motel near the boardwalk also was engulfed in flames. Officials said the fire got underneath the boardwalk, making it even more difficult to extinguish. “It’s underneath the boards, and its coming up through the cracks,” Koury said. “It’s making it harder to get water on it.” Matthies said the businesses were primarily wood with tar roofs and shingles, which accelerated the fire.

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giant sand piles — makeshift dunes that this time held back not water but fire. “That appears to have done the trick,” said Seaside Park Mayor Robert Matthies. “It certainly looks like it’s been suppressed,” the mayor said. No serious injuries were reported. The 6-alarm blaze began in the area of a frozen custard stand on the Seaside Park portion of the boardwalk. Fanned by 15-20 mph winds from an approaching storm system, it quickly spread north into Seaside Heights, the boardwalk town where the MTV series “Jersey Shore” was filmed — and where the October storm famously plunged a roller coast into the ocean. The blaze destroyed all 32 businesses on the Seaside Park portion of the boardwalk, borough Councilwoman Nancy Koury said. An undetermined number of additional boardwalk businesses in Seaside Heights also were burned.

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ANOTHER UNIVERSE: ANCIENT CHINA, MIND, AND LANDSCAPE: Poet David Hinton discusses his book Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape, 7:30 p.m., no charge. 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca.

NIGHTLIFE

Friday, Sept. 13 TWO SISTERS AND A PIANO: Teatro Paraguas presents Nilo Cruz’s play set in 1991 Cuba, 7:30 p.m., $12 and $15. 3205 Calle Marie. ¡CHISPA! AT EL MESÓN: The Three Faces of Jazz and friends, 7:30-close., no cover. 213 Washington Ave. BISHOP’S LODGE RANCH RESORT & SPA: Jazz guitarist Pat Malone, 6-9 p.m., no cover. 1297 Bishops Lodge Road. CAFÉ CAFÉ: Los Primos Trio, traditional Latin rhythms, 6-9 p.m., no cover. 500 Sandoval St. COWGIRL BBQ: Blues guitarist/songwriter Dave Duncan, 5-7:30 p.m.; Jay Boy Adams & Zenobia, with Mister Sister, bluesy Americana fusion, 8:30 p.m., no cover. 319 S. Guadalupe St. HOTEL SANTA FE: Ronald Roybal, flute and classical

obit about abusive mother goes viral By Sandra Chereb and Scott Sonner The Associated Press

RENO, Nev. — The children of an abusive woman whose horror stories prompted Nevada to become one of the first states to allow children to sever parental ties wrote a scathing obituary that was published in the local newspaper — and has since become an Internet sensation. The obituary opened with a harsh statement about the legacy of Marianne Theresa Johnson-Reddick: “On behalf of her children who she abrasively exposed to her evil and violent life, we celebrate her passing from this earth and hope she lives in the after-life reliving each gesture of violence, cruelty and shame that she delivered on her children.” Katherine Reddick said she wrote it about her mother, who died at a Reno nursing home Aug. 30 at the age of 78. Now a psychology consultant for a school district outside Austin, Texas, she said she decided to share the story of their painful physical and mental abuse after consulting with her brother, Patrick Reddick. They said they grew up with four siblings in a Carson City orphanage after they were removed from their mother’s home and had been estranged from her for more than 30 years. “Everyone she met, adult or child was tortured by her cruelty and exposure to violence, criminal activity, vulgarity, and hatred of the gentle or kind human spirit,” the obit said. “Our greatest wish now is to stimulate a national movement that mandates a purposeful and dedicated war against child abuse in the United States of America.” Six of Johnson-Reddick’s eight children were admitted to the Nevada Children’s Home from 1963 to 1964 after they endured abuse at the hands of their mother, Patrick Katherine Reddick said. The obituary was printed in Tuesday’s editions of the Reno GazetteJournal and appeared on RGJ.com after it was submitted through a selfservice online portal. John Maher, president and publisher of the newspaper, said in a “note to readers” that the paper had “removed the online listing of this obituary as we continue our review of the circumstances surrounding its placement.” Little else is known about the woman. The Reno newspaper reported that she lived in a mobile home with 15 cats up until she was hospitalized in May for treatment of bladder cancer.

Lotteries Spanish guitar, 7-9 p.m., no cover. 1501 Paseo de Peralta. LA CASA SENA CANTINA: Best of Broadway, piano and vocals, 6-10 p.m., no cover. 125 E. Palace Ave. LA FIESTA LOUNGE AT LA FONDA: Blues band Night Train, 8 p.m.-close, no cover. 100 E. San Francisco St. LA POSADA DE SANTA FE RESORT AND SPA: Nacha Mendez Duo, pan-Latin rhythms, 6:30-9:30 p.m., no cover. 330 E. Palace Ave. PRANZO ITALIAN GRILL: Geist Cabaret with David Geist, 6-9 p.m., call for cover. 540 Montezuma Ave. SECOND STREET BREWERY: The Hot Club of Santa Fe, Gypsy jazz, 6-9 p.m., no cover. 1814 Second St. SECOND STREET BREWERY AT THE RAILYARD: Banjo and cello duo The Littlest Birds, 7-10 p.m., no cover. 1607 Paseo de Peralta. SWEETWATER HARVEST KITCHEN: Hawaiian slack-key guitarist John Serkin, 6 p.m., no cover. 1512 Pacheco St. Building B. TGIF ORGAN RECITAL: Jan Worden-Lackey performs works by Bach, 5:30-6 p.m., 982-8544, Ext. 16. 208 Grant Ave. THE PALACE RESTAURANT & SALOON: Local rock cover band Chango, 9:30 p.m., call for cover. 142 W. Palace Ave.

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THE UNDERGROUND AT EVANGELO’S: Grunge/folkrock band Colorblind Poet, 9 p.m., call for cover. 200 W. San Francisco St., downstairs. TINY’S: Bluesman Joshua Alan McNeil, 5:30 p.m.; classic-rock band Controlled Burn, 8:30 p.m.; no cover. 1005 St. Francis Drive, Suite 117. VANESSIE: Pianists Doug Montgomery, jazz and classics, 6-8 p.m.; Bob Finnie, pop standards piano and vocals, 8 p.m.-close; call for cover. 427 W. Water St. WAREHOUSE 21: Kill the Mic concert including rappers Crim Deezy, Rec Syphen Records, and Dan K Stackhouzemusick, 7 p.m., call for cover. 1614 Paseo de Peralta. For more events, see Pasatiempo in Friday’s edition. To submit an events listing, send an email to service@ sfnewmexican.com.

Corrections An article about the murals in the Joseph M. Montoya Federal Building that was published on Page A-1 of the Thursday, Aug. 29 edition, incorrectly reported where the muralist grew up and the building for which he was painting another set of murals when he died. Gerald Cassidy grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was painting murals to hang in the U.S. Courthouse in Santa Fe when he died of carbon-monoxide poisoning from working on a high scaffolding in a poorly ventilated studio.

uuu A local news on Page A-6 on Thursday, Sept. 12, incorrectly identified the amount of St. Elizabeth Shelter’s annual budget. The annual budget is $1.3 million, not $13 million. The mistake was an editing error.

uuu The New Mexican will correct factual errors in its news stories. Errors should be brought to the attention of the city editor at 986-3035.


NATION & WORLD

Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

A-3

Kerry talks tough with Russia over Syria plans By Matthew Lee and Nancy Benac The Associated Press

GENEVA — Striking a tough tone, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry opened swiftly convened talks with Russia on Syria’s chemical weapons Thursday by bluntly rejecting a Syrian pledge to begin a “standard process” by turning over information rather than weapons — and nothing immediately. That won’t do, Kerry declared, a stone-faced Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov at his side. “The words of the Syrian regime in our judgment are simply not enough.” “This is not a game,” Kerry said of the latest developments in a series that has rapidly gone from deadly chemi-

cal attacks to threats of retaliatory U.S. airstrikes to Syrian agreement with a Russian plan to turn over the weapons. And Kerry kept alive the threat of U.S. military action, saying the turnover of weapons must be complete, verifiable and timely — and “there ought to consequences if it doesn’t take place.” Adding to the drama, Russian PresiU.S. Secretary of State John Kerry dent Vladimir Putin weighed in from meets with U.N. Special Represenafar, raising eyebrows with an opinion tative for Syria Lakhdar Brahimi in piece in The New York Times that Geneva on Thursday to hear Ruschided Americans for seeing themsia’s plans to disarm Syria of its chemical weapons. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS selves as “exceptional.” That was an apparent reference to a comment President Barack Obama made in his Syria to authorize military action, and a vote speech Tuesday night, explaining why on that has been put off. he felt the U.S. needed to take action. Putin also warned that a U.S. strike Congress has shown little inclination against Syria because of chemical

fighters, and alShabab counts The Associated Press several hundred foreign MOGADISHU, Somalia — An fighters among American who became one of its ranks, Somalia’s most visible Islamic including about rebels and was on the FBI’s two dozen Most Wanted Terrorist list with Omar Somali-Amera $5 million bounty on his head icans from Hammami was killed Thursday by rivals in Minneapolis the al-Qaida-linked extremist recruited over the past several group al-Shabab, militants said. years. The killing of Omar HamHammami’s death will hurt mami, an Alabama native known the group’s recruitment efforts, for his rap-filled propaganda said Abdirizak Bihi, an advocate videos, may discourage other for the Somali community in would-be jihadis from the U.S. Minnesota and the uncle of a and elsewhere from traveling to young man killed in Somalia in Somalia, terrorism experts said. 2008. Hammami, known as Abu Along with Adam Gadahn in Mansoor Al-Amriki, or “the Pakistan — a former Osama bin American,” was killed in an Laden spokesman — the 29-yearambush in southern Somalia fol- old Hammami was one of the lowing months on the run after two most notorious Americans falling out with al-Shabab’s top in jihadi groups. He grew up in leader, the militants said. Daphne, Ala., a community of Reports of Hammami’s death 20,000 outside Mobile, the son of have cropped up every few a Christian mother and a Syrianmonths in Somalia, only for him born Muslim father. to resurface. But J.M. Berger, His YouTube videos that a U.S. terrorism expert who featured him rapping and his closely follows the inner workpresence on Twitter made him ings of al-Shabab, said he thinks one of the most recognizable the current reports are accurate. and studied U.S. foreign fighters. The FBI put Hammami on Hammami was highly critical of al-Shabab’s leadership over the its Most Wanted Terrorist list in 2012 and offered a $5 million past year and freely shared his reward in March for informaviews in Internet videos and on tion leading to his capture. Twitter, making him a marked U.S. prosecutors had charged man. Somalia has long been an attractive destination for foreign Hammami with providing mate-

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rial support to terrorists. A member of al-Shabab who gave his name as Sheik Abu Mohammed said Hammami was killed in an ambush in Somalia’s southern Bay region. Some of Mohammed’s associates carried out the killing, he said. Two other fighters with Hammami, including a Briton of Somali descent, also were killed, he said. Before the falling out with al-Shabab, Hammami made frequent appearances in combat videos, and in 2011 he released two rap songs, “Send Me a Cruise [missile]” and “Make Jihad With Me.” Last week, Voice of America interviewed the wanted American, who said he was unlikely to ever return to the U.S. “That is not an option unless it’s in a body bag,” Hammami said.

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international convention banning such weapons. Syria’s ambassador to the United Nations said that as of Thursday, his country had become a full member of the treaty, which requires destruction of all chemical weapons. The meetings in Geneva got underway as Assad, in an interview with Russia’s Rossiya-24 TV, said his government would start submitting data on its chemical weapons stockpile a month after signing the convention. Even as diplomacy took center stage, word surfaced that the CIA has been delivering light machine guns and other small arms to Syrian rebels for several weeks, following Obama’s statement in June that he would provide lethal aid to the rebels.

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American jihadi rapper slain in Somalia by rivals By Abdi Guled and Jason Straziuso

weapons use could unleash new terrorist attacks. And he still maintained there is “every reason to believe” the weapons were used by rebels and not by Assad’s military. In Washington, Obama’s spokesman said Russia was “isolated and alone” in that view. The back-and-forth was a stark indication of the challenging work ahead as Kerry, Lavrov and their teams of chemical weapons experts plunge into talks aimed at finding agreement on how to dismantle the chemical weapons amid the danger of Syria’s civil war. Lavrov seemed to contradict Kerry’s negative view of Syrian President Bashar Assad’s offer to provide details on his country’s chemical arsenal beginning 30 days after it signs an

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

NASA: Voyager 1 probe has left solar system By Alicia Chang

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Voyager 1 has crossed a new frontier, becoming the first spacecraft ever to leave the solar system, NASA said Thursday. Thirty-six years after it was launched from Earth on a tour of the outer planets, the plutonium-powered probe is more than 11.5 billion miles from the sun, cruising through what scientists call interstellar space — the vast, cold emptiness between the stars, the space agency said. Voyager 1 actually made its exit more than a year ago, according to NASA. But it’s not as if there’s a dotted boundary line or a signpost out there, and it was not until recently that the space agency had the evidence to convince it that the spacecraft had finally

This artist rendering released by NASA shows Voyager 1 spacecraft barreling through space. AP/NASA

plowed through the hot plasma bubble surrounding the planets and escaped the sun’s influence. While some scientists said they remain unconvinced, NASA celebrated. “It’s a milestone and the beginning of a new journey,” said mission chief

scientist Ed Stone at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. While Voyager 1 may have left the solar system as most people understand it, it still has hundreds of years to go before bidding adieu to the last icy bodies that make up our neighborhood, NASA said. Voyager 1 will now study exotic particles and other phenomena in a never-before-explored part of the universe and radio the data back to Earth, where the Voyager team awaits the starship’s discoveries. The interstellar ambassador also carries a gold-plated disc containing greetings, songs and photos, in case it bumps into an intelligent species. Voyager 1’s odyssey began in 1977 when the spacecraft and its twin, Voyager 2, were launched on a tour of the gas giant planets of the solar system. After beaming back dazzling postcard

views of Jupiter’s giant red spot and Saturn’s shimmering rings, Voyager 2 hopscotched to Uranus and Neptune. Meanwhile, Voyager 1 used Saturn as a gravitational slingshot to power itself past Pluto. Voyager 1, which is about the size of a subcompact car, carries instruments that study magnetic fields, cosmic rays and solar wind. Last year, scientists monitoring Voyager 1 noticed strange happenings that suggested the spacecraft had broken through: Charged particles streaming from the sun suddenly vanished. At the same time, there was a spike in galactic cosmic rays bursting in. A chance solar eruption caused the space around Voyager 1 to echo like a bell last spring and provided the scientists with the data they needed, convincing them the boundary had been crossed in August of last year.

Torrents: Burn scars exacerbate flooding’s effect Continued from Page A-1 dents were huddling together on higher ground. Although everyone was believed to be safe, the deluge was expected to continue into Friday. “It is not an ordinary disaster,” Pelle said. “All the preparation in the world … it can’t put people up those canyons while these walls of water are coming down.” Jason Stillman, 37, said he and his fiancée were forced to evacuate their home in Lyons at about 3 a.m. after a nearby river began to overflow into the street. Stillman, who was staying at a friend’s house on higher ground, went back to his neighborhood in the afternoon and saw how fast-moving water had overturned cars and swept away homes at a nearby trailer park. “From what I could tell, my house is sitting in Class 3 rapids,” he said. When he returns, “it’s going to be a sobering experience.” By midafternoon, some high-clearance vehicles were on their way to the town, where the Red Cross said about 200 people sought shelter in an elementary school. National Guard rescue helicopters were grounded by fog and low visibility. To the north, residents along the Big Thompson Canyon in Larimer County, scene of the deadliest flash flood in state history, also were evacuated. The Big Thompson River flooded in 1976 after about a foot of rain fell in just four hours, killing 144 people. Water roaring across U.S. 36 south of Lyons prevented residents from leaving the Crestview subdivision, so Howard Wachtel arranged for someone to meet him at a roadblock for a ride to a gas station. He needed more gasoline to keep his generator running so he could pump water out of his basement. “This is more like something out of the Bible. I saw one of my neighbors building an ark,” he joked, over the sound of the rushing water. Firefighters performed a daring rescue of two men trapped in vehicles in Rock Creek, east of Boulder. After rushing water collapsed a section of road, rescuers used a raft to reach the men, broke the car windows and lifted them to safety. Some of the flooding was exacerbated by wildfire “burn scars” that have spawned flash floods all summer in the mountains. That was particularly true in an area scarred by fire in 2010 near the tiny community of Jamestown and another near Colorado Springs’ Waldo Canyon that was hit in 2012. Rain is normally soaked up by a sponge-like layer of pine needles and twigs on the forest floor. But wildfires incinerate that layer and leave a residue in the top layer of soil that sheds water. A relatively light rain can rush down charred hillsides into streambeds, picking up dirt, ash, rocks and tree limbs along the way. Narrow canyons aggravate the threat. At the University of Colorado, about 400 students in a dorm were evacuated, and administrators canceled classes at least through Friday. About a quarter of the school’s buildings have some kind of water damage. One person was killed when a structure collapsed in the tiny town of Jamestown northwest of Boulder. Another person drowned in northern Boulder as he was trying to help a woman who was swept away in a torrent of water, authorities said. Boulder County sheriff’s Cmdr. Heidi Prentup said the woman is still missing. To the south, Colorado Springs police conducting flood patrols found the body of 54-year-old Danny Davis in Fountain Creek on the west side of the city. Weather service meteorologist Bob Kleyla said a 20-foot wall of water was reported in Left Hand Canyon north of Boulder, and a firefighter radioed he was trapped in a tree. He said rescuers trying to get to him were initially blocked by debris. “We did access him. They put him onto a sled and were able to take him across the creek, so he is getting treatment at this point,” Prentup said. The creek is usually “just a trickle,” said nearby resident Carm Say. “You can walk across it and have fun. Now, as you can see, it’s hitting houses.” At least one earthen dam gave way southeast of Estes Park, the gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park. Water levels could rise downstream as authorities release more water to ease pressure on dams. With debris piling up near bridges, downstream farming areas including Fort Lupton, Dacono and Plateville were also at risk. In rural Morgan County, authorities urged ranchers to move cattle to higher ground as the mountain rains emptied onto the plains. Rain showers and thunderstorms were expected through the night, with some storms capable of dumping an inch of water in 30 minutes, the weather service warned.

ABOVE: Rushing floodwaters course through a small park in Boulder, Colo., on Thursday. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides in the area. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LEFT: The pool at the Fort Marcy Recreation Complex was closed Thursday due to a roof leak from heavy rains. LUIS SÁNCHEZ SATURNO THE NEW MEXICAN

Showers: Carlsbad homes flooded Continued from Page A-1 annual average. The Fort Marcy Recreation Complex swimming pool had to be closed due to roof leaks. Recreation complex manager Liz Roybal said leaks were an ongoing problem at the facility. Roof repairs had fixed problems over the gymnasium and the fitness room, she said, but other areas still need repairs. Bandelier National Monument and Frijoles Canyon reported more than an inch of rain beginning Tuesday. A wall of water 2 feet deep passed a warning gauge in the upper Frijoles Canyon by midafternoon Thursday, but hadn’t caused flooding at the Bandelier National Monument Visitors Center that evening, according to officials. The rain is expected to dissipate by Saturday, forecasters said. Flood-plagued roads in Southern New Mexico on Thursday prompted Carlsbad Caverns to shut down and evacuate visitors and staff. The Red Cross reported that families from 200 flooded Carlsbad homes had to be evacuated. Sumner Lake received more than 8 inches of rain over a twoday period. Cannon Air Force Base reported 3.5 inches, while Las Vegas, N.M., received at least 3 inches. Red Cross reported that families from 200 flooded Carlsbad homes had to be evacuated.

National Guard helicopters flew to a mobile-home park 15 miles south of Artesia to help rescue people stranded there by flooding. The Pecos River swelled to more than 15 feet at the Puerto de Luna gauge south of Santa Rosa, its second-highest level since the 1930s. Flows that had dwindled to 70 cubic feet per second suddenly exploded Wednesday to more than 30,000 cfs, according to streamflow records. Near Alamogordo, two raincaused rock slides on both sides of a tunnel on U.S. 82 closed the highway briefly Wednesday. By Thursday evening, the Red Cross had opened shelters in three counties to provide respite for evacuees. Despite the havoc, the heavy flows also were filling up reservoirs that had seen unprecedented lows in the last year. “The rainfall totals from when this event began are going to be record-breaking; they already have been,” said Kerry Jones, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Albuquerque. Jones said it’s likely some areas could see 6 to 10 inches of rain by the weekend. In one spot in the Guadalupe Mountains of Southern New Mexico, more than 11 inches fell in a 24-hour period, which forecasters described as “unbelievable.” The weather phenomenon coming toward the tail end of the

monsoon season was unusual, primarily for how long it has lasted, Jones said. Rain began falling on the state Tuesday. “This is not a storm per se,” Jones said. “It is a flow” — a tropical air mass. The slow-moving, moistureladen clouds have dropped enough precipitation since Tuesday to bring some areas in the state to near normal amounts. But it would take an estimated 10 inches of rain across the whole state to overcome the last three years of drought, Kerry said. Temperatures around the state were below normal Thursday, except in the northwest. Rain fell as fast as an inch an hour in the Interstate 25 corridor south of Albuquerque to Socorro. The weather service issued flashflood warnings for many areas in the central and southern parts of the state, lasting into Friday. Officials warned of high danger from flash flooding off wildfire burn scars for Thursday and Friday. Burn scars at high risk include Jaroso, Tres Lagunas, Las Conchas, Thompson Ridge, Miller, Little Bear and Wallow. The Rail Runner Express posted warnings of delayed trains due to the weather Thursday afternoon. Spokeswoman August Meyers said there had been no other problems due to the rain. The AP contributed to this report. Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@sfnewmexican.com.

Eatery: El-Evation to serve beer, wine Continued from Page A-1 has worked front-of-house jobs at numerous Santa Fe restaurants, including Little Anita’s, SantaCafé, Rio Chama and Pranzo. He said prices at El-Evation will range from $7 to $16 per plate. Atomic’s highest-priced plate was a $15 flatiron steak served with mashed potatoes and salad. Sanders said he’ll close the restaurant to paint and make other cosmetic changes to the Water Street space but hopes to reopen in a few weeks. One of the things Sanders plans to do to change the atmosphere of the place is to paint the walls white and hang projectors from the high ceilings in order to project sports games on the walls. “We’ll have like 16 games going at one time,” Sanders said, “and we’ll have some more TVs on the patio.” Sanders said he’ll make some changes in staff — which may include bringing in a chef he worked with when he lived in Hawaii — but will retain most of the 12 employees who worked at The Atomic. Atomic owners Brisa Barnes, 40, and her husband, Dennis Barnes, 48, each worked at the restaurant for more than 10 years — 16 years for her, 11 for him. The couple bought the restaurant about six years ago from Joe Garcia, who opened it in the late 1990s. Asked why they decided to sell the business, the couple said they had “several reasons.” “Mostly, we needed a change,” Brisa Barnes said, adding, “The economy isn’t what it used to be. Santa Fe nightlife isn’t what it used to be. It seems like we roll up the streets at 6 p.m. every night, and then it’s quiet.” Brisa Barnes, who is originally from Houston and has lived in Santa Fe for 21 years, said Santa Fe seems to have become “more and more of a retirement community” over the years. “The average age of people seemed to be getting older,” she said, “people who are more interested in fine dining. We catered to a younger crowd.” Brisa Barnes pointed to the closure of the Paramount, the Catamount and Corazón — bars and dance clubs that have closed in the past decade — as evidence of the decline of downtown nightlife. The Atomic’s late-night hours attracted not only people who wanted to eat after drinking and dancing, she said, but also teenagers who couldn’t go to bars but could still hang out late at The Atomic. “We became friends with the parents of a lot of high school kids,” she said. “Santa Fe should really do something to bring back the nightlife and to cater to a younger crowd again. That’s what we think.” Brisa Barnes added that the couple also want to move to “somewhere that is not the desert.” Their tentative plan is to move to Seattle, where they hope to operate a food cart. “We’re going to try to bring some good green chile to the Northwest,” she said. “We love food.” The couple said they’ll will miss The Atomic. “It’s been an albatross, but it’s been our home,” Brisa Barnes said. “The staff is our family.” “It’s been a sweet moment,” Dennis Barnes said, “but after working nights till 3 a.m. for six years, it will be nice to get back to normal life.” Michael Greene, president of Sam Goldenberg & Associates, who brokered the deal between the Barneses and Sanders, declined to say how much the business sold for, but offered that it was listed at $140,000. Sanders — who will be going into business with his wife, Christina Sanders, mother and father Marti Sanders and John Sanders, and younger brother Ben Sanders — said he’s not afraid he’ll run into the same problems that the Barneses did. “Kinda the opposite,” he said. “I think they were more tired than anything. As far as the economy, everyone has to eat. If there is a good place for a local to go and eat, then they are going to go. I want to make a spot for local people and people in the industry to come and have a good time, relax, take a load off, not have to pay a huge price but still have a great-quality meal. I think that is really important.” Contact Phaedra Haywood at 986-3068 or phaywood@ sfnewmexican.com.


NATION

Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

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Study finds lifelong effects of abuse on brain function cost an estimated $80 billion in both the direct costs of hospitalization, law enforcement and child welfare, and WASHINGTON — In the first major the indirect costs of special education, study of child abuse and neglect in juvenile and adult criminal justice 20 years, researchers with the National costs, adult homelessness and lost Academy of Sciences reported Thurs- work productivity. day that the damaging consequences of “Child abuse and neglect is a seriabuse not only reshape a child’s brain, ous public health problem which but also can last a lifetime. requires immediate, urgent attention,” Untreated, the effects of child abuse said Anne Petersen, a professor at the and neglect, the researchers found, can Center for Human Growth and Develprofoundly influence a child’s physiopment at the University of Michigan cal and mental health, their ability to who chaired the research commitcontrol emotions, their achievement in tee for the Institute of Medicine and school and the relationships they form the National Research Council of the as children and as adults. National Academies. The researchers recommend an The report, produced at the request “immediate, coordinated” national of the U.S. Department of Health and strategy to better understand, treat and Human Services, found that while rates prevent child abuse and neglect, notof physical and sexual child abuse have ing that each year, abuse and neglect declined in the past 20 years, rates of By Brigid Schulte

The Washington Post

emotional and psychological abuse, the kind that can produce the most serious long-lasting effects, have increased. Rates of neglect have held fairly steady. Researchers say they don’t know why. “That’s why we make that a research priority in our recommendations, said Lucy Berliner, a professor at the University of Washington’s School of Social Work and a committee member. Berliner said the committee is proposing a coordinated strategy because they found so much variation among states. “Some states had dramatic, 100 percent increases in cases of neglect,” she said. “And others had 100 percent decreases. That speaks to the complexity of the problem.” Every year, child protective services receives 3 million referrals for child abuse and neglect involving about 6 million children, the report found,

although the researchers say the actual number is likely much higher. About 80 percent of the children in investigated abuse and neglect cases are not removed from the home. Child victims are equally likely to be male or female, the report found. The majority are younger than 5. About 80 percent of the perpetrators are parents, the vast majority biological parents. More than half are female. Angela Diaz, director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center in New York and another committee member, said the report found three risk factors that increased the likelihood of abuse: parental depression, parental substance abuse and whether the parents had been abused or neglected as children. The researchers did not find an association between rates of abuse and times of economic hardship.

But while so much remains a mystery about the causes of abuse, the advances in brain science in the past 20 years shows just how devastating and long-lasting the effects of abuse can be on the structure and the function of the brain, particularly the amygdala, a part of the brain that regulates emotions. Abuse has also been shown to change how the prefrontal cortex functions, the part of the brain responsible for reasoning and decision-making. But there is hope, researchers said. “The effects seen on abused children’s brain and behavioral development are not static,” said committee member Mary Dozier, chairwoman of Child Development at the University of Delaware. “If we can intervene and change a child’s environment, we actually see plasticity in the brain. ... Interventions can be very effective.”

A new toll on drivers? Libertarian group proposes alternative to dwindling fuel tax for interstate revamp

those roads.” In some ways, they did. Starting in the 1950s, the highway trust fund was established to fund the construction of interstates, with revenue from the federal gasoline tax, which all motorists paid every time they By Curtis Tate filled their tanks. McClatchy Washington Bureau Now, the oldest parts of the WASHINGTON — With large system are reaching the end of portions of the 46,000-mile Inter- their design life, and the tank is almost empty. Congress hasn’t state Highway System wearing raised the federal gasoline tax out and needing replacement, of 18.4 cents a gallon in 20 years, but with few federal and state and the tax has lost a third of dollars do it, one possible solution goes back to how most roads its value to inflation. People are driving less and cars get better were originally built: tolls. mileage, further reducing the revFuel taxes aren’t keeping up enue collected at the gas pump. with growing highway mainteThe International Bridge, nance needs, forcing states and Tunnel and Turnpike Assothe federal government to look ciation estimates it would cost for alternatives, and tolls are from $1.3 trillion to $2.5 trillion part of the mix. to rebuild the entire interstate The libertarian Reason Foun- system over the next 50 years. dation released a study ThursThe highway trust fund has day that proposes tolling the been steadily paying out more entire interstate system, chargthan it takes in. The Congressioing 3.5 cents a mile for cars, nal Budget Office projects that 14 cents for trucks, adjusted it could go broke next year. every year for inflation. “The gas tax is clearly on its Under federal law, new inter- last legs,” said Bob Poole, direcstates can be tolled, but existing tor of transportation policy at ones can’t, and Congress would the Reason Foundation and the have to change it. But it could author of the tolling study. be a tough sell to a public long Under a pilot program, the U.S. accustomed to freeways. Department of Transportation is “Tolling is not something allowing three states to levy tolls that many motorists want,” said on existing interstates: Missouri, Michael Green, a spokesman for North Carolina and Virginia, AAA. “They feel, in their mind, although none of them do so. that they’ve already paid for Poole wants Congress to allow

Pa. judge halts marriage licenses for gay couples HARRISBURG, Pa. — A Pennsylvania judge on Thursday ordered a suburban Philadelphia court clerk to stop issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, and the clerk said he would comply but is considering an appeal. Commonwealth Court Judge Dan Pellegrini said Montgomery County Register of Wills D. Bruce Hanes did not have the power to decide on his own whether Pennsylvania’s samesex marriage ban violates the state constitution. Hanes said he was disappointed. It was not clear what the decision will mean for the 174 couples who obtained licenses. The Associated Press

every state to have that right. Poole proposes the users of the interstate system pay for its rebuilding with electronic tolls collected on a per-mile basis. A driver of a two-axle passenger car who crosses Pennsylvania from the Delaware River to the Ohio border — roughly 350 miles — would pay about $12.25 for the trip. A truck driver would pay about $49. Compare that with the current cost of crossing the Keystone State on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, one of the country’s first superhighways and a forerunner of the interstate system. The car driver pays $30.77, while the driver of an 80,000-pound, five-axle truck pays $160.96. To address concerns of double taxation — having to pay a fuel tax and a toll — Poole proposes a fuel-tax rebate for interstate drivers, who would be reimbursed electronically through the same system that collects the tolls. Poole argues that the system is fair, because it charges only the people who use the road. Interstates cost a lot more to build and maintain than local roads and streets, and Poole’s system would put toll revenue directly into the interstates. Congress could require that toll revenues are spent to improve only the roads that generate them. But the plan runs up against public resistance to tolling existing highways. Proposals to add tolls to I-70 in Missouri and I-95

in North Carolina have gained little support, even though both roads need major improvements. Even proposals to use tolls to finance highway expansion have encountered opposition, including a plan for high-occupancy toll, or HOT lanes, on I-77 north of Charlotte, N.C. And one of the biggest users of the interstate system, the trucking industry, opposes tolling existing roads. “We are very much opposed to tolling interstates,” said Darrin Roth, director of highway operations for the American Trucking Associations, an industry group. Roth prefers the traditional method of funding highways through motor-fuel taxes. The industry has lobbied, so far unsuccessfully, for a fueltax increase. Poole said that as cars and trucks become more fuelefficient or use alternative energy, transportation policy will move away from the fuel tax and toward fees based on miles driven, whether on an interstate or a local road. “The country is going to be shifting from per-gallon gas taxes to mileagebased user fees,” he said.

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NATION

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

Federal judge clears American Airlines, US Airways merger Philadelphia’s dominant airline, is a key part of the plan. The antitrust case will go to NEW YORK — A federal trial Nov. 25. bankruptcy judge approved If the merger is disallowed on American Airlines’ reorganizaantitrust grounds, or if a settletion plan Thursday, including a ment changes the terms, Amerimerger with US Airways Group, can’s plan to exit Chapter 11 bankconditional on the combination ruptcy would go back to Lane. clearing an antitrust challenge “No merger will occur unless by the Justice Department. and until there is regulatory Judge Sean H. Lane also approval,” Lane said. struck down nearly $20 million Lawyers for American and in severance payments for Tom US Airways have vowed to fight Horton, CEO of American’s parthe Justice Department lawent company, AMR Corp. Horsuit, and argued it should not ton quickly agreed to the move. prevent Lane from approving Lane said he found the arguAMR’s restructuring plan. ments for confirming AmeriLane on Thursday struck can’s plan to exit bankruptcy to down a nearly $20 million sevbe persuasive. erance award for AMR CEO American spokesman Mike Tom Horton, who would serve Trevino called the development as chairman of the new airline, an “important milestone” in the to be called American, before he airline’s turnaround. American leaves the company next sumserves both the Santa Fe and mer. Albuquerque airports. The U.S. Trustee’s office had Two weeks ago, when he set contended the payment violates Thursday’s hearing date, Lane bankruptcy law limits designed said he was leaning toward approving the merger that would create the world’s largest airline. The one remaining issue is an antitrust lawsuit filed Aug. 13 by the Justice Department and several state attorneys general, seeking to block the proposed merger. Lane on Thursday said the bankruptcy confirmation and the Department of Justice case F I L T R A T I O N “can proceed concurrently, rather than wait.” www.goodwatercompany.com 933 Baca St, Santa Fe 471-9036 “The broad support for this plan could be put at risk if the confirmation is delayed,” Lane said at the outset of the hearing in New York City. Lawyers for AMR Corp., its unsecured creditors committee, and American’s labor unions had urged the judge to confirm the plan, ending American’s nearly two years under bankruptcy protection. The merger with US Airways, By Linda Loyd

The Philadelphia Inquirer

to prevent executives from getting big payouts that are not available to regular employees. AMR attorney Stephen Karotkin told the judge, “Mr. Horton has asked me to tell you he will promptly ask the AMR board of directors to remove his compensation agreement and allow the plan to proceed.” The Justice Department has argued that the merger would reduce competition and increase fares and fees, and the combined carrier would have a monopoly on too many flights at certain airports, in particular at Washington Reagan National Airport, where the new American would control 69 percent of the slots, which are takeoff and landing rights. Joshua L. Schank, president and CEO of the Eno Center for Transportation, a Washington think tank, wrote in a newsletter Tuesday that U.S. airline passengers enjoy “historically low” airfares.

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Pa. man charged with threatening to kill Obama HARRISBURG, Pa. — A Pennsylvania grand jury has charged a Clarks Summit, Pa., man with threatening to kill President Barack Obama. Prosecutors say in a Thursday news release that 42-year-old Nicholas Savino allegedly sent a threatening email to the White House on Aug. 16. The email allegedly said that Obama is the Antichrist and that he must stand down or be shot dead. The charges stem from an investigation by

the U.S. Secret Service and the Clarks Summit police. Clarks Summit is about 10 miles outside Scranton. Obama visited Scranton and the region Aug. 23, a week after the alleged threatening email. That same day, local police seized ammunition and weapons at a Clarks Summit home on behalf of the Secret Service. Savino couldn’t be reached for comment. The Associated Press

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By Barbara Ortutay and Michael Liedtke The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Twitter has decided to go public. The company aptly announced on its short messaging service Thursday afternoon that it has filed documents for an initial public offering of stock. San Francisco-based Twitter Inc. posted on its official Twitter account that it has “confidentially submitted an S-1 to the SEC for a planned IPO.” The documents Twitter filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission are sealed, as Twitter is taking advantage of federal legislation passed last year that allows companies with less than $1 billion in revenue in its last fiscal year to avoid submitting public IPO documents. The confidentiality will likely help Twitter avoid the public hoopla and intense scrutiny that surrounded the initial public offerings of other high-profile social networking companies, including Facebook Inc., which went public in May 2012. Under the law, Twitter’s financial statements and other sensitive information contained in the IPO filing must become publicly available at least 21 days before company’s executives begin traveling around the country to meet with potential investors — a process known as a “road show.” Twitter’s IPO has been long expected. The company has been ramping up its advertising products and working to boost ad revenue in preparation. But it is still tiny compared with Facebook, which saw its hotly anticipated IPO implode last year amid worries about its ability to grow mobile ad revenue. Most of Twitter’s revenue comes from advertising. Research firm eMarketer estimates that Twitter will generate $582.8 million in worldwide ad revenue this year, up from $288.3 million in 2012. By comparison, Facebook had ad revenue of $1.6 billion in the April-June quarter of this year. By 2015, Twitter’s annual ad revenue is expected to hit $1.33 billion.

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Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

OPINIONS

The West’s oldest newspaper, founded 1849 Robin M. Martin Owner

COMMENTARY: JOHN DIAMOND

Blueprint for weapons destruction exists

S

ecretary of State John Kerry was probably right when he said “it can’t be done,” referring to getting Syria, in a week’s time, to surrender control of its chemical weapons. But timelines aside, compelling a Middle Eastern state through threat of military action to hand over weapons of mass destruction not only can be done, it has been done. The success happened in Iraq, not a place where the word success is often applied, particularly in a U.S. foreign policy context. It happened after the 1991 Persian Gulf War when a combination of sanctions, military pressure and U.N. inspections forced Saddam Hussein to give up his WMDs. For political as well as practical reasons, this success went unnoticed and unacknowledged, even by the U.S. intelligence community that helped bring it about. A dozen years later, the second Bush administration invaded Iraq based on the inflated charge that Baghdad still possessed a deadly arsenal. When it turned out there were no WMDs in Iraq, the United States was stuck with the painful consequences of its own military action. Amid the fallout from that misjudgment, few bothered to consider how it came to pass that Iraq had no WMDs at the time of the U.S.-led invasion in 2003, though it had definitely used such weapons against Iran and against its own people. What happened was that a combined international effort, backed by U.S. military power, compelled the regime in Baghdad to abandon its WMD programs and destroy its weapons stocks. It wasn’t done in a week, but it was done with surprising rapidity. We now know, based on the 2004 report to the U.S. intelligence community by Charles Duelfer’s Iraq Survey Group, that Hussein destroyed most of his chemical and biological weapons in 1991, in the months following the coalition victory in the Persian Gulf War. “Iraq unilaterally destroyed its undeclared chemical weapons stockpile in 1991,” Duelfer reported. “There are no credible indications that Baghdad resumed production of chemi-

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Robert M. McKinney Owner, 1949-2001 Inez Russell Gomez Editorial Page Editor

Ray Rivera Editor

OUR VIEW

Open up access to preschool

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

reschool education is a smart investment for the future. That’s true whether it’s made by the federal government, states or parents. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan brought the federal proposal — Preschool for All — to Santa Fe earlier this week. President Barack Obama suggested $75 billion toward preschool education in his State of the Union address, although it’s hard to predict whether Congress will include it in the final 2014 budget. Republicans don’t like that Obama wants to fund preschool by raising the tax on tobacco; we’re just pleased that the president has a way to pay for the program. Closer to home, Gov. Susana Martinez has committed $13.7 million to public school pre-K programs in New Mexico. She understands that children benefit from preschool preparation. Those dollars could stretch even further if New Mexico reaches out for federal preschool funds once they become available. If Congress endorses the president’s initiative, the number of U.S. children in pre-K would rise from about 1.1 million to 2.2. million nationally. Participation will not be mandatory, and Duncan said the feds will only seek to work with states who want to work with them. New Mexico should be one of those states, although we are disappointed that Public Education Secretary-designate Hanna Skandera skipped the public event. Despite being from different political parties, it seems beneficial for New Mexico for our education secretary to welcome the U.S. secretary of education when he’s in town. She should be able to appear with Duncan show up and share New Mexico’s education goals publicly, not just show up for a private talk. With fewer than 40 percent of New Mexico’s school districts offering pre-K, some 17,000 students are losing out on better preparation for school. By taking part in the program, New Mexico could get $24.5 million the first year, bringing preschool to some 2,990 additional children across the state. That’s not enough to close the gap, but it’s a start. Of course, New Mexico can do more — there has been talk for years about tapping into a small portion of the Land Grant Permanent Fund to invest in the early years of a child’s life. With New Mexico children now dead last in well-being in the nation, the state should begin having a serious discussion on how best to give kids a healthy start in life. Allowing a vote on whether to take a portion of the Permanent Fund to pay for the health, development and early education of children must be part of the discussion. Helping children reach their full potential is a goal that should unite people across political parties — Preschool for All is a worthy initiative, one that New Mexico should embrace.

Renewing positive Zozobra experiences

The past 100 years

cal munitions thereafter, a policy ISG attributes to Baghdad’s desire to see sanctions lifted, or rendered ineffectual, or its fear of force against it, should WMD be discovered.” On Iraq’s nuclear ambitions, the Duelfer report was similarly definitive: “Saddam Hussein ended the nuclear program in 1991. … ISG found no evidence to suggest concerted efforts to restart the program.” And on biological weapons, Duelfer reported that “in 1991 and 1992, Iraq appears to have destroyed its undeclared stocks.” Note the concentration of activity in 1991. The underlying message is important: Maximum Iraqi compliance coincided with maximum coalition military leverage in Iraq. Several factors prevented this disarmament success from gaining the recognition it deserved. For the second Bush administration, of course, what the Duelfer report brought to light was more an embarrassment than anything else, disclosing, as it did, the magnitude of the misjudgments before the 2003 invasion. The first Bush administration, which deserves much of the credit for the U.S. role in disarming Iraq, understandably regarded the regime in Baghdad with deep suspicion, an attitude that continued under

I

want to give a big thank you to Ray Sandoval and the entire Kiwanis organization for one of the best Zozobra burnings I, and I believe Santa Fe, have ever witnessed. I was very vocal after receiving calls and letters from constituents about last year’s production. This year, the calls and comments have been about praise to the Kiwanis for not only the show, but for all the outreach the club did throughout the year. Zozofest was one of the best events to come out of that outreach. Good job, Kiwanis — you are creating new memories for all us santafesinos. Ronald S. Trujillo

city councilor, District 4 Santa Fe

A neighborhood watch Enough is enough! My wonderful neighborhood, where I have lived off and on since the early 1950s, is being ruined because of the lack of proper oversight by the Santa Fe Housing Authority at the

President Clinton. Neither George H.W. Bush nor Clinton “declared victory” with regard to Iraqi WMDs because to do so ran counter to the policy of continuing military and economic pressure on Baghdad. U.N. inspectors, who had long experience with Iraqi evasions and lies, were never quite able to satisfy themselves that they’d compelled Baghdad to get rid of everything, even though they had. Any caveats that Hussein might possibly have some WMDs stashed away played into the hands of the second Bush administration, which maintained a deep distrust of the U.N. as an effective foreign policy tool. To accept U.N. reports that no weapons stocks could be found would mean endorsing the concept of U.N. inspections, something the second Bush administration was loathe to do. One of the tragedies of the run-up to the invasion of Iraq is that military threats from the U.S. helped get U.N. inspectors back into Iraq one last time. But the Bush administration simply wasn’t interested when they reported they couldn’t find any WMDs. Distrust of Hussein, distrust of the United Nations and distrust of the ability of U.S. intelligence to collect all of Iraq’s WMD secrets, plus a desire to act unilaterally and flex U.S.

