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Kessel scores hat trick, helps United States rout Slovenia in Sochi Sports, B-1

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2014 LEGISLATURE

Panel puts Skandera hearing on agenda

More talking helps babies learn

Kerry mocks those who question climate change

New research shows that the sooner you start explaining the world to your baby, the better. FAMILY, A-11

The U.S. secretary of state compares people who don’t believe climate change is real to people who insist that the world is flat. PAge A-3

SFPS eyes technology upgrade

Senate committee to consider confirmation in morning; vote possible By Robert Nott

The New Mexican

With just four days left in this year’s legislative session, the Senate Rules Committee has scheduled a confirmation hearing and possible vote on Secretary of Education-designate Hanna Skandera. Sen. Linda Lopez, head of the Rules Committee and a Democrat running for governor, Hanna said Sunday that Skandera the committee will schedule Skandera for an 8:30 a.m. hearing Monday in the Roundhouse. The news comes as a Senate Joint Resolution that would eliminate the position of secretary of education by

Please see SKANDeRA, Page A-6

INSIDe u Alternate budget proposal advances to full Senate. PAge A-6

Concealed gun licenses doubled in N.M. in 2013 By Barry Massey

The Associated Press

More than twice as many concealed-carry permits were issued in New Mexico last year when state and federal policymakers considered whether to tighten firearms laws, government records show. The Department of Public Safety issued 10,601 licenses in 2013 compared with 4,793 the previous year, according to state records obtained by The Associated Press.

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Today Sunny much of the time. High 59, low 32. PAge A-14

Santa Fe High School engineering teacher Dave Forester watches Braeden LaBounty, 17, work on a chess game that he made in Forester’s class. The school board is scheduled to vote on a plan that would put new technology in the hands of every student by 2015 and whether to approve an Education Technology Note to pay for the devices, training and facility ugrades involved. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

Five-year plan would provide computers for all students; board to vote Tuesday By Robert Nott The New Mexican

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sther Lescht and Braeden La Bounty have grown up in the digital world of iPhones, iPads, tablets, computers and YouTube. Using these resources to learn makes perfect sense to both Santa Fe High School juniors. “It doesn’t seem like a new thing to us,” La Bounty said as he sat in front of a computer screen in teacher Dave Forester’s engineering class on Thursday. “Not having [computers] would be pretty weird.” The two students and their peers discussed posting mini-essays on the impact of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech to a student-group blog for history teacher John Morrison. After watching video of the speech on YouTube, the students could then use the blog to exchange ideas and comment on one another’s work. “It’s easier for me to write my thoughts in a blog rather than stand in front of the class and express myself,” Lescht said. But not every student at Santa Fe High School — or at any of the district’s other schools — has ready access to a computer. And in those rare cases in which every student has a district-provided iPad — as in Santa Fe High science teacher Peter Graham’s class — mass iPad crashes have occurred due to a lack of sufficient Internet bandwidth. Within five years, however, Santa Fe Public Schools wants all 14,000 of its students to have a

computer or tablet, a plan that will cost between $50 million and $55 million. State law gives school districts the authority to increase property taxes for technology upgrades. The Educational Technology Note, as it is called, does not have to go to voters for approval but can be imposed by a majority vote of the Board of Education, although the board could call for a special general obligation bond election to raise the money instead. The board will make a decision regarding this plan — including possibly approving the Educational Technology Note — at Tuesday’s 5:30 p.m. meeting at the Educational Services Center on Alta Vista Street. If the plan is approved, taxes on a $300,000 home with a taxable valuation of $100,000 would increase $150 a year. The plan — which would also draw on funds from a February 2012 mill levy approved by voters — calls for professional-development training for teachers, installing updated fiber-optic cables in all facilities and placing an age-appropriate device — be it iPad, tablet or computer — in the hands of every student. The district estimates that 50 percent of the money will go to in-school equipment, with the other 50 percent targeted toward implementation, maintenance, networking and infrastructure. The district would start this coming fall by focusing on three new school sites: Atalaya Elementary School, Nina Otero Community School and El Camino Real Community School, which is replacing

Agua Fría Elementary School. It would then expand to schools being renovated — Kearny and Piñon elementary schools — and two middle schools in need of technology: De Vargas and Ortiz. Superintendent Joel Boyd said the second most common complaint he fields — after the issue of salaries — is from staffers who say the district’s technology is outdated or inconsistent. He and others acknowledge that many teachers are unable to use current technology due to insufficient infrastructure support. In a recent interview, Boyd said too many students within the district do not have Internet access at home and that the new plan will help “close economic gaps” between the haves and have-nots when it comes to equal use of computers. For children without Internet access, the new devices will allow them to download school material at the school library or at community hubs near schools so they can still work on projects. Boyd sees infinite possibilities here: “With a computer, you have every book at your fingertips.” He said the district could wait until its next general obligation bond cycle in 2017 to put the idea out to voters, but time is of the essence. “I keep hearing, ‘faster, faster, faster, more, more, more.’ Well, when it comes to technology, that means more money,” he said. Advocates claim today’s students are more easily

