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Stilled life — Godfrey Reggio’s ‘Visitors’ at the The Screen Pasatiempo, inside The New Mexic

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Sports commentary: It’s just a little cold

State and region thirsty for moisture as drought persists

Environmentalists clash with Obama

The panic that has simmered about extreme Super Bowl conditions is laughable, writes James Barron. SPORTS, B-5

The blood-red color on the latest U.S. Drought Monitor map symbolizes the dryness that has spread across New Mexico and the rest of the West. LOCAL NewS, B-1

The president’s fossil-fuel dependent energy policy is at odds with his goals on global warming, advocates say. PAge A-3

2014 LEGISLATURE

HEALTH EXCHANGE

State cuts insurance sign-up estimates

Sen. Wirth wades into fight over Gila River

Enrollment predictions for 2014 slashed in half

Santa Fe lawmaker aims to slow diversion, focus on conservation

By Patrick Malone The New Mexican

New Mexico’s state-run health care marketplace has sharply reduced its enrollment expectations for 2014, cutting the estimated number of people expected to sign up for coverage by about half, the program’s chief said Thursday. Mike Nuñez, interim chief executive officer of the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange, said problems with the federal healthcare.gov website when it was rolled out last fall slowed New Mexico’s efforts to promote enrollment in the exchange, resulting in drastically lowered enrollment expectations. The state had expected up to 83,000 people to enroll in insurance plans through the exchange this year. Those figures were based on a 2011

By Staci Matlock

The New Mexican

S

Boaters participate in the 2007 Gila River Festival in southwestern New Mexico. The Interstate Stream Commission plans to refine and further study nearly 20 proposals for developing 14,000 acre-feet of river water accessible to four counties in southwestern New Mexico through the Arizona Water Settlement Act of 2004. COURTESY DENNIS O’KEEFE/GILA CONSERVATION COALITION

Following the Gila River

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The Gila River begins in the Gila Wilderness of New Mexico, where it flows year-round, before it enters Arizona and meets the Colorado River.

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outhwestern New Mexico has a potential new water supply, a rare treasure in this dry state. But tapping into the resource means diverting the Gila River, the last free-flowing river in the state. Under a 2004 settlement agreement with Arizona, New Mexico has rights to some 14,000 acrefeet of water from the Gila and one of its tributaries. The deadline for deciding what to do with the water is at the end of this year. If New Mexico doesn’t use it, the water will keep flowing down the river into Arizona, and the state will forgo millions of dollars in federal funds available for construction of a diversion project. Peter Wirth The region’s farmers want the diversion project as a backup, but conservationists and sportsmen say dams or diversions would harm wildlife and the outdoor recreation that feeds the area’s economy. Estevan Lopez, director of the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, thinks conserving the river and diverting it aren’t mutually exclusive. “There are ways of finding synergy that can benefit the environment,” he said. For a decade, people and agencies on both sides of the Gila issue have haggled other over what to do. Now they’re running out of time. Two state senators are sponsoring bills in the current legislative session to address the Gila River basin dilemma. Senate Bill 89, sponsored by Sen. Peter Wirth, D-Santa Fe, requires the Interstate Stream Commission to spend a chunk of the federal dollars available under the agreement to boost water supplies in the region by conserving water, reusing effluent, practicing conservation agriculture and restoring watersheds. Wirth said the projects can serve as a conservation road map for other water-strapped communities in the state. “These are low-hanging fruit that every part of the state, municipalities and agriculture should look at,” Wirth said. Wirth also prefiled SB 90, a bill that requires the commission to secure all funding for a river diversion before seeking approval for the project from the secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior. “When I look at the costs and benefits, doing the non-diversion projects first absolutely makes sense,” Wirth said. “Then, before we take that last step about diversion, let’s be darn sure all the money is there.” Sen. Howie Morales, D-Silver City, signed on as a co-sponsor of the bills last week. The Gila River “draws in visitors and residents that support

SOURCES: AP, ROCKY MOUNTAIN MAPS, GOOGLE MAPS THE NEW MEXICAN

our local economy,” Morales said in a prepared statement. “If we divert and transfer a significant amount of Gila water to other parts of the state for urban development, the economic and ecologic health of my district would be jeopardized now and in the future.”

Tapping a river The Gila River, a tributary of the Colorado River, begins in New Mexico’s Gila National Forest and is fed by a couple of rivers in Arizona. It flows unimpeded south and west before emptying into Arizona.

INSIde u Additional Legislature coverage. PAge A-4

Under the 2004 Arizona Water Settlements Act, New Mexico can harvest 14,000 acre-feet of water a year from the Gila River and the San Francisco River, a tributary, as long as the water rights of downstream users aren’t affected. The Interstate Stream Commission has until December to tell the secretary of the interior what the state is going to do.

Please see gILA, Page A-4

Please see SIgN-UP, Page A-5

Super Bowl bet sparks chile battle Denver mayor’s wager fires up New Mexicans The Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE — A friendly Super Bowl bet between the mayors of Seattle and Denver is causing a stir in New Mexico. If the Seahawks win Sunday, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has wagered a few things he says are indicative of his city. Among them: handmade skis, a hoodie and a sampling of Denver’s “amazing green chile.” Chile from the Mile High City? The question has fired up New Mexicans, resulting in a flurry of social media posts on New Mexico’s long history with the hot peppers. Chile is the state vegetable and the basis of the official state question — “Red or green?” A state law even

Please see CHILe, Page A-5

Growth brightens economic outlook for 2014 Increased consumer spending fuels hopes; year expected to be best since recession ended The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Consumers will spend more. Government will cut less. Businesses will invest more. And more companies will hire. Add it all up, and you can see why expectations are rising that 2014 will be the best year for the U.S. economy

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since the recession ended 4½ years ago. That’s why the Federal Reserve is pressing ahead with a plan to scale back its economic stimulus. The optimists got a boost Thursday from a government report that showed consumers fueled solid economic growth in the final quarter of 2013. The report lifted hopes that the economy

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will be able to withstand turmoil in emerging economies, a pullback in the Fed’s stimulus and mounting risks to the U.S. stock market over the next 12 months. Americans struggling with longterm unemployment and stagnant pay might not get relief anytime soon. And areas such as manufacturing, construction and home sales remain far from full health. Still, the outlook for the economy as a whole brightened after the government said growth reached a

Opinions A-7

Police notes B-2

Editor: Ray Rivera, 986-3033, rrivera@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Krisitna Dunham, kdunham@sfnewmexican.com

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3.2 percent annual rate last quarter on the strength of the strongest consumer spending in three years. “The economy showed real signs of momentum at the end of 2013,” said Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial. “We are better positioned for decent growth for 2014 than we were a year ago.” Consumer spending surged in the October-December quarter at an

Please see OUTLOOK, Page A-5

Time Out A-8

Generation Next C-1

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Obituaries Anne Christy Faires Atwell, Jan. 28 PAge B-2

Today Windier and colder. High 55, low 26. PAge B-8

Three sections, 24 pages Pasatiempo, 56 pages 165th year, No. 31 Publication No. 596-440


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

NATION&WORLD In brief

Italy reinstates Knox’s murder conviction FLORENCE, Italy — More than two years after Amanda Knox returned to the U.S. apparently home free, an Italian court Thursday reinstated her murder conviction in the stabbing of her roommate and increased her sentence to 28½ years in prison, raising the specter of a long extradition fight. Knox, 26, received word in her hometown of Seattle. The former American exchange student said she was “frightened and saddened by the unjust verdict” and blamed “overzealous and intransigent prosecution,” ”narrow-minded investigation” and coercive interrogation techniques. “This has gotten out of hand,” Knox said in a statement. “Having been found innocent before, I expected better from the Italian justice system.” Lawyers for Knox and her 29-year-old exboyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, who was also found guilty, vowed to appeal to Italy’s highest court, a process that will take at least a year and drag out a seesaw legal battle that has fascinated court-watchers on both sides of the Atlantic and led to lurid tabloid headlines about “Foxy Knoxy” and her sex life. It was the third trial for Knox and Sollecito, whose first two trials in the 2007 slaying of British exchange student Meredith Kercher produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty, then innocent.

U.S. says Syria is delaying in mission

LIVE AT THE BOWL

Renee Fleming says she only knows how to sing the national anthem one way: live. The 53-year-old opera singer will perform ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ before Sunday’s NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game. Fleming, known as ‘The People’s Diva,’ said Thursday at a news conference she won’t sing to a pre-recorded track and that she ‘wouldn’t know how to lip-sync if you paid me.’ Fleming promised the it will be entirely real when she walks onto the field at MetLife Stadium, where the Seattle Seahawks will play the Denver Broncos. She’ll be singing with an arrangement from the New Jersey Symphony and have 32 military singers from all the service branches as backup.

BEIRUT — The United States accused the Syrian government Thursday of using stalling tactics to delay efforts to remove and destroy chemical agents, an indication that the international community’s patience is wearing thin over the slow pace of the operation. The comments, delivered by the U.S. representative to the international chemical weapons watchdog, marked some of the strongest public criticism of Syria’s commitment to relinquish its chemical stockpile. Syria agreed to surrender its arsenal after a deadly chemical attack in August on a rebelheld suburb of Damascus raised the threat of punitive U.S. missile strikes. President Barack Obama has touted the agreement as a victory and a major policy achievement for his administration on Syria’s intractable civil war. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is leading the mission to eliminate Syria’s 1,300-metric ton stockpile by a June 30 deadline. Under the OPCW’s tight timeline, the most toxic chemicals in Syria’s arsenal were to have been removed from the country by Dec. 31, but that deadline was missed due to poor security amid Syria’s raging civil war as well as other factors. So far, just two small consignments of chemicals have been shipped out.

sile launch officers have been implicated in the cheating. The cheating scandal is the latest in an array of troubles that now have the attention of senior defense officials, including Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. But James and Lt. Gen. Stephen Wilson, who heads Global Strike Command, insisted that the failures haven’t affected the safety of the military’s nuclear mission. Of the 92 officers implicated so far, as many as 40 were involved directly in the cheating, Wilson said. Others may have known about it but did not report it. Separately, James said that an investigation into drug possession by officers at several Air Force bases now involves 13 airmen, two more than initially announced. All 92 officers have been decertified and suspended while the scandal is being investigated, meaning other launch officers and staff to fill in, performing 10 24-hour shifts per month, instead of the usual eight, Wilson said. Staff members from the 20th Air Force, which oversees all of the nuclear missile force, are also being tapped to do the shifts.

WASHINGTON — Top Air Force officials described a persistent culture of “undue stress and fear” that led 92 out of 550 members of the military’s nuclear missile corps to be involved in cheating on a monthly proficiency test on which they felt pressured to get perfect scores to get promoted. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said Thursday that at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana, roughly half of the 183 mis-

on immigration reform, are signalling they may back off on their long-standing insistence that reform legislation must include a “special path” to eventual citizenship for the country’s estimated 11 million illegal immigrants. Instead, a variety of immigrant advocates this week said they were delighted that House Republicans now seem open to finding ways to compromise on illegal immigra-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Immigrant groups might 92 implicated in Air Force accept legalization WASHINGTON — Immigrant advocates, nuke cheating scandal responding to expected new GOP overtures

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tion, including reported proposals that would “legalize” various categories of undocumented immigrants but not necessarily allow them all to become U.S. citizens. “To see the Republicans moving from selfdeportation to legalization is a major shift,” said Clarissa Martinez of the National Council of La Raza in Washington. “There is a big chasm between saying “no special path” and shutting the door to citizenship entirely. It could mean a lot of things. There is no clarity or definition yet, but it is a start and we are definitely encouraged.” Frank Sharry, executive director of the immigrant advocate group America’s Voice, said neither advocates or Democratic legislators would accept proposals that “create a permanent underclass” of non-citizens, but that they might accept legislation that allowed many undocumented immigrants to obtain some form of legal status and “most, if not all” to eventually achieve citizenship through “normal channels.” “The details matter hugely, and we don’t know what they will be,” Sharry said. But if a mix of ideas now being discussed among Republicans evolve into concrete proposals, including citizenship for student “dreamers,” work permits for some adults, and green card sponsorship for illegal spouses and parents of U.S. citizens, he said, “that might meet our demands.” According to a study released this month by the National Foundation for American Policy, between 4.4 million and 6.5 million illegal immigrants — mostly parents of U.S. born children — could gain eventual U.S. residency under current approaches being discussed informally in the House. The bipartisan Senate bill that passed last year would have allowed about 8 million people to gain residency.

Study finds Americans optimistic about aging WASHINGTON — As the global population of people 65 and older is projected to triple to 1.5 billion by 2050, public concern about the graying of society varies widely across the world, with Americans much more optimistic than those in many other countries thanks to immigration, a new study finds. That optimism is not unfounded: While 1 in 5 U.S. residents is expected to be 65 or older by 2050, the country is aging at a slower rate than other nations. This is largely due to the high rate of immigration, according to the report, Attitudes About Aging: A Global Perspective, released Thursday by the Pew Research Center. Nations across the world will see their ranks of older people swell, with about onesixth of the global population expected to be 65 or older by 2050. But perspectives about this diverge dramatically, according to the report. In surveys in 21 countries last spring, 22,425 people were asked whether aging posed a problem for their country, whether they anticipated having an adequate standard of living in their old age, and whether governments or families and older people themselves should bear more responsibility for the elderly. Americans ranked among the least worried, at 26 percent — a stark difference from residents of the United States’ main economic and political partners in Europe and Asia, where more than half the respondents said aging was a major problem. The United States is projected to age more slowly, in large part because immigrants and their descendants are expected to shore up the ranks of young people of working age.

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Friday, Jan. 31 LECTURE: Princeton professor Leora Batnitzky will discuss Freedom Depends on its Bondage: The Return of Plato in the Philosophies of Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas at 7:30 p.m.,St. John’s College, 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca. SENIOR OLYMPICS: From 9 a.m. until noon, local Santa Fe 50+ Senior Olympics Games Registration is open for adults age 50 and older at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Participate in one or more of 23 sports during March, April and May for fitness, fun and friendship. Fee is $20. Call Cristina Villa at 955-4725. TGIF RECITAL: CHANCEL CHOIR: Mozart’s Requiem with Jan Worden-Lackey on organ at 5:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant Ave.

NIGHTLIFE

Friday, Jan. 31 ¡CHISPA! AT EL MESÓN: Three Faces of Jazz, revolving piano trio, 7:30-10:30 p.m., 213 Washington Ave. COWGIRL BBQ: Aaron Hamre, bluesy, acoustic rock, 5-7:30 p.m.; Broomdust Caravan, juke-joint honky-tonk and biker-bar rock, 8 p.m., 319 S. Guadalupe St.

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Navy admiral is Obama’s pick to take reins of NSA The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A Navy admiral is President Barack Obama’s choice to be the next head of the National Security Agency, which is embroiled in controversy over its secret surveillance programs and massive collection of phone and Internet data. Vice Adm. Mike Rogers, the head of the Navy’s Cyber Command and a former intelligence director for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is being appointed to lead the NSA, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Thursday. Rogers also is being nominated to get a fourth star and head U.S. Cyber Command. Rogers, who replaces Army Gen. Keith Alexander at the NSA, comes into the job facing the challenge of revamping the way the agency collects and stores its data. Alexander plans to retire in mid-March. The NSA has been rocked by former analyst Edward Snowden’s disclosures detailing widespread surveillance programs that have swept up the phone records of hundreds of millions in the U.S. Rogers has long been considered the heir apparent for the job. In a statement Thursday, Hagel said he is confident that Rogers “has the wisdom to help balance the demands of security, privacy and liberty in our digital age.” “This is a critical time for the NSA, and Vice Admiral Rogers would bring extraordinary and unique qualifications to this position as the agency continues its vital mission and implements President Obama’s reforms,” Hagel said. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper described Rogers in a statement as a dedicated intelligence officer “who deeply understands signals intelligence and cyber operations, which makes him uniquely qualified to lead the NSA and U.S. Cyber Command missions.” Rogers’ nomination to head Cyber Command requires Senate confirmation. The NSA job does not, but it will undoubtedly come up at the Cyber Command hearing, as lawmakers air their frustrations with the agency’s data collection program and demand that he lay out his vision for how the NSA will move forward. The White House has said it intends to continue having one commander oversee the NSA and Cyber Command, despite suggestions that the jobs should be split. Both jobs are based at Fort Meade, Md. Hagel also announced that he is appointing Rick Ledgett to be the NSA’s deputy director, replacing Chris Inglis as the top civilian at the agency. Ledgett, an NSA official, has been leading the task force assessing the damage from Snowden’s leaks. Alexander has served for nearly nine years as NSA director. He was the first commander of the Pentagon’s Cyber Command, which was set up in 2010.

Vice Adm. Michael Rogers has been chosen to be the next chief of the troubled National Security Agency. COURTESY U.S. NAVY

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Lotteries DEZRON DOUGLAS BLACK LION QUARTET: Douglas on bass, Josh Evans on trumpet, Lummie Spann Jr. on alto saxophone, and Eric McPherson on drums, 8 p.m., The Den, 132 W. Water St. DUEL BREWING: Santa Fe Revue, country, bluegrass, and R&B mash-up, 7-10 p.m., 1228 Parkway Drive. EL FAROL: John Kurzweg Band, alt. folk-rock, 9 p.m., 808 Canyon Road. LA CASA SENA CANTINA: Nunsense, a musical comedy, 5:30 and 8:30 p.m., 125 E. Palace Ave. LA POSADA DE SANTA FE RESORT AND SPA: Nacha Mendez Trio, pan-Latin rhythms, 6:30-9:30 p.m., 330 E. Palace Ave. MINE SHAFT TAVERN: DJ Sass-a-Frass, 5 p.m.; open mic with Glenn Neff, 8 p.m., 2846 N.M. 14. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE IN HD: Coriolanus, Donmar Warehouse’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy, 7 p.m., The Lensic, 211 W. San Francisco St. PALACE RESTAURANT & SALOON: C.S. Rockshow, with Don Curry, Pete Springer, and Ron Crowder, classic rock, 9:30 p.m., 142 W. Palace Ave. PRANZO ITALIAN GRILL: Geist Cabaret with pianist David Geist, 6-9 p.m., 540 Montezuma Ave. SECOND STREET BREWERY:

Folk rockers The Bus Tapes, with Heather Tanner on guitar and vocals, Case Tanner on bass guitar, David Gold on lead guitar, and Milton Villarubia on drums, 6-9 p.m., 1814 Second St. SECOND STREET BREWERY AT THE RAILYARD: Bill Hearne Trio, classic country, 7-10 p.m., 1607 Paseo de Peralta. VANESSIE: Pianists Doug Montgomery (6-8 p.m.) and Bob Finnie (8-11 p.m.), 427 W. Water St.

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In a story on Page A-10 of the Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, edition of The Santa Fe New Mexican about the annual Roundhouse Comedy Revue threatrical performance, the last name of Democratic lawmaker Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson was misspelled.

DOG WALKERS WANTED: The Santa Fe animal shelter needs volunteer dog walkers for all shifts, but especially the Coffee & Canines morning shift from 7 to 9 a.m. Send email to krodriguez@sfhumanesociety. org or call Katherine at 983-4309, ext. 128. THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY: Volunteers are needed to support the Cancer Resource Center at the Christus St. Vincent Cancer Center. Training is for the various shifts Monday through Friday. Call Geraldine Esquivel with the American Cancer Society at 463-0308. SANTA FE WOMEN’S ENSEMBLE: Always in need of ushers for concerts; email info@sfwe.org or call 954-4922.

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NATION

Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

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U.S. prosecutors seek execution of marathon suspect By Denise Lavoie

The Associated Press

BOSTON — Federal prosecutors announced Thursday they will seek the death penalty against 20-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in the Boston Marathon bombing, accusing him of betraying his adopted country by carrying out an attack calculated to cause maximum carnage. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder’s decision to press for Tsarnaev’s execution was widely expected. The twin blasts last April killed three people and wounded more than 260, and over half the 30 federal charges against Tsarnaev — including using a weapon of mass destruction to kill — carry a possible

death sentence. “The nature of the conduct at issue and the resultant harm compel this decision,” Holder said in a statement of just two terse and dispassionate sentences that instantly Dzhokhar raised the stakes in one Tsarnaev of the most wrenching criminal cases Boston has ever seen. Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty. No trial date has been set. In a notice of intent filed in court, federal prosecutors in Boston listed factors they contend justify a sentence of death against Tsarnaev, who moved to the U.S. from Russia about a decade ago.

“Dzhokhar Tsarnaev received asylum from the United States; obtained citizenship and enjoyed the freedoms of a United States citizen; and then betrayed his allegiance to the United States by killing and maiming people in the United States,” read the notice filed by U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz. Prosecutors also cited Tsarnaev’s “lack of remorse” and allegations that he killed an MIT police officer as well as an 8-year-old boy, a “particularly vulnerable” victim because of his age. They also said Tsarnaev committed the killings after “substantial planning and premeditation.” In addition, they cited his alleged decision to target the Boston Marathon, “an iconic event that draws large crowds

of men, women and children to its final stretch, making it especially susceptible to the act and effects of terrorism.” Tsarnaev’s lawyers had no immediate comment. In an interview with ABC, Tsarnaev’s mother, who lives in Russia, said: “How can I feel about this? I feel nothing. I can tell you one thing, that I love my son. I will always feel proud of him. And I keep loving him.” Prosecutors allege Tsarnaev, then 19, and his 26-year-old brother, ethnic Chechens from Russia, built and planted two pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line of the race to retaliate against the U.S. for its military actions in Muslim countries. The older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev,

died in a shootout with police during a getaway attempt days after the bombing. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was injured but escaped and was later found hiding in a boat parked in a yard in a Boston suburb. Authorities said he scrawled inside the boat such things as “The US Government is killing our innocent civilians” and “We Muslims are one body, you hurt one you hurt us all.” Killed in the bombings were: Martin Richard, 8, of Boston; Krystle Campbell, 29, of Medford; and Lu Lingzi, 23, a Boston University graduate student from China. At least 16 others lost limbs. Tsarnaev is also charged in the slaying of the MIT officer and the carjacking of a motorist during the brothers’ getaway attempt.

Environmentalists clash with president over energy plan By Dina Cappiello and Matthew Daly

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is sticking to a fossil-fuel dependent energy policy, delivering a blow to a monthslong, behind-the-scenes effort by major environmental groups to convince the White House that the policy is at odds with his goals on global warming. The division between Obama and some of his staunchest supporters has been simmering for months, a surprising schism that shows the fine line the environmental community has walked with a president who has taken significant steps on climate change, and the recalcitrance of Obama’s White House when it is criticized, even by its allies. Days before Obama’s State of the Union speech, the heads of 18 environmental groups sent a letter to the president that had long been in the works saying his policy doesn’t make sense. They see a contradiction in increased American production of energy from oil and natural gas at the same time the government is attempting to reduce the pollution blamed for global warming. “We believe that continued

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reliance on an ‘all-of-the-above’ energy strategy would be fundamentally at odds with your goal of cutting carbon pollution,” they wrote. But in his speech Tuesday, Obama proclaimed that embracing all forms of energy, even carbon-pollution fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, is working. “Taken together, our energy policy is creating jobs and leading to a cleaner, safer planet,” Obama said. White House officials knew last spring that a letter objecting to Obama’s energy policy was in the works. They urged the environmental groups to wait until after Obama delivered a speech on climate change in June, hoping his aggressive steps on global warming would change their minds. “There is a cognitive dissonance inside the administration. We believe their commitment to fight climate change is genuine, and yet the energy policy goals of the administration make addressing climate change much more difficult,” Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, said in an interview

with the Associated Press. The environmental groups’ stance could be dismissed as advocacy groups just doing what they do — pushing the president to go further on an issue important to their members. Already, they have protested a pipeline project carrying Canadian tar sands oil into the U.S., fought to shutter coalfired power plants and opposed hydraulic fracturing. But for the major groups, the letter marked new territory, the first time the lobby has been both united and sharply critical of Obama’s central environmental issue and one they support in principle: curbing climate change. “Not a lot of these groups have said it aloud. It does mark a shift in environmental community,” said Maura Cowley, executive director of the Energy Action Coalition, who signed the letter. No one in the environmental community is knocking what Obama has achieved. He has secured deals to double the fuel economy for cars and trucks, greatly expanded renewable energies such as wind and solar

power and has proposed the first-ever limits on carbon dioxide pollution from future coalfired power plants. This summer, the Obama administration is expected to take on the largest source of carbon dioxide pollution by proposing limits for existing coal-fired power plants. Yet, at the same time, the number of rigs drilling offshore in the Gulf of Mexico has returned to levels not seen since the BP oil spill. Oil production and natural gas production are booming, largely on private lands where the administration has little control, and as a result, the heat-trapping pollution from those operations is growing. While U.S. greenhouse gas emissions declined 4.5 percent overall from 2011 to 2012, thanks in part to a switch from coal to natural gas for electricity production being helped along by

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Obama, emissions from oil and gas production were up and second to only power plants when it comes to global warming. “They know they are doing more than previous administrations and we know that too,”

said David Yarnold, president and CEO of the National Audubon Society, one of the environmental groups that signed the letter. “They aren’t doing what the moment requires, and they know that too.”

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

2014 Legislature

Opposition to minimum-wage amendment could kill bill Democratic senator vows to fight measure in Rules Committee By Milan Simonich

The New Mexican

A push by Democrats to raise New Mexico’s statewide minimum wage through a constitutional amendment may die a quick death. State Sen. Clemente Sanchez said Thursday he will oppose the measure, and that could scotch it. Sanchez, D-Grants, sits on the Senate Rules Committee, where the constitutional amendment is to have its first

hearing. Four Republicans also are on the 10-member committee, and they almost certainly would help Sanchez derail the amendment on a 5-5 vote. “It won’t make it out of Rules,” Sanchez said in an interview. “I’m against it because I don’t think it belongs in the constitution.” He said he supported increasing the state minimum wage, now $7.50 an hour, but wanted it done by statute, not a constitutional change. Sanchez voted last year with every other Democrat in the Senate to raise the minimum wage by $1, to $8.50 an hour. That bill cleared the Legislature, but Republican Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed it. She said she would have

accepted an increase of 30 cents an hour. Sen. Richard Martinez, D-Española, is sponsoring the constitutional amendment to raise the minimum wage. He said he chose that route because the governor probably would again veto an increase approved by statute. But the governor cannot veto a constitutional amendment. If the Senate and the House of Representatives approve a proposed amendment, it would go to voters in the November election for a final decision. Sen. Martinez said he had hoped his party would close ranks behind his amendment. “I’m disappointed,” he said of San-

chez’s opposition. “I was counting on my fellow Democrats to support this.” He said he had hoped Sanchez would see the need for an increase, given the poverty in his district, which includes parts of Cibola and McKinley counties. Sanchez said he might introduce a bill of his own to raise the minimum wage. He said he probably would propose a 70-cent increase, to $8.20 an hour. That is far less than is proposed in a bill already filed in the House of Representatives. Rep. Luciano “Lucky” Varela, D-Santa Fe, is proposing an increase in the state minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. Varela’s bill also calls for annual

increases in the minimum wage, based on the U.S. Consumer Price Index. The constitutional change that Sen. Martinez wants would start in July 2015. It would establish a new minimum wage based on cost-of-living increases from 2009 through the 2014 election. In addition, his amendment could annually increase the minimum wage, based on changes in the cost of living. Santa Fe already pays a higher minimum wage than those proposed by Varela and Sanchez. The city’s minimum wage will rise 15 cents, to $10.66 an hour, in March. Albuquerque and Bernalillo County also have a higher minimum wage than the rest of the state — $8.50 an hour.

Lobbyists shower state lawmakers with freebies Gila: It’s about more than the river, Wirth says By Steve Terrell The New Mexican

Once again, legislators will be able to hit the slopes, courtesy of a leading ski industry trade group in the state. Lawmakers also will be getting plenty of free meals, drinks and receptions in their honor from lobbyists and interest groups in a time-honored tradition of influence and information peddling during the legislative session. George Brooks, president of Ski New Mexico, gave every lawmaker ski passes Tuesday to provide “an opportunity for legislators to become more familiar with the ski industry and tourism.” The total value of the ski passes, as reported in Brooks’ lobbyist expense report, was $27,750. That’s $250 per legislator, which happens to be the limit under the Gift Act, which regulates the value of gifts someone can legally give legislators. While the Legislature is in session, lobbyists are required to report expenditures larger than $500 within 48 hours of the spending. The reports reveal at least some of the wining, dining and good times lobbyists provide for senators and representatives. The VIP passes are gifts that Ski

New Mexico bestows upon lawmakers every year. So far this year, as in most years, there are no bills directly affecting the ski industry, except the state Tourism Department’s advertising budget. Typically in a session, the golf industry also gives golf passes to lawmakers. So far, that hasn’t shown up in the lobbyist reports. The ski passes allow the holder to ski two days at each of the industry trade group’s ski areas — which include most ski areas in the state. The passes are transferable, which means legislators can give their passes to family members, friends or staff members. Besides the ski passes, other reports that have been filed between the start of the session and late Thursday afternoon include the following: u Presbyterian Health Plan spent $8,851 on a dinner at La Posada de Santa Fe Resort & Spa on Jan. 22 for legislators and guests, as well as Presbyterian Healthcare board members and staff. u Scott Smart, the lobbyist for Eastern New Mexico University, spent $7,707 for a “meet-and-greet” at the Inn and Spa at Loretto for “various legislators” to socialize and discuss legislation.

u Charles Henson, a lobbyist for the New Mexico Automotive Dealers Association, spent $7,668 for a Tuesday reception at the Inn and Spa at Loretto for all legislators, other elected officials, car dealers and guests. u William Smith, lobbyist for the New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau, spent $5,000: Half of that went to the state Democratic Party to sponsor a legislative dinner. The other $2,500 went to the state Republican Party for a Republican dinner sponsorship. u Several lobbyists contributed $4,006 each for a Monday “Friends of the Legislature” dinner at La Fonda for various legislators. Those reporting include Varney Brandt, lobbyist for XCEL Energy-Southwestern Public Service; Arthur Melendres, lobbyist for Albuquerque Public Schools and New Mexico Broadcasters Association; and Leo Baca, lobbyist for CenturyLink. u The National Education Association spent $3,795 on a Jan. 22 reception at its local headquarters, 2007 Botulph Road. Invited were the governor, legislators and NEANM members. u BNSF Railroad spent a total of $3,025 on meals the first week of the session. That figure includes

$1,685 for a dinner Jan. 22 to discuss economic development with 13 people, including Rep. Patricia Lundstrom, D-Gallup, officials from the city of Gallup, McKinley County and others. The figure also includes $1,340 for a breakfast Jan. 23 to discuss economic development and highway projects with 30 people, including Lundstrom, Gallup officials, Chamber of Commerce members and state Department of Transportation commissioners. The report doesn’t specify where the meals took place. u Ruth Hoffman of Rocky Mountain Synod-Evangelical Lutheran Church spent $2,623 for the “Bishop’s Legislative Luncheon” on Tuesday at La Fonda. All legislators were invited. u Susan Loubet, a lobbyist for New Mexico Women’s Agenda, spent $1,738 for a Wednesday reception at Rio Chama Steakhouse for legislators and elected and appointed female officials. u The University of New Mexico spent $1,210 for a reception Tuesday at The Pink Adobe for all legislators, UNM Law School faculty, UNM Law School donors and two UNM Law School staff members. Look for an update in The New Mexican in about a week.