Luisa Senior Center. This center has existed for many years, and the senior citizens have always proven themselves to be good and considerate neighbors. However, in recent times, this center has become a magnet for shady characters who are not seniors or good citizens. We have begun to see suspicious behavior on a daily basis and we are now finding used syringes on our properties. There also have been an unusual number of property crimes in this quiet neighborhood. We have had enough and we want this issue addressed by the proper authorities. We are not going to give up our neighborhood without a fight. Joe Padilla

Santa Fe

Hazel Kaufman: RIP A great person from Tucson, Ariz., and formerly from Santa Fe, Hazel Gordon Kaufman passed away last week. She befriended me when she owned a gal-

MAllARD FillMORE

Section editor: Inez Russell Gomez, 986-3053, igomez@sfnewmexican.com, Twitter @inezrussell

muscle in the wake of the 9/11 attacks — these, then, were the ingredients that led to the greatest U.S. foreign policy disaster since the Vietnam War. The scope of the disaster, in turn, obscured the basic fact that the U.S.-supported U.N. inspection regime had worked. If the Obama administration pivots now and embraces a weapons hand-over from Syria, President Obama could cite this under-the-radar Iraq success story as one cause for cautious optimism about controlling those chemical weapons. It shows that U.N. inspections wouldn’t work without the credible threat of the use of force. Right now, the credibility of that threat is under serious question as the White House struggles to muster support in Congress for a military response to Syria. But Bashar Assad’s eager grab for the opening created by Kerry’s comments makes clear that the Syrian regime takes the threat seriously. Those engaged in designing a plan to inspect, catalog and secure or destroy Syria’s arsenal should know that a blueprint already exists. John Diamond is the author of The CIA and the Culture of Failure. This commentary first appeared in The Los Angeles Times.

lery in downtown Santa Fe when her husband, Bruce Kaufman, was a judge in New Mexico’s First Judicial District. She loved dogs and adopted many strays, and as a kind of amateur psychologist, always had time to listen the woes sometimes confronting her many friends. She and Bruce were two of the most enlightened people I have ever met. They retired to Tucson so that Bruce could spend more time with horses and they could both get out of the sometimes wearying political rat race inherent in being a District Court judge. I missed her terribly when she left Santa Fe. Now I know that she is resting in peace, her legacy a magnificent life of accomplishments, two wonderful children, Bobby and Jackie, dozens of lasting friends, hundreds of happy art collectors and generally throughout her long life and memorable good karma. Stephen Fox

founder, New Millennium Fine Art Santa Fe

From The Santa Fe New Mexican: Sept. 13, 1913: A registered package containing $1,900 in worn out, ragged, not crisp bills, is missing. The police and postal officials are working hard to find the bills and ascertain who is responsible for their loss. The package was mailed Sept. 3 at the Santa Fe post office by the First National Bank of Denver. It was not only registered but insured. It is said the package was found ‘missing’ when the mail sack reached Lamy. Sept. 13, 1963: The U.S. Public Health Service this month reported the amount of radioactivity in milk nearly doubled nationally in June, but New Mexico milk samples failed to show an increase. Amounts of strontium-89 and iodine-131 also were scarcely traceable in New Mexico milk. Sept. 13, 1988: The state of New Mexico, which earlier studies showed has a serious radon problem, will be included in an Environmental Protection Agency radon study this winter. The radon problem is worse during winter months because the radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is the result of the decay of uranium, becomes trapped in closed houses. An estimated 20 percent of Santa Fe homes, 40 percent of the Pojoaque homes and 70 percent of the Taos homes had high levels of radon, the 1986-87 winter study showed.

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NATION

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

Women’s Nuke: Quakes, faulty security system concerns at LANL rebound in The NNSA is cited regularly in a GAO report of agencies considered “high-risk” due to its job market vulnerabilities to fraud and waste. not all rosy Continued from Page A-1

By Christopher S. Rugaber and Paul Wiseman The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The slowly recovering U.S. job market has helped women rebound faster than men: They’ve now regained all the jobs they lost to the Great Recession. Men are still 2.1 million jobs short. And the gender gap is expected to persist until the job market is much healthier. To understand why, consider the kinds of jobs that are, and aren’t, being added. Lower-wage industries, like retail, education, restaurants and hotels, have been hiring the fastest. Women are predominant in those areas. Men, by contrast, dominate sectors like construction and manufacturing, which have yet to recover millions of jobs lost in the recession. “It’s a segregated labor market, and men and women do work in different industries, and even in different areas within industries,” says Heidi Hartmann, an economist. Economists have long known that the recession hit men the hardest. “A man-cession,” some have called it. Or a “she-covery.” The August jobs report issued last week spotlighted the divergence: The unemployment rate for women was 6.8 percent — nearly a full percentage point less than the 7.7 percent rate for men. All told, 68 million women said they were employed last month. That topped the 67.97 million who had jobs when the recession began in December 2007, the government says. Among men, 76.2 million were employed last month. That was down from 78.3 million in December 2007. Since the recession officially ended in June 2009, education and health services have helped drive job growth: That sector added nearly 1.6 million jobs. And women gained nearly 1.1 million of them. While that category includes some goodpaying jobs such as nurses and physical therapists, many are lower-paying positions such as home health care aides. Women also make up more than half of the workforce in hotels and restaurants, which has produced the third-largest job gain of any industry. Heidi Shierholz, an economist with the Economic Policy Institute, says the lackluster economy has limited the growth of good jobs — the kind traditionally held by men. Low-paying jobs, more typically held by women, have been growing instead. “It’s not like women are fine now,” Shierholz says. “Women have been disproportionately in lowerquality jobs.”

and to continue cutting-edge research at the nation’s nuclear labs. But critics say the nuclear program — run largely by private contractors and overseen by the NNSA, an arm of the Energy Department — has turned into a massive jobs program with duplicative functions. “The post-Cold War nuclear warhead complex has become a gigantic self-licking ice cream cone for contractors,” said Greg Mello of the Los Alamos Study Group, a watchdog organization. U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, chairwoman of the Senate Homeland Security financial and contracting oversight subcommittee, said a key problem is the Energy Department’s reliance on private contractors to carry out its mission. The the department has fewer than 16,000 employees and more than 92,000 contractors. “Unfortunately for the taxpayer … cost overruns, scheduled delays and technical failures are the rule, not the exception,” said McCaskill, D-Mo. “We need to find a better way to do this because we can’t just afford the status quo anymore.” The retired head of one of those contractors, former Lockheed Martin CEO Norman Augustine, told Congress this spring that the absence of day-today accountability and an ineffectual structure at the NNSA pose a national security risk. He described a “pervasive culture of tolerating the intolerable and accepting the unacceptable.” Energy Department and NNSA officials agree there are problems. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said earlier this month that addressing the cost overruns, and also embarrassing security breaches at some facilities, is a top priority. A congressionally appointed panel, co-chaired by Augustine recently began studying a potential overhaul of the NNSA.

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Moniz acknowledged some projects had seen “substantial cost overruns” and said he considers the review by the panel “a good chance to … have this dialogue and reach a conclusion.” An NNSA spokesman referred The Associated Press to congressional testimony by the agency’s project and acquisitions manager, Bob Raines, who said projects completed in the last two years had met cost goals and finished under budget. “We are making progress,” Raines testified in March before a House subcommittee. These issues at the NNSA aren’t new. The agency, along with the Defense Department and programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, is cited regularly in a GAO report of agencies considered “high-risk” due to their vulnerabilities to fraud, waste and mismanagement or because they are most in need of broad reform. However, the nuclear labs are getting renewed scrutiny in light of forced across-the-board federal budget cuts and security lapses such as an incident last year in Tennessee. Before finally being detected, an elderly nun and two other protesters cut through security fences, hung banners and crime-scene tape and hammered off a small chunk of a building inside the complex that is the nation’s central repository for bombgrade uranium. At Los Alamos, officials late last year announced that a new security system meant to protect the only place in the country where nuclear weapon triggers are made didn’t work, and they would

to turn weapons-grade plutonium into commercial nuclear reactor fuel. The plant is $3 billion over budget, now costing an estimated $7.7 billion, and is three years behind schedule, according to the GAO. The problems have resulted in need $41 million and six more months renewed scrutiny and changes in leaderto fix it. Lab officials said the system is ship at the NNSA over the past year. now nearing completion. Thomas D’Agostino, who had led the That is the same area that oversight agency since 2007, retired in January officials worry is susceptible to earthamid criticism of management mistakes quake damage. The Defense Nuclear related to the Tennessee break-in. The Facilities Safety Board, which evaluates agency has had two interim adminishealth and safety conditions at U.S. trators since, and in August, President nuclear facilities, has been working with Barack Obama nominated retired Air Energy Department and the NNSA to Force Lt. Gen. Frank Klotz as its next ensure that contractors are adequately head. He’s awaiting Senate confirmaupgrading a Los Alamos facility after tion. studies showed the potential for a major Members of the panel Augustine earthquake in the area to be 300 percent co-chairs, made up of retired military greater than previously believed. officials, former lab officials and forThe board found that upgrades mer members of Congress, declined initially planned by contractors were requests for interviews. But Augustine insufficient to prevent potential postand other experts have previously recquake radiation releases. Work on the ommended adding an overseer at sites improvements continues. Safety board under the NNSA. Those inspectors Chairman Peter Winokur said that the would be rotated periodically to ensure upgrades top the board’s list of concerns independence. because any building collapse could Critics, however, deride the panel’s send dangerous radiological doses into work as a futile exercise that repeats nearby towns. past reviews. In addition to being over budget at And one panel member, former U.S. times, the NNSA also has been forced Rep. Heather Wilson, R-N.M., has herto abandon several projects on which self become a target of government money has already been spent. auditors for work related to the national Last year, Congress suspended for labs. The Energy Department’s inspecfive years additional spending on a $6 tor general reported in June that Wilson billion plutonium research laboratory at collected nearly half a million dollars for Los Alamos that critics say duplicates no-bid consulting work from nuclear lab a facility in Tennessee and is an unneccontractors. The report found the conessary attempt to expand the nation’s tractors could not document what work nuclear bomb-building mission. The lab Wilson had actually performed. has been on the drawing board for 20 The contractors — Lockheed Martin, years — with millions spent on design Bechtel and other companies — have plans. since reimbursed NNSA most of the Also being cut is a program at the $464,203 that was paid to Wilson, but an investigation continues. Savannah River Site in South Carolina

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Scoreboard B-2 Generation Next B-5 Weather B-6 Time Out B-7 Comics B-8

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

SPORTS

Protection 101: College-bound teens learn how to fend off attacks, avoid dangerous situations. Generation Next, B-5

NFL PATRIOTS 13, JETS 10

Patriots squeak by Jets By Howard Ulman The Associated Press

Patriots wide receiver Aaron Dobson catches a pass in front of Jets defensive end Sheldon Richardson and heads for a first-quarter touchdown Thursday. CHARLES KRUPA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Changes in the air for state’s schools F

all doesn’t officially begin until Sept. 22, but Mother Nature rang it in early for Northern New Mexico. And that wind of change might as well be a signal for the winds of change that are coming all too soon. Many schools are treading close to the 40-day enrollment count that will ultimately decide the future of alignment and classifiJames cation in the state Barron for the next two Commentary years. Many Northern schools will be holding their breath to see where enrollment figures end up and how that will affect them for the 2014-15 school year. With that in mind, here is what the crystal ball says will play out when the official classification and alignment proposal is stamped in November: u Santa Fe High will be in Class AAAAAA. Not that this is the biggest surprise. Last year’s approved proposal had the city’s largest high school again in the state’s largest classification, and as one of the smallest schools. What Santa Fe Public Schools can only hope is that the Demons are not placed in the district with the Rio Rancho schools, Cibola and Volcano Vista. The Rio Rancho schools are strong across the board, while Volcano Vista has emerged as a threat in several sports (football, girls basketball, baseball and softball). Santa Fe High has come a long way in being more competitive in AAAA (soon to be AAAAA), but you can count one sport where it can compete right away — girls basketball. That’s about it. u A last-minute appeal by the private school district brings back the old District 2AAA. OK, this is a long shot at best, but Northern New Mexico can dare to dream, right? The plan right now is for District 3AAA to include St. Michael’s and Santa Fe Indian School with Albuquerque private schools Hope Christian, Sandia Prep and Bosque School, plus charter school East Mountain. The six schools already are grumbling about how convenient it was for the NMAA to form an all-nonpublic school district. This would be a fair compromise. There would still be four close-range schools in 3AAA, and the NMAA can benefit from the return of perhaps the state’s most competitive — and intense — district. Remember how much fun the basketball season was from 2004 to 2010? Perhaps the best time to be a fan — and a reporter. u District 4AA will be the best district in AA … when Mora moves down. The school’s enrollment has been declining slowly over the past 10 years or so, and this year’s numbers might be enough to push it into the AA (currently A) area. That would end the long-standing district rivalry with Pecos (sorry, Panthers fans), but look at what Ranger fans get. Peñasco. Mesa Vista. McCurdy. Escalante. Questa. Back when there was a 3AA, that district was a roller-coaster ride every week during the district season. With Mora in the fray, it would be even more fun. It’s conceivable that every team in the district could get into the state tournament. Now how much fun would that be?

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — One picture-perfect pass started the New England Patriots toward an ugly win. Tom Brady threw a 39-yard touchdown to a wide-open Aaron Dobson on the game’s first series before both offenses played as sloppily as the second-

half weather, and the Patriots got by the New York Jets 13-10 on Thursday night. Brady had trouble connecting with his rookie-filled receiving corps, while Jets rookie Geno Smith was sacked four times when he took too much time to find someone to throw to. The Patriots (2-0) managed just nine first downs after lead-

ing the NFL in points and yards last season. The Jets (1-1) cut the lead to 13-10 on Bilal Powell’s 3-yard touchdown run with 5:05 left in the third quarter. But Smith threw three interceptions in the fourth quarter, two to Aqib Talib and one to Alfonzo Dennard. Talib’s second with 38 seconds

Please see nfL, Page B-2

B Starting strong Brandt Snedeker zooms out front in the BMW Championship with a string of birdies and an 8-under 63. Page B-2

PREP FOOTBALL

QUICK STUDY AT QB

St. Michael’s quarterback Keith Dominguez looks to throw the ball during Saturday’s game against St. Pius X. LUIS SÁNCHEZ SATURNO/THE NEW MEXICAN

Keith Dominguez off to 2-0 start at center stage for the Horsemen By Will Webber The New Mexican

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or two years, he was the shadow man. Now, he’s the guy standing center stage. Inserted this summer as the starting quarterback of the defending Class AAA state championship football team, senior Keith Dominguez is literally learning on the job with the St. Michael’s Horsemen. Rest assured, the rest of the state is watching. “It’s a challenge for him, but he’s a senior and he’s been in our system for a while,” said St. Michael’s head coach Joey Fernandez. “Coming into this year, I was more concerned about the offensive line, to be honest with you. I knew Keith would be fine. It was that line that worried me.” In two games, Dominguez is making the most of his one-and-done season under center. He has completed 61 percent of his passes and has thrown

for 426 yards with three touchdowns and two interceptions. Most importantly: He is 2-0 as a starter. His predecessor, Cory Serna, would be proud. In his two-plus seasons as a starter he went 26-1, led the Horsemen to consecutive berths in the state championship game and guided the team to its third title in 10 years. Since Serna graduated, it’s all on Dominguez to carry the load of that amazing run. “I don’t really feel any pressure because that’s not the kind of person I am,” he said. “It’s my turn, but this team is about so much more than one player. The line, the defense. Everyone’s doing their part.” Whereas Serna wore a nontraditional quarterback number on his jersey (24), Dominguez is going with a more conventional digit (7) in honor of his favorite player, fellow left-handed quarterback Michael Vick.

inside u Capital blanked by Albuquerque Valley. u Football notebook: Demon’s defense a matter of perspective. Page B-3

So far, Dominguez hasn’t shown much of Vick’s get-up-and-go approach for running the ball. In wins over Bloomfield and St. Pius, he has minus18 rushing yards, mostly due to getting sacked on dropbacks. “I can be fast, but not Michael Vick fast,” Dominguez said. “I wish. I guess I’ll just have to do other stuff on my own.” Fernandez said his QB has the green light to run. He attributes Dominguez’s lack of rushing yardage to the one thing that is becoming his strength. “Poise,” Fernandez said. “He is very composed in

Please see QB, Page B-3

PREP SOCCER

Demons fall to Tigers in OT By Edmundo Carrillo The New Mexican

Santa Fe’s Armando Hernandez, left, challenges Los Lunas’ Ryan Romero for the ball during the second half Thursday at Santa Fe High School. LUIS SÁNCHEZ SATURNO/THE NEW MEXICAN

Minutes after Los Lunas sophomore midfielder Chris Lovato scored a first-half goal to set the tone for Los Lunas 4 what would SFHS 3 become a 4-3 Tigers overtime victory, rain started coming down hard at Santa Fe High. “We play better in the rain, boys,” Demons head coach A.J.

Sports information: James Barron, 986-3045, jbarron@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Kristina Dunham, kdunham@sfnewmexican.com

Herrera yelled at his team from the sideline. In the 33rd minute, as rain was pounding the artificial turf, Santa Fe High’s Ruben Guzman knocked in a goal from the corner to tie the match. Shortly after that, Santa Fe High’s Daniel Matzir was fouled in the box to allow fellow Demon and team-leading scorer Josue De Luna to attempt a penalty kick. As De Luna was setting up to

take the kick, Los Lunas goalkeeper Dylan Romero received a yellow card for delaying the match. As a result of the yellow card, Romero had to be substituted out of the game. Lovato took his place in the net for the penalty kick, but De Luna’s confidence did not sway knowing that he was not going up against the starting goalkeeper. “I go into every penalty kick with a lot of confidence since

Please see socceR, Page B-3

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


B-2

SPORTS

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

FOOTBALL Football

NFL American Conference

East New England Miami N.Y. Jets Buffalo South Indianapolis Tennessee Houston Jacksonville North Cincinnati Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland West Kansas City Denver San Diego Oakland

W 2 1 1 0 W 1 1 1 0 W 0 0 0 0 W 1 1 0 0

L 0 0 1 1 L 0 0 0 1 L 1 1 1 1 L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .500 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000 Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

National Conference

BASKETBALL basketball PF 36 23 28 21 PF 21 16 31 2 PF 21 9 27 10 PF 28 49 28 17

East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 North W L T Pct PF Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 Week Two Thursday’s Game New England 13, N.Y. Jets 10 Sunday’s Games Dallas at Kansas City, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Houston, 11 a.m. Washington at Green Bay, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 11 a.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 11 a.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Miami at Indianapolis, 11 a.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 11 a.m. Carolina at Buffalo, 11 a.m. Detroit at Arizona, 2:05 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 2:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Oakland, 2:25 p.m. Denver at N.Y. Giants, 2:25 p.m. San Francisco at Seattle, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 6:40 p.m.

NCAA The AP Top 25

PA 31 10 30 23 PA 17 9 28 28 PA 24 16 49 23 PA 2 27 31 21 PA 27 31 33 36 PA 17 18 12 23 PA 24 21 34 34 PA 24 28 7 27

Thursday’s Game Texas Tech 20, No. 24 TCU 10 Saturday’s Games No. 1 Alabama at No. 6 Texas A&M, 1:30 p.m. No. 2 Oregon vs. Tennessee, 1:30 p.m. No. 4 Ohio St. at California, 5 p.m. No. 5 Stanford at Army, Noon No. 7 Louisville at Kentucky, Noon No. 8 LSU vs. Kent State, 5 p.m. No. 10 Florida State vs. Nevada, 1:30 p.m. No. 11 Michigan vs. Akron, Noon No. 12 Oklahoma St. vs. Lamar, 5:30 p.m. No. 13 South Carolina vs. Vanderbilt, 5 p.m. No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Tulsa, Noon No. 16 UCLA at No. 23 Nebraska, Noon No. 17 Northwestern vs. Western Michigan, 7 p.m. No. 19 Washington vs. Illinois at Chicago, 4 p.m. No. 20 Wisconsin at Arizona State, 8:30 p.m. No. 21 Notre Dame at Purdue, 6 p.m. No. 25 Mississippi at Texas, 6 p.m.

WNBA Eastern Conference

Pct .719 .531 .469 .469 .344 .281

GB — 6 8 8 12 14

W L Pct z-Minnesota 25 7 .781 x-Los Angeles 22 10 .688 x-Phoenix 18 14 .563 x-Seattle 16 17 .485 San Antonio 11 21 .344 Tulsa 11 22 .333 x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference Thursday’s Games Seattle 76, Tulsa 67 Minnesota at Los Angeles Wednesday’s Games Connecticut 78, Atlanta 77 Chicago 70, Phoenix 68 Friday’s Games New York at Indiana, 5 p.m. Connecticut at Washington, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 6:30 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Tulsa at Seattle, 8 p.m.

GB — 3 7 91/2 14 141/2

z-Chicago x-Atlanta x-Indiana x-Washington New York Connecticut

W 23 17 15 15 11 9

L 9 15 17 17 21 23

Western Conference

NBA Calendar

Oct. 1 — Training camps open. Oct. 28 — Rosters set for opening day. Oct. 29 — Regular season opens. 2014 Jan. 6 — 10-day contracts can be signed. Jan. 10 — Contracts guaranteed for rest of season. Feb. 14-16 — All-Star weekend, New Orleans. Feb. 20 — Trade deadline, 1 p.m. EST. April 16 — Last day of regular season. April 19 — Playoffs begin.

CYCLING CyCling

UCI WorLdToUr Vuelta a Espana

Thursday At Pena Cabarga, Spain 18th Stage 116 miles from Burgos to Pena Cabarga 1. Vasil Kiryienka, Belarus, Sky, 4 hours, 46 minutes, 48 seconds. 2. Chris Anker Soerensen, Denmark, SaxoBank-Tinkoff, 28 seconds behind. 3. Adam Hansen, Australia, Lotto Belisol, 1:18. 4. Martin Kohler, Switzerland, BMC, 1:34. 5. Egoi Martinez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 1:42. 6. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShack-Leopard, 1:53. 7. Amets Txurruka, Spain, Caja RuralSeguros RGA, 2:02. 8. Joaquim Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 2:13. 9. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, st. 10. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Astana, 2:18. overall Standings (After 18 of 21 stages) 1. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Astana, 73 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds. 2. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShack-Leopard, 3 seconds behind. 3. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, 1:09. 4. Joaquim Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 2:24. 5. Nicolas Roche, Ire., SaxoBank-Tinkoff, 3:43. 6. Domenico Pozzovivo, Italy, AG2R La Mondiale, 5:44. 7. Thibaut Pinot, France, Francaise des Jeux, 6:14. 8. Leopold Konig, Czech Republic, NetAppEndura, 6:35. 9. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, EuskaltelEuskadi, 7:51. 10. Tanel Kangert, Estonia, Astana, 11:10.

TENNIS tennis

golF GOLF

SOCCER soCCeR

TRANSACTIONS tRansaCtions

Thursday At Club Avantage Multi-Sports de Quebec Quebec City Purse: $235,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Second round Ajla Tomjlanovic, Croatia, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands (4), United States, 7-5, 3-6, 4-1, retired. Lucie Safarova (3), Czech Republic, def. Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (10). Lauren Davis (7), United States, def. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 6-1, 2-6, 6-3. Eugenie Bouchard (5), Canada, def. Sesil Karatantcheva, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Kristina Mladenovic (2), France, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-3, 2-3, retired. doubles Quarterfinals Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, and Anastasia Rodionova (2), Australia, def. Francoise Abanda and Carol Zhao, Canada, 7-6 (4), 7-5. Irina Falconi, United States, and Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Asia Muhammad and Allie Will, United States, 6-1, 6-1.

Thursday At Conway Farms Golf Club Lake Forest, Ill. Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,149; Par: 71 (35-36) First round Brandt Snedeker 33-30—63 Zach Johnson 32-32—64 Charl Schwartzel 34-32—66 Steve Stricker 32-34—66 Tiger Woods 32-34—66 Kevin Streelman 30-36—66 John Merrick 32-35—67 Adam Scott 34-33—67 Ryan Moore 33-34—67 Nick Watney 34-33—67 Roberto Castro 32-36—68 Gary Woodland 35-33—68 Hunter Mahan 35-33—68 Nicholas Thompson 32-37—69 Rory Sabbatini 33-36—69 Kevin Stadler 36-33—69 Matt Jones 33-36—69 Brian Gay 35-35—70 Graeme McDowell 36-34—70 Harris English 36-34—70 Michael Thompson 34-36—70 Jason Kokrak 36-34—70 Chris Stroud 33-37—70 Sergio Garcia 36-34—70 Graham DeLaet 34-36—70 Phil Mickelson 36-34—70 Luke Donald 35-35—70 Sang-Moon Bae 36-34—70 Brendon de Jonge 36-35—71 D.A. Points 35-36—71 Justin Rose 36-35—71 Jason Dufner 37-34—71

East W L T Pts GF GA Montreal 13 7 6 45 45 37 New York 13 9 6 45 44 36 Kansas City 13 9 6 45 41 27 Philadelphia 10 9 9 39 37 38 New England 10 10 7 37 37 29 Houston 10 10 7 37 31 35 Chicago 10 11 6 36 33 38 Columbus 9 14 5 32 31 38 Toronto 4 13 11 23 24 40 D.C. United 3 19 5 14 16 44 West W L T Pts GF GA Salt Lake 14 8 6 48 52 35 Seattle 14 8 4 46 35 27 Los Angeles 13 10 4 43 43 33 Colorado 11 8 9 42 35 29 Portland 10 5 12 42 43 30 Dallas 10 7 10 40 39 39 Vancouver 10 10 7 37 39 38 San Jose 10 11 7 37 29 40 Chivas USA 6 15 7 25 27 48 Note: Three points for win and one for a tie. Thursday’s Games No games scheduled. Wednesday’s Game Toronto 1, Chicago 1, tie Friday’s Game Salt Lake at Seattle, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Columbus at Montreal, 12 p.m. Los Angeles at D.C. United, 2 p.m. Toronto at New York, 5 p.m. Houston at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m. New England at Chicago, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 7 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Chivas USA, 8:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20 Colorado at Portland, 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21 Vancouver at Montreal, 12 p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 2 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 5:30 p.m. D.C. United at New England, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Houston, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Salt Lake, 7 p.m. Seattle at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22 Dallas at New York, 3 p.m.

LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Sent RHP Robert Coello to Salt Lake (PCL) for a rehab assignment. NEW YORK YANKEES — Designated RHP Jim Miller for assignment.

WTA ToUr Bell Challenge

Tashkent open

Thursday At The olympic Tennis School Tashkent, Uzbekistan Purse: $235,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Olga Govortsova, Belarus, def. Alexandra Cadantu (5), Romania, 6-3, 6-2. Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Yvonne Meusburger (3), Austria, 6-3, 6-0. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, def. Nastassja Burnett, Italy, 7-6 (4), 7-5. Bojana Jovanovski (1), Serbia, def. Galina Voskoboeva (7), Kazakhstan, 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5). doubles Quarterfinals Valeria Savinykh, Russia, and Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Irina-Camelia Begu and Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, 2-6, 6-3, 13-11. Semifinals Olga Govortsova, Belarus, and Mandy Minella (2), Luxembourg, def. Lyudmyla and Nadiya Kichenok, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-3.

ONDate THIS DATE this September 13

1930 — Tommy Armour beats Gene Sarazen 1 up to win the PGA Championship. 1959 — Neale Fraser of Australia wins the men’s singles title in the U.S. Open with a four-set victory over Alex Olmedo. Brazil’s Maria Bueno wins the women’s title. 1964 — Roy Emerson beats fellow Australian Fred Stolle to win the men’s title in the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships. Brazil’s Maria Bueno wins the women’s title. 1970 — Only 55 of 126 finish the first New York City Marathon, with Gary Muhrcke winning in 2 hours, 31 minutes, 38.2 seconds. 1970 — Ken Rosewall of Australia beats countryman Tony Roche in the men’s singles final at the U.S. Open. 1981 — The Atlanta Falcons, trailing 17-0 with 13 minutes remaining in the game, score 31 points to beat the Green Bay Packers 31-17. The Falcons score touchdowns on a punt return, two by passes, an interception return and a fumble return. 1981 — John McEnroe defeats Bjorn Borg to win his third straight men’s singles title in the U.S. Open. 1987 — Ivan Lendl beats Mats Wilander for his third U.S. Open crown, 6-7, 6-0, 7-6, 6-4.

PGA ToUr BMW Championship

EUroPEAN ToUr KLM open

Thursday At Kennemer Golf and Country Club Zandvoort, Netherlands Purse: $2.37 million Yardage: 6,626; Par: 70 (36-34) First round Miguel Angel Jimenez, Esp 33-31—64 Pablo Larrazabal, Esp 33-32—65 Damien McGrane, Irl 33-32—65 David Howell, Eng 34-31—65 Fabrizio Zanotti, Par 35-30—65 Robert Allenby, Aus 35-30—65 Gary Orr, Sco 33-32—65 Oscar Floren, Swe 34-32—66 Wil Besseling, Ned 36-31—67 Tom Lewis, Eng 32-35—67 Richard Bland, Eng 36-31—67 Prom Meesawat, Tha 35-32—67 Simon Khan, Eng 35-32—67 Marcus Fraser, Aus 35-32—67

WEB.CoM ToUr Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship

Thursday At ohio State University Golf Club, Scarlet Course Columbus, ohio Purse: $1 million Yardage: 7,455; Par: 71 (36-35) Partial First round Jim Herman 33-31—64 Sean O’Hair 34-32—66 Danny Lee 33-33—66 Andrew D. Putnam 33-34—67 Miguel Angel Carballo 34-33—67 Seung-Yul Noh 33-35—68 Brice Garnett 36-32—68 Chesson Hadley 34-34—68 Kelly Kraft 34-34—68 Dawie van der Walt 33-35—68 Scott Dunlap 33-35—68 Billy Hurley III 36-33—69 Alex Aragon 35-34—69 Bronson La’Cassie 34-35—69 Note: Play suspended with 59 golfers still on the course.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Snedeker zooms out in front at BMW The Associated Press

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — Brandt Snedeker was making so many birdies that even an 18-foot putt looked like a mere tap-in. When he finished his amazing run Thursday in the BMW Championship, he had seven straight birdies on his card and an 8-under 63 at blustery Conway Farms. “You get on runs like that, you get excited for the next hole because you know something good is going to happen, because you’re in such a good frame of mind and everything is going in the right direction,” Snedeker said. In this case, everything was going in — a 15-foot putt from the fringe on the 13th, another 15-footer on the next hole when he used the blade of his sand wedge to bump the ball out of the short rough, and a 40-footer from the fringe on the 17th stood out to him. That gave him a one-shot lead over Zach Johnson in the third FedEx Cup playoff event. Tiger Woods sounded disgusted with his round of 66, mainly because he had a pair of three-putt bogeys and missed a 4-foot birdie putt over his last five holes. “I’m not exactly real happy,” Woods said. “I played well, and I just didn’t get much out of that round. I missed three little short ones in there and then played the par 5s even par. That’s just not very good.” Steve Stricker, Charl Schwartzel and Kevin Streelman also were at 66. The opening round was mainly about the debut of Conway Farms, a Tom Fazio design north of Chicago which has a blend of strong holes and plenty of birdie opportunities on par 4s where players hit wedge for their second shot. Low scoring was predicted, and Snedeker’s round was proof of that. But as the wind picked up and shifted directions, the course was far from a pushover. Rickie Fowler opened with a pair of double bogeys, followed by a pair of bogeys. He rallied for a 77. Rory McIlroy made a double bogey -- his ninth of the FedEx Cup playoffs -- on his second hole,

NorTH AMErICA Major League Soccer

EUroPE English Premier League

G W d L F A Liverpool 3 3 0 0 3 0 Chelsea 3 2 1 0 4 1 Man. City 3 2 0 1 8 3 Arsenal 3 2 0 1 5 4 Stoke 3 2 0 1 3 2 Tottenham 3 2 0 1 2 1 Man. United 3 1 1 1 4 2 West Ham 3 1 1 1 2 1 Norwich 3 1 1 1 3 3 Southampton 3 1 1 1 2 2 Cardiff City 3 1 1 1 3 4 Newcastle 3 1 1 1 1 4 Aston Villa 3 1 0 2 4 4 Crystal Palace 3 1 0 2 4 4 Everton 3 0 3 0 2 2 Swansea 3 1 0 2 3 5 Fulham 3 1 0 2 2 4 Hull City 3 1 0 2 1 4 Sunderland 3 0 1 2 2 5 West Brom 3 0 1 2 0 3 Saturday’s Games Man. United vs. Crystal Pal., 5:45 a.m. Aston Villa vs. Newcastle, 8 a.m. Fulham vs. West Brom, 8 a.m. Hull City vs. Cardiff, 8 a.m. Stoke vs. Man. City, 8 a.m. Sunderland vs. Arsenal, 8 a.m. Tottenham vs. Norwich, 8 a.m. Everton vs. Chelsea, 10:30 a.m. Sunday’s Games Southampton vs. West Ham, 9 a.m. Monday, Sept. 16 Swansea vs. Liverpool, 1 p.m.

BASEBALL American League

National League

LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Transferred RHP Shawn Tolleson to the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of LHP Onelki Garcia from Albuquerque (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Named Trevor Hoffman upper level pitching coordinator and special assistant to the general manager. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Reinstated LHP Jeremy Affeldt from the 15-day DL.

American Association

LAREDO LEMURS — Traded C Brian Peterson to Somerset (Atlantic) for a player to be named.

Atlantic League

LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Reinstated RHP Jared Lansford to the active list. Placed RHP Nick DeBarr on the inactive list.

Can-Am League

QUEBEC CAPITALES — Exercised the 2014 option on INF Balbino Fuenmayor. ROCKLAND BOULDERS — Exercised the 2014 option on INF Steve Nyisztor and RHP Kevin Fuqua.

FooTBALL National Football League

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Claimed DT Chris Jones off waivers from Tampa Bay. Released OL Josh Kline. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Signed DE Jay Richardson. Released WR Andy Tanner. NEW YORK GIANTS — Claimed LB Allen Bradford off waivers from Seattle. Placed LB Dan Connor on injured reserve. Signed WR Marcus Harris to the practice squad. Terminated the contract of T Steven Baker. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released WR Tyrone Walker and LB Ty Powell from the practice squad. Signed DT Michael Brooks and G Jared Smith to the practice squad.

HoCKEY National Hockey League

DETROIT RED WINGS — Agreed to terms with F Daniel Cleary on a one-year contract.

American Hockey League

P 9 7 6 6 6 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1

In brief Texas Tech tops No. 24 TCU 20-10 LUBBOCK, Texas — Freshman backup quarterback Davis Webb threw a 19-yard touchdown pass to Bradley Marquez with 3:48 remaining to lead Texas Tech to a 20-10 victory over No. 24 TCU on Thursday night. The score came after the Red Raiders (3-0, 1-0 Big 12) thought they’d scored on a 49-yard TD pass from Webb to DeAndre Washington, but he dropped the ball at the half-yard line. An unsportsmanlike conduct penalty took them back to the TCU 14. Two plays later, Webb hit Marquez. TCU (1-2, 0-1) scored its only touchdown when B. J. Catalon

HARTFORD WOLF PACK — Signed F Andrew Rowe.

LACroSSE National Lacrosse League

EDMONTON RUSH — Named Jeff McComb offensive coach.

SoCCEr Major League Soccer

CHIVAS USA — Signed D Bobby Burling to a contract extension through the 2015 season.

National Women’s Soccer League

CHICAGO RED STARS — Loaned M Alyssa Mautz to WFK Zorky (Russia) until Dec. 1.

CoLLEGE NCAA

SOUTHERN STATES ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Named Katie Bright assistant commissioner. DELAWARE — Named Allison Daly director of women’s basketball operations and Tim Brock women’s assistant cross country and track and field coach. Promoted associate head trainer Dan Watson to head trainer and assistant director of athletics for athletic training. HOUSTON — Named Carl Lewis volunteer assistant track and field coach. HUNTINGDON — Promoted Morgan Cross to women’s lacrosse coach. LIMESTONE — Named Alan Ferguson men’s and women’s interim tennis coach. MONTANA — Named Melanie Meuchel assistant softball coach.

ran in from 17 yards to make it 10-all with 6:28 remaining TCU’s Trevone Boykin went 23 for 36 for 194 yards and two interceptions. Texas Tech’s starting quarterback Baker Mayfield left the game in the fourth quarter with what appeared to be a leg injury.

Sparks defeat Lynx 85-84 LOS ANGELES — Nneka Ogwumike had 25 points and 11 rebounds, Kristi Toliver added 19 points and the Los Angeles Sparks beat the Minnesota Lynx 85-84 on Thursday night. In other WNBA action, Shekinna Stricklen scored a careerhigh 26 points, Tina Thompson added 20 and the Seattle Storm beat the Tulsa Shock 76-67 to snap a three-game losing streak. The Associated Press

Tiger Woods hits out of the sand to the 13th green Thursday during the first round of the BMW Championship at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest, Ill. CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

and then three-putted from 4 feet for a triple bogey and staggered to a 78. Lee Westwood, fighting severe pain in his back and ribs, had an 80. “There’s a good mixture of really hard holes and really good birdie opportunities. I think that makes for exciting golf,” Phil Mickelson said after opening with a 70. “That’s why we have such a discrepancy in scores.” EuROPEan TOuR In Zandvoort, Netherlands, nearly two decades after winning this tournament, Miguel Angel Jimenez of Spain shot a 6-under 64 Thursday for the first-round lead at the KLM Open. Jimenez, the 1994 champion, is the oldest player in the field at 49 and would like to add another Spanish name to the trophy. Jimenez had two bogeys and eight birdies in a round in which he took advantage of good conditions. One of his birdies came when he holed a wedge from 40 yards at the 16th. Another on the 18th

gave him the outright lead. LPGa TOuR In Evian-les-Bains, France, the first day of play at the Evian Championship was washed out after heavy morning rain soaked the newly-designed course. Players were on the course for less than one hour before being forced to come off, and organizers decided to postpone further play until Friday. Top-ranked Inbee Park of South Korea, the defending champion, is looking to become the first professional golfer to win four majors in a year. WEB.cOm TOuR In Columbus, Ohio, Jim Herman shot a 7-under 64 on Thursday and built a twoshot lead over Sean O’Hair and Danny Lee among those who finished the raindelayed opening round of the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship on the Web.com Tour. Rain caused a three-hour delay in the morning, and the first round could not be completed until Friday.

nFL: Brady missing top offensive players Continued from Page B-1 left sealed the victory. With wide receiver Danny Amendola, tight end Rob Gronkowski and running back Shane Vereen all sidelined, Brady was without three of his top offensive players. He was left with just two tight ends and four wide receivers, three of them rookies. “We have a long way to go,” Brady said. “No one is coming to [our] rescue and save the day, so we’ve just got to fight through it.” In the second half, the teams had to deal with a torrential downpour that started at intermission.

On the 17 possessions in the first half, there were 11 punts, a lost fumble, one missed field goal, three field goals and a touchdown. The officials didn’t have a very good half, either, with one touchdown by each team and a lost fumble by New England’s Julian Edelman being overturned by video review. The only touchdown of the half came on the first series when Brady hit Dobson down the right side. It was the first reception for the second-round draft choice, who missed the opening 23-21 win over the Buffalo Bills with a hamstring injury.


SPORTS PREP FOOTBALL

Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-3

Northern New Mexico

Vikings blank Jaguars 50-0 SCOREBOARD By James Barron The New Mexican

ALBUQUERQUE — Time spoke volumes on Thursday night. It went beyond the 61 minutes of actual time it took Albuquerque Valley to post an easy 50-0 win over Capital in nondistrict football at Milne Stadium. Time flew by so quickly that Vikings senior quarterback Bo Coleman, who completed 6 of 10 passes for 161 yards and three touchdowns, as well as a 66-yard run for a touchdown in the opening quarter, didn’t realize it until he checked his phone after the game. Even Valley head coach Enrico Marcelli felt bad about ending the evening at 8:01 p.m., when backup quarterback Jordan Velasquez took a knee to end play in accordance with the 50-point mercy rule. “We tried,” Marcelli told Capital head coach Bill Moon about getting the game into the second half. Perhaps the Vikings (3-0) tried too hard to execute what Marcelli preaches. The Vikings offense used 7:31 on the clock to score 43 points, and none of the drives ever approached the 2-minute mark.

Valley, the sixth-ranked team in Class AAAAA according to maxpreps.com, was a model of efficiency as it scored its first two touchdowns in exactly 1:16 each. The final score took 1:12, when Velasquez blew through the wall of blockers and scorched earth on his way to a 42-yard touchdown run for 50-0 with 2:26 left in the first half. “We’re trying to model this thing after Oregon as much as possible,” Marcelli said. “We’ll go as fast as they let us go.” As for Capital, it had 12 seconds of glory when Johnathan Anaya picked off Coleman’s first pass and returned it to the Valley 41-yard line. The Jaguars managed just three yards on their drive before giving it back to the Vikings and Colemen, who needed just four plays before he broke through with a 66-yard touchdown run down the left sideline on an option keeper. That opened the scoring at 6-0 with 8:40 left. “I made a mistake first play, so I had to go out there and pick myself up,” Coleman said. “I had to pick up for my mistake, and there was a huge gap in the line, and our line does such a great job, so I just went.” That opening sequence was the precursor to Capital’s evening.

“We opened too many doors,” Moon said. “We dropped too many snaps. We played lethargically, and they played well. I mean, what a great set of athletes, and well-coached.” Perhaps the most significant time factor Thursday was not even on the field. Capital (0-2) had 11 days between its opening win over Socorro on Aug. 30 and play against one of the top AAAAA teams in the state. In between, the Jaguars suffered an ignominious forfeit for playing an ineligible player in the 35-28 win, a dark cloud that didn’t quite lift. While Moon and Santa Fe Public Schools did not name the player, missing from the roster was sophomore Kevin Brown, who rushed for 143 yards and four touchdowns against the Warriors. If anything, the Jaguars became even younger with freshman Jesus Garza-Vargas starting in Brown’s place. It was not an auspicious start, as he ran for just 47 yards on 18 carries, but Moon sees a potential dilemma with two young running backs to continue Capital’s rebuilding job. “Did you see much difference in their skill levels?” Moon said. “I didn’t.” Only time will tell.