Please see UPgRADe, Page A-5

Obituaries David Earl Maez, Feb. 8 William Zeckendorf Jr., 84, Feb. 12 PAge A-12

Pasapick www.pasatiempomagazine.com

The New Mexican

The photographer discusses his exhibit of photos of abandoned theaters at Jean Cocteau Gallery, at 6:20 p.m., 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528.

Calendar A-2

Efforts to reduce risk of destructive wildfire in rugged terrain ongoing By Staci Matlock

Matt Lambros

Index

Dense vegetation, dry conditions threaten watershed

Classifieds B-6

Close to a million acres in New Mexico have gone up in smoke in the last three years from wildfires. But there’s still plenty left to burn, especially near the fire-vulnerable watershed east of Santa Fe.

Comics B-14

Family A-11

El Nuevo A-8

City and national forest crews have worked for more than a decade to reduce the wildfire risks in the Santa Fe Municipal Watershed. The watershed encompasses the Sangre de Cristo Mountain slopes and canyon that drain into the city’s two municipal reservoirs and the Santa Fe River. Officials worry a large, intense wildfire in the watershed followed by rain would wash ash and debris into the reservoirs, clogging them and requiring expensive work to clean the water. A heavy rain on burned slopes would also increase the risk of flooding into

Opinions A-13

Editor: Ray Rivera, 986-3033, rrivera@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Kristina Dunham, kdunham@sfnewmexican.com

Police notes A-12

downstream neighborhoods. Fire crews have cut and thinned trees and burned vegetation within about 10,000 acres of the lower watershed around the Nichols and McClure reservoirs, said Sandy Hurlocker, district ranger for the Española Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest. Some of it has been treated more than once. Firefighters burned 40 acres of piled branches and cut wood in the watershed last week. “We’re trying to get the condition of the watershed to the point where if there is a fire, it will stay

Sports B-1

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Time Out B-11

Main office: 983-3303 Late paper: 986-3010

INSIDe u Drought-stricken states prepare for landmark year in wildfires. PAge A-4

low on the ground and we will have time to get in there,” Hurlocker said. But the mid-level and upper municipal watershed remain dense with trees. So do the private and national forest lands adjacent to the watershed boundaries. Much of the land is at high risk of crown fires, which spread

Please see WATeRSHeD, Page A-4

Two sections, 28 pages 165th year, No. 48 Publication No. 596-440


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

NATION&WORLD

Whose legacy is it?

Relatives of civil rights leaders fight for control of earthly — and valuable — possessions