Proposed gas tax hike would fund N.M. road projects The Associated Press

New Mexico’s taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel would increase by 5 cents a gallon for a decade under a proposal in the Legislature to help finance highway construction projects. The measure by the chairman of the House Transportation and Public Works Committee, Democratic Rep. Roberto “Bobby” Gonzales of Taos, would raise the gasoline tax to 22 cents a gallon through June 30, 2024, and then the rate would revert to 17 cents. The special fuels tax on diesel would go to 26 cents a gallon for the same 10-year period before returning to 21 cents. The additional tax revenue would allow the state to issue up to $300 million in bonds for 10 major highway improvements projects. Gonzales acknowledged Thursday it will be difficult to win approval of a tax increase during an election year, but he said it’s critical that New Mexico start to address a growing gap between needs for highway construction and mainte-

Legislative roundup Days remaining in session: 20 Guarding against a guard: A state district judge has issued a temporary restraining order requested by state Rep. Debbie Rodella, D-Española, against a member of a Senate security team. As originally reported by KRQETV, Algin Mendez, a former state police officer and Rio Arriba County sheriff’s deputy, was fired from the latter job by Rodella’s husband, Sheriff Tommy Rodella. In her request for the restraining order, Rep. Rodella said Mendez tried to intimidate her last week during a meeting of a committee discussing tribal gambling compacts. She also said Mendez accosted her and her husband on the dance floor of the Santa Claran Hotel last October. The restraining order forbids Mendez from coming within 100 yards of Rodella — which effectively means he can’t enter the Roundhouse while Rodella is there. KRQE said Mendez got his legislative job with the help of state Sen. Richard Martinez, D-Española. The station quoted Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez saying he had confidence in Mendez, but that he would be allowed only to work inside and outside of the Senate chambers — and not in any com-

Daniel Zombrano pumps gas Thursday at Allsup’s on Guadalupe Street. The state’s tax on gasoline and diesel would increase 5 cents a gallon under a proposal in the Legislature. LUIS SáNCHEz SATURNO/THE NEW MEXICAN

nance, and available revenue. “I’ve always felt that I’d rather be criticized for trying than not trying. We’re in a position that we have to do something,” he said.

mittee rooms. KRQE said Mendez didn’t show up for work Thursday, and he couldn’t be reached for comment. A hearing is set for Feb. 10 to determine whether the restraining order will become permanent. Legendary Lou returns: Lou Henson coached New Mexico State University and the University of Illinois to the Final Four of college basketball. He will return to the sidelines next week, at age 82, to coach the state House of Representatives in its annual game against the state Senate. Age has robbed Henson of none of his intensity. About a month ago, before the legislative session began, he phoned Rep. Paul Pacheco to lay down some expectations. “He said, ‘Paul, this is Coach Henson. I’ll be coaching the House this year.’ He asked about my background, and I told him I played in high school. He told me to get in shape,” said Pacheco, R-Albuquerque. Henson led New Mexico State to the Final Four in 1970, losing to eventual champion UCLA. Henson took the Illinois job in 1975, testing himself against Big 10 coaches that included Bob Knight. Henson’s 1989 Illinois team also reached the Final Four. It lost 83-81 to conference rival Michigan, which won the national championship two days later against Seton Hall. Call from the White House: House Speaker Kenny Martinez, D-Grants, spent part of Thursday

Any tax hike will run into trouble with Republican Gov. Susana Martinez, who’s adopted a notax-increase stance since taking office in 2011. Taxes on motor fuels are a main source of money for road construction and maintenance, but revenue isn’t growing much, in part because vehicles are more fuel efficient. New Mexico’s 17-cents-a-gallon tax rate on gasoline has been in effect since 1995, and it’s among the lowest in the region. Oklahoma’s gas tax is 16 cents, Arizona’s is 18 cents, Texas’ is 20 cents, and Colorado’s is 22 cents a gallon, according to the American Petroleum Institute. The national average is about 21 cents, and the federal government also imposes a tax of 18.4 cents a gallon on gasoline. A nickel-a-gallon increase in taxes on gasoline and diesel would generate about $70 million annually, according to estimates last year by the state Taxation and Revenue Department. Among the projects that would be financed under the legislation is the $25 million reconstruction of N.M. 68 from Española to Velarde.

morning on a conference call with President Barack Obama, White House staff and legislators from around the country to talk about the president’s agenda outlined this week in his State of the Union address. “Speaker Martinez offered up a bushel of green chile from New Mexico to the White House, in which the White House graciously accepted,” a news release from House Democrats said. “The speaker then highlighted his commitment to increase to the minimum wage during New Mexico’s legislative session.” Lottery fixes: At least two Republican bills to address the state lottery scholarship solvency issues have emerged. House Bill 263, sponsored by Rep. Tim Lewis, Rep. Jason Harper and Sen. Craig Brandt, all Rio Rancho Republicans, would award qualified students a flat amount of money each year instead of paying full tuition, as the scholarships do now. This bill also would reduce the number of semesters covered by the scholarship from eight to seven. Meanwhile, Senate Bill 146, sponsored by Senate Republican Leader Stuart Ingle of Portales, would not allow a tuition rate to increase for a student with lottery scholarship. The bill also would raise the minimum grade-point average for the scholarship from 2.5 to 2.75, and it would raise the number of credit hours required to receive a scholarship from 12 to 15. “This bill would help the State’s

Lottery Tuition Fund to stay solvent while still helping serious students to stay in college,” Ingle said in a news release. Looking ahead: Sen. Michael Padilla’s Senate Joint Resolution 2, which would re-establish the state Board of Education, which would run the Department of Public Education instead of a Cabinet secretary, is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Rules Committee at 9 a.m. in Room 321 of the Capitol. The Rules Committee is one of three committees to which Padilla’s measure has been assigned. u KNME’s New Mexico In Focus will air a segment on Gov. Susana Martinez’s proposal to earmark 60 percent of this year’s capital outlay money for water projects. Rep. Brian Egolf, D-Santa Fe, and Sen. Bill Burt, R-Alamogordo, will be featured. There also will be a panel discussion about the outbreak of “amendment fever” — several proposed constitutional amendments dealing with issues such as the minimum wage and pot legalization — in the Legislature. The show airs at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, and 7 a.m. Sunday on KNME Channel 5.1. u Aggrieved Santa Fe educators will be in the House chambers at the Roundhouse at 9 a.m. Saturday to air concerns about “overload of testing,” “poor evaluation policy” and “insufficient funding.” They are inviting the public to listen to and share “tragic education stories” with legislators. The New Mexican

Continued from Page A-1 If New Mexico builds a diversion and stores the water, that water can’t be sold or leased anywhere outside the state. Under the settlement, the federal government will give the state $66 million to use on any water resource development projects, including conservation in the Gila Basin. In addition, the state might be eligible for $62 million more if it develops a river diversion and storage system. Both of those figures are in 2004 dollars. In 2014 dollars, the total amount would be more, but still only half the estimated cost of building a diversion, which is recommended by the engineering firm hired by the Interstate Stream Commission to analyze options. “It doesn’t make economic sense to go down that road when we don’t have even 50 percent of the funds in place yet,” Wirth said. Farmers, environmentalists, the general public and municipal, state and federal officials began meeting more than a decade ago, before the settlement was signed, to work out a plan. More than 200 meetings later, the Interstate Stream Commission settled on 16 potential projects in the Gila Basin — from municipal water conservation to river diversions. The commission’s staff and contractors are trying to finish a plethora of studies on how the projects would impact the region’s hydrology, economy, ecology and cultural resources. The commission will propose a plan for the Gila River in August to give the public time to comment, and it will make a final decision in November.

Debating diversion Wirth came to the Legislature in 2004, the same year the Arizona Water Settlements Act was signed. He’s been a member of the interim Water and Natural Resources Committee every year and has watched the Gila River struggle. “We’ve been briefed every year by the [Interstate Steam Commission] about the options,” he said. “The reason I agreed to sponsor these bills is because I think this is about way more than the Gila.” “The state already has huge water infrastructure needs and monetary obligations under existing water settlements,” Wirth said. “Here is a chance to focus these federal dollars in the Gila on water conservation, efficiency improvements and watershed restoration projects without any cost to state taxpayers. Not only is this a great road map for addressing New Mexico’s water supply issues in the rest of the state, it does not have us embarking on costly engineering projects that move relatively small amounts of water.” Lopez said any diversion on the river would not be a water-holding dam. It could be constructed to allow water flows to continue past a barrier and would only divert water periodically from the river when flows are high. “My staff is being painted as pro-diversion,” he said. “In my mind, we are trying to keep the diversion on the table as an option. Some people would like to take the diversion option off the table.” Lopez thinks the two Senate bills are designed to constrain the diversion option. “These two bills are not saying, per se, that the diversion can’t happen,” Wirth said. “The first bill is simply saying let’s use $82 million as a pilot for the rest of the state to show what can happen through conservation. The second says before [the Interstate Stream Commission] makes a decision that binds us to a dam, let’s make darn sure where the rest of the money is coming from, so taxpayers are not on the hook.” M.H. Dutch Salmon, a Silver City businessman, sportsman and former state game commissioner, opposes any form of diversion on the river. “We’re pretty universally against it,” Salmon said of residents he knows in the area. The nonprofit groups New Mexico Wildlife Federation and Trout Unlimited also oppose the river diversion, saying it will harm wildlife and outdoor recreation, which are important to the region’s economy. Salmon, who is chairman of the nonprofit Gila Conservation Coalition, said this is just the latest attempt to dam the river. He said there were dams proposed on the Gila in the 1970s and 1980s. Salmon said the proposed location for the diversion is a roadless area prized by outdoors enthusiasts for its unscathed landscape and unblocked wild river. The diversion would require a large pipe or canal to move the water. “Even if it is only an occasional diversion, it would still be a major construction project in a pristine area,” he said.


Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

A-5

Sign-up: Outlook: Economists say growth could top 3 percent State says site issues to blame since the recession ended in mid2009. annual rate of 3.3 percent — The strength in consumer the best pace since 2010 and spending last quarter was driven a big jump from the 2 percent by purchases of both durable growth rate of the previous goods — products such as cars, quarter. Consumer spending is computers and communications particularly important because equipment — and nondurable it accounts for about 70 pergoods like clothing. Spending on cent of the economy. services also rose strongly. For 2013 as a whole, the In addition, businesses economy grew a tepid 1.9 per- invested in more equipment. cent, weaker than the 2.8 perThere was also strength from a cent increase in 2012, the Com- shrinking trade deficit. merce Department said ThursSpending on home construcday. Growth was held back by tion declined, though. And higher taxes and federal spend- government spending fell at a ing cuts that kicked in early in 4.9 percent rate last quarter, led 2013. by a plunge in federal spendA budget deal Congress ing. That was a result, in part, of approved earlier this month the government’s 16-day partial halted tens of billions in addishutdown during October. The tional spending cuts that were shutdown shrank fourth-quarter due to kick in this year. With growth by about 0.3 percentage that drag diminished, many point, the government said. economists think growth could Many global investors fear that top 3 percent in 2014. That the Fed’s pullback in its bond would be the best showing purchases will raise U.S. interest

Continued from Page A-1

Continued from Page A-1 study cited by the exchange in its application for a federal grant under the Affordable Care Act. “We now estimate between 40,000 and 50,000,” Nuñez told The New Mexican in an email. The exchange announced Thursday that it had received a $69.4 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The grant was about 85 percent of the $81.4 million the state had requested. Nuñez said the grant was cut principally because of federal spending cuts commonly known as sequestration and also because of a lower than expected price tag for integrating some information technology systems for the exchange. Nuñez said he did not expect the reduced grant to hamper the exchange’s operations. “We feel we can stand up the exchange with the grant awarded,” Nuñez said. The first open-enrollment period for individual policies ends March 31, and small-business enrollment will continue throughout the year. The New Mexico exchange got off to a sluggish start with 934 enrollments in November. Exchange administrators blamed the difficulties with the federal Web portal’s introduction. By Dec. 28, enrollment in the state had climbed to 7,688. Currently, New Mexico’s health exchange website, www. BeWellNM.com, is a portal to the small-business insurance marketplace and redirects individuals to the federal site. A target date of Oct. 1 has been set for the site to begin serving the individual market as well. Two previous federal grants to get the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange off the ground total $52.8 million.

rates and cause investors to shift money out of emerging markets and into the United States for higher returns. Currency values in emerging economies have fallen over that concern. In response, central banks in emerging economies, from India to Turkey to South Africa, have been acting to counter any damage from the Fed’s pullback and the prospect of higher U.S. rates. They’ve been raising their own rates, hoping to control inflation, lift their flagging currencies and keep investors from fleeing. In Argentina, consumer prices are soaring, the treasury is short on foreign currency, and the peso has suffered its sharpest slide in 12 years. It’s possible the turmoil in those countries could spill into developed economies such as the U.S. Overseas demand for U.S. goods might suffer, for example, and investors might abandon stocks globally.

Chile: Crop is sacred to many Continued from Page A-1 has been passed to protect the spicy reputation of New Mexico peppers by targeting impostors everywhere from roadside stands to grocery stores. “We are the chile state,” declared Katie Goetz, a spokeswoman for the New Mexico Department of Agriculture. To help set the record straight, department officials aren’t waiting for the outcome of Sunday’s matchup between the Broncos and Seahawks. They’re sending care packages with 20 pounds of frozen green chiles, aprons, hats and recipes to Hancock and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. Hancock announced this week he would be wagering a sampling of green chile from a half-dozen local restaurants. There are some chile farms north of Denver and near Pueblo, but many Denver restaurants source their pep-

pers straight from New Mexico, which pumps out more than 60,000 tons of green chile every year. “The flavor of New Mexico green chile is just unique, and nobody else can even come close to delivering that kind of flavor,” said Jaye Hawkins of the New Mexico Chile Association. “I’m assuming that’s what the folks in Colorado love about it.” When it comes to green chile, Gov. Susana Martinez said Thursday there’s no question it’s synonymous with New Mexico. “Although New Mexico doesn’t have an NFL team, we definitely win the Super Bowl of green chile every single year,” the governor said. “Our green chile, whether from Hatch or Chimayó or anywhere else in the state, is our state’s Lombardi Trophy.” Chile is a sacred crop in New Mexico. For neighbors to the north, it has become a culinary pursuit. “If you’re a Denver native, you’ll know all too well of the

green chile culture here,” said Amber Miller, a spokeswoman for the mayor. “People put it on everything, and then you can even eat it straight up as soup. We have chile cook-offs.” It’s not so different in Denver come late summer, when the sweet smell of roasting green chile permeates the air outside some grocery stores and markets, Miller said. “New Mexico and Colorado do share in two major items here — a love of our green chile and a love of the Denver Broncos,” she said. And for the Broncos, green chile has become somewhat of a good luck charm. Hancock first wagered it for the AFC title game and again during the playoffs. “We’ve just kept it on the table so hopefully it will take us through to a Super Bowl championship,” Miller said. If not, New Mexicans say they’re ready to help Hancock make good on his wager with some authentic green chile.

But most analysts think the improving U.S. economy will manage to withstand any damage that might spread from overseas. “I don’t think the [U.S. economy] is terribly vulnerable, assuming it doesn’t rock financial markets in a deep way,” said Joshua Feinman, global chief economist with Deutsche Asset and Wealth Management. “What we’re seeing in places like Turkey, South Africa and Argentina I don’t think matters all that much in the U.S. … The U.S. does seem to be gaining strength of its own domestically. And Europe is at least stabilizing.” The solid U.S. economic growth in the October-December quarter followed an even stronger 4.1 percent annual growth rate in the July-September quarter. But that surge was

due to a huge buildup in business stockpiles that slowed during the fourth quarter. The 3.2 percent estimated growth rate for the economy last quarter was the government’s first of three projections of gross domestic product for the October-December quarter. GDP measures the economy’s total output of goods and services. This year, economists think the economy will get a lift from continued gains in hiring. Further steady job growth would give more households money to spend and help increase consumer spending. In addition, U.S. manufacturers are expected to gain from rising global demand. And housing construction and auto sales are expected to strengthen further in 2014.

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A-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

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Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

OPINIONS

A-7

The West’s oldest newspaper, founded 1849 Robin M. Martin Owner

Blindsiding the GOP base

Robert M. McKinney Owner, 1949-2001 Inez Russell Gomez Editorial Page Editor

Ray Rivera Editor

OUR VIEW

Green chile? Stand back, Colorado

Dana Milbank

The Washington Post

W

L

egendary football coach Lou Holtz gives motivational lectures about “overcoming seemingly impossible challenges,” according to his page on the Washington Speakers Bureau website. So it would seem that Holtz found an ideal client for his services: He was scheduled to deliver a keynote address Wednesday night to the House Republican Conference, meeting in Cambridge, Md. The retired Notre Dame coach, whose bio says he has a “sterling reputation for turning pretenders into contenders,” had his work cut out for him with this GOP squad. The night before, Republicans sat in the House chamber and listened to President Barack Obama inform them in his State of the Union address that, because they had refused to work with him, he would find ways to govern without them. Then, after no fewer than four Republicans gave televised responses to the president’s speech, a more memorable (if unplanned) response came from Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., who threatened to break a reporter in half and throw him off the [expletive] balcony of the Cannon House Office Building rotunda for asking unwanted questions. Grimm apologized Wednesday morning for his unsportsmanlike conduct. The larger problem for Republicans is a series of losses on key issues for the party’s conservative fan base. First, GOP lawmakers ignored complaints from conservative groups when they passed a 2014 appropriations bill this month that raised spending above previously set levels.

Then, before leaving town Wednesday morning for their private retreat on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, they passed a compromise farm bill that abandoned conservatives’ effort to make deep cuts in food stamps. Now come reports that the Republicans will abandon plans to fight over the next debt-limit increase. In addition, House GOP leaders will reportedly outline immigration legislation at the retreat that includes a path to legal status for illegal immigrants. These developments are good news for House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, who has been struggling for three years to corral his caucus. And they are good news for the country because they hint at the possibility that Washington is beginning to function again. But it’s a delicate spot to be in for Republican lawmakers because the conservative activists who brought them to power — and who still dominate the party’s grass roots — feel betrayed. Coach Holtz’s challenge: Is it possible for Republicans to play ball with Senate Democrats and the White House without losing their fan base and the groups that essentially own the team? The farm bill shows the conundrum. The legislation has been three years in the

making, and it was delayed last year by conservatives’ attempts to remove the foodstamp program from the legislation, to give food-stamp recipients work requirements and to cut the program by $40 billion over 10 years. But in the end, food stamps stayed in the farm bill, the work requirements became a work-training pilot program, and the $40 billion cut was eased to $8 billion — and that was achieved by eliminating a loophole involving homeheating assistance that would have allowed states to game the food-stamp program in ways even some liberals found dubious. On top of that, the 959-page compromise was made public late Monday night and the vote was held Wednesday morning, well short of the 72 hours Republicans promised in 2010 so that lawmakers could read legislation before voting on it. The House devoted all of an hour to debating the bill before dashing off to the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay. Groups affiliated with the tea party were furious. Heritage Action complained that “it means more unnecessary government dependence for wealthy farmers and food-stamp recipients.” The Club for Growth called it a “ ‘Christmas tree’ bill where

there’s a gift for practically every special-interest group out there with a well-connected lobbyist, including the fresh-cut-Christmas-tree industry.” But during floor debate Wednesday morning, I heard only one Republican voice opposition, and that was in a one-minute speech by Rep. Marlin Stutzman of Indiana before the debate technically began. “Business as usual fought back and here we are today,” he complained. “This is exactly the kind of logrolling that we fought to prevent.” Sixty-two Republicans sided with Stutzman, Heritage Action and the Club for Growth. But 161 Republicans sided with Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas, R-Okla., who said the bill “may not have exactly everything my friends on the right would want or my friends on the left would want. It represents making the process work, achieving consensus.” The problem for Republicans is that the people who brought them to power didn’t ask for consensus and smooth processes. They wanted blocking and tackling. Follow Dana Milbank on Twitter @milbank.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Gonzales not responsible for ‘hold harmless’

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ayoral candidate Patti Bushee, rather than promoting her policies and vision for Santa Fe, has resorted to attacking Javier Gonzales on an issue that he had no role in promoting or voting on. The issue is the so-called compromise tax “hold-harmless” bill. The state Legislature compromised on this bill last year. It will cut 1 percent of Santa Fe’s revenue as it is phased in over the next 15 years. However, the same compromise also restored new tax credits for film, the socalled Breaking Bad tax credits. Santa Fe will gain over $6 million in new revenue this year alone, plus many jobs with Breaking Bad credits. Rather than criticize Javier, we should applaud the Legislature for passing a compromise that benefits Santa Fe. And with Javier as mayor he will fight to get that 1 percent back! Edward T. Stein

Santa Fe

Disclose expenses Patti Bushee is beginning to sound a

lot like Ronald Reagan. Reagan was the first one to call unions “special interests.” So Bushee and Bill Dimas are opposed to unions being able to communicate to their members and supporters who they support and why they support them because, presumably, they are “special interests.” Although Javier Gonzales has been endorsed by almost every union representing teachers, public employees and film and construction workers, Bushee has been endorsed by the firefighters and Dimas by the police. Are Bushee and Dimas going to tell their supporters not to spend any money informing their members and supporters why they endorsed them? At least Gonzales’ supporters are doing it the absolute right way: setting up a legal political action committee and disclosing all donations and expenditures. Are Bushee and Dimas supporters doing the same? Rosemary Romero

former city councilor Santa Fe

MAllARD FillMORE

Section editor: Inez Russell Gomez, 986-3053, igomez@sfnewmexican.com, Twitter @inezrussell

Real-world experience I take issue with your coverage of city council candidate Michael Segura in District 1 (“Personal record casts shadow on Segura’s campaign,” Jan. 26). The article begins with his legal and financial problems such as DWI convictions, which occurred years ago, in 1991, 2001 and 2009. The man is running for city council, not school bus driver, so his DWI record is irrelevant, and the same for his personal bankruptcy. What I like about Segura (who I do not know personally) is that he has real-world business and financial experience. I also like that he’s been personally subjected to police brutality, so he’s not under any illusions that the police are always trustworthy and responsible. We saw the reality of police brutality with the recent cold-blooded slaying of Jeannette Anaya by state police Officer Oliver Wilson. I don’t trust the other District 1 candidate, Signe Lindell, to speak out against police officers who abuse their power. Linda Chavez

e feel for Colorado. Yes, they have professional football, impressive mountains and enviable scenery. But when betting on the Super Bowl, the poor mayor of Denver is without a Colorado agriculture product to call his own. Else, why promise to send “Denver green chile” to Seattle if the Broncos lose to the Seahawks in the Super Bowl this Sunday? That’s right, outraged New Mexicans. Denver is putting our state’s most famous agriculture product on the line. Mayor Michael Hancock is wagering handmade skis, a hoodie and a sampling of what he claims is Denver’s “amazing green chile.” We, of course, know that even though some green chile is grown in southern Colorado, most Denver restaurants have a supply line leading straight to Hatch. Our state produces more than 60,000 tons of green chile a year. It’s not Denver green chile. It’s New Mexico green chile. (Even more insulting, the samples of chile he plans to mail the mayor of Seattle include some made with cumin and oregano.) Officials from the New Mexico Department of Agriculture aren’t letting the insult go without response. The smart folks there are preparing green chile care packages for both Mayor Hancock and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. As for the Denver mayor, perhaps he should rethink the bet. We suggest true products of Colorado: a case of Coors beer and a mixtape of the best of John Denver.

Casino hearings out of place

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en. Linda Lopez, as chairwoman of the essential Rules Committee in the state Senate, needs to learn how to set priorities. Her committee is where important appointees from the governor go to be vetted — we are still waiting on a vote of Public Education Department Secretary-designate Hanna Skandera (her hearing took place last year). This, in Gov. Susana Martinez’s fourth year. Department of the Environment Secretary-designate Ryan Flynn needs a hearing and a vote. Other appointees to boards and commissions — more than 100 — need to be moved along so the full Senate can vote. All of this, yet Lopez has decided that the Rules Committee is where a lease approved in 2011 now needs to be examined. Under scrutiny is the 25-year lease for The Downs Racetrack & Casino at Expo New Mexico in Albuquerque. We don’t disagree with Lopez that questions remain about the lease. However, in an election year (by the way, Lopez is an announced Democratic candidate for governor) and a 30-day session, there is little time for a fishing expedition disguised as a hearing. That’s especially true given the controversy over The Downs is nothing new. A hearing in 2012, perhaps, might have been a fact-finding mission. Now, it will be a distraction.

The past 100 years From The Santa Fe New Mexican: Jan. 31, 1964: There was more grain sorghum in storage in New Mexico on Jan. 1, 1964, than ever before in recorded history: 10,461,000 bushels. Other crop stocks were wheat: 3,659,000, corn: 4,320,000 bushels, barley: 250,000 bushels, oats: 84,000 bushels. Filming of a big budget modern Western comedy, taken from The Rounders, a novel by Taos author Max Evans, is expected to start near Santa Fe shortly. The movie will star Glenn Ford and Henry Fonda. It will be the first time the two famous actors have made a film together. Jan. 31, 1989: Governors from 19 New Mexico pueblos voted Friday to support a request for $7.5 million in federal funding to cover a deficit created by the addition of 52 new tribes to the program which supplies meals and other social services to the elderly. Congress decided to add the new tribes, including Hawaiians, starting next year. No additional funding was added to pay for the additional services which will be required.

SEND US yOUR lEttERS Send your letters of no more than 150 words to letters@ sfnewmexican.com. Include your name, address and phone number for verification and questions.

Santa Fe

DOONESBURy

BREAKING NEWS AT www.SANtAFENEwMExicAN.cOM


A-8 THE NEW MEXICAN

Friday, January 31, 2014

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

TIME OUT Horoscope

Crossword

The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Jan. 31, 2014: This year you flip-flop from one stance to another, and it causes confusion in others’ perceptions. Pisces helps you make and spend money. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You could feel uncomfortable about a matter revolving around your household. You might have pushed someone away. Tonight: TGIF! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening. A loved one’s response might not warm the cockles of your heart. Tonight: Celebrate the weekend in style. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You could question a decision more than you need to. Recognize your limits in the present situation, and resist pushing too hard. Tonight: Your treat. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You’ll respond positively to someone’s efforts to draw you in. Relating closely happens naturally when you are with this person. Tonight: Follow the music. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You are able to see a personal matter differently from how many people do. You will want to communicate your vision more fully than you have in the past. Tonight: Time for a talk. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Others insist on dominating the scene, no matter what is going on. Your feelings could come out in an odd way or through spending. Tonight: With a favorite person.

Super Quiz Take this Super Quiz to a Ph.D. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Subject: CLUB(S) (e.g., How many clubs are in a standard deck of playing cards? Answer: 13.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. What type of club is usually used on a golf green? Answer________ 2. This New York City club with the name of a bird operated from 1929 to 1965. Answer________ 3. What are the traditional meat ingredients in a club sandwich? Answer________ GRADUATE LEVEL 4. What is the mission of the Sierra Club? Answer________

5. This famous jazz music club in Harlem operated from 1923 to 1940. Answer________ 6. What wooden club is associated with Ireland in folklore? Answer________ PH.D. LEVEL 7. This global think tank was founded in 1968. Answer________ 8. What term is used to describe wounds inflicted by a club? Answer________ 9. What type of club is used in ceremonies to represent the sovereign? Answer________

ANSWERS:

1. Putter. 2. Stork Club. 3. Turkey and bacon. 4. To protect Earth’s wild places. 5. Cotton Club. 6. Shillelagh. 7. The Club of Rome. 8. Bludgeoning or blunt-force trauma injuries. 9. Mace.

SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? (c) 2013 Ken Fisher

Cryptoquip

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error. © 2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You might feel as though you are carrying a burden alone, but that is not the case. You will get a better grasp of a situation later in the day. Tonight: Beam in more of what you want.

Grandparents sleep with granddaughter

Dear Annie: I have a question regarding the appropriateness of a grandfather sleeping with a 5-yearold granddaughter during visits to her family home. In this case, the grandmother and grandfather take turns sleeping in the same bed with the granddaughter. I feel this is most inappropriate and sends very mixed messages to the child. I have read some research that suggests it shouldn’t be done after the age of 8, or at reaching puberty. What is your take? — Concerned Cousin Dear Cousin: Unless one of the grandparents is molesting the child, this is nothing to be alarmed about. The grandparents don’t live with the family and don’t sleep with the girl on a regular basis. We suspect this arrangement has more to do with the lack of beds during a visit and the desire to spend extra time with a young grandchild. If the girl objects (and if she doesn’t now, she will later), other arrangements should be made — such as a sleeping bag or an air mattress. Dear Annie: I have two girlfriends I’ve been very close to for several years. We are all in our 40s. Recently, we have grown apart. I’ve seen Facebook postings of things they are doing and pictures of activities they’ve done together, and I haven’t been invited to any of them. I mentioned this to one of them, who assured me they weren’t trying to hurt me. But I recently saw pictures of them celebrating on New Year’s Eve. The same friend told me it was a spur-of-the-moment thing, that they had no plans to celebrate, but circumstances allowed it when their shifts ended. When I asked the other friend, she gave a flippant remark as if it didn’t matter. Am I being oversensitive? Is it too much to think they could have called or texted me to join them? I sat at home, ringing in the New Year alone.

Sheinwold’s bridge

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You have been very sure of yourself lately and perhaps too hard on someone you care about. Tonight: Act as if there will never be another Friday night. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Use your instincts in an important conversation. Understand that much more is going on than meets the eye. Stress on your finances will ease up soon enough. Tonight: Head home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You will experience an unusual urge to spend. Much of that desire is being fueled by a personal situation. Tonight: You deserve to have some fun. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Be aware of your effect on others. Sometimes you are pushed way beyond what you can handle. Think through a problem by getting more feedback. Tonight: Make it OK to be a little overindulgent. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You might sense a change in the air, but you are uncomfortable with change. Relax, and understand that others might not be on the same level as you. Tonight: All smiles — it’s Friday! Jacqueline Bigar

Chess quiz

WHITE TO PLAY Hint: Force a draw. Solution: 1. Rh3ch! Qxh3 with a draw by stalemate!

Today in history Today is Friday, Jan. 31, the 31st day of 2014. There are 334 days left in the year. This is the Chinese New Year of the Horse. Today’s highlight in history: On Jan. 31, 1944, during World War II, U.S. forces began a successful invasion of Kwajalein Atoll and other parts of the Japanese-held Marshall Islands.

Hocus Focus

My gut tells me to move along. What do you think? — Afterthought Dear Afterthought: Your gut is right. These friends are no longer interested in making the effort to include you. Please search for friendships elsewhere. There’s no reason to sit home alone because others don’t call. Make your own plans. Get involved in activities that will allow you to meet others and become more interesting in the process. Dear Annie: This is in response to the letter from “Massachusetts,” who is having an affair with “Harry,” her childhood sweetheart, even though both of them are married to others. I have been married to the same woman for 35 years, and it has not always been a bed of roses. My job placed a lot of stress on our marriage. But we persevered. I have always told my kids, their friends and anyone I know that marriage is the hardest “job” they would ever have. It takes a lot of effort and commitment from both sides to make it work, but anything worth having is worth working as hard as you can to achieve it. The benefits far outweigh the bad parts. I could have cheated numerous times, but when I pledged my vows, I meant every word. Obviously, “Massachusetts” and “Harry” were not quite so sincere. Those two have not only betrayed their spouses, but also their children. You want to mess around? Get a divorce first. I have no idea what either of your spouses has done to deserve the blatant disrespect you two have shown, but I hope they can find happiness with someone else after your divorce. What absolutely floors me is that you would write to Annie’s column, which is published across the country, asking her for suggestions to help you cheat. The only feeling I have for you is absolute contempt. — You Disgust Me

Jumble


Obituaries B-2 Police notes B-2 Sports B-5

sports,B-5

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

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Season of high hopes slipping away from Desert Academy.

Suit: Ex-art teacher tried to choke first-grader Former Atalaya Elementary School instructor denies allegations, says charges made are ‘completely false’ By Anne Constable The New Mexican

Parents of an Atalaya Elementary School student on Thursday sued Santa Fe Public Schools, the school board and a former art teacher, alleging the teacher tried to choke their 6-year-old son for misbehaving in class. Roberta Johanson and Joey San-

doval say the teacher’s actions were “grossly excessive” and that since the December 2012 incident, their son is “terrified” to attend school, has trouble sleeping and is afraid to leave his parents. The teacher, Nina Mastrangelo, who was never criminally charged, is no longer working for the Santa Fe school district. Latifah Phillips, chief of staff to

Superintendent Joel Boyd, said Mastrangelo resigned in February 2013. Phillips added that the district is aware of the lawsuit, “and once we are formally served, we will analyze and proceed appropriately.” Mastrangelo declined to comment on the complaint, other than to say, “I will tell you, I have read it through, and the allegations concerning me are completely false. None of that happened. I don’t know why they are saying this about me.” She was specifically referring to the description of the classroom incident

cited in the court document. According to the complaint, Mastrangelo became “outraged” at the boy because he was “talking out of turn” during a first-grade art class. The complaint says she placed her arm around the child’s neck so that the crook of her elbow was against his throat and pulled him toward a wall, where she placed her hands around his throat “in a choking manner” and screamed at him. The complaint says she then lifted him by his neck so that the bottoms of his feet were no longer touching the ground and shoved him

Parched state awaits moisture N.M.’s three-month forecast does not promise relief as extreme drought conditions expand By Staci Matlock

DRoUGHT LeVeL

The New Mexican

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he blood-red color on the U.S. Drought Monitor map released Thursday symbolizes the dryness that has spread across New Mexico and the rest of the West. Winter is half over, and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains haven’t received significant snowfall since before Thanksgiving, when the region received a foot of snow, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. The water equivalent of the snow left in the mountains was at 56 percent to 62 percent of the normal level over the last three decades, based on measurements taken at telemetry sites. Several inches of snow are predicted for elevations above 7,500 feet this weekend in the state’s northern mountain ranges, but otherwise the moisture outlook is not pretty. High winds also are expected to batter the state through Friday. The portion of the Land of Enchantment in extreme drought conditions — measured by precipitation, snowpack, soil moisture and other factors — rose to 13 percent. But that’s better than this time last year, when one-fourth of the state was in extreme drought. Only a small sliver of the far southern part of the state in Eddy and Lea counties shows a normal precipitation pattern. Albuquerque is in the third-driest winter stretch it has seen in the last 94 years, based on precipitation records. If Feb. 1 rolls around with no rain or snow at the Albuquerque International Sunport, the city will have gone 42 days without measurable moisture, the longest stretch dating back to 1920. The lack of snow is impacting businesses. Santa Fe Mountain Sports is closing in April, and the Los Ala-

U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR

Severe drought

Abnormally dry

Extreme drought

Moderate drought

Exceptional drought

Please see cHoKe, Page B-3

Rape suspect’s behavior caused concern South-side neighbors say Romero started to act odd recently By Chris Quintana The New Mexican

Last year’s drought conditions looked worse than this year’s. The Santa Fe Municipal Watershed, shown in April, was only at one-third of its capacity after three years of severe drought. By the end of the year, precipitation levels were almost normal thanks to late summer and early fall rains. NEW MEXICAN FILE PHOTO

mos Ski Club is talking about handing over the small Pajarito Mountain Ski Area to the county due to the lack of snow, skiers and revenue. Despite the bad start to winter, nature could still be kind. Drought conditions and winter precipitation looked even worse at the end of January 2013. But heavy rains in late summer and early fall made up the difference, leaving New Mexico close to normal precipitation levels by the end of 2013, according to the National Weather Service.