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Demons’ defense a matter of perspective

By Will Webber The New Mexican

Ray Holladay had a point when he said his Santa Fe High football team played some of the best run defense of his fiveyear tenure as head football coach of the Demons in last week’s win over Albuquerque High. The unit gave up just 70 yards on 26 attempts to the Bulldogs, or an average of fewer than three yards per carry. Like everything, however, it’s a matter of perspective. While opponents have had a hard time claiming real estate by running the ball, it’s because they don’t necessarily have to. In two games, the Demons have surrendered nine touchdown passes — four to Grants quarterback Cassius Corley in the opener and five more last week to Albuquerque High’s Ryley Padilla. The pair have combined to go 23-for-47 for 442

yards with two interceptions. Time and again, the pair found receivers open deep downfield against corners that couldn’t keep up and safeties who misread the receivers’ route. Of the 11 touchdowns the Demons have given up, only two — runs of 59 and 61 yards by Corley — have been on the ground, and both of those were essentially scrambles where Corley pulled it down and improvised his way downfield. uuu

Capital may have taken a beating Thursday in Albuquerque. Certainly the Jaguars have taken a beating of a different kind thanks to their recent forfeit after the use of an ineligible player. At least the program is doing something right with regards to honoring its more glorious past. Head coach Bill Moon, in his second tour of duty with the

program he launched when the school opened its doors in the late 1980s, has summoned the captains of the program’s most successful teams to be present during the pregame coin flip before every home contest this season. It began prior to the Socorro game two weeks ago, when the captains from the 1988 squad, the school’s first, helped toss the coin. It will continue next week, when the leaders of the school’s first district championship team from 1990 will be in attendance at the Sept. 20 game against Gallup. uuu

The first Santa Fe-area team to play a game in the new Community Stadium, the multimillion dollar venue completed last month on Albuquerque’s Nine Mile Hill, was Taos. The Tigers (2-0) avenged a playoff loss to Hope Christian with an impressive 37-14 victory,

one in which senior running back Isaac Gonzales rushed for 129 yards and two touchdowns and caught one pass for 35 yards and a score. They are one of only five remaining unbeaten teams in Class AAA. While fans and coaches have raved about the new stadium’s cozy confines, they’re holding off on the facility’s design until it cools off a little. Unlike Albuquerque Public Schools’ other venues, Wilson and Milne stadiums, the Community Stadium does not have a track surrounding the playing surface. Instead, it is essentially a concrete bowl in which the grandstands come almost as close to the sidelines as those at Santa Fe High’s Ivan Head Stadium. “It’s just hot in there, especially those Saturday afternoon games,” said St. Michael’s head coach Joey Fernandez. “With all that concrete and the turf, all that heat just sits in there. It can be draining.”

qB: Senior says he is ‘ready for anything’ Continued from Page B-1 the pocket. He can stand in there and keep that focus when a lot of kids might try and run.” Dominguez has also proven to be a quick study. In the season opener, he was 12 of 21 with a pair of passes picked off. At least two more passes could have been intercepted. “Keith is getting better every day,” said senior running back Daniel Ortega, following the win over St. Pius. “He’s working hard and he does what he has to for us. We’ll probably have to throw the ball a little more, but that’s going to happen the more he gets used to be being back there.” In last week’s home opener, Dominguez

was steady under pressure and worked to find the open man while risking the occasional trap in the backfield. That, Fernandez suggested, is a sign of how much he is improving. “I thought he did a good job finding open receivers,” Fernandez said. “The big thing, though, is I thought he got a lot better making presnap reads at the line of scrimmage. That’s been his problem, especially against Bloomfield. He wasn’t seeing things the defense was giving him, but now he is.” It doesn’t hurt that Dominguez had a chance to learn and grow under what may arguably have been the most talented group of upperclassmen the program has ever had. The Horsemen started 12-0 two

years ago before losing in the championship game, then completed an undefeated campaign a year ago. “Being two years under those guys, they were role models and it was easy to learn a lot from them,” Dominguez said. “What I got out of it makes me ready for anything right now.” That includes a date Friday night in Wildcats Stadium against perennial power Lovington. A win there would give Dominguez two road wins against top-6 AAA teams in the season’s first three weeks. If things keep up, the player so often lost on the sidelines during the Horsemen’s glory days may be the next big thing amid another deep postseason run.

Soccer: Lady Jaguars earn 3rd win of season Continued from Page B-1 I’ve been taking them since my freshman year,” De Luna said. “I just try to relax and not really think about the shot. I practice them everyday, and it just comes naturally to me.” De Luna converted the penalty kick, and the Demons (4-5) took a 2-1 lead into the intermission. The Demons had just come off another rain-soaked match against Valley, which they won 2-1. “We knew that one tough game experience was going to help us when it started raining,” Herrera said. When the rain starts coming down, there is something that clicks with the Demons. “I think we control the ball better on a dry field, but our intensity goes up when we play on a wet field,” De Luna said. Lovato, who is a transfer from Belen, scored 20 minutes into the second half to tie the match at 2-2. By this time, the downpour had stopped.

Three minutes after that, Santa Fe High forward Chris Hunter was fouled in the box, setting up another penalty kick for De Luna. He converted on the kick and, once again, the Demons had the lead. With just a few minutes left in regulation, De Luna committed a foul in the box to set up Lovato with a penalty kick, and De Luna tried to plead his case with the referee, but to no avail. “I think it was a foul, but not a good enough foul for a penalty.” Lovato knocked in his third goal of the day and sent the match into overtime. Not content with a mere hat trick, Lovato scored on a breakaway goal in the first minute of the overtime period to end the match with a 4-3 Tiger victory. Just before the final goal, Demon defender Elijah Wolverton fell hard to the turf, but no foul was called and Lovato was able to break away for the goal. Herrera expressed his frustration on the no-call with the referee

after the match. “I thought Elijah got fouled in the middle of the field, and that resulted in a breakaway,” Herrera said. “It’s just something I wanted to bring to the ref’s attention, but that was a little bit of frustration on my part.” Much like that other rainy match against Valley, Herrera came into this match knowing it was going to be close. “Every year we play them it’s exactly like this, it’s a close [match],” he said. “It’s not a good feeling knowing that we let it slip away because we felt like we dominated most of the play, even though it was back and forth. That was a very good test for us, and we’re going to be able to benefit from this game come district time.” After a match like this, perhaps the Demons will be hoping for some sunshine. GIRLS SOCCER CAPITAL 2, ALBUqUERqUE DEL NORTE 1 With a little help from Albu-

querque Del Norte, the Lady Jaguars of Capital were able to pull off their third win of the season with a 2-1 victory at Jaguar Field on Thursday afternoon. In the fifth minute, Capital goalkeeper Anahi Corral cleared a ball that sailed to the other side of the field. Once it was there, a Del Norte player knocked it into her own goal to give the Lady Jaguars (3-5) a 1-0 advantage. Capital’s Alejandra Palos scored in the 50th minute for a 2-0 lead. Del Norte scored four minutes later, but the Lady Jaguars would hang on for the win. Corral had eight saves, including two in the final minute. “Anahi really saved the [match] for us,” Capital head coach Moises Del Rio said. This win comes after Capital dropped three straight matches. Del Rio said things are starting to get better for the program that didn’t have a head coach until the third match of the season. “They’re learning to play like a team,” Del Rio said. “They really showed up today, and they were playing with intensity.”

Local results and schedules Today on TV

Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. All times local. AUTO RACING 8 a.m. on FS1 — NASCAR Truck Series: Practice for EnjoyIllinois. com 225, in Joliet, Ill. 10 a.m. on FS1 — NASCAR Truck Series: Final practice for EnjoyIllinois.com 225, in Joliet, Ill. 11 a.m. on FS1 — NASCAR Sprint Cup: Practice for GEICO 400, in Joliet, Ill. 12:30 p.m. on FS1 — NASCAR Nationwide Series: Practice for Dollar General 300, in Joliet, Ill. 2 p.m. on FS1 — NASCAR Truck Series: Pole qualifying for EnjoyIllinois.com 225, in Joliet, Ill. 3 p.m. on ESPN2 — NASCAR Sprint Cup: Pole qualifying for GEICO 400, at Joliet, Ill. 6:30 p.m. on FS1 — NASCAR Truck Series: EnjoyIllinois.com 225, at Joliet, Ill. COLLEGE FOOTBALL 6 p.m. on ESPN — Air Force at Boise St. GOLF 5:30 a.m. on TGC — LPGA: The Evian Championship second round, in Evian-les-Bains, France 10:30 p.m. on TGC — European PGA Tour: KLM Open second round, in Zandvoort, Netherlands (same-day tape) 1 p.m. on TGC — PGA Tour: BMW Championship second round, in Lake Forest, Ill. 4:30 p.m. on TGC — Web.com Tour: Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship second round, in Columbus, Ohio (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Noon on WGN — Cleveland at Chicago White Sox 5 p.m. on MLB — N.Y. Yankees at Boston PREP FOOTBALL 6 p.m. on ESPN2 — Stillwater (Minn.) at Cretin-Derham Hall (Minn.) 8 p.m. on FSN — St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.) vs. John Curtis (La.), in New Orleans SOCCER 8 p.m. on NBCSN — MLS, Real Salt Lake at Seattle

HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS

Football

Albuquerque Valley (Milne) 50, Capital 0

HIGH SCHOOL SCHEDULE This week’s varsity schedule for Northern New Mexico high schools. For additions or changes, please call 986-3045.

Today Boys soccer — Moriarty at Capital, 4 p.m. Monte del Sol at Las Vegas Robertson, 5 p.m. Los Alamos at the Albuquerque Academy Invitational: TBA Football — Deming at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. St. Michael’s at Lovington, 7 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at Española Valley, 7 p.m. Albuquerque St. Pius X at Los Alamos, 7 p.m. Taos at Laguna Acoma, 7 p.m. Jal at Escalante, 7 p.m. Questa at Magdalena, 7 p.m. Santa Rosa at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m. Portales at West Las Vegas, 7 p.m. Girls soccer — Moriarty at Capital, 6 p.m. Albuquerque Sandia Preparatory at Monte del Sol (MRC), 4:30 p.m. Los Alamos at the Albuquerque Academy Invitational: TBA Volleyball — Albuquerque Sandia Preparatory at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. St. Michael’s at Capital, 7 p.m. Desert Academy at Evangel Christian Invitational: first round, Desert Academy at Hondo, noon. Santa Fe Waldorf at Cimarron, 6 p.m. Pecos at Fort Sumner Invitational: TBA

Saturday Boys soccer — Portales at St. Michael’s, 1 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at Santa Fe High, 1 p.m. Los Alamos at the Albuquerque Academy Invitational: TBA Taos at Bloomfield, 1 p.m. Cross country — Santa Fe High, Capital, St. Michael’s, Santa Fe Preparatory, Desert Academy, Pojoaque Valley, Peñasco, Las Vegas Robertson at Academy for Technology and the Classics Invitational, 9 a.m. Santa Fe Indian School, Mora at Taos Invitational, 9 a.m. Los Alamos at Albuquerque West Mesa Invitational, 9 a.m. Pecos, West Las Vegas at Jemez Valley Invitational, 9 a.m. Football — McCurdy at Santa Fe Indian School, 1 p.m. Girls soccer — Pojoaque Valley at Santa Fe High, 11 a.m. Portales at St. Michael’s, 11 a.m. Los Alamos at the Albuquerque Academy Invitational: TBA Taos at Bloomfield, 3 p.m. Volleyball — Desert Academy at Evangel Christian Invitational: TBA Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind at New Mexico School for the Deaf, 10 a.m. Raton at Española Valley, 7 p.m. Mesa Vista at Peñasco, 4:30 p.m. Taos at Mora, 2:30 p.m. Escalante at Questa, 5 p.m. Pecos at Fort Sumner Invitational: TBA

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Football

u Registration for the city of Santa Fe’s flag football league goes through Sept. 20, with the season beginning Sept. 29. It is an eight-game season with a single-elimination playoff. Cost is $450 per team. For more information, call Contact Greg Fernandez at 955-2509 or Philip Montano at 955-2508.

Running

u The Global Footprints Youth Run is Saturday at Fort Marcy Ballpark. Events include a cross-country run for ages 10-13 and a relay run for ages 6-10. The free event begins with the cross-country run at 12:30 p.m. Preregistration is required and can be done at www.santafethunder.com. u The third annual Santa Fe-To-Buffalo Thunder Half Marathon is scheduled for Sunday. Along with the half-marathon will be a 5-kilometer run and a 1-mile fitness walk. For more information, go to www.santafethunder.com.

Swimming

u The Santa Fe Seals begin practice for the 2014 season on Monday at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center pool. Practices are from 4 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, call Theresa Hamilton at 660-9818.

Submit your announcement

u To get your announcement into The New Mexican, fax information to 986-3067, or email it to sports@sfnewmexican.com. Please include a contact number. Phone calls will not be accepted.

NEW MEXICAN SPORTS

Office hours 2:30 to 10 p.m.

James Barron, 986-3045 Will Webber, 986-3060 Edmundo Carrillo, 986-3032 FAX, 986-3067 Email, sports@sfnewmexican.com


B-4

BASEBALL

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rays defeat Red Sox The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Wil Myers hit a tiebreaking double in the eighth inning and Tampa Bay Rays 4 beat Boston 4-3 on Red Sox 3 Thursday night to avoid a three-game sweep. Myers drove in Evan Longoria, who also doubled off Rubby De La Rosa (0-1), to give the Rays a 4-3 lead. Jake McGee (5-3) pitched a scoreless eighth before Fernando Rodney got three outs to earn his 34th save. The Rays lead the crowded race for the second AL wild card despite going 5-13 since Aug. 25. David Ortiz and Jarrod Saltalamacchia homered for Boston, which has an 8½-game lead over second-place Tampa Bay in the AL East. The Red Sox threatened in the ninth when Stephen Drew had an infield single and pinchhitter Mike Carp walked with one out. Rodney worked out of the jam when pinch-hitter Will Middlebrooks lined out to third and Dustin Pedroia popped out. Ortiz has 43 career homers against Tampa Bay, the secondmost by an opponent. Of those, 28 have come at Tropicana Field. YANKEES 6, ORIOLES 5 In Baltimore, New York’s Brendan Ryan scored the tiebreaking run in the ninth inning on a wild pitch by Jim Johnson after the Yankees blew a fourrun lead. Mark Reynolds and Curtis Granderson homered for the Yankees, who remained one game behind Tampa Bay for the second AL wild card. New York travels next to first-place Boston for a weekend series. New York led 5-1 before Nick Markakis hit a solo shot in the seventh and Danny Valencia homered with two on against David Robertson in the eighth. But the Yankees bounced right back in the ninth with an unearned run against Johnson (3-8). ATHLETICS 8, TWINS 2 In Minneapolis, A.J. Griffin allowed two hits in seven innings for Oakland. Josh Reddick homered and had three RBIs for Oakland, which has a 3½-game lead over idle Texas in the AL West. It is Oakland’s largest lead over the Rangers since Aug. 3. The teams are to scheduled play a three-game series this weekend in the Lone Star State. Oswaldo Arcia homered for Minnesota, which has lost six of eight. In winning his fourth straight start, Griffin (14-9) struck out eight and walked just one batter. ANGELS 4, BLUE JAYS 3 In Toronto, Garrett Richards pitched 6⅔ innings for his third straight win and Kole Calhoun hit a solo home run as Los Angeles completed a threegame sweep. Erick Aybar had two hits and scored twice as the Angels won for the 15th time in 20 games and improved to 12-2 in their past 14 road contests. Calhoun went 2 for 3 with a walk to help the Angels win for the 10th time in 13 meetings with the Blue Jays. Los Angeles recorded its first sweep in Toronto since April 16-18, 2010. Jose Reyes homered and finished 4 for 4 with a walk, but the Blue Jays lost for the 29th time when scoring first. INDIANS 14, WHITE SOX 3 In Chicago, Ryan Raburn went 3 for 3 with a homer and five RBIs for Cleveland, which remained 1½ games out of the second AL wild-card spot. The Indians blew the game open with a seven-run, raindelayed fifth inning, when their first nine batters reached base. Charlie Leesman, who relieved Chicago starter John Danks (4-13), faced seven Cleveland hitters, all of whom scored. Nick Swisher had a solo homer and three RBIs, and Asdrubal Cabrera added a solo shot to support Corey Kluber (9-5), who gave up two runs and six hits in five innings. Danks lasted four innings and allowed seven runs, nine hits and three walks in his third straight loss. In his last three outings, the left-hander has given up 17 runs in 14⅓ innings.

East W L Boston 89 59 Tampa Bay 79 66 New York 79 68 Baltimore 77 69 Toronto 67 79 Central W L Detroit 84 62 Cleveland 78 68 Kansas City 77 69 Minnesota 63 82 Chicago 58 88 West W L Oakland 85 61 Texas 81 64 Los Angeles 70 76 Seattle 65 81 Houston 50 96 Thursday’s Games Oakland 8, Minnesota 2 N.Y. Yankees 6, Baltimore 5 L.A. Angels 4, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3 Cleveland 14, Chicago Sox 3

American League

Pct .601 .545 .537 .527 .459 Pct .575 .534 .527 .434 .397 Pct .582 .559 .479 .445 .342

GB — 81/2 91/2 11 21 GB — 6 7 201/2 26 GB — 31/2 15 20 35

WCGB L10 Str Home — 7-3 L-1 47-25 — 4-6 W-1 45-28 1 6-4 W-3 44-31 21/2 4-6 L-3 42-33 121/2 5-5 L-3 35-37 WCGB L10 Str Home — 4-6 W-2 44-27 11/2 6-4 W-1 45-30 21/2 7-3 W-2 40-35 16 4-6 L-2 30-41 211/2 2-8 L-3 33-37 WCGB L10 Str Home — 7-3 W-2 47-27 — 2-8 L-3 39-32 91/2 6-4 W-3 35-40 141/2 3-7 L-4 33-42 291/2 5-5 W-3 23-49 Wednesday’s Games Kansas City 6, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 4 L.A. Angels 5, Toronto 4 Boston 7, Tampa Bay 3, 10 innings Detroit 1, Chicago Sox 0 Oakland 18, Minnesota 3 Houston 6, Seattle 1

Away 42-34 34-38 35-37 35-36 32-42 Away 40-35 33-38 37-34 33-41 25-51 Away 38-34 42-32 35-36 32-39 27-47

Friday’s Games Cleveland (Salazar 1-2) at Chicago Sox (H.Santiago 4-8), 12:10 p.m. Baltimore (Hammel 7-8) at Toronto (Redmond 3-2), 5:07 p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 7-2) at Detroit (Verlander 12-11), 5:08 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 11-10) at Boston (Lackey 9-12), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Straily 9-7) at Texas (D.Holland 9-8), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Vargas 8-6) at Houston (Oberholtzer 4-2), 6:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Archer 8-7) at Minnesota (Correia 9-11), 6:10 p.m. East W L Atlanta 88 58 Washington 77 69 Philadelphia 68 78 New York 64 81 Miami 54 91 Central W L Pittsburgh 85 61 St. Louis 85 61 Cincinnati 83 64 Milwaukee 63 82 Chicago 62 84 West W L Los Angeles 85 60 Arizona 73 72 Colorado 67 80 San Diego 66 79 San Francisco 66 80 Thursday’s Games Atlanta 6, Miami 1 Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 2 Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 1 Philadelphia 10, San Diego 5 Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 3 San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers

National League

Pct .603 .527 .466 .441 .372 Pct .582 .582 .565 .434 .425 Pct .586 .503 .456 .455 .452

GB — 11 20 231/2 331/2 GB — — 21/2 211/2 23 GB — 12 19 19 191/2

WCGB L10 Str Home — 5-5 W-1 51-20 51/2 8-2 W-6 40-31 141/2 6-4 W-2 41-34 18 2-8 L-4 28-42 28 4-6 L-1 31-44 WCGB L10 Str Home — 6-4 W-4 46-25 — 6-4 L-1 46-26 — 7-3 W-1 48-26 19 4-6 W-1 31-40 201/2 4-6 L-2 29-46 WCGB L10 Str Home — 5-5 L-1 45-29 9 4-6 W-1 40-31 16 3-7 L-1 41-31 16 6-4 L-2 41-33 161/2 5-5 W-1 38-38 Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 0 Pittsburgh 7, Texas 5 San Francisco 4, Colorado 3 Philadelphia 4, San Diego 2 Miami 5, Atlanta 2 Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 0 St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 1 Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 1

Away 37-38 37-38 27-44 36-39 23-47 Away 39-36 39-35 35-38 32-42 33-38 Away 40-31 33-41 26-49 25-46 28-42

Friday’s Games Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 2-2) at Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4), 5:05 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 10-12) at Washington (Strasburg 7-9), 5:05 p.m. Miami (B.Hand 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-7), 5:10 p.m. San Diego (Kennedy 6-9) at Atlanta (Hale 0-0), 5:30 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 14-5) at Milwaukee (Lohse 9-9), 6:10 p.m. Seattle (Iwakuma 12-6) at St. Louis (Wainwright 16-9), 6:15 p.m. Colorado (Chatwood 7-4) at Arizona (McCarthy 4-9), 7:40 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 11-9) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 14-8), 8:10 p.m. TODAY’S PITCHING COMPARISON

American League

Team REC 3-4 7-14 Team REC 10-11 5-5 Team REC 7-4 13-17 Team REC 16-13 12-14 Team REC 14-10 18-11 Team REC 10-10 7-12 Team REC 11-8 12-16

2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA No Record 0-0 2.1 19.29 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 0-1 12.0 7.50 0-0 4.0 6.75 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 1-1 12.1 5.84 0-3 34.2 3.12 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 1-3 25.1 4.26 2-1 18.2 5.79 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 2-1 21.0 5.14 1-1 18.1 3.44 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 0-0 11.0 6.55 1-0 12.1 5.11 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 1-0 6.0 0.00 0-0 5.1 5.06

Team REC 5-6 10-6 Team REC 15-14 12-16 Team REC 0-0 9-11 Team REC 11-17 — Team REC 19-10 15-14 Team REC 9-8 7-11 Team REC 14-15 17-13

2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA No Record 0-1 6.0 6.00 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 1-2 24.0 4.13 2-0 23.0 0.39 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 0-0 1.2 0.00 0-0 12.2 2.13 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 1-0 9.1 5.79 No Record 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 1-1 13.0 5.54 1-1 19.2 2.29 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA No Record 0-1 12.0 7.50 2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA 2-1 22.0 1.64 3-0 32.0 1.13

2013 Team Pitchers Line W-L ERA REC Seattle Iwakuma (R) 12-6 2.97 17-13 St. Louis Wainwrght (R) -175 16-9 3.03 19-11 KEY: TEAM REC-Team’s record in games started by today’s pitcher. AHWG-Average hits and walks allowed per 9 innings. VS OPP-Pitcher’s record versus this opponent, 2013 statistics. Copyright 2013 World Features Syndicate, Inc.

2013 vs. Opp. W-L IP ERA No Record No Record

Cleveland Chicago

Pitchers Salazar (R) Santiago (L)

Line -130

Baltimore Toronto

Pitchers Hammel (R) Redmond (R)

Line -115

Kansas City Detroit

Pitchers Chen (L) Verlander (R)

Line -175

New York Boston

Pitchers Kuroda (R) Lackey (R)

-135

Oakland Texas

Pitchers Straily (R) Holland (L)

Line

Line -135

Los Angeles Houston

Pitchers Vargas, J (L) Keuchel (L)

Line -135

Tampa Bay Minnesota

Pitchers Archer (R) Correia (R)

Line -165

Chicago Pittsburgh Philadelphia Washington

Pitchers Arrieta (R) Morton (R) Pitchers Kendrick (R) Strasburg (R)

2013 W-L 1-2 4-8 2013 W-L 7-8 3-2 2013 W-L 7-2 12-11 2013 W-L 11-10 9-12 2013 W-L 9-7 9-8 2013 W-L 8-6 5-9 2013 W-L 8-7 9-11

ERA 2.92 3.44 ERA 5.11 4.40 ERA 2.79 3.64 ERA 2.99 3.48 ERA 4.15 3.17 ERA 3.76 4.99 ERA 3.19 4.30

National League Line -180 Line -230

Miami New York

Pitchers Hand (L) Niese (L)

Line

San Diego Atlanta

Pitchers Kennedy (R) Hale (R)

Cincinnati Milwaukee

Pitchers Latos (R) Lohse (R)

Line -150

Colorado Arizona

Pitchers Chatwood (R) McCarthy (R)

Line -145

San Fran. Los Angeles

Pitchers Bumgarner (L) Kershaw (L)

-190

-145 Line -145

Line

2013 W-L 3-4 7-4 2013 W-L 10-12 7-9 2013 W-L 0-0 6-7 2013 W-L 6-9 — 2013 W-L 14-5 9-9 2013 W-L 7-4 4-9 2013 W-L 11-9 14-8

Interleague

ERA 5.49 3.44 ERA 4.51 2.96 ERA 0.00 3.86 ERA 4.86 — ERA 3.02 3.59 ERA 3.17 4.66 ERA 2.82 1.92

BOxSCORES Rays 4, Red Sox 3

Boston

Tampa Bay bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 0 DeJess lf 1 1 0 0 Nava rf 0 DYong ph 0 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 1 Fuld pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 0 Zobrist 2b 4 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 1 Loney 1b 4 0 1 1 JGoms lf 0 Longori 3b 4 2 2 0 Drew ss 1 Joyce dh 3 0 0 0 Bogarts 3b 0 WMyrs rf 3 0 2 2 Carp ph 0 DJnngs cf 4 1 1 1 Berry pr 0 Loaton c 4 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 0 YEscor ss 2 0 0 0 Mdlrks ph 0 Totals 3 Totals 29 4 6 4 Boston 000 102 000—3 Tampa Bay 011 100 01x—4 E—Drew (7). DP—Boston 1. LOB—Boston 7, Tampa Bay 7. 2B—Drew (25), Loney (27), Longoria (35), W.Myers (14). 3B—Longoria (3). HR—D.Ortiz (27), Saltalamacchia (12), De.Jennings (13). SB—Saltalamacchia (2). CS—Joyce (3). IP H R ER BB SO Boston Peavy 6 4 3 3 5 4 D.Britton 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 R.DLa Rosa L,0-1 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 Thornton 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay Hellickson 5 1-3 4 3 3 3 7 J.Wright BS,1-1 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 4 McGee W,5-3 1 0 0 0 0 2 Rodney S,34-42 1 1 0 0 1 0 WP—Hellickson. T—3:17. A—20,360 (34,078). ab r 5 0 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 2 4 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 33 3

h 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

Angels 4, Blue Jays 3

Los Angeles ab r Cowgill cf 5 0 Aybar ss 5 2 Trout dh 4 0 Trumo 1b 4 0 JHmltn lf 4 0 Iannett c 3 1 Calhon rf 3 1 GGreen 2b 3 0 AnRmn 3b 4 0

Toronto ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 2 4 1 Kawsk 2b 3 1 2 0 Lawrie 3b 5 0 0 0 Lind 1b 4 0 1 1 Sierra rf 4 0 3 1 RDavis dh 4 0 0 0 Gose cf 4 0 0 0 Thole c 4 0 1 0 Pillar lf 3 0 0 0 Goins ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 4 8 3 Totals 36 3 11 3 Los Angeles 011 110 000—4 Toronto 102 000 000—3 E—Gose (4). DP—Los Angeles 2. LOB—Los Angeles 8, Toronto 9. 2B—Aybar (29), Trout (38), Reyes 2 (15), Kawasaki (5), Lind (25), Sierra 2 (11). HR—Calhoun (7), Reyes (10). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Richards W,7-6 6 2-3 9 3 3 1 4 Kohn H,7 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 D.De La Rosa H,17 1 1 0 0 0 1 Frieri S,33-37 1 1 0 0 1 2 Toronto Happ L,4-6 4 1-3 6 4 4 2 6 Wagner 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 Jeffress 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 Cecil 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 L.Perez 1 0 0 0 1 1 S.Santos 1 0 0 0 0 0 WP—Happ. T—3:10. A—20,767 (49,282). h 0 2 1 1 0 1 2 1 0

bi 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0

Yankees 6, Orioles 5

New York

Baltimore

ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr cf 1 0 0 0 McLoth lf 3 0 0 0 Grndrs cf 3 1 1 1 Morse ph-lf 1 0 0 0 ARdrgz dh 2 1 0 0 ChDckr lf 1 0 0 0 ZAlmnt pr 0 0 0 0 Machd 3b 5 0 1 1 ASorin lf 5 1 2 0 C.Davis 1b 4 0 2 0 Cano 2b 3 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 1 1 0 V.Wells rf 3 0 1 2 Markks rf 4 2 2 1 Ovrby ph-1b1 0 0 0 Betemt dh 1 0 0 0 Nunez 3b 4 1 1 0 Valncia dh 3 1 1 3 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 2 0 Rynld 1b-3b 4 1 1 2 Wieters c 3 1 1 0 Ryan ss 4 1 1 0 BRorts 2b 4 0 0 0 CStwrt c 4 0 0 0 Totals 34 6 8 5 Totals 37 5 10 5 New York 022 000 101—6 Baltimore 001 000 130—5 E—Nunez (13), Ji.Johnson (2). DP—New York 1, Baltimore 1. LOB—New York 6, Baltimore 6. 2B—A.Soriano (5), Hardy (24). HR—Granderson (6), Mar.Reynolds (19), Markakis (10), Valencia (8). S—Granderson. IP H R ER BB SO New York P.Hughes 3 3 1 1 0 3 Huff 3 2 1 1 0 1 Warren H,1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 Cabral H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 D.Robertson W,6-1 1 4 3 3 0 2 M.Rivera S,44-51 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore W.Chen 6 1-3 7 5 5 2 9 Stinson 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 Ji.Johnson L,3-8 1 1 1 0 1 0 P.Hughes pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. Huff pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WP—P.Hughes 2, Ji.Johnson. T—3:04. A—24,659 (45,971).

Indians 14, White Sox 3

Cleveland

Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 2 2 1 De Aza cf 4 0 1 1 JRmrz ss-2b2 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 5 0 0 0 Swisher 1b 6 3 2 3 AlRmrz ss 2 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 2 2 2 2 LGrc ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 2 0 0 0 JrDnks ph 1 0 0 0 CSantn dh 4 1 1 1 A.Dunn dh 2 0 1 0 Raburn lf 3 2 3 5 Kppngr ph 0 1 0 0 MCrsn pr-rf 1 0 0 0 Konerk 1b 2 1 1 1 AsCarr ss 4 1 1 1 Gillaspi 1b 2 0 1 0 Kubel lf 1 0 0 0 AGarci rf 4 0 2 0 YGoms c 3 1 2 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 1 Shppch c 2 0 0 0 Phegly c 2 0 0 0 Aviles 3b-ss 3 1 0 1 MgGnzl c 2 0 1 0 Stubbs rf-cf 4 1 3 0 Semien 3b 3 1 2 0 Totals 41 14 1614 Totals 34 3 9 3 Cleveland 411 170 000—14 Chicago 011 000 010—3 E—Shoppach (2), Gillaspie (17), Viciedo (5), Semien (1). DP—Cleveland 1, Chicago 2. LOB—Cleveland 11, Chicago 9. 2B—Kipnis (33), Raburn (17), Y.Gomes 2 (17), Stubbs (21), Semien (1). 3B—Bourn (3). HR— Swisher (18), Raburn (16), As.Cabrera (12), Konerko (11). SB—Kipnis (28). SF—Kipnis, Aviles, Viciedo.

IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Kluber W,9-5 5 6 2 2 1 2 Tomlin 2 2 0 0 0 0 Pestano 1 1 1 0 1 2 Guilmet 1 0 0 0 1 0 Chicago Joh.Danks L,4-13 4 9 7 6 3 1 Leesman 0 3 7 7 4 0 Axelrod 5 4 0 0 2 3 Leesman pitched to 7 batters in the 5th. PB—Shoppach. T—3:36. A—14,375 (40,615).

Phillies 10, Padres 5

San Diego

Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Venale rf 4 2 1 1 CHrndz cf 4 2 3 2 Amrs cf-ss-lf4 1 0 0 Rollins ss 3 2 2 1 Gyorko 2b 3 1 1 0 Utley 2b 3 1 1 2 Headly 3b 2 1 0 1 Ruiz c 3 1 3 3 Medica 1b 4 0 2 1 Ruf rf 4 1 1 1 Kotsay lf 3 0 0 1 Asche 3b 4 1 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Frndsn 1b 5 1 2 0 RCeden ss 1 0 0 0 Galvis lf 5 1 2 0 Layne p 0 0 0 0 Hallady p 1 0 0 1 Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Stauffr p 0 0 0 0 Orr ph 1 0 0 0 Hynes p 0 0 0 0 CJimnz p 0 0 0 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0 Kratz ph 1 0 0 0 Frsyth ph-ss1 0 0 0 EMartn p 0 0 0 0 Hundly c 3 0 0 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0 CRonsn ph 1 0 0 0 Berndn ph 1 0 0 0 T.Ross p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Bass p 1 0 0 0 Fuents cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 31 5 4 4 Totals 35 101410 San Diego 100 040 000—5 Philadelphia 601 020 10x—10 E—Halladay (1), Rollins (10). LOB—San Diego 6, Philadelphia 11. 2B—Medica (1), C.Hernandez (4), Ruiz (14). HR—Venable (22). SB—Venable (18), Headley (7), Rollins (20). SF—Kotsay, Utley, Ruf. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego T.Ross L,3-8 2-3 5 6 6 2 2 Bass 2 2-3 4 1 1 3 4 Layne 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Stauffer 1 3 2 2 1 2 Hynes 1 1-3 2 1 1 2 1 Brach 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Philadelphia Halladay 4 1-3 4 5 4 5 6 De Fratus W,3-3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 C.Jimenez 1 0 0 0 0 2 E.Martin 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rosenberg 1 0 0 0 0 0 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP—by Halladay (Headley). PB—Hundley 2. T—3:10. A—29,986 (43,651). Chicago

Pirates 3, Cubs 1

ab r 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

bi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pittsburgh

ab r h bi StCastr ss JHrrsn 2b 2 0 0 0 Barney 2b Barmes ss 1 1 1 0 Rizzo 1b Mrcr ss-2b 4 0 2 1 DMrph 3b McCtch cf 3 1 1 0 Lake lf Mrneu 1b 3 1 0 0 Castillo c Byrd rf 4 0 1 1 DMcDn rf PAlvrz 3b 3 0 1 1 Sweeny cf RMartn c 3 0 0 0 Rusin p Tabata lf 2 0 0 0 DNavrr ph Pie lf 0 0 0 0 Russell p GSnchz ph 0 0 0 0 BParkr p SMrte pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Rosscp p Locke p 2 0 0 0 Grimm p Watson p 0 0 0 0 Buck ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 4 1 Totals 28 3 6 3 Chicago 001 000 000—1 Pittsburgh 000 200 01x—3 DP—Chicago 1. LOB—Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 5. 2B—D.McDonald (2), Mercer (20), McCutchen (36). CS—S.Marte (14). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Rusin L,2-4 7 4 2 2 0 2 Russell 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 B.Parker 0 2 1 1 1 0 Rosscup 0 0 0 0 1 0 Grimm 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Pittsburgh Locke W,10-5 7 3 1 1 1 5 Watson H,20 1 0 0 0 0 0 Melancon S,14-16 1 1 0 0 0 1 B.Parker pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Rosscup pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by Rusin (J.Harrison). WP—Melancon. T—2:32. A—23,541 (38,362).

Brewers 5, Cardinals 3

Milwaukee ab r Aoki rf 4 0 Gennett 2b 5 1 Lucroy c 4 0 ArRmr 3b 4 0 CGomz cf 4 1 LSchfr lf 4 1 Halton 1b 4 1 Hndrsn p 0 0 Bianchi ss 4 0 Thrnrg p 1 0 JFrncs ph 1 0 Wooten p 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 YBtncr ph-1b1 1

h 1 2 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

bi 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

St. Louis

ab r h bi MCrpnt 2b 4 0 1 0 Jay cf 2 1 1 0 Hollidy lf 3 1 1 1 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 0 0 1 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 1 T.Cruz c 4 0 1 0 Kozma ss 2 0 0 0 Dscls ph-ss 1 0 0 0 J.Kelly p 1 0 0 0 Wong ph 1 0 0 0 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Chamrs ph 1 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 11 5 Totals 30 3 6 3 Milwaukee 110 200 001—5 St. Louis 000 200 001—3 E—J.Kelly 2 (2). DP—Milwaukee 1, St. Louis 1. LOB—Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 4. 2B— Holliday (28). 3B—Aoki (2). HR—Halton (2), Ma.Adams (13). CS—Aoki (12), Jay (3). S—Thornburg. SF—Freese. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Thornburg W,2-1 6 3 2 2 2 6 Wooten H,4 1 1 0 0 0 1 Kintzler H,24 1 1 0 0 0 0 Henderson S,25-29 1 1 1 1 0 1 St. Louis J.Kelly L,8-4 5 7 4 3 1 4 Ca.Martinez 2 2 0 0 0 2 Maness 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 Siegrist 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Thornburg (Jay). WP—J.Kelly. Umpires—Home, Chris Guccione; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T—3:02. A—35,208 (43,975).

Oakland

Athletics 8, Twins 2 Minnesota

ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 5 2 0 1 Presley cf 4 0 1 1 Dnldsn 3b 3 1 1 1 Pinto c 4 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 5 1 2 1 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 Cespds dh 5 0 2 2 Arcia rf 4 1 2 1 Callasp 2b 4 0 0 0 Doumit dh 4 0 0 0 CYoung lf 4 2 2 0 Wlngh lf 4 0 1 0 Reddck rf 2 1 1 3 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 0 DNorrs c 4 1 2 0 Colaell 1b 3 0 0 0 Barton 1b 4 0 1 0 Flormn ss 3 0 1 0 Totals 36 8 11 8 Totals 33 2 7 2 Oakland 004 011 020—8 Minnesota 000 000 110—2 E—Plouffe (13). DP—Oakland 1, Minnesota 2. LOB—Oakland 5, Minnesota 5. 2B—C. Young (16), D.Norris (13). 3B—Cespedes (4), C.Young (3). HR—Reddick (11), Arcia (12). SB—Crisp (19). SF—Reddick. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Griffin W,14-9 7 2 1 1 1 8 Otero 1 3 1 1 0 1 Balfour 1 2 0 0 0 0 Minnesota Diamond L,5-11 4 2-3 6 5 4 2 1 Swarzak 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 Martis 1 0 0 0 1 1 Duensing 1 2 2 2 0 1 Burton 1 1 0 0 0 0 WP—Balfour. T—2:46. A—26,188 (39,021). Atlanta

Braves 6, Marlins 1

Miami bi ab r h bi ElJhns lf 0 Coghln lf 4 0 0 0 J.Upton rf 0 DSolan 2b 4 0 1 1 2 Yelich cf 3 0 2 0 FFrmn 1b Gattis c 2 Stanton rf 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 2 Morrsn 1b 4 0 0 0 Janish 3b 0 Lcas 3b-ss 4 0 1 0 Smmns ss 0 Hchvrr ss 2 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 0 SDyson p 0 0 0 0 BUpton cf 0 Pierre ph 1 0 1 0 FGarci p 0 Caminr p 0 0 0 0 Walden p 0 Mrsnck ph 1 0 0 0 Trdslvc ph 0 Brantly c 3 1 1 0 DCrpnt p 0 Flynn p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 Polanc 3b 2 0 0 0 Totals 6 Totals 32 1 7 1 Atlanta 004 200 000—6 Miami 001 000 000—1 DP—Atlanta 1, Miami 1. LOB—Atlanta 8, Miami 6. 2B—Gattis (18), C.Johnson 2 (32). HR—F.Freeman (20). CS—El.Johnson (1). S—F.Garcia, Flynn. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta F.Garcia W,1-1 6 5 1 1 1 3 Walden 1 1 0 0 0 0 D.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 0 2 Varvaro 1 0 0 0 0 2 Miami Flynn L,0-1 4 6 6 6 6 4 S.Dyson 3 2 0 0 0 2 Caminero 2 1 0 0 0 3 HBP—by S.Dyson (Simmons). Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Rob Drake; Second, Joe West; Third, Sam Holbrook. T—2:36. A—15,274 (37,442). ab r 4 1 2 2 4 2 5 1 5 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 4 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 33 6

h 1 0 3 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Nationals 7, Mets 2

Washington ab r Span cf 4 1 Zmrmn 3b 4 2 Werth rf 3 0 Harper lf 4 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 AdLRc 1b 4 2 WRams c 4 1 Rendon 2b 3 1 Roark p 2 0 Lmrdzz ph 1 0 Stmmn p 0 0 XCeden p 0 0 Tracy ph 1 0 Matths p 0 0

h 1 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

bi 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

New York

ab r h bi EYong lf 3 1 2 0 Lagars cf 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 1 Duda 1b 4 1 1 0 Satin 3b 4 0 0 0 Baxter rf 4 0 1 0 Recker c 3 0 2 1 RTejad ss 3 0 0 0 ABrwn ph 1 0 0 0 Harang p 2 0 1 0 Felicin p 0 0 0 0 Atchisn p 0 0 0 0 dnDkkr ph 1 0 0 0 Frncsc p 0 0 0 0 Ardsm p 0 0 0 0 Z.Lutz ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 7 8 7 Totals 33 2 8 2 Washington 110 010 121—7 New York 100 100 000—2 LOB—Washington 3, New York 7. 2B—Span (28), Zimmerman (25), Ad.LaRoche (19), Dan.Murphy (35). HR—Zimmerman (23), Ad.LaRoche (20), W.Ramos (13), Rendon (7). SB—E.Young (37). S—Lagares. SF— Rendon. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Roark W,6-0 6 6 2 2 1 3 Stammen H,5 1 1 0 0 1 2 X.Cedeno 1 0 0 0 0 2 Mattheus 1 1 0 0 0 3 New York Harang L,0-1 6 4 3 3 1 10 Feliciano 0 1 1 1 0 0 Atchison 1 0 0 0 0 1 F.Francisco 1 2 2 2 0 0 Aardsma 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 Henn 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by F.Francisco (Werth). Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Bob Davidson; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third, James Hoye. T—2:56. A—20,484 (41,922).

LATE BOxSCORES Red Sox 7, Rays 3, 10 inn.

Boston

Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 2 2 0 DeJess lf 2 0 1 1 Victorn rf 4 1 1 0 SRdrgz ph 0 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 3 2 0 0 KJhnsn lf 2 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 1 1 2 WMyrs rf 5 0 1 0 Nava lf 3 0 2 1 Zobrist 2b 4 1 0 0 JGoms ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Longori 3b 3 0 2 1 Carp ph 1 1 1 4 Joyce dh 2 0 0 0 Berry lf 0 0 0 0 DJnngs cf 4 0 0 0 Drew ss 5 0 1 0 Loney 1b 5 1 1 1 Mdlrks 3b 5 0 0 0 Loaton c 4 0 0 0 D.Ross c 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 4 1 1 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 0 1 0 Totals 36 7 9 7 Totals 35 3 6 3 Boston 003 000 000 4—7 Tampa Bay 001 000 110 0—3 DP—Boston 1, Tampa Bay 3. LOB—Boston 6, Tampa Bay 10. 2B—Victorino (25), Napoli (36), Bradley Jr. (4), DeJesus (4), Longoria 2 (34), Y.Escobar (25). HR—Carp (9), Loney (12). S—Victorino.

IP H R ER BB SO Boston Dempster 5 4 1 1 5 7 F.Morales H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Workman BS,1-1 2 2 2 2 1 4 Uehara W,4-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 1 1 Tampa Bay Cobb 5 2-3 7 3 3 3 4 W.Wright 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Wright 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 McGee 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Al.Torres 1 0 0 0 0 0 Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 2 Jo.Peralta L,2-7 1-3 0 2 2 2 0 Ro.Hernandez 2-3 1 2 2 1 1 HBP—by Dempster (Longoria). Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Angel Hernandez. T—4:05. A—19,215 (34,078).

Detroit

Tigers 1, White Sox 0

Chicago h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 1 0 LeGarc 2b 4 0 3 0 TrHntr rf 2 0 JrDnks rf 2 0 1 0 MiCarr 3b 1 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 0 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 VMrtnz dh 1 0 AGarci cf 4 0 0 0 NCstlns lf 1 0 Viciedo lf 4 0 0 0 D.Kelly lf 0 0 Phegly c 2 0 1 0 Infante 2b 2 1 Gillaspi ph 1 0 0 0 Avila c 1 0 Semien 3b 3 0 0 0 Iglesias ss 0 0 Totals 10 1 Totals 31 0 5 0 Detroit 000 000 010—1 Chicago 000 000 000—0 E—Al.Ramirez (22). DP—Detroit 1, Chicago 2. LOB—Detroit 11, Chicago 8. 2B—Infante (22), Avila (13). SB—Le.Garcia 2 (5), Phegley (1). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit AniSnchz W,14-7 7 1-3 5 0 0 4 10 Veras H,5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Smyly H,15 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Benoit S,18-18 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Quintana 7 5 0 0 2 6 Lindstrom L,2-4 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 Veal 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Petricka 1 2 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Quintana (A.Jackson). WP—Veal. T—3:16. A—15,799 (40,615).

Houston

ab r 4 0 5 0 4 0 0 0 3 1 4 0 4 0 0 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 36 1

Astros 6, Mariners 1

Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Villar ss 5 1 2 1 B.Miller ss 4 0 2 0 Altuve 2b 5 0 0 0 FGutrrez rf 4 0 0 0 Crowe cf-lf 4 0 0 0 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 Wallace 1b 3 1 1 1 KMrles dh 3 1 2 1 BBrns ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Franklin pr 0 0 0 0 MDmngz 3b 3 2 2 0 Ibanez lf 3 0 0 0 Carter lf-1b 4 0 1 2 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 Krauss dh 4 1 2 1 MSndrs cf 3 0 0 0 Elmore pr 0 1 0 0 Zunino c 4 0 1 0 Corporan c 4 0 1 1 Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 Paredes rf 4 0 2 0 Totals 37 6 11 6 Totals 33 1 5 1 Houston 023 000 001—6 Seattle 000 100 000—1 E—Villar (10). LOB—Houston 5, Seattle 8. 2B—M.Dominguez 2 (24), Krauss (5). HR—K.Morales (21). SB—Villar (17), B.Miller (5). CS—Paredes (4). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Peacock W,5-5 6 3 1 1 1 4 K.Chapman 1 2-3 1 0 0 2 0 Zeid S,1-2 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 Seattle Maurer L,4-8 3 7 5 5 0 3 LaFromboise 2 0 0 0 0 1 Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 1 3 O.Perez 2 1 0 0 0 3 Noesi 1 3 1 1 0 0 WP—K.Chapman. Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T—3:00. A—11,656 (47,476).