life, so their families have a right to be concerned about the financial value of their famous relaWASHINGTON tives’ legacy, said John A. Powell, artin Luther King director at the Haas Institute Jr.’s daughter for a Fair and Inclusive Society recently walked up at the University of California, to the pulpit of the Berkeley. Atlanta church where her father “Somebody is going to make preached and, in a painful public money off their names,” powell display, dissociated herself from said. “You just hope people do it her brothers. with a certain amount of dignity.” She accused them of plotting Few would say that’s hapto sell their father’s personal pened. Many point to the King Bible and his Nobel Peace Prize family’s public feuds as evidence — items she declared “sacred” that it has not. and worth more than money. “To be fighting over money When it comes to fights like and profit is to dishonor everythis, the Kings are not alone. thing their father stood for,” said Malcolm X’s daughters are Deborah E. McDowell, director suing to block a book deal, of the Carter G. Woodson Instisigned by one sister, to publish tute for African-American and their father’s diary. African Studies and Alice Griffin Rosa Parks’ valuable memenprofessor of English at the Unitos, including her Presidential versity of Virginia. Medal of Freedom and CongresMost families only have to sional Gold Medal of Honor, deal with a parent’s estate once. have sat in a New York City But when the parent in queswarehouse for years because of a tion was a beloved historic protracted battle over her estate. figure, there regularly are new America’s greatest civil rights issues to address, said lawyers leaders may belong to the ages, Andrew and Danielle Mayoras, but the fights among family, who wrote a book about famous friends and outsiders over conestate battles. trol of their earthly possessions “There can always be a seem never-ending. new project that the family is Unsavory as they may appear, approached with or a new item fights like these are not unique someone decides to sell,” said and are exacerbated by the moral Andrew Mayoras, who specialheft of the leaders’ life work, and izes in probate matters. “So yes, the fact that their belongings for these families, we do think it’s could be worth millions. With going to keep going on and on, each court battle, civil rights sadly.” historians worry about the negaMany American families go tive impact such infighting might through the same thing, said have on the legacy of the civil Danielle Mayoras, an estate rights movement. attorney. “Sometimes they are Neither Malcolm X nor King, fighting over the Christmas killed in 1965 and 1968, respecornaments instead of diaries tively, left wills, so there are no that might be very valuable, but specifics about what they wanted oftentimes what we see is that done with their belongings. The it’s not the value of the item, it’s strong widows who built legacies the sentimental attachment or for them and who could enforce the emotion that’s involved,” she peace in the family through said. matriarchal fiat, also are gone: Martin III, Dexter and Bernice Betty Shabazz in 1997, Coretta King have fought in court for Scott King in 2006. years, going after their father’s Not even a long life and carefriends and fellow activists in ful planning are enough to quell addition to each other. The famdisputes. ily has sent numerous ceaseParks, who died in 2005 at age and-desist letters to stop various 92, stipulated in her will that her uses of King’s written work and belongings go to a charitable image, and followed up with foundation, the Rosa and Raycourt action if they weren’t satismond Parks Institute for Selffied with the results. Development in Detroit. Parks The King heirs even have used the courts to fight each other. had no children, but her nieces Currently, Martin III and Dexand nephews challenged her ter are suing Bernice over her will, and this fight has left her valuable possessions in limbo for possession of their father’s Bible and his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize nearly a decade. medal. King, Parks and Malcolm Both items are likely to gain X were not wealthy people in

By Jesse J. Holland

The Associated Press

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Oct. 24, 1966, in Atlanta. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS

Robin Martin

Owner

Rosa Parks on Oct. 28, 1986, at Ellis Island in New York.

Ray Rivera

Editor

Malcolm X in 1963.

value: The 50th anniversary of King’s Nobel Prize is later this year, and King’s personal Bible was used to swear in President Barack Obama during his second inauguration in 2013. Bernice King refused to turn them over, saying her brothers want to sell them, just as the three of them have sold other

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items that belonged to their father. “I take this strong position for my father because Daddy is not here to say himself, ‘My Bible and my medals are never to be sold not to an institution or even a person,’ ” she said during a news conference this month at Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church.

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KIEV, Ukraine — Anti-government demonstrators in Ukraine’s capital ended their nearly three-month occupation of Kiev City Hall on Sunday as promised in exchange for the release of all 234 jailed protesters. But tensions remained high as hundreds stayed outside the building, vowing to retake it if the government failed to drop all charges against the protesters. Late that night, after a meeting with opposition leaders, Prosecutor General Viktor Pshonka said the criminal cases would be closed Monday. Prospects for an easing of the standoff between the opposition and President Viktor Yanukovych, however, were still unclear. Yanukovych is expected to nominate a new prime minister in the near future, and Western officials have been advocating for a coalition government drawn from the ruling party and the opposition.

SUNBURY, Pa. — The FBI says it is willing to help investigate claims by a 19-year-old woman charged in a Pennsylvania murder case that she killed more than 20 other people. Carrie Adamowski, spokeswoman for the FBI in Philadelphia, said Monday the agency has been in contact with local police in Sunbury and will offer any assistance that they request. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty for Miranda Barbour and her husband, Elytte Barbour, who are charged with killing a stranger they allegedly lured through a Craiglist ad. Miranda Barbour told The Daily Item in Sunbury in a jailhouse interview that she had previously killed more than 20 people across the country as part of her involvement in a satanic cult. The Associated Press

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A verdict in the city of Jacksonville is again raising the issue of self-defense and race in Florida, just seven months after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the shooting of a black teenager, Trayvon Martin. Michael Dunn, a white 47-year-old software developer, could face 60 years in prison following his conviction Saturday on multiple counts of attempted murder for shooting into a carful of teenagers outside a Jacksonville convenience store in 2012. Jordan Davis, a black 17-year-old, was killed in the shooting, but the jury couldn’t reach a verdict on the firstdegree murder charge against Dunn. A mistrial was declared on that count. The verdict is a far cry from one delivered in the Zimmerman case, when he was acquitted in July in the shooting death of 17-year-old Martin in Sanford, about 125 miles south of Jacksonville. Following an argument over loud music coming from the car that Davis was in, Dunn said he shot at the car with his 9 mm handgun — he said he was afraid and thought he saw a shotgun in the car.