The water year in New Mexico — which measures precipitation as snow and rain beginning each October — started off well. The snows in November were followed by a dry December in most regions, but still left the state at 85 percent of average. The northwest and north-central portions of the state, including Santa Fe, fared best, based on observation sites. Santa Fe was at 80 percent of normal precipitation at the end of December. Eagle Nest, Chama and Los Ala-

mos were all over 100 percent. But all that has changed in the last few weeks. The three-month weather outlook issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows warmer than normal temperatures for most of New Mexico and normal to below normal precipitation for February through April. Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@sfnewmexican.com. Follow her on Twitter @stacimatlock.

Angel Fire fears end of dwindling water reserves By Jesse Chaney

Sangre de Cristo Chronicle

ANGEL FIRE — The village of Angel Fire will drain its emergency water reserves next year if the municipality continues to use the supply like it did in 2013. The village, with nearly 730 acrefeet of water demand last year, usually receives its annual allocation from a mix of water rights and a contract known as Permit 71, which provides water from Eagle Nest Lake. In past years, the 414 acre-feet available through the village’s “junior” rights — or those with lower priority — met the demand for municipal water from the beginning of January through the end of August. But the Office of the State Engineer won’t let the village use these rights in times when the Spring Ditch Co. has top priority, due to low flows in the ditch. This was the case for part of 2012 and all of 2013. “All it takes is some good storms, and Spring Ditch would fill up and be out of priority, but it just has to get the moisture,” said Alfred “Buster”

against the wall in a “rapid and violent manner.” The force used, the complaint says, “amounted to a brutal and inhumane abuse of official power that is shocking to the conscience.” The incident took place in view of other students in the class, according to the complaint. The boy’s parents said the back of their son’s head was swollen from being slammed against the wall. The lawsuit charges that Mastran-

Monique Trujillo and her family launch a boat at Eagle Nest Lake in 2008, when the lake had begun to drop below the bottom of the boat ramp. The lake provides much of the water supply for Angel Fire. THE SANGRE DE CRISTO CHRONICLE

Rayado, a watermaster with the State Engineer’s Office. The village of Angel Fire usually receives about 223 acre-feet of water from Eagle Nest Lake through Permit

71, but it lost about 45 of those in 2013 because of mandatory cutbacks due to drought conditions. Including the 317 acre-feet of water available through its “senior” or

Section editor: Howard Houghton, 986-3015, hhoughton@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Dennis Rudner, drudner@sfnewmexican.com

Two people who live near a man arrested Tuesday on charges of raping a 16-year-old girl more than two decades ago said he had recently started behaving oddly. One neighbor said Gilbert Romero, 51, had tried to peddle earrings and a power generator Gilbert to other residents Romero on Vereda Oriente, south of the Genoveva Chavez Community Center. “He started ringing doorbells at weird hours,” the neighbor said. Another nearby resident noticed more and more people coming by Romero’s house, prompting her to think that he might be selling drugs. She said he used to have a tow truck that he would take out several times

Please see accUseD, Page B-3

Police: Man in parking lot fracas at Prep had firearms 76-year-old accused of brandishing weapon at teen for reckless driving

high-priority rights, the village got a total allocation of only about 490 acre-feet in 2013, while the demand for municipal water came to about 728 acre-feet. The village had to dip into its reserves for the second year in a row. The reserves, also stored at Eagle Nest Lake, are replenished only when the village has excess water available at the end of the year. The village, established in 1986, didn’t use water reserves until 2012, when it took about 63 acre-feet from the supply. In 2013, it had to tap 239 acre-feet from the supply. The village has about 446 acre-feet of water remaining in storage, which won’t be enough to cover the shortfall in 2015 — unless it begins receiving more water or using less than it did last year. Despite efforts to conserve municipal water, usage increased in the village by about 85 acre-feet from 2012 to 2013. Angel Fire officials are trying to decrease water usage by eliminating

Santa Fe police officers recovered three guns from the home of a man whom they suspect pointed a firearm at a 17-year-old Santa Fe Preparatory School senior Tuesday in a student parking lot at the school. Officers who Allan searched the 13 Wheeler Ravens Ridge Trail home of 76-yearold Allan Wheeler on Wednesday recovered a .22-caliber Ruger pistol, a H&R Inc. .22-caliber revolver and a Marksman BB pistol from the home. Wheeler reportedly was outraged by the student’s reckless driving and followed him into the parking lot, where the teen said he pulled out a gun, pointed it at the boy’s stomach

Please see waTeR, Page B-3

Please see GUns, Page B-3

By Chris Quintana The New Mexican

BREAKING NEWS AT www.sanTafenewmexican.com


B-2

LOCAL & REGION

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

Teatro Flamenco co-founder Cecilio Benítez dies at age 80 By Uriel J. Garcia

The New Mexican

Cecilio Benítez, a Spanish theatrical director who helped spread his country’s culture across New Mexico and the United States, died at his home in New York City after a long illness, a family friend said. He was 80 years old. His daughter-in-law, Anna Benítez, said he had suffered for years from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Benítez was a co-founder of the Santa Febased María Benítez Teatro Flamenco and the Institute for Spanish Arts with his wife, María Benítez, who originally is from Taos. Cecilio Benítez was born in Barcelona but later moved to Madrid to start his career in theater at the age of 14. Benítez met his wife while in Madrid, where she was studying to become a flamenco dancer. The couple married in 1966 and moved to Taos and later to Santa Fe, where they founded the cultural organizations in the 1970s. “He was a reserved but incredibly artistic person,” said Theresa Cardenas, a close family friend. “His overall contribution was expanding the Spanish arts in America.” Both of the organizations he co-founded in Santa Fe with his wife were recognized internationally. According to an obituary prepared by his family, Cecilio Benítez began doing radio work on KDCE radio in Española in 1967, after he and his wife moved to New Mexico. The couple then moved to Sedona, Ariz., with their son in 1969, where Cecilio Benítez taught Spanish literature at Verde Valley School and directed plays. In 1973, the couple moved to Santa Fe, where they founded María Benítez Teatro Flamenco and later the Institute for Spanish Arts. Jose Valle Fajardo, a Flamenco guitarist in Santa Fe who had played for the company Ceci-

A 69-year-old woman from Bernalillo County has become the state’s fifth flu death of the season. The death comes amid signs that the disease is receding in the state, according to the New Mexico Department of Health. Department officials said they are tracking a decrease in the number of people seeing their doctor for influenza-like illness, which has dropped over the past three weeks from a peak of 7 percent during the week ending Jan. 4 to 4.6 percent for the week ending Jan. 25. However, the newest fatality brings the total in the 2013-14 season to five. People who have died from influenza range in age from 45 to 79 years old. Over half (52.9 percent) of all hospitalizations involved people ages 18 to 64. People 18 to 49 years old accounted for 27.1 percent of flu cases with hospitalizations; those 50 to 64 years old, 25.8 percent; and those 65 years and older, 26.6 percent. Children up to 4 years old accounted for 16.2 percent, and children 5 to 17 years of age,

Cecilio Benítez, co-founder of the Santa Febased María Benítez Teatro Flamenco, died at the age of 80. COURTESY PHOTO

lio Benítez co-founded, said he was an educated man and a bullfighting fan. Cecilio Benítez, along with his wife, gave a lot of New Mexicans the opportunity to meet and perform with a lot of great flamenco artists, Fajardo said. Fajardo, also originally from Spain, met Cecilio Benítez in Santa Fe after working in Canada, where he performed with María Benítez, he said. “They deserve a lot of respect because they were pioneers in spreading flamenco in New Mexico and across the United States,” Fajardo said. “They helped me out a lot in my career.” In addition to his wife, Cecilio Benítez is survived by a son, Francisco “Paco” Benítez, and five brothers who live in Spain. Arrangements are pending for a memorial service in Santa Fe in April. Contact Uriel J. Garcia at 986-3062 or ugarcia@ sfnewmexican.com. Follow him on Twitter at @ ujohnnyg.

4.4 percent. “As long as we have flu circulating in New Mexico, it is not too late to get vaccinated,” Health Secretary Retta Ward said in a statement. “All New Mexicans also can help prevent the flu and other illness by everyday actions, including washing hands with soap and water.” The predominant circulating flu strain in New Mexico and the United States is influenza H1N1. This strain was first identified in 2009 and might cause severe illness, even in healthy young adults. The New Mexico Department of Health is urging everyone 6 months of age and older to see their doctor or pharmacist about getting a flu vaccine. The vaccine currently is available and protects against H1N1 and other strains of flu. In Santa Fe on Friday, Blue Cross Blue Shield will be on the east side of the Roundhouse at Old Santa Fe Trail and Paseo de Peralta to provide flu shots. The vaccines will be offered from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday for those age 18 and over.

Police notes The Santa Fe Police Department is investigating the following reports: u City officers arrested Shawn McDermott, 43, 1187 Senda del Valle, on three counts of battery against a health care worker at 12:05 a.m. Thursday. u A woman reported that a man got out of an SUV and stole her purse at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Smith’s, 1899 Pacheco St. u Someone illegally entered a home in the 2900 block of Calle Princesa Juana between 9 and 10 a.m. Monday. The victim was able to give officers a detailed description of the intruder and her vehicle. u City officers arrested Candy Salas, 32, of Los Banos, Calif., at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday on a charge of battery against a peace officer and an outstanding warrant in connection with a charge of failure to appear in California. u City officers arrested Elvis Lopez, 18, 2001 Hopewell St., and Edwardo Fernandez, 18, 2800 Cerrillos Road, at 3:10 p.m. Wednesday after someone reported that the two were trying to break into apartments in the 2000 block of Hopewell Street. The two were found in a

labels were approved by the Legislature, the state would DENVER — Labels on genet- then have to penalize retailers ically modified foods have been that mislabeled foods — setting rejected again by Colorado law- up possible fines and jail time. makers. But the food-labeling Several said the federal govdebate could just be getting ernment, not the states, should started for Colorado voters. address labels on food items A House committee unanimade or derived from genetimously rejected a voluntary cally modified crops, known as measure Thursday to give food GMOs. producers the option of labeling “I think that would be better food that doesn’t include geneti- than doing it state by state,” said cally modified ingredients. Rep. Beth McCann, D-Denver. The Food and Drug AdminisSeventy percent of processed tration already allows producers foods contain at least one GMO to voluntarily label their items ingredient, according to the as genetically engineered or not. nonprofit Center for Science in Lawmakers from both parties the Public Interest. pointed out that if the optional Currently, only Connecticut The Associated Press

69-year-old woman is state’s fifth flu fatality this season The New Mexican

Colorado lawmakers again reject GMO labels

park near Navajo Drive and Taos Street. u An employee at Sprint, 3777 Cerrillos Road, reported that a man entered the store and stole an iPad mini at 7:54 p.m. Tuesday. u A man reported that someone stole a vehicle from his residence in the 2800 block of Cerrillos Road sometime Tuesday. u A man on Aviation Drive reported that someone tried to break into his home at 9:04 a.m. Tuesday. u Someone entered a home and stole a shotgun and a handgun from a home in the 1600 block of La Cieneguita between 2 and 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the following reports: u An iPad and a cellphone were stolen from a home on Aaron y Veronica Road between Dec. 16 and Tuesday. u County deputies arrested a 17-year-old boy on Amigos Lane who allegedly struck his mother with a baton sometime Wednesday. u Someone broke into a car parked on the shoulder of U.S. 84/285 sometime Thursday. It’s unclear if anything was stolen.

DWI arrest u City officers arrested Nicholl Martinez, 25, of Santa Cruz at 1:18 p.m. Wednesday on charges of burglary and shoplifting at the Wal-Mart Supercenter, 5701 Herrera Drive.

Texas board voting on textbook review rule changes AUSTIN, Texas — Texas’ long-standing cultural battle over textbook content could be inching toward a cease-fire. The State Board of Education will vote Friday on tightening rules for who can serve on citizen review panels that scrutinize textbooks for classrooms statewide, suggesting teachers or professors be given priority for subjects in their areas of expertise. In past years, some social and religious conservatives have volunteered for the panels and raised objections about science texts with extensive lessons on climate change and evolution. Those volunteers also used separate panels to suggest updates to the state’s curriculum to emphasize the importance of Christian doctrine in the founding of America.

The 15-member education board has final approval on textbook recommendation and curriculum, but its members are influenced by the review panels. Critics have long complained that a few activists with religious or ideological objections have too much power to shape what more than 5 million Texas public school students learn. “We don’t need lay people making these highly specific and technical decisions on these books,” said Thomas Ratliff, a Mount Pleasant Republican who is the chief proponent for the mandate, during the board’s meeting in November. Still, Texas is so large that edits it demands can affect textbooks sold in many other parts of the country. The Associated Press

Funeral services and memorials ANNE CHRISTY FAIRES ATWELL 12/3/36 ~ 1/28/14

Anne Christy Faires Atwell passed away peacefully in Austin, Texas on January 28, 2014 with her family at her side. Anne had a strong and vibrant personality that left an impression wherever she went. Throughout her years in Dallas, Texas, Wimberley, Texas, Santa Fe and Tesuque, New Mexico, and Tequesta and Mt. Dora, Florida, Anne entertained countless friends and acquaintances. Her selfless nature and sense of humor will be missed. Anne is survived by two sons, Anthony Atwell, Jr. and Christopher D. Atwell, her daughter in law, Gretchen Seewald Atwell, three grandchildren, Alexander Atwell, Anthony Hill Atwell, and Kathryn Grace Atwell, and numerous nieces and nephews. Anne’s son Webster Atwell, II predeceased her. Anne was an artist, designer, chef, traveler, and mother. Anne loved to laugh and play. Anne appreciated American Indian and Mexican culture and art. Anne collected antique American Indian jewelry. Anne loved excellent food and interior decoration, and, most importantly, her family. Anne served her community in many roles. Anne served on the Board of the Dallas Museum of Art and served in various roles at the Dallas Junior League. Anne also supported the Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, Texas and many other charities in the places she lived. Anne’s family would especially like to thank Katelyn Collins, Anne’s best friend in Austin, the devoted staff at New Century Hospice, and the skilled nursing unit professionals at Longhorn Village in Steiner Ranch. Anne knew life was short and lived life to its fullest. Anne would want to be remembered as the life of the party, which she was. A memorial service is scheduled for 1 p.m. on January 31, 2014 at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, 1500 N. Capital of Texas Highway, Austin, Texas 78746. In lieu of flowers, donations in Anne’s honor may be made to Alzheimer’s research, New Century Hospice Foundation, or a charity of your choice (with any acknowledgements to 3200 Lamantilla Cove, Austin, Texas 78746). IN LOVING MEMORY OF FLORENCIO BEN “BENJI” LUCERO THIRTEEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY MASS

Speed SUVs u Mobile speed-enforcement vehicles are not in use as the city renegotiates its contract with Redflex Traffic Systems.

The Ascension And if I go while you’re still here, Know that I live on, vibrating to a different measure Behind a thin veil you cannot see through. You will not see me, so you must have faith. I wait for time when we can soar together again, both unaware of each other. Until then, just whisper my name in your heart, and I will be there.Dad, we love and miss you everyday. You will be forever in our hearts.

Help lines Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families hotline: 800-473-5220 St. Elizabeth Shelter for men, women and children: 982-6611 Interfaith Community Shelter: 795-7494 New Mexico suicide prevention hotline: 866-435-7166 Solace Crisis Treatment Center: 986-9111, 800-7217273 or TTY 471-1624 Youth Emergency Shelter/ Youth Shelters: 438-0502 Police and fire emergency: 911 Graffiti hotline: 955-CALL (2255)

and Maine have laws requiring labels for genetically modified food. But those requirements won’t kick in until other states adopt their own rules. Voters in California and Washington state rejected GMO-labeling measures over the last two years. Efforts are underway in Colorado to put up a similar ballot measure here. One of the groups, Right To Know Colorado GMO, is currently gathering signatures to put up a ballot measure that would require foods with GMO ingredients to be labeled “PRODUCED WITH GENETIC ENGINEERING.”

There will be a Thirteen Year Anniversary Mass celebrated on Saturday, February 1st, 2014 at 6 p.m. at St. Anne Catholic Church. All family, friends and neighbors are all invited to attend. The Family of Florencio Ben “Benji” Lucero

To place an obituary please call: 986-3000

THIRTEEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY MASS IN LOVING MEMORY OF LEO ROMERO FEBRUARY 2, 2001

DADDY A million times we’ve needed you; a million times we’ve cried. If love alone could have saved you, you never would have died. In life we loved you dearly; in death we love you still. In our hearts you hold a place, no one else will ever fill. It broke our hearts to lose you; but you didn’t go alone. Part of us went with you, the day God took you home. Daddy, you are in our hearts and thoughts everyday. We love and miss you very much. The Montoya and Romero Families. There will be a Mass celebrated on Saturday, February 1, 2014, at 5 p.m. at the San Isidro Center, Agua Fria. RICHARD CARLOS MAES JANUARY 31, 2005 9 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

All things bright and beautiful, all creatures, great and small, all things wise and wonderful, the Lord God made them all. Forever In Our Hearts. Mom, Dad, Charlene, Gil, Lawrence, Anita and George.

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LOCAL & REGION

Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-3

Californians get ‘wake-up call’ Governor warns conservation efforts voluntary — for now

was squeezing out only dribs and drabs of moisture in most areas. The National Weather Service office in San Francisco reported rainfall amounts since Wednesday night generally The Associated Press were a few hundredths to a tenth of an inch. LOS ANGELES — Gov. “Needless to say the rain is Jerry Brown provided some a welcome sight but does little very practical guidance for for drought relief,” the weather Californians amid a deepening service wrote. drought: Take shorter showers, Snow — heavy in places — turn off the water while brushwas falling in the Sierra Nevada ing teeth, and “don’t flush more just in time for the latest meathan you need to.” surement of snow depth. The “Make no mistake, this peaks of the towering range drought is a big wake-up call,” Brown said Thursday in down- normally store a huge amount town Los Angeles before meet- of the state’s water supply in the form of snowpack, but the ing with local water district officials. “Hopefully it’s going to previous survey earlier this rain. If it doesn’t, we’re going to month found the snow water equivalent was just 17 percent of have to act in a very strenuous way in every part of the state to normal. The brown peaks were visible in satellite photos from get through.” space. The governor’s pragmatic Brown, who declared a plea came as wet weather finally moved through northern drought emergency Jan. 17, met portions of the state, which has behind closed doors with water agency officials serving the vast been in an extraordinary dry period during what is normally population of Southern California, where banked supplies the time for rain and snow. are keeping crisis at bay for the But the stingy storm system

time being, but the future is being eyed with caution. The situation, however, is not uniform throughout California, where 38 million residents share the water supply with a vast farming industry and a host of sensitive environments such as rivers where low flows can threaten fisheries. State officials have said 17 rural communities are in danger of a severe water shortage within four months. Brown said water conservation may be voluntary now, but “every day this drought goes on, we’re going to have to tighten the screws on what people are doing.” Brown acknowledged there is a geographic divide when it comes to water politics. “I’m going to do my best to unite this state. Water is something that we share, and we have a common interest in maximizing the economic wellbeing of the state. And one does that by using water wisely,” he said. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern Califor-

nia said it’s looking for ways to help water agencies to the north. During the state’s worst drought, in 1977, the district had a surplus in its reservoir in Northern California that it was able to transfer to Marin County. But that’s not the case this time around. The district said decades of aggressive water conservation and other measures have prevented a water crisis in Southern California. It’s urging residents to voluntarily cut water use and will ask that its board approve rebates for water conservation. The district’s general manager, Jeffrey Kightlinger, said he doesn’t expect to impose mandatory water cutbacks this year. “We’re pretty prepared for this drought. We have ample storage. We are in pretty sound shape.” But he acknowledged there are parts of the state where the situation is different. “Since this is a one-state issue, we’re going to look for how best we can help the rest of the state while retaining our reliability here,” he said.

Guns: Teen’s family seeks restraining order Continued from Page B-1 and demanded his license and registration. According to an affidavit for the search warrant, an officer stated that the victim and a witness heard Wheeler use several expletives during the incident. The student, 17, admitted to police that he had passed other vehicles in a no-passing zone, said Celina Westervelt, the police department’s spokeswoman. According to a police department news release, Wheeler left the campus while police were summoned, calling the incident

“ridiculous.” But Wheeler returned while officers were interviewing the student. He denied having a gun on campus but admitted to confronting the student for “driving like a maniac.” The affidavit says Wheeler told police that he did own guns and gave officers permission to search his vehicle. But when he was asked if he owned a “a small black semi-automatic pistol,” he told officers, “I’m not here to talk to you about that.” Officers found that Wheeler had a box of bullets in his vehicle, but no gun, although

there was a nylon holster for a .38-caliber handgun in the sleeve of Wheeler’s coat. Santa Fe County jail records show Wheeler was released on a $20,000 surety bond Wednesday. New Mexico Courts online records also show that the victim’s family has requested a temporary restraining order against Wheeler. A man named Allan Wheeler has written letters to The New Mexican on topics ranging from tourism to water usage. Contact Chris Quintana at 986-3093 or cquintana@sfnewmexican.com.

Accused: 51-year-old charged in 1992 rape Continued from Page B-1 a night. She said Romero had lived in the neighborhood for about two years, and had helped people fix their cars. He also scared off strangers. Both neighbors said Romero lived with a woman, but they didn’t know the nature of their relationship. Neither wanted to be identified, saying they feared retaliation. Romero is facing felony charges in connection with the 1992 rape case, including counts of kidnapping and criminal sexual penetration of a child. A police document says that in October 1992, a man they

believe to be Romero offered a ride to the teen and took her to a park on Navajo Street, where he started to hug and kiss her. The man then raped her at gunpoint. Police working cold cases were able to match DNA evidence gathered during the rape investigation in 1992 with an old sample of Romero’s DNA that was in a national database. However, that wasn’t considered sufficient probable cause to arrest him. In December, investigators obtained a warrant to take a new DNA sample from Romero, and state laboratory results confirmed the match Jan. 24. Police still have not said why Romero’s DNA was in the

national database. Nick Apodaca, the president of the Pueblos de Rodeo Road Homeowners Association, where Romero lives, said no one in the neighborhood has complained about Romero, although Apodaca expected the case to come up at the next association meeting. According to online records, Romero was indicted on forgery, fraud and embezzlement charges in 1996. He was transferred to Santa Fe from the sheriff’s department in Brighton, Colo. Later that year and in 1997, he pleaded no contest to the charges against him. As of Thursday night, Romero was being held in lieu of a $50,000 surety bond at the

Santa Fe County jail. He is set for a preliminary examination at 8:30 a.m. Feb. 12 in Magistrate Court. Contact Chris Quintana at 9863093.

George Peck enjoys ice fishing at Eagle Nest Lake, which supplies much of the village of Angel Fire’s water supply. COURTESY OF NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISH

Water: Village to seek snowmaking credits Continued from Page B-1

“golf course and other irrigation, snow making, and other many of the village’s “bleedappropriate recreational uses ers,” or lines scattered through- of the Resort” at a rate of $1 out the water system that per acre-foot annually until release a constant drip into the 2077, according to a 1997 agreeground during winter months ment between the village and to prevent the lines from freezthe resort. The resort gave all ing. Some of the lines that of its water rights to the vilneed bleeders were not buried lage as part of the agreement, deep enough, and others have whereby the resort transferred become too shallow because of its water and wastewater sysroad-blading on the surface. tems to the village. The bleeders cost about Mitchell said he believes the 41 acre-feet of water in 2011 village is entitled to more water and just over 42 acre-feet in than it is receiving from the 2012. Angel Fire Manager M. State Engineer’s Office, and he Jay Mitchell said the village eliminated about 20 percent to plans to appeal for more. “Our water that’s being 30 percent of the bleeders in pumped up on the mountain 2013 by digging up roads and for snow and all that kind of improving waterlines. stuff feeds back into the system The village also has tried to for downstream flow, and we limit municipal water usage don’t get any of that, and that’s through a set of water restrictions implemented in 2012 and my argument,” he said, adding that other New Mexico users updated in 2013. receive credits specifically for About a fourth of the water snowmaking. supply consumed each year Mitchell also said he believes goes to Angel Fire Resort, which used about 188 acre-feet the village should be allowed to use its junior water rights. He in 2010, 203 acre-feet in 2011, said the aquifer levels at the vil205 in 2012 and 179 in 2013 for lage’s well sites are “extremely both snowmaking and golf healthy” and have remained course irrigation. level or have increased during The resort is entitled to the last few years. 400 acre-feet per year for

Choke: Suit alleges history of anger ing said Mastrangelo started running volunteer art projects in her gelo had a history of “temper daughter’s classroom in Santa Fe tantrums, angry outbursts and and then joined the public school inappropriate physical contact district’s artist-in-residence prowith students,” and the school gram. In 2005, she obtained her district and the board should K-12 teaching license through have known she was unfit. Santa Fe Community College and According to John Day, a law- became a full-time art teacher. yer for the parents, the district The profile said she taught didn’t dispute the incident. In some 400 students a week but fact, he said, “The district has quickly grew “frustrated with acknowledged to us that the an inflexible school system, teacher did indeed throw the focused on giving the kids child against a wall, but they everything ‘except what they have told us he ‘deserved what needed.’ ” he got,’ an exact quote. The kid “Exhausted and stressed,” was just a little over 3 feet tall.” she enrolled in the academy’s A profile on the website for the Teacher Renewal Program, the Academy for the Love of Learnprofile said. On Thursday, she

Continued from Page B-1

declined to tell a reporter where she is currently working. In 2011, her show Structures of Dynafluxian Exuberance — watercolor on paper with mirrors and filament — was featured by Axle Contemporary, a roving gallery on wheels. She was an original member of the city’s Bicycle and Trails Advisory Committee and cut the ribbon to open the city’s Museum Hill Trail in 2012. The lawsuit seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages and legal fees. Contact Anne Constable at 986-3022 or aconstable@ sfnewmexican.com.

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B-4

LOCAL & REGION

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

Airports wrestle with transporting of legal pot Colorado warns of fines, possible jail; Washington takes more relaxed view The Associated Press

DENVER — Among the many oddities that have arisen from marijuana legalization in Washington and Colorado is this: It can be easier to get through airport security with a bag of weed than a bottle of water. At Washington’s airports, including Seattle-Tacoma International, there’s nothing police can do to prevent travelers from flying with pot in their carry-on or checked luggage, provided it doesn’t exceed the state legal limit of 1 ounce. Instead, airport officials say, officers simply recommend that travelers leave it in their cars, toss it or have a friend pick it up. But in Colorado, where the legal pot law gives property owners more authority to restrict the drug, some airports have banned marijuana possession and enacted penalties, including fines as high as $2,500 and a jail stint at the airport in Colorado Springs. “Carrying marijuana in a civilian aircraft is illegal under federal regulations. That’s why we implemented the rule, to prevent marijuana from reaching a civilian aircraft,” said airport

Carrying pot through Denver International Airport is banned, but there appears to be little danger of legal repercussions if caught. BRENNAN LINSLEY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

spokeswoman Kim Melchor, adding that the airport has yet to levy a fine and that a drop-box where travelers can toss excess weed hasn’t been used. The situation underscores the difficulty officials in both states have as they try to prevent pot from leaving their borders — one of several conditions the Department of Justice imposed when it allowed the legal pot experiments to proceed. An attorney with Smart Colorado, which opposed legalization, worried about tourists transporting concentrated products, such as hardened hash oil that has enough THC, pot’s primary psychoactive chemical, for hundreds of uses. “For the size of a traveler’s shampoo

bottle, you can serve an entire urban high school and get them stoned,” Rachel O’Bryan said. Voters in the two states approved legalizing marijuana for adults over 21 in 2012, but the laws don’t allow people to take pot out of state. Federal law prohibits marijuana possession, on a plane or anywhere else. Anyone who touched down in the other 48 states where marijuana is illegal would also be violating state law. While the Justice Department said it wanted the states to keep the legal weed in state, there’s been little to keep people from trying to bring back souvenirs from the legal-pot states. The Transportation Security Administration makes travelers empty their water bottles, but when agents encounter personal amounts of marijuana at security checkpoints, they typically don’t call the DEA or FBI. Federal prosecutors don’t waste their time on such small potatoes. An agency spokesman said TSA’s focus is on terrorism and threats to the aircraft and passengers. TSA agents normally hand over pot cases to local law enforcement officers, who have little recourse in Colorado and Washington. At Sea-Tac, they rely on a “totality of the circumstances” test to decide whether to make an arrest or investigate further, Port of Seattle spokesman Perry Cooper said: Is the

passenger combative or assaultive, or carrying vast amounts of cash? Detention might be warranted for some of those things, but not for the pot itself, he noted. Airports say there have been few incidents where passengers have been stopped carrying marijuana. The Port of Denver banned pot at Denver International, with fines of up to $999. No one’s been fined yet. At the urging of Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo, Aspen’s airport is installing an “amnesty box” where travelers can drop any leftover weed before taking to the skies. In the few cases where travelers have been caught trying to take pot on a plane, they have received polite reprimands and no legal consequences. “How do we invite people here, tell them they can use a product and then prosecute them when they try to leave the state?” he asked. His office has confiscated marijuana edibles from several travelers at the Aspen airport — after obtaining voluntary releases of the property — but has not taken legal action against them. Travelers were caught taking as much as 5 pounds of pot-infused candies and oils, he said. But the Colorado initiative allows people to carry up to 1 ounce of THC. DiSalvo said there probably was not that amount of THC

Medical marijuana clears Ariz. court hurdle The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Prodded by a court ruling, Maricopa County now has a zoning ordinance allowing medical-marijuana dispensaries in unincorporated areas of the county. The Board of Supervisors’ approval of the new ordinance on a 4-0 vote Wednesday allows dispensaries in commercial zones and cultivation sites in industrial zones. The ordinance specifies minimum distances from churches,

U.S. senator’s son arrested on drug charge in Colo. DENVER — The son of U.S. Sen. Mark Udall was arrested on drug and trespassing charges, the Boulder County Sheriff’s office said Thursday. Jedediah Lee FoxUdall, 26, was booked into Boulder County Jail Wednesday on suspicion Jedediah Lee of possesFox-Udall sion of drugs and four counts of trespassing, Cmdr. Heidi Prentup said. Deputies found him about noon when responding to a call of a man breaking into cars in the semirural community of Eldorado Springs, where Sen. Udall lives. They discovered drug paraphernalia on Fox-Udall, and he admitted using heroin in the previous 48 hours, Prentup said. He was released on $1,500 bond Wednesday evening and is scheduled to appear in court Feb. 20. Udall and his wife issued a statement Thursday saying they were distressed to learn of their son’s arrest and asked for privacy to deal with it as a family. They said they love their son and “stand with him in his commitment to getting the treatment he needs.” Court records show FoxUdall also faces a misdemeanor charge from a December incident in which he allegedly stole Advil and Imodium from a supermarket. The Associated Press

schools, day care centers, parks, adult-oriented businesses and other medical-marijuana facilities, The Arizona Republic reported. The county previously had a zoning classification that effectively blocked dispensaries and cultivation sites. But a judge ruled in a lawsuit filed by a would-be operator of a planned dispensary in Sun City that the county wasn’t in compliance with the state’s voter-approved law on medical marijuana.

The county is appealing the trial judge’s ruling. County Attorney Bill Montgomery called the board’s approval of the zoning ordinance an “intermediate zoning solution” that was necessitated by the court order. “Obviously, I disagree with the trial court’s order; that’s why we’re appealing it,” Montgomery said. “Nonetheless, I can’t expect people, as the county attorney, to follow the law if I’m not going to obey court orders either.”

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Meanwhile, White Mountain Health Center is awaiting approval of its application for a building permit for its planned dispensary in Sun City. It plans to open in March. “It’s been incredibly frustrating,” said Jeffrey Kaufman, attorney for White Mountain. “It’s been unfair to the sick people of Sun City and that area, but they’re looking forward to moving on and hope that they’ll be able to open quickly.”