Royals 6, Indians 2

Kansas City Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi AGordn lf 4 2 1 1 Bourn cf 4 1 1 0 Bonifac 2b 5 2 3 0 Aviles ss 3 1 0 0 Hosmer 1b 5 1 2 1 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 3 0 1 0 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 Brantly lf 4 0 1 2 Maxwll rf 3 0 1 0 YGoms c 4 0 0 0 JDyson cf 1 0 0 0 Kubel dh 3 0 0 0 L.Cain cf-rf 3 1 2 1 AsCarr ph 1 0 0 0 Carroll 3b 3 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 1 0 1 1 Stubbs rf 3 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 37 6 11 4 Totals 32 2 4 2 Kansas City 300 010 110—6 Cleveland 200 000 000—2 E—Shields 2 (3), R.Hill (1), Kazmir (3). DP— Cleveland 1. LOB—Kansas City 6, Cleveland 5. 3B—Bonifacio (3). HR—A.Gordon (19). SB—Maxwell (6), L.Cain 2 (14), Kipnis (27), C.Santana (3). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,11-9 8 4 2 2 1 7 G.Holland S,42-45 1 0 0 0 0 3 Cleveland Kazmir L,8-8 4 9 4 3 0 4 Shaw 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 R.Hill 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 M.Albers 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 Rapada 1 0 0 0 0 0 Kazmir pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Shields pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. HBP—by Shields (Aviles). Umpires—Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Dana DeMuth. T—2:58. A—12,085 (42,241).

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Freddy Garcia pitches Braves past Marlins The Associated Press

MIAMI — The game had all the earmarks of low-stakes September baseball, with a small crowd and two spot starters in a matchup of first- and last-place teams. Braves 6 Bring on Freddy Garcia. Marlins 1 Garcia earned his second NL victory since 2007, and first since joining the Atlanta Braves last month, by pitching six innings to help beat the Miami Marlins 6-1 on Thursday. Freddie Freeman had three hits on his 24th birthday, including his 20th home run. Chris Johnson had three hits to raise his average to .330. Closing in on their first NL East title since 2005, the Braves reduced their magic number to six. Garcia (1-1) allowed five hits and one run. He was making a spot start in place of rookie left-hander Alex Wood, whose turn was skipped to give him a breather. Three relievers completed a sevenhitter. The crowd of 15,274 was the Marlins’

smallest at home since July 1. They are last in the NL in attendance. Brian Flynn (0-1), making his second major-league start, allowed six runs in four innings. PIRATES 3, CUBS 1 In Pittsburgh, Jeff Locke allowed three hits over seven innings to earn his first victory in nearly two months as Pittsburgh beat Chicago to move into a tie for the NL Central lead. Locke (10-5) struck out five and walked one to help the Pirates win their fourth straight and pull even with St. Louis at 85-61. Mark Melancon worked out of a two-on, none-out jam in the ninth for his 14th save. Jordy Mercer went 2 for 4 with an RBI double for Pittsburgh. Marlon Byrd and Pedro Alvarez each added an RBI single. Chris Rusin (2-4) gave up two runs and four hits in seven innings for the Cubs. BREWERS 5, CARDINALS 3 In St. Louis, Tyler Thornburg threw six solid innings, Sean Halton homered and Milwaukee snapped St. Louis’ five-game winning streak. The Brewers beat the Cardinals for only the fourth time in 16 meetings

this season. Thornburg (2-1), making his eighth career start, gave up two runs and three hits. He spent most of the season with Triple-A Nashville, going 0-9 with a 5.79 ERA in 15 starts. Jim Henderson earned his 25th save in 29 opportunities. Halton, who had three RBIs, hit a two-run homer off Joe Kelly (8-4) in the fourth to put Milwaukee up 4-0. NATIONALS 7, METS 2 In New York, Ryan Zimmerman, Adam LaRoche and Wilson Ramos homered off Aaron Harang in his Mets debut, and Washington completed a four-game sweep. Anthony Rendon also connected for Washington, which outhomered the Mets 13-0 in a series that helped the Nationals remain on the fringe of the NL wild-card race. Zimmerman added an RBI double in the eighth after Denard Span extended his career-best hitting streak to 23 games with a leadoff double. The Nationals won 17 of those games. The Mets have lost nine of 11 and fallen to 64-81, ensuring a non-winning record in all five seasons at Citi Field. Tanner Roark (6-0) allowed two runs and six hits in six innings of his second

big league start. Harang (0-1) allowed the three homers and a single in six innings. He struck out 10 and walked one. PHILLIES 10, PADRES 5 In Philadelphia, Carlos Ruiz had three hits and three RBIs, and rookie Cesar Hernandez reached base four times, scored twice and drove in two runs as Philadelphia rode a six-run first inning to a win over San Diego. Roy Halladay was in line for the win but couldn’t get through the fifth after walking four straight batters and committing a throwing error. In his fourth start since coming off the disabled list, Halladay gave up five runs — four earned — and four hits. He struck out six and walked a season-high five in 4⅔ innings. Five relievers held the Padres hitless over the final four innings to lead the Phillies to their fifth victory in six games. Justin De Fratus (3-3) escaped a fifth-inning jam. After a 55-minute rain delay at the start, Will Venable hit a leadoff homer on Halladay’s third pitch. San Diego starter Tyson Ross (3-8) gave up five hits and six earned runs in two-thirds of an inning.


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

CLASS EDUCATES COLLEGE-BOUND WOMEN ON SELF-DEFENSE TACTICS

gen e

Protection 101

n o i t ra

B-5

for and by teens

MOVIES Alena Schaim leads an IMPACT college-bound class in a blocking drill that transitions from a protective stance to an eye jab.

Story and photo by Sophie Wickert Generation Next

W

e hear about violence around the world every day, and Santa Fe is not exempt. In June, a 16-yearold girl was raped at the Cross of the Martyrs. Whether one is attacked by a stranger or by a known person, the potential for violence is real. When physical safety becomes a concern, some Santa Fe teens turn to self-defense courses to learn how to fight off potential attackers. Facing physical conflict was a focus of a course for college-bound girls offered last month at IMPACT Personal Safety in Santa Fe. IMPACT was founded in 1999 by members of what was then the Santa Fe Rape Crisis Center. The nonprofit organization educates men, women and children about how to prevent and protect themselves from verbal, physical and sexual violence. The college-bound course was designed specifically for young women ages 15-21, which IMPACT says is the age group at highest risk for sexual assault. Midway through the class, a line of about 20 girls stood in a row facing an intimidating man — an educator dressed in a puffy protective suit and helmet. The girls took turns practicing yelling and blocking attacks by jabbing the man in the eyes or kneeing him in the groin. During the practice, girls were energized. But self-defense isn’t just about knowing how to throw a punch. The course also emphasized awareness, assessing potentially dangerous situations and using verbal skills to talk down a situation before it escalates to physical violence. “The talking-down segment was especially useful,” said Ellie Oakley, a participant in the class and a student at Bard College in New York. “The scenarios were really realistic.” The talking-down scenarios consisted of

each girl sitting on a couch and talking to a “boy” played by an educator. The girls practiced explaining their personal boundaries and articulating to the boy that he was moving too fast. The simulations got harder as the exercise progressed, culminating in the girls leaving when the boy didn’t listen to or respect her boundaries. “I wish I’d done this years ago,” said Alena Schiappacasse, who attends Middlebury College in Vermont, after the simulation. Schiappacasse and Oakley signed up for the class after a college counselor recommended it. “It’s such a good thing to know. Just knowing you are able to [defend yourself],” said Schiappacasse. “I feel way more empowered. I feel like if I was in a situation, my body would know what to do.” According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), two-thirds of assaults are committed by someone known to the victim, and 38 percent of rapists are friends or acquaintances. “We are part of an entire violence prevention movement,” said Alena Schaim, the executive director of IMPACT and an instructor. Previously, Schiam worked at Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families. From an early age, Schaim looked for ways to avoid violence. “I tried martial arts and it didn’t work,” she said. “[Self-defense classes] didn’t teach rape scenarios. It was too scary with men in the martial arts classes.” Schaim described how they learned to run in zigzag patterns to evade shooters. “Nothing they taught was relevant,” Schaim said of martial arts and other self-defense classes. “After I took IMPACT, I suddenly felt safe.” RAINN estimates that 44 percent of rape and sexual assault victims are under the age of 18, and 80 percent are under the age of 30.

Posed to teens in Europe: “What do you think of Americans?”

With an emphasis on maintaining healthy intimate relationships, IMPACT works to promote confidence. IMPACT’s motto is, “Joy happens when people feel safe,” a phrase that resonated with Kaytea Hendricks, an IMPACT instructor. “As a program, IMPACT [teaches] life skills that help you in all kinds of different areas,” Hendricks said. “[It’s helpful in] public speaking, adrenaline management. … Give yourself more skills so you can live the life you want.” For Hendricks, the verbal skills she learned from IMPACT were helpful in getting involved in volunteering and teaching for the organization. The physical tools she learned proved useful, too. “I was grabbed when I was in the Peace Corps [in Morocco],” she said. “And I felt good about a very scary situation, so I want to spread that to as many people as possible.” IMPACT doesn’t posit that scary situations don’t exist, or that many of us won’t have to confront violence at some point. What it aims to offer is empowerment. “[If you] feel weak or like a target, there’s something out there so you can feel differently,” Schaim said. “There are no guarantees in life, but there is something you can do and something you can learn.” IMPACT offers classes for teens, men, women, kids and people with disabilities. Learn more at www.impactpersonalsafety.org or call 992-8833. If you are a victim of violence, contact Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families in Santa Fe at 474-5536; Solace Crisis Treatment Center’s 24-hour hotline at 800-721-7273; Children, Youth, and Family Services of New Mexico at 800-7973260; or the Rape Crisis Center of Central New Mexico’s 24-hour hotline, 888-811-8282. Sophie Wickert is a senior at St. Michael’s High School. Contact her at sophiepwickert@yahoo. com.

SPEAK OUT in

ion nat ter

al

The magic of bees In the documentary More Than Honey, bees are portrayed as docile, accommodating and highly intelligent. One thing’s for sure: Bees are essential and hardworking. With stunning visuals, the film leads the viewer to become attached to bees while seeing the incredible work that they do. Everyone associates bees with stings, honey and pollination. More than Honey delves deeper, showing how a colony works and explaining how crucial bees are to humanity. According to the movie, a third of our food supply depends on the pollination bees provide. With fantastic cinematography from Germany, China and across the United States, the movie shows the traveling patterns of bees while focusing on their plight. Colony collapse disorder has had a disastrous effect on bee populations. The film states that worldwide, 90 percent of beehives have died. Despite the negative attention they’ve attracted, Africanized-hybrids, or “killer bees,” have been able to get past the problems that average agricultural honeybees face. The documentary addresses broad themes: capitalism, commercial agriculture, pesticide use and world trade. In parts of China where pesticides killed off bee populations, farmworkers employed a bizarre and ineffective solution: handpollinating crops. Incredible closeups of bees’ everyday activities and devastating images of bees dying make for magnificent footage. Without being too pushy or intimidating, director Markus Imhoof effectively communicates the growing catastrophe that bees face. They’re dying out, whether by pesticides, diseases, parasites, stress, overbreeding, farming practices or the mysterious and layered colony collapse. However, Imhoof provides interesting possible solutions. More than Honey persuades the viewer to think differently about bees, fantastic creatures that help to provide us with many foods we love. Next time you put honey in your tea or take a bite of an apple, I encourage you to honor the little insects that helped to create it. Raina Wellman

Pierre-Adriem Fraisse, 13, Grenoble “In the U.S., teens eat whenever they want. Meals in France are more important affairs.”

Eugénie Fraisse, 15, Grenoble “They are more dependent on their parents.” COMPILED BY ELIZA DONAHUE GENERATION NEXT

Pauline Beuriet, 19, Brussels “Teenage girls in America are more superficial; it’s all about looks.”

Romain Beuriet, 16, Brussels “They are more open and talkative. We are told that America is the place where all your dreams come true.”

Léo D’hautcourt, 15, Brussels “The primary stereotype is that they’re fat. They supposedly watch lots of TV and drink lots of Coca-Cola.”

Yann Vincent, 19, Paris “They are like us. The grandiose portrayal of the United States in movies is unrealistic.”

Flavie Bachelet, 20, Paris “I picture American girls roller skating with their dogs. In America, it’s all about size: big serving sizes, cars, etc. Teens don’t appreciate things as much.”

MY VIEW ELIZA HARRISON

The true measure of adulthood

F

or teenagers, getting older presents a range of social and experiential challenges and opportunities. We find ourselves between our desire for (and disdain of) adulthood. As a young person looking ahead to her 17th birthday, the arbitrariness and variability of American standards of “adultness” can be maddening. When a person turns 18, for example, they can legally vote, enlist in the military, rent a hotel room, buy and own a gun, sign a work contract, be criminally indicted, purchase tobacco and live independently. The right to purchase or consume alcohol is, however, only available to people 21 or older. The legal driving age for most states is 16. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “In 2010, seven teens ages 16 to 19 died every day from motor vehicle injuries. Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash.” Licensing teenagers to drive multi-ton vehicles at high speeds with countless distractions ignores the tremendous risks of this celebrated right of passage.

On the other hand, opportunities for teenagers to engage in certain types of community service can be thwarted by age limitations. The Wilderness Medicine Institute of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), for example, provides training to teenagers 16 and older to treat wounds, cardiac and respiratory trauma, altitude sickness, gastrointestinal problems, poisoning and splint injuries. But after receiving their certification, 16-year-olds cannot volunteer in most search and rescue organizations until they have turned 18. Why does our society apply standards of maturity and responsibility to age when age is rarely a strong indicator of capability? According to Daniel S. Slotnik, a blogger for The New York Times, “Science has never had much of an influence on [how old a person must be to drive, vote or drink]. If it did, we wouldn’t have ended up with a society that permits teenagers to drive before they can see R-rated movies on their own, or go to war before they can buy beer. Surely the maturity required to operate a car or face combat exceeds that required to handle sexy movies or drinking. Age boundar-

ies are drawn for mainly political reasons, not scientific ones.” Maybe it’s time we move our definition of “adulthood” beyond simple chronological standards. Maybe we should allow organizations and governmental institutions to develop tools and metrics to evaluate a person’s maturity relative to their psychological, social, educational and experiential accomplishments. A person’s age may be necessary as a general guide for freedoms and responsibilities, but affording broader discretion to policymakers and employers as to the capacities of teens could allow a larger share of young people to engage in their communities more effectively than current standards allow. Perhaps we could celebrate the unique skills of teens and afford them a place in the “real world” at an earlier point in their development. Given the needs of our community and the planet, bringing youth skills to the task of creating a better world should not be discouraged or deferred. Eliza Harrison is a junior at Santa Fe Preparatory School. Contact her at echarrison@gmail.com.

Section editor: Adele Oliveira, 986-3091, aoliveira@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Brian Barker, bbarker@sfnewmexican.com

Alaska & a new world The 2006 novel Looking for Alaska by John Green tells the story of Miles Halter, an average teenager from Florida. While Miles’s world is generally boring, when he’s sent to Culver Creek Boarding School in Alabama, life suddenly becomes new and vibrant. Upon arriving at school, Miles is nicknamed “Pudge” (a joke, as he’s very skinny). The boy behind the nickname (and other practical jokes) is the Colonel, Pudge’s roommate and soonto-be companion in mischief. Through the Colonel, Pudge meets Alaska Young, who’s a joker herself, fun-loving, sexy and free. Alaska has a room full of books and spends many evenings with Pudge discussing famous authors. To seem cool, Pudge is quickly pressured into drinking and smoking, and ends up naked in a lake within his first week of classes. The three friends play lots of pranks, starting with small things like switching out a bottle of hair gel, which eventually lead to a school-wide prank. Although Pudge is seen as strange — his favorite hobby is memorizing people’s last words — he is accepted at Culver Creek. Pudge went to school a nerdy kid with few friends, and returns home with new friends, a smoking habit and stories about the many times he skated past authority at Culver Creek. I cheered Pudge on as he took the lead in mischief-making with his friends. He represents an average high school student transitioning into a new world. At times, it was disappointing to see Pudge so easily give in to the expectations of those around him.

BOOKS

Elena Wirth

BREAKING NEWS AT WWW.santafeneWmexican.com


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

Billy Joel poses at a piano in New York in 2011. Joel is one of five entertainers who will receive this year’s Kennedy Center Honors. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

Diverse group to receive Kennedy Center Honors By Brett Zongker

The Associated Press

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Today’s talk shows 3:00 p.m. KOAT The Ellen DeGeneres Show Andy Samberg; Mel B; WWE wrestler Darren Young. KRQE Dr. Phil KTFQ Laura KWBQ The Bill Cunningham Show KLUZ El Gordo y la Flaca KASY Jerry Springer CNN The Situation Room FNC The Five MSNBC The Ed Show 3:30 p.m. CNBC Options Action 4:00 p.m. KOAT The Dr. Oz Show Getting health items and services free of charge. KTEL Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste KASY The Steve Wilkos Show FNC Special Report With Bret Baier 5:00 p.m. KASA Steve Harvey KASY Maury FNC The FOX Report With Shepard Smith

6:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC The O’Reilly Factor 7:00 p.m. CNN Piers Morgan Live FNC Hannity MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show 8:00 p.m. E! E! News FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 8:30 p.m. KNME Washington Week With Gwen Ifill 9:00 p.m. CNN Stroumboulopoulos FNC The O’Reilly Factor 10:00 p.m.KASA The Arsenio Hall Show Actress Angela Bassett; music group Emblem3. KTEL Al Rojo Vivo FNC Hannity 10:35 p.m. KRQE Late Show With David Letterman Dr. Phil McGraw; comic Tom Dreesen. 10:45 p.m. KOB The Tonight Show

With Jay Leno Zooey Deschanel; Terry Crews; Buena Vista Social Club. 11:00 p.m. KNME Charlie Rose KOAT Jimmy Kimmel Live Bill Hader; Richard Simmons; Alpine performs. HBO Real Time With Bill Maher 11:30 p.m. KASA Dish Nation 11:37 p.m. KRQE The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson Actor Seth Green; comic Andi Osho; Johnnyswim performs. 12:00 a.m. FNC The Five 12:02 a.m. KOAT Nightline 12:19 a.m. KOB Late Night With Jimmy Fallon Actress Scarlett Johansson; Drake performs. 12:30 a.m. E! E! News 1:00 a.m. KASY The Trisha Goddard Show CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC Red Eye 1:18 a.m. KOB Last Call With Carson Daly

TV

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top picks

7 p.m. on ABC Last Man Standing Star Tim Allen is reunited with another of his Home Improvement co-stars in this episode. Jonathan Taylor Thomas guest stars as Jon, a former co-worker of Kristin’s (Amanda Fuller) at the diner. The news that he’s now a successful restaurant owner, coming on top of Mandy’s (Molly Ephraim) acceptances to two colleges, has Kristin taking stock of her own life in “College Girl.” Nancy Travis also stars. 7 p.m. on CBS Undercover Boss In this episode, Kat Cole, president of Cinnabon Inc., the bakery chain with more than 770 franchised outlets, poses as an ordinary worker to try out a variety of jobs, from making the company’s signature cinnamon rolls to serving customers. As always, the goal is for her to gain a new appreciation of how hard her people work and come up with ways to show it — and, it’s hoped, make their jobs easier. 7:30 p.m. on ABC The Neighbors During a trip to Atlantic City with the BirdKersees, Marty (Lenny Venito, pictured) discovers that Larry (Simon Templeman) can see through cards. Jackie (Toks Olagundoye) confesses she’s always wanted a human wedding. Back home, Dick (Ian Patrick) gets a call

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from his grandfather that could spell the end of the family’s mission on Earth. George Takei and Mark Hamill guest star in “It Has Begun... .” 8 p.m. on CBS Hawaii Five-0 McGarrett’s (Alex O’Loughlin) mother, Doris (Christine Lahti), enlists his help with a covert operation to retrieve a microfiche containing some incriminating material. Kono (Grace Park) comes closer to learning Adam’s (Ian Anthony Dale) secret, putting her own life in danger in “He welo ‘oihana” — Hawaiian for “family business.” Scott Caan also stars. 8 p.m. on HBO Movie: Contagion A fast-spreading virus puts international disease experts to the test, not only to identify the cause but to prevent mass global panic, in this effective 2011 thriller from director Steven Soderbergh. In his all-star cast, he re-enlists Matt Damon (Ocean’s Eleven) as one of the first people to feel the effects of the crisis, when his wife (Gwyneth Paltrow) comes down with the illness. Jude Law and Kate Winslet also star.

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or Carlos Santana, music has always been a calling. He idolized his mariachi musician father as a boy in their remote hometown in Mexico and later grew up with the Woodstock generation after immigrating to San Francisco. Now the music legend will join the luminaries receiving this year’s highest national honors for influencing AmerCarlos ican culture Santana through the arts. Santana is among five who will receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Fellow honorees announced Thursday include actress Shirley MacLaine and three standout musicians spanning rock, jazz and opera — Billy Joel, Herbie Hancock and Martina Arroyo. Top entertainers will salute them in a gala performance Dec. 8 to be broadcast Dec. 29 on CBS. Santana is unique among those who have received the cultural prize. He began learning English by watching American television from Tijuana, Mexico, and picked up the guitar after hearing blues and rock ’n’ roll on the radio. In an interview, Santana, 66, said he was grateful to receive an award he remembers watching others receive almost every year on television with his family. “I guess people understand that Santana is not just a Mexican guitar player — I bring a collective-consciousness awareness agenda with me,” he said. “I grew up with the generation of Woodstock and Bob Marley, ‘One Love,’ and ‘Imagine,’ John Lennon. I am one of them, and we don’t do what we do to be commercial or to be popular or to be cute. It’s not entertainment or show business for us. For us, it’s a calling.” He said his musical life has been about bridging cultures, drawing on sounds of Africa, Latin America and American Indians, as well as rock, jazz and the blues to create something new. Last year, the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts complained the Kennedy Center had long excluded Latinos from the honors. Of the more than 180 past honorees, only two had been Hispanic — Placido Domingo, the acclaimed Spanish tenor, and Chita Rivera, the actress and singer of Puerto Rican descent — the group said. The criticism led to a revised selection process this year. Santana has been a contender in recent years for his strong credentials, said show producer George Stevens Jr. Santana, who swept the 2000 Grammy Awards in nine categories with his album “Supernatural,” said more mainstream institutions should be recognizing Latino artists as well. In December, President Barack Obama will host the recipients at the White House, and Secretary of State John Kerry will host a dinner for them at the State Department. Joel, the “Piano Man” and one of the best-selling recording artists of all time, has devoted his life to music since

he left high school before graduating. The 64-year-old, who wrote and performed such unforgettable hits as “Uptown Girl,” “The Longest Time,” “Allentown” and “We Didn’t Start the Fire,” said in a written statement that it is meaningful to join the roster of outstanding musicians who came before. “But to be chosen for this special award essentially for doing what I love most amazes me more than anything,” he said. The honors stand apart from other awards and feel almost like a homecoming, said MacLaine, 79, who grew up in nearby Arlington, Va. “It’s a more global kind of recognition … not just Hollywood or New York,” she said. “The people who get these awards are contributing to the world’s art, and I feel privileged to be one of them.” After nearly 60 Shirley years as MacLaine one of Hollywood’s leading actresses, MacLaine hasn’t stopped. She began this year with a role in the popular Downton Abbey on PBS and will close 2013 with her latest film, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, alongside Ben Stiller and Kristen Wiig. Hancock, born in Chicago, became a classical music prodigy after his parents bought him a piano as a boy. By age 11, he was playing with the Chicago Symphony. In high school, Herbie though, he Hancock discovered jazz and began learning by listening. “The more I looked into it, the more it pulled me like a magnet,” he said. “And I was hooked forever.” In 1963, Hancock joined the Miles Davis Quintet, one of the great jazz ensembles. He has gone on to embrace electronic music and collaborate with the likes of Annie Lennox, John Mayer and Christina Aguilera. Hancock, 73, said he is overwhelmed “to be on that list of people whose work I’ve respected for so many years during my lifetime.” Arroyo, born and raised in Harlem as the daughter of a Puerto Rican father and an African American mother, said her voice was discovered by acciMartina dent in high Arroyo school when she was heard imitating the singers outside an opera workshop. She went on to star in the great opera houses of Paris, London and Vienna, and performed 199 times at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City after her breakthrough performance in Aida in 1965. Arroyo, 76, said she is most proud of her current work teaching young opera students, though she called receiving the Kennedy Center Honors unimaginable.


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

TIME OUT Horoscope

Crossword

The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Sept. 13, 2013: This year you move forward and create more of what you desire. Your creativity and intellect work together, which opens one door after another. Capricorn often provokes mischievous thoughts. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Confusion surrounds your immediate plans. Many last-minute changes could emerge, but you will handle them well. The unexpected will occur in your daily life. Tonight: In the limelight. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Take news with a grain a salt, and consider the source of the information. You might want to do some fact-checking and speak with the parties involved. Tonight: If you can, take off for the weekend. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You finally will be able to make headway with a key person in your life. Seize the moment, and have the conversation that you feel is necessary. Tonight: Relax with the one you love. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Someone who wants to dominate will emerge. If you are tired of this trend, walk away and refuse to respond to his or her power plays. Tonight: TGIF! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You might want to do something very differently. Fortunately, the prevailing winds of fate will encourage you on this path. Tonight: Weigh the pros and cons of a situation. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH You like excitement, and you like to express your creativity. Revise your thoughts about a child or new person in your life. Tonight: Get into the moment.

Super Quiz Take this Super Quiz to a Ph.D. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Subject: B.S. Identify the person with the initials B.S. (e.g., Member of the elite NHL Triple Gold Club. Answer: Brendan Shanahan.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. The Boss. Answer________ 2. She has won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony Award. Answer________ 3. Pop star who was hired as a judge for the second season of The X Factor. Answer________ GRADUATE LEVEL 4. The original host of America’s Funniest Home Videos. Answer________

5. Quarterback for the Green Bay Packers from 1956 to 1971. Answer________ 6. His films include Zoolander and Night at the Museum. Answer________ PH.D. LEVEL 7. Mobster who was a force behind the development of the Las Vegas Valley. Answer________ 8. “Anyone know what this is? Class? Anyone? Anyone?” Answer________ 9. He put together The Silver Bullet Band. Answer________

ANSWERS:

1. Bruce Springsteen. 2. Barbra Streisand. 3. Britney Spears. 4. Bob Saget. 5. Bart Starr. 6. Ben Stiller. 7. Bugsy Siegel. 8. Ben Stein. 9. Bob Seger. SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? (c) 2013 Ken Fisher

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Evaluate a problem that involves a personal matter. Confusion could make a decision harder to make. Listen to your inner voice before heading in any direction. Tonight: Relax in a familiar place.

Day-care hours take a toll on grandma Dear Annie: My granddaughter, “Mary,” is employed full time, has two daughters, ages 10 and 5, and is pregnant with her third child, even though a divorce has been in the works for at least a year. The problem is that Mary expects her mother, my daughter, “Cindy,” to provide daycare, often for 12 hours a day. Cindy is in her 60s and finds that her stamina is winding down. Not only that, but her loving care has been unappreciated, and she has been treated with disrespect and even contempt. Without affordable daycare, Mary would have to quit her job and go back on welfare. She is putting a real guilt trip and extreme pressure on Cindy, and so are her husband and soon-to-be former in-laws. I feel that my daughter is being taken advantage of, and I think she is becoming increasingly depressed. Just how obligated is she to continue babysitting under these circumstances? — Concerned GreatGrandma in Seattle Dear Seattle: Both Cindy and Mary are in a difficult position. Since Mary is unlikely to make the effort, Cindy could look into available subsidized daycare or even after-school programs so she doesn’t need to be with the kids for such a long day. Can the in-laws babysit two days a week? What about taking the kids for a couple of hours a day to give Cindy a break? It is up to your daughter whether she wants to continue caring for the grandchildren, but she should look into possible compromises in case there is a better solution than all or nothing. Dear Annie: I’m only 12, but I love reading your column. Here’s my problem: My younger sisters and I don’t get along. Even when I try to be nice to them, they’re always being mean. We are each two years apart, but I feel weak and pathetic around them. Sometimes they side with each other and bully me. Every kind thing

Sheinwold’s bridge

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You tend to deal with others in a unique way. Sometimes your self-discipline comes across as a stern attitude. Tonight: Hang out with a special someone. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Splurging happens easily with you, so make an effort to rein in your natural inclinations. A situation could develop that might shock you. Tonight: Treat a loved one to dinner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Reach out to a friend or loved one at a distance. You might want to make special plans to visit this person. Keep paperwork and calls moving in an efficient manner. Tonight: Do what you want. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH The less said the better. You might want to discuss a situation privately with someone before bringing it up with others who are involved. Tonight: Have an important talk. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You have the capacity to excite and inspire many people. Listen carefully to your peers in a meeting. Tonight: Find your friends. Jacqueline Bigar

Cryptoquip

Chess quiz

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error. © 2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

BLACK WINS A PIECE Hint: First, safeguard his own. Solution: 1. … Nc6! The knight is now safe, but White’s bishop is a goner [adapted, Naiditsch-Adams ’13].

Today in history Today is Friday, Sept. 13, the 256th day of 2013. There are 109 days left in the year. The Jewish Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, begins at sunset. Today’s highlight in history: On September 13, 1788, the Congress of the Confederation authorized the first national election, and declared New York City the temporary national capital.

Hocus Focus

I do for them is unappreciated, and they make me so angry, I fight back. A lot of the time it becomes physical. I don’t want to have a bad relationship with them, but I fear things will never change. — The Hated Older Sister Dear Sister: We think your siblings are too immature to understand the value of having a big sister who wants a closer relationship. Part of the reason they behave this way is to get a rise out of you and control your attention. Try to walk away from those engagements. Talk to your parents about mediating some of these fights. You also could discuss the problem with your school counselor. Remember, sisterhood is for the long haul. You may have to wait until your siblings are older before you can have the relationship you are hoping for, but if you are patient, it will happen. Dear Annie: This is a response to the letter from “Feeling Sorry in Vermont,” who was concerned about the teenage children who cannot read or write in cursive. Here’s an update for her: Cursive writing is no longer being taught in most schools in my state. The teachers in our community who teach writing are upset and angry about this. It means these children will not have a signature. Major documents that include “print and sign” will soon simply say “print and print.” — Champs Mom Dear Champs: A lot of people are upset that cursive writing seems to be going the way of the dinosaur. We find cursive useful. But a lot of skills have gone by the wayside over the years. Remember all those guys who could flip open a car hood and repair the engine? Try doing that now. Handwriting is being replaced by keyboards, which will soon enough be replaced by dictation software. One’s “signature” is likely to be a thumbprint or a retinal scan. Time marches on.

Jumble


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

THE NEW MEXICAN WILL BE TESTING OUT SOME NEW COMIC STRIPS IN THE COMING MONTHS. PLEASE TELL US WHAT YOU THINK: EMAIL BBARKER@SFNEWMEXICAN.COM OR CALL 505-986-3058

WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

PEANUTS

THE ARGYLE SWEATER

LA CUCARACHA

LUANN TUNDRA

ZITS RETAIL

BALDO STONE SOUP

GET FUZZY KNIGHT LIFE

DILBERT

MUTTS

PICKLES

ROSE IS ROSE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PARDON MY PLANET

BABY BLUES

NON SEQUITUR


Obituaries C-2 Police notes C-2

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

LOCAL NEWS

Icons of faith

Taos hospital to lay off 44

Greek artists return to Eldorado church to create art By Chris Quintana The New Mexican

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wo Greek artists have been coming to Santa Fe for about 15 years to adorn the walls of a local Greek Orthodox church with elaborate paintings, and the couple recently completed their newest additions. The new paintings, referred to as icons, at St. Elias the Prophet in Eldorado, cover five previously blank walls with images of saints such as St. Elias, the church’s namesake saint, riding a chariot of fire into heaven and notable scenes from the Bible, such as the resurrection of Lazarus. Artists Maria Sigala and Nikolaos Spanopoulos have been coming to St. Elias since 1998, when they first installed the paintings on the church’s dome. They have since come back in 2004 and 2006 to add more icons to the church’s blank walls. “We always feel like we’re part of the family,” Spanopoulos said. The icons are similar to the retablos, paintings on wood, that adorn local Roman Catholic churches, but the saints’ facial features appear more European. Moreover, icongraphers don’t have a lot of room for improvisation, and instead strive to recreate the saints from established images, said the church’s priest, the Rev. Dimitrios Pappas. Sigala and Spanopoulos have spent the past five weeks putting up their paintings. But the majority of the artwork had been completed before the artists flew into America. Sigala and Spanopoulos sketched out the figures on paper before transferring the designs to canvas. They then painted the icons — a five-month process — and carefully packed the canvas for shipping from their studio in Athens. When they arrived in New Mexico, they only need to glue the canvases to the walls and add touches of gold leaf. Pappas said they also touched up their previous paintings in the church. The married couple has also done work in parishes in Greece, England and Jerusalem. Pappas has been with the church for about two years now, but he’s made it his goal to cover the church’s few remaining blank walls with creations from Sigala and Spanopoulos. “Icons help in our worship,”

Please see faitH, Page C-3

Holy Cross to focus on more profitable services By Andrew Oxford The Taos News

TAOS — Forty-four employees of Taos Health Systems and its subsidiary, Holy Cross Hospital, will be laid off in a move administrators claim is necessary amid changing trends in the healthcare sector. The latest round of layoffs, included in a strategic plan drafted by the nonprofit’s board, will include at least 32 nursing and support staff. The changes announced Sept. 9 follow several cuts over the last four years that have seen the number of full-time equivalent staff employed by Holy Cross cut from to about 315 from 370, according to hospital CEO Peter Hofstetter. Under the new strategic plan, the intensive care unit will be reduced from five beds to two and the observation unit will also be reduced from six beds to four. The loss of those five beds and the addition of another in the medical surgery unit would leave the facility with 29 beds, according to Hofstetter. In announcing the cuts, administrators cited a decline in the number of daily inpatients to 17.8 in 2013, down from an average of 23.2 each day the previous year. “During this time we’ve remained staffed in case more patients were admitted, but that hasn’t been the case and we can’t continue this way,” chief nursing officer Anna Abeyta

Please see taos, Page C-3

New radio ad lambastes gov. over behavioral health crisis By Steve Terrell The New Mexican

Commissioned artists Nikolaos Spanopoulos, Konstantinos Spanopoulos and Maria Sigala of Greece work Wednesday on the wall painting depicting Jacob’s Ladder and the Prophet Elias in the Chariot at the Greek Orthodox Church in Eldorado. CLYDE MUELLER/THE NEW MEXICAN

This distinctive style of religious art traces its roots back to the Byzantine Empire. Icons, which were helpful in the past when the majority of parishioners couldn’t read, would depict key scenes in the Bible and serve as aids for the priest.

S.F. home among items sought in fruitcake fraud case Staff and wire reports

A federal grand jury has indicted the former controller of a famed North Texas fruitcake bakery who’s accused of embezzling nearly $17 million to fund a lavish lifestyle — including a large home near Santa Fe. Sandy Jenkins was indicted Wednesday on 10 counts of mail fraud. Court documents say Jenkins managed a scheme to defraud the Collin Street Bakery in Corsicana by writing almost 900 fraudulent checks from 2005 through this June. The indictment contends Jenkins spent the money on luxury vehicles — including a 2010 Mercedes, an ’05 Lexus, a ’13 GMC Denali and a BMW — plus some 60 watches, 600 bottles of wine, 50 necklaces, 35 bracelets, 57 rings, rare coins, a gold bar, 93 designer handbags, 14 furs, 11 paintings, high-end audio equipment and half a dozen firearms. Jenkins and his wife, Kay, own one home in Corsicana as well as a

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Ursine tourism: Santa Fe plays host to 13th foraging bear. Page C-3

FBI agents raided Wednesday the home of Sandy Jenkins (pictured with his wife, Kay), corporate accountant for a North Texas bakery who is accused of helping himself to more than $16 million of the bakery’s money. COURTESY WFAA.COM

home at 35 Cibola Circle in Hondo Hills, southeast of Santa Fe, valued at $784,380 by the Santa Fe County Assessor’s Office. In 2006, when the 3-bedroom, 2½-bath, 3,302-squarefoot house and 747-square-foot guesthouse on 2.3 acres was last put up for sale by Sotheby’s, the Jenkinses were asking $549,000. The homes are among assets that

Section editor: Howard Houghton, 986-3015, hhoughton@sfnewmexican.com

federal officials want to seize, Dallasnews.com reported Thursday. The allegedly fraudulent activity came to light June 20 when an account clerk discovered a suspicious $10,000 check and called it to the attention of the bakery’s chief financial officer, telling him she feared for her life due to the discovery, according to the Corsicana Daily Sun.

An FBI affidavit says Jenkins was accused of writing hundreds of fraudulent checks on the bakery’s account and mailing them to personal creditors such as banks, loan companies and Neiman-Marcus. Managers of the family-owned business confronted and fired Jenkins, then filed a civil suit against him on July 3, alleging he had stolen $16,872,462 from the business where he had been employed since 1998. On Aug. 2, state District Judge Raymond Ortiz of Santa Fe ordered Jenkins to pay the bakery a judgment reached by the Texas court. When asked why he had embezzled the money, “Jenkins stated he was ruined and would lose his wife and daughter,” according to the civil lawsuit. “He continued by saying ‘But if I did this, I guess I deserve it.’ ” Corsicana police reported the matter to the FBI. Jenkins is scheduled for arraignment on the criminal charges on Sept. 19.

New Mexicans Fighting For Behavioral Health, a group that is running radio spots in Albuquerque lambasting Gov. Susana Martinez’s handling of the mental-health system shake-up, is a coalition of individuals, including mental-health organizations and activist groups, a spokeswoman said Thursday Lobbyist Linda Siegle, who also serves on the board of Santa Fe Community College, said the coalition is acting through a nonprofit organization called Resource for Change Policy Works that she started several years ago with her wife, Santa Fe County Commissioner Liz Stefanics. Siegle said the group has raised about $3,500. Because it is a nonprofit, Resource for Change Policy Works does not have to disclose its donors as political action committees do. “As long as we keep it educational,” Siegle said. The ad, which began running Wednesday on KOB TV Channel 4, calls the behavioral-health situation a “disaster” and says, “The governor has placed New Mexico’s vulnerable citizens in the hands of outsiders whose CEOs are being paid up to $300 per hour during the transition, and who are not familiar with our traditions or our culture.” But technically it’s not political because it doesn’t directly tell people not to vote against Martinez. Siegle named several of the groups that contributed to the ad. These include Health Action New Mexico, New Mexico Voices for Children, the National Association of Social Workers, the New Mexico Psychological Association and the National Alliance on Mental Illness. She also said that some of the New

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BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


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LOCAL

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

Judge: Pay back swindled $440,000 By Phaedra Haywood The New Mexican

Two brothers who scammed an elderly Edgewood couple out of $440,000 via a real-estate scheme were sentenced to nine years in prison Thursday. The sentence was suspended, however, and the men were ordered to spend five years on probation instead and sign a promissory note acknowledging that they will pay the money back. The pair will also have to sign a piece of property they own over to the couple, Robert Duncan, 70, and Carol Duncan, 75. Michael Maxwell of Edgewood and Steven Maxwell of Santa Barbara, Calif., were each convicted of 11 felony counts of securities fraud, fraud and forgery in the case last May. Michael Maxwell has two children with the Duncan’s granddaughter. The brothers reportedly befriended the elderly couple and convinced them to take out a mortgage on their home and use their life savings to invest in fraudulent real estate deals. “They were as cunning as serpents and as gentle as doves,” Carol Duncan said after the sentencing. “I can’t wait to go home so I can just cry.” The convictions against the

Train ridership falls in 2012 Ridership on New Mexico’s commuter rail system dropped last year, and officials attribute part of that to the weak economy and job losses reducing the pool of passengers. Rio Metro Regional Transit District Director Terrence Doyle told a legislative panel Tuesday that Rail Runner Express ridership declined by about 9 percent in 2012, but fare revenues grew 10 percent because of higher ticket prices. He said lower gasoline prices and the higher fares contributed to the ridership decline. About 1.1 million riders boarded the train last year and 734,000 through August of this year. Rail Runner officials said they’re looking for ways to boost ridership. The New Mexican

Radio: Other ad praises Continued from Page C-1 Mexico behavioral-health providers who had their Medicaid funds suspended after an outside audit reportedly found possible evidence of fraud. The Attorney General’s Office is investigating the providers. No charges have been filed. The coalition’s ad is the second one to hit New Mexico airwaves this week. New Mexico Competes — operated by Sara Lister, a long-time New Mexico Republican who has worked in Martinez’s administration — is running a spot on several stations around the state. This ad praises Martinez for “cracking down on Medicaid fraud” and scorns the “special-interest groups” critical of the governor. New Mexico Competes also is a nonprofit and doesn’t have to disclose its contributors. Contact Steve Terrell at sterrell@sfnewmexican.com. Read his political blog at roundhouseroundup.com.

Two brothers avoid going to prison, but they must make restitution to the elderly couple they scammed. brothers exposed them to a possible 49 years in prison. District Court Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer said she would have liked to send them to prison, but she didn’t because the prosecutor and the victims agreed that the brothers would be more able to make restitution if they weren’t behind bars. “The State in more interested in obtaining restitution than in paying room-and-board for the defendants,” said Jerome Marshak, who prosecuted the brothers on behalf of the State Regulation and Licensing Department. Carol Duncan said she had mixed emotions about the agreement. “What they stole from us belongs to God,” she said. “But Michael is the father of our great-grandchildren. We loved him. His brother could go to prison. I could care less. But [Michael] has three children.” Mrs. Duncan said she considered the order to pay restitution “a joke. We’ll never see that money. We’ll be dead by then.” What really hurt, Carol Dun-

can said, was that the Maxwells made them feel foolish and stupid. “They stole from us and we missed all the red flags,” she said. “My husband is a broken man over this.” The elderly woman said she and her husband still owe the bank $330,000 for the line of credit they borrowed against their home. They’ve been paying $600 per month interest on the note, she said. But a balloon payment is due soon for which they don’t have the money. “In a couple of months we may not have a place to live,” she said. The Maxwell’s attorneys argued that their clients where not “hardened criminals” and said they truly believed their investments would work out but got in over their heads in a shaky economy. Both asked for a conditional discharge for their clients which would allow their records to be cleared of the felony conviction if they successfully complete the probation and restitution. “We started doing business

with the Duncans with the best of intentions,” said Michael Maxwell, whose attorney noted that his client’s comments would be minimal due to the fact that he plans to appeal his conviction. Michael Maxwell said some of the deals the two brokered almost worked out and he is sorry the Duncans lost their investment and sorry for the damage done to family relationships. The judge was not sympathetic. “I would like to send you to prison,” she said to the brothers. “You deserve prison. You’re selfish. You’re not accountable. You’ve never been accountable. You’ve ruined lives then you blame others. You were playing your own game of Monopoly. You were using their money as play money. I don’t believe you are contrite. You are going to pay. You all have had way too long of a comfort zone in your life and it’s going to have to change.” The judge refused to give the men conditional discharges and ordered that they be placed on electronic monitoring during their five years of probation. Contact Phaedra Haywood at 986-3068 or phaywood@ sfnewmexican.com.

Police notes The Santa Fe Police Department is investigating the following reports: u A burglar removed a window screen at a home in the 1000 block of Don Diego Avenue on Wednesday evening and stole a bicycle and a laptop computer. u Jewelry was stolen from an unlocked residence in the 7100 block of Sereno Loop sometime between 7 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. The victim told police she found a Christian Fellowship flier on her door when she got home that day. u A woman reported Tuesday that someone had stolen her credit card and tried to make charges on the card. Two suspects were named and interviewed, according to a police report. u A juvenile male was arrested Tuesday on charges of distribution of a controlled substance (marijuana), possession of drug paraphernalia and being in minor in possession of alcohol. He was released to the custody of his mother at the request of the juvenile probation officer on duty, according to a police report. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the following reports: u Rick Arthur Ortiz, 47, of 6600 Jaguar Drive was arrested on charges of driving with a revoked license and speeding Tuesday on Agua Fria Street at Camino Juliana. Ortiz was traveling 43 miles per hour in a 30 mph zone when a deputy

stopped him, according to a sheriff’s office report.

Speed SUVs u The Santa Fe Police Department listed the following locations for mobile speedenforcement vehicles: SUV No. 1 at Gonzales Community School from 7:25 to 8:15 a.m. and 2:10 to 2:55 p.m., and on West Alameda Street at Cedar Street at other times; SUV No. 2 at Ramirez Thomas Elementary School from 7:25 to 8:15 a.m. and 2:10 to 2:55 p.m., and on Rufina Lane between Senda del Valle and Lois Lane at other times; SUV No. 3 at Plaza Blanca between Rodeo Road and Camino Carlos Rey.

Help lines Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families hotline: 800-473-5220 St. Elizabeth Shelter for men, women and children: 982-6611 Interfaith Community Shelter: 795-7494 New Mexico suicide prevention hotline: 866-435-7166 Solace Crisis Treatment Center: 986-9111, 800-721-7273 or TTY 471-1624 Youth Emergency Shelter/ Youth Shelters: 438-0502 Police and fire emergency: 911 Graffiti hotline: 955-CALL (2255)

Funeral services and memorials CAPT. ROBERT H. SKAMFER, RET., OCTOBER 11, 1914 SEPTEMBER 11, 2013

Bob lived a wonderful life and was active for all of his nearly 99 years. Born in Eau Claire, WI, he left in 1937 for Hawaii to become a school teacher. Upon his return to the mainland he married Patricia Jean Ward. They raised two daughters and eventually settled with their children in Arlington Heights, IL moving then to Barrington, IL until their permanent move to Tucson, AZ some 35 years ago. Bob spent his career as an executive with a manufacturing company having worked as Vice President of Personnel for the Richardson Company. Upon retirement he and Pat moved to Tucson, AZ where they had been snowbirds for several years. A passionate golfer, he lived his dream and enjoyed 30 years playing golf at the Tucson National Golf Club. He enjoyed travel and reading and kept all that knew him smiling with his clever sense of humor and charisma. Throughout his life and especially into his 90’s Bob listened carefully to others taking an interest in their lives and generated stimulating conversations about any topic that came to mind. He will be remembered for his kindness and extreme generosity. He was a dedicated father and husband who enjoyed his role as caregiver when the time came for his two wives. He resided in Santa Fe, NM, for the past 7 months where his daughter Libby and her husband, Wyck, live. He is survived by his daughters and their husbands, Diane and Jim Hamblin of Tryon, NC, and Libby and Wyck Pattishall of Lamy, NM; his step daughter, Marijo Lovstrom of Tucson; his step grandsons, Todd Lovstrom and Mark Lovstrom; his brothers, Don Skamfer of Eau Claire, WI and Carl Skamfer of Las Vegas, NV; and numerous nieces and nephews and their children. He was preceded in death by his brother, Russell; his wife of 43 years, Patricia; and his wife of 20 years, Mildred Smith Skamfer. In memory of Robert the family requests a donation to your favorite charity.

IN LOVING MEMORY

LOYOLA P. TAPIA

10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

Mom, It’s been years that you have left us to be with our Lord. It seems just like yesterday you were here with us. There is not a day that goes by that we don’t think or speak of you. You blessed us with wonderful memories we will always cherish. We miss and love you dearly, Your Family A 10 year Anniversary Mass will be celebrated on Sunday, September 15th 12:00 at San Isidro Church.

ROSS ALAN GLASER SEPTEMBER 6, 1981 SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

PHIL R. LUCERO

ERLINDA (ARLENE) MONTOYA SEPTEMBER 10, 2013

Passed away on Tuesday, September 10th. Our beloved and cherished Mama, Mother, Grandmother, Sister, Aunt, Tia and friend, passed away into the Lord’s light. Erlinda was preceded in death by her parents, Juan and Marianita Romero; daughter, Cynthia Marie Montoya; husband, David B. Montoya; sisters, Flora Jones and Alice Dalton; and grandson,

David Hattaway. She is survived by her daughter, Yvonne (Bonnie) Montoya; son, Marty Montoya; grandson, Charles Hattaway; brother and sisterin-law, JoJo and Dolores Romero and family; brother and sisterin-law, Tony and Carmen Montoya and many adored nieces, nephews, cousins, family members and friends. We miss you deeply. You are our Angel. The Matriarch of our family. Your light will forever be in our hearts. We love you Mama. Funeral Mass will be held at Cristo Rey Catholic Church, Monday, September 16th at 10 am. Reception will be held at the home of Maryann and Wes Hall. Directions will be given at Mass.

Rivera Family Funerals and Cremations 417 East Rodeo Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87505 Phone: (505)989-7032 Fax: (505)820-0435 santafefuneraloption.com

BARBARA JEAN CAWLEY

Ross is the beloved son of William and Adele Glaser and brother of Emily Glaser. Born in Santa Fe, NM, he graduated from Santa Fe High, then lived and worked in Portland, OR. Ross apparently experienced shallow water blackout and died in the ocean near Kona, HI. He is survived by his grandmother, Dorothy Healy, and many aunts, uncles and cousins. Ross had a big heart, a keen sense of humor, and an inquiring intelligence. He is fondly remembered by many as a caring and generous friend with a great love for the outdoors. Ross is forever in our hearts as we deeply honor his life and his love.

There will be a burial with military honors at Memorial Cemetary in Santa Fe on Friday, September 13th at 12:45 pm for Phil R. Lucero of Espanola. Guests are asked to arrive by 12:30, and cars will be lined up curbside, with procession into cemetary to begin at 12:45 sharp. Services are estimated at 30 minutes. All family and friends are invited to attend. The Lucero family would like to thank all the relatives and friends all across New Mexico for the wonderful memories and friendship given to Phil. Phil surely loved all of you. We will miss Phil dearly.

We are here to assist you.

Call 986-3000

Barbara Jean Cawley, 81, long-time resident of Santa Fe, NM passed away Friday, September 6th surrounded by love. She is survived by her husband of 60 years, Bernard; five children: Bernard Jr., Pamela, Alicia, Walter and Michael; their spouses; 6 grandchildren and 2 greatgrandchildren. Cremation has taken place. A Rosary will be held at 10 am on Friday, September 13th at San Isidro Catholic Church, followed by Mass at 11 am. Interment will follow at Rosario Cemetery. Mom, please rest in peace; you will be missed but not forgotten.

Rivera Family Funerals and Cremations 417 East Rodeo Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87505 Phone: (505)989-7032 Fax: (505)820-0435 santafefuneraloption.com


LOCAL

Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

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Taos: Concerns over patient care remain Continued from Page C-1

move would leave staff overwhelmed and consequently stated in a news release issued diminish the care provided to Monday, adding that the recent patients. measures would not impact “It comes down to patient ratios of one nurse to every four safety,” nurse Julie Kane told or five patients with one nurse The Taos News, lamenting the caring for two patients in the elimination of several telemetry intensive care unit. and nursing assistant posiIt was not clear how much tions. The cuts, she said, would money the hospital expected require her to keep an eye on to save through the cuts or heart monitors while conductthe nature of the financial ing rounds and providing supcircumstances that prompted port to other departments. “If the elimination of dozens of they’re expecting me to be able positions. “Currently, we have money in the bank and no debt,” to monitor heart rhythms with a full patient load without an Hofstetter wrote in an email assistant, it puts us in an unsafe to The Taos News. “Given the changes in reimbursement and position.” our losses of the last few years Though the union was still this becomes a bit tenuous. The negotiating with administracurrent system (nationally and tors when The Taos News went locally) is not sustainable and to print, organizers said the we intend to make our operacuts would lead to a reduction tions sustainable.” in nursing staff in the intenHofstetter insisted, however, sive care unit and emergency that Taos could support a hosdepartment. Several nursing pital. “The big question is what assistants would also lose services does a hospital offer,” their jobs as would secretarial he wrote. employees such as a nurse Holy Cross is shifting its scheduler. One administrative focus to more profitable inpaposition would also be elimitient services, according to nated. administrators, and that trend Union organizers suggested would drive the development of the cuts could precede a change “growth revenue opportunities” such as occupational medicine, in status for Holy Cross from an acute-care hospital to a critical oncology, cosmetic dermatolaccess hospital. ogy, geriatric psychiatry, inpaHofstetter confirmed admintient rehabilitation and physical istrators would consider changtherapy. ing the hospital’s status to critiEmployees, many of whom cal access in the next several responded to the layoffs with months. criticism and concern, said the

Commissioned artist Maria Sigala of Greece works Wednesday on the wall painting depicting Jacob’s Ladder and the Prophet Elias in the Chariot at the Greek Orthodox Church in Eldorado. CLYDE MUELLER/THE NEW MEXICAN

Faith: Artist couple may return next year Three blanks walls remain, and Pappas said he hopes to bring Sigala and Pappas said. Spanopoulos back within the next year. He also said icons were helpful in the The artist added he and his wife will be past when the majority of parishioners a bit disappointed when they finally fincouldn’t read. Icons would depict key ish covering the church’s wall with icons, scenes in the Bible and serve as aids for the because it means they probably won’t priest. return.

Continued from Page C-1

In brief

The church is open to public viewing most Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and Pappas said the congregation will host a special viewing celebration for the public from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 22. Contact Chris Quintana at 986-3093 or cquintana@sfnewmexican.com

as those who went through the longer training period. Garcia added that most agencies also provide training for cadets before and after they go through the academy.

Monte del Sol seeking new Manderfield neighbors head of school for 2014 Monte del Sol Charter School, which serves approve school plan

A New Mexico Department of Game and Fish officer pulls cactus spines from a bear Thursday morning. The furry omnivore was the 13th bear spotted during the past nine days in Santa Fe. COURTESY PHOTO

City gets 13th bear visit All 13 bears found in Santa Fe have been The New Mexican healthy, said Game and Fish spokesperson Rachel Shockely. She added that the bears are in the Santa Fe was visited by yet another bear Thurs- middle of the foraging season and they generally day morning, marking the 13th appearance of start hibernating between late October and midthe furry omnivores in city limits within the past November. nine days. Shockley said Santa Feans could easily reduce “This is a huge uptick for the city,” said Celina running into bears by keeping trash cans secure Westervelt, the Santa Fe Police Department’s and placing bins curbside the morning of pickup. public information officer. Additionally, she said homeowners should Westervelt said officers received a call about remove bird feeders, solid and liquid alike, from the 200-pound bear a little before 10 a.m. Thurstheir yards. Finally, pets and their food should be day. A resident in the 1700 block of Callejón placed in secure areas, such as a garage, every Emilia spotted the bear dozing in a neighbor’s night. yard and called the police. If people do spot a bear, Shockely said people Officers cordoned a street block, and then cornered the bear. A New Mexico Department of should leave the creature alone, but avoid making the omnivores feel welcome in human surroundGame and Fish officer eventually arrived, tranquilized the creature and tagged it. ings. Westervelt said those who spot bears should That bear hadn’t been spotted in Santa Fe call the police department at 428-3710 or, in emerbefore Thursday, Westervelt said. The Game and gency situations, 911. Fish officer also removed cactus spines from the Contact Chris Quintana at 986-3093 bear’s nose and paws before giving the creature antibiotics. or cquintana@sfnewmexican.com By Chris Quintana

Fallen firefighter remembered “He was a prankster. ALBUQUERQUE — A Forest He would tell Service firefighter found dead jokes to his in a rugged area of Northern crew and just New Mexico was remembered laugh about Thursday as a devoted family the joke,” man and prankster. Abbott said. Token Adams More than 200 people gath“They would ered for a memorial service only laugh for Token Adams, a 41-year-old because he was laughing so engine captain who disaphard they started laughing along peared Aug. 30 while checking with him.” a report of smoke near Jemez He was also a good husband Springs, where he lived with his and father, with two children pregnant wife, Hiedi, and their from a previous marriage, he 3-year-old son, Tristan. said. Adams was missing for a Abbott said Adams sought week before searchers found his a transfer with the U.S. Forest body under his crashed ATV on Service from Texas to New a steep incline. Mexico after coming to the state His father-in-law, Dave Abbot, to help fight the Los Conchas said Adams loved to tell jokes. Fire, which burned 150,000 The New Mexican

acres and threatened the town of Los Alamos and Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2011. “When he went back, he told Hiedi, ‘This is where I want to be. This is where I want to go,’ ” Abbott said. “And I can see why. The area is beautiful. The people are wonderful.” Abbott said his daughter is due with the couple’s second child in a week, and she has changed the date of her planned cesarean delivery from Sept. 17 to Sept. 19, which was Adams’ birthday. Meantime, friends have set up a fund to help Hiedi Adams relocate to Rockport, Maine, where she grew up. Family friend Chuck Whitehouse says family members want to get Hiedi Adams closer to family.

about 370 students in grades 7-12, seeks a head learner (principal) to replace Jim Ledyard, who announced this week that he is retiring at the end of the 2013-14 school year. The school, which opened in 2000, has a campus in a residential neighborhood on the south side of town, not far from the community college. The head learner reports to the school’s governing board, which oversees policy for the school. Interested candidates should submit an application to HLSearch@montedeol.org by Oct. 15, 2013 and include a cover letter, a résumé, a personal statement of educational philosophy no longer than two pages, and a list of at least five references. Visit www.montedelsol.org for more information about the school and the position.

Gold outlook bright in Ortiz mine near Madrid Santa Fe Gold Corp. says gold deposits at the historic Ortiz mine site south of Santa Fe is an estimated 874,000 ounces, more than a billion dollars worth. The company, formerly Azco Mining, wants to reopen gold mining in the Ortiz Hills near Madrid and is the early stages of gathering information for permits it must obtain from the state. The process will take at least another year. Gold mining by other companies in a different portion of the Ortiz Mountains generated controversy in the 1980s after the open-pit mine and cyanide heap leaching to extract the mineral, contaminated the area. Local residents sued and won a partial judgement against the companies. Santa Fe Gold says new gravity and flotation techniques for extracting gold don’t require chemical leaching. The company also claims its methods will reduce water needs by two-thirds. The company mailed out slick, full-color brochures called “Continuing a Legacy” to residents around Santa Fe County during the summer, touting the benefits of gold mining for jobs and county revenues. A preliminary assessment by Minerals Advisory Group and Independent Mining Consultants found the Carache and Lucas gold deposits within the area Santa Fe Gold wants to mine could produce 874,000 ounces over an nine to 18 year period.

Police academy reduces training time for officers The state Law Enforcement Academy will shorten its basic officer training program, a move that has pleased local law enforcement agencies. The New Mexico Law Enforcement Agency Board on Wednesday unanimously approved changes in the program, which will require officer candidates to undergo four months of training instead of five and a half months. The Santa Fe Police Department since last August has actively sought candidates to fill openings on the local police force, and Chief Ray Rael said Wednesday he’s pleased with the academy’s reduced training time. “This will shorten the time for new cadets to be street ready and available to fill holes,” Rael said. Santa Fe County Sheriff Robert Garcia said he believes that cadets who go through the fourmonth training period will be just as capable

The Canyon Neighborhood Association voted this week to approve a developer’s plan to transform the vacant Manderfield School into a combination of residential condos and artist studios. The move came after the developers, Clare and Michael Maraist, agreed to drop plans to include a coffee shop on the property, located at the top of Canyon Road near Cristo Rey Church. In August, the city’s planning commission rejected the Maraists’ plans after neighbors voiced concern about commercialization of the property and increased traffic. According to both Richard Ellenberg of the Canyon Neighborhood Association and Jennifer Jenkins, who represents the Maraists, the two sides collaborated to address neighbor concerns in order to make the plan work. The plan goes before the City Council for a vote on Wednesday, Sept. 25. The school opened in the 1920s and though the district shut it down in the 1970s, various entities used the property until about eight years ago.

Theater wins court case over showing adult film New Mexico’s highest court has tossed out an Albuquerque movie theater’s conviction for violating a zoning restriction on where adult films can be shown. The state Supreme Court said Thursday in a split decision the art-house theater wasn’t an “adult amusement establishment” under the city ordinance because it only occasionally showed erotic or pornographic films. A company that does business as the Guild Cinema showed adult films only one weekend a year during a festival called “Pornotopia.” It was fined $500 for showing an X-rated film during a 2008 festival. The court made its ruling without deciding whether the theater’s free speech rights were violated by the restrictions on adult films. Justice Petra Jimenez Maes dissented, saying the majority ruling undermined the zoning power of cities.

Los Lonely Boys cancels Friday show in Santa Fe The Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa Fe announced Wednesday that a Los Lonely Boys concert planned for Friday, Sept. 13, has been canceled because a member of the Texas-based rock trio is injured and unable to perform. Refunds for tickets purchased from either santafetickets.org or the Lensic Performing Arts box office will be processed by the Lensic. Call 988-1234 for more information. Those who purchased a ticket directly from the Boys & Girls Clubs can receive a refund by calling the club at 983-6632. Radio station KTAOS also announced that a Los Lonely Boys show scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 12, in Taos was postponed because band member Henry Garza’s doctor instructed him not to travel due to problems stemming from a back injury. However, KTAOS said the band plans to reschedule its appearance there for Sept. 29. Any tickets purchased for the original date will be honored, and there will be no refunds, the statement said. Staff and wire reports


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

VOTING: pet

2014

The Santa Fe New Mexican’s

VOTING MIdNIG TOTALS AS O HT, SEPT F . 11, 201 3

rOuNd 1

CALENDAR

over $2,000 in prizes are at stake, vote noW for your favorites!

Benefitting:

the top 25 pets with the most votes in round one will advance to the finalist round where they will compete for a spot in the 2014 pet Calendar.

V O T I N G F O R R O U N D 1 E N D S M I D N I G H T, W E D . , 9 / 1 8 help your favorite pet move to round 2! 166

166 1367

13

1 1. Misty Anthony Armijo

2. Cochiti Barbara Cohn & Jan Gaynor

72

3. Deuce & Bell Greg Teal

4. Jackson & Nina Victoria Price

20

5. Woofie Phyllis Falance

91

101

23 6. Luna Karen & Jean-Francois Chabaud

7. Mojo & Minx Patricia Morris

8. Mia Love Robert Montoya

9. Shelby M.F. Biliswansky-McMorrow

272

71

10. Hondo Tina Carmichael

22

0 33 11. Sport Clark Elliott

adopt me! 12. Brumby Dr. Philip J. Hinko

13. Lupita The Horse Shelter

14. Cody Tom & Marilyn Clagett

15. Pedro Jerri Udelson

0

43

54 16. Hercules Pattie Christianson

17. Hank & Mackey Susan Maslar

41 18. Nero Robert Shilling

121

21. Cooper Keza & Joel Boyd

20. Sam Cheryl Odom

30

11 22. Hercules Pattie Christianson

2

26. Oscar Donna Wynant

19. Hercules Pattie Christianson

5

1

0

313

27. Nellie Susie Sullivan

23. Cody Racheal & Angela Rael

24. Willie & Hector John Teer

43

25. Rosa Mary Beth Shymkus

21

28. Bella Harry McKee

29. Cinch Cheryl Abeyta

41

30. Thadeus Wilton Wiggins

Who Will you vote for? hoW to vote:

online www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar or by e-mail classad@sfnewmexican.com in person at the new mexican’s downtown office at 202 e marcy st. or at 1 new mexican plaza. By phone: 505-986-3000. $1.00 per vote august 29th – september 18th. $10 min. on all voting done by credit card.

donate!

non-perishable pet items and 1 of every 10 votes will be free!

donations must be made at either of the santa fe new mexican offices.


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

FinAliSt roUnd

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top Vote GetterS

VoteS cAn be cASt For tHe FinAliStS September 25tH – october 8tH For $2 per Vote.

win prizes from:

The 13 pets with the most votes at the end of the finalist round will have their photos and owner/pet bio featured in the 2014 calendar and will be eligible for one of our great prizes!

tHe cAlendAr

Get your copy in the October 26th edition of the Santa Fe New Mexican, or at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter or Santa Fe New Mexican offices for $5, with 100% of all calendar sales donated directlY to the Santa Fe Animal Shelter.

Glen Smith / Oil Pet Portraits Get complete prize information at www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar

Adopt me!

Animals with the Adopt me! star, are available for adoption at the following shelters.

Yellow Adopt me!

Green Adopt me!

Gentle Souls pet Sanctuary 505-988-7080

0

the Horse Shelter 505-982-8825

101

7

0 31. Violet Keith Wall

34

32. Henri Nancy Hubbard

33. Sledge David Dennison

26

orAnGe Adopt me!

Santa Fe Animal Shelter 505-983-4309

34. Spenser Jack Hasted

34

35. Daisy Carolyn Armijo

0

20 36. Jayme Boots Toni Montoya

21

37. Whisper Carol Maloney

38. Dr. Pupper Randy Murray

39. Molly Andrea Cuadros

40. Cinch Cheryl Abeyta

123

2 41. Duke Breanna Aguilar

56 42. Mugsy Christopher Sovereign

103

43. Cinda & Lois Elaine Nicholson

44. Lulu Wendy Katzman

14

18

1 45. Max Matt Altenberg

12

91

0

46. Szechuan Sarah Blitstein

47. Angel Ciaran Clark

10

48. Murray Dana Levin

49. Snuggles Dora Waldorf

50. Bella Laura LeRoy

29

100

6 51. Murray Dana Levin

37

20

52. Muji Chandrika & Will River-Smolak

53. Pushkin Janet Buchbinder

27

56. Rosie Johnny Sanchez

54. Lily Keonan Yardley

1

57. Foxie Delo Gutierrez

58. Lulu & Joee Suzy Bienvenu

16

55. Zathina Kathleen Pastirik

5

59. Sweetpea Susan Johnson

60. Ruby Lynne Brosnahan

perSon at the new mexican: 202 e marcy St. or 1 new mexican plaza #2 bY pHone: 505-986-3000 classad@sfnewmexican.com or online: www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar • $10 min. on all voting done by credit card. 3 wAYS to Vote: #1#3 ine-mail:


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

Thank you To all The sponsors of The 2014 peT Calendar!

A

Calendar Photography Provided by:

mazing DOGS

DOG TRAINING BY CONNIE DILLON

505-982-1583

Pet Angel Santa Fe.com 20

1

141

61. Millicent Denny Alff

50

62. Nirvana & Cosmo Robin Laughlin

0

63. Jane Sigrid Mabel

350

66. Lucy Thomas Berner

102

67. Sam Hwy Hedley Karen & Bob Drewry

64. Rico Annie Gonzales

65. Clara Kim Kennedy

69. Murray Dana Levin

70. Zepp Amber Ortiz

7

68. Andrew Andree Smith

14

0

101 71. Leroy Jose Pluto

81

5

72. Dante Charlotte Bordegaray

73. Teddy Bear Kristi Chilcote

5

74. Rosy Deborah Martin

31

75. Lester Brown Melanie Monsour

22

15 76. Rocket, Shasta, Tinkerbell & Tiger Robin Sarkissian

7 77. Lacy, Teddy & Allie Emily Alexis

78. Mrs. Hollyhocks & Poppy Rose Linda Dunning

69

79. Nicholas & Beauregard Kristi Chilcote

9

22

80. Sacha Kristi Chilcote

1

36 81. Maxx Mark Nelson

82. Sammie Kristi Chilcote

83. Andrew Andree Smith

161

84. Sasha Anou Mirkine

9

0

85. Manapua Andree Smith

32

13 86. Tanner Kristi Chilcote

87. Roxie Gene Farnum

88. Vincent Kristie Chilcote

89. Tinkerbell Arlen Sarkissian

90. Rufus & Max Judy Taylor

PErsOn at The new Mexican: 202 E Marcy st. or 1 new Mexican Plaza #2 By PhOnE: 505-986-3000 classad@sfnewmexican.com or online: www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar • $10 min. on all voting done by credit card. 3 ways TO VOTE: #1#3 InE-mail:


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

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The Santa Fe New Mexican’s 2014 peT caleNdar Voting round 1 53

211

11

11

11 91. Cartman Andree Smith

92. Rocket Lauren Sarkissian

93. Mesa Sunrise Nancy Ogur

94. Chloe & Ducky Danielle Martinez

95. Lira Alexa Shea

6

7 96. Chloe Daniel Gonzales

30

6

97. Megan Sue and Bob Kirkpatrick

365

98. Ducky Daniel Gonzales

7

101. Lily Gabrilla Hoeglund

0 99. Oreo Aiden Ortiz

194

102. Tiki Doreen Hurtig

47

103. Maggie Maureen McCarthy

62

100. Cassie Doreen Hurtig

60

104. Carter Elberta Honstein

105. Lacy Emily Alexis

171

8 106. Bella Julie Kastendieck

2 107. Lady Kristi Chilcote

2

108. Max & Bree Latricia Mckosky

2

111. Bedbug Katie Diamond LeSchnitzer

70

2 109. Maya Matthew Daughters

25

112. Mafan Lavonne Slusher

113. Rexy Boy Debbie Prather

43

114. Wilburn & Penny Gretchen Kemple-Taylor

11

39

117. Bertie Susan Guillaume

0

121. Indigo Raysean Marchi

115. Cali Emma Hamilton

10

1 116. Jaxx Laura Ortega

110. Ringo Dennis Comeau

31 118. Dirk Francisco Rivera

96

122. Pele Tracy Aspen

119. Denim Raysean Marchi

120. Baxter Claudia Mcelvaney

115

123. Zuzu Laraine Ferguson

30

124. Merlin Helen Fogel

125. Ms. Trudy Murphy Bobbie Murphy

105

50

0 126. Buttered Stuff Lilly Lopez

127. Edie Desiree Valdez

43 128. Abby Maureen Nash

0

129. Twilight Kim Larranaga

130. Layla Emma Hamilton

40

51 131. Ari Cynthia Archuleta

41

11 132. Felix the Cat Cathy Ducaj

133. McJagger, Daphne & Boru Eliza Gordon

134. Kayla Eliza Gordon

135. McJagger Eliza Gordon

pErsOn at The new Mexican: 202 E Marcy st. or 1 new Mexican plaza #2 By phOnE: 505-986-3000 classad@sfnewmexican.com or online: www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar • $10 min. on all voting done by credit card. 3 ways TO VOTE: #1#3 InE-mail:


C-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

The Santa Fe New Mexican’s 2014 peT caleNdar Voting round 1 246

0

Adopt me! 136. Jemina Puddleduck Elizabeth

0

1

1

0

Adopt me!

137. Monkey Gentle Souls Sanctuary

138. Sugar Gentle Souls Sanctuary

139. Millie Denny Alff

81

140. Allegra & Arnie Rosemary Ulibarri

81

121

52 141. Calla Holly Baldwin

142. Sweet Pea Rafie McCullar

143. Sage Marsie Silvestro

144. Sunny Caryl Acuna

22

145. Beaurigard Scot Eastwood

12

10 146. Leeloo Paula Rosemond

22 147. Kaila Robert Ellis

2

50

148. Bella Patrick & Valorie Leinberger

149. Myka Robert Tucker

150. Toby Isabel Mendoza

65

57 151. Mischief, Clementine, Liza Jane Terence E. Hall

152. McKinley Brooke Little

91 153. Louie Susan Sussman

136

154. Balthazar Charles Gamble & Acushla Bastible

155. Abby Kathy Wesoloski

0

10

1 156. Chloe Annette Lombardo

157. Bella Luna Kathy Ortega

5 158. Mario Frank & Stella Juare

159. Freddie Anah & Elvi Coates

Adopt me!

3

160. Goldie Santa Fe Animal Shelter

6

3

Adopt me!

8

Adopt me!

161. Batman Santa Fe Animal Shelter

162. Fiona Santa Fe Animal Shelter

9

Adopt me!

163. Superman Santa Fe Animal Shelter

20

Adopt me!

17

164. Dozer Santa Fe Animal Shelter

Adopt me! 165. Bela Santa Fe Animal Shelter

4

20

100

210 166. Gordo Wendy Katzman

167. Annabel Brandon Hall

41

24

168. Blue Judi & Geoff Hendricks

169. Buddy John Flynn

170. Cosmo Amber Gray

71

119 171. Joe Freddy Perdomo

172. Louisa Dona Durham

173. Mo Mali Murphey

174. Noel Kaelyn Fenstermacher

181

175. Trina Jeannie Sena

191

117 176. Tika Caryl Acuna

0

177. Bailey Alynna Montoya-Wiuff

91 178. Cisco Heidi Seizys

32 179. Duke Arlette Atencio

180. Bella Candace Kenyon

person at the new mexican: 202 e marcy st. or 1 new mexican plaza #2 By phone: 505-986-3000 classad@sfnewmexican.com or online: www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar • $10 min. on all voting done by credit card. 3 wAys to Vote: #1#3 Ine-mail:


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

D-1

sfnm«classifieds classifieds to place an ad

click here

or email us: classad@sfnewmexican.com For Additional Assistance, call 986-3000 or Toll Free (800) 873-3362 »real estate«

SANTA FE

1804 San Felipe Circle, Beautiful midcentury multi generational Stamm Home, significant additions, upgrades, and remodeling. Must See to Believe. Main, Guest, 3,352 squ.ft., 4 bedroom, 3 bath, cul-de-sac lot on Acequia, 2 plus car garage, private well, incredible irrigated landscaping. $565,000. Sylvia, 505-577-6300.

OPEN HOUSE

SANTA FE

FARMS & RANCHES

LOTS & ACREAGE

LAND

2 HAWK RANCH Penasco horse property. 1999 Adobe home, indoor arena, forest access, two streams, irrigation, hayfield, 11.6 acres. $789,000 505-690-1850 or 575-5870119.

TEN TO Twenty Acre tracks, east of Santa Fe. Owner Financing. Payments as low as $390 a month. Negotiable down. Electricity, water, trees, meadows, views. Mobiles ok. Horses ok. 505-690-9953.

LOTS & ACREAGE

Three 5 acre lots Next to Wilderness Gate and St. Johns College. Hidden Valley, Gated Road, $125,000 per lot, SF Views. 505-231-8302.

5 acres off 599 only $198,000 2 ½ acres Cienega on Nancy’s Trail $110,000 40 Acres Gold Mine Rd. $90,000 5 Acres off St. Rd. 14 $60,000 All owner financed – you choose the down and payment. 988-5585

Off The Grid

Amazing views, 23 acres with rustic, unfinished adobe casita, shared well, 20 minutes to Eldorado. horses ok. $169,000. JEFFERSON WELCH, 505-577-7001

E L D O R A D O . $315,000. 3 bedroom, 2 bath bath, guest quarters. O P E N HOUSE SEPTEMBER 21, 22 , 12-4. 73 ENCANTADO LOOP. BEST VIEWS. 575421-0100.

Have a product or service to offer?

2 BEDROOM, 2.5 baths, with basement office or workout room. 2.5 acres. 1101 Bishops Lodge Road. Possible Owner Financing. $585,000. 505-982-6281 or 505-4697121.

Just Reduced! 3 beds, 2 baths, over 1,600 square feet, kiva fireplace, tile floors, large gameroom or office, convenient location, only $220,000. JEFFERSON WELCH, 505-577-7001

CALL 986-3000 VIA CAB 2587 CALLE DELFINO Total remodel, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car, 2 Kiva, AC. Huge lot $290,000. 505-920-0146

OPEN SUNDAY, 2-6

Maclovia and Rosina Hardwood floors, vigas, plus $1000 monthly rental. Huge lot, patios, parking. Only $278,000. Mary E. Bertram Realty 505-983-4890 or 505-920-7070

*50 Acre Tracks . Off grid. Backed to National Forest. On Rowe Mesa. $250,000. Owner Financing $5,000 down $500 per month. 5 year balloon. Russ 505-470-3227

SEARCHING FOR GREAT SAVINGS? Check out the coupons in this weeks

TV book

Quaint Southside Townhome

Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

ACALDE ADOBE Green and Irrigated, wood floors, brick fireplace, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, 2 car garage. Seperate Large workshop. Great Deal at $130,000. TAYLOR PROPERTIES 505-470-0818

*12 1/2 Acre Tracks . All utilities, views, horses allowed. No mobile homes. $160,000 to $250,000. On Spur Ranch Road.

BUILDINGS-WAREHOUSES FSBO 1600 SQUARE FOOT WAREHOUSE. 12 foot ceilings, overhead door. 1/2 bath. Good shape. Close to Silar Road. $160,000. 505-982-3204

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

OUT OF TOWN

Hot Springs Landing at Elephant Butte Lake

A getaway retreat on New Mexico’s largest body of water, with miles of trails and sandy beaches. Minutes from Truth or Consequences hot springs. House has spectacular views in three directions from the second story wrap-around sun porch. Two living areas, two bedrooms, one bath, updates throughout, including central heat and air conditioning. On half-acre lot bordered by BLM land. Includes large studio or boathouse, two-car garage. $135,000. MLS#20118360 Stagner & Associates 575-740-1906 or call 505986-8420 in Santa Fe.

MANUFACTURED HOMES RE (3) 2.5 Acre Lots, Senda Artemisia, Old Galisteo Road, Close to town. Easy building sites. Views, utilities, shared well. Owner financing. No Mobile homes. $119,700- $129,700 each. Greg. 505-690-8503, Equity Real Estate. BUILDING SITE 2.5 Acres, all utilities plus well, at the end of St. francis Dr. and Rabbit Rd. on Camino Cantando. Views, views, views! Beautiful land, vigas, latillas and lumber included. $280,000, 505-603-4429.

Northside View Lot

Owner will carry, Cerros Colorados, 1.04 acre treed lot with multiple level building sites, minutes to town. Just $170,000. JEFFERSON WELCH, 505-577-7001

2 ADJOINING WAREHOUSES FOR SALE. Each 2000 square feet with 25 ft. ceilings Leaseback possible, price flexible. Bisbee Ct. Call Carrie 505473-0590 or 505-690-0342

1993 OAK-CREEK double-wide mobile home $38k. Newly remodeled, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1800 sqft, in trailercourt. Unoccupied since remodel. 10 Carlson Ct. 505-333-9225.

PECOS RIVER CLIFF HOUSE

BRAND NEW 2013 KARSTEN SINGLEWIDE 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH IN CASITAS M.H.P SPACE #21 $48,425 16X80 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH SINGLEWIDE IN HACIENDA M.H.P. BY THE NEW WAL-MART SPACE #96 $55,965 ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED "EXCLUSIVE PROGRAM" 5-10% DOWNPAYMENT REQUIRED SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY CALL TIM, 505-699-2955.

Broker is owner. $585,000 MLS#2013 03395

OUT OF TOWN

CONDO ELDORADO

3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, plus Den, 2 Fireplaces, 1920 Square Feet. E-Z access paved road, 2 car finished garage. $294,500.00 Taylor Properties 505-470-0818.

RUSTIC BUT HIP

River View near Ilfeld $190,000 Open House Sept. 14 and 15 11:00 - 2:00

REDUCED PRICES! 3 bedroom, 2 bath plus 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment. $380,000. 5600 sq. ft. warehouse, $280,000. 5 bedroom 4600 sq.ft. 1105 Old Taos Highway, $480,000. 3.3 acres Fin del Sendero, $145,000. 505-470-5877

Catherine Alexander 505 231-8648 Skyes the Limit Realty 505 988-2034

LEASE & OWN!

ZERO DOWN! ZIA VISTAS LARGEST 2 BEDROOMS, 2 BATH CONDO. $1216 INCLUDES ALL MAJOR COST OF OWNERSHIP. 505-204-2210

FARMS & RANCHES 426 ACRE Ranch with declared water rights. Adjacent to Tent Rocks National Monument. Call 505-843-7643. (NMREC Lic. 13371)

RIVER RANCH Private River Frontage 1,000 Acres, high Ponderosa Pine Ridges. Well, utilities. Rare opportunity to own this quality ranch. $1,599,000 Great New Mexico Properties www.greatnmproperties.com 888-883-4842

RIVERFRONT AND IRRIGATED PROPERTIES FROM $34,000 EASY COMMUNITE TO SANTA FE. Drip Landscaping, 2 Car Garage. 4 bedrooms, 2 bath. Near RailRunner Station. 1,851 Square Feet $218,000. 505-899-6088.

MICHAEL LEVY REALTY 505.603.2085 msl.riverfront@gmail.com PecosRiverCliffHouse.com

service«directory CALL 986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts to learn how we can help grow your business! CARETAKING

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

In Home Care:

Exceptional in home care for the home bound due to mental and/ or physical conditions. Four sisters and four daughters work together to provide up to 24 hour service. We have been in business since 2005, providing personal care and companionship. We take great pride in our work and care about our clients. Bonded and licensed. Call Maria Olivas 505-316-3714. www.olivassisters.com

GET NOTICED!

Add an Attention Getter to make your ad stand out Call our helpfull Ad-Visors for details

CALL 986-3000

CHILDCARE

CONCRETE Cesar’s Concrete.

Concrete work, Color, Stamp, and Acid Wash. Masonry work. Licensed, bonded, insured. License# 378917. Call Cesar at 505-629-8418.

HANDYMAN

PROFESSIONAL IRRIGATION

sprinklers, drip, new installations, and rennovations. Get it done right the first time. Have a woman do it. Lisa, 505-310-0045.

LANDSCAPING

CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS is committed to protecting your home. Creosote build-up in a fireplace or lint build-up in a dryer vent reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. Call 505989-5775. Get prepared!

CLEANING CLEAN HOUSES IN AND OUT

Windows, carpets and offices. Own equipment. $17 an hour. BNS 505-920-4138.

Handyman, Landscaping, FREE estimates, BNS 505-316-6449.

FLORES & MENDOZA’S PROFESSIONAL MAINTENENCE. Home and Office cleaning. 15 years experience, references available, Licensed, bonded, insured. (505)7959062.

Tree removal, yard Cleaning, haul trash, Help around your house. Call Daniel, 505-690-0580.

WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000

MOVERS

ROOFING

Aardvark DISCOUNT M O VERS serving our customers with oldfashioned respect and care since 1976. John, 505-473-4881. PASO DEL N O RTE. Home, Offices: Load & Unload. Honest, Friendly & Reliable. Weekends, 505-3165380.

PAINTING A BETTER PAINT JOB. A REASONABLE PRICE. PROFESSIONAL, INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR. 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE. RELIABLE. FREE ESTIMATES. 505-9821207.

AFFORDABLE HANDYMAN SERVICE

Housecleaning, garage cleaning, hauling trash. Also, Cutting Trees, Flagstone Patios, Driveways, Fencing, Yard Work. Greg & Nina, 920-0493 I CLEAN yards, gravel work, dig trenches. I also move furniture, haul trash. Call George, 505-316-1599.

REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, PRO-PANEL ROOFS, PAINTING, FENCING, YARDWORK. MINOR PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL. 25 years experience. Consulting. Licensed. References. Free estimates. (505)470-5877

ARTIFICIAL TURF. High quality, remnants at a fraction of the cost. Ideal for large or small areas. Call, 505-471-8931 for more information.

GREENCARD LANDSCAPING

Plan Now! New Installations and Restorations. Irrigation, Hardscapes, Concrete, retaining walls, Plantings, Design & intelligent drought solutions. 505-995-0318 PROFESSIONAL, HONEST, REASONABLE Excavating, Paving, Landscaping, Demolition and Concrete work. Licensed, Bonded, Insured References. 505-470-1031

HOUSEKEEPER. Offices, Windows, Yards. 15 years of experience. $18 per hour or for contract. Call Gabriela at 505-501-2216 or 505-5013293.

AVAILABLE CHILDCARE for children ages 20 months to 5 years old. Licensed CPR Certified. For more information call Deborah, 505-501-1793.

IRRIGATION

TRINO’S AFFORDABLE Construction all phases of construction, and home repairs. Licensed. 505-920-7583

TRASH HAULING, Landscape clean up, tree cutting, anywhere in the city and surrounding areas. Call Gilbert, 505-983-8391, 505-316-2693. FREE ESTIMATES!

ANDY ORTIZ PAINTING Professional with 30 years experience. License, insured, bonded. Please call for more information 505-670-9867, 505-473-2119. HOMECRAFT PAINTING Small jobs ok & Drywall repairs. Licensed. Jim. 505-350-7887

PLASTERING 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE. Professional Plastering Specialist: Interior & Exterior. Also Re-Stuccos. Patching a specialty. Call Felix, 505-920-3853. A.C.E. PLASTERING INC. Stucco, Interior, Exterior. Will fix it the way you want. Quality service, fair price, estimate. Alejandro, 505-795-1102 STUCCO, DRYWALL & REPAIRS Faux Plaster, paint to match, synthetic systems. Locally owned. Bonded, Insured, Licensed. 505-316-3702

ALL TYPES . Metal, Shingles, Composite torch down, Hot Mop, Stucco, Plaster. Free Estimates! Call, Ismael Lopez at 505-670-0760. ROOF LEAK Repairs. All types, including: torchdown, remodeling. Yard cleaning. Tree cutting. Plaster and stucco. Experienced. Estimates. 505-603-3182, 505-204-1959.

Have an empty house or apartment you need to rent? Read the WANT TO RENT column for prospective tenants.

STORAGE A VALLEY U STOR IT Now renting 10x10, 10x20, Outdoor RV Spaces. Uhaul Trucks, Boxes, Movers. In Pojoaque. Call 505-455-2815.


D-2

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

sfnm«classifieds »rentals«

1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED CLEAN ADOBE CASITA. Fireplace, saltillo floors, private patio. Walk to Plaza. Non-smoking, no pets. $775, utilities paid. 505-988-9203.

CHARMING, CLEAN 1 BEDROOM, $700. Private estate. Walled yards, kiva fireplace. Safe, quiet. Utilities paid. Sorry, No Pets. 505-471-0839 CHARMING, CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, $800 Private estate. Walled yards, kiva fireplace. Safe, quiet. Utilities paid. Sorry, No Pets. 505-471-0839 FURNISHED South Side 1 room efficiency $430 plus utilities; 2 room efficiency $470 plus utilities. $600 deposit. Clean, NON-SMOKER. 505-204-3262 SPOTLESS, FURNISHED efficiency. $520 monthly includes utilities. Quiet person, NON-smoker, NO pets. Deposit, references. 505-982-0136.

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED 1303 RUFINA LANE, 2 bedroom, 1 full bath, living/ dining room, washer/ dryer hookups. $765 PLUS utilities. 4304 CALLE ANDREW , 2 bedroom, 2 full bath, full kitchen, Saltillo tile, radiant heat, small back yard, storage shed, washer, dryer and dishwasher. $895 PLUS utilities. DOWNTOWN: *1425 PASEO DE PERALTA, 1 bedroom, full bath & kitchen, tile throughout. $735 all utilities paid. Free laundry room. NO PETS IN ALL APARTMENTS! 505-471-4405

1 Bedroom, 1 Bath

1,000 sq.ft apartment in private home, nice neighborhood. overlooking arroyo, trails, private yard, storage shed, washer, dryer, all utilities free. $975 monthly. 505-603-4262

1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. Recently remodeled off Siringo Road. $700 monthly plus deposit & utilities. No pets. 505-471-0521, 505-690-8502. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. Nice quiet neighborhood. Private parking. $750 utilities paid. First, last, $350 deposit. No pets, non-smoking. 505-920-4746 2 BEDROOMS , large living room, dining room, kitchen, bath, garage with hardwood floors, kiva fireplace, fenced yard. Clean. Washer, dryer on premises. $1200 monthly; $500 deposit. 5 references from previous landlords. Non-smoking. No pets. 505-982-5232

ATTRACTIVE, QUIET 1 BEDROOM.