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in even the largest load. Jeffrey Gard, a Boulder attorney who represents marijuana users and sellers, said there’s no reason for Colorado airports to worry about people boarding a plane with pot. “By law, it’s no different than bringing a flask or a pack of cigarettes,” he said. “As tourists come here and do dumb things you’re going to see more of these things happen.” Gard advises clients not to board planes with pot. The risk, he and other marijuana advocates say, is too great. Sean McAllister, a lawyer who is on the board of the Colorado chapter of NORML, a pot legalization group, said that medical marijuana patients used to be allowed to fly with their medication to other states with similar laws. But Denver’s airport ban on pot, which went into effect on Jan. 1, now means those patients might get their legal medication trashed, he said. “The law’s getting looser in Colorado, and they’re getting stricter,” McAllister complained. Airports say they aren’t bracing for an influx of travelers carrying marijuana from Colorado and Washington. “Law enforcement officers in Texas enforce the laws of Texas, and it’s incumbent on people from Colorado to know the laws in places where they’re going,” said David Magana, a spokesman for Dallas-Fort Worth International.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

SPORTS Los Alamos girls soccer coach retires Kubicek led team for 22 years, 2 state titles

Top 25: McBride leads Notre Dame to win over Virginia Tech. Page B-6

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL

PREP GIRLS SOCCER

time running out for wildcats

By Edmundo Carrillo The New Mexican

After leading the Los Alamos girls soccer team for 22 years, head coach Jiri Kubicek is hanging up the whistle and officially stepping down Saturday. In a letter sent to Los Alamos athletic director Vicki Nelms, Kubicek said his family and his health were the reasons for his retirement. He could not be reached for comment by The New Mexican on Thursday. Jiri Kubicek Kubicek appeared in nine state championship games with the Lady Hilltoppers. He won titles in 1998 in Class A-AAA and in 2003 in AAAA. He is leaving Los Alamos with an overall record of 332-143, good for a .699 winning percentage He made his first state championship appearance in 1994 when all girls soccer teams were consolidated into Class A-AAAA, where the Lady Hilltoppers lost to Albuquerque La Cueva. That loss also doubled as the Lady Hilltoppers’ first loss of that season. Los Alamos made it to the championship game three straight years from 2008-10, but fell to Albuquerque Academy each time. In total, the Lady Hilltoppers had a 1-5 record against the Lady Chargers in championship matches. Kubicek did get the upper hand on them in 2003. Kubicek’s teams even got some national attention. In 2012, Los Alamos was visited by the Strongsville,

Please see coacH, Page B-6

NFL SUPER BOWL XLVIII

Receiver’s grandma, mom root from prison By Arnie Stapleton

The Associated Press

JERSEY CITY, N.J. — Demaryius Thomas’ mother and grandmother will cheer for the Broncos receiver around the prison TV Sunday, both wearing No. 88 jerseys they crafted with strips of tape. The two women have never seen Thomas play in person. He was 11 when police burst through the door of their home in Demaryius Montrose, Ga., and Thomas arrested both in 1999. Police allowed Katina Smith to walk her son and his two younger sisters to the school bus one last time. Now she’s at a minimum-security prison in Florida, sentenced to 20 years. Her mother, Minnie Pearl Thomas, who had two previous drug convictions, received two life sentences with the possibility for parole after 40 years. Smith could have gotten a lighter sentence by testifying against her mother, but she refused. They’ll watch Thomas play in his first Super Bowl Sunday, when he will be matched against Seahawks star cornerback Richard Sherman for much of the game. “I think that drives me more to know that they’re there and they’re watching me,” Thomas said. “I try to go out there and play my best because they’re going to talk about it to the people in the jailhouse.” Thomas’ father was serving in the Army and stationed in Kuwait when his mother and grandmother were arrested. He went to live with an aunt

Please see tHomas, Page B-7

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Desert Academy’s Mack Snyder makes a basket during the second quarter of Thursday’s game against Jemez Valley at the Driscoll Center at Santa Fe University of Art and Design. For more photos, go to tinyurl.com/k234nrt. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

Desert Academy’s prospects dim after loss to Jemez Valley By James Barron

U

tion for which 2A teams advance to the postseason and which will D. Academy 42 watch it. But with the way Desert Academy played, head coach Ernie Rodriguez wasn’t sure if extending the season into March would be much of a victory for his team. “People that finish weak usually finish early,” Rodriguez said. “So we don’t have a lot of options. If we don’t improve, it doesn’t matter if we get into the state tournament. Getting into the state tournament, while it might be nice for some, getting there ill-prepared to do anything. … It’s a short stay to say the least.” Preparation and focus were in short supply for the Jemez Valley 61

The New Mexican

p. It’s the only direction for the Desert Academy Wildcats to go. A boys basketball season that was filled with aspirations of being a contender in District 2A and perhaps in Class A in November might have reached its nadir on Thursday night. Not even the presence of 6-foot-6 senior center Josh Bohlman could have made a difference against 2A foe Jemez Valley, as the Warriors hounded the Wildcats in a 61-42 win that was not even that close. That the setback occurred with third place on the line in the district, which might be the line of demarca-

Please see time, Page B-7

Super Bowl weather: Calm down

H

as the Super Bowl advanced to such a prima donna stage that we wring our hands over … the weather? I mean, this is football we’re talking about here? This is the sport that popularized the term “frozen tundra” (of Lambeau Field. Yes, most of us have watched NFL Films) and coined several James “bowl” games — The Ice Bowl, Barron the Fog Bowl, the Commentary Snow Bowl. But ever since Super Bowl IX, which was played under cloudy, dreary conditions in temperatures in the 40s, the NFL’s championship battle has taken place in relative warmth, be it indoors or out, and in mostly supreme conditions. So the NFL decides to bring the Super Bowl up north — to the outdoor chill of New York City — and the freakout begins. While the latest weather reports suggest it will just be cold — temperatures in the high 30s, but no snow or rain — the panic that simmered under the surface of snow, wind and bone-chilling cold was laughable. Postpone the Super Bowl? Seriously? Granted, the wintry weather that hammered most of the Midwest and East Coast over the past month-anda-half was bizarre in its own sense, but since when did it cause such an upheaval with a sport that is accustomed to harsh conditions? Where was the outrage when the San Francisco 49ers and Green Bay Packers played in the NFC Wild Card game on Jan. 4, which was played in 5-degree temperature and a windchill of minus-10? Why was it fine to play that game, but God forbid we have to deal with such conditions for the Super Bowl? Perhaps part of the issue is the type of crowd that will be there at the game. Sure, the hardiest of die-hard fans will be there screaming their lungs out — and some of them in so little clothing that you’d think it was summer. But you also have a very, how should we say, cosmopolitan crowd that is there because of the event, not the game. It’s cool to be there — so long as the weather is fine and the drinks don’t freeze. If one snowflake dares to float from the heavens, the panic that ensues might only rival what happens in Phoenix when a flake dares to enter its space. For the NFL to even entertain the notion of postponement is absurdist theater. If anyone wants to complain about the weather in New York City in February, please tell that to every highschool player who steps on to an icy field to pursue a state championship. Heck, talk to the folks at Clayton and Las Vegas, N.M. Clayton endured minus-16 degree wind chill to become the Class AA state champion. The Cardinals of Las Vegas Robertson won their AAA title in 15-degree weather with a wind chill of minus-3 by the end of the game. But you couldn’t wipe the smiles off their faces when they were rewarded with that blue trophy. I doubt Russell Wilson, Peyton Manning or any of the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos would care if a hurricane descended upon them when they get their hands on the Vince Lombardi Trophy. And neither should the rest of us.

WINTER OLYMPICS

Russians face high stakes in men’s hockey By Greg Beacham

The Associated Press

Sidney Crosby and Canada are traveling halfway around the world in search of another golden moment. Sweden, Finland and the U.S. team arrive in Sochi brimming with NHL talent and intending to depart with medals. While every elite hockey player in the world desperately wants to win his sport’s biggest international

tournament, nobody needs to win in Sochi like the host team and Alex Ovechkin, the peerless goal-scorer expected to put Russia back atop the Olympic podium. “Russia is going to have a whole different kind of pressure,” said Teemu Selanne, who will suit up for the Finns in his record-tying sixth Olympics. “And it’s not easy to be that team.” The Olympic men’s hockey competition is much more than a glorified All-Star week to the 150 NHL players

Sports editor: James Barron, 986-3045, jbarron@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Eric J. Hedlund, ehedlund@sfnewmexican.com

exchanging their money-making jerseys for their national colors in 12 frantic days on the Black Sea coast. The NHL’s stars are back at their fifth consecutive games, and the defending champion Canadians are largely favored to win their third gold medal in four Olympics. Yet even Wayne Gretzky realizes all eyes in Sochi are squarely on the home team, saying the Russians will be “very difficult for anybody to beat.”

“There’s a number of teams that can win,” said Gretzky, who played for Canada in Nagano and built its gold-medal team in Salt Lake City. “It comes down to the same thing all the time: Best goaltender, and if your best player is the best player on the ice and the best line on the ice, your team is ultimately going to be the goldmedal winner.” The vaunted Soviet Union team

See HocKeY, Page B-6

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NATIONAL SCOREBOARD

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

HOCKEY NHL Eastern Conference

Atlantic GP Boston 53 Tampa Bay 54 Toronto 56 Montreal 54 Ottawa 54 Detroit 53 Florida 54 Buffalo 53 Metro GP Pittsburgh 54 N.Y. Rangers 55 Columbus 54 Philadelphia 55 Carolina 53 New Jersey 55 Washington 54 N.Y. Islanders 56

BASKETBALL

HOCKEY W 34 31 29 29 24 23 21 15 W 38 29 27 26 24 23 24 21

L OL Pts GF GA 16 3 71 160 119 18 5 67 160 136 21 6 64 164 173 20 5 63 135 135 20 10 58 155 170 19 11 57 135 149 26 7 49 132 170 30 8 38 104 154 L OL Pts GF GA 14 2 78 175 129 23 3 61 141 139 23 4 58 159 153 23 6 58 150 163 20 9 57 134 150 21 11 57 130 137 22 8 56 155 163 27 8 50 158 187

Western Conference

Central GP W L OL Pts GF GA Chicago 56 33 10 13 79 199 156 St. Louis 52 36 11 5 77 180 119 Colorado 53 34 14 5 73 158 141 Minnesota 56 29 21 6 64 137 140 Dallas 54 24 21 9 57 156 160 Nashville 55 24 23 8 56 136 166 Winnipeg 55 25 25 5 55 155 162 Pacific GP W L OL Pts GF GA Anaheim 56 40 11 5 85 189 137 San Jose 55 34 15 6 74 166 133 Los Angeles 56 30 20 6 66 134 120 Vancouver 55 27 19 9 63 139 143 Phoenix 54 25 19 10 60 156 163 Calgary 54 20 27 7 47 128 170 Edmonton 56 18 32 6 42 147 190 Note: Two points are awarded for a win; one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Thursday’s Games Montreal 4, Boston 1 Toronto 6, Florida 3 Columbus 5, Washington 2 Ottawa 5, Tampa Bay 3 New Jersey 3, Dallas 2, OT Colorado 5, Minnesota 4 Calgary 4, San Jose 1 Buffalo 3, Phoenix 2 Anaheim 5, Philadelphia 3 Pittsburgh 4, Los Angeles 1 Friday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 5 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Winnipeg, 6:30 p.m.

Boxscores Maple Leafs 6, Panthers 3

Florida 2 0 1—3 Toronto 1 2 3—6 First Period—1, Florida, Bjugstad 12 (Upshall, Shore), 1:39. 2, Florida, Bergenheim 13 (Boyes, Gomez), 13:50. 3, Toronto, Franson 4 (Kadri, van Riemsdyk), 16:49. Second Period—4, Toronto, Raymond 14 (Bodie, Gleason), :27. 5, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 22 (Kessel, Phaneuf), :58 (pp). Third Period—6, Toronto, Kulemin 8 (Lupul, Kadri), 4:00. 7, Toronto, Lupul 16 (Kadri, Rielly), 6:22 (pp). 8, Florida, Kulikov 6 (Goc), 14:29. 9, Toronto, Bozak 10 (Kessel), 18:37. Shots on Goal—Florida 11-15-12—38. Toronto 9-12-11—32. Goalies—Florida, Clemmensen. Toronto, Bernier. A—19,448 (18,819). T—2:37.

Senators 5, Lightning 3

Tampa Bay 0 1 2—3 Ottawa 2 2 1—5 First Period—1, Ottawa, Methot 5 (Zibanejad, Spezza), 1:49. 2, Ottawa, E.Karlsson 13 (Spezza, Michalek), 19:34. Second Period—3, Tampa Bay, Killorn 13 (Kucherov, Hedman), 3:10. 4, Ottawa, Smith 10, 6:25. 5, Ottawa, Turris 18 (Ryan), 18:40. Third Period—6, Ottawa, Ryan 20 (Turris, MacArthur), 6:55. 7, Tampa Bay, Johnson 17 (Palat), 12:54 (sh). 8, Tampa Bay, Hedman 11 (St. Louis, Palat), 17:08. Shots on Goal—Tampa Bay 7-8-23—38. Ottawa 12-10-6—28. Goalies—Tampa Bay, Bishop, Lindback. Ottawa, Anderson. A—19,757 (19,153). T—2:31.

Devils 3, Stars 2, OT

New Jersey 1 1 0 1—3 Dallas 0 1 1 0—2 First Period—1, New Jersey, Zubrus 10 (Jagr, Zidlicky), 10:59. Second Period—2, New Jersey, T.Zajac 9 (Brunner, Elias), 9:50 (pp). 3, Dallas, Ja.Benn 21 (Seguin, Nichushkin), 10:52. Third Period—4, Dallas, Seguin 24 (Cole, Chiasson), 19:08. Overtime—5, New Jersey, Elias 10 (T.Zajac, Jagr), :40 (pp). Shots on Goal—New Jersey 7-7-82—24. Dallas 4-6-6-0—16. Goalies—New Jersey, Schneider. Dallas, Lehtonen. A—14,237 (18,532). T—2:32.

Flames 4, Sharks 1

San Jose 0 0 1—1 Calgary 1 1 2—4 First Period—1, Calgary, Stempniak 8 (Backlund, Wideman), 9:41. Second Period—2, Calgary, Giordano 9 (Backlund, Hudler), 3:38. Third Period—3, San Jose, Hayes 1 (Marleau, Wingels), :36. 4, Calgary, Monahan 15 (Colborne, Smid), 13:00. 5, Calgary, Hudler 14 (Wideman), 18:14 (en). Shots on Goal—San Jose 8-13-7—28. Calgary 12-8-10—30. Goalies—San Jose, Stalock. Calgary, Ramo. A—19,289 (19,289). T—2:25.

Avalanche 5, Wild 4

Minnesota 1 0 3—4 Colorado 1 3 1—5 First Period—1, Colorado, O’Reilly 20 (Duchene, McGinn), 4:41. 2, Minnesota, Parise 17 (Heatley, Suter), 6:16 (pp). Second Period—3, Colorado, J.Mitchell 6 (Guenin, Duchene), 1:43. 4, Colorado, Stastny 16 (Johnson, Landeskog), 9:17. 5, Colorado, Talbot 6 (J.Mitchell, MacKinnon), 15:26. Third Period—6, Minnesota, Parise 18 (Pominville, Granlund), 7:47. 7, Minnesota, Granlund 5 (Parise, Ballard), 12:51. 8, Colorado, MacKinnon 19 (Benoit, Barrie), 17:35. 9, Minnesota, Pominville 22 (Granlund, Parise), 17:46. Shots on Goal—Minnesota 7-1117—35. Colorado 10-18-4—32. Goalies—Minnesota, Kuemper, Backstrom. Colorado, Varlamov. A—14,697 (18,007). T—2:36.

Ducks 5, Flyers 3

Philadelphia 1 0 2—3 Anaheim 2 1 2—5 First Period—1, Anaheim, Maroon 5 (Beauchemin, Perreault), 10:38. 2, Philadelphia, Lecavalier 12 (Gustafsson, Downie), 14:35 (pp). 3, Anaheim, Getzlaf 26 (Lindholm, Palmieri), 19:24. Second Period—4, Anaheim, Perry 29 (Getzlaf, Fowler), 10:29. Third Period—5, Philadelphia, Read 14 (Streit, Couturier), 5:48. 6, Anaheim, Winnik 2 (Koivu), 12:26 (sh). 7, Anaheim, Koivu 9 (Cogliano), 19:36 (en). 8, Philadelphia, Raffl 5 (L.Schenn, Read), 19:50. Shots on Goal—Philadelphia 10-911—30. Anaheim 5-12-11—28. Goalies—Philadelphia, Mason. Anaheim, Andersen. A—16,007 (17,174). T—2:32.

Penguins 4, Kings 1

Pittsburgh 3 1 0—4 Los Angeles 1 0 0—1 First Period—1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 15 (Jokinen, Neal), :57. 2, Los Angeles, Kopitar 16 (Doughty, Voynov), 9:32 (pp). 3, Pittsburgh, Kunitz 27 (Jokinen, Crosby), 10:50 (pp). 4, Pittsburgh, Jokinen 16 (Malkin, Niskanen), 11:47 (pp). Second Period—5, Pittsburgh, Glass 4 (Niskanen, Maatta), 11:44. Third Period—None. Shots on Goal—Pittsburgh 7-12-3—22. Los Angeles 8-11-12—31. Goalies—Pittsburgh, Zatkoff. Los Angeles, Quick, Jones. A—18,118 (18,118). T—2:23.

NBA Eastern Conference

Atlantic Toronto Brooklyn New York Philadelphia Boston Southeast Miami Atlanta Washington Charlotte Orlando Central Indiana Chicago Detroit Cleveland Milwaukee

W 24 20 19 15 15 W 32 23 22 20 12 W 35 23 18 16 8

L 21 23 27 31 33 L 13 21 23 27 35 L 10 22 27 30 37

Pct .533 .465 .413 .326 .313 Pct .711 .523 .489 .426 .255 Pct .778 .511 .400 .348 .178

GB — 3 51/2 91/2 101/2 GB — 81/2 10 13 21 GB — 12 17 191/2 27

Western Conference

Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 33 13 .717 — Houston 31 17 .646 3 Dallas 26 21 .553 71/2 Memphis 24 20 .545 8 New Orleans 19 26 .422 131/2 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 37 10 .787 — Portland 33 13 .717 31/2 Minnesota 23 22 .511 13 Denver 22 22 .500 131/2 Utah 16 29 .356 20 Pacific W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 33 16 .673 — Phoenix 28 18 .609 31/2 Golden State 28 19 .596 4 L.A. Lakers 16 30 .348 151/2 Sacramento 15 30 .333 16 Thursday’s Games Phoenix 102, Indiana 94 New York 117, Cleveland 86 Golden State 111, L.A. Clippers 92 Friday’s Games Milwaukee at Orlando, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Toronto at Denver, 7 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 8:30 p.m.

Boxscores Knicks 117, Cavaliers 86

CLEVELAND (86) Deng 3-9 6-6 13, Thompson 1-5 0-0 2, Zeller 1-3 0-0 2, Irving 10-25 3-5 24, Miles 3-4 0-0 9, Waiters 8-15 3-3 21, Bennett 1-6 2-4 4, Clark 1-3 0-0 2, Jack 1-8 1-2 4, Dellavedova 0-2 0-0 0, Gee 0-2 1-2 1, Sims 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 31-87 16-22 86. NEW YORK (117) Anthony 8-17 10-12 29, Smith 8-16 1-3 19, Chandler 4-4 3-5 11, Prigioni 0-0 0-0 0, Felton 5-10 2-2 12, Hardaway Jr. 11-17 1-1 29, Tyler 4-6 0-1 8, World Peace 2-4 0-2 5, Murry 1-1 0-0 2, Aldrich 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 43-76 19-28 117. Cleveland 21 15 29 21—86 New York 38 22 21 36—117 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 8-23 (Miles 3-4, Waiters 2-4, Deng 1-2, Jack 1-3, Irving 1-5, Clark 0-1, Bennett 0-2, Dellavedova 0-2), New York 12-26 (Hardaway Jr. 6-12, Anthony 3-5, Smith 2-5, World Peace 1-2, Felton 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Cleveland 47 (Deng 11), New York 57 (Chandler 8). Assists—Cleveland 14 (Irving 3), New York 21 (Felton 9). Total Fouls—Cleveland 25, New York 18. Technicals—New York defensive three second. A—19,812 (19,763).

Suns 102, Pacers 94

PHOENIX (102) Tucker 3-8 1-2 7, Frye 3-8 0-0 7, Plumlee 2-8 0-0 4, Dragic 11-21 5-7 28, Green 6-15 2-2 16, Mark.Morris 4-10 5-6 15, Barbosa 3-4 2-2 9, Marc.Morris 7-12 1-1 16, Len 0-4 0-0 0, Smith 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-91 16-20 102.

TOP 25 BASKETBALL

McBride leads Notre Dame to win over Virginia Tech Ariel Edwards scored 21 as No. 12 Penn State avenged its lone Big Ten loss by beating No. 19 Purdue.

The Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Kayla McBride scored 18 points and Notre Dame held Virginia Tech to 27 percent shooting in a 74-48 victory Thursday night, the Fighting Notre Dame 74 Irish’s 22nd straight Va. Tech 48 home win. The Irish (20-0, 7-0) are off to their second best start, three victories shy of matching the 2000-01 start en route to a national championship. It was the most lopsided loss of the season for the Hokies (10-10, 0-7), who have lost eight straight. NO. 3 DUKE 76, MIAMI 75 In Coral Gables, Fla., Elizabeth Williams made 1 of 2 free throws with 1.7 seconds to lift No. 3 Duke to a victory over Miami. Tricia Liston scored 29 points for the Blue Devils (21-1, 8-0 Atlantic Coast Conference). Williams and Alexis Jones added 18 points apiece as Duke won its ninth straight. NO. 7 SOUTH CAROLINA 99, MISSISSIPPI 70 In Columbia, S.C., freshman Alaina Coates tied her career high with 24 points and added 12 rebounds, as No. 7 South Carolina beat Mississippi. NO. 18 N.C. STATE 72, NO. 8 MARYLAND 63 In Raleigh, N.C., Myisha Goodwin-Coleman scored all 16 of her points after halftime, including the go-ahead 3-pointer with 3:51 left, to help No. 18 North Carolina State beat No. 8 Maryland.

NO. 14 LSU 65, MISSISSIPPI ST 56 In Baton Rouge, La., Shanece McKinney didn’t miss a shot en route to a career-high 19 points to lead No. 14 LSU to a win over Mississippi State. MISSOURI 59, NO. 16 VANDERBILT 54 In Columbia, Mo., Bri Kulas scored 15 points and Missouri held off a rally from No. 16 Vanderbilt for a victory.

Notre Dame guard Kayla McBride, center, drives the lane between Virginia Tech forward Uju Ugoka, right, and guard Vanessa Panousis during Thursday’s game in South Bend, Ind. JOE RAYMOND/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SYRACUSE 78, NO. 6 NORTH CAROLINA 73

In Chapel Hill, N.C., Brianna Butler scored 22 points to help Syracuse erase an 18-point deficit and beat No. 6 North Carolina. NO. 10 TENNESSEE 70, ARKANSAS 60 In Knoxville, Tenn., Cierra Burdick and Meighan Simmons each scored 16 points as No. 10 Tennessee shot 62.2 percent from the floor to beat Arkansas for its third consecutive victory. NO. 12 PENN STATE 75, NO. 19 PURDUE 72 In West Lafayette, Ind., Maggie Lucas had 23 points and

FOOTBALL FOOTBALL

BASKETBALL

NO. 17 TEXAS A&M 71, AUBURN 54 In Auburn, Ala., Courtney Williams scored 17 points, Karla Gilbert had 16 and Tori Scott 15 to lead No. 17 Texas A&M to a win over Auburn. MEN NO. 3 FLORIDA 62, MISSISSIPPI STATE 51 In Starkville, Miss., Casey Prather scored 16 points, Patric Young added 12, and No. 3 Florida beat Mississippi State for its 12th straight win. NO. 10 MICHIGAN 75, PURDUE 66 In Ann Arbor, Mich., Caris LeVert had 14 points and a career-high 11 rebounds for his first career double-double, and Michigan beat Purdue to extend its winning streak to 10. NO. 13 CINCINNATI 69, NO. 12 LOUISVILLE 66 In Louisville, Ky., Sean Kilpatrick scored 28 points, including six free throws down the stretch that helped Cincinnati rally for a victory over Louisville.

INDIANA (94) George 5-17 2-4 12, West 8-18 2-2 18, Hibbert 9-17 8-11 26, G.Hill 7-8 3-4 17, Stephenson 6-12 1-1 14, Scola 1-5 1-2 3, Granger 0-3 0-0 0, Watson 2-6 0-0 4, Mahinmi 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 38-87 17-24 94. Phoenix 36 30 11 25—102 Indiana 19 30 25 20—94 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 8-17 (Green 2-3, Mark.Morris 2-3, Marc.Morris 1-1, Barbosa 1-1, Dragic 1-2, Frye 1-6, Tucker 0-1), Indiana 1-15 (Stephenson 1-3, West 0-1, Granger 0-1, G.Hill 0-1, Watson 0-3, George 0-6). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Phoenix 56 (Frye 8), Indiana 56 (George 12). Assists— Phoenix 18 (Dragic 7), Indiana 15 (Stephenson 10). Total Fouls—Phoenix 21, Indiana 23. Technicals—Dragic, Tucker, Phoenix defensive three second. A—16,541 (18,165).

Warriors 111, Clippers 92

L.A. CLIPPERS (92) M.Barnes 0-3 0-0 0, Griffin 11-21 5-10 27, Jordan 3-4 3-9 9, Collison 6-11 7-7 22, Redick 4-11 0-0 12, Ja.Crawford 1-9 7-8 9, Dudley 2-5 0-0 4, W.Green 1-4 0-0 2, Turkoglu 1-3 0-0 2, Hollins 1-1 0-0 2, Mullens 1-3 0-0 3, Bullock 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-76 22-34 92. GOLDEN STATE (111) Iguodala 3-7 2-3 8, Lee 10-15 2-2 22, Bogut 7-11 0-0 14, Curry 8-10 2-2 22, Thompson 6-14 3-4 16, H.Barnes 4-13 2-3 10, Jo.Crawford 1-7 2-2 5, D.Green 1-3 0-2 2, Speights 5-8 2-2 12, Bazemore 0-1 0-0 0, Brooks 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 45-91 15-20 111. L.A. Clippers 21 35 11 25—92 Golden State 32 32 26 21—111 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 8-24 (Redick 4-6, Collison 3-5, Mullens 1-2, W.Green 0-1, M.Barnes 0-1, Bullock 0-1, Turkoglu 0-2, Dudley 0-2, Ja.Crawford 0-4), Golden State 6-21 (Curry 4-4, Thompson 1-3, Jo.Crawford 1-4, Brooks 0-1, Bazemore 0-1, D.Green 0-1, Speights 0-1, H.Barnes 0-3, Iguodala 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 48 (Jordan 20), Golden State 60 (Bogut 17). Assists—L.A. Clippers 17 (Collison 5), Golden State 24 (Curry 7). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 15, Golden State 21. A—19,596 (19,596).

NCAA Men’s Top 25 Schedule

Thursday’s Games No. 3 Florida 62, Mississippi State 51 No. 10 Michigan 75, Purdue 66 No. 13 Cincinnati 69, No. 12 Louisville 66 Friday’s Games No games scheduled.

Men’s National Scores

Thursday’s Games East Canisius 86, Quinnipiac 74 Marist 75, Monmouth (NJ) 73 Robert Morris 79, Bryant 76 St. Francis (Pa.) 69, CCSU 63 Wagner 75, LIU Brooklyn 68 Midwest Grand Canyon 76, Chicago St. 75 IPFW 86, Nebraska-Omaha 82 Marquette 61, Providence 50 Milwaukee 68, Wright St. 64 N. Dakota St. 66, South Dakota 63 Nebraska 60, Indiana 55 W. Illinois 69, IUPUI 54 South Auburn 74, Alabama 55 Cent. Arkansas 76, McNeese St. 75 Charlotte 62, FAU 53 Cincinnati 69, Louisville 66 Davidson 94, Chattanooga 51 E. Kentucky 89, UT-Martin 66 Elon 74, W. Carolina 60 Florida 62, Mississippi St. 51 Georgia Southern 83, The Citadel 52 Lipscomb 88, Jacksonville 76 Louisiana-Monroe 72, Arkansas St. 65 Marshall 80, FIU 68 UAB 75, Old Dominion 66 Southwest Lamar 59, Houston Baptist 57 UALR 80, Louisiana-Lafayette 69 Utah Valley 67, Texas-Pan American 53

Far West BYU 88, Pacific 78 CS Northridge 93, UC Riverside 89, OT Montana 69, S. Utah 61 New Mexico St. 89, CS Bakersfield 86 North Dakota 73, E. Washington 61 Oregon St. 76, Southern Cal 75, OT Portland St. 80, N. Colorado 57 S. Dakota St. 74, Denver 73 Sacramento St. 84, Idaho St. 78 San Diego 61, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 43 UC Davis 62, Cal Poly 58 UC Santa Barbara 80, UC Irvine 60 UCLA 70, Oregon 68 Weber St. 76, N. Arizona 67

Women’s AP Top 25

Thursday’s Games No. 2 Notre Dame 74, Virginia Tech 48 No. 3 Duke 76, Miami 75 No. 4 Stanford 70, No. 21 California 64 Syracuse 78, No. 6 North Carolina 73 No. 7 S. Carolina 99, Mississippi 70 No. 18 N.C. St. 72, No. 8 Maryland 63 No. 10 Tennessee 70, Arkansas 60 No. 12 Penn St. 75, No. 19 Purdue 72 Georgia 58, No. 13 Kentucky 56 No. 14 LSU 65, Mississippi State 56 Missouri 59, No. 16 Vanderbilt 54 No. 17 Texas A&M 71, Auburn 54 No. 22 Gonzaga 89, Santa Clara 37 Friday’s Game No. 15 Arizona State vs. Oregon State, 6:30 p.m.

Women’s National Scores

Thursday’s Games East Albany (NY) 66, Stony Brook 51 Buffalo 58, Miami (Ohio) 56 Delaware 74, Northeastern 65 Drexel 66, William & Mary 42 Iona 68, Fairfield 55 Manhattan 62, Siena 55 Mass.-Lowell 65, Binghamton 54 Monmouth (NJ) 52, St. Peter’s 41 Pittsburgh 67, Boston College 65 South Austin Peay 86, Murray St. 71 Campbell 63, Longwood 54 Clemson 80, Georgia Tech 79, OT Duke 76, Miami 75 East Carolina 64, Old Dominion 63 Florida 75, Alabama 67 Florida Gulf Coast 85, Lipscomb 67 Georgia St. 63, South Alabama 55 LSU 65, Mississippi St. 56 NC State 72, Maryland 63 South Carolina 99, Mississippi 70 Syracuse 78, North Carolina 73 Tennessee 70, Arkansas 60 Texas A&M 71, Auburn 54 Virginia 64, Wake Forest 59 Winthrop 59, Charleston Southern 48 Midwest Akron 82, Toledo 62 Bowling Green 78, Ohio 62 Cent. Michigan 82, E. Michigan 67 Michigan St. 71, Wisconsin 67 Missouri 59, Vanderbilt 54 North Dakota 82, E. Washington 60 Northwestern 58, Indiana 52 Notre Dame 74, Virginia Tech 48 Ohio St. 90, Illinois 64 Penn St. 75, Purdue 72 S. Dakota St. 72, Denver 61 South Dakota 83, N. Dakota St. 70 Southwest Houston Baptist 76, Lamar 66 Sam Houston St. 79, Texas A&M-CC 76 Stephen F. Austin 80, Abilene Christian 59 Far West CS Bakersfield 86, New Mexico St. 63 CS Northridge 71, UC Riverside 61 Cal Poly 81, UC Davis 72 Gonzaga 89, Santa Clara 37 Grand Canyon 84, Chicago St. 53 Idaho St. 62, Sacramento St. 53 Long Beach St. 74, Hawaii 71 N. Arizona 96, Weber St. 87 N. Colorado 77, Portland St. 60 Pacific 80, San Diego 70 S. Utah 87, Montana St. 81 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 75, BYU 70 San Francisco 74, Portland 73 Texas-Pan American 64, Utah Valley 54 UC Irvine 77, UC Santa Barbara 60

NFL PLAYOFFS Wild-card Playoffs

Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20

Divisional Playoffs

Saturday, Jan. 11 Seattle 23, New Orleans 15 New England 43, Indianapolis 22 Sunday, Jan. 12 San Francisco 23, Carolina 10 Denver 24, San Diego 17

Conference Championships

Sunday, Jan. 19 Denver 26, New England 16 Seattle 23, San Francisco 17

Pro Bowl

Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu Team Rice 22, Team Sanders 21

Super Bowl

Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 3:30 p.m. (FOX)

PGA TOuR Dubai Desert Classic

Thursday At Majlis Course at Dubai Golf Club Dubai, united Arab Emirates Purse: $2.5 million Yardage: 7,316; Par: 72 First Round a-amateur Rory McIlroy, NIr 31-32—63 Edoardo Molinari, Ita 32-33—65 Matthew Baldwin, Eng 35-31—66 Stephen Gallacher, Sco 33-33—66 Damien McGrane, Irl 32-34—66 Julien Quesne, Fra 36-30—66 Richard Sterne, SAf 33-33—66 Soren Hansen, Den 33-34—67 Robert Rock, Eng 32-35—67 Jorge Campillo, Esp 34-34—68 Thongchai Jaidee, Tha 34-34—68 Soren Kjeldsen, Den 35-33—68 Paul Lawrie, Sco 35-33—68 Hennie Otto, SAf 33-35—68 Romain Wattel, Fra 33-35—68 Tiger Woods, USA 35-33—68

Phoenix Open

Thursday At TPC Scottsdale, Stadium Course Scottsdale, Ariz. Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,152; Par: 71 (35-36) Partial First Round (a-amateur) Y.E. Yang 34-30—64 Bubba Watson 31-33—64 Pat Perez 34-31—65 Kevin Stadler 30-35—65 William McGirt 33-32—65 Greg Chalmers 33-32—65 Matt Jones 33-32—65 Harris English 31-34—65 Chris Kirk 32-33—65 Hunter Mahan 33-33—66 Keegan Bradley 32-34—66 Ryan Moore 32-34—66 Tommy Gainey 32-34—66 Jason Kokrak 34-32—66

TRANSACTIONS TRANSACTIONS

FOOTBALL National Football League

TENNESSEE TITANS — Named Nick Eason assistant defensive line coach.