Walk-in closet, carpet and tile floors, off-street parking. Camino Capitan, near city park, walking trails. $665 plus utilities & deposit. NO PETS. 505988-2057. CHARMING 1 BEDROOM Compound. Private Patio. Lots of light. Carport, Laundry facilities. No pets. Non-smoking. $650 monthly, $600 deposit. (505)474-2827 E. PALACE Ave. Two blocks from Downtown Plaza. One Bedroom, No Pets, Non-Smoker. $790 plus deposit. Washer, dryer. Utilities paid. 505-9833728 OR 505-470-1610.

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

Available Now!

$1150 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOUSE, PARTIALLY FURNISHED. South of Plaza. Non-smoking, no pets. Interviews 9/13- 9/15. 805-704-8019

LAS CAMPANAS 3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH Furnished. AC. No pets, nonsmoking. 6 month lease minimum. $6500 monthly plus utilities. $14500 deposit. 203-481-5271

15 minute application process

SAN MIGUEL COURT APARTMENTS 2029 CALLE LORCA Call for appointment

505-471-8325

SMALL DUPLEX OFF AIRPORT ROAD 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Hardwood floors. $600 monthly utilities included. $200 deposit. Year lease. 505-5774675

STUDIO APARTMENT

400 SQFT, 3/4 Bath, $600 monthly includes utilities. Quiet street. Non Smokers, Will Consider Pets. 505-6034196

COMMERCIAL SPACE

CONDOSTOWNHOMES 24 - 7 Security Quail Run

2 bedroom, 2 bath. Fully furnished. Country club living, gym, golf, spa. Month to month, short and long term available. $1950 monthly. 505-573-4104 DOS SANTOS, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd story, nicely upgraded, community amenities. $800. Western Equities, 505-982-4201. RANCHO SANTOS, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, pretty unit, 2nd story, 1 car garage. $1000. Western Equities, 505-982-4201.

WE HAVE RENTALS! Beautiful Homes & Condos. Great Locations. Unfurnished and Furnished. Prices Start at $1250 monthly + utilities, deposit.

GO TO: www.MeridianPMG.com Lisa Bybee, Assoc. Broker 505-577-6287 GUESTHOUSES

2 BEDROOM, 1 Bath, Carport House For Rent In the Village of Cordova. 40 minute drive from Santa Fe. $550 Rent, $550 Deposit. 505-263-1420 or 505-351-4572. 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH 2 car garage, washer, dryer. Breathtaking mountain view, trails, golf course. Near Cochiti Lake. $900 505-359-4778, 505-980-2400. 2 OR 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH COUNTRY LIVING AT IT’S BEST! 1,000 monthly plus electricity & gas. Brick & tile floor. Sunny, open space. Wood stove, lp gas, new windows. 1.5 acres fenced, off Hwy 14. Pets ok. Steve, 505-470-3238. 3 OR 4 bedroom, 2 bath; fenced yard; spacious living area. Safe, quiet Bellamah neighborhood. $1,300 month plus utilities. $1,200 deposit. 505-690-8431.

4 BEDROOM, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage, well maintained home in Via Caballero. $1,875. Western Equities, 505-982-4201.

RODEO ROAD, $950 MONTHLY. 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, washer, dryer, storage, carport. Non-smoking, no pets. Quiet. First, last and deposit. 505-699-3222.

OFFICES

Great location and parking! $500 monthly includes utilities, cleaning, taxes and amenities. Move in incentives! Please call (505)983-9646. Railyard Office or Studio in beautiful shared suite, with kitchen, bath, parking, cleaning, highspeed internet utilities included. $450 monthly. 505-988-5960.

Brokers Welcome. Call Southwest Asset Management, 505-988-5792.

SENA PLAZA Office Space Available Call Southwest Asset Management, 505-988-5792.

FREE ADS

LIVE-IN STUDIOS

505-992-1205 valdezandassociates.com PRIME DOWNTOWN LOCATION 2 bedroom, 2 bath, wood floors, vigas, small enclosed yard, washer, dryer, 2 car garage, $1800 plus utilities DETACHED GUEST HOUSE short walk to Plaza, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, private yard, $775 plus utilities. LA CEINEGA Charming 2 bedroom, 2 bath, private and secluded, large balcony off master, great natural light $1200 plus utilities CENTRALLY LOCATED 3 bedroom, 1 bath, carport, large storage shed, washer, dryer hookup’s, enclosed backyard $950 plus utilities EXCELLENT LOCATION 3 bedroom, 2 baths, 2 car garage, fireplace, washer, dryer, large kitchen and breakfast nook. Close to schools, hospital and downtown. $1750 plus utilities NORTH SIDE CONDO 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, kiva fireplace, vigas, covered patio, washer, dryer, $950 plus water & electric. LOCATED AT THE LOFTS on Cerrillos, this live, work studio offers high ceilings, kitchenette, bathroom with shower, 2 separate entrances, ground corner unit with lots of natural lighting. $1000 plus utilities

LOT FOR RENT FIRST MONTH FR EE . $220 monthly. Wooded area, spacious lots. Pinon Mobile Home Park, Pecos, NM. (505)690-2765, (505)249-8480.

TESUQUE TRAILER VILLAGE

"A PLACE TO CALL HOME"

505-989-9133

VACANCY

FULLY FURNISHED 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, backyard view! 730 sq.ft. You’ll have light, charm, and comfort! $1,100 month plus utilities. Available 9/15/13. 505-350-4871 PolaClark@aol.com

COUNTRY LIVING. LARGE, 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE. 20 minutes to Santa Fe or Los Alamos. Safe, quiet, affordable, luxury. 505-470-4269, 505455-2948.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS; furnished 3 bedroom 2 bath on 2 acres; 15 min south of plaza; non-smoking; no pets; available Sept 16th - Oct 1st; interviews 9/13 9/14; e-mail michellecaputo2010@yahoo.com or call for details 805-704-8019 or 805391-1191.

ELDORADO, 2 bedroom, 2 bath plus large office. Beautiful walled gardens and covered portal, washer, dryer, 2 car garage, beautifully maintained. $1,500, WesternSage 505-690-3067. ELDORADO NEW, LARGE 3 bedroom, 3 bath, hilltop home. 12-1/2 acres. Energy efficient. All paved access from US 285. 505-660-5603

GALISTEO CASITA

Newly renovated, Santa Fe style, beautiful ranch setting, 1 bedroom, washer, dryer. $750 plus utilities, security deposit. 505-466-3059

JUST SOUTH OF ELDORADO, FOUR BEDROOM, TWO BATH. On 5 acres, fenced, two car finished garage, security system, fireplace, washer, dryer hookups, extra 40’x60’ slab with utilities, nonsmoking, horses ok, inside pets considered, one-year lease, leasepurchase option. $1,800 monthly plus utilities plus deposit. 505-9831335 or 505-690-6651.

Advertise what you want to sell, $100 or less. The New Mexican will give you the ad for free.

ARTIST STUDIO. 827 Squ.ft. 8 foot overhead door, easy access to I-25. (110-120) volt outlets. $775 monthly with 1 year lease plus utilities. South Santa Fe. 505-474-9188.

It sells, you make money.

»announcements«

Even a stick kid gets it.

sfnm«classifieds 986-3000 classad@sfnewmexican.com OUT OF TOWN RENTAL PEACEFUL, GREAT VIEWS! 2 bedroom country casita. 80 miles north of Santa Fe. Highway 84. $350 monthly plus utilities. 505-988-1741

STORAGE SPACE

Single & Double Wide Spaces

TESUQUE TRAILER VILLAGE

A-Poco Self Storage 2235 Henry Lynch Rd Santa Fe, NM 87507 505-471-1122

"A PLACE TO CALL HOME"

505-989-9133

VACANCY

4x5 $45.00 5x7 $50.00 4x12 $55.00 6x12 $65.00 8x10 $65.00 10x10 $75.00 9x12 $80.00 12x12 $95.00 12x24 $195.00

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH

Single & Double Wide Spaces

MANUFACTURED HOMES

OFFICES

A STROLL TO Farmers Market! Lovely South Capitol 2 bedroom home; private yard, deck, mature trees. Wood floors, washer, dryer. No smoking, No pets, $1,275. 505-986-0237.

WORK STUDIOS

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH

PEACE & Quiet: 3 bedroom, 2 bath Partial utilities paid. Plaster, stucco. Lease, deposit. Highway 14 area. $850 month. References required. 505-473-7155, 505-699-0120.

WAREHOUSES 1500 SQUARE FOOT SHOP-SPACE WITH OFFICE. Overhead door. Heated. In nice area on Airport Road. $1050 plus utilities. 505-438-8166, 505-670-8270.

SOLD

LIVE IN STUDIOS

S kylights, overhead doors, 2500 square feet, $975. 4100 square feet, 3 phase electric, $1175. La Mesilla. No dogs. 505-753-5906

LUXURY ITALIAN VILLA WITH SUNSET VIEWS

5 minutes to town serene mountain location, city lights. 2 bedroom, 2 bath with den. Private gated community. Pet friendly. $2250. 505-6996161.

RETAIL ON THE PLAZA Discounted rental rates.

Superb 3 bedroom, 2 bath, high ceilings, radiant heat, $1200 plus utilities and deposit. No pets or smokers. Tierra Contenta 505-699-1331. WALK TO PLAZA Charming Adobe 2 bedroom, 2 bath, plus den, 3 fireplaces, washer, dryer. $1700 plus deposit. 505-690-4791

VACATION

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE

South Santa FE , 1900 sq.ft. Garage, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 fireplaces, 1 acre lot. 2 horses, no barn. $1,500. 505-228-6004.

800 square feet downstairs, 400 - 500 square foot living area upstairs. Skylights, high ceilings. Wayne Nichols, 505-699-7280.

HOUSES FURNISHED

ELEGANT SANTA FE SUMMIT

OSHARA VILLAGE - Clean & Energy Efficient 2 bed 2 bath 1 car. All appliances, dog or cat ok. $1300 monthly plus utilities. First and last plus $200. security deposit. 505-982-5929

1200 & 1300 SQUARE FEET

EASTSIDE WALK TO CANYON ROAD! Furnished, short-term vacation home. Walled .5 acre, mountain views, fireplace, 2 bedroom, washer, dryer. Private. Pets okay. Large yard. 970-626-5936

ABIQUIU NM ON CHAMA RIVER 1 bedroom, remodeled 2 story cottage on private acres, beautiful surroundings, $720 monthly (additional studio space available at $100) NON-SMOKER 505-685-4764 blnkabqnm@gmail.com

NICE 4 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2 CAR garage. Fenced patio. $1,250 monthly, First and Last, plus $1,000 security deposit. 505-231-3257

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

2nd Street LIVE, WORK, OFFICE

1 BEDROOM FURNISHED GUEST HOUSE IN TESUQUE near Shidoni, 5 miles to Plaza. Vigas, Saltillo tile, washer dryer. No pets, Non-smoking. $1,113 includes utilities. 505-982-5292

4 miles to downtown on Hyde Park Road. All masonry, luxe home. Woodland setting. On-site manager. Guarded Gate. 2 Bedroom, 2 baths, study. $2400 monthly. 505-983-7097.

Large, Bright, Near Hospital 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Beautiful yard, modern appliances. Washer, dryer, off street parking. $900 per month plus utilities, 1 year lease. First month plus security deposit. Calle Saragosa. 505-603-0052, 505-670-3072

1810 SQ. FT. 3, 3 OPEN PLAN, PASSIVE SOLAR, SKY LIGHTS, WALKIN CLOSETS, TILE, pellet stove, outdoor storage, fresh paint + solarium + studio with private entry & kitchenette on .75 acres. pics online here. 1450.00 + utilities. 505-264-0501

1200 SQ.FT INDUSTRIAL BUILDING WITH SMALL OFFICE. Tall ceilings, 12’ overhead door, fenced yard, ample parking. Year lease. $1200 monthly. 505-690-4232, 505-692-4800.

HOUSES PART FURNISHED

NEAR HOSPITAL 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Great location New carpet, modern appliances. Washer, dryer, off street parking $1500 per month plus utilities, 1 year lease. First month, plus security deposit Calle Saragosa off St. Francis

986-3000

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED

1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. $620-1bdrms $680-2bdrms $720-3bdrms Includes: Washer/Dryer and Gas Stove $0 Security Deposit (OAC ) APARTMENTS FURNISHED

to place your ad, call

Found Kitten, 4 - 5 month old, white and buff, friendly and sweet, found dodging cars on Galisteo St in South Capital area on Thursday. September 5th, night. Is he yours? 505-989-1859 or 505-920-3688. FOUND September 10th. Tranquil Trail, East Frontage Road. Medium size male dog, reddish brown, docked tail, Heeler-Chow-Shepard mix? No collar. Very sweet. 505-6604436

LOST 3 MONTHS old, striped orange tabby kitten. Purple collar with bell. Pink tag: "Persephone". Camino Capitan area. Spayed, microchipped. Needs rabies shots. 505-204-4919.

EXTRA LARGE UNIT BLOWOUT SPECIAL

Airport Cerrillos Storage U-Haul Cargo Van 505-474-4330

1500 SQUARE FOOT SHOP-SPACE WITH OFFICE. Overhead door. Heated. In nice area on Airport Road. $1050 plus utilities. 505-438-8166, 505-670-8270.

FOUND

Have a product or service to offer?

Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000

227 EAST PALACE

Three room, 600 sq.ft., professional space, good light, ideal share. Faces Palace Avenue, assigned parking. Lease 505-820-7657 2 OFFICES WITH FULL BATH & KITCHENETTE. Excellent signage & parking. 109 St. Francis Drive, Unit #2. $650 monthly plus utilities. 505-988-1129, 505-6901122. Light bright office near Trader Joes. Reception, large conference room, offices and lots of storage. $680 monthly. Call 505-316-1228.

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO VICE PRESIDENT

For a complete description of the job and compensation, visit our website: www.stjohnscollege.edu. Click on – “About” “Santa Fe Campus” “Santa Fe Jobs.” This position is exempt, full-time 35 hours per week, with benefits. Send resume, letter of intent, salary history and names, addresses and phone numbers of three professional references to jobs@sjcsf.edu. Resume packets will be accepted until interviews begin. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

NEW SHARED OFFICE

$300 - 2ND STREET STUDIOS

Private desk, and now offering separate private offices sharing all facilities. Conference room, kitchen, parking, lounge, meeting space, internet, copier, scanner, printer. Month-To-Month. Wayne Nichols, 505-699-7280. OFFICE or RETAIL 2 High Traffic Locations Negotiable, (Based on usage) 505-992-6123 or 505-690-4498 PROFESSIONAL OFFICE space available for rent, 1813 sq. ft. located at 811 St. Michael’s Drive, Santa Fe. All utilities included, snow removal, plenty of parking. Phone, 505954-3456

ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE The Thrifty Nickel is recruiting for a full-time Advertising Sales Executive. Our ideal candidate must love sales and have the skill to close the sale. This position manages relationships with clients to grow and develop their business needs. In addition is aware of client’s industry and provides appropriate advertising solutions. Will be expected to maintain comprehensive understanding of competitive media and understand how the utilization of other media sources fit with customer’s strategic business objectives. Actively seeks out new business to meet or exceed sales goals. Selected candidate will be expected to generate advertising revenue by prospecting new business, outside and inside sales calls. Must be able to multitask, possess excellent communication skills, have great attention to detail and thrive in a high-stress environment. Base pay plus commission with performance expectations. Benefits and 401k plan with paid time off. Issue 32 Vol. 37 • Santa Fe,

NOW LEASING

Bright, spacious, affordable Studios & 2 Bedrooms at Las Palomas Apartments – Hopewell Street. Call (888) 482-8216 today to schedule a tour with our NEW management team and be sure to ask about the spectacular move-in specials we’re offering! Se habla español, llame ahora! SOUTH CAPITOL NEIGHBORHOOD. Walk downtown, charming adobe 1 bedroom. Spacious kitchen, vigas, skylights, hardwood floors. Pets considered. $775. Utilities included. 505898-4168.

August

8, 2013

FREE! TAKE

Angel Fire, , Mora, Ojo Caliente Alcalde, Maxwell Abiquiu, Madrid, Los Alamos,

Springer

ries & Accesso Auto Parts iles Autos Wanted Automob iles Classic c Automob Domesti nt Farm Equipme 4x4s nt Heavy Equipme iles Automob Import Pickups Sports Cars

SUVs & Trailers Trucks Buses Vans &

Place an ad today! 473-4111

4X4s

at 34K Engine at JEEP 2001 ssion miles. New Transmi 84K original er). New (4-cylind 505-466-2645 36K. $9200. -4111

Place an

ad today!

Place an

ad today!

473-4111

d Rubir Unlimite hard tires, Wrangle 2011 JEEP 5-speed, new n, wellt conditio con. Rare Call 505-216top, excellen ed. $32,851. maintain 3800

For A Call Now Any Paid, FOR CARS. or Dollar TOP CASH n Running 2Offer. Top Instant k, Any Conditio Tow. 1-800-45 Car/Truc Pick-up/ Not. Free 7729 $ TRUCKS$ CARS & ED JUNK Not Running, or $$WANT keys. Wrecked title, or Free. without with or haul away for 4424 We will 505-699-

Only 30,000 RAV4 4x4. clean CarFax, 2010 Toyota 1-owner $18,791. 505n miles, 4-cyl, t conditio excellen 216-3800

505-473

4X4s CYCLES E MOTOR KZ1000, JAPANES KZ900, GS400, WANTED KI: Z1-900, GT380, id, KAWASA i Triples, Cash-Pa ) Z1R, Kawasak 2-1142, (1969-75 CB750, ide-Pickup, 1-800-77 Nationw1-0726. 1-310-72 ssicrunners.com usa@cla

ONE!

WANTED

4X4s

4X4s

ks«

»cars & truc

FREE! TAKE

• 202 E.

Coyote, Penasco Wagon Mound, CANCochitiFIN Pena Blanca, Pueblo, Costilla, , Velarde, YOU e, Pecos, , Taos, Tesuque , Pojoaqu Arroyo Hondo,

ONE!

NM

Plaza Mexican ! , Las Vegas, & 1 New MEX, ICO ez, La Cienega Domingo, Marcy St. Hernand NEW Fe, Santo RN , Espanola ille, Santa THE , Embudo Eldorado River, Ribera, Romerov El Rancho, Red OVER NOR Eagle Nest, De Taos, Raton, Ranchos White Rock AUTOS D US ALLCuyamungue, Dixon, , Questa,

73-4111

Phone: (505)4

404 . Unimog ely reES MERCED miles. Complet 9821962 OBO. $24,000 23,000 original engine. built. Gas 670-7862 2511 or

AUTOS WANTED

cars and We buy ANY CAR! your car TODAY! TOSell CASH FOR 1-888-AU or the spot. pay on INSTANT offer: -6239) Call for (888-288 A.com 239 llACarUS e - Inwww.Se AUTO Insuranc AcMONTHAny Credit TypeRates $18 PER Best You the4073 now. stant Quote - We Find cepted Area. Call 800-734In Your

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473-411 CLASSIC

CARS

driver. PU. Great 1951 CHEVYfloor starter. r 235, dualI 6-cylinde when ever Floor shift, l flat up PowerfuI get thumbs send you a full -5105 carbs. town. Can (575)776 $18,000. drive into L.COM set of photos. 245@AO AGALL14

Submit resume and cover letter to: Wayne Barnard, General Manger 202 E. Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 Or e-mail to wbarnard@sfnewmexican.com Position is open until filled.


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds »jobs«

MEDICAL DENTAL

to place your ad, call ARTS CRAFTS SUPPLIES

Tech Aide

ACCOUNTING Full-charge Bookkeeper

Needed for part-time or full-time employment at constructionrelated company. Will be in charge of: payroll, AP, AR, GL, taxes, job-costing, financials, etc. College-level accounting a plus. We use PeachTree. Attractive salary, plus medical and 401K. Send resume and cover letter to PO Box 8363, Santa Fe, NM 87504.

XRANM has an opening to work with patients, medical records 12-9pm, MF at our Santa Fe office. HS diploma, GED, Windows systems. Prefer patient, medical experience, will train. Excellent salary, benefits. Send resume to resumes@xraynm.com, fax 505-998-3100. XRANM.com. EOE

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS LIFEGUARD THE PUEBLO of Pojoaque Wellness Center is looking to hire a lifeguard. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age, possess a high school diploma or equivalent, have at least one year experience and the following certifications; American Red Cross Lifeguard, First Aid, CPR and AED. Also, applicants must be able to pass pre-employment lifeguard skills test. 505-455-9355

SALES MARKETING

986-3000

AUCTIONS Raye Riley Auctions 4375 Center Place, Santa Fe.

Auction every Thursday. Viewing at 5:00p.m. Auction at 6:00p.m. We accept consignments for every week’s auction. 505-913-1319

LAWN & GARDEN

A-1 FIREWOOD INC. Seasoned Cedar, Pinon, Juniper; 2 cords, $240 delivered, 3 cords $235 delivered, 4 or more $230 delivered. Cedar, Pinon, Oak; $325 delivered, Oak and Hickory; $425 delivered. 505-242-8181 Visa, MC, Discovery, American Express accepted.

LARGEST SELECTION of Stone in Santa Fe. Variety of stones, competitive prices, sand blasting. 7521 Cerrillos Road. 505-426-7393, 505980-4205.

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

NATURAL BEEF, Santa Fe Raised, grass finished and grain finished. Taking orders for half and whole beef. 505-438-2432, 505-469-1016.

WHEELED WALKER: Foldable. Adjustable. Perfect condition. $20. 505-2319133

FURNITURE

MISCELLANEOUS

CONSTRUCTION

Lineman/ Laborers

CDL with telecom experience preferred. Must have valid driver license. Insurance & Benefits available. Call 505-753-0044 or email jody.gutierrez@ trawickconstruction.com. SEEKING APPLICATIONS FOR LABORERS AND LICENSED CRANE O P E R A T O R for possible upcoming project in Los Alamos, NM. Please fax resumes to 505-747-0537. Drug test & background check required! NO PHONE CALLS!

HOSPITALITY HIGH END, fine dining restaurant on Canyon Road is hiring experienced Servers. Experience must include fine dining, a vast knowledge of wines, and wine presentation. Submit resume to: elfarolbizmgr@gmail.com

MANAGEMENT

SALES POSITION

available for friendly professional person selling clothing, southwestern jewelry, art, and gifts. Apply at The Original Trading Post 201 W. San Francisco St.

TRADES ELECTRICAL APPRENTICE 3-4 year experience a plus. Must have valid NM driver’s license. Fulltime position Santa Fe area. Pay DOE. Art, 505-690-3233.

»merchandise«

36" Toshiba tube TV, in good shape. $40. Please call, 505-438-0465. ATTRACTIVE GLASS-TOP END TABLE. Metal legs with faux verde marble finish. Very nice! $35. 505-231-9133

LARGE ROCKY MOUNTAIN BULL ELK.

Don’t wait any longer apply today at: www.qhire.net/586185

Cute "Steve Madden" casual shoes black with red accent straps. size 8, excellent condition, $18. 505-4749020. Gianni Bini Boots, yellowish tan. Brand new, never worn. Size 6 medium. $40. 505-954-1144

2570 Camino Entrada 541 W. Cordova Road 505-474-6300, 505-780-8975

ANTIQUES AFGHAN HANDCRAFTED of shimmering blues. Large size, soft and cuddly. $25. 505-954-1144. Oriental, Persian, Turkish, Indian rugs. Retirement sale. Albq. since 1982. Every size. 419 San Felipe Suite A NW. Old Town. 11 ot 6 daily. Ph 505301-0857.

TWO RESTORED, CIRCA 1940’S, GAS COOK STOVES, 1 Okeefe & Merritt, 1 Wedgewood. Both present well, are complete working stoves. Photos available, choice $1,500. 575622-7638, Roswell, NM.

BEAUTIFUL BRUNSWICK 8’ Oak Pool Table, 1" Slate, with Harley Cover & accessories. Excellent Condition. $2,000.00 OBO. Serious inquiries only. 505-474-7438 Leave message BEAUTIFULLY CARVED B E D R O O M SUITE: California King bed with tempurpedic mattresses (adjustable). Head & footboards. 2 marbletop nightstands with drawers, 6’ marble top bureau, 7’ tall armoir. $5000. 21’ sectional leather couch with 2 recliners, 1 coffee table, 2 end tables- $600. 505-424-4311 BLACK TV S T A N D with shelf $35, Please call 505-438-0465.

Tony Lama Traditional Dress Cowboy Boots, brown, and very soft. Size 5 medium. $40. 505-954-1144

COLLECTIBLES 55 ISSUES, Early American Home, Early American Life. From 1996-2006. Includes garden, decorates and christmas issues. $55, 505-690-1062.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 1963 STEINWAY & Sons Upright Piano, Model 2577. Walnut finish, good condition. $3,500 delivered from Taos. 214-729-7150, 575-7761856.

DESK, BEAUTIFUL varnished keyboard tray, 3 drawers. $65. 505-577-3141

pine,

FAUX ANTIQUE ARMOIRE STYLE MEDIA CABINET. Will hold 44" TV and related components. 84"h x 44"w x 23"D, $325. Gary 505-989-9678, 505-660-7487 FREE, 5 drawer solid wood desk with accessories. Please call 505-4715783.

MOROCAN MIRROR. Nice detailing. $75. 505-986-8633. OAK BATHROOM cupboards. Small vanity, no top or sink, wall cupboard, towel bar, mirror, other accessories. Call for dimensions. $100, 505-6901062.

ONE WOODEN bookcase. 2 shelves. 3’x4’. $50. 505-986-8633. SMALL RATAN and bamboo end table. Unique. $60. 505-986-8633. SMALL WOODEN bookcase. shelves. 2’x3’. $25. 505-986-8633.

3

TV STAND, 2-shelf enclosed cabinet. Black with smoky glass door. 28x18x20. $30. 505-231-9133

APPLIANCES VINTAGE TOY BOX, engraved plate. 33x17x19. Solid wood. $75. 505-9894845

MEDICAL DENTAL

Santa Fe Indian Hospital has an opening for a Medical TechnologistCLS for general laboratory testing and lab section lead. Further information can be found on the USA jobs website www.usajobs.gov (announcement #s IHS-13-AQ-954080ESEP/MP and IHS-13-AQ-954167-DE) or by calling the SFIH Laboratory Supervisor at 505-946-9325 The IHS has preferential hiring for NA, AN, and is an EOE.

Exquisite vase with gold intricate outlay. 4 feet tall, $2,500, OBO. 505426-7393.

COMPUTERS

ARTS CRAFTS SUPPLIES FRAMES, ALL SIZES. Whole Collection, Reasonable. $4 - $25. 505-4749020.

pet

2014

The Santa Fe New Mexican’s

CALENDAR

FREE OUTDOOR rabbit hutch with top & front access and a removable tray. Must come to get it 505-473-5347

Need some extra cash in your pocket?

Sell Your Stuff!

28" WOK. VERY DEEP. BRAND NEW. $60. CALL 505-469-3355 COOKING DISCOS (DISCATAS) 16" TO 24" STARTING AT $30. Call 505469-3355

SPORTS EQUIPMENT HAND push Golf Cart, $30. 505-954-1144 WEIGHT LIFTING bench with assorted weights. 2.5-25 lbs. $100 OBO. 505982-1010.

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000

TOOLS MACHINERY HIAB KNUCKLE Boom, 7,000 lb capacity. $2,000, OBO. 505-426-7393. LARGE AND S M A L L woodworking tools, workbenches, hardware, hand tools, shop supplies and accessories. Good quality, prices. Call Maury at, 505-471-4107.

REWARD $700, Light Brown, white chest, black nose, Pitbull mix Puppy Taken Wednesday 8/7 around Resolana, Clark, Siringo area, Big 5. If seen please call 505-204-5497 .

WICKER TABLE. Beautiful. Coffee table or end table. 25x17x22H with shelf. $40. 505-474-9020.

WROUGHT IRON, antique finish, glass top dinette set. Southwestern, upscale design. $1,000 new - sell for $499.00; delivery: $40. 505-988-1289.

CONVERTER BOX. $40. Please call, 505-438-0465.

»animals«

LAWN & GARDEN

(credit card minimum is $10)

The top 25 pets will receive a pet photo session, by Pet Angel Santa Fe, and will advance to Round 2 voting. Vote online at:

FIREWOOD-FUEL SEASONED PINE FIREWOOD- cut last November. Hundreds of truckloads. It is piled in random lengths and diameters in our forest after thinning. Sold by truckload, depending on bed size. $60 for 8 foot bed. Five miles east of Peñasco. Call for haul times, days and location. 575-587-0143 or 505-660-0675

WHO WILL YOU VOTE FOR?

Round 1 Voting currently is in process- Vote until 9/18 for your favorite pet! Just $1 per vote!

Konica Minolta toner cartridge. Black. for use in Konika Minolta Magicolor Printers. $25. 505-4749097. "ROTIS-A-GRILL", VINTAGE Kenmore gas oven, Circa 1960, 36" wide, 4 burners, griddle, large oven with separate rotisserie and broiler. $500, works good. 505-989-4512.

The Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society 505-983-4309

TV RADIO STEREO

EOE

Position available in a oral surgery based practice. Qualifications include but not limited to: New Mexico Board of Dental Healthcare radiographic certified, dental assisting experience, high level of computer skills, able to focus and follow directions, exceptional communication skills and team oriented. Submit resume: Attention Cheryl, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Santa Fe, 1645 Galisteo Street, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Fax: 505-983-3270.

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

WALK BEHIND concrete cutter, excellent condition. $2,500, 505-4267393.

VINTAGE SLED, original finishes. Paris Champion. $50, 505-954-1144

RADIOGRAPHIC CERTIFIED DENTAL ASSISTANT

METAL STORAGE TRUNK, green with reinforcements and leather handles. $15. 505-231-9133

WESTINGHOUSE SANDWICH MAKER PRESS, new in box. $40. (new $79). 505-989-7930

CHIPPENDALE CHAIR, Circa 1890’s. Good condition. $375. 505-989-1842

Billy the Yorkie, is a 7 year old bundle of joy. This gentleman wants nothing more than to settle in with you and offer unconditional love. Meet Billy and other adoptable dogs and cats from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter this weekend at PetSmart, 3561 Zafarano Drive. We’re there from 1p.m. - 5p.m. Friday, 10a.m. - 4p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. - 4p.m. Sunday.

DARLING 5 month old miniature labradoodle puppies available now in Taos. Puppy shots all done. Fenced yard a requirement. Please contact: mitz@kitcarson.net or call 575-751-1924

VOICEOVER PERFORMERS & STUD E N T S : two teaching tapes with book. New $15 . 505-474-9020.

CLOTHING

High-end brands, great quality at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter’s resale stores, Look What the Cat Dragged In 1 and 2. Sizes 20 and up.

*Bilingual Required

large antler spread six points per side, 46" length, 38" spread, nice for home, office, lodge, conference room, gallery, casino, lounge or other. $1600 OBO. Santa Fe, 520-906-9399.

COMING SOON - 1" minus recycled concrete base course material. This product will be sold for $10.00 per Ton which comes out to $13.00 per cubic yard.

PLUS SIZES GALORE!

NOW HIRING Assistant Manager Sante Fe, NM

On the job paid training! Fast Food and Retail Experience a Plus! *Paid Holidays and Vacations *Medical, Dental, Vision and short and long-term disability *401(k) *And MORE

NOW AVAILABLE - 1-1/2 inch minus recycled asphalt for $13.50 per Ton which comes out to $17.55 per cubic yard. Crushing plant in operation off 599 ByPass. This price is for material picked up at the recycling pit. Please contact Jeff at 505-9755410 for directions and to make arrangements for pick up. We encourage builders and contractors to contact us for possible volume discounts. Individuals and homeowners are also welcome.

MBT BLACK LEATHER WALKING S H O E S . Womens 10, mens 8. Like new! $20, retail over $100. 505-4749020.

WE’RE LOOKING FOR UNIQUE PROFESSIONALS

Assistant Managers At Sun Loan , you will make sure people get the financial help they need when they need it most. In the process, you’ll build a career that is filled with growth, teamwork, and plenty of opportunities to make someone’s day a little brighter. Imagine that! As the Assistant Manager, you’ll work hand-in-hand with the Manager to make sure every customer receives our very best.

FENCE JOB cancelled! Good pricesnew T-Post, Barbwire, and Stays (no tax). 6’ 125# T-Post $4.50ea 36" Stays are $45 bundle 12.5ga twisted wireTuffmac $56 ea 2pt 15.5ga Stay Tuff $38ea. In Cerrilos. 830-377-9349

BENGALS SILVER KITTENS from Supreme Grand Champion, $950 to $1,600. 720-434-6344, chateauxchampagne@gmail.com

2 MAPLE bar chairs. $80 for the pair. 505-986-8633.

BUILDING MATERIALS A-1 LANDSCAPING MATERIALS #1, 9 foot Railroad Ties, $13.50. #2, 8 foot Railroad Ties, $8 . #3, 8 foot Railroad Ties $6.75. Delivery Available, 505-242-8181 Visa, MC, Discovery, American Express accepted.

PETS SUPPLIES

PROPANE BBQ GRILL, Sunshine Legend, with griddle. Storage wooden shelves. Good condition. $75. 505231-9133

RESALE STORE ASSOCIATE

Have an eye for detail? Want to help animals? The Santa Fe Animal Shelter’s premier resale store, Look What The Cat Dragged In on Camino Entrada, seeks a full-time sales associate. Weekends required; must have excellent customer service skills, previous cashier experience and be able to lift 25 pounds. Email resume to: sward@sfhumanesociety.org

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

FIREWOOD-FUEL

FOOD FRUIT

SCULPTURE BY GUILLOUME, wellknown contemporary Spanish Market artist, titled, "Campechano". Signed & Dated. On wood stand. Mint. 10"H. $450. 505-992-2728

D-3

santafenewmexican.com/ petcalendar

FEED EQUIPMENT SERVICES COMPOSTUMBLER 36"Hx30"Wx25"D with rotating 24" drum and wheels. Like new $100 (paid $270). Contact 505-913-1423.

ALFALFA GRASS Mix bales. $11 each Bale, for 50-100 bales. Over 100 bales, price reduction. Barn stored Ribera, NM. 505-473-5300.

or Call 505-986-3000

DONATE!

Donate Non-perishable pet items and 1 of every 10 votes will be FREE! Donations must be made at either of the Santa Fe New Mexican’s offices.

VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITES NOW! VOTING ENDS 9/18/13

Top 25 pets WIN a Pet Photo Session from Pet Angel Santa Fe and continue on to Round 2 Voting to compete for Great Prizes and the chance to appear in the 2014 Calendar. Vote online at www.santafenewmexican.com/petcalendar, or at the Santa Fe New Mexican offices.

Benefitting

animal shelter

505-986-3000


D-4

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

sfnm«classifieds PETS SUPPLIES

GARAGE SALE SOUTH

to place your ad, call

986-3000

CLASSIC CARS

DOMESTIC

CHEVROLET CAMARO Z28 1969: Real X-33 Norwood built 1969 Z28 Fathom Green with green interior. Completely rebuilt DZ302 restored to factory specs with less that 100 miles. M21 Muncie 4 speed with Hurst shifter, 12 bolt 3.73 positraction rear end. Mostly stock condition, ASKING $45,000. SERIOUS BUYERS ONLY! 505-699-9424

1982 Chrysler Cordoba 318 4BBL rear power amplifier, mag wheels, all power, excellent maintenance records, second owner, $3,400 or best offer. noga7@sisna.com 505-471-3911

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! IMPORTS

IMPORTS

CIELO VISTA Court Neighborhood Sale Saturday 9/14 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Custom cabinetry, furniture, office, kitchen items, linens, clothing, nice decorative items. MOVING TO EUROPE! MUST SELL EVERYTHING! Beautiful furniture, Art, Brand name kitchenware, China, Vintage items and clothes, Sony TV’s and more. 3221 LA P A Z LANE, Saturday, 8a.m.-2p.m.

Zoom is a 1 year old purebred St. Bernard who thinks he is a 120-pound puppy!

MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE Saturday, September 14th 8 to 3 2253 CALLE DE ARCE Huge selection of miscellaneous items. SATURDAY, 9/14 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 51 CRAFTSMAN RD., in Oshara Village. All kinds of furniture, tools, Diego Mulligan book collection, and CDs; much more!

2012 HONDA FIT SPORT Sweet as can be. Excellent condition. 5 Speed, alloys, Factory Warranty. 33mpg. 6400 mi. One owner, clean CarFax. Grand Opening Sale! $15,995. 505-954-1054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

57 CHEVY Pickup, short bed, step side. Rebuilt 283, 3 speed, excellent shape, many new parts. $9,000 Firm. For information 505-490-4158.

GARAGE SALE ELDORADO

4X4s

2008 SUBARU Outback Limited. Low miles, leather, dual roofs, excellent, clean, CarFax, $17,821. Call 505-216-3800.

Great 2 family Yard Sale! 11 Dulce Road Compac model 16’ sail boat, Vic 12 jewelry casting system, 1986 Toyota long bed topper, leather reclining sofa $400, human touch massage chair $500, more furniture and many many household items.

Tenacious is a 3 month old kitten with a name bigger than he is, but confidence is his middle name. These pets and many more are available at the Espanola Valley Humane Society, open 7 days a week from 10:30am-5pm. For more information call the Espanola Valley Humane Society at 505-753-8662 or visit their website at: www.evalleyshelter.org

»finance«

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Liquor License For Sale. Espanola, Rio Arriba, Also land and store. Call John, 505-699-3492.

»garage sale«

Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Take Eldorado entrance, right on Casa Del Oro, right on Dulce.

315 CORDOVA LANE Multi-family, Saturday 8 - 12 Furniture, art, clothes, books, kid stuff, tableware, household items AND a kitchen sink!

Join us this week for a lovely sale at 114 E. Sunrise Drive in Santa Fe. Friday, 9/13, noon til 4 pm, $1 adm.; Saturday, 9/14, 9 am til 2:00. These museum curators have moved and left behind great pieces: Fine antiques, fine art, mid-century pieces from Herman Miller, Mathsson, Komfort et al, Asian furniture, exquisite glass including Baccarrat, Tiffany, Steuben, fine quilts and linens, Navajo Rugs and pottery by Marie Tafoya,, a thunderbird necklace and fine jewelry. Pics and map at www.landmark-estates.com. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 8a.m. - 2p.m. 1149 Camino San Acacio. Vintage Jewelry and clothes, materials, tools, furniture, old windows and many treasures. Cash Only. Street Parking, do not block driveways.

Louisa McElwain Ranch Estate Sale Continues! Saturday 9/14, 9-2 pm 213-B State Rd. 76, Santa Cruz

»cars & trucks«

123 CAMINO DE LAS CRUCITAS, SATURDAY, 7A.M. - 12P.M. Beautifully hand made bags (Shakoshi) and PC-IPAD covers in fun African Materials. All the benefits go to the Women of Congo. All items are a prize. And other items.

38 CALLE San Martin, (off Tano Road) Friday & Saturday, 9-3. Lots of great stuff, home goods, portable evaporative cooler, kids bikes, new ceiling fan, clothes, jewelry, SO MUCH MORE...

AUTO PARTS ACCESSORIES

2007 HYUNDAI TIBURON Excellent condition with low miles. V6, Automatic, Moonroof, Infiniti Sound System, Alloys, Clean CarFax, Sweet deal. Grand Opening Sale! $9,995. 505-9541054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

1984 MERCEDES 300SD Turbo Diesel, Looks good, runs good. $4500. 505986-9924 2003 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 4WD V-6 Limited. White & tan, loaded, leather, sunroof, heated seats. Non-smoker, clean Carfax. NEW TIRES. 115k miles. $12,500. 505-310-2346.

2012 TOYOTA PRIUS ONE Sweet cream. Excellent condition. 8 yr hybrid warranty. 35k miles. One owner, clean CarFax. Grand Opening Sale! $17,995. 505-9541054.

2000 TOYOTA TACOMA. This truck is in great condition in every way, the motor runs great and is very strong and starts up fine with no issues $2,900. For more questions call: 804592-6387. 1981 MERCEDES 380SL convertible, 89,000 original miles. Body & engine are in excellent condition. Hard top included. Phone: 505-570-0828 or email at annemulvaney@yahoo.com.

www.sweetmotorsales.com

IMPORTS

2006 JAGUAR XK8 Coupe. WOW! ONLY 29,000 miles! Absolutely pristine, amazing low mileage, rare gem, don’t risk missing it! Clean CarFax $24,751. Call 505-216-3800 .

1974 MERCEDES 450 SL CONVERTIBLE. Good condition. 200,000 miles. $6,000. 505-660-5184

Toy Box Too Full?

CAR STORAGE FACILITY

2005 AUDI ALLROAD QUATRO WAGON Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Service Records, Manuals, XKeys, 69,000 Miles, Automatic, Perfect Air Suspension, Loaded, Pristine $14,995. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FR YOUR VEHICLE!

2011 TOYOTA RAV 4 FWD Sweet Cherry. Excellent condition. Leather, navigation. 34k mi. One owner, clean Carfax. Grand Opening Sale! $16,895. 505-9541054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945 2012 Land Rover LR2 SUV. Retired Service Loaner includes Bluetooth, Sirius Radio, Climate Comfort Package. Still in factory warranty. Showroom condition! $31,995. Call 505474-0888.

Airport Road and 599 505-660-3039

2011 Toyota 4Runner SR5 4WD. Low miles, well-equipped, 1 owner clean CarFax, $31,771. Call 505216-3800.

TONEAU vinyl truck bed cover. Fits Tacoma 2005 to current, 6 foot bed. Rails, clamps included. $100, 505-6702021.

CLASSIC CARS

2012 TOYOTA Camry XLE HYBRID. Over 40 mpg! 9k miles, FULLY LOADED, leather, moonroof, navigation, 1-owner clean CarFax $29,741. Call 505-216-3800.

1962 MERCEDES Unimog 404 . 23,000 original miles. Completely rebuilt. Gas engine. $18,000 OBO. 505-982-2511 or 505-670-7862

Stephens A Consignment Gallery

1032 OSAGE CIRCLE Saturday 9/14, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Women’s clothes, baskets, picture frames, printer, fax machine, work stools, storage carts, some furniture, yard pottery, miscellaneous.

1336 BISHOP’S Lodge Road. Tesuque Garage Sale. Saturday 8 a.m.2 p.m. only. No early birds. All sorts of stuff. Tools, old teacher’s desk, pillows, weedwhacker, curtains, etc. Some post-renovation stuff free, like old irregular sized doors. See Craig’s List for details.

CLASSIC ’90 Mitsu Montero. Rare 6 cyl two door Sport. 5 speed 4x4 never off road, annual mileage 2,300. Good to excellent conditions. All deluxe options and manuals, $5000 firm, (NADA $5925) Call, 505-984-2222 soon.

ESTATE SALES

Way too much to list- Antiques, Furniture, Books, Home Furnishings, Equestrian Equipment, Corrals, Saddles, Tack, Construction equipment and materials, pallets of Flagstone, moss Rock, Latillas, Cinder block and solid Block,Vigas, Doors, Windows, Vehicles, Wrought Iron, Western Clothing & Boots, Tools Bring your own muscle! Take 85/285 N, go Right at DreamCatcher Movies, go .7 miles, go Right onto 76 go .5 mile on Right. Like us on Face Book for images 505-471-0802

GARAGE SALE NORTH

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS, Red, Automatic, air conditioning, CD player. 4-door sedan. 35 MPG. 36,500 miles. Warranty good. LIKE NEW! $8,500. 505-983-7546.

700 GONZALES Road Saturday 9:00-1:00. Housewares, sporting goods, clothing, doors, furniture, lighting, pallets, toys, ’69 Toyota, CASH AND PAYPAL

LANDMARK ESTATES JUDY Says: It’s The Art of Connoisseurship!

2008 BMW X5 3.0si. 70k miles, Technology Package, Premium Package, Rear Climate, and Cold Weather Package. Showroom Condition. Non-smoker. No accidents! Warranty Available. $24,995. Please call 505-474-0888.

DOMESTIC

2010 Toyota Highlander Hybrid Limited. Only 30k miles, loaded, NAV, leather, moonroof, 1 owner, clean CarFax, immaculate. $35,421. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 MINI Cooper S Clubman. Turbocharged, 34 mpg hwy! great miles, super clean, panoramic roof, heated seats $18,971. Call 505-2163800.

810 JUNIPER DR Saturday 9/14 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Electronics, Bose Wave 3, clothing, crystals, juicer, books, framed prints, and much more! MOVING SALE Thursday-Saturday 11-4, 305 VERA DRIVE , Furniture, tools, building materials, kitchen gadgets, gas range stove, washer, dryer, new tub with jets, MORE!

GARAGE SALE SOUTH

#1 WINDSTONE ROAD, RANCHO VIEJO SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH 8A.M. - 4P.M. Great Furniture, wicker, and sleeper sofa, artwork, refrigerator, files cabinets, kitchen and garden items, and more! 3 GRAYHAWK PLACE Saturday 9/14 from 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.! See ad on Craigslist for more info, photos. Sale will be INDOORS!

2013 SUBARU XV Crosstrek. 4k miles, like new, clean CarFax $24,981. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 Toyota Prius II. Only 24k miles, 1 owner clean CarFax, 50 mpg and pristine! $18,971. Call 505-216-3800 .

1982 Chevrolet Corvette.

The engine is a 350 cid with Crossfire Injection, newly rebuilt with performance camshaft. The fuel injection system has been reconditioned. New tires. The transmission is automatic overdrive, that has been completely rebuilt with torque converter and Shift Kit. Power windows, Air Conditioning, Power Steering, Glass T-tops, 4 wheel disc brakes. Car has all matching numbers with original wheels. This car is a beautiful head turner, a real classic. Live the dream!!! Must sell in a hurry...no reasonable offer refused. Only $16,000 for a sports car that has the old Stingray look, with all the modern conveniences. Could be used as a daily driver, very reliable. Engine and transmission have a one year warranty from the time of purchase. 505-690-0838

2008 Cadillac DTS. Only 20k miles! 1SC package, NAV, moonroof, heated & cooled leather, 1 owner clean CarFax $21,951. Call 505-216-3800. 2006 BMW X5 Excellent condition with low miles. One owner, clean CarFax. 3.0 Liter, AWD, leather, CD, Alloys Sweet Dreams. Grand Opening Sale! $15,995. 505-954-1054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

2008 NISSAN 350Z Touring Coupe. 53,003 miles, 6 Speed Manual Transmission. Leather power seats, Bose Audio, and much more! Please call 505-474-0888.

2009 TOYOTA Prius II - WOW only 25k miles! pristine example, 1 owner, clean CarFax, don’t miss it! $17,461. Call 505-216-3800. 2007 LINCOLN Towncar. 45,000 miles, excellent condition, new tires, battery, records, full power, leather, hitch. $14,995 OBO. 505-466-1181.

2007 Volkswagen Convertible Beetle. Less than 45,000 miles. Leather seats $13,000 firm. 505-438-6040.


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds IMPORTS

IMPORTS

to place your ad, call PICKUP TRUCKS

986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! TRUCKS & TRAILERS

SUVs

D-5

CAMPERS & RVs

SPECIAL!

2006 Volkswagen New Beetle TDI Hatchback. 28,532 miles, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Monsoon Audio System, and much more. $13,995. 505474-0888.

2008 TOYOTA YARIS HATCHBACK Sweetie pie. Excellent condition. 4 cylinder, automatic, AC, CD, gas saver. Low 39k miles. Clean Carfax, no accidents. Grand Opening Sale! $9,995. 505-954-1054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

2008 FORD-F150 SUPER-CREW One Owner, 76,000 Miles, Carfax Records, Manuals, Bed-Liner, Warranty Included, Loaded, Pristine $16,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2007 LEXUS RX350 AWD Loaded! Heated leather seats, sunroof, power everything, new tires. Runs great 82k miles.

2006 FORD F-250 XL. Diesel. 4x4. Automatic. 108,000 miles. Long Bed. Newer tires. Runs great. Well-maintained. $11,200 OBO. 505-469-4041

Sam’s Used Cars St Michaels Dr at Cerrillos Rd 505-820-6595

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

1995 Damon Class A Motor Home $11,900 31’ Class A Damon Motor home, Chevy 454 V-8 engine. Own your home -- Comfortable Queen rear bedroom, full shower with bubble sky light, kitchen galley, hide-abed couch, easy chair, driver and passenger captain chairs. Tons of basement storage underneath. Sleeps six. Only 52,000 original miles. Easy to drive, clean, same owner since 1997. Located in Santa Fe. 520-906-9399.

NEW!! 2012 FLAT BED TRAILER. 14,000 pounds. GVW, 18’x8’ extra heavy duty. Loading ramps, tool box & spare. $4,999 OBO. 808-346-3635 2005 PORCHE CAYANNE S. Excellent condition, inside & out. 100k miles. One owner. Silver with black interior. $16,500. Carlos, 505-670-3181

SPORTS CARS

1992 CHEVY Conversion Van, 117,000 miles. A/C very reliable. $3,500, OBO. 505-426-7393.

»recreational«

VOLKSWAGEN R32 2008. Rare find R32, low miles 20,767 , Garage Kept, V6, 250hp, Gasoline, 6 Cylinders, All Wheel Drive. Patrick Aranda 505-9837391. View at the Corner of Hickox Street & Cortez.

2013 CHEVROLET Corvette Gran Sport convertible. Just under 2 000 miles! Truly like new, automatic, leather, BOSE, NAV, 3LT package $58,741 Call 505-216-3800. ,

1995 TOYOTA Previa AWD, My great workhorse. Runs and works good. Some nics and dents. All manuals and records. $2900 firm (NADA $3200) Call, 505-984-2222 Hurry!

VANS & BUSES

2005 VOLVO V50 AWD Turbo. Amazing 35k miles! Loaded, just 1 owner, clean CarFax, don’t miss this one! $10,991. Call 505-216-3800.

Sell Your Stuff!

2012 TOYOTA COROLLA SEDAN FWD Another One Owner, Remaining Factory Warranty, 35,000 Miles Garaged, Non-Smoker, X-Keys, Manuals, New Tires, Great MPG, Pristine $14,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICE! VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

SUVs

Need some extra cash in your pocket?

CAMPERS & RVs

PICKUP TRUCKS

2012 VOLKSWAGEN Passat SE TDI. DIESEL!!! leather, moonroof, awesome mpgs! $25,871. Call 505-2163800

2006 BMW-X5 AWD AUTOMATIC Local Owner, Clean Carfax, All Service Records, Non-Smoker, Garaged, Manuals, Xkeys, New Tires, Panoramic Roof, Leather, Loaded, Soooo Afford-ably Luxurious, Pristine $15,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! 2011 Nissan Frontier Crew Cab PRO-4X. Only 28k miles! leather, moonroof, Rockford Fosgate sound, new tires, 1 owner clean CarFax $27,641. Call 505-216-3800.

2011 VOLKSWAGEN-TDI JETTA WAGON MANUAL One Owner, CarFax, Garaged, NonSmoker, 54,506 Miles, Service Records, Loaded, Goodbye Gas Stations, Pristine $21,995. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000 2010 Toyota RAV4 4WD. Just 29k miles, prsitine, 4 cyl, 1 owner clean CarFax $18,971. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 42FT FIBERGLASS FIFTHWHEEL. 4 SLIDES, 2 BEDROOM, 2 AIRS, WASHER, DRYER, DISHWASHER, ANWING, 4 SEASONS. LIKE NEW, USED ONCE. 38,900 505-385-3944.

ANTIQUE 1969, 25’ AVION TRAVEL TRAILER. Good Condition. Recently Renovated. Needs some Modifications. Stored 20 years in Santa Fe. $6,000 firm (was $9,000) $15,000 new. (my dad’s #13) You take it, 505-9842222. 1987 CHEVY conversion van, 8 cylinders, power steering, power brakes, AC, CB radio, TV, bed, and refrigerator. $2,995. Call, 505-982-0444.

2012 JEEP Patriot, perfect condition. 1,600 miles, 2 wheel drive posi.trac. Red exterior, black interior. Air conditioning, CD. $13,500, 303-332-5646.

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2002 TOYOTA TACOMA. 1 Ow ner, bought new in Santa Fe, low 77,000 miles. TRD package, locking differential. Very hard to find in this condition! $14,500. 505-690-0323

TOYOTA LAND Cruiser 2001 Exc. cond., 167,000 miles, 2nd owner, new brks, timing belt, water pump, good tires, $13,500. 505-263-4067

LEGALS

At its September 20, 2013 regular meeting at Hotel Encanto at 702 Telshor Blvd. Las Cruces, NM at 1:30 p.m., the NMHIX Board will consider an amendment to Section 6.3 of the Plan of Operation to more closely reflect the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange Act’s establishment of the Exchange’s audit authority, and to reiterate the Exchange’s obligation to avoid taking action that duplicates the activities of the Superintendent of Insurance. The text of the proposed amendment is available at www.nmhix.com/wpcontent/uploads/201 3/01/PlanofOperProp osedAmendment6.3.p df. The full Plan of Operation can be found at www.nmhix.com/wp/uploads/2013/01/0816-13-Plan-ofOperation-final-andapproved.pdf. The public is encouraged to submit written comment to the Exchange before the September 20, 2013 meeting to the NMHIX at 506 Agua Fria Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 or to stakeholders@nmhix. com. The public is also encouraged to attend the September 20th meeting where anyone wishing to comment will have further opportunity to do so.

CITY OF SANTA FE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Governing Body of the City of Santa Fe will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at its regular City Council Meeting, 7:00 p.m. session, at City Hall Council Chambers, 200 Lincoln Avenue. The purpose of this public hearing is to discuss a request from Geronimo Hospitality, LLC for the following: a) Pursuant to SS606B-10 NMSA 1978, a request for a waiver of the 300 foot location restriction to allow the sale of alcoholic beverages at Georgia’s Museum Cafe, 223 & 225 Johnson Street which is within 300 feet of First Presbyterian Church and Preschool, 208 and 210 Grant Avenue.

b) If the waiver of the 300 foot restriction is granted, a request from Geronimo Hospitality, LLC for a transfer of ownership of Dispenser License #28050 from Monte Circle Partners, LLC dba Stats Sports Bar & Nightlife, 135 W. Palace to Geronimo Hospitality, LLC, dba Georgia’s Museum Cafe, 223 and 225 Legal#95432 Johnson Street, Santa Published in the San- Fe. ta Fe New Mexican September 11, 12, 13, 16, 17 ,18, 19, 20, 2013

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LEGALS

26’ 1997 Mobile Scout. One owner, one slide out, great condition! $8,500 OBO. 505-690-4849 Mike.

WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS

2009 Toyota RAV4 4WD. WOW only 19k miles! like new condition, 4cyl, clean CarFax $17,931. Call 505-2163800.

to place legals, call LEGALS

986-3000

LEGALS

Consumption Only) to All interested citizens be located at Jose- b) If the waiver of the are invited to attend ph’s, 428 Agua Fria, 300 foot restriction is this public hearing. Santa Fe. granted, a request from the Guadalupe Yolanda Y. Vigil All interested citizens Cafe, Inc. for a TransCity Clerk are invited to attend fer of Ownership of this public hearing. Dispenser License Legal #95702 #683 from Hoback, Published in The San- Yolanda Y. Vigil Inc to the Guadalupe ta Fe New Mexican on City Clerk Cafe, Inc. This license September 13 and 20, will be located at the 2013. Legal#95665 Pink Adobe and GuaPublished in the San- dalupe Cafe, 406 Old ta Fe New Mexican Santa Fe Trail, Santa CITY OF SANTA FE on: September 13, 20, Fe. 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC All interested citizens HEARING are invited to attend CITY OF SANTA FE this public hearing. Notice is hereby givNOTICE OF PUBLIC en that the Governing Yolanda Y. Vigil HEARING Body of the City of City Clerk Santa Fe will hold a public hearing on Notice is hereby giv- Legal #95701 Wednesday, Septem- en that the Governing Published in The Sanber 25, 2013 at its reg- Body of the City of ta Fe New Mexican on ular City Council Santa Fe will hold a September 13 and 20, hearing on Meeting, 7:00 p.m. public 2013. session, at City Hall Wednesday, SeptemCouncil Chambers, ber 25, 2013 at its regular City Council CITY OF SANTA FE 200 Lincoln Avenue. Meeting, 7:00 p.m. The purpose of this session, at City Hall NOTICE OF PUBLIC Chambers, HEARING hearing is to discuss Council a request from Foodie 200 Lincoln Avenue. Notice is hereby giv428, LLC for the folThe purpose of this en that the Governing lowing: public hearing is to Body of the City of a request Santa Fe will hold a 1. Pursuant to Section discuss hearing on 60-6B-10 NMSA 1978, from the Guadalupe public a request for a waiv- Cafe, Inc. for the fol- Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at its reger of the 300 foot lo- lowing: ular City Council cation restriction to allow the sale of alco- a) Pursuant to SS60- Meeting, 7:00 p.m. holic beverages at Jo- 6B-10 NMSA 1978, a session, at City Hall Chambers, seph’s, 428 Agua Fria request for a waiver Council which is within 300 of the 300 foot loca- 200 Lincoln Avenue. feet of Our Lady of tion restriction to alGuadalupe Church, low the sale of alco- The purpose of this holic beverages at hearing is to discuss 417 Agua Fria; the Pink Adobe and a request from Santa 2. If the waiver of the Guadalupe Cafe, 406 Fe Cider Works, LLC 300 foot restriction is Old Santa Fe Trail for the following: granted, a request which is within 300 from Foodie 428, LLC feet of the San MIguel 1. Wine Growers Liqfor a Restaurant Liq- Mission Church, 401 uor License to be located at Santa Fe Ciduor License (Beer and Old Santa Fe Trail; er Works, 4363 Center Wine On-Premise

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LEGALS

toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com LEGALS

g Place, Unit 9, Santa City Clerk Fe; and Legal #95700 2. Wine Wholesalers Published in The SanLiquor License to be ta Fe New Mexican on located at Santa Fe September 13 and 20, Cider Works, 4363 2013. Center Place, Unit 9, Santa Fe. New Mexico Environment Department All interested citizens Ground Water Quality are invited to attend Bureau this public hearing. Notice is hereby givYolanda Y. Vigil en pursuant to City Clerk 20.6.2.3108.G NMAC, the following Ground Legal#95664 Water Discharge PerPublished in the San- mit applications have ta Fe New Mexican been proposed for on: September 13, 20, approval. To request 2013 additional information or to obtain a copy of a draft perCITY OF SANTA FE mit, contact the Ground Water Quality NOTICE OF PUBLIC Bureau in Santa Fe at HEARING (505) 827-2900. Draft Notice is hereby giv- permits may also be on-line at en that the Governing viewed Body of the City of http://www.nmenv.st Santa Fe will hold a te.nm.us/gwb/NMEDW Q B public hearing on G Wednesday, Septem- PublicNotice.htm ber 25, 2013 at its regular City Council DP-1132, Los Alamos Meeting, 7:00 p.m. National Laboratory’s Liquid session, at City Hall Radioactive Council CHambers, Waste Treatment Facility, Robert Beers, 200 Lincoln Avenue. Point of Contact, Los The purpose of this Alamos National Labhearing is to discuss oratory, Environmena request from Tokyo tal Protection DiviCafe, Inc. for a Res- sion, Water Quality & taurant Liquor Li- RCRA Group, P.O. Box cense (Beer and Wine 1663, Mail Stop K490, Alamos, NM On-Premise Con- Los sumption Only) to be 87545, Los Alamos located at Tokyo National Security, LLC Cafe, 1847 Cerrillos (LANS) and the United States Department Road, Santa Fe. of Energy (DOE) proAll interested citizens pose to treat up to are invited to attend 40,000 gallons per day of low-level radioacthis public hearing. tive wastewater at Los Alamos National Yolanda Y. Vigil

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2011 SUNDANCE 3100ES, 5TH WHEEL. USED TWICE. THREE SLIDES, ALL THE EXTRAS, INCLUDING EVEN A FIREPLACE! W ILL TAKE BEST OFFER OVER $27,500NADA BOOK VALUE $42,500. 505-310-0309.

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LEGALS Laboratory’s Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility, and to discharge treated effluent to a mechanical evaporation system, solar evaporation system or to an outfall (Outfall 051 also regulated under a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the federal Clean Water Act section 402, 33 U.S.C. § 1342). Potential contaminants associated with this type of waste stream include nitrogen compounds, metals, organic compounds, and low-level radioactive materials. The Facility is located within Los Alamos National Laboratory, approximately 1.5 miles south of Los Alamos, New Mexico, in Sections 16, 17, 20, 21 and 22, Township 19N, Range 06E, Los Alamos County. Ground water most likely to be affected ranges from depths of approximately one foot to 1,306 feet and has a total dissolved solids concentration ranging from approximately 162 to 255 milligrams per liter. This public notice has been extended to a period of 90 days in which written comments may be submitted to the department and/or a public hearing may be requested in writing. NMED permit contact:

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LEGALS p Jennifer Fullam (505) 827-2909.

at

Prior to ruling on any proposed Discharge Permit or its modification, the New Mexico Environment Department, (NMED) will allow thirty days after the date of publication of this notice to receive written comments and during which a public hearing may be requested by any interested person, including the applicant. Requests for public hearing shall be in writing and shall set forth the reasons why the hearing should be held. A hearing will be held If NMED determines that there is substantial public interest. Comments for requests for hearing should be submitted to the Ground Water Quality Bureau at PO Box 5469, Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469. Legal#95438 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican September 13, 2013 Notice is hereby given that New Mexico Connections Academy will hold a meeting of its Governing Council on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 9:00 am. The meeting will be held at the offices of the school located at 4001 Office Court, Suite 201-204 Santa Fe, NM 87507. Legal# 95434 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican September 13, 2013


D-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS Notice is hereby given that on June 24, 2013, Brian W. and Rebecca F. Martinez, 71 El Sitio Road, Espanola, NM 87532, filed Application SD 02426, part of Subfile 9.104 from the Rio Santa Cruz Adjudication, with the State Engineer for Permit to Change Place of Use of Surface Water within the Northern Rio Grande Basin. The applicant proposes to discontinue the use of 0.28 acre-feet of surface water per annum from Acequia de la Puebla with a point of diversiqn on the Rio Santa Cruz Stream System at x : 583,855 and 5 1,819,880 (NM State Plane Qentral, NAD27, ft), for the irrigation of 0.1 acre of land located at Santa Fe County Road 88, (a.k.a-. La Puebla Rd) House #2II-8, owned by David P. and Katherine P. Rodriguez. The movefrom land is part of Tract I04, Santa Cruz H y d r o s u r v e y Mapsheet 9. The applicant has purchased water rights severed from the lands of David P. and Katherine P. Rodriguez and seeks to change place of use for the described water right tO 0.1 acre within a0.75 acre tract located in Santa Fe County in Section 8, Township 20 North, Range 09 East and partially located in the Santa Cruz Land Grant. The move-to lands are owned by Brian W. and Rebecca F. Martinez. The lands are located on Tract C’at#71El Sitio Road (Santa Fe County Rd 88-A), Espanola, NM, and are approximately 1,00Q,ft:north of the move-from lands. The moveto lands will continue to use water from the Acequia de la Puebla. This notice of publication is also posted on the Office of the State Engineer website at: http ://www. ose. state.nm.us/watelinf o*ri ehts_notice.html Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application: (l) if impairment, you must specifically identify your water tights; and/or (2) if public welfare or conservation of water within the State of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially effected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, P. O. Box 25102, Santa Fe, New Mexico 875045102, within (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax’s) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to 505-827-6682. lf no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sectio ns 7 2-2-l 6, 7 25 -6 and 7 2- I2-3. Legal#95415 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican August 30, September 6, 13 , 2013 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Regular Board Meeting of the Board of Education for the Pecos Independent School District will take place on Wednesday, September 18, 2013.

LEGALS

LEGALS

be liable to the suc- its bid verbally or in cessful bidder for any writing. The Plaintiff FRED TRUJILLO, SU- damages. may apply all or any PERINTENDENT part of its judgment NOTICE IS FURTHER to the purchase price THE PECOS INDE- GIVEN that the real in lieu of cash. and imPENDENT SCHOOL property con- At the date and time DISTRICT IS AN EQUAL provements OPPORTUNITY EM- cerned with herein stated above, the PLOYER AND DOES will be sold subject to Special Master may NOT DISCRIMINATE any and all patent postpone the sale to ease- such later date and ON THE BASIS OF reservations, RACE, NATIONAL ORI- ments, all recorded time as the Special GIN, RELIGION, AGE, and unrecorded liens Master may specify. SEX, MARITAL STA- not foreclosed herein, TUS, HOMELESSNESS and all recorded and NOTICE IS FURTHER special GIVEN that this sale OR DISABILITY IN unrecorded COMPLIANCE WITH assessments and tax- may be subject to a FEDERAL AND STATE es that may be due. bankruptcy filing, a Plaintiff and its attor- pay off, a reinstateLAWS. neys disclaim all re- ment or any other Legal #95633 Published in The San- sponsibility for, and condition that would ta Fe New Mexican on the purchaser at the cause the cancellaSeptember 12, 13 sale takes the prop- tion of this sale. Furerty subject to, the ther, if any of these 2013 valuation of the prop- conditions exist, at erty by the County the time of sale, this Assessor as real or sale will be null and personal property, af- void, the successful STATE OF NEW fixture of any mobile bidder’s funds shall MEXICO or manufactured be returned, and the COUNTY OF SANTA FE home to the land, de- Special Master and FIRST JUDICIAL activation of title to a the mortgagee giving DISTRICT mobile or manufac- this notice shall not tured home on the be liable to the sucCase No. D-101-CV- property, if any, envi- cessful bidder for any 2011-02930 ronmental contami- damages. nation on the properGMAC MORTGAGE, ty, if any, and zoning NOTICE IS FURTHER LLC, violations concerning GIVEN that the real the property, if any. property and imPlaintiff, provements conNOTICE IS FURTHER cerned with herein v. GIVEN that the pur- will be sold subject to chaser at such sale any and all patent RICHARD P. PADILLA, shall take title to the reservations, easeANN S. PADILLA AND above-described real ments, all recorded UNITED STATES OF property subject to and unrecorded liens AMERICA BY AND rights of redemption. not foreclosed herein, THROUGH THE INTERand all recorded and NAL REVENUE SERV- Jeffrey Lake unrecorded special ICE, Special Master assessments and taxSouthwest Support es that may be due. Defendant(s). Group Plaintiff and its attor20 First Plaza NW, neys disclaim all reSuite #20 sponsibility for, and NOTICE OF SALE Albuquerque, NM the purchaser at the 87102 sale takes the propNOTICE IS HEREBY 505-767-9444 erty subject to, the GIVEN that the undervaluation of the propsigned Special Mas- NM00-01590_FC01 erty by the County ter will on September Assessor as real or 25, 2013 at 11:30 AM, Legal #95681 personal property, afat the front entrance Published in The San- fixture of any mobile of the First Judicial ta Fe New Mexican on or manufactured District Court, 225 August 30, September home to the land, deMontezuma, Santa 6, 13 and 20, 2013 activation of title to a Fe, New Mexico, sell mobile or manufacand convey to the tured home on the highest bidder for STATE OF NEW property, if any, envicash all the right, ti- MEXICO ronmental contamitle, and interest of COUNTY OF SANTA FE nation on the properthe above-named de- FIRST JUDICIAL ty, if any, and zoning fendants in and to DISTRICT violations concerning the following descrithe property, if any. bed real estate locat- Case No. D-101-CVed in said County and 2012-02357 NOTICE IS FURTHER State: GIVEN that the purCITIMORTGAGE, INC., chaser at such sale Tract A-1, as shown shall take title to the on plat entitled Plaintiff, above-described real "Boundary Survey For property subject to Alvis E. & Joann R v. rights of redemption. McDonald... Tract A-1 And A-2, Portion of JOANNA E. Jeffrey Lake S.H.C. 1179 Tract 3 R E B E L G A L E , Special Master Section 31, T17N, R9E, CITIBANK, N.A. AND Southwest Support N.M.P.M.", filed in the ELDORADO COMMUN- Group office of the County ITY IMPROVEMENT 20 First Plaza NW, Clerk of Santa Fe ASSOCIATION, INC., Suite #20 County, New Mexico Albuquerque, NM on February 12, 2002 Defendant(s). 87102 in Plat Book 494, Page 505-767-9444 001 as Document No. 1193, 002. NOTICE OF SALE NM12-01716_FC01 sary.

The address of the real property is 4810 West Alameda St., Santa Fe, NM 87507. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on August 6, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $490,717.51 plus interest from April 11, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 8.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and Agendas are availa- time as the Special ble at the Administra- Master may specify. tion Office on the day prior to the Board NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale Meeting. may be subject to a The meeting may in- bankruptcy filing, a clude Budget Adjust- pay off, a reinstatement or any other ment Requests. condition that would An Executive Session cause the cancellamay take place dur- tion of this sale. Furing the agenda to dis- ther, if any of these cuss limited person- conditions exist, at nel matters and/or the time of sale, this pending litigation as sale will be null and per NM Statutes Arti- void, the successful cle 15 Open Meetings bidder’s funds shall 10-15-1 Subparagraph be returned, and the H (2 & 8). Action item Special Master and as a result of execu- the mortgagee giving tive session if neces- this notice shall not The meeting will begin at 6:00 pm in the Pecos Schools Board Room.

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to place legals, call

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986-3000

LEGALS common, in fee simple, and in possession of that certain real estate in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, located at 318 Fiesta St., Santa Fe, New Mexico, and being more particularly described as follows (the "Property"): Lot 4, comprising 0.138 acre, more or less, as shown on the plat of survey (the "Plat") entitled "Boundary Survey Plat for Olivia Trujillo Dotson, Eloy M. Trujillo, Bertha Boling, Josephine Vega, Joe L. Trujillo", prepared by Michael V,. Trujillo, N.M.P.S. no. 12130, and filed for record with the Santa Fe County Clerk on June 15, 2010, in Book 718, at page 009, as Document no. 1601576. You and each of you are hereby notified that unless you enter your appearance in this cause on or before the 21st day of October, 2013, judgment will be rendered against you in this cause by default. Plaintiffs’ attorney is Kenneth J. Cassutt, Cassutt, Hays & Friedman, P.A., 530-B Harkle Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505, telephone no. (505) 989-1434. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said District Court of the First Judicial District, Santa Fe, New Mexico this 29th day of August , 2013. Stephen T. Pacheco Clerk of the District Court By: Melody S. Gonzales Deputy Legal #95717 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on September 6, 13, 20 2013 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No. 2010-01771

D-101-CV-

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,

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p for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

p p y p ularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on August 6, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $291,294.84 plus interest from January 27, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 7.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale v. shall take title to the above-described real LEWIS J. SNYDER, property subject to WELLS FARGO BANK, rights of redemption. N.A., OCCUPANTS, WHOSE TRUE NAMES Jeffrey Lake ARE UNKNOWN, IF Special Master ANY AND THE UN- Southwest Support KNOWN SPOUSE OF Group LEWIS J. SNYDER, IF 20 First Plaza NW, ANY, Suite #20 Legal #95498 Albuquerque, NM Defendant(s). Published in The San87102 ta Fe New Mexican on 505-767-9444 August 23, 30, SepNOTICE OF SALE tember 6 and 13, 2013 NM00-01112_FC01

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on September 18, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 FIRST JUDICIAL Montezuma, Santa DISTRICT Fe, New Mexico, sell STATE OF and convey to the NEW MEXICO highest bidder for COUNTY cash all the right, tiOF SANTA FE tle, and interest of the above-named de- NO. D-101-CV-2013fendants in and to 01910 the following described real estate locat- OLIVIA TRUJILLO ed in said County and DOTSON, ELOY M. State: TRUJILLO, BERTHA BOLING, JOSEPHINE Lot 14, Block 14, Unit VEGA, JOE L. TRUJIL3, ELDORADO AT SAN- LO, ROSALIE TORRES, TA FE, as shown and ALICIA TRUJILLO, ANdelineated on the plat GELA CARLTON AND thereof (known as DAMIAN MIERA, sheet 12) filed July 22, 1974 as document No. Plaintiffs, 366,746 and recorded in Eldorado plat Book vs. 05, Pages 1-4, records of Santa Fe County, THE FOLLOWING New Mexico. NAMED PERSON BY NAME IF LIVING, IF The address of the re- DECEASED, HER UNal property is 6 Monte KNOWN HEIRS: Alto Circle, Santa Fe, SIMONICA TRUJILLO; NM 87508. Plaintiff does not represent or THE UNKNOWN HEIRS warrant that the stat- OF THE FOLLOWING ed street address is DECEASED PERSONS: the street address of NARCISO TRUJILLO; the described proper- ROSALIA TRUJILLO; ty; if the street ad- MANUEL TRUJILLO; SIdress does not match MON TRUJILLO; PAUL the legal description, TRUJILLO; RICKY TRUthen the property be- JILLO; EUGENE TRUJILing sold herein is the LO aka Gene Trujillo; property more partic- DOLORES H. VIGIL; ularly described AND above, not the property located at the ALL UNKNOWN street address; any CLAIMANTS OF INprospective purchas- TEREST IN THE PREMer at the sale is given ISES ADVERSE TO THE notice that it should PLAINTIFFS, verify the location and address of the Defendants. property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the NOTICE OF judgment entered on PENDENCY OF SUIT July 23, 2013 in the TO QUIET TITLE above entitled and numbered cause, THE STATE OF NEW which was a suit to MEXICO TO THE foreclose a mortgage AFORESAID DEFENDheld by the above ANTS AGAINST Plaintiff and wherein WHOM CONSTRUCPlaintiff was TIVE SERVICE IS adjudged to have a HEREBY SOUGHT TO lien against the BE OBTAINED: above-described real estate in the sum of GREETINGS: $197,864.51 plus interYou are notiest from April 30, 2013 fied that suit has to the date of sale at been filed against the rate of 5.750% per you in the District annum, the costs of Court of the First Jusale, including the dicial District Court of Special Master’s fee, the State of New publication costs, Mexico. The general and Plaintiff’s costs object of this suit is expended for taxes, to quiet Plaintiffs’ fee insurance, and keep- simple title in the real ing the property in estate described in good repair. Plaintiff the Complaint. has the right to bid at Plaintiffs are the such sale and submit owners, as tenants in

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toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

Plaintiff,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on September 25, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State:

Legal #95684 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on August 30, September 6, 13 and 20, 2013

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STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No. 2011-03505

D-101-CV-

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

FEDERAL NATIONAL NOTICE IS FURTHER MORTGAGE ASSOCIA- GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale TION, shall take title to the above-described real Plaintiff, property subject to Lot 23, Block 2, Canarights of redemption. da Gardens Subdivi- v. sion, Phase 2, as Jeffrey Lake shown on plat of sur- CELIA MEDINA AKA Special Master vey filed in the office CELIA G. MEDINA AND Southwest Support of the County Clerk, LUIS JAVIER MEDINA Group Santa Fe County, New PORTILLO, 20 First Plaza NW, Mexico on September Suite #20 26, 1985, in Plat Book Defendant(s). Albuquerque, NM 157, page 35, as No. 87102 576696 505-767-9444 NOTICE OF SALE The address of the reNM11-01945_FC01 al property is 268 Ca- NOTICE IS HEREBY mino Del Olmo, Santa GIVEN that the under- Legal #95682 Fe, NM 87501. Plain- signed Special Mas- Published in The Santiff does not repre- ter will on September ta Fe New Mexican on sent or warrant that 25, 2013 at 11:30 AM, August 30, September the stated street ad- at the front entrance 6, 13 and 20, 2013 dress is the street ad- of the First Judicial dress of the descri- District Court, 225 Santa bed property; if the Montezuma, STATE OF NEW street address does Fe, New Mexico, sell MEXICO not match the legal and convey to the IN THE PROBATE description, then the highest bidder for COURT property being sold cash all the right, tiSANTA FE COUNTY herein is the property tle, and interest of more particularly de- the above-named de- IN THE MATTER OF scribed above, not fendants in and to THE ESTATE OF Bernathe property located the following descri- dette E. Garcia, DEat the street address; bed real estate locat- CEASED. any prospective pur- ed in said County and chaser at the sale is State: NO.2013-0108 given notice that it should verify the lo- Lot 18, Block 2 of NOTICE TO CREDcation and address of ALTURAS DE SANTA ITORS the property being FE SUBDIVISION, as sold. Said sale will be shown on plat filed in NOTICE IS HEREBY made pursuant to the the office of the GIVEN that the underjudgment entered on County Clerk, Santa signed has been apJuly 29, 2013 in the Fe County, New Mexi- pointed personal repabove entitled and co, on May 23, 1980, in resentative of this esnumbered cause, Plat Book 80, Page 11, tate. All persons havDocument No. ing claims against which was a suit to as foreclose a mortgage 458,632. this estate are reheld by the above quired to present Plaintiff and wherein The address of the their claims within real property is 2083 Plaintiff was two (2) months after De Las the date of the first adjudged to have a Avenida lien against the Alturas, Santa Fe, NM publication of this noabove-described real 87505. Plaintiff does tice, or the claims will estate in the sum of not represent or war- be forever barred. $334,061.93 plus inter- rant that the stated Claims must be preest from December street address is the sented either to the 26, 2011 to the date of street address of the undersigned personal sale at the rate of described property; if representative at the 6.375% per annum, the street address address listed below, the costs of sale, in- does not match the or filed with the Prodescription, bate Court of Santa cluding the Special legal Master’s fee, publica- then the property be- Fe, County, New Mexition costs, and Plain- ing sold herein is the co, located at the foltiff’s costs expended property more partic- lowing address: PO

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p g BOX 1985, 102 Grant annum, the costs of Ave, Santa Fe, NM sale, including the Special Master’s fee, 87504. publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs Dated: 8/23/13 expended for taxes, insurance, and keepTammy Logghe 1000 Cordova Place # ing the property in good repair. Plaintiff 606 has the right to bid at Santa Fe, NM 87505 such sale and submit 505-577-1943 its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff Legal# 95429 Published in the San- may apply all or any ta Fe New Mexican part of its judgment September 6, 13, 2013 to the purchase price in lieu of cash. NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF The Board of Regents of the New Mexico School for the Deaf will have a Special Board of Regents’ meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, September 27, 2013 in the Pat Payne Room, James A. Little Theatre, NMSD Campus, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM. If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of a special service, such as an interpreter or amplifier, to participate in the meeting or if you need the agenda or minutes put in an accessible format, please call 476-6302, V/TTY. The Board of Regents of the New Mexico School for the Deaf values and recognizes the importance of effective communication with the school’s stakeholders. Accordingly, it welcomes and encourages participation at its meetings which are subject to the Open Meetings Act. The meetings are a vehicle for people to learn more about the school, raise questions and give input. Board of Regents New Mexico School for the Deaf Legal #95698 Published in The Santa Fe, New Mexican on September 13, 2013. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No. 2012-02126

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real D-101-CV- property subject to rights of redemption.

WELLS FARGO BANK, Jeffrey Lake Special Master NA, Southwest Support Group Plaintiff, 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 v. NM Albuquerque, 87102 KATRINA SOLTERO, 505-767-9444 Defendant(s). NM12-01761_FC01 Legal #95693 Published in The SanNOTICE IS HEREBY ta Fe New Mexican on GIVEN that the under- September 6, 13, 20 signed Special Mas- and 27, 2013 ter will on October 2, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of The Gallina East and Community the First Judicial Dis- West trict Court, 225 Mon- Ditch Association of Santa Fe, Gallina, New Mexico tezuma, be accepting New Mexico, sell and will convey to the highest sealed bids for restobidder for cash all the ration work located right, title, and inter- on the Gallina River est of the above- at Gallina, New Mexinamed defendants in co. Copies of the bid and to the following specifications may be described real estate obtained at the ditch located in said Coun- address given below. liAny contractor ty and State: censed, bonded and Lot 7, Block 1 of JIME- insured in the State NEZ SUBDIVISION, as of New Mexico intershown on amended ested in this job can subdivision plat of call Levi A. Sanchez survey filed in the of- at (505) 685-0602 for fice of the County further information. Clerk, Santa Fe Coun- A site showing will be ty, New Mexico on held September 18, August 23, 1984, in 2013 at 10 a.m. We Plat Book 144, Page will meet at the Gallina Nuestra Se21, as No. 549147. nora de Guadalupe The address of the re- Catholic Church Paral property is 4754 ish Hall, SR96, mile Morning Lane, Santa marker 17.7 to go to Fe, NM 87507. Plain- project site. Mandatiff does not repre- tory Contractor atto site sent or warrant that tendance the stated street ad- showing is required; dress is the street ad- i.e. bids will not be dress of the descri- accepted if not at site bed property; if the showing. Bids should to delivered street address does be not match the legal Gallina East and West description, then the Community Ditch Asproperty being sold sociation, P.O. Box herein is the property 1112, Abiquiu, New No more particularly de- Mexico 87510. scribed above, not bids will be accepted the property located after 5:00 p.m., Sunat the street address; day, September 22, any prospective pur- 2013. Contractor inchaser at the sale is terviews will be held given notice that it after the site showshould verify the lo- ing. Sealed bids will cation and address of be opened and read the property being by the Ditch CommisSeptember sold. Said sale will be sioners made pursuant to the 24, 2013 at 10 a.m. at judgment entered on the Nuestra Senora August 9, 2013 in the de Guadalupe Cathoabove entitled and lic Church Parish Hall, numbered cause, Gallina, New Mexico. which was a suit to It is mandatory bidforeclose a mortgage ding contractors atbid opening. held by the above tend Plaintiff and wherein The public is invited attend. Bids Plaintiff was to adjudged to have a should include all aplien against the plicable taxes and above-described real fees and should be estate in the sum of marked "Sealed Bid, $145,209.86 plus inter- Gallina East and West Ditch est from April 19, 2013 Community to the date of sale at Job" on the envelope. the rate of 6.250% per Legal# 95436 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican Continued... September 13, 2013 NOTICE OF SALE


Friday, September 13, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE PROCLAMATION OF NOTICE OF SPECIAL SCHOOL BOND ELECTION On the 24th day of September, 2013, there will be held in the Pojoaque Valley Public School District No. 1, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, a special school bond election for the purpose of submitting to the qualified electors of the District the question of creating a debt by the issuing of general obligation bonds. Section 2. The Precinct Polling Places for this Election are as follows: Votin g District 1 Election Precincts 5, 6, 23, 40, 60, 61, 87 and those portions of 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 59, 82, and 83 lying within the District Polling Places

LEGALS p September 20, 2013, being the Friday immediately prior to the Election.

y emitirán y se venderán en tal fecha o en tales fechas y conforme a los términos y This notice is publish- condiciones que la ed in my capacity as Junta determine?" Principal Filing Officer for this election. Los Centros para SANTA FE COUNTY Votar en dicha CLERK E l e c c i ó n permanecerán By: /s/ Geral- abiertos entre las dine Salazar horas de las 7:00 a.m. y las 7:00 p.m. el día LEGAL NOTICE de la Elección. PROCLAMACIÓN DE AVISO DE ELECCIÓN ESPECIAL DE BONOS ESCOLARES El 24 de septiembre de 2013 se efectuará una elección especial en el Distrito Escolar Público Núm. 1 de Pojoaque Valley, Condado de Santa Fe, Estado de Nuevo México con el fin de presentarle a todos los votantes habilitados del Distrito candidatos por elección para ser miembros en la Junta de Educación y con el fin de presentarle a todos los votantes habilitados del Distrito la cuestión si se puede crear una deuda con la emisión de bonos de obligación general.

Los Distritos Electorales y Los Miembros del Frank B. Lopez Gym Consejo del Precincto Multi-Purpose Room por esta elección son Pojoaque Valley los siguientes: School Northwest Corner of the Intersection of High- Distrito Electoral way 1 285 and 502 Pojoaque, New MexiElección co Núm. del Precinto Precinct Board Mem- 5, 6, 23, 40, 60, 61, 87 y estas partes de 1, 2, 3, bers 4, 7, 59, 82 and 83 Tracy J. Baca, Presidque residen dentro ing Judge Thomas Abel Miera, del Distrito Judge John David Roybal, Sitios Judge Dorothy Roybal, Clerk De Votación Doreen S. Mirabal, Frank B. Lopez Gym Multi-Purpose Clerk RoomEsquina Noreste de la Interseccion de Voting las Carreteras District 285 y 502 2 Pojoaque, Nuevo México Election Precinct Los Miembros del Absentee and Absen- Consejo del Precincto tee in person voting. Tracy Baca, Juez Principal Polling Thomas Abel Miera, Place Juez Office of the County John David Roybal, Juez Clerk, Roybal, Administra- Dorothy County Escribana tion Building Santa Fe, New Mexico Doreen S. Mirabal, Escribana Precinct Board Members Distrito Yvon B.Loretto, Pre- Electoral siding Judge 2 Patrick L. Ortiz, Judge Judy D. Roybal, Clerk Elección The polls for said Núm. del Precinto Election will be open between the hours of En Ausencia y En 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 Ausencia en Persona p.m. on the day of the Sitios De Votación Election. Oficina del (de la) At such Election, the E s c r i b a n o ( a ) d e l Condado la Oficina following question shall also be submitdel ted to such qualified, Administracion registered electors of Condado de Santa Fe Santa Fe, Nuevo the District: México GENERAL OBLIGATION Los Miembros del BOND QUESTION Consejo del Precincto "Shall the Board of Education of the Yvon B. Loretto, Juez Pojoaque Valley Pub- Principal lic School District No. 1, County of Santa Fe, Patrick Ortiz, Juez Roybal, State of New Mexico, Judy be authorized to is- Escribana sue general obligation bonds of the Dis- En dicha Eleccion, la cuestión trict, in one series or siguiente more, in the aggre- será sometida a la consideración de gate principal amount of not ex- dichos votantes del ceeding $6,000,000, Distrito que se hayan y estén for the purpose of inscrito erecting, remodeling, habilitados: making additions to and furnishing school CUESTIÓN DE BONOS buildings and pur- DE OBLIGACIÓN GENchasing or improving ERAL school grounds and purchasing computer "¿Se le concederá la software and hard- autorización a la Junware for student use ta de Educación del Escolar in public schools, Distrito providing matching Público Núm. 1 de Valley, funds for capital out- Pojoaque lay projects funded Condado de Santa Fe, de Nuevo pursuant to the Pub- Estado lic School Capital México a fin de que emita Bonos de una Outlay Act [22 24 1 o más de NMSA 1978], or any serie general combination of these obligación purposes, said bonds del Distrito, en la to be payable from suma agregada pringeneral (ad valorem) cipal que no exceda taxes and to be is- de los $6,000,000, con sued and sold at such el fin de construir, agregar time or times upon remodelar, such terms and con- anexos y amueblar a los edificios ditions as the Board escolares y comprar may determine?" o mejorar terrenos Absentee voting will escolares y comprar be permitted in the programas y equipo manner authorized de computadora para by Section 1-6-1 et el uso estudiantil en seq., NMSA 1978; pro- las escuelas públicas, fondos vided, however, that proveyendo por los pursuant to Section igualados proyectos de 1-22-19, NMSA 1978, d e s e m b o l s o s qualified electors may also vote absen- capitales financiados tee in person at the conforme al Acto de office of the County D e s e m b o l s o s [22-24-1 Clerk of Santa Fe Capitales County during the NMSA 1978], o una regular hours and combinación de estos los days of business própositos, bonos se from 8:00 a.m., Au- dichos pagarán con los gust 30, 2013, being fondos derivados de the twenty-fifth day impuestos preceding the Elec- los (ad tion, until 5:00 p.m., generales y se valorem)

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LEGALS

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La votación en ausencia se permitirá conforme lo prescriben las Secciónes 1-6-1 et seq., NMSA, 1978; siempre que conforme a la Sección 1-22-19, NMSA, 1978 los electores habilitados podrán votar presentándose personalmente en la Oficina del (de la) Escribano(a) del Condado de Santa Fe durante las horas y en los dias hábiles entre las 8:00 a.m., el 30 de agosto de 2013, fecha que cae 25 dias antes de la fecha del la Elección, hasta las 5:00 p.m. el 20 de septiembre de 2013 que es el día viernes que antecede inmediatamente la fecha de la Elección. Este aviso se publica conforme a la autorización que la ley me otorga como funcionario principal de archivos para esta elección. Escribano(a) del Condado de Santa Fe Por: /f/ Geraldine Salazar [Sello de la Escribana del Condado] Legal#95437 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican September 13, 20, 2013 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No. 2013-00269

D-101-CV-

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, v. MICHAEL WHITE, CITIBANK, N.A. AND EQUABLE ASCENT FINANCIAL, LLC, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on September 18, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Tract "S-B-2", as the same is shown and designated on the Plat entitled "Land Division of Lands of James B. Ullrich and Kathleen S. Ullrich... Located in a portion of the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section 35, Township 10 North, Range Seven East, N.M.P.M...." filed In the Office of the County Clerk of Santa Fe County, New Mexico on April 27,1995, In Plat Book 302, Page 001, as Document No. 902,303. The address of the real property is 4 Spring Court, Edgewood, NM 87015. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on July 24, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $132,282.91 plus interest from May 31, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 7.000% per annum, the costs of

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sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

986-3000

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on October 2, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the abovenamed defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Tract A-1, as shown on plat entitled "Lot Split for Ion and Nancy Gilorteanu...", filed in the office of the County Clerk, Santa

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LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

y Fe County, New Mexico on February 26, 1996, in Plat Book 328, Page 003, as Document No. 936007.