HOCKEY National Hockey League

CALGARY FLAMES — Assigned C Blair Jones to Abbotsford (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Activated G Cam Ward from injured reserve and assigned him to Charlotte (AHL) for conditioning. DALLAS STARS — Recalled F Dustin Jeffrey from Texas (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled F Christian Thomas from Hamilton (AHL).

Hockey: Russians favored and the ostensible advantage of their familiarity with the wider claimed seven of the nine gold international rink, the Russians medals awarded between are well-positioned — but 1956 and 1988, but Russia history and expectation have hasn’t won this tournament in weighed immensely on these 22 years. The Russians have players since they crashed out just one silver and one bronze of Turin and Vancouver. since Albertville in 1992, get“We always hope that ting shut out entirely in the because there’s only one puck, last two Olympics despite they’re going to be in trouble,” their wealth of world-class Selanne said with a smile. talent. “They all need the puck, so “When you’ve got great that’s what we always hope. players like [Evgeni] MalI don’t think anybody can kin, [Pavel] Datsyuk and match their talent, but it’s a Ovechkin, everybody thinks team sport, and there’s still they’re going to carry them only one puck there.” to the gold medal,” said Igor Canada is equally loaded, Larionov, Russia’s three-time and Crosby will wear the Olympic medalist and Hall of maple leaf for the first time Famer. “It will be interesting since scoring the overtime to see how they handle the winner against the Ameripressure.” cans to end the Vancouver In his jaw-dropping 18th Olympics. But the favored international competition for Canadians still haven’t won a Russia, the stalwart Ovechkin gold medal outside of North tops a lineup that includes top America since 1952, and their NHL goalie Sergei Bobrovsky lineup is bulky and physical, and KHL scoring stars Ilya which could be a liability in Kovalchuk and Alexander a speed-based international Radulov. game. “I like our Canadian team,” With a home-crowd push

Continued from Page B-5

Gretzky said. “I think we have a lot of depth. To me, it’s always an advantage when the best player in the world is on your team, and I think Crosby is the best player in the world.” The Americans don’t have incredible star power, but they’re quite fast — and they might have the tournament’s best goaltending combo in Ryan Miller and Jonathan Quick. Sweden is loaded with offense led by the Sedin twins, and goalie Henrik Lundqvist is a proven international star. Selanne and the Finns can’t match others’ depth, but they’ve won four medals in the last five Olympics — more than any other nation. Jaromir Jagr leads a lively Czech team into his fifth Olympics, while the popular dark horse pick is Switzerland, which finished second at last year’s world championships. The gold-medal game at the Bolshoi Ice Dome on Feb. 23 is the grand finale to the Sochi Olympics.

Coach: News wasn’t a surprise Continued from Page B-5 Ohio, girls soccer team — a four-time Ohio state champion. In 2011, the Lady Mustangs finished as the No. 2 team in the country in the ESPN RISE FAB 50 girls’ soccer rankings. While Kubicek never had a nationallyranked team, he did have teams that were always in contention for a state championship. His retirement did not come as a shock to Nelms, as he’s been in control of the girls soccer program for more than two decades.

“I knew it was coming at some point,” she said. Now Nelms has the daunting task of replacing Kubicek. She said there is no candidate up for consideration right now and all candidates have to go through Los Alamos’ regular hiring process. After interviewing all of the candidates, a committee composed of parents, athletes, coaches and administrators will make a final decision. Nelms gave no timetable as to when that decision will be made.


SPORTS PREP ROUNDUP

Mora triumphs over Monte del Sol The New Mexican

Just when the Mora Rangers needed a win, they got one. Mora beat visiting Monte del Sol 78-72 in a District 2AA game in Mora 78 Sen. Joseph Montoya Gymnasium after trailMonte d. Sol 72 ing the Dragons 58-51 at the end of the third quarter. The Rangers (7-12, 1-1) went on a 26-14 run in the fourth quarter to get a win after dropping three straight. “We picked up our pressure on the defense,” Mora head coach James Branch said. “The kids came out and played well. They shut them down.” Branch characterized this as an emotional game because the Rangers have lost so many close ones. “Our record doesn’t reflect how hard we play,” Branch said. “We haven’t had a big win in a while.” Casimiro Fresquez had 24 points to lead the Rangers, while Jeremiah Olivas and Miguel Olivas added 14 each and Travis Romero and Jerome Alcon each added 10. Antonio Tapia scored 25 points to lead

Monte del Sol (12-6, 0-1) while Omar Ndiaye scored 21 to go with 15 points added by Ryan Vanderham. SANTA FE WALdORF 60, NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE dEAF 27 After a rough start to the season, the Wolves opened 5B play with a win over the host Roadrunners in Larson Gym. “We felt like it was a new beginning for us,” Santa Fe Waldorf head coach Rob Clifford said. Santa Fe Waldorf (9-8, 1-0) started hot as it made five 3-pointers in the first quarter to jump out to a 22-7 lead. Fourteen of those first-quarter points came from Sean Ramsey, who finished with 32. He also had 11 rebounds and five steals. Kendrick Skeets had 11 points to lead NMSD (3-6, 0-2) while Fernando Silva added 10. GIRLS TIERRA ENCANTAdA JV 41, PECOS JV 31 The Lady Alacranes jumped out to a 24-8 halftime lead over the Lady Panthers and didn’t look back. After dropping three straight games, Tierra Encantada head coach Mike Velarde

said this win was a big weights off his team’s shoulders. “It was a good victory,” he said. “It’s good to win one.” Laura Dominguez led Tierra Encantada with 17 points while Julia Sanchez led Pecos with 10. MORA 60, MONTE dEL SOL 20 Mora head coach Mark Cassidy picked up the 300th win of his career in a 2AA win over the visiting Lady Dragons. He joins Mora boys basketball head coach James Branch, who picked up his 300th career earlier this season. “We’re old guys,” Cassidy said. Gerty Herrera had 16 points to lead Mora (15-3, 2-0) while Destiny Pacheco and Briana Pacheco each added 10 points. Amelia Gutierrez had nine points to lead Monte del Sol (8-7, 0-1). SANTA FE WALdORF 30, NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE dEAF 26 After having a 17-7 lead over the host Lady Roadrunners at halftime, the Lady Wolves nearly lost their 5B opener. Alex Chastenet hit two free throws with seven seconds left to make it a two-possession game and seal the win for the Lady Wolves (4-11, 1-0).

Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-7

Northern New Mexico

SCOREBOARD Local results and schedules ON THE AIR

Today on TV Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. All times local. BOXING 7 p.m. on ESPN2 — Light heavyweights, Blake Caparello (18-0-1) vs. Elvir Muriqi (40-5-0), in West Orange, N.J. GOLF 1 p.m. on TGC — PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, second round, in Scottsdale, Ariz. 2 a.m. on TGC — European PGA Tour, Dubai Desert Classic, third round, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. on ESPNU — Cleveland St. at Detroit 7 p.m. on ESPNU — Manhattan at Iona MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. on NBCSN — Boston U. at UMass NBA BASKETBALL 6 p.m. on ESPN — Oklahoma City at Brooklyn 8:30 p.m. on ESPN — Golden State at Utah SOCCER

NBA

Dragic, Suns hand Pacers 2nd home loss The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Goran Dragic had 28 points and seven assists, and the Phoenix Suns handed the Suns 102 Indiana Pacers 94 Pacers just their second home loss of the season with a 102-94 victory Thursday night. Gerald Green and Marcus Morris scored 16 points apiece

to help the Suns win their fourth straight game. Roy Hibbert had 26 points and David West added 18 for the Pacers (35-10). Morris hit a 3-pointer with 2:58 remaining to give the Suns a 98-92 lead and Dragic dunked to give the Suns a 100-94 with 44 seconds left. The Suns scored 66 points in the first half — the most given up by the Pacers in a half this

season since the Suns scored 62 on Indiana a week ago in a 124-100 win.

January after going just 9-21 through the end of December. They have rebounded from losing the first three games on KNICKS 117, CAVALIERS 86 their franchise record-tying, In New York, Carmelo Anthony eight-game homestand and can and rookie Tim Hardaway Jr. finish it with a winning record each scored 29 points, J.R. if they beat Miami on Saturday Smith embarrassed a couple of night. defenders on his way to 19, and Kyrie Irving scored 24 points the Knicks beat Cleveland for for the Cavs on a day in which their fourth straight victory. his long-term commitment to New York led nearly all the way and wrapped up a 10-6 Cleveland was again questioned.

Time: Lack of confidence blamed for loss Continued from Page B-5 Wildcats, as well as depth since Bohlman sat out the game with a thumb injury that left just three reserves on the bench. After Desert Academy (11-7 overall, 3-3 2A) scored the first four points of the game, the Warriors went on a 9-2 run that set the tone for the rest of the evening. Jemez used its press to force 29 turnovers overall and 19 in the first half to take a 34-22 lead. The tactic was something Warriors head coach Harlyn Francisco hadn’t used much during the season, but he went to it right after the sluggish start. “I saw that we needed to press them a little bit,” Francisco said. “This was the first time we pressed a team.” Once that happened, the turnovers came in bunches. Eleven came in the opening quarter as Jemez Valley (9-9, 5-2) built an 18-12 lead. Desert Academy worked the ball inside with some success in second quarter and a Michael Heath layup with 5:08 left in the first half cut the Jemez lead to 20-17. But the collapse came swiftly after that. The Wildcats went 2-for-9 to finish the quarter and committed six turnovers as Jemez went on a 14-5 spurt to take a 34-22 lead at the half. The cold shooting continued in the second half as Desert Academy missed seven of its first eight shots from the field, and the Warriors scored 16 of the first 18 points of the third quarter for a 50-24 lead. It was a frustrating sight for the Wildcats, especially Bohlman, who is averaging 10.8 points and 8.2 rebounds per game. He said the Wildcats have not looked the same since losing to Magdalena, the No. 2 team in A according to MaxPreps.com, by

Desert Academy’s Alex Redmond, left, goes up for a basket while Jemez Valley’s Trevor Armijo tries to defend during Thursday’s game at the Driscoll Center at Santa Fe University of Art and Design. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

a 73-40 count to open the 2A season. “I think we’ve had a lack of self-confidence since then,” Bohlman said. “I’ve seen it in the team that we’ve had our heads down since then and we haven’t been playing our best.” Rodriguez has noted that crisis of confidence.

“Right now, we’re struggling with an old mentality,” Rodriguez said. “It cropped up for the Magdalena game, where we are giving more credit [to opponents] than is due and we are short-changing ourselves while we do it. We need to learn to control our nerves, and we need to learn that there are certain aspects we can control and those are the things we need to focus on.” When the going is good, the Wildcats can rely on the one-two combination of Bohlman and Mack Snyder inside and guard Sudi Torres to slash to the basket. It was not a good sign when both Snyder and Torres spent time on the bench in foul trouble. Both seniors fouled out, with Snyder scoring a game-high 16 points. Torres, though, struggled to a four-point performance. Adjusting to Rodriguez, who replaced Jonathan Salazar after he took the varsity assistant coach position at Capital, and his style has had its bumps as well. Rodriguez’s extended pressure from a man-toman set goes against the zone principles the Wildcats were accustomed to a year ago. Some of those old habits have been hard to change. “They have some experience in standing in 2-3 zones, and one-on-one,” Rodriguez said. “That’s not the way I coach, that’s not the way I play. When you’re learning new things, if you don’t maintain a high-level of concentration, then you are going to have a breakdown.” The only way to overcome a breakdown is to fix it, but time is short for the Wildcats. So is the confidence.

7 p.m. on FS1 — Women’s national teams, exhibition, United States vs. Canada, in Frisco, Texas

LOCAL TV CHANNELS FOX — Ch. 2 (KASA) NBC — Ch. 4 (KOB) ABC — Ch. 7 (KOAT) CBS — Ch. 13 (KRQE) ESPN — Comcast: Ch. 9 (Digital, Ch. 252); DirecTV: Ch. 206; Dish Network: Ch. 140 ESPN2 — Comcast: Ch. 8 (Digital, Ch. 253); DirecTV: Ch. 209; Dish Network: Ch. 144 ESPNU — Comcast: Ch. 261 (Digital, Ch. 815);

DirecTV: Ch. 208; Dish Network: Ch. 141 FOX Sports 1 — Comcast: Ch. 38 (Digital, Ch. 255); DirecTV: Ch. 219; Dish Network: Ch. 150 NBC Sports — Comcast: Ch. 27 (Digital, Ch. 837): DirecTV: Ch. 220; Dish Network: Ch. 159 CBS Sports — Comcast: Ch. 274; (Digital, Ch. 838); DirecTV: Ch. 221; Dish Network: Ch. 158 ROOT Sports — Comcast: Ch. 276 (Digital, 814); DirecTV: Ch. 683; Dish Network: Ch. 414

PREP SCORES

Boys basketball

Girls basketball

Carlsbad 71, Goddard 58 Hagerman 59, NMMI 45 Jemez Valley 61, Desert Academy 42 Laguna-Acoma 47, Wingate 41 Menaul 71, Mountainair 56 Mesilla Valley Christian 49, Chaparral 45 Monte del Sol 78, Mora 72 Santa Fe Waldorf School 60, NMSD 27 Silver 59, Deming 42 St. Pius 51, Cibola 49 Tohatchi 81, Zuni 57

Albuquerque High 78, West Mesa 37 Atrisco Heritage 51, Highland 41 Cibola 62, Eldorado 58 Corona 74, Vaughn 40 Del Norte 57, Sandia Prep 38 Grants 39, Valencia 37 Hagerman 53, NMMI 43 La Cueva 58, Rio Rancho 31 La Veta, Colo. 53, Cimarron 37 Mayfield 48, Carlsbad 26 Mora 60, Monte del Sol 20 Robertson 58, Raton 42 Santa Fe Waldorf School 30, NMSD 26

MIDDLE SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL SCORES Eighth grade Ortiz 29, Pojoaque 27. Top scorers — Ortiz: Tyler Alarid 16;Pojoaque: Avery Torres 10. Records — Ortiz 4-0, Pojoaque 3-2.

Seventh grade Pojoaque 35, Ortiz 30. Top scorers — Pojoaque: Diego Trujillo 13; Ortiz: Jonnathan Jaime 10. Records — Pojoaque 4-2, Ortiz 1-3.

PREP SCHEDULE This week’s varsity schedule for Northern New Mexico high schools. For additions or changes, call 986-3060 or email sports@sfnewmexican.com.

Today Boys Basketball — Dulce at Coronado, 5 p.m. Questa at Mesa Vista, 7 p.m. Bernalillo at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. Capital at Los Alamos, 7 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at West Las Vegas, 7 p.m. Santa Fe Indian School at Navajo Prep, 7 p.m. Las Vegas Robertson at Abq. Sandia Preparatory, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball — Questa at Mesa Vista, 5:30 p.m.

Saturday Boys Basketball — Capital at Abq. St. Pius X, 2 p.m. Albuquerque Menaul at Desert Academy (at GCCC), 2 p.m. Santa Fe Indian School at Dulce, 2:30 p.m. Mesa Vista at Escalante, 5:30 p.m. Santa Fe Waldorf at Tse’ Yi’ Gai, 5:30 p.m. Las Vegas Robertson at Taos, 7 p.m. Pecos at Monte del Sol (at Christian Life), 7 p.m. Santa Fe Preparatory at Peñasco, 4 p.m. Estancia at McCurdy, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball — Mesa Vista at Escalante, 4 p.m. Santa Fe Waldorf at Tse’ Yi’ Gai, 4 p.m. Santa Fe Preparatory at Peñasco, 2:30 p.m. Pecos at Monte del Sol (at Christian Life), 5:30 p.m. Questa at McCurdy, 6 p.m. Santa Fe High at Bernalillo, 7 p.m. Los Alamos at Capital, 7 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at West Las Vegas, 7 p.m.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Thomas: Receiver antithesis of prima donna Continued from Page B-5 and uncle, Shirley and James Brown, a Baptist minister who lived six miles away. Thomas, called “Bay-Bay” by his family, started working as an usher at the church and attending Bible study after track and basketball practices. “Once I moved in with him, I told him I wanted to do something to stay off the streets and stay out of trouble, so I tried football,” Thomas said. “And it worked out for me.” Thomas played at Georgia Tech and was a first-round pick by Denver in 2010. Injuries slowed him down until his 80-yard catch from Tim Tebow in overtime beat Pittsburgh in the playoffs. Two months later, Peyton Manning came to Denver and Thomas has flourished ever

since, catching 204 passes for 3,089 yards and 27 touchdowns over the last two years. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound deep threat has an uncanny mix of size, speed and strength — Wes Welker laughed about his “Triple-XL gloves.” Dominique Rodgers Cromartie said he lost a bet when he challenged Thomas to throw a ball 60 yards from his knees “and he just flicked it!” Yet, Thomas is the antithesis of the prima donna wide receiver who demands passes and attention. He never says a thing to the cornerback covering him, much less talk trash. It goes back to the values instilled in him by his aunt and uncle, Thomas said. “It made me a stronger man and a better man just being in that atmosphere, working

harder, knowing that nothing’s going to be easy.” Brown said it wasn’t easy taking in another child with three kids of his own and just one paycheck, but he found ways to make it all work. He also found the money to keep Thomas involved in sports. “I truly believe his Christian upbringing and sports, playing basketball and football, contributed to him releasing a lot of the anger and anxiety that he had in him,” Brown said. “He left it on the basketball court, on the football field so it didn’t get bottled up in him.” Thomas led all NFL receivers in TD receptions (14) and yards after the catch (718) this season while grabbing 92 passes for 1,430 yards. In the playoffs, he has 15 receptions for 188 yards and TDs in both

of Denver’s wins. “Watching him mature as a football player and as a person has been tremendous,” teammate Eric Decker said. “The guy has so much talent.” Brown says he just wanted Thomas to grow up to be a good man, never thinking he would become a star. “The blessing has been just seeing the product of how we took this young man who was lost — well, trying to find his way — and we were able to nurture him and give him what he needed,” said Brown, who will be in the stands Sunday. “When Demaryius was staying with us, I never dreamed that he would be in the Super Bowl. I just wanted to make sure the anger in him didn’t send him down the wrong path like his mama and grand-mama had gone down.”

Running u The 10th annual Wood Gormley Panther Run is scheduled for April 26 at Wood Gormley Elementary School. Events include a 5-kilometer run, a 2-mile walk and a 1K kids fun run. Registration can be completed at www.newmexicosportsonline.com. All proceeds go to programs benefiting students at the school.

Soccer u Registration for the Northern Soccer Club spring season is underway for the spring season. The season runs from March 17-May 17 and is for ages 3-13. Cost is $75. The league is also looking for coaches for teams in the Under-6 through Under-13 divisions. For more information on the season, go to www. northernsc.org or call Kristi Hartley-Hunt at 982-0878, ext. 1. For information about coaching opportunities, call Fernando Rodriguez at 982-0878, ext. 3, or email doc@northernsc.org.

Submit your announcement u To get your announcement into The New Mexican, fax information to 986-3067, or email it to sports@sfnewmexican.com. Please include a contact number. Phone calls will not be accepted.

NEW MEXICAN SPORTS

Office hours 2:30 to 10 p.m.

James Barron, 986-3045 Will Webber, 986-3060 Edmundo Carrillo, 986-3060 FAX, 986-3067 Email, sports@sfnewmexican.com


B-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

The weather

For current, detailed weather conditions in downtown Santa Fe, visit our online weather stations at www.santafenewmexican.com/weather/

7-day forecast for Santa Fe Tonight

Today

Becoming windier and cooler

Mostly cloudy with a snow shower

Saturday

Sunday

Cooler with times of clouds and sun

55

26

43/21

34%

52%

32%

Partly sunny

Almanac

The following water statistics of January 28 are the most recent supplied by the City Water Division (in millions of gallons). Total water produced from: Canyon Water Treatment Plant: 1.207 Buckman Water Treatment Plant: 4.510 City Wells: 1.895 Buckman Wells: 0.000 Total water produced by water system: 7.612 Amount delivered to Las Campanas: Golf course: 0.000, domestic: 0.091 Santa Fe Canyon reservoir storage: 63.7 percent of capacity; daily inflow 1.16 million gallons. A partial list of the City of Santa Fe’s Comprehensive Water Conservation Requirements currently in effect: • Irrigation water leaving the intended area is not permitted. Wasting water is not allowed. • Using water to clean hard surfaces with a hose or power washer is prohibited. • Hoses used in manual car washing MUST be equipped with a positive shut-off nozzle. • Swimming pools and spas must be covered when not in use. For a complete list of requirements call: 955-4225 http://www.santafenm.gov/waterconservation

40/16

Humidity (Noon)

64

44%

36%

32%

41%

wind: WNW 8-16 mph

wind: W 4-8 mph

wind: SSE 8-16 mph

285

64

Raton 54/20

64

Air quality index

Española 61/31 Los Alamos 50/28 40

Santa Fe 55/26 Pecos 49/25

25

Albuquerque 62/33

87

56

412

Clayton 54/21

AccuWeather Flu Index

25

Las Vegas 55/25

25

Today.........................................3, Low Saturday ...................................3, Low Sunday ......................................2, Low Monday.....................................4, Low Tuesday.....................................3, Low Wednesday...............................3, Low The AccuWeather Flu Index™ combines the effects of weather with a number of other known factors to provide a scale showing the overall probability of flu transmission and severity of symptoms. The AccuWeather Flu Index™ is based on a scale of 0-10.

54

40

40

285

Clovis 70/33

54

60 60

Thursday’s rating ........................ Moderate Today’s forecast ................................. Good 0-50, Good; 51-100, Moderate; 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200, Unhealthy; 201-300, Very Unhealthy, 301500, Hazardous Source: EPA

64

Taos 47/19

84

60

25

Today’s UV index

54 285 380

180

Roswell 80/37

Ruidoso 58/37

25

70

Truth or Consequences 67/38 70

Las Cruces 68/41

70

70

380

380

Carlsbad 83/49

54

Sun and moon

State extremes

Thu. High: 77 ................................ Carlsbad Thu. Low 18 ..................................... Chama

State cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo W 71/41 pc 62/33 pc 42/18 sn 82/46 pc 83/49 pc 38/16 sn 49/22 sn 54/21 pc 50/22 pc 70/33 pc 49/23 r 69/38 pc 61/31 pc 49/20 sn 70/36 pc 48/19 sn 51/25 sn 78/42 pc 68/41 pc

Hi/Lo W 59/34 pc 47/30 pc 33/10 c 67/35 pc 70/37 pc 31/2 sf 38/16 pc 36/13 pc 42/16 pc 51/18 pc 39/16 pc 58/31 pc 46/29 pc 39/16 pc 56/25 pc 40/13 pc 40/15 pc 63/27 pc 57/38 pc

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Las Vegas Lordsburg Los Alamos Los Lunas Portales Raton Red River Rio Rancho Roswell Ruidoso Santa Rosa Silver City Socorro Taos T or C Tucumcari University Park White Rock Zuni

Hi/Lo 62/36 72/30 57/32 70/35 74/35 65/25 65/14 67/30 74/31 63/36 70/42 64/36 74/29 55/28 74/33 71/43 73/40 61/32 59/28

W pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc s pc pc pc pc pc pc

Hi/Lo W 55/25 sh 68/43 pc 50/28 pc 64/29 pc 70/35 pc 54/20 sn 38/15 pc 59/30 pc 80/37 pc 58/37 pc 69/33 pc 61/36 pc 67/34 pc 47/19 sn 67/38 pc 68/32 pc 70/43 pc 53/29 pc 48/21 sn

Hi/Lo W 41/17 pc 60/35 pc 39/24 pc 50/28 pc 54/20 pc 37/15 pc 30/4 c 47/26 pc 65/29 pc 49/29 pc 49/24 pc 53/33 pc 54/34 pc 36/10 c 56/35 pc 48/22 pc 61/38 pc 42/25 pc 40/14 pc

Weather (w): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sfsnow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Weather for January 31

Sunrise today ............................... 7:05 a.m. Sunset tonight .............................. 5:31 p.m. Moonrise today ............................ 7:21 a.m. Moonset today ............................. 6:55 p.m. Sunrise Saturday .......................... 7:04 a.m. Sunset Saturday ........................... 5:32 p.m. Moonrise Saturday ....................... 8:02 a.m. Moonset Saturday ........................ 8:05 p.m. Sunrise Sunday ............................. 7:04 a.m. Sunset Sunday .............................. 5:33 p.m. Moonrise Sunday .......................... 8:41 a.m. Moonset Sunday ........................... 9:12 p.m. First

Feb 6

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 27/20 40/13 29/5 23/14 16/3 43/34 30/16 34/27 39/7 32/20 33/8 28/11 60/32 49/33 24/8 7/-3 49/28 80/67 58/22 32/15 46/33 73/48 63/55

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Hi/Lo 29/18 52/36 43/28 27/9 14/-7 38/24 41/32 57/41 51/28 19/15 38/33 32/27 74/57 27/12 29/23 8/-12 39/17 81/70 71/61 32/29 28/16 57/40 66/49

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Hi/Lo 29/21 56/51 47/35 17/6 7/-17 38/23 42/34 66/56 50/42 25/4 50/25 42/22 63/33 30/8 34/13 10/-7 38/13 81/66 76/58 41/13 29/5 55/35 66/48

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Full

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Feb 14

Rise 7:58 a.m. 5:01 a.m. 11:07 p.m. 3:02 p.m. 1:31 a.m. 9:44 a.m.

Mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus

New

Feb 22

The planets

Mar 1 Set 7:00 p.m. 3:33 p.m. 10:35 a.m. 5:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 10:08 p.m.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

National cities City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Fairbanks Flagstaff Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Richmond St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Sioux Falls Trenton Washington, DC

Hi/Lo 38/13 46/18 70/61 29/15 28/10 50/25 30/16 57/32 51/45 28/10 77/52 30/2 50/42 36/4 47/25 39/34 69/32 62/56 58/52 47/44 16/15 27/5 34/16

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Hi/Lo 43/40 53/52 81/72 16/8 4/0 65/56 40/33 50/30 74/61 40/30 68/46 35/31 46/35 48/26 34/31 36/22 77/61 62/51 57/43 44/34 16/7 40/30 44/29

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World cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Cold front

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National extremes

(For the 48 contiguous states) Thu. High: 83 ........................ El Centro, CA Thu. Low: -13 .................... Flag Island, MN

January of 1977 was Philadelphia’s coldest January in 211 years. Buffalo, N.Y., was buried in a huge blizzard, and more than 100 inches of snow fell in West Virginia.

Weather trivia™

What type of precipitation may be Q: wet or dry?

A: Snow.

Weather history

Today’s talk shows 3:00 p.m. KOAT The Ellen DeGeneres Show Michael J. Fox; Max Greenfield; Aloe Blacc performs. KRQE Dr. Phil KTFQ Laura KWBQ The Bill Cunningham Show Relatives reveal their sexual relationships. KLUZ El Gordo y la Flaca KASY Jerry Springer CNN The Situation Room FNC The Five MSNBC The Ed Show 3:30 p.m. CNBC Options Action 4:00 p.m. KOAT The Dr. Oz Show KTEL Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste KASY The Steve Wilkos Show FNC Special Report With Bret Baier 5:00 p.m. KASA Steve Harvey Kim Gravel; LuAnn de Lesseps; Carrie Keagan. KCHF The 700 Club KASY Maury

FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 6:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC The O’Reilly Factor 7:00 p.m. CNN Piers Morgan Live MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show 8:00 p.m. E! E! News FNC Hannity 8:30 p.m. KNME Washington Week With Gwen Ifill 9:00 p.m. FNC The O’Reilly Factor 10:00 p.m.KASA The Arsenio Hall Show MingNa Wen; the Chop It Up Panel; Bow Wow performs. 10:35 p.m. KRQE Late Show With David Letterman Actor Bill Murray; Eagulls performs. 10:49 p.m. KOB The Tonight Show With Jay Leno Tim Allen; Dave Salmoni; Sara Bareilles performs. 11:00 p.m. KNME Charlie Rose

KOAT Jimmy Kimmel Live FNC Hannity HBO Real Time With Bill Maher 11:30 p.m. KASA Dish Nation 11:37 p.m. KRQE The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson Actress Hayden Panettiere; comic Brooke Van Poppelen. 12:00 a.m. E! Chelsea Lately Comic Ross Mathews; actor Timothy Olyphant. HBO Real Time With Bill Maher 12:02 a.m. KOAT Nightline 12:21 a.m. KOB Late Night With Jimmy Fallon David Beckham; David Steinberg; Busta Rhymes performs with The Roots. 12:30 a.m. E! E! News 1:00 a.m. KCHF The 700 Club FNC Red Eye 1:21 a.m. KOB Last Call With Carson Daly Vanish Valley performs; actor Brody Stevens.

City Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Bogota Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Ciudad Juarez Copenhagen Dublin Geneva Guatemala City Havana Hong Kong Jerusalem Lima

Hi/Lo 37/28 59/41 72/48 90/70 55/44 36/26 25/19 82/50 88/68 72/54 86/71 73/43 28/23 43/39 37/32 73/58 82/70 76/61 63/41 82/69

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Hi/Lo 42/36 55/48 67/46 90/71 54/40 44/28 39/29 69/45 90/68 72/54 86/70 72/50 34/32 43/35 37/28 77/55 84/62 72/65 63/49 84/70

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Hi/Lo 46/37 53/51 65/43 90/72 55/40 48/32 43/31 69/48 82/73 74/60 87/72 65/38 39/37 45/36 42/34 73/56 85/64 73/63 68/52 82/69

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City Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Prague Rio de Janeiro Rome Santiago Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Vancouver Vienna Zurich

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 55/45 43/39 52/36 72/47 23/9 1/-13 70/50 43/39 30/24 88/77 57/48 88/59 43/36 86/73 27/24 84/70 63/41 43/39 32/27 34/25

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Hi/Lo 57/50 46/39 50/43 75/43 30/12 10/-2 72/49 45/40 35/30 92/77 58/50 86/59 43/30 86/73 26/23 88/70 57/43 41/27 37/30 38/27

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Hi/Lo 55/46 48/37 48/32 76/43 27/23 16/5 74/48 47/34 34/30 92/77 58/45 82/55 45/36 88/73 32/28 84/70 50/41 38/30 38/33 44/33

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top picks

7 p.m. on CW The Carrie Diaries The tension between Carrie and Tom (AnnaSophia Robb, Matt Letscher) escalates in the season finale. After Larissa (Freema Agyeman) delivers some news to Carrie, Sebastian (Austin Butler) decides to reveal a secret of his own. Maggie (Katie Findlay) gets a surprise when she turns to Walt (Brendan Dooling) with her suspicions about Pete (Claybourne Elder). Samantha (Lindsey Gort) thinks about leaving the city in “Run to You.” 7:30 p.m. on ABC The Neighbors Debbie (Jami Gertz) has her college study group over and finds herself acting more like her fellow students’ mom than their peer. Larry (Simon Templeton) visits Jackie (Toks Olagundoye) at work and has his first experience with jealousy. Reggie and Amber (Tim Jo, Clara Mamet) make a big decision about their relationship in the new episode “You’ve Lost That Larry Feeling.” Lenny Venito also stars. 8 p.m. on ABC Shark Tank Are you ready for some money? New York Giants co-owner Steve Tisch, who’s also a successful movie producer, is a guest Shark in this new episode. He and the other Sharks hear pitches for a cookie dough that’s meant to

2

Bieber vs. Ford: Who is Canada’s favorite bad boy? The Associated Press

0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High; 8-10, Very High; 11+, Extreme The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

285

10

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford orders the media to get off his property as he leaves his home on Oct. 31, 2013. Pop star Justin Bieber is giving Ford a brief respite as Canada’s favorite bad boy. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS

By Charmaine Noronha

Hobbs 78/42

285

Alamogordo 71/41

180

Hi/Lo W 68/37 pc 67/31 pc 47/33 pc 73/32 pc 77/25 pc 44/18 r 55/33 pc 53/39 pc 51/28 pc 68/32 c 58/30 pc 71/31 pc 66/30 pc 59/31 pc 75/38 pc 59/26 c 61/22 pc 73/28 s 70/34 pc

39/15

Humidity (Noon)

wind: SW 8-16 mph

Farmington 49/20

City Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Cimarron Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Crownpoint Deming Española Farmington Fort Sumner Gallup Grants Hobbs Las Cruces

40/20

Humidity (Noon)

41%

666

Gallup 48/19

Thursday

wind: S 6-12 mph

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

10

Water statistics

Humidity (Noon)

New Mexico weather

Area rainfall

Albuquerque 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.00”/0.00” Las Vegas 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.04”/0.04” Los Alamos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................. Trace/Trace Chama 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace Month/year to date .................. 0.08”/0.08” Taos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.00”/0.00”

Wednesday

A chance for rain and Partly sunny and cold Cloudy, snow tapersnow ing off; cold

43/22

Humidity (Noon)

wind: WSW 15-25 mph wind: WNW 10-20 mph wind: WNW 7-14 mph

Tuesday

Chance for snow showers

42/24

Humidity (Noon) Humidity (Midnight) Humidity (Noon)

Santa Fe Airport through 6 p.m. Thursday Santa Fe Airport Temperatures High/low ......................................... 57°/21° Normal high/low ............................ 47°/21° Record high ............................... 60° in 1986 Record low ................................. -8° in 1949 Santa Fe Airport Precipitation 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.00”/0.00” Normal month/year to date ..... 0.59”/0.59” Santa Fe Farmers Market 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.00”/0.00”

Monday

be eaten raw, milk that tastes like cereal bowl leftovers, a phone app for hands-free picture taking and an interactive workout technology demonstrated by Olympic boxer Marlen Esparza. 9 p.m. on CBS Blue Bloods Danny and Baez (Donnie Wahlberg, Marisa Ramirez) are on the case when a drag queen featured on a reality television show is found murdered in a park. Erin (Bridget Moynahan) is abducted by the mother of a man she’s about to try on drug charges in the new episode “Manhattan Queens.” Tom Selleck also stars. 9:30 p.m. on PBS Great Performances The new episode “Barrymore” captures Christopher Plummer, pictured, and his moving performance as John Barrymore, which won him a Tony on Broadway. He portrays the matinee idol in the last year of his life, 1942, as he prepares to bring his 1920 Broadway triumph in Richard III back to the stage, reflecting on his career highs and lows along the way.