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT

and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages.

dress is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on July 25, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $334,986.69 plus interest from December 12, 2012 to the date of sale at the current rate of adjustable 2.750% per year, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

The address of the real property is 1334 Agua Fria Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on August 10, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $575,634.69 plus interest from January 7, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.375% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages.

Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real 87102 property and im505-767-9444 provements concerned with herein NM12-03843_FC01 will be sold subject to any and all patent Legal #95497 easePublished in The San- reservations, ta Fe New Mexican on ments, all recorded August 23, 30, Sep- and unrecorded liens tember 6 and 13, 2013 not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special STATE OF NEW assessments and taxMEXICO es that may be due. COUNTY OF SANTA FE Plaintiff and its attorFIRST JUDICIAL neys disclaim all reDISTRICT sponsibility for, and the purchaser at the Case No. D-101-CV- sale takes the prop2012-00899 erty subject to, the valuation of the propTHE BANK OF NEW erty by the County YORK MELLON F/K/A Assessor as real or THE BANK OF NEW personal property, afYORK, AS TRUSTEE fixture of any mobile FOR THE HOLDERS OF or manufactured THE CERTIFICATES, home to the land, deFIRST HORIZON activation of title to a MORTGAGE PASS- mobile or manufacTHROUGH CERTIFI- tured home on the CATES SERIES FHASI property, if any, envi2006-2, BY FIRST HO- ronmental contamiRIZON HOME LOANS, nation on the properA DIVISION OF FIRST ty, if any, and zoning TENNESSEE BANK NA- violations concerning TIONAL ASSOCIA- the property, if any. TION, MASTER SERVICER, IN ITS CA- NOTICE IS FURTHER PACITY AS AGENT GIVEN that the purFOR THE TRUSTEE UN- chaser at such sale DER THE POOLING shall take title to the AND SERVICING above-described real AGREEMENT, property subject to rights of redemption. Plaintiff, Jeffrey Lake v. Special Master Southwest Support JOSEPH E. BLEA, LISA Group D. BLEA AND STATE 20 First Plaza NW, EMPLOYEES CU OF Suite #20 NEW MEXICO, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Defendant(s). 505-767-9444 NOTICE OF SALE

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Case No. 2012-03081

D-101-CV-

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVING LP, Plaintiff, v. MICHELE BOLTE, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOMEEQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-C, VILLA DE LA PAZ ASSOCIATION, INC. AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHELE BOLTE, IF ANY,

Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group Defendant(s). 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM NOTICE OF SALE 87102 NOTICE IS HEREBY 505-767-9444 GIVEN that the undersigned Special Mas- NM12-02661_FC01 ter will on September 25, 2013 at 11:30 AM, Legal #95685 at the front entrance Published in The Sanof the First Judicial ta Fe New Mexican on District Court, 225 August 30, September Montezuma, Santa 6, 13 and 20, 2013 Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the STATE OF NEW highest bidder for MEXICO cash all the right, ti- COUNTY OF SANTA FE tle, and interest of FIRST JUDICIAL the above-named de- DISTRICT fendants in and to the following descri- Case No. D-101-CVbed real estate locat- 2011-02784 ed in said County and State: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Unit 49 of VILLA DE LA PAZ CONDOMINIUMS, Plaintiff, created by Condominium Declaration v. for Villa de la Paz Condominium, re- MICHAEL G. corded in Book 1709, MERRIMAN, MORTPage 853, as amend- GAGE ELECTRONIC ed, and as shown on REGISTRATION SYSplat recorded in Plat TEMS, INC. (SOLELY Book 499, Pages 35- AS NOMINEE FOR 36, as Document No. LENDER AND LEND1202, 524, filed in the ER’S SUCCESSORS office of the County AND ASSIGNS) AND Clerk, Santa Fe Coun- ANGELA M. ty, New Mexico. MERRIMAN, The address of the real property is 3143 La Paz Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87507. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on July 31, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $180,293.69 plus interest from July 2, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other NM00-00722_FC01 condition that would cause the cancellaLegal #95694 tion of this sale. FurPublished in The San- ther, if any of these ta Fe New Mexican on conditions exist, at September 6, 13, 20 the time of sale, this and 27, 2013 sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages.

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NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

Defendant(s).

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102 505-767-9444

NOTICE OF SALE

NM00-02411_FC01

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on September 25, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State:

Legal #95683 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on August 30, September 6, 13 and 20, 2013

LOT 8, COLONIA VISTOSO SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN ON PLAT THEREOF RECORDED ON JULY 18, 2003 IN PLAT BOOK 537, AT PAGES 022-024 AS DOCUMENT NO. 1278032, RECORDS OF SANTA FE COUNTY, NEW MEXICO. The address of the real property is 7029 Vuelta Vistoso, Santa Fe, NM 87507. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on August 2, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $345,100.55 plus interest from February 19, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.875% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No. 2010-00218

D-101-CV-

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CERTIFICATES, FIRST HORIZON MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES FHAMS 2006-AA6, BY FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, MASTER SERVICER, IN ITS CAPACITY AS AGENT FOR THE TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT,

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NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

Plaintiff,

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale FLORIANA VENETICO shall take title to the AND THE UNKNOWN above-described real SPOUSE OF FLORIANA property subject to rights of redemption. VENETICO, v.

Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on September 18, 2013 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Tract 1, as shown on plat entitled "Lot Line Adjustment for The Estate for Carlos G. Ulibarri, lying and being situate within the Pasadena Addition, Subdivision No. 2, Lot 1, Block 2, at 1002 Hickox Street...", filed in the office of the County Clerk, Santa Fe County, New Mexico on July 26, 2002, in Plat Book 508, Page 017, as Document No. 1216427

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein The address of the rewill be sold subject to al property is 1002 any and all patent Hickox Street, Santa reservations, easeFe, NM 87501. Plainments, all recorded tiff does not repreand unrecorded liens At the date and time sent or warrant that not foreclosed herein, stated above, the the stated street ad-

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At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages.

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Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102 505-767-9444 NM00-00693_FC01 Legal #95499 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on August 23, 30, September 6 and 13, 2013

NOTICE OF DESTRUCTION OF DENTAL RECORDS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT ALL NEW MEXICO PERFECT TEETH DENTAL OFFICES INTEND TO DESTROY ALL DENTAL RECORDS FOR PATIENTS WHO HAVE NOT BEEN SEEN BY PERFECT TEETH SINCE BEFORE DECEMBER 31, 2005. ANY PERFECT TEETH PATIENT WHO WISHES TO OBTAIN HIS OR HER PERFECT TEETH DENTAL RECORDS FOR THE PERIOD BEFORE DECEMBER 31, 2005 MAY DO SO BY CONTACTING THE PERFECT TEETH LOCATION THEY VISITED ON OR BEFORE OCTOBER 11, 2013. Legal#95435 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican September 13, 2013.


D-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, September 13, 2013

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986-3000

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NOTICE OF NAMES APPEARING TO BE OWNERS OF ABANDONED PROPERTY

Pursuant to Section 7-8 A-9 NMSA 1978, Notice is hereby given that the persons listed below appear to be owners of unclaimed money or other personal property. To obtain information concerning these properties, address all inquiries to the Presbyterian Medical Services, Accounting Department - Unclaimed Property, PO Box 2267, Santa Fe , NM 87501. VENDOR-VNAME AADI, INC AAFPPT PROGRAM ABEYTA, DORA ADDINGTON, ROY ADDINGTON, ROY AETNA AETNA U.S. HEALTHCARE AGUERO, SUSANA AGUILAR, MARIA AGUILAR, MYDA ALBIN, JENNIFER ALL PAINT SUPPLY COMPANY ALPHA OFFICE SOLUTIONS A-MED AMERICAN HOME PATIENT AMERIPRIDE SERVICES, INC ANANDA, CHELA ANDAZOLA, MARTHA ANDERSON, WENDY ANDERSON, WENDY ANGEL, DENISE APODACA, VALERIE M. ARELLANO JOSIE ARELLANO, MARTHA ARMIJO, RHONDA ARMSTRONG, MELONIE ARNOLD, FRANK ARTESIA BUILDING SUPPLY ARTESIA GENERAL HOSPITAL ARVISO, LISA ASKINAZY, DANIELLE ATENCIO, BRANDY AVERY, COLEEN BACA, ADAM BACA, ANTONIA BACA, YOLANDA BAKER, CYNTHIA DORA BANDY, MICHAEL BARTON’S FLOWERS & GIFTS BEAMER, JONATHAN BEARDSLEY, JESSICA BEATY, SHARON BEGAY, FREDA BEGAY, FREDA BELL, WANDA BENALLY, SHARMAINE BERNALES, WILSON BERNARD, CINDY BEST WESTERN KACHINA LODGE BEST WESTERN-INN AT RIO RANCH BEST WESTERN-RED ROCK INN/GAL BIBLE, DELBERT BIBLE, DELBERT BIELENBERG, BRANDI BLACK, JANICE BLACKWELL, LISA BLEAK, MARK BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF NM BONFADINI, DONIKA BOWKETT, NICOLA BOWMAN, KATARA BOWMAN, KATHERINE BOWMAN, KATHERINE BRADLEY, CHRISTINA BRAKE, LYNDA BRAZIEL, VELVET BROADWAY MARKET BROOKS, JOSEPH BROOKS, TYSON BROWN, ARLENE BUCCA, BETSEY BUCHANAN, EILEEN BURGESS, BEVERLEY BURNS, STEPHANIE C DE ACOSTA, MARIBEL C DE BACA, CAMILA CAMPBELL, CHARLOTTE CANON, ALYSON CANON, ALYSON CANON, ALYSON CAREER TRACK CAREY, LISA CAREY, LYNN CARMAN, ROBIN CARPIO, DIXIE CASAUS, PATRICIA CASAUS, TOBIAS CASSIOPEIA, ANDROMEDA CELOSSE, LISA CELOSSE, LISA CHARLEY, ALONZO CHARLEY, MARTHA CHAVEZ, ANNA CHAVEZ, APRIL CHAVEZ, DEBBIE CHAVEZ, ELENA CHAVEZ, KATHERINE CHAVEZ, KATHERN CHAVEZ, KATHERN CHAVEZ, MARIA CHAVEZ, MARTIN CHAVEZ, OLIVIA CHAVEZ, PAUL CHEE, EDWIN CHIQUITO, MAGGIE CHURCH’S CHICKEN CHURCHWELL, ANTHONY CIENFUEGOS, MIRNA CIMA COMPANIES INC CINTAS DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT CISNEROS, CHARLOTE CITY OF SANTA FE CLAUSCHEE, CORINNE CLEVEREX SYSTEMS, INC. CLITSO, TINA COEN, ANNA COMCAST COMCAST CONNER, CHARLES CONSUMER REPORT CONTRERAS-TAYLOR, ROSE COOK, CHERYL COOK, GAIL COOKE, PEGGY COPY MACHINES, INC CORDOVA, JENNIFER COSMETIC DENTAL ARTS CRABTREE, DANIELE CUNNINGHAM, BARBARA Z. DALEN, GORDON DANN, GLENDA DAVIDSON, JAMES DAVIS, DEBBIE DAVIS, MICHELLE DCE INC DELUCA, BARBARA DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIR DIGIOIA, JAMES DIGIOIA, SABRINA DOYLE, NATHAN DUFUR, MEGAN DUNCAN, JUDY EARNEST, SUSAN ECONO LODGE - SILVER CITY EFIRD, PHILLIP ELDRIDGE, FAITH ELIOT PRESS ELLIOTT, RAY ELLIS, HAROLD ELLIS, LEAH EMW GAS ENGLAND, MARY ENVIRONMENT OF CARE NEWS ESPINOZA, GINGER ESPINOZA, KRISTEN ESPINOZA, MALISSA ESQUIBEL, CHRISTIE ESTATE OF LILYAN SIROP ESTRADA, ANNA EVANS, RACHAEL EXPRESSIVE INDUSTRIES FARMINGTON ROTARY CLUB FARRAR, SANDRA FELIX, BERNADETTE FELT, KANONA FERGUSON, RANDY FIERRO, PATSY FINNEY, JOHN FLEMING, KARTER FORCE, CHRISTINA FOX,GLENDA L FRANKS, JIMMY FREDERICK, ELEANOR “KAY” FUND RAISERS ASSOC OF SANTA F GABLE, JAMES GABORA. LYNNEA GALISTEO MENTAL HEALTH GARCIA, EVON GARCIA, FABIOLA

CITY FARMINGTON LEAWOOD CHIMAYO FARMINGTON FARMINGTON LEXINGTON BLUEBELL LUDLOW BERNALILLO GRANTS FARMINGTON FARMINGTON ALAMOGORDO LAFEYETTE ALBUQUERQUE

STATE NM KS NM NM NM KY PA MA NM NM NM NM NM IN NM

SANTA FE SANTA FE MOUNTAINAIR MOUNTAINAIR SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE FARMINGTON EHS FARMINGTON FARMINGTON ARTESIA ARTESIA ALBUQUERQUE SANTA FE AZTEC FARMINGTON SANTA FE MORIARTY SANTA FE SANTA FE AZTEC SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE FARMINGTON FARMINGTON FARMINGTON FARMINGTON FARMINGTON FAYETTEVILLE SANTA FE TAOS RIO RANCHO GALLUP FARMINGTON FARMINGTON GRANTS RESERVE AZTEC ALBUQUERUQE ALBUQUERQUE ALBUQUERQUE PECOS FARMINGTON SANTA FE SANTA FE

NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM

BLOOMFIELD KIRTLAND MOUNTAINAIR PLACITAS FARMINGTON RUIDOSO DENVER RESERVE FARMINGTON CHHC/THC SANTA FE SANTA FE DEMING SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE KANSAS CITY ALBUQUERQUE CCMC SANTA CRUZ ESTANCIA LA COMM BLOOMFIELD SANTA FE CHIMAYO CHIMAYO BLOOMFIELD CAHS SILVER CITY SANTA FE POJOQUE BERNALILLO FARMINGTON FARMINGTON FARMINGTON AZTEC MAGDALENA SANTA FE PORTLAND FARINGTON CUBA FARMINGTON FARMINGTON RIO RANCHO ALEXANDRIA ALBUQUERQUE RIO RANCHO SANTA FE FARMINGTON RESTON FARMINGTON THC/HC DALLAS SANTA FE FARMINGTON BOULDER DULLES FARMINGTON ROSEVILLE SANTA FE EL PASO MORIARTY ALBUQUERQUE FARMINGTON ALTO FARMINGTON FARMINGTON ESPANOLA FARMINGTON SANTA FE KINGS PARK SF HEAD START DENVER AZTEC FRUITA FARMINGTON FARMINGTON AZTEC SF HEAD START SILVER CITY, AZTEC AZTEC NATICK ALBUQUERQUE FARMINGTON TCHS ESTANCIA FARMINGTON DULUTH ALBUQUERQUE FARMINGTON EHS MIDLATHIAN SANTA FE SANTA FE PENNINGTON SANTA FE FARMINGTON QUEMADO SANTA FE CARLSBAD ESTANCIA CARLSBAD ALBUQUERQUE BLOOMFIELD AZTEC FARMINGTON FARMINGTON TULAROSA SANTA FE KIRTLAND CLOUDCROFT SANTA FE SANTA FE ESPANOLA

NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM CO NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM KS NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM OR NM NM NM NM NM VA NM NM NM NM VA NM TX NM NM CO VA NM CA NM TX NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NY CO NM CO NM NM NM NM NM NM MA NM NM NM NM MN NM NM TX NM NM NJ NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM

REFERENCE APWF-1048 APWF-12250 NWPR-2032 NWPR-7567 NWPR-7567 APWF-11095 APWF-6318 NWPR-5543 NWPR-4341 NWPR-7014 NWPR-6412 APWF-1101 APWF-8504 APWF-5040 APWF-1141 APWF-1155 NWPR-5071 NWPR-4545 APWF-13523 NWPR-6860 OPER-1173 APWF-7979 OPER-5795 OPER-1206 OPER-5279 NWPR-6135 NWPR-6344 APWF-1221 OPER-4086 APWF-13818 OPER-7017 NWPR-5828 APWF-1261 APWF-13860 NWPR-6798 OPER-1273 APWF-12762 NWPR-383 APWF-10307 APWF-12532 NWPR-6835 NWPR-374 NWPR-7032 NWPR-7032 NWPR-2161 OPER-1325 NWPR-8052 OPER-1334 APWF-1338 APWF-5791 APWF-6497 NWPR-839 NWPR-839 NWPR-7495 NWPR-5927 NWPR-7797 NWPR-6796 APWF-1364 NWPR-7536 NWPR-4184 NWPR-7027 NWPR-6691 NWPR-6691 OPER-7342 NWPR-4267 NWPR-1940 APWF-13575 NWPR-4784 NWPR-5242 OPER-4310 NWPR-6060 APWF-12420 NWPR-5728 OPER-1432 APWF-12871 NWPR-4435 APWF-9504 OPER-7536 NWPR-4492 NWPR-4492 APWF-5261 NWPR-7270 OPER-1472 NWPR-2735 NWPR-4589 OPER-7607 NWPR-841 NWPR-2896 NWPR-7143 NWPR-7143 NWPR-6559 OPER-6803 NWPR-5041 NWPR-3558 NWPR-4763 APWF-13583 APWF-4272 NWPR-3459 NWPR-3459 NWPR-1974 OPER-5888 NWPR-4548 NWPR-4544 NWPR-5744 APWF-10814 APWF-8512 APWF-10392 NWPR-6324 OPER-1563 APWF-3281 NWPR-412 APWF-1583 APWF-13749 APWF-9647 NWPR-6900 OPER-5916 APWF-9550 APWF-11408 NWPR-6266 APWF-1648 NWPR-3068 OPER-1656 NWPR-3777 NWPR-6842 APWF-10108 NWPR-5009 APWF-4636 NWPR-6213 APWF-12393 APWF-1732 NWPR-6737 NWPR-2258 NWPR-7408 NWPR-7723 OPER-1756 OPER-7521 APWF-12999 NWPR-5584 NWPR-5518 NWPR-5347 APWF-12239 NWPR-838 OPER-4569 OPER-7601 NWPR-5945 NWPR-5986 OPER-7537 NWPR-3340 NWPR-6046 OPER-4414 APWF-1889 NWPR-2014 APWF-6105 NWPR-6361 NWPR-4189 OPER-5934 NWPR-5946 OPER-4832 NWPR-5320 NWPR-5925 OPER-1915 APWF-1940 NWPR-4277 NWPR-4464 APWF-10009 APWF-9959 NWPR-4792 NWPR-6314 NWPR-1756 NWPR-7559 OPER-1995 NWPR-7259 OPER-2004 OPER-5342 NWPR-4692 OPER-6780 OPER-999000046 NWPR-5838 NWPR-449

The inquiry must include the name and address of the owner, and the reference number shown in this notice. Satisfactory proof of claim must be presented to the Presbyterian Medical Services Accounting Department to file a claim. All listed unclaimed property will be remitted to the state of New Mexico on November 1, 2013.

GARCIA, IVA FARMINGTON NM NWPR-4313 GARCIA, LEONARD SANTA FE NM OPER-4809 GARCIA, OLIVIA MORIARTY NM APWF-12261 GATELEY, SHARON ALBUQUERQUE NM NWPR-6922 GEIGER BROS. LEWISTON ME APWF-9318 GELLERT-LIGON, JULIE MANAGED CARE OPER-4639 GILBERT, JOANNE FARMINGTON NM NWPR-1842 GILLIS, CHITA SANTA FE NM NWPR-3708 GOEBEL, RANDY BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-455 GOMEZ, ANITA TAOS NM NWPR-283 GONZALES, KRYSTAL RIO RANCHO NM APWF-13423 GONZALES, PERLA LAS VEGAS NM NWPR-3007 GONZALES, SHERLEY QUESTA NM NWPR-6840 GONZALEZ, PERLA ALBUQUERQUE NM NWPR-8125 GRANTHAM-PHILIPS, GARRETT SANTA FE NM NWPR-8155 GREEN, KAREN APWF-10448 GRIEGO, TERESA C LA RES OPER-2104 GRISWALD, SHARI SANTA FE NM APWF-13210 GROW, STEFFIE THE HOSPICE CENTER OPER-4610 GUILEZ, YVETTE TULAROSA NM OPER-4346 GUPTA, GOURI JACKSON HEIGHTS NY NWPR-4454 GUSTIN HARDWARE MOUNTAINAIR NM APWF-2120 GUTIERREZ, ROBERT LA JARA NM NWPR-5886 GUTIERREZ, SARA FARMINGTON NM NWPR-7211 HAINES, CHARLES CORRALES NM NWPR-74 HALES, WILLIS HAUGHTON LA NWPR-7217 HARTMAN, PAMELA CORONA NM NWPR-6774 HAZEN, SAMANTHA BLOOMFIELD NM APWF-13482 HEALTHXNET ALBUQUERQUE NM APWF-13772 HEIGHTCHEW, DEIDRE SANTA FE NM APWF-12790 HEMMERICH, CARLA AZTEC NM NWPR-2145 HENRY, CHARLENE FARMINGTON NM OPER-2185 HENRY, CHARLENE PHOENIX AZ NWPR-3259 HENRY, MARILYN BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-4849 HENRY, RENITA FARMINGTON NM NWPR-479 HERNANDEZ, JOHN CUBA NM NWPR-6241 HERRERA, LINDA SAN JUAN NM NWPR-2656 HILLS, ADRIENNE SANDOVAL CHS OPER-6202 HOLIDAY INN SANTA FE NM APWF-2227 HOOVER, MICHELLE CLOUDCROFT NM NWPR-4231 HORNER-WALLER, KRISTEN FARMINGTON NM NWPR-6492 HOSPICE FOUNDATION OF AMERICA WASHINGTON DC APWF-2247 HOUSER, JOSEPHINE SANTA FE NM NWPR-3892 HOWE, CYNTHIA THC OPER-5271 HUGHSON, PAULA ALBUQUERQUE NM NWPR-7344 HULSE, KAREN CARLSBAD NM NWPR-6743 HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT SANTA FE NM APWF-5593 HUNT, CELIA WATERFLOW NM NWPR-499 INFINITI ELECTRIC, INC. CARLSBAD NM OPER-4897 INGRAM, COURTNEY LA PLATA NM NWPR-6520 IVY. PRESTON SANTA FE NM OPER-5044 JARAMILLO, MARY FARMINGTON NM NWPR-3148 JOEL’S PORTABLE WELDING SERV SANTA FE NM OPER-7278 JSEC ESPANOLA NM APWF-12646 KANE, MICHAEL DURANGO NM NWPR-4569 KEOGH, JANET TULAROSA NM NWPR-4680 KIRKES, JESSICA SANTA FE NM OPER-4337 KISHA, LYDIA CHHC/THC OPER-4478 KRAMER, JOEL TAOS NM OPER-7555 KRASNIQI, XHEVAHIRE SANTA FE NM NWPR-6078 KRAUKLIS, JUDIE GALLUP NM APWF-6903 LAEMMLE, DAMON SANTA FE NM NWPR-3269 LANIER WORLDWIDE INC ATLANTA GA APWF-2450 LEDBETTER, HEATHER MORIARTY NM NWPR-6797 LEE, COURTNEY SANTA FE NM NWPR-6986 LEMON, KRISTIN SANTA FE NM NWPR-8090 LEWIS, ROSE ESPANOLA NM NWPR-4671 LINCARE INC SPOKANE WA APWF-2500 LOGAN/UTE LAKE CHAMBER OF COM LOGAN NM APWF-6032 LOPEZ, GLEN SANTA FE NM NWPR-4808 LOPEZ, LENA SANTA FE NM NWPR-5223 LOPEZ, VICKY HOBBS NM NWPR-7063 LOVELACE HEALTH PLAN PUEBLO CO APWF-2530 LOVELACE WESTSIDE ALBUQUERQUE NM APWF-13338 LOZANO, HECTOR SANTA FE NM NWPR-4833 LUCERO, DOLORES AMALIA NM NWPR-4920 LUCERO, JOANN GARCIA CO NWPR-4415 LUCERO, LANNA PENA BLANCA NM NWPR-5712 LUJAN, CHERI MOUNTAINAIR NM NWPR-4412 LUJAN, LINDA PECOS NM NWPR-3964 LUJAN, SEVEDEO PECOS NM NWPR-5895 LUJAN, VICTOR SANTA FE NM NWPR-7463 LUPINACCI, KATHLEEN SANTA FE NM OPER-6712 MAESTAS-LUCERO, KIMBERLY SANTA FE NM NWPR-7070 MAGEE, JOANNA EL PRADO NM NWPR-6962 MARCH, RICHARD SANTA FE NM OPER-2567 MARGOLIS, DANIEL SANTA FE NM NWPR-7298 MARIANO, CAROLINE THOREAU NM NWPR-6838 MARIANO, CAROLINE THOREAU NM NWPR-6838 MARSHALL, ALEXANDER HESPERUS CO NWPR-7130 MARTIN, KIMBERLY FARMINGTON NM APWF-13324 MARTIN, MICHELLE BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-3859 MARTINEZ, ANDREA CANJILON NM NWPR-6261 MARTINEZ, ANGELA SANTA FE NM NWPR-6763 MARTINEZ, JOE L BLOOMFIELD NM APWF-4160 MARTINEZ, JOLYNN SANTA FE NM NWPR-4393 MARTINEZ, MARIA C. SANTA FE NM OPER-7489 MARTINEZ, MELISSA SANTA FE NM APWF-13055 MARTINEZ, NORMA JO LA RES OPER-4295 MARTINEZ, STEPHEN SANTA FE NM NWPR-5554 MATTHIESSEN, MARK HOSPICE APWF-12265 MATTHIESSEN, MARK SANTA FE NM NWPR-5600 MATTSON JR, GARDNER BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-2087 MAYS, ALLISON M. APWF-12174 MCAVINCHEY DONALD F SANTA FE NM OPER-4992 MCDONALD, MARIA MORIARTY NM NWPR-7316 MCGEE, KENT BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-5114 MEDICAL CENTER PHARMACY SANTA FE NM APWF-11036 MEDICAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICE EAU CLAIRE WI OPER-2651 MEDICAL LETTER NEW ROCHELLE NY APWF-2654 MEDTRONIC PHYSIO CONTROL REDMOND WA APWF-7234 MENDEZ, RACHEL HARRIET AR NWPR-5140 MENENDEZ, NERY SANTA FE NM NWPR-4004 MERAZ, ISABELLA ALBUQUERQUE NM NWPR-7125 MEZA, ALMA ALBUQUERQUE NM NWPR-6811 MIERA JOANN SANTA FE NM OPER-2677 MIERA, JOANN SANTA FE NM NWPR-3257 MIKKELSEN, JUDITH SANTA FE NM NWPR-575 MILES, GAIL C. FARMINGTON NM APWF-13027 MILLER, AUDNI GALLUP NM APWF-12971 MILLER, LINDA RUIDOSO NM OPER-3996 MITCHELL, JOHANNA SANTA FE NM APWF-12236 MLADOSICH, ANA SANTA FE NM NWPR-3327 MO-LOPEZ, AUDREY ALBUQUERQUE NM NWPR-6097 MONROY, LINDA MAE CERRILLOS NM APWF-13058 MONROY, YOLANDA ORTIZ NM APWF-12733 MONTANEZ, BRENDA SANTA FE NM NWPR-6274 MONTANO, YOLANDA SANTA FE NM APWF-12572 MONTOYA MARIA LA COMMUNIDAD OPER-4996 MONTOYA, ERICA SANTA FE NM APWF-13492 MONTOYA, MARIE E CAHS OPER-5750 MONTOYA, REBECCA PHOENIX AZ NWPR-4151 MOONEY, JANE SANTA FE NM OPER-2708 MOORE, DUSTIN FARMINGTON NM NWPR-7903 MOORE, STEVEN BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-6204 MORALES, MYRIAM SANTA FE NM NWPR-1978 MORTENSEN, LINDA ALBUQUERQUE NM APWF-13262 MOTHERS HELPING MOTHERS CARLSBAD NM OPER-5533 MOYA, ISABEL AZTEC NM NWPR-582 MT TAYLOR MEDICAL SUPPLY GRANTS NM APWF-7095 MTE INC CUBA NM APWF-2729 MUNOZ, ERIC SANTA FE NM OPER-2731 MUNOZ, LUIS SANTA FE NM NWPR-2630 MUNOZ, MARIA BLOOMFIELD NM NWPR-221 MURPHY, BARBARA FARMINGTON NM OPER-2734 MYERS, HERMAN TULAROSA NM APWF-8977 NACHC WASHINGTON DC APWF-6671 NAJERA, BERNADETTE RIO RANCHO NM APWF-11633 NAJERA, SIMON NAVAJO DAM NM NWPR-5208 NAMSS/NATL ASSOC MED.STAFF SV AUSTIN, TX APWF-5904 NATL TECHNICAL INFO SERVICE SPRINGFIELD VA OPER-4749 NEBRASKA EMERGENCY MEDICINE P LINCOLN NE APWF-10894 NEITO, BERTHA SANTA FE NM OPER-5798 NELSON, LYNDSAE KIRTLAND NM NWPR-6132 NELSON, WILLIAM RIO RANCHO NM NWPR-5851 NESTLERODE, JORDAN THE HOSPICE CENTER APWF-14021 NESTLERODE, JORDAN LYNN WOOD WA NWPR-7050 NEW ORLEANS REGIONAL PHYSICIA KENNER LA APWF-12616 NEZ, BARBARA FARMINGTON NM NWPR-2411 NICKERSON, RANDALL FARMINGTON NM NWPR-837 NM ASSOC OF DRUG COURT ALBUQUERQUE NM APWF-5941 NM MAINTENANCE CO GRANTS NM OPER-2859 NM PRIMARY CARE ASSOCIATION ALBUQUERQUE NM APWF-2867 NORTHERN NM BOTTLING DBA SANTA FE NM APWF-2904 NORTHERN NM COMMUNITY COLLEGE EL RITO NM APWF-4278 NORTHERN NM HUMAN RESOURCES SANTA FE NM OPER-7165 NOVICK, JENNIFER SANTA FE NM OPER-2911 NOWLIN-MADRID, HEATHER Farmington NM NWPR-5595 NUNEZ, LESLEE QUAY NM APWF-12232 OCHOA, ERIKA SANTA FE NM NWPR-3534 OLSEN, VIVIAN SANTA FE NM NWPR-3663 ORAL CANCER PREVENTION INTNL MONSEY NY APWF-5981 ORTEGA ROBERT QUESTA NM APWF-2938 ORTEGA, MAXINE QUESTA NM NWPR-597 ORTIZ, EVELYN SANTA FE NM NWPR-3851 ORTIZ, MARISOL SANTA FE NM APWF-13450 ORTIZ, SALLY SANTA FE NM NWPR-5102 PADIA, BEVERLY AZTEC NM NWPR-602 PADILLA, THERESE QUESTA OPER-4696 PAGE, GLENDA ESTANCIA NM NWPR-6158 Legal # 95433, Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican September 13, 2013

PARRETT, AVERYE PARTS PLUS PATTON MATTHEWS, KATHERINE PAYNE, NICOLE PAZ, ALEXANDRIA PEREA, STELLA PEREZ, RAMON D.D.S. PETER, JENNIFER PETERS, AMANDA PIERCE, VALERIE PIPER, GWENDOLYN PIPER, GWENDOLYN POJOAQUE TRUE VALUE PONCHALEK, KARL POPE, EDWARD POSTLEWAIT, HILARY PRESBYTERIAN HEALTHCARE SVC PRESCRIBING REFERENCE INC. PRICHARD, SHIRLEY PROTECTION ONE ALARM PROVENCE, JANET PROVIDIAN NATIONAL BANK PRUITT, BONNIE QUAM, GAIL QUEST DEX QUINTANA, HELENE RADIANCE CORPORATION RADIO SERVICES RADIO SHACK RAEL, GEORGIANA RAEL-VIGIL, CYNTHIA RAINES, LINDA RAMIREZ, FERNANDO RDM WASTE MANAGEMENT REIN DANCE ASSOCIATION, INC REININGA, MARK RENTZ, PAUL RHODES, MARY RHODES, THERESA RICHARDS’ TRUE-VALUE RICOH USA,INC. RIFFLE, MARION RIOS, JUANA RIOS, LORI RIVERA, CARLA ROAD RUNNER MARKET ROBERTSON, HEATHER RODRIGUEZ, NAOMI ROGERS, REBECCA ROMERO, ARIEN ROMERO, DOLORES ROMERO, MARYLOU ROMERO, TIFFANIE ROSS - TOLEDO, KIMBERLY ROYBAL, ADELINA ROYBAL, AMANDA RUIZ, LEAH RUNNELLS, BRENDA SACO, KAREN SALABIYE, JACOB SALAZAR, BECKY SALAZAR, BECKY SALAZAR, JANELL SALAZAR, LUCY SALGADO, FRANCESCA SAMRA LLC. SAM’S CLUB COMMERCIAL CREDIT SANCHEZ, CHRISTINA SANCHEZ, JUSTIN SANDERS, AMANDA SATHER, JEROME SAVEWAY MARKET SCHAPIRO, DEBRA SCHIFFMACHER, JENNIFER A SCHMITZ, NANCY SCHNEIDER, JOANNA SCHOENBACH, SYDNEY SCHREIBER, JANET M. SCHWEEDLER, JEAN SCHWEEDLER, JEAN SEELY, KAREN SEGUR, LAIMA SENA, CHARLENE SERENO, LUZ SERVICE MASTER SHAMROCK FOODS CO. SHERMAN, ROWENA SHOCKEY, EUNICE SHORT, JANIS SHORTY, JOANN SHURTER, KYLEE SLIWINSKI, ZOFIA SMITH, JACLYN SMITH, JUDY SMITH, JULIA SOUTHERN DIRECTORY CO, INC SPARKS OFFICE SUPPLY SPEIRER, JANET SPENCER, CONSUELO SPILLMAN ELECTRIC COMPANY SPRINGTIME CLEANING SERVICES ST FRANCIS MED CENTER ST. DENIS, LAURIE ST. VINCENT HOSPITAL ST. VINCENT HOSPITAL STAMETS, CHRISTINE STANNARD, LESLIE STEVEN, LEE STEWART BROTHERS DRILLING SULLIVAN, DUSTIN SWAFFORD, DEALY SWARTS, CHERIE SWICEGOOD, RICHARD TAFOYA, MABEL TALAVERA, JESSICA TANNER, JOHN TAYLOR, CHERYL TERRAZAS, LUDIVINA TERRAZAS, LUDIVINA TEXAS ADVERTISING INC. THE LUBRICATORS THE SOURCE THOMAS, CARY THORNTON, JEWEL THRASH, NANCY TIEGLER, KAREN TOLEDO, VARLENA L. TOLEDO, WALLY TRUDEAU, PATTY TRUE VALUE HARDWARE TRUJILLO, LARUICE TUCKER, JOHN TULSA DENTAL PRODUCTS, INC. TUNE, KRISTINA TYO, JOAN UNITED HEALTH CARE INS CO UNM ASAP / CASAA UNM HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER UNM LOS ALAMO COMM US POSTAL SERVICE USA MOBILITY WIRELESS, INC. VALENCIA, VIRGINIA VALUE OPTIONS OF NM VAN DYKE, DAVID S VAN WINKLE, WANDA VANDIVER, CHARLES VARGAS, MAGGIE VELARDE, RICHARD VIGIL, RAMONA VIGIL, RAMONA VIRAMONTES, SANDY WALGREENS HOMECARE INC WARD, CINDY WASHBURN, KARA WATERS, JoANNE WATTS, EMILY WEB TPA, INC. WESTERN ELITE SECURITY WESTERN NM MEDICAL GROUP WHITE, KATHLEEN WHITE, SHAWNA WICKETTS, ALVIRA WIGGINS-MARTINEZ, LAURA WILLIE, DEWEY WOOD, NICHOL WOOD, ROCHELLE M WOODY, LOU WRIGHT, CHARLES XEROX CORPORATION X-RAY ASSOCIATES OF NEW MEXIC YAZZIE, PAULINE YOUR CREDIT, INC

BERNALILLO BERNALILLO SANTA FE SANTA FE SOCORRO MORIARTY SILVER CITY SANOSTEE

NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM

QUESTA ALBUQUERQUE ALBUQUERQUE POJOAQUE Albuquerque FARMINGTON FARMINGTON DENVER BRENTWOOD ALBUQUERQUE KANSAS CITY MOUNTAINAIR ALBUQUERQUE CARLSBAD AZTEC DENVER COCHITI PUEBLO TAOS CHICAGO RIO RANCHO QHC QUESTA

NM NM NM NM NM NM NM CO TN NM MO NM NM NM NM CO NM NM IL NM NM

LA RES LOGAN FLORA VISTA ATHENS AUBURN CUBA CORRALES CUBA

NM NM OH AL NM NM NM

GALLUP SANTA FE EL PASO FARMINGTON ESTANCIA CHHC/THC TCHS SANTA FE SANTA FE LA COMMUNIDAD LA COMM RIO RANCHO GALLUP THE HOSPICE CENTER ESPERANZA SANTA FE FARMINGTON CHHC/THC WINDOW ROCK LA RES CORDOVA JEMEZ PUEBLO CHHC/THC SANTA FE DEMING ATLANTA QUESTA EL PASO FARMINGTON ALBUQUERQUE CUBA GALLUP SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE QUESTA MCINTOSH MCINTOSH CORONA THE HOSPICE CENTER GRANTS SANTA FE SANTA FE PHOENIX SANTA FE BLOOMFIELD DURANGO FARMINGTON RIO RANCHO CUBA HOUCK CARLSBAD FARMINGTON SUGAR LAND ARTESIA CLANCY, RIO RANCHO CARLSBAD CARLSBAD CARLSBAD SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE FARMINGTON FARMINGTON FARMINGTON PEORIA FARMINGTON ARTESIA FARMINGTON SANTA FE SANTA FE SANTA FE FARMINGTON ESPERANZA SANTA FE SANTA FE CROWLEY FARMINGTON DULUTH ALBUQUERQUE FARMINGTON GALLUP SANTA FE FARMINGTON CAHS AZTEC CARLSBAD

NM NM TX NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM AZ NM NM NM NM GA NM TX NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM AZ NM NM CO NM NM NM AZ NM NM TX NM MT NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM IL NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM NM TX NM MN NM NM NM NM NM NM NM

RIO RANCHO TULSA SANTA FE LA RES

NM OK NM

ALBUQUERQUE DALLAS LOS ALAMOS CUBA DALLAS FARMINGTON ALBUQUERQUE PSU FARMINGTON

NM TX NM NM TX NM NM

SANTA E CUBA SANTA FE PENA BLANCA SANTA FE CHICAGO MORIARTY FARMINGTON SANTA FE SANTA FE GRAND PRARIE SANTA FE GALLUP SANTA FE TEEC NOS POS RESERVE AZTEC SHIPROCK MCINTOSH SF HEAD START SANTA FE BLOOMFIELD PASADENA ALBUQUERQUE FRUITLAND BELEN

NM NM NM NM NM IL NM NM NM NM TX NM NM NM AZ NM NM NM NM

NM

NM NM CA NM NM NM

NWPR-271 OPER-7629 NWPR-7104 NWPR-4676 NWPR-7434 NWPR-5352 APWF-11725 NWPR-4092 APWF-12444 NWPR-5255 APWF-8104 NWPR-3883 APWF-3107 NWPR-5394 NWPR-7254 NWPR-5629 APWF-3128 APWF-13277 NWPR-2046 APWF-13585 NWPR-5016 APWF-5123 NWPR-5805 NWPR-7310 APWF-3763 NWPR-4497 APWF-10452 APWF-3208 APWF-3209 OPER-3212 APWF-9698 APWF-12207 OPER-6878 APWF-4243 APWF-11651 NWPR-2912 NWPR-8015 APWF-12704 NWPR-6283 APWF-3257 APWF-13132 OPER-6783 NWPR-4040 NWPR-7905 OPER-4266 APWF-12275 OPER-3285 OPER-4456 NWPR-6447 NWPR-3029 OPER-4879 OPER-6230 NWPR-4452 APWF-11972 OPER-5337 APWF-13803 NWPR-5993 NWPR-663 OPER-4408 APWF-13819 OPER-7257 NWPR-4542 NWPR-6295 OPER-5101 NWPR-5197 APWF-10082 APWF-3353 NWPR-3385 NWPR-7322 APWF-13345 NWPR-7980 APWF-3420 APWF-13722 OPER-3422 NWPR-2575 NWPR-7182 NWPR-5174 OPER-6729 NWPR-1585 NWPR-1585 NWPR-4116 OPER-4711 NWPR-1249 NWPR-3548 APWF-3449 APWF-7638 NWPR-5043 NWPR-5792 NWPR-7055 NWPR-6649 NWPR-4235 NWPR-2231 NWPR-3732 NWPR-4860 OPER-6136 OPER-3522 APWF-3540 APWF-8426 NWPR-1182 OPER-3547 APWF-3552 OPER-3561 NWPR-6813 APWF-3565 APWF-7722 APWF-12749 NWPR-6586 APWF-8779 APWF-13624 NWPR-5186 NWPR-6296 APWF-7958 NWPR-4013 NWPR-2623 OPER-6323 NWPR-3186 APWF-11243 APWF-13177 NWPR-6734 APWF-10299 APWF-2535 APWF-11313 NWPR-1970 APWF-13080 NWPR-5908 OPER-4466 OPER-5824 OPER-3682 NWPR-1555 OPER-6349 APWF-12451 NWPR-8112 APWF-10491 OPER-3721 OPER-3727 APWF-3740 APWF-11563 APWF-6010 OPER-3749 APWF-3760 APWF-4511 NWPR-4940 APWF-12044 APWF-7378 NWPR-750 APWF-12435 NWPR-4111 APWF-12895 OPER-4619 NWPR-3994 OPER-3802 APWF-12122 NWPR-5012 APWF-12388 NWPR-7065 NWPR-7153 APWF-12932 OPER-3855 OPER-3859 NWPR-6692 NWPR-6864 NWPR-4420 NWPR-4024 NWPR-5510 NWPR-6476 OPER-3903 NWPR-2849 NWPR-2141 APWF-3917 APWF-3919 NWPR-3694 OPER-3928

Santa fe new mexican, sept 13, 2013  

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