4 5

TORONTO op star Justin Bieber is giving Toronto Mayor Rob Ford a brief respite as Canada’s favorite bad boy and butt of all jokes. Ford has admitted smoking crack while in a drunken stupor and is being sued for supposedly orchestrating the jailhouse beating of his sister’s ex-boyfriend. The 19-year-old teen idol is facing the equivalent of a misdemeanor assault charge. “It’s a change from the Rob Ford show,” said 14-year-old Jon Bullock, who braved glacial temperatures to catch a glimpse of the star as he turned himself in at a Toronto police station Wednesday evening to face charges over an altercation with a limousine driver in late December. The incident, which comes on the heels of Bieber’s Miami arrest while apparently drag racing and driving under the influence of alcohol, marijuana and prescription drugs, is the latest to sully the image of the singer, who has been drawing more attention for his brushes with the law than for his music. For now at least, Bieber has eclipsed Ford as fodder for late-night comedy talk shows on both sides of the border. “He had to fly to Toronto to turn himself in. Boy, this kid is really on a crime spree. He’s become a menace to society. I liked him better when he was just a menace to music,” said TV comedian Jimmy Kimmel. “By the way, when you have Justin Bieber and Rob Ford together in the same place, it’s like Gotham City got attacked by the Joker and the Penguin at once.” Others feel a comparison with Laurel and Hardy more appropriate. On Wednesday, former Globe and Mail reporter Steve Ladurantaye tweeted an image of Bieber and Ford decked out to resemble the classic comedy duo. “Seems as good a time as ever to look at this picture again,” Ladurantaye, who now works for Twitter Canada, said in the tweet. Even some members of the Toronto City Council — all too familiar with Mayor Ford’s foibles — were compelled to weigh-in on the battle of the country’s bad boys. “Both Justin Bieber and Mayor Ford need to get their lives together,” said Toronto City Councilor Joe Mihevc on Thursday on the sidelines of a council meeting. Amidst all the hullabaloo, it’s perhaps not surprising the Toronto mayor has rushed to Bieber’s defense. “He’s a young guy. I wish I was as successful as he was. He’s 19 years old. Think about when you were 19,” Ford opined during one of his regular call-in appearances on a Washington, D.C., radio show called The Sports Junkies. Beyond the jokes, however, there’s a sense of embarrassment, damaged pride and the feeling that Bieber and Ford are behaving in way that’s just not Canadian. “Canada has always been considered this polite place. People like Sarah McLachlan and Shania Twain have ful-

P

Canadian musician Justin Bieber is swarmed by media and police officers as he turns himself in Wednesday to Toronto police for an expected assault charge.

filled that stereotype as seemingly nice, friendly people who don’t get into a lot of trouble,” said Joshua Ostroff, the Huffington Post Canada’s pop culture columnist and senior editor. Ostroff said the Canadian rapper Drake got it right when he joked a couple of weeks ago on Saturday Night Live that Toronto is the kind of place where rappers are nice and the mayor smokes crack. “It was a great joke because it’s absolutely true. Drake is the kind of rapper you expect Canada to produce and Bieber is acting counter to our stereotypes,” Ostroff said. But Ostroff worries that lumping Ford and Bieber together threatens to trivialize the mayor’s actions. “The people Ford has been associated with have been accused of murder. Bieber has been an idiot like many 19-year-old boys. He egged a house. He maybe drag raced after having a beer. They are all dumb things and he deserves to be pilloried for it, but comparatively, he’s not an adult, he’s not the mayor of North America’s fourth largest city and he’s not actually hanging out with gangsters and the mayor of Toronto is,” Ostroff said. A side-effect of Bieber’s scuffles with the law has been to remind Americans that the teen idol is not a U.S. citizen. Advocacy groups, acutely aware of how less famous immigrants are treated upon arrest in the United States, have started an online petition with more than 100,000 signatures demanding that the Obama administration “deport Justin Bieber and revoke his green card.” They point out that were Bieber an American citizen, a conviction for driving under the influence or assault would be enough to get him deemed inadmissible to Canada. Errol Nazareth, a pop culture commentator for the Canadian Broadcast Corporation, says he thinks deportation is a bit much. “It’s really just an imperfect storm of two people who seem to be up to no good at the same time. It’s really just more of a circus than a statement on our reputation,” Nazareth said. “Bieber is trying to project this bad boy image. They [Bieber and Ford] are both projecting weird images and it’s not surprising they become the butt of jokes. They’re easy targets.”


By Marielle Dent Generation Next

T

he increasing popularity of social networking has certainly made it easier for anonymous users to search personal information and instantly discover your true interests. Although this ability is known to have impacted job applicants’ efforts to gain employment, it seems that college admissions officers are using this approach as well. A recent Kaplan Test Prep survey reported that a greater percentage of admission officers searched applicants’ social media sites in 2013 compared to 2012. The survey of about 380 admissions officers found that 32 percent had searched an applicant’s Facebook or other social media site while 29 percent Googled an applicant to see what they could find out. However, the number of officers who found something that negatively impacted the applicant’s chances decreased from 35 percent to 30 percent in the past year, according to the survey. Yet this activity is not yet a common practice among New Mexico colleges, it seems. The University of New Mexico, New Mexico State University and Eastern New Mexico University all prefer to use social media as a means of communication with prospective and current students, according to representatives of those institutions. Admission to these schools generally is based on an applicant’s grade-point average, test scores and applications. “The quantity of applicants is so substantial that [checking social media] would be almost impossible,” said Matt Hewlett, director of admissions at The University of New Mexico. “It is also not necessary as we are primarily checking to see if they will be successful at this school. This is certainly a debate within the profession, but it just depends on what the office is looking for.” He said he does not foresee the university using this practice anytime soon. Anya Markowitz, a graduate of Santa Fe Prep and current student at Yale University, said, “I haven’t heard about anyone being directly penalized for their social media presence by college applications, but I think it is something that every high school senior is intuitively aware of at this point. You can pretty much tell the moment application season starts because your high school-age Facebook friends’ names will disappear and morph into song lyrics and stuff like that.” Markowitz said that she did take the extra precaution of changing her Facebook name to Anya Sofia, a variation of her middle name, when she was applying to Yale. According to the Kaplan Test Prep survey, 50 percent of students said they would “not be at all concerned” if a college admissions officer searched their online presence. One student who fits this category is William Fong, a student at the New Mexico Institute of Mining

Social snooping

More colleges vetting applicants via online networking sites, but practice isn’t common at New Mexico schools

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN SECTION C

n o i t ra

gen e

Classifieds C-2 Comics C-8

for and by teens

MOVIES Films shine spotlight on first year of college By Emily Davis

Generation Next

A recent Kaplan Test Prep survey reported that a greater percentage of admission officers searched applicants’ social media sites in 2013 compared to 2012. KEIFER NACE/GENERATIoN NExT

and Technology. “I did consider [social media] when applying for college, but I don’t post anything that could negatively affect me. I also don’t know anyone who has been affected by this. Everyone does a good job of keeping anything like that off of the Internet,” he said. Still, some might advise students to be more careful when it comes to posting online. The Kaplan Test Prep website suggests that students search their own names online regularly so they can always be aware of what information is available out there about them. Students also should keep anything obscene or unflattering off social networking sites as colleges do not want such misbehavior occurring on their campuses. On the flip side, these social media sites can offer a chance to

present a student’s talents and hobbies, which could help when it comes to being accepted by a college. Benson Hendrix, an adjunct instructor at UNM’s Communication and Marketing Department, said, “social media is a great way for students to highlight what they’re interested in. They can show what they are doing. A writer can showcase their work or an artist could post their drawings and paintings. When they later meet admissions officers they could point out these accomplishments. Social media can provide [students] with an opportunity to put their best foot forward.” Marielle Dent is a freshman at The University of New Mexico. Contact her at marielle.j.dent@ gmail.com.

A survey of about 380 admissions officers found that 32 percent had searched an applicant’s Facebook or other social media site while 29 percent Googled an applicant to see what they could find out.

What were the best and worst parts of your first semester at college?

SPEAK OUT

The freedom and decision-making that accompany the first year of college can be enlightening, harrowing and mindboggling. In today’s issue of Generation Next, our writers explore the various aspects of the freshman experience — be it creating gap-year memories or having your social media sites checked out by college-admissions officials. Of course, these aren’t the only takes on that life-changing first year in college: Cinema has had its say as well. Here are five movies that deal with the first-year experiences of both students and teachers.

‘Horse Feathers’ (1932) Starring the ever-hilarious Marx Brothers, this film revolves around a high-stakes football game between the fictional Darwin and Huxley colleges. Groucho plays Quincy Adams Wagstaff, the new president of Huxley, while Zeppo plays his son, Frank, who is embarking on his 12th year at college and convinces his father to illegally recruit professional football players to help their team — and that’s where Harpo and Chico come in. Jokes about dubious collegiate departments abound, including the notable scene in which Wagstaff leads his colleagues in the nonsensical tune, “Whatever it is, I’m against it!”

‘Animal House’ (1978) Will the talented, clean-cut, infuriatingly snobbish fraternity pull a gloating win over the group of raucous tricksters at Faber College? This question drives the plot of this crass but entertaining movie. Replete with a now-famous cast, including John Belushi, Thomas Hulce and Donald Sutherland, Animal House provides a laugh-out-loud picture of a fundriven freshman year. Though toga parties abound and the alcohol flows freely, the film also offers clear insights regarding the American fraternity system.

‘Rudy’ (1993) Lauren Trujillo, Fort Lewis College “The best part is all the different people I have met. The worst part is 8 a.m. classes in negative-degree weather.”

Ian Belzer, Fort Lewis College “The greatest part is the opportunity for adventure in Durango [Colo.]. My least favorite part was no home-cooked meals.”

Cory Patterson, Fort Lewis College “The best was starting a taekwon do club. The worst was having to get a job.”

Rylee Houston, Fort Lewis College “The best part was knowing I could do whatever I put my mind to. The worst part was late nights writing papers.”

Ariadne Ellsworth, Brown University “The best thing about my first semester was the people I met, friends I made and the endless opportunities. And to be honest, I can’t think of the worst thing — there wasn’t one.”

CoMpIlED BY CHARINE GoNZAlES AND ElIZA HARRISoN/GENERATIoN NExT

Griffin Merians, Claremont McKenna College “The best thing about my experience is my immersion into a community of intelligent, dedicated, funloving, diverse, interesting and inspiring individuals. The worst thing is the absence of chile, red or green.”

Anna Carter, Johns Hopkins University “The best thing about my first semester of college was learning to be an independent person. The worst thing about my first semester of college was the realization that I spend more time working than I spend doing all of my other activities combined [including sleeping].”

MY VIEW

Experience life through a gap year By Kyle McMichael Generation Next

A

s the tassels turn and the graduation caps fly into the air, a level of uncertainty might loom in every graduate’s head regarding what the future may bring. Regardless of whether you choose to continue your education by attending college or going directly into the workforce, the years following high school graduation mark a time in which many of the decisions you make will impact the rest of your life — for better or worse. Santa Fe High School graduated me in May of 2013. Once I got accepted into Colorado College, I was at first ready to unleash my potential in another classroom. It wasn’t until some time later that I realized I could get a whole lot more out of my college experience if I could first better myself in ways other than academics by undergoing experiences I could bring with me to college. College isn’t all about academics — it’s about creating your future. Realizing the importance of this, I figured

I’d amp up my entire package I’m immersing myself in experiences outside the classroom. Though I was accepted at Colorado College immediately — for the class of 2017 — college officials graciously granted my request to take a gap year as a member of the 2018 graduation class. With an entire year to grow as a person, what better way to spend that time than by doing things that I truly love to do? The past five months have been among the best in my life. I had the opportunity to travel around the West Coast and to South America. I skied in some of the greatest terrain in the country without having to write a paper for Advanced Placement English literature class at the end of the day. I also found time to work at La Casa Sena and Thunderbird Bar and Grill, saving money and immersing myself in a work environment with a number of people who either loved what they were doing or had no other choice — which in itself was an invaluable experience. I got to meet and reconnect with some truly amazing people. I had the chance to just “live.”

Section editor: Robert Nott, rnott@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Carlos Lopez, clopez@sfnewmexican.com

In mid-February, I leave for Lander, Wyo., to embark on a Wilderness Medicine and Rescue course with the National Outdoor Leadership School — a course that will teach me survival techniques that I can use every single day of my life — even in the classrooms of Colorado College. Along with what this course will teach me, I will be immersed in the wilderness for two months — something I’ve dreamt about since I was a kid. Though it may seem obvious, taking a break after going to school for 12 years will clear your head a bit, which in turn may help you make some smart decisions regarding your future. It also buys you extra time to mature before you go to college. So for all you high school seniors, here’s my advice: Cherish the moment and tread lightly as you choose what you want to do for the next few years. There really is no need to rush through the most important years of your life. Kyle McMichael will be a freshman at Colorado College in the fall of 2014. Contact him at kylemcmichael95@gmail.com.

Daniel Eugene “Rudy” Reuttiger (Sean Astin) has dreamed of playing football at University of Notre Dame his whole life, but he lacks the money, grades and stature to do so. Fueled by his incredible determination, he enrolls at a nearby junior college and works for free for the wise Notre Dame groundskeeper (Charles S. Dutton). Though Rudy experiences setbacks — including his dyslexia and an obvious dearth of athletic talent — he applies again and again to the school and the team, finally earning his place through back-breaking work and perseverance. The film delivers a heart-warming message that dedication and love are more important than anything else when it comes to achieving goals.

‘Good Will Hunting’ (1997) This critically-acclaimed film stars Matt Damon as Will Hunting, a college-age South Boston janitor who also is an unrecognized mathematical genius. Through his troubled past restricts his potential for success, a renowned professor (Stellan Skarsgård) convinces Will to study at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and see an unusual psychologist (Robin Williams). With their help, as well as his relationship with his new girlfriend (Minnie Driver) and the words of his best friend (Ben Affleck), Will comes to see the world and himself through entirely new eyes. The movie remains a genuinely complex and moving story that reveals many truths about humanity. Damon and Affleck co-wrote the screenplay.

‘Mona Lisa Smile’ (2003) When free-thinking feminist Katherine Anne Watson (Julia Roberts) arrives at Wellesley College to teach art history in 1953, her conservative superiors are shocked by her radical views. Though she meets resistance from both colleagues and students, Katherine uses her lessons to show that women should be allowed to follow their dreams and that marriage should not be their only goal. In turn, she is forced to re-evaluate her own fixed opinions on art and feminism through the questions of her sharp-minded students. The film stresses how the college experience can open both students and teachers to new ideas.

Emily Davis is a junior at Santa Fe Prep. Contact her at emilydavis@sfprep.org.

BREAKING NEWS AT WWW.SAntAFeneWMexicAn.coM


C-2

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

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2 BEDROOM, 1.5 BATH. Nice safe neighborhood. 900 squ.ft, yard. $795 monthly, not including utilities, no cats, dogs. Call, 505-470-0727.

SANTA FE FSBO TOWNHOUSE, 3 bedroom, 2 baths, and garage. $179,900. Close to schools, available immediately. Owner - Broker. Please call 505-850-5005.

1085 Calle Nueva Vista $67,500 Seller, Tim Monaco 505-699-2955 Moriarty. Two 40 acre Farm-Land Parcels with irrigation and domestic wells, water and mineral rights. Owner Finance. 505-471-0365, 505310-0566.

MANUFACTURED HOMES RE

Now Showing Rancho Viejo Townhome $232,500

2014 KARSTEN 16X80 3 BED, 2 BATH FOR SALE $56, 062 + tax Move-in ready! Rancho Zia MHP Space #26

360 degree views, Spectacular walking trails, Automated drip watering, Finished 2 car garage, 2 BDR, 2 ½ bath plus office.

575-694-5444

www.facebook.com\santafetown house STATELY OPEN C O N C E P T , 3400+ Sq.Ft. 1+ acres, unlimited water. Tennis court, hot tub, sauna, gazebo, fountains & ponds. 3+ Bedrooms, 2 Baths (master suite). Nichos, bancos, view. CHAPMAN REALTY: 505-983-8100.

FARMS & RANCHES 146.17 AC. 1 hour from Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Electricity, views of Sangre De Cristo Mountains and Glorieta Mesa. $675 per acre, 20 year owner financing. Toll Free 1-877-797-2624 www.newmexicoranchland.net

2 BEDROOMS. $1250, UTILITIES INCLUDED. HILLSIDEWALK TO PLAZA. FIREPLACE, PRIVATE PATIO. SUNNY, QUIET. OFF-STREET PARKING. 505-685-4704. NON- SMOKING, NO PETS.

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

Sunset Street Studio Apartment. Laundry facility on site. $499 monthly. Griffin Street, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, washer- dryer hookups, fireplace, patio. $1000 monthly, year lease. Cozy studio, $750 monthly, $500 deposit, includes utilities, washer, dryer. saltillo tile, great views. No smoking or pets. Call 505-231-0010. INCREDIBLE SANGRE VIEWS! $935. ZIA VISTAS LARGEST 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATHROOM, large walk-in closets. Fireplace. Exceptional layout. Gated. Much more. 505-204-2210

Love is in the air and we have specials to spare! Call our friendly new management team at Las Palomas Apartments- Hopewell St reet at 888-482-8216 for a tour of one of our sunny Studios or large 2 Bedrooms. We’ve made a lot of changes- you’ll be amazed! Se habla español.

Easy Qualify 4.5% APR, 10 year payoff Call Tim 505-699-2995 Shown by appointment only RESORT TIMESHARING

ONE BEDROOM, one bath apartment. Twenty minutes North of Santa Fe. $600 monthly plus deposit, utilities. Quiet safe area. 505-929-1237. OUTDOOR PATIO. All tile floors. Washer, Dryer. Parking. Rent $925 including heat, water. Call Sheilah Motelet Realty, Cat considered. Santa Fe 505-660-7045.

PUEBLO BONITO Emerald Bay Timeshare (Mazatlan Mexico) for sale. Presidential Suite for use 1 week per year anytime except Christmas-New Years week. 21 years left on contract. Price firm at $18,000. Contact John at 505-4383793.

1 bedroom, 1 bath apartment. Private patio, carport parking, laundry facility, no pets, nonsmoking. $650 plus deposit. 505-3102827

»rentals«

$420 MOVES YOU IN

GUESTHOUSES 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath. $750 monthly. $750 damage deposit. No pets. Baseboard heat. 1 year lease. Owner Broker. 505-850-5005.

2 BEDROOM 1 bath. Fenced yard, $995 monthly. Please call 505-6901803. Available for showing Monday through Wednesday.

EASTSIDE, WALK TO CANYON ROAD! Furnished, short-term vacation home. Walled .5 acre, mountain views, fireplace, 2 bedroom, washer, dryer. Private. Pets okay. Large yard. 970-626-5936.

2 BEDROOM 1 office 1 bath southside house. Yard is completely enclosed, large covered patio. $1,100 monthly plus deposit. No pets, no smoking. 505-660-0084.

HOUSES FURNISHED 4 BLOCKS TO plaza. Eastside, 3 bedroom 2 bath. Fenced yard, fireplace. Pets ok. $2,500 plus utilities. Monthly or year lease. 505-795-3131.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED CHARMING, CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, $800

Private estate. Walled yard, kiva fireplace. Safe, quiet. Utilities paid. Sorry, No Pets. 505-471-0839 FULLY FURNISHED STUDIO, $750. Utilities paid, charming, clean, fireplace, wood floors. 5 minute walk to Railyard. Sorry, No Pets. 505471-0839

4 BEDROOM, 2 living areas, fireplace, washer, dryer, new carpet, 2 1/2 acres, 360 views, fenced. $1,350 plus deposit. 505-263-2770 FULLY FURNISHED! SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS. CLOSE PLAZA. Indoor, outdoor fireplaces. Front and back patio. Non-smoking, no pets. $2300 monthly plus utilities. Jennie, 859-512-7369, serious inquiries only.

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

VIEWS VIEWS VIEWS 3 Bedroom 2 ½ Bath home, 8 miles from plaza. Light and bright. Wonderful master suite and great kitchen. Three fireplaces, media room, office. Fabulous covered portal for outdoor entertainment. Immediate occupancy! $3500 month plus utilities.

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED

2 bedroom, 1 bath, on-site laundry, close to parks $600 plus utilities

COZY CONDO WITH MANY UPGRADES

2 bedroom, 1 bath, kiva fireplace, washer, dryer, granite counters $850 plus utilities

LOCATED AT THE LOFTS ON CERRILLOS

This live & work studio offers high ceilings, kitchenette, bathroom with shower, 2 separate entrances, ground, corner unit with lots of natural lighting. $1000 plus utilities

CHARMING AND CENTRALLY LOCATED

3 bedroom, 1 bath, wood & tile floors, enclosed backyard, additional storage on property $1050 plus utilities

Charming Condo

2 bedroom, 2 bath, granite counters, washer, dryer, upgraded appliances, access to all amenities $975 plus utilities

5 plex conveniently located on Camino Capitan

this unit is a one bedroom loft, fireplace, and fenced back yard $650 plus utilities Beautiful floor plan. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1500 sq.ft., all tile, private patio, 2 car garage. Available February 1. $1,550 monthly. Call 505-989-8860. CANYON ROAD- 700 BLOCK. HOME, OFFICE OR STUDIO. 2000 square feet: 2 bedrooms, 3 baths. Fireplaces, radiant heat, tile floors, parking. Enclosed yard. $2300 plus utilities. (505-989-9494 COZY 1 bedroom plus Loft. Refrigerator, 2 car garage, enclosed backyard. No Pets. $885 monthly, $700 deposit. 480-236-5178.

BARRIO LA CANADA

1900 sqft 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home For Rent 3 Bedroom, 2 Full Bath Home for rent near Zia and St Francis. Washer and Dryer, Fireplace, Extra Dining or Living area and 2 car garage. Huge fenced back yard with patio. PETS OKAY! $1,250 monthly plus utilities. Available for showing and immediate move in February 3rd or after. Call 505-929-2827.

VALLE DEL SOL Pristine condition and perfect location just north of the Plaza. 2 Bedroom 2 Bath in desirable Valle del Sol. Tile floors, fireplace, and garage. Lovely garden and private courtyard. Small pet considered. Immediate occupancy! $2300 month plus utilities

Professionally managed by Proctor Property Management 505-471-9186 BEAUTIFUL, UPDATED HOUSE. 2 bedroom 2 bath +bonus room, sunroom, garage. Washer, dryer, kiva fireplaces. Wood floors. Landscaping. Pets-negotiable. Available now. No smoking. $1425 monthly! http://rentsantafe.blogspot.com/ 720-235-8458.

505-471-8325

1,900 sq.ft. Warehouse, 600 sq.ft Office Space, reception area, two offices, kitchen, security, fenced yard, On-site parking. $1,500 plus utilities. 505-982-2511.

4 BLOCKS TO plaza. Eastside, 3 bedroom 2 bath. Fenced yard, fireplace. Pets ok. $2,500 plus utilities. Monthly or year lease. 505-795-3131.

505-992-1205 valdezandassociates.com

Move in tomorrow! 3 bedroom 2 bath home in well-established neighborhood off West Alameda. Close to park, downtown and shopping! Large back yard, new appliances. $1295 month plus utilities

(January move in , 12 Mo. Lease, required for special)

COMMERCIAL SPACE

2 BEDROOM, 2 bath in Jaconita on Highway 502. $900 monthly plus utilities. $900 security deposit. 505-4552336

3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH Custom Home 2.5 acres. Solar exposure, city lights, ridge above city. 360 views. $1900. John, 505-989-7172.

CHECK THIS OUT!!

2029 CALLE LORCA

2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH H O U S E , $950 plus utilities. Sunny, Hardwood Floors, Open Floor Plan, Fenced. Pet OK. San Marcos area. Available 2/10. Steve, 505-470-3238.

2 BEDROOMS 2 BATHS, double garage, washer, dryer. Breathtaking mountain view, trails, golfing, lake. South of Santa Fe. $875. 505-359-4778

PRIVATE COMPOUND

SAN MIGUEL COURT APARTMENTS

1+ ACRE . Nice touches; tile in dining room, kitchen & baths; nichos; kiva fireplace; flagstone patio with portal; 2 car garage; fenced, pets ok. Convenient highway access for Albuquerque commuters. Available now. Open this weekend. $1600 monthly. 210-426-6366. 2 1/2 acre, 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Studio and horse barn. Lone Butte area. Beautiful, quiet country living. $1,250 monthly. $1,000 deposit. 505-6705998.

Can also be used as u n f u r n i s h e d a p a r t m e n t . $850 monthly. All utilities included. Reserved parking. Call 505-471-1238 additional details.

A 1 Bedroom Apt. $0 Security Deposit For Qualified Applicants & No deposit required for Utilities, Ask me How!!

GREAT NEW MEXICO PROPERTIES BIG MOON RANCH NORTHERN NEW MEXICO 988 ACRES. $720,000.00 CALL OWNER, 802-236- 1314

ZIA VISTA, top floor. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 1 year lease. Available 3/1/14 $900 monthly. Sign by 2/6/14; 50% off first month. 432-847-9510

OFFICE- STUDIO NEAR RAILYARD

LOTS & ACREAGE

(3) 2.5 Acre Lots, Senda Artemisia, Old Galisteo Road, Close to town. Easy building sites. Views, utilities, shared well. Owner financing. No Mobile homes. $119,700- $129,700 each. Greg. 505-690-8503, Equity Real Estate.

GREAT SHORT term rental. Washer dryer. Fully Furnished. $1,750, monthly includes utilities, Dish, WIFI, Free long distance calls. Nancy 505-6703971.

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

NEWLY REMODELED, CENTRALLY L O C A T E D . 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX . Large yard, front & back. $1150 monthly, utilities included, $1000 deposit. Prefer long term. Pets negotiable. CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 505-204-1685.

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

MONTE AZUL LO O P , 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, washer- dryer hook-ups, fireplace, covered patio, large back yard. $1395 monthly.

IMMACULATE. 3, 2, 2, + office. 1920 sq.ft. Rancho Viejo. Corner Lot, front courtyard and backyard walled. Great Mountain Views, fireplace, multiple upgrades. $1,850 monthly. Rancho Viejo Estates, 505-780-0129. LOVELY LARGE 1 BEDROOM ADOBE for lease. Next to Acequia, overlooking Patrick Smith Park on Canyon Road. Available mid-February. 505989-8654

RAILYARD, DOWNTOWN, CHARMING SOUTHWESTERN CASITA. 1 bedroom, office, laundry. Spacious flagstone great room, chateau fireplace. Walled courtyard. $995 Lease. 505-8984168. VILLAGE OF CERRILLOS. 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath. $900 monthly. Newly remodeled. Washer, dryer. First, last, plus deposit. Cat okay. 505-473-4186

service«directory CALL 986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts to learn how we can help grow your business! CARETAKING PART TIME In home care for family members and or pets. References available. Call Jean at 862-222-7500, 505-470-5609.

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

CLEANING A+ Cleaning

Homes, Office Apartments, post construction. House and Pet sitting. Senior care. References available, $18 per hour. Julia, 505-204-1677.

WE GET RESULTS! So can you with a classified ad

FIREWOOD Dry Pinon & Cedar

Free Kindling, Delivery & Stack. 140.00 pick up load.

505-983-2872, 505-470-4117

HANDYMAN

LESSONS

REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, PRO-PANEL ROOFS, PAINTING, FENCING, YARDWORK. MINOR PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL. 25 years experience. Consulting. Licensed. References. Free estimates. (505)470-5877

INTRODUCTORY FLYING LESSONS. 3 HOURS GROUND SCHOOL, 3 HOURS FLYING. $250. LET’S HAVE FUN! PLEASE CALL 505-577-7552. rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

and independent

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

l makers gril State law r gas crisis utility ove

HANDYMAN

A-8

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

50¢

mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations

CALL 986-3010

paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded Others originated Page A-9 bin said. CITATIONS, Please see

The New

CALL 986-3000

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

N

Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug By Staci The New

Matlock

and Anne

Constable

Ellen Cava-

Mexican

and his housemate, their fireplacetheir in front of John Hubbard Near huddled stay warm. plea to naugh, were trying to morning away Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go front gate, saying, “Please the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in Pajaleave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow With more than 20 pergas for heating less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been today, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put cent of Rio Monday. New Mexico and pipefiton plumbers by noon to licensed on meters. out a message them turn ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, Please see

at tax

PLASTERING

Pasapick Art lecture

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

agency

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid A-12

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may

40 YEARS EXPERIENCE. Professional Plastering Specialist: Interior & Exterior. Also Re-Stuccos. Patching a specialty. Call Felix, 505-920-3853. up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Index

Managing

CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS is committed to protecting your home. Creosote build-up in a fireplace or lint build-up in a dryer vent reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. Call 505989-5775. Get prepared!

YOUR HEALTH MATTERS. We use natural products. 20 Years Experience, Residential & Offices. Reliable. Excellent references. Licensed & Bonded. Eva, 505-919-9230. Elena. 505-946-7655

AFFORDABLE HOME REPAIR

Housecleaning, garage cleaning, hauling trash. Cutting Trees, Flagstone Patios, Driveways, Fencing, Yard Work, Stucco, Tile.. Greg, Nina, 920-0493.

TRINO’S AFFORDABLE Construction all phases of construction, and home repairs. Licensed. 505-9207583

SELL YOUR PROPERTY! with a classified ad. Get Results!

CALL 986-3000

Calendar

A-2

Dean, editor: Rob

Classifieds

986-3033,

B-9

Comics B-14

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Opinion

Cynthia Miller,

ROOFING

m

cmiller@sfnewmexican.co

rdean@sfnewmexican.com

ROOFING ROOFING EXPERIENCE. Shingles, Brai, Metal, TOP. 20 years experience. No job too small! Free Estimates. Licensed, bonded. 505-577-3605

ALL TYPES . Metal, Shingles, Composite torch down, Hot Mop, Stucco, Plaster. Free Estimates! Call Ismael Lopez at 505-670-0760.

Have a product or service to offer? Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000


Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds LIVE IN STUDIOS

»jobs«

ACCOUNTING

OFFICES Accounting Associate 227 EAST PALACE

GREAT RETAIL SPACE! Water Street Store Front

Brokers Welcome. Call Southwest Asset Management, 505-988-5792.

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE

Great location and parking! $500 monthly includes utilities, cleaning, taxes and amenities. Move in incentives!

Please call (505)983-9646.

Needed for a fast paced, dynamic Santa Fe company. The Accounting Associate’s primary role is to contribute to the productivity, efficiency and effectiveness of the Accounting Department. Specific duties include processing AP, AR using fund accounting; and servicing loans. Homewise is looking for an energetic, selfstarter, who is solution oriented and able to work independently with little or no supervision. This person must have strong customer service skills; demonstrated strong computer skills; and be highly organized with strict attention to detail. Three years’ experience in an accounting function or a college degree in accounting is required. Competitive compensation package. EOE. Send resume-cover letter to blange@homewise.org

RETAIL SPACE SEASONAL PLAZA RETAIL Month-Month Call Southwest Asset Management, 988-5792.

STORAGE SPACE 10X30 MOVE-IN-SPECIAL , $180 monthly. Airport Cerrillos Storage. Wide, no swing, roll-up doors. U-haul Cargo Van. Professional, Resident Manager. www.airportcerrillos.com. 505-474-4330

A-Poco Self Storage 2235 Henry Lynch Rd Santa Fe, NM 87507 505-471-1122 12x24 for Only $195.00. Call to reserve yours Today!!! WAREHOUSES

2000 sq.ft. Workshop, art studio, light manuafacturing. Siler Road area. $1470 monthly, $1000 deposit. 505670-1733.

»announcements«

MEDICAL DENTAL

ADMINISTRATIVE Administrative Assistant

T h e New Mexico Suicide Intervention Project, a private non-profit organization, is looking for an experienced Administrative Assistant who enjoys working in a multi-person, multi-task office environment. This position requires a highly organized self-starter with excellent communication skills and advanced computer skills. This is a 10-month, part-time position, from August 15 through June 15 each year; 25-30 hours weekly. Send resume and cover letter to NMSIP, P.O. Box 6004, Santa Fe, NM 87502 or theskyctr@gmail.com attention Ex.Director.

PERSONAL ASSISTANT: Bathe, dress, feed, medical care, house clean for disabled 155lb man. Communication skills, responsible, PC skills. $18 hourly. jobapppa@gmail.com.

MANAGEMENT HIGH-END RESIDENTIAL CUSTOM HOME DESIGN-BUILDER IN SANTA FE SEEKS E S T IM A T IN G PURCHASING MANAGER . Position includes estimating large and small residential construction projects, material take offs, contracting subcontractors and suppliers, entering contracts and prices into Sage Master Builder software, purchasing materials and managing subcontracts. 5 years experience as a purchasing manager and-or construction estimator required. Construction experience and proficiency in Sage Master Builder, Adobe, Auto Desk Design Review and Microsoft Excel a plus. Please mail all resumes to: P O Box 9035, Santa Fe, NM 87504-9035.

Portfolio Manager-Fixed Income The New Mexico Educational Retirement Board seeks a portfolio manager for an investment grade bonds portfolio. Functions include portfolio management and analysis, trade execution, and risk management. CFA designation and 4+ years of fixed income portfolio management with demonstrable track record preferred. Salary range: $31.21-$55.49 per hour. Location: Santa Fe, NM. Apply on the State Personnel Office website: www.spo.state.nm.us (Portfolio Manager-ERB #10108634) by February 27, 2014. Santa Fe Railyard Stewards invites applications for the position of Executive Director. Visit www.railyardpark.org for more information and minimum qualifications.

Busy law firm in Santa Fe seeking litigation paralegal. Experience (2-3 years) required in general civil practice, including labor & employment, insurance defense, and professional malpractice defense. Candidates should have excellent writing and research skills, and the ability to work independently. Paralegal certificate or degree is necessary. Those who don’t meet this criteria need not apply. Competitive salary and benefits. All inquiries kept confidential. Email resume: kjc508@yahoo.com

WWM COLLECTION MANAGER

Performs managerial coordination, direction, and supervision over the operations and maintenance of the City’s sewer collections system section. For detailed information on educational requirements and required experience, visit our website at www.santafenm.gov . The City of Santa Fe offers competitive compensation and a generous benefit package including excellent retirement program, medical, dental, life insurance, paid holidays, generous vacation and sick leave. The closing date is 2/12/14.

MEDICAL DENTAL

LOST: UNIQUE WALKING STICK with mermaid brass head. Smith’s Supermarket (Pacheco location), Tuesday, 1/28. G E N E R OUS REWARD! CALL: 505-795-7630. PLEASE HELP US FIND BAKER. White, 100 pounds, curly tail, golden eyes, pink nose. Very Friendly. microchipped. REWARD!!! 830-560-6212 or 505-699-3400. REWARD FOR THE RETURN OR INFORMATION pertaining to 1 black plastic garbage bag that contained literary writings, some clothing, left off the Dale Ball Trail between 1/2013 5/2013. Bruce Becker, 505-670-1682. Jeremiah Camp.

EDUCATION DESERT ACADEMY OF SANTA FE

Please submit cover letter & resume to: lgildes@desertacademy.org

PUBLIC NOTICES

Changing Futures, One Person At A Time Become a Plasma Donor Today Please help us help those coping with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. New donors can receive $100.00 this week! Ask about our Specialty Programs! Must be 18 years or older, have valid ID along with proof of SS#, and local residency. Walk-ins Welcome! New donors will receive a $10.00 Bonus on their second donation with this ad.

Biotest Plasma Center 2860 Cerrillos Road, Ste B1 Santa Fe, NM 87507. 505-424-6250

Book your appointment online at: www.biotestplasma.com NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

A MULTI-SPECIALTY AMBULATORY SURGERY CENTER, in Durango, CO is seeking experienced, teamoriented individuals to fill the following positions in our fast paced environment:

FULL-TIME OR RN CERTIFIED SURGICAL TECH CLINICAL INTERN BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Comprehensive benefit package available to those who qualify. No weekends, holidays, or call required. Send resumes to jphelps@pscdgo.com or fax to 970508-0505 attn: J. Phelps.

a college preparatory independent IB World School grades 7-12, is seeking qualified candidates for the following positions for the 2014 season:

* Part Time Head Varsity Girls’ Soccer Coach * Part Time Assistant Girls’ Soccer Coach

Holy Cross Catholic School is now accepting applications for a Kindergarten teacher, immediate hire, for the last semester of the 2013-2014 school year who has a NM Certification K-8 or Early Childhood/ BA Degree. If interested please contact school office at 505-753-4644.

MAINTENANCE POSITION available; skilled in carpentry, exterior trim, painting, electrical, roofing, stucco, must read and write English and keep good records. 30 to 40 hours per week Monday - Friday with some on-call for emergencies. Pay dependent on experience. Submit resume: 3 Nuevo Milenio Santa Fe NM 87507.

WANTED: WARHOL-HARING Lichtenstein, Hockney, S. Fairey, etc. Buying signed works.

310-259-9188 or zyart@pacbell.net FIREWOOD-FUEL

INTENSIVE CASE MANAGER Provide in-depth case management services to homeless patients, with special attention and understanding of the needs and circumstances related to homelessness. Require Bachelor’s degree in Human Services and prefer bilingual in Spanish-English. Send resume by email to mpopp@lfmctr.org

Have a product or service to offer? Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000

FIREWOOD, MISCELLANEOUS Cedar, pinion ponderosa. 1/2 cord delivered $120. 508-444-0087 or 505-2179198.

FURNITURE

ANTIQUES MERRY FOSS, Latin American ETHNOGRAPHIC & ANTIQUE DEALER moving. Selling her COLLECTION, Household FURNITURE & EVERYTHING! By appt 505-7957222.

APPLIANCES

Children’s Behavioral Health program seeks full time Therapist with clinical experience working with children 0-6. LISW/LPCC, NM Licensure. Must have dependable transportation for home visitation. Bilingual strongly preferred. Fax (505) 747-0421 or jobs@lascumbres-nm.org.

2006 KIRBY Vacuum cleaner. All attachments included. Almost new condition. $600 OBO. Please call 505455-3653. 3 year old Frigidaire french door refrigerator with bottom freezer, 27.8 cu.ft. Too large for my kitchen. 505982-7547

email

email

BEAUTIFUL COUCH WITH LOVELY ACCENTS. FROM A SMOKE AND PET FREE HOME. $350. PLEASE CALL, 505-238-5711 TO SCHEDULE A VIEWING.

ART

MONTANA HAND-CRAFTED CUSTOM BLUE PINE LOG BED

Therapist, Clinician: Santa Fe Community Infant Program. Infant, parent mental health program seeks Full-Time therapist. Clinical experience working with children. Bilingual preferred. LISW/LPCC, NM Licensure. Dependable transportation for home visitation.

2002 INDIAN Market blue ribbon winning painting by museum artist Shonto Begay... 50x72 framed beautifully... have to sell, $8450.00 firm... Santa Fe. 505-471-4316

Excellent condition, includes head board, foot board and side boards with heavy metal support frame and bolts. Fits double mattress. It’s gorgeous! One owner. $450 OBO. 520-906-9399.

WE HAVE OPENING FOR 1 Full-time Unit Manager. The position requires that you must be a R E G I S T E R E D NURSE. The duties will be to help the DON Oversight & Systems Management. This is a salary position. Anyone interested please call Raye Highland, RN/DON, 505-982-2574.

DIRECTOR OF NURSES

Responsible for effective overall management of the Nursing Department and coordination with other disciplines to provide quality care to all patients & residents. This position is significant in facility leadership. Assures action plans are in place to generate sufficient applicant flow and to select qualified individuals to fill position vacancies. Performs other duties as deemed necessary and appropriate or as directed by the administrator or his/her designee. All other duties to be discussed. This position is significant in facility leadership. Anyone interested please call CRAIG SHAFFER Admin, 505-982-2574.

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS Avaria Apartments seeks Full time Experienced Groundskeeper Positive, fast paced environment. Drug screen. Apply: 1896 Lorca Dr, 87505, fax: 505-473-7131. EOE

FOUND

TEMPORARY DELIVERY Drivers, Flower Designers needed for Valentine’s Day. Apply at Rodeo Plaza Flowers, 2801 Rodeo Road, Suite A2. No phone calls.

COLLECTIBLES

UNIT MANAGER

40 Hours weekly. $12+ hourly based on experience. Description: Installation of ignition interlocks, customer service, computer work, auto wiring experience. Clean driving record, NO alcohol or drug related offences for the last 4 years. 505-9291237.

DRIVERS

TRADES

»merchandise«

Fax (505) 747-0421 or jobs@lascumbres-nm.org

IGNITION INTERLOCK TECHNICIAN

LOST

HYGEINIST, FULL-TIME for busy progressive office. Please send cover letter and resume to drparker@richardparkerdds.com

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

IN HOME CARE

ATTENTION PARALEGALS: If you are a top-notch litigation paralegal with solid experience, a great job with good benefits awaits. Send résumé, cover letter and references to Comeau, Maldegen, Templeman & Indall, P.O. Box 669, Santa Fe, NM 87504 or to Paula Cook at pcook@cmtisantafe.com

AUTOMOTIVE

WORKOUT, RUNNING BRACELET found Tuesday afternoon 1/28, near Yucca & Rodeo. Call to describe 505577-8727.

HEAD DENTAL ASSISTANT Rare Opportunity!!! Progressive Taos Dental Office has immemdiate opening for Full-time certified head dental assistant, 575-7794532.

Therapist

PARALEGAL

WAREHOUSE WORK SPACE AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY

EDUCATION

SANTA FE INDIAN SCHOOLS IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR A HEALTH TEACHER. IF INTERESTED, SUBMIT AN APPLICATION, A LETTER OF INTEREST, RESUME, AND TWO REFERENCES TO THE HUMAN RESOURCE OFFICE, PO BOX 5340, SANTA FE, NM 87505. APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED UNTIL POSITION IS FILLED. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 505989-6330 OR FORWARD AN EMAIL TO: Felisa@sfis.k12.nm.us. Website for application: www.sfis.k12.nm.us

MANUFACTURED HOMES

Three room, 600 sq.ft., professional space, good light, ideal share. Faces Palace Avenue, assigned parking. Lease 505-820-7657

986-3000

VACANCY NOTICE

LIVE-IN STUDIOS

S kylights, overhead doors, 2500 square feet, $975. 4100 square feet, 3 phase electric, $1175. La Mesilla. No dogs. 505-753-5906

CLEAN 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH HOME in Tesuque area 12 min. from downtown Santa Fe. $900 per month + deposit. No smoking, no pets. Credit check & references required. Call 505-321-2402 or 505-220-7254.

to place your ad, call

C-3

MIGUEL MARTINEZ "Girl From Galisteo (1991)" Original oil pastel; Not a lithograph. Beautifully framed. $12,500, Offer. Serious inquires only. Approx. 40"x34". (505) 690-1190.

ARTS CRAFTS SUPPLIES ETCHING PRESS for sale, Whelan Xpress Pro bed size 31" x 63", $3500.00 505 228 9844.

BUILDING MATERIALS

SALES MARKETING NM’S 2ND largest insurer seeks entrepreneurial candidates with a strong desire to be successful and respected business owners in their community. Award winning training from the University of Farmers. Subsidy packages available for building your agency. For more information, please contact 954-1612.

DENTAL ASSISTANT OR STERILIZATION TECH wanted for busy practice. Full time, Monday - Thursday. Experience preferred. Salary DOE. Email resume to: admin@childs2thdr.com

FRONT OFFICE POSITION OPEN at DENTAL PRACTICE. At least one year of experience using Dentrix required. Call Lana, 505-629-8287.

A DVANCEMENT A SSISTANT DATABASE M ANAGER For a complete description of the job and compensation, visit our website: www.stjohnscollege.edu. Click on—“About” “Santa Fe Campus” “Santa Fe Jobs.” This is a full-time, 35 hours per week, contract position. Send resume, letter of intent, salary history and names, addresses and phone numbers of three professional references to jobs@sjcsf.edu. Resume packets will be accepted until interviews begin EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Read the WANT TO RENT column for prospective tenants.

MISCELLANEOUS

STEEL BUILDING Allocated Bargains. 40x60 on up. We do deals! www.gosteelbuildings.com Source# 18X. 505-349-0493

50 SHADES OF GRAY trilogoy. $30. Videos: BRIDESMAIDS, a n d , THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES, $25 each OBO. 505-929-3812

People • Relationships • Community Excellent Employment Opportunity COLLECTOR Responsibilities include: Contacting delinquent accounts to request payment from our past loans by telephone, letter, and/or personal visits. Work closely with Management to determine potential credit risks relating to the loan portfolio. Support the Loan Administration Department in such areas as may be assigned. Preparing Month End Past Due reports, make recommendations for payment extensions, rewriting of loans, and repossessions/foreclosures. Skip trace accounts as needed. Handle repossession of collateral as assigned and required. Handle collection of charge-off deficiency balances. Qualifications: Two years demonstrated experience with customer loan collections preferred. Good verbal and written communication skills. Basic understanding of debits and credits. Century Bank offers a competitive compensation and benefits package. Please apply online at www.centurynetbank.com. We are an EEO/AA employer. Veterans are encouraged to apply. United Way of Santa Fe County (UWSFC) is a wonderful place to work! We offer an exciting opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of families in Santa Fe County. We are currently seeking candidates for the following positions:

CSR - Part Time XRANM has an opening in patient scheduling, reception, 1-5pm, M-F in Santa Fe. HS-GED, prefer medical office, customer service experience. Excellent salary. Send resume to resumes@xraynm.com, fax: 505-9983100. EOE

Have an empty house or apartment you need to rent?

PLYWOOD. CABINET GRADE. 4’x8’ sheets. Never used. Different thicknesses. 505-983-8448

Avaria Apartments seeks Full time Assistant Manager. Computer proficient, sharp dresser, Personable and positive! Enjoy Bonuses and benefits! cover letter and resume: avariamgr@gmail.com

FULL-TIME MAID Needed for Santa Fe Estate To live on property Excellent salary and paid vacations 505-660-6440

SIMMONS BEAUTYREST, CALIFORNIA KING. Box Springs & Frame. Good condition. $150. 505-983-3948

First Born® Program Lead: 32 -40 hours per week* Provides day-to-day oversight of all programmatic and clinical aspects of the UWSFC First Born® Program. Maintains quality delivery through the process of hiring, orienting and supervising First Born® Home Visitation staff, and ensures compliance with program and contractual requirements of funding sources including the New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD) standards. Includes some provision of directcare services to families within home and community settings in Santa Fe County. SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS: • Master’s degree in social work (licensed as LISW) or counseling (licensed as LPCC) strongly preferred. • Bachelor’s degree required. • Minimum five years professional experience in early childhood setting. • Minimum one year staff supervisory experience. • Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred. • Knowledge of infant mental health and child development. • Experience managing multiple staff, setting priorities and meeting deadlines. Postpartum Program Lead: 32 -40 hours per week* Provides day-to-day oversight of all programmatic and clinical aspects of the UWSFC Postpartum Program. Maintains quality delivery through the process of hiring, orienting and supervising home Postpartum Home Visitation staff, and ensures compliance with agency program standards and contractual requirements of funding sources. Includes some provision of direct-care services to families within home and community settings in Santa Fe County. SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS: • Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) strongly preferred. • Certified midwife or doula required. • High School Diploma or GED required. • Minimum five years professional experience working with prenatal and/or new mothers required.

• • • •

Minimum one year staff supervisory experience. Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred. Knowledge of infant mental health and child development. Experience managing multiple staff, setting priorities and meeting deadlines.

First Born® Home Visitor: 32 -40 hours per week* Provides culturally sensitive, in-home and community visitation services to first-time families (prenatal and postpartum) within Santa Fe County. Provides education and support through use of reflective listening and curriculum. Assists families in linking with relevant community resources. Completes developmental and other screens as required. Participates in program activities. Extensive local travel. SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS: • High school diploma or GED required; college or graduate school degree preferred • Experience working with children ages 0-3, pregnant mothers and families representing a wide range of socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, highly preferred • Bilingual (English/Spanish) highly preferred • Ability to maintain accurate records using both paper and electronic files • Excellent interpersonal communication skills required *Go to www.uwsfc.org and click on “Home” then “Opportunity” for a complete list of responsibilities and qualifications. All candidates are required to participate in pre-employment screening, background investigation and verification of education credentials, as well as proof of reliable transportation and a valid driver’s license. Please submit: 1) Cover letter, 2) Resume, and 3) Professional References directly to monak@uwsfc.org Compensation contingent upon experience, education, and certifications: excellent benefit package. Relocation funding is not available. EEO.


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

sfnm«classifieds »animals«

»garage sale«

to place your ad, call

»cars & trucks«

986-3000

DOMESTIC

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! 4X4s

4X4s SPECIAL

FEED EQUIPMENT SERVICES

GARAGE SALE SOUTH

ALFALFA BALES & ALFAFLA ORCHARD GRASS BALES. $9.50 each bale. 100 or more, $9.00 each. Barn stored in Ribera, NM. Call 505-473-5300.

CLASSIC CARS Toy Box Too Full? CAR STORAGE FACILITY

PETS SUPPLIES

2004 PACIFICA. Meticulously maintained, all records, always garaged. AWD, loaded, everything works. 127,000 miles. Clean CarFax. Reliable commuter. $6,900. 505-603-8079

WE’RE SO DOG GONE GOOD! Using

We always Larger get results! Type

2006 FORD-F150 CREW CAB-XLT 4X4

Two Owner, Local, Carfax, Vehicle Brought up To Date With Services, Drive Ready, Most Options, Transport Crew Truck, Affordable $12,450. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com PAUL 505-983-4945

2010 TOYOTA Tacoma Crew Cab SR5 4x4. Another 1 owner Lexus trade! Only 25k miles, NEW tires & NEW battery, clean CarFax $26,891. Call 505-216-3800.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT

will help 986-3000 your ad

Airport Road and 599 505-660-3039 Multi-person Garage Sale Saturday Only 8am-12pm 2195 Lumbre Court. Check out this gorgeous girl!

D a l l a s is a year old spayed German Shepherd cross. She enjoys long walks, chasing balls and play time at the dog park with calm, large dogs. She would love to be part of an active family who will take her for long hikes or perhaps a daily jog. To learn even more about Dallas, call her good friend and sponsor, Katya, at 505-501-0790. GERMAN SHEPHERD, beautiful female 1 year old, imported from Germany. AKC and German registered Champion Pedigree, all generations xrayed. Great guard dog or breeder. 505-660-4505. PURE BRED RED STANDARD POODLE PUPPIES. $500. 4 WEEKS OLD . Bred for excellent temperament. Call or text 575-840-4771 or email: kros78v@yahoo.com for more info.

get noticed

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

DOMESTIC

986-3000

4X4s

2006 BOBCAT S220. Excellent condition! Includes bucket & brand new set of 48" forks. $19,999 OBO. John, 808-346-3635

(Zia & St. Frances) Household & kitchen items, clothing, shoes, gameboards, furniture, appliances and much much more!

Add a pic and sell it quick!

IMPORTS

2011 Subaru Outback

2006 BUICK LACROSSE. Squeaky clean! 100,349 miles, locally owned, new tires. $7,599. This deal wont last long! Schedule a test drive today.

2001 ISUZU VEHICROSS. Unique Specilaty Car. Great condition. Ricarro leather seats. Loaded. Only 60,200 miles. $10,500. 505-670-6662

Sweet one owner Subie. Power seat, windows, locks. 62k miles. CarFax. 3 month, 3,000 mile warranty included, compare prices! $16,995. Call 877-232-2815.

sweetmotorsales.com

2007 Acura MDX AWD

Using

Larger Type

It’s that easy! will help your ad get noticed

2012 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. 3 piece Hardtop, Automatic Transmission. 15,077 miles. Excellent Condition! One Owner! $29,995. 505-474-0888.

986-3000

Sell Your Stuff!

Sweet CarFax certified one owner, 75k miles. Gorgeous Nimbus grey metallic with ebony black leather, accident free, smoke free, all wheel drive. 3 month/3000 mile warranty included!! $19,995. Call 877-2322815.

sweetmotorsales.com

Call and talk to one of our friendly Ad-visors today!

986-3000

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

GARAGE SALE 986-3000 WEST

VALENTINE POMERANIAN PUPPIES, gorgeous, registered, first shots, $500-$900. Ready by Valentine’s Day. Gorgeous rare grey Poodle, female, $450. 505-901-2094, 505-753-0000.

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986-3000

A MAN’S GARAGE SALE! 2791 AGUA FRIA, SATURDAY 8 A.M. - 4 P.M. WOODWORKING TOOLS, MISCELANEOUS WOOD, HARDWARE, MUCH MORE!

GARAGE SALE ELDORADO

2013 CADILLAC ATS 2.0 Turbo, Motor Trends Car of the Year, Loaded with Bose Surround, Sunroof, Heated Leather Seats, Back up camera & many more options. Showroom condition, 7k miles, Thousands Less than new!! $28,500 call 575-770-2236.

YARD SALE, Power & Yard Tools, patio table & chairs, kettle charcoal grill, card table, etc. SUNDAY, 2/2, 8noon. 12 GAVIOTA ROAD

208 DELGADO STREET Office Furniture, Equipment, Desks, Hutches, File Cabinets, Drawers, Sinks, Industrial Sinks, Doors, Shades, Shelves, Lights. Friday, Jan 31st (12:00 Noon - 4:00 PM) *Saturday, Feb 1st (10:00 AM - 4:00 PM) *Sunday, Feb 2nd (10:00 AM - 1:00 PM)

2012 Toyota Tundra Double Cab 4x4, rare TRD Rock Warrior, new BFG A/T tires, good miles, 1 owner clean CarFax, HOT! $30,981. Call 505-216-3800.

2011 CADILLAC CTS COUPE. Gorgeous car! Premium model. One owner, immaculate condition. 14,032 miles. $30,999. Schedule a test drive today.

2004 Volvo XC90 - Another Lexus trade-in! Locally owned, low miles, obviously well maintained, rear DVD & well equipped, clean CarFax $9,871. Call 505-216-3800.

2007 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. 44,325 miles, 6spd Manual, 3 Piece Hardtop, 6 Disc CD, Sirius Radio. Excellent Condition! $23,995. 505-474-0888.

ESTATE SALES DESIGNER’S HOME: 1805 ARROYO CHAMISO

Antiques, English oak table with 4 chairs, art, books, ceramics, toys, furniture, sports equipment. 9-4, FRIDAY 1/31. SATURDAY, 2/1.

Early Street Antiques And More SUPER WEEKEND SALE

Antique Furniture , Jewelry, Rugs, Clothes, Boots, Lamps, Home Accessories and MORE 20% OFF STOREWIDE . This Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 to 5:30. 905 Cerrillos Road. 505-428-0082. We accept all Major Credit Cards.

FORD TEMPO 1994. One owner. Records of maintenance. 129,000 miles. 6 cylinder, 5 speed. AM, FM cassette. Great condition. $2000 OBO. 505-3101812

1995 MITSUBISHI Montero. 2nd owner, great SUV with new computer and fuel pump. 264,000 miles. $2,300 OBO. Please call 505-231-4481.

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flock to the ball.

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Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds IMPORTS

2010 Audi Q7 3.6L quattro - Another pristine Lexus trade-in! Only 39k miles, AWD, well-equipped with panoramic roof, new tires, clean CarFax, significantly undervalued at $33,212. Call 505-2163800.

IMPORTS

2004 BMW X3 AWD

Sweet Beemer at an affordable price!! 91k miles. Luxury all wheel drive, leather, power seats with memory, moonroof, CD and more. No accidents, clean CarFax. Price includes 3 month, 3000 mile warranty. $11,950. Call 877-232-2815.

sweetmotorsales.com

to place your ad, call IMPORTS

2008 Land Rover LR3

Top of the line HSE V8. Excellent black exterior, luxurious wood and tan leather, 7 passenger seating, 96k miles, service history, Carfax, Free Warranty. $21,995. Call 877-232-2815.

sweetmotorsales.com

986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! IMPORTS

PICKUP TRUCKS

2010 Toyota Venza - Rare V6 AWD and fully loaded with leather and panoramic roof, low miles, clean CarFax $23,871. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 GMC SIERRA 1500 4WD Crew Cab. Great work truck! Power everything! 121,758 miles $20,999. Schedule a test drive today.

IMPORTS

2006 MINI COOPER-S CONVERTIBLE MANUAL

Another One Owner, Carfax, 51,051 Miles. Garaged, Non-smoker, Manuals, X-Keys, Service Records. Drive All Season, Pristine, Soooo Beautiful $14,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

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VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2009 Toyota Corolla LE. Only 53k miles! Another 1 owner clean CarFax trade-in! Super nice, fully serviced $11,942. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 AUDI-A5 QUATTRO CABRIOLET PREMIUM PLUS

Another One Owner, Local, Carfax, 29,537 Miles, Automatic, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Every Service Record, X-keys, Manuals, Extended Warranty, Every Option, Pristine, Sooo Intoxicating Beautiful. $31,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2010 HONDA Civic Hybrid - Another pristine Lexus trade-in! Just 39k miles, leather, 45+ mpg, clean CarFax $15,741. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 Land Rover Range Rover HSE. Another Lexus trade-in! low miles, clean CarFax, must see to appreciate, absolutely gorgeous $31,921. Call 505-216-3800.

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2009 HONDA CR-V AUTOMATIC

2005.5 AUDI A4 3.2 QUATRO. 63k miles. One owner. Always garaged. No accidents. Leather seats, navigation, cold-weather package, sports package, Bose stereo, Xenon headlights. $13,250. 505-577-5342

Local Owner, Carfax, 76,569 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, manuals, XKeys, Service Records, All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Pristine, Soooo Perfect $15,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2011 Lexus CT200h - Recent Lexus trade! Factory Certified with 100k mile warranty, hybrid 42+ mpg, 1 owner clean CarFax, forget Prius for $23,841. Call 505-216-3800.

Using

Larger Type

2003 PORSCHE Cayenne S - WOW! merely 51k miles, recent local trade, AWD, loaded, perfectly maintained, clean CarFax $16,841. Call 505-216-3800.

It’s that easy! 2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDERSPORT AWD. Another One Owner, Carfax, 84,000 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Service Records, New Tires, Manuals, Third Row Seat,Moon-Roof, Loaded. Soooo Beautiful, Pristine, $20,750. W E PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

BMW 320I x Drive Sedan 2014 $36,000. 6,700 miles. All Wheel Drive. Heated, power front seats, Hands-free Bluetooth, USB and more! Transferable 4 year, 50,000 mile warranty. 505920-6634

2004 LEXUS RX-330 AWD

986-3000 Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000 SUVs

2007 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ - Recent trade-in, loaded, leather, buckets, moonroof, DVD, new tires & brakes, super clean! $17,851. Call 505-216-3800.

GET NOTICED!

Another One Owner, Carfax, 80,014 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Service Records, New Tires, Chrome Wheels, Moon-Roof, Loaded. Pristine. Soooo Beautiful, $16,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

will help your ad get noticed

2013 SUBARU Impreza Limited Sport - REALLY, why would you buy new? Just 5k miles, heated leather, original MSRP $25k, clean CarFax. $21,871. Call 505-216-3800.

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

1998 HONDA CRV, manual transmission. 212,000 miles, runs good, all service records. New brakes, tires, and radiator. Please call 505-9834863.

Add a pic and sell it quick!

BOLD YOUR TEXT to make your ad stand out Call our helpfull Ad-Visors for details

CALL 986-3000

2006 TOYOTA AVALON FWD LIMITED

Local Owner, Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, X-Keys, Manuals, Every Service Record, Moonroof, Navigation, Loaded, Affordable Luxury, Pristine, Sooo Manageable, $11,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2010 FORD EXPLORER 4WD Eddie Bauer Edition. Only 44,944 miles! Clean, third row seating. $23,999. Schedule a test drive today.

2012 TOYOTA PRIUS-C HYBRID FWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, Records, Garaged, Non-Smoker, XKeys, 14,710 Miles, City 53, Highway 46, Navigation, Remaining Factory Warranty. $18,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICE!

2012 Infiniti M37x AWD - Just traded! Gorgeous and loaded, good miles, navigation & technology packages, local one owner, clean CarFax $34,281. Call 505-216-3800. 2010 BMW 335Xi - Another Lexus trade! Low miles, AWD, completely loaded with Navigation, still under warranty! clean CarFax $27,932 Call 505-216-3800.

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

Mercedes-Benz C230 Sport

2011 Land Rover LR2. Climate Comfort Package, Bluetooth, and Sirius Radio. 37,626 miles. New Brake Pads, and New Wipers. One Owner! $26,995. 505-474-0888.

2011 Volkswagen Tiguan S 4Motion - Just 27k miles! AWD, new tires, 1 owner clean CarFax, turbocharged, truly immaculate! $19,971. Call 505-216-3800.

Absolutely cherry, 87k miles. Loaded, heated seats, moonroof, 6 CD changer, spotless inside and out. Clean title, no accidents, includes 3 month, 3,000 mile warranty. Sweet price only $11,900. Call 877232-2815.

2004 PONTIAC AZTEK. A perfect mix of sport utility and a sedan. 67,298 miles. Unique look. Big attention getter! $8,995. Call 505982-1957.

sweetmotorsales.com

2010 BMW 535Xi AWD. Recent trade-in, factory CERTIFIED with warranty & maintenance until 3/2016, fully loaded, clean CarFax $24,432. Call 505-216-3800. 2011 Toyota RAV4 - Just 27k miles! 4 cyl, 4WD, recently serviced with new tires AND brakes, 1 owner clean CarFax, pristine! $18,821. Call 505-216-3800.

VANS & BUSES 2009 Volkswagen Tiguan SEL AWD Turbo. Navigation, panoramic roof, NICE, clean CarFax. $15,932. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 Land Rover LR2 HSE SUV. 21,627 miles, Climate Comfort Package, Bluetooth, Sirius Radio. One Owner! The BEST 4X4 BY FAR! $25,995. 505-474-0888.

2009 TOYOTA COROLLA. New front brakes, tires, and battery. Local trade. 96,868 miles. $11,999. Schedule a test drive today.

rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

2012 Toyota RAV4, V6 engine, 28k miles, sunroof, extra wheels & snow tires. $21,900. Call 505-6998339.

and independent

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

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mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

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out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

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Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded originated Others Page A-9 bin said. CITATIONS, Please see

The New

2010 Toyota Prius II - Merely 20k miles! 1 owner clean CarFax, excellent condition and 50+ mpg $17,493. Call 505-216-3800.

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

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Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

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Pasapick Art lecture

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

PICKUP TRUCKS

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow Constable With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating Matlock less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been Mexican Ellen Cavatoday, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put and his housemate, their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitin front of John Hubbard Near on Monday. plumbers huddled by noon stay warm. plea to to licensed naugh, were trying to on meters. out a message morning away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

By Staci The New

at tax agenc

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

y

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid A-12

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Index Managing

Calendar editor: Rob

A-2

Classifieds

Dean, 986-3033,

B-9

Comics B-14

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Opinion

Cynthia Miller,

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C-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January 31, 2014

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SANTA FE STATE OF NEW MEXICO

LEGALS

LEGALS

Post Office Box 2268 / 225 Montezuma Ave., Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504 / 87501 Dated: January 10, 2013 /s/ Karl H. Sommer Karl H. Sommer Sommer Karnes & Associates, LLC Attorneys for the Estate of Marcia Hurtado King Please forward Claims to the Attorneys for the Estate:

Board of Education for the Pecos Independent School District will take Place on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 5:30 pm in the Pecos Schools Board Room. An Executive Session may take place during the agenda to discuss limited personnel matters and/or pending litigation as per NM Statutes Article 15 Open Meetings 10-15-1 Subparagraph H (2 & 8). (If action is necessary, agendas will be available prior to the work session.) FRED TRUJILLO, PERINTENDENT

SU-

THE PECOS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, NATIONAL ORIGIN, RELIGION, AGE, SEX, MARITAL STATUS, HOMELESSNESS OR DISABILITY IN COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS.

Legal#96388 Sommer Karnes & As- Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican sociates, LLP on: January 31 and P.O. Box 2476 Santa Fe, NM 87504- February 3, 2014 2476 505-989-3800 NOTICE OF MEETING Legal#96260 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican January 24, 31, 2014 NEW MEXICO HIGHLANDS UNIVERSITY REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL #962

LEGAL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) will hold a Special Board Meeting on Wednesday, February 4, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Santa Fe Community College, President’s Conference Room #108, 6401 Richards Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87508.

New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU) will accept proposals for the GOLF COURSE RESTAURANT Request for Board meetings are Proposal number 962 open to the public. If you are an individual (RFP). with a disability who This RFP is for the is in need of any form lease of the 5th Quar- of auxiliary aid, servter Grill located at ice or special assisNMHU’s golf course. tance to attend or in the Included in the lease participate are the restaurant meeting, please cone q u i p m e n t , tact the President’s smallwares and other Office at 428-1148 at restaurant supplies. least 24 hours before meeting. An Additional informa- the tion is included in the agenda will be available from the PresiRFP. dent’s Office 72 hours A mandatory site vis- prior to the meeting. it will be held on Thursday, February 6, Legal#96382 2014. The site visit Published in the Sanwill begin at 1:00 pm ta Fe New Mexican and will be held at on: January 31, 2014 the restaurant located at 200 Mills Ave- Santa Fe Civic nue, Las Vegas, NM. Housing (SFCHA) At that time prospec- will convene a pubtive proposers will be lic hearing to disgiven a tour of the fa- cuss the Annual cilities. Prospective Plan on March 19, proposers will be al- 2014. The SFCHA Plan lowed to ask ques- is a comprehensive tions of the NMHU guide to public housstaff. ing agency policies, programs, operations All proposals must be and strategies for in NMHU’s Purchas- meeting local housing Department prior ing needs and goals. to 3:00 pm local time It is through the Five on Thursday, Febru- Year and Annual Plan ary 20, 2014. Propos- that the SFCHA reals received after ceives capital fundthat time will not be ing and the SFCHA, in accepted. Proposals addition to Santa Fe, will not be opened manages housing in publicly. Espanola and Bernalillo. The Annual All proposals shall plan is available for comply with the New review on weekdays Mexico Procurement from 8:30 to 4:30 and Code, and applicable is available at three federal, State and lo- locations, 664 Alta cal laws. NMHU re- Vista Street in Santa serves the right to ac- Fe, 136 Calle De cept, reject, and issue Pajarito in Espanola awards in part or in and 857 Calle Los full if it is in its best Mayores in Bernalillo. interest. The Public Hearing will be conducted at RFP documents can the SFCHA Adminisbe obtained by con- tration Building in tacting Michael Santa Fe, 664 Alta VisSaavedra at ta Street. The Public mjsaavedra@nmhu.e Hearing will be held du or 505-454-3053; or during the meeting of Mario Romero at

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LEGALS

g g the Board of Commissioners which starts at 6:00 PM. You may contact Rudy Gallegos, Deputy Director for additional information, includthe San- ing accessibility for Mexican persons with disabili505-988-2859 30, 31, ties, X128.

mrromero@nmhu.ed u or 505-454-3195 or Jennifer Madrid at jrmadrid@nmhu.edu or 505-454-3249.

Legal#96392 Published in No. D-101-PB-2012ta Fe New 00088 January 29, IN THE MATTER OF 2014 THE ESTATE OF MARCIA HURTADO NOTICE KING, Deceased NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Work NOTICE TO CREDSession of the ITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Charles William King has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned counsel for the personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the First Judicial District Court of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, located at the following address:

to place legals, call

Continued...

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 408-1 through Sec. 40-83 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Damian Knight Yeider will apply to the Honorable Sarah M. Singleton, District Judge of the First Judicial District Legal #96332 at the Santa Fe JudiPublished in The San- cial Complex in Santa ta Fe New Mexican on Fe, New Mexico, at January 30 and 31, 1:00 p.m. on the 20th 2014. day of February, 2014 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME STATE OF NEW from Damian Knight MEXICO to Damian COUNTY OF SANTA FE Yeider Knight. FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Stephen T. Pacheco, Case No. D-101-CV- District Court Clerk. /s/ Jill Nihk Deputy 2013-02827 Court Clerk. SUNTRUST MORTLegal# 96397 GAGE, INC., Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican Plaintiff, January 31, February v. 7, 2014 FLOYD LUJAN, IF LIVING, IF DECEASED, STATE OF NEW THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, MEXICO DEVISEES OR COUNTY OF SANTA FE LEGATEES OF FLOYD FIRST JUDICIAL LUJAN, DECEASED DISTRICT AND THE UNKNOWN SURVIVING SPOUSE No. D-101-CV-2009OF FLOYD LUJAN, IF 02923 ANY, METLIFE HOME Defendant(s). LOANS, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, N.A., NOTICE OF SUIT Plaintiff, STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named v. Defendants Floyd Lujan, if living, if de- SCOTT RAMSEY, ceased, The Unknown KENDRA RAMSEY AND Heirs, Devisees or BANK OF AMERICA, Legatees of Floyd NA, Lujan, deceased. Defendant(s). GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the abovenamed Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 996 Camino Consuelo, Santa Fe, NM 87507, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: Lot Numbered Eight (8), excepting the Northerly Two (2) feet in Block Numbered Twenty (20) of Dale J. Bellamah’s La Resolana Addition, Unit 6, an Addition to the City of Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, as the same is shown and designated on replat thereof filed in the Office of the County Clerk, of Santa Fe County, New Mexico on August 24, 1962, in Plat Book 9, Page 77, as Document No. 258,848. Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC By: /s/ __Steven J. Lucero__ Electronically Filed Steven J. Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 8489500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff NM13-02985_FC01 Legal #96335 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on January 24, 31 and February 7, 2014. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF DAMIAN KNIGHT YEIDER CASE NO. D-101-CO2014-00137

NOTICE OF OF NAME

CHANGE

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PUBLIC NOTICE: REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS AVAILABLE TO PERFORM ANNUAL FINANCIAL AUDIT. The State of New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department (TRD) is requesting proposals for qualified firms of certified public accountants to perform the annual financial and compliance audit of TRD for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2014. These audits are to be performed in accordance with Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS), the standards set forth for financial audits in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s (GAO) Government Auditing Standards, the provisions of the Federal Single Audit Act, Amendments of 1996 and applicable Federal OMB Circulars, Audits of State and Local Governments. Audits must comply with the New Mexico State Auditor’s Rule 2.2.2 NMAC, Regulations Governing the Audits of Agencies of the State of New Mexico. Copies of the Request for Proposals will be available on February 3, 2014 and can be obtained on the TRD website: http://www.tax.newmexico.gov/AboutUs/Administrative-Services-Division/Pages/Financial-Services-Bureau.aspx. TRD will conduct a proposal conference on February 14, 2014 in Room 3040 at address indicated below. TRD contact information is as follows: TRD REPRESENTATIVE: David Robbins, ASD Director. TELEPHONE: (505)8270369. E-MAIL: david.robbins@state.nm.us. LOCATION AND MAILING ADDRESS: New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department, PO DRAWER 630, 1100 S. St. Francis Dr., Santa Fe, NM 87504-0630. Legal #96345 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on January 31, February 1, 2 and 3, 2014.

NOTICE OF SALE

986-3000

LEGALS

LEGALS

sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any The address of the re- damages. al property is 40 Prairie Wind Trail, NOTICE IS FURTHER Edgewood, NM 87015. GIVEN that the real and imPlaintiff does not rep- property conresent or warrant provements that the stated street cerned with herein address is the street will be sold subject to address of the descri- any and all patent easebed property; if the reservations, street address does ments, all recorded not match the legal and unrecorded liens description, then the not foreclosed herein, property being sold and all recorded and special herein is the property unrecorded more particularly de- assessments and taxscribed above, not es that may be due. the property located Plaintiff and its attorat the street address; neys disclaim all reany prospective pur- sponsibility for, and chaser at the sale is the purchaser at the given notice that it sale takes the propshould verify the lo- erty subject to, the cation and address of valuation of the propthe property being erty by the County sold. Said sale will be Assessor as real or made pursuant to the personal property, afjudgment entered on fixture of any mobile manufactured February 22, 2013 in or the above entitled home to the land, deand numbered cause, activation of title to a which was a suit to mobile or manufacforeclose a mortgage tured home on the held by the above property, if any, envicontamiPlaintiff and wherein ronmental Plaintiff was nation on the properadjudged to have a ty, if any, and zoning lien against the violations concerning above-described real the property, if any. estate in the sum of NOTICE IS FURTHER $352,451.47 plus inter- GIVEN that the purest from February 23, chaser at such sale 2012 to the date of shall take title to the sale at the rate of above-described real 6.875% per annum, property subject to the costs of sale, in- rights of redemption. cluding the Special Master’s fee, publica- Jeffrey Lake tion costs, and Plain- Special Master Support tiff’s costs expended Southwest for taxes, insurance, Group and keeping the 5011 Indian School property in good re- Road NE NM pair. Plaintiff has the Albuquerque, right to bid at such 87110 sale and submit its 505-767-9444 bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff NM00-00774_FC01 may apply all or any part of its judgment Legal #96490 to the purchase price Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on in lieu of cash. Jnuary 31, February 7, At the date and time 14 and 21, 2014. stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. N.M.P.M...", filed in the office of then County Clerk, Santa Fe County, New Mexico on October 28, 2004 in Plat Book 572, at page 028, Instrument No. 1252443.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on February 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and NOTICE IS FURTHER State: GIVEN that this sale Tract 4-C-2-A, as may be subject to a shown on plat enti- bankruptcy filing, a tled "Minor Subdivi- pay off, a reinstatesion of Lands of Ad- ment or any other vantage Builder, Inc., condition that would a New Mexico corpo- cause the cancellaration, being Tract 4- tion of this sale. FurC-2 of Lands of Davis ther, if any of these located in Section 26, conditions exist, at T. 10 N., R. 7 E., the time of sale, this

Continued...

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toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

To Place a Legal ad 986-3000

Continued...

NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BIDS CALLED FOR – February 7, 2014 SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO Notice is hereby given that SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED UNTIL 11:00 A.M. (National Institute of Stand-ards and Technology (NIST), atomic clock) on February 7, 2014, AT THE NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION’S GENERAL OFFICE TRAINING ROOMS, 1120 CERRILLOS ROAD, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO, 87505 at which time bids will be publicly opened and read. An Invitation For Bids together with the plans and contract documents may be requested and/or examined through the P. S. & E. Bureau of the New Mexico Department of Transportation, 1120 Cerrillos Road, Room 223, PO Box 1149, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504 1149, 505.827.6800. The plans and contract documents may also be examined at the District Offices: District 1, 2912 East Pine Deming, NM Trent Doolittle 575.544.6620

District 4, South Highway 85 Las Vegas, NM David Trujillo 505.454.3695

District 2, 4505 West 2nd Street Roswell, NM Ralph Meeks - 575.637.7200

District 5, 7315 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM Miguel Gabaldon 505.476.4201

District 3, 7500 East Frontage Road Albuquerque, NM Timothy Parker 505.841.2739

District 6, 1919 Piñon Street Milan, NM Larry G. Maynard 505.285.3200

The following may be obtained from the P. S. & E. Bureau, New Mexico Department of Transportation, Room 223, 1120 Cerrillos Road, PO Box 1149, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1149, telephone 505.827.5500, FAX 505.827.5290: • Contract books, that include bidding documents, technical specifications and bid forms, with a deposit of $15.00 per Contract Book. • Complete sets of reduced plans with a deposit of $0.30 per sheet. Contractors having established an account with the P. S. & E. Bureau prior to the publishing of the Invitation For Bids may charge the deposits to their accounts. Other contractors may obtain the bidding documents by paying in advance the required deposit to the P. S. & E. Bureau. Such deposits shall only be made by check or money order payable to the New Mexico Department of Transportation. Deposits may be credited to the contractor’s account or refunded by the Department, as appropriate, provided the contract bidding docu-ments are returned prior to bid opening in usable condition by the contractor who obtained them. Usable condition shall mean that the contract book and plans have been returned to the P. S. & E. Bureau in complete sets, have not been marked, defaced, or disassembled, and no pages have been removed. As an option, the Department has implemented the Bid Express website (www.bidx.com) as an official deposi-tory for electronic bid submittal. Electronic bids submitted through Bid Express do not have to be accompa-nied by paper bids. In the case of disruption of national communications or loss of services by www.bidx.com the morning of the bid opening, the Department will delay the deadline for bid submissions to ensure the abil-ity of potential bidders to submit bids. Instructions will be communicated to potential bidders. For information on Digital ID, and electronic withdrawal of bids, see Bid Express website (www.bidx.com). Electronic bid bonds integrated by Surety 2000 and Insure Vision will be the only electronic bid bonds ac-cepted for NMDOT highway construction projects. Plans and Contract Books in electronic format are also available in Bid Express. (1) A300013 CN A300013 TERMINI: NM 45, MP 11.600 to MP 12.700 for 0.963 miles COUNTY: Bernalillo (District 3) TYPE OF WORK: Roadway Rehabilitation CONTRACT TIME: Physical Completion date of May 21, 2014 LICENSES: (GA-1 or GA-98)

You can view your legal ad online at sfnmclassifieds.com NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BIDS CALLED FOR – February 21, 2014 SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO Notice is hereby given that SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED UNTIL 11:00 A.M. (National Institute of Stand-ards and Technology (NIST), atomic clock) on February 21, 2014, AT THE NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION’S GENERAL OFFICE TRAINING ROOMS, 1120 CERRILLOS ROAD, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO, 87505 at which time bids will be publicly opened and read. An Invitation For Bids together with the plans and contract documents may be requested and/or examined through the P. S. & E. Bureau of the New Mexico Department of Transportation, 1120 Cerrillos Road, Room 223, PO Box 1149, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504 1149, 505.827.6800. The plans and contract documents may also be examined at the District Offices: District 1, 2912 East Pine Deming, NM Trent Doolittle 575.544.6620

District 4, South Highway 85 Las Vegas, NM David Trujillo 505.454.3695

District 2, 4505 West 2nd Street Roswell, NM Ralph Meeks - 575.637.7200

District 5, 7315 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM Miguel Gabaldon 505.476.4201

District 3, 7500 East Frontage Road Albuquerque, NM Timothy Parker 505.841.2739

District 6, 1919 Piñon Street Milan, NM Larry G. Maynard 505.285.3200

The following may be obtained from the P. S. & E. Bureau, New Mexico Department of Transportation, Room 223, 1120 Cerrillos Road, PO Box 1149, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1149, telephone 505.827.5500, FAX 505.827.5290: • Contract books, that include bidding documents, technical specifications and bid forms, with a deposit of $15.00 per Contract Book. • Complete sets of reduced plans with a deposit of $0.30 per sheet. Contractors having established an account with the P. S. & E. Bureau prior to the publishing of the Invitation For Bids may charge the deposits to their accounts. Other contractors may obtain the bidding documents by paying in advance the required deposit to the P. S. & E. Bureau. Such deposits shall only be made by check or money order payable to the New Mexico Department of Transportation. Deposits may be credited to the contractor’s account or refunded by the Department, as appropriate, provided the contract bidding docu-ments are returned prior to bid opening in usable condition by the contractor who obtained them. Usable condition shall mean that the contract book and plans have been returned to the P. S. & E. Bureau in complete sets, have not been marked, defaced, or disassembled, and no pages have been removed. As an option, the Department has implemented the Bid Express website (www.bidx.com) as an official deposi-tory for electronic bid submittal. Electronic bids submitted through Bid Express do not have to be accompa-nied by paper bids. In the case of disruption of national communications or loss of services by www.bidx.com the morning of the bid opening, the Department will delay the deadline for bid submissions to ensure the abil-ity of potential bidders to submit bids. Instructions will be communicated to potential bidders. For information on Digital ID, and electronic withdrawal of bids, see Bid Express website (www.bidx.com). Electronic bid bonds integrated by Surety 2000 and Insure Vision will be the only electronic bid bonds ac-cepted for NMDOT highway construction projects. Plans and Contract Books in electronic format are also available in Bid Express. (1) 4100530 CN 4100530 TERMINI: COUNTY: TYPE OF WORK: CONTRACT TIME: DBE GOAL:

I-40, MP 353.870 to MP 362.000 for 3.593 miles Quay (District 4) Roadway Rehabilitation, Roadway Reconstruction 60 working days At this time NMDOT will meet the State DBE on Federally assisted projects through a combination of raceneutral and race-conscious measures. This project is subject to race-conscious measures. The established DBE goal for this project is 0.00%. LICENSES: (GA-1 or GA-98) (2) A300303 CN A300303

TERMINI: I-40/98th Street Interchange and I-40/Unser Boulevard Interchange for 0.704 miles COUNTY: Bernalillo (District 3) TYPE OF WORK: Ramp Reconstruction, Lighting CONTRACT TIME: 90 calendar days DBE GOAL: At this time NMDOT will meet the State DBE on Federally assisted projects through a combination of raceneutral and race-conscious measures. This project is subject to race-conscious measures. The established DBE goal for this project is 2.50%. LICENSES: (GA-1 or GA-98) and (EE-98) (3) 2101191 CN 2101191 TERMINI: COUNTY: TYPE OF WORK: CONTRACT TIME: DBE GOAL:

US 82, MP 175.225 to MP 191.450 for 16.222 miles Lea (District 2) Roadway Rehabilitation 320 calendar days At this time NMDOT will meet the State DBE on Federally assisted projects through a combination of raceneutral and race-conscious measures. This project is subject to race-conscious measures. The established DBE goal for this project is 3.00%. LICENSES: (GA-1 or GA-98) (4) A300940 CN A300940

TERMINI: NM 500 (Rio Bravo Boulevard)/Isleta Boulevard Intersection for 0.511 miles COUNTY: Bernalillo (District 3) TYPE OF WORK: Roadway Reconstruction, Roadway Rehabilitation, Lighting, Signalization CONTRACT TIME: 180 calendar days DBE GOAL: At this time NMDOT will meet the State DBE on Federally assisted projects through a combination of raceneutral and race-conscious measures. This project is subject to race-conscious measures. The established DBE goal for this project is 3.00%. LICENSES: (GA-1 or GA-98) and (EE-98) (5) 2101210 CN 2101210 TERMINI: NM 245/North Thornton Street Intersection for 0.520 miles COUNTY: Curry (District 2) TYPE OF WORK: Signalization, Roadway Reconstruction, Lighting, CONTRACT TIME: 90 calendar days DBE GOAL: At this time NMDOT will meet the State DBE on Federally assisted projects through a combination of raceneutral and race-conscious measures. This project is subject to race-conscious measures. The established DBE goal for this project is 0.00%. LICENSES: (EE-98) and (GA-1 or GA-98)

Tom Church, Cabinet Secretary Designate New Mexico Department of Transportation Santa Fe, New Mexico

Tom Church, Cabinet Secretary Designate New Mexico Department of Transportation Santa Fe, New Mexico

Legal#96256 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican January 24, 31, 2014

Legal# 96257 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican January 24, 31, 2014


Friday, January 31, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS NOTICE OF INTENT TO PARTICIPATE AUTO PARTS - LIGHT DUTY GSD State Purchasing Division GENERAL INFORMATION: The State of New Mexico intends to participate in a NASPO/WSCA Contract w28-2008 for Auto Supplies - Light Duty. The three current awarded vendors are: AutoZone 5-09-99-28 NAPA 5-09-99-29 O’Reilly 5-09-99-31 If there are any objections to this intent please contact the person listed below via email.

LEGALS

LEGALS

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT

GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages.

No. 00534

D-101-CV-2011-

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006M1, Plaintiff, v. MICHAEL C. TRUJILLO, NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS WORKFORCE TRANSITION SERVICES DIVISION AND THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION & REVENUE,

DISCLAIMER: All information provided on this page, including dates, is believed to be accurate. However, in the case of any differences between the information presented here Defendant(s). and the information presented in the NOTICE OF SALE Award, the information give in the Award NOTICE IS HEREBY shall prevail. GIVEN that the undersigned Special MasCONTACT PERSON: Name: Brenda S. ter will on February 26, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Chacon Address: NM State at the front entrance of the First Judicial Purchasing Division 1100 S. St. Francis District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Drive - Rm.2016 Fe, New Mexico, sell P.O. Box 6850 and convey to the Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone: (505) 827- highest bidder for cash all the right, ti0488 tle, and interest of E m a i l : BrendaS.Chacon@sta the above-named defendants in and to te.nm.us the following descriOBJECTIONS ARE DUE: bed real estate locatAll objections are ed in said County and due, no later than State: 12:00 p.m. Mountain Standard or Daylight Lot 6, Block 3 of Time (whichever ap- Candelero de Santa plies) Tuesday, Febru- Fe, Unit 1, as shown ary 11, 2014 in email on plat filed in the ofto the contact per- fice of the County son. Objections re- Clerk, Santa Fe Counceived after this ty, New Mexico, on deadline will not be July 28, 1977, in Plat Book 55, Page 023, as accepted. Document No. 406,036. NOTICE OF INTENT TO PARTICIPATE The address of the Travel - Nationwide real property is 2188 Candelero Street, Vehicle Rental Santa Fe, NM 87505. GSD State Purchasing Plaintiff does not represent or warrant Division that the stated street GENERAL INFORMA- address is the street TION: The State of address of the descriNew Mexico intends bed property; if the to participate in a street address does NASPO/WSCA Con- not match the legal tract w27-2009 for description, then the Travel - Vehicle Rent- property being sold al. The two current herein is the property awarded vendors are: more particularly described above, not Enterprise/National the property located Hertz at the street address; If there are any objec- any prospective purtions to this intent chaser at the sale is please contact the given notice that it person listed below should verify the location and address of via email. the property being DISCLAIMER: All in- sold. Said sale will be formation provided made pursuant to the on this page, includ- judgment entered on ing dates, is believed December 9, 2013 in to be accurate. How- the above entitled ever, in the case of and numbered cause, any differences be- which was a suit to tween the informa- foreclose a mortgage tion presented here held by the above and the information Plaintiff and wherein was presented in the Plaintiff Award, the informa- adjudged to have a against the tion give in the Award lien above-described real shall prevail. estate in the sum of $434,225.87 plus interCONTACT PERSON: est from September Name: Brenda S. 3, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of Chacon Address: NM State 10.650% per annum, the costs of sale, inPurchasing Division 1100 S. St. Francis cluding the Special Drive - Rm.2016P.O. Master’s fee, publication costs, and PlainBox 6850 tiff’s costs expended Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone: (505) 827- for taxes, insurance, and keeping the 0488 property in good reE m a i l : BrendaS.Chacon@sta pair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such te.nm.us sale and submit its OBJECTIONS ARE DUE: bid verbally or in All objections are writing. The Plaintiff due, no later than may apply all or any 12:00 p.m. Mountain part of its judgment Standard or Daylight to the purchase price Time (whichever ap- in lieu of cash. plies) Tuesday, February 11, 2014 in email At the date and time above, the to the contact per- stated son. Objections re- Special Master may postpone the sale to ceived after this deadline will not be such later date and time as the Special accepted. Master may specify. Legal#96401 Published in the San- NOTICE IS FURTHER ta Fe New Mexican January 31, 2014

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NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

to place legals, call LEGALS

The address of the real property is 2129 Calle de Sebastian, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on December 9, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $285,750.47 plus interest from August 19, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 5011 Indian School Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87110 At the date and time 505-767-9444 stated above, the Special Master may NM12-02055_FL01 postpone the sale to such later date and Legal #96493 Published in The San- time as the Special ta Fe New Mexican on Master may specify. Jnuary 31, February 7, NOTICE IS FURTHER 14 and 21, 2014. GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a STATE OF NEW bankruptcy filing, a MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE pay off, a reinstatement or any other FIRST JUDICIAL condition that would DISTRICT cause the cancellaNo. D-101-CV-2011- tion of this sale. Further, if any of these 03522 conditions exist, at PNC BANK, NATIONAL the time of sale, this ASSOCIATION SUC- sale will be null and CESSOR BY MERGER void, the successful WITH NATIONAL CITY bidder’s funds shall REAL ESTATE SERV- be returned, and the ICES LLC, SUCCESSOR Special Master and BY MERGER TO NA- the mortgagee giving TIONAL CITY MORT- this notice shall not GAGE, INC. FUTHER be liable to the sucKNOWN AS NATIONAL cessful bidder for any damages. CITY MORTGAGE CO, Plaintiff, v. ANGELA POOLE, BRENT POOLE, DEVARGAS HEIGHTS TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION AND WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL BANK, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on February 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State:

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Lot 15, Block 2, of DeVARGAS HEIGHTS UNIT 2, Santa Fe, New Mexico, as shown and delineated on the plat thereof filed January 14, 1974, and recorded in Plat Book 33, Page 14, in the records of Santa Fe County, New Mexico.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

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986-3000

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NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 5011 Indian School Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87110 505-767-9444 NM11-02169_FC01 Legal #96491 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on Jnuary 31, February 7, 14 and 21, 2014. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. 01718

D-101-CV-2012-

property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on November 21, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $123,535.50 plus interest from October 16, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 10.500% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NEW MEXICO, At the date and time INC., stated above, the Special Master may Plaintiff, postpone the sale to such later date and v. time as the Special ROBERTA D. DALTON Master may specify. FKA ROBERTA D. ANAYA AND THE UN- NOTICE IS FURTHER KNOWN SPOUSE OF GIVEN that this sale ROBERTA D. DALTON may be subject to a FKA ROBERTA D. bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstateANAYA, IF ANY, ment or any other condition that would Defendant(s). cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these NOTICE OF SALE conditions exist, at NOTICE IS HEREBY the time of sale, this GIVEN that the under- sale will be null and signed Special Mas- void, the successful ter will on February bidder’s funds shall 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, be returned, and the at the front entrance Special Master and of the First Judicial the mortgagee giving District Court, 225 this notice shall not Montezuma, Santa be liable to the sucFe, New Mexico, sell cessful bidder for any and convey to the damages. highest bidder for cash all the right, ti- NOTICE IS FURTHER tle, and interest of GIVEN that the real and imthe above-named de- property confendants in and to provements the following descri- cerned with herein bed real estate locat- will be sold subject to ed in said County and any and all patent reservations, easeState: ments, all recorded and unrecorded liens A Tract of land situate in the Southwest not foreclosed herein, 1/4 of the Southeast and all recorded and special 1/4 of Section 35, unrecorded Township 14 North, assessments and taxRange 9 East, es that may be due. N.M.P.M., Village of Plaintiff and its attorGalisteo, Santa Fe neys disclaim all reCounty, New Mexico sponsibility for, and and being more par- the purchaser at the ticularly described as sale takes the property subject to, the follows: valuation of the propBeginning at the erty by the County Southeasterly corner Assessor as real or of the tract herein de- personal property, afscribed from whence fixture of any mobile manufactured the Northeast corner or of the Galisteo Grant home to the land, debears S 72° 32’E, activation of title to a 588.20 feet; thence mobile or manufacfrom said point and tured home on the place of beginning property, if any, envicontamialong the following ronmental bearings and distan- nation on the property, if any, and zoning ces: N 79° 09" W, 133.20 violations concerning the property, if any. feet; N 43° 48’E, 49.00 feet; S 76° 02’E, 114.75 feet; NOTICE IS FURTHER S 23° 54’ W, 45.85 feet; GIVEN that the purTo the point and chaser at such sale place of beginning. shall take title to the Being Tract 2 as above-described real shown on plat enti- property subject to tled "Plat of Survey rights of redemption. for Juanita Stallard", by George Rivera, Jeffrey Lake dated January 2, 1970, Special Master Southwest Support Survey No. A2-242. Group 5011 Indian School The address of the re- Road NE NM al property is 10 Via Albuquerque, St, Galisteo, NM 87110 87540. Plaintiff does 505-767-9444 not represent or warrant that the stated NM12-01269_FC01 street address is the street address of the Legal #96492 described property; if Published in The Santhe street address ta Fe New Mexican on does not match the Jnuary 31, February 7, legal description, 14 and 21, 2014. then the property being sold herein is the STATE OF NEW property more partic- MEXICO ularly described COUNTY OF SANTA FE above, not the prop- FIRST JUDICIAL erty located at the DISTRICT street address; any prospective purchas- No. D-101-CV-2012er at the sale is given 02320 notice that it should verify the location GMAC MORTGAGE, and address of the LLC,

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toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com LEGALS

Plaintiff, v. DARLENE E. HAFFNER AND DONALD W. HAFFNER, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on February 26, 2014 at 11:30 AM, at the front entrance of the First Judicial District Court, 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, New Mexico, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Lot 4, as shown and delineated on plat of survey entitled "Final Subdivision Plat Jaguar Village Lying within Section 7; T16N, R9E., N.M.P.M., Santa Fe County, New Mexico," prepared by Richard A. Chatroop, NMPS No. 11011, filed September 18, 2003 as Document No. 1290,992 and recorded in plat Book 542 Pages 004 - 007, Records of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico. The address of the real property is 4362 Village Loop, Santa Fe, NM 87507-1833. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on August 29, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $246,215.88 plus interest from March 31, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.500% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any

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LEGALS damages.

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NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any.

Ronald J. VanAmberg VanAmberg, Rogers, Yepa, Abeita & Gomez, LLP P.O. Box 1447 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504-1447 You and each you are further notified that unless you enter your appearance in said cause or file a motion or other pleading within thirty (30) days from the last publication date judgment will be rendered against you in said cause by default and in accordance with the prayer of the Plaintiff’s Complaint on file in said cause. Witness my hand and seal of said Court, this 28th day of January, 2014. STEPHEN T. PACHECO CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT BY: Maureen Naranjo Deputy

Legal #96338 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on January 31, February NOTICE IS FURTHER 7 and 14, 2014. GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the STATE OF above-described real NEW MEXICO property subject to IN THE rights of redemption. PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Group MARIA ISABEL L. 5011 Indian School ORTIZ, DECEASED. Road NE Albuquerque, NM NO. 2014-0005 87110 505-767-9444 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NM12-01714_FC01 Legal #96489 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on Jnuary 31, February 7, 14 and 21, 2014. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. 02643

D-101-CV-2013-

SANTA FE COMMUNITY HOUSING TRUST, Plaintiff, v. THE HEIRS OF GARY D. PLUM, THE MUNICIPALITY OF SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO AND THE ZOCALO ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF PENDANCY OF SUIT TO THE DEFENDANTS THE HEIRS OF GARY D. PLUM

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at the following address" PO Box 1985, Santa Fe, NM 87504. Dated: January 27, 2014 Marcella O. Gonzales 7 Traviesa De Camilo E. Santa Fe, NM 87508 505-471-8329

Legal# 96398 Published in the SanYou, and each of you, ta Fe New Mexican are notified that January 31, February there is pending in 7, 2014 the District Court of the First Judicial District of the State of New Mexico New Mexico, within The the County of Santa Health Insurance ExFe, an action in which change (NMHIX) is the Santa Fe Com- soliciting responses qualified munity Housing Trust from is Plaintiff and the offerors that are able to provide IndependHeirs of Gary D. Plum are among the De- ent Verification and (IV&V) fendants in this case. Validation services during the The general object of Design, Development this action is to fore- and Implementation close a mortgage by (DDI) of the NMHIX the Plaintiff upon that system. The Contracland and real estate tor should be able to whether situate and lying and assess being within the City NMHIX and its partof Santa Fe, being ners are on track to Unit #103-601 Circulo implement the requiDe Morelia of Zocolo, site technology for Condominium as cre- the NMHIX in time for ated by Condomini- enrolling consumers um Declaration filed into qualified health for record in the of- plans (QHPs) by Ocfice the County Clerk tober 1 2014, as well of Santa Fe County, as meeting all the New Mexico, in Book other specified re2128 Misc. at Page quirements for Ex107, as amended and changes under the in plats recorded Affordable Care Act. therein, and as More information can found at: amended, record be http://www.nmhix.co Santa Fe County and m / v e n d o r being the property e m p l o y m e n t described in the pportunities/vendorComplaint opportunities/. The name and post office address of the Legal#96255 Plaintiff’s attorneys Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican are: January 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, February 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, Continued... 4, 2014


C-8 THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, January WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

31, 2014

THE ARGYLE SWEATER

PEANUTS

LA CUCARACHA

TUNDRA

RETAIL

STONE SOUP

KNIGHT LIFE

DILBERT

LUANN

ZITS

BALDO

GET FUZZY

MUTTS

PICKLES

ROSE IS ROSE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PARDON MY PLANET

BABY BLUES

NON SEQUITUR


Santa Fe New Mexican, Jan. 31, 2014