Pa. Craigslist killing suspect claims killing 22 others

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CAIRO — An explosion tore through a bus filled with South Korean sightseers in the Sinai Peninsula on Sunday, killing at least four people and raising fears that Islamic militants have renewed a bloody campaign to wreck Egypt’s tourism industry. The bombing near the tip of the Red Sea’s Gulf of Aqaba was the first attack against tourists in Sinai in nearly a decade. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. But the blast bore the hallmarks of attacks blamed on the al-Qaida-linked militant groups that have been battling government forces in Sinai’s restive north for years. At least three South Korean tourists were killed and 12 seriously wounded, according to Egyptian security officials. The Egyptian bus driver was also among the dead, the officials said.

Ukrainian protesters leave Kiev City Hall after 3 months

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Monday, Feb. 17 EXPLORING MARS: CURIOSITY ROVER AND ITS LASER: At 6 p.m., a Southwest Seminars lecture with Mars Rover leader Roger Wiens at Hotel Santa Fe, 6 p.m., 1501 Paseo de Peralta. ‘GAME OF THRONES’: Free screenings of the HBO series every Monday through March 24 at 7 p.m., Jean Cocteau, 418 Montezuma Ave. SENIOR OLYMPICS: From 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., local Santa Fe 50+ Senior Olympics Games Registration is open for adults age 50 and older through Feb. 28. Registration is available at Mary Esther Gonzales Senior Center, 1121 Alto St., Monday through Friday. Participate in one or more of 23 sports during March, April and May for fitness, fun and friendship. Fee is $20. Call Cristina Villa at 955-4725.

NIGHTLIFE Monday, Feb. 17 COWGIRL BBQ: Cowgirl karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig, 8 p.m., 319 S. Guadalupe St. EL FAROL: Tiho Dimitrov, R&B, 8 p.m., 808 Canyon Road. LA CASA SENA CANTINA: Best of Broadway, piano and vocals, 6-10 p.m., 125 E. Palace Ave.

Corrections VANESSIE: Pianist/vocalist Bob Finnie, ’50s-’70s pop, 6:30 p.m., 427 W. Water St.

VOLUNTEER DOG WALKERS WANTED: The Santa Fe animal shelter needs volunteer dog walkers for all shifts, but especially the Coffee & Canines morning shift from 7 to 9 a.m. For more information, send an email to krodriguez@sfhumanesociety. org or call Katherine at 9834309, ext. 128. THE HORSE SHELTER: If you are 16 years old or older and have some experience with horses — or a great desire to learn about horses — the Horse Shelter could use your help with a variety of chores. Volunteers receive orientation on the second Saturday of the month — weather permitting. Volunteers can make their own schedules —from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. For more information, send an email to info@thehorseshelter. org, visit www.thehorseshelter. org or call 471-6179. FOOD FOR SANTA FE: A nonprofit, tax-exempt, all volunteer organization provides supplemental food on a weekly, year-round basis to hungry families, individuals and those facing food insecurity — no forms to fill out, no questions asked. Volunteers are needed

to pack and distribute bags of groceries from 6 to 8 a.m. on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Visit ww.foodforsantafe.org or call 471-1187 or 603-6600. PEOPLE FOR NATIVE ECOSYSTEMS: Volunteers are needed to join the feeding team for the endangered prairie dog colonies in Santa Fe. If you can give two to three hours a week to help, call Pat Carlton at 988-1596. KITCHEN ANGELS: Join the crew by volunteering two hours a week. It will make a real difference in the lives of homebound neighbors. Kitchen Angels is looking for drivers to deliver food between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. Visit www.kitchenangels.org or call 471-7780 to learn more. THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY: Volunteers are needed to support the Cancer Resource Center at the Christus St. Vincent Cancer Center. Training is for the various shifts that are worked during business hours Monday through Friday. Call Geraldine Esquivel with the American Cancer Society at 463-0308. BIENVENIDOS: Volunteers are needed at the tourist information window on the Plaza. Join Bienvenidos, the volunteer division of the Santa Fe chamber of Commerce. Call Marilyn O’Brien, the membership chairwoman, at 989-1701.

A story on Page A-1 of the Feb. 15, 2014, edition of The New Mexican about a proposed electricity rate discount for big businesses incorrectly stated that the discounted rate for large businesses would cost other ratepayers an estimated 0.2 cents more for every 600 kilowatt-hours used, or about $3.24 a month, based on estimates. PNM estimates the cost of the discount to residential customers would add between 2 cents and $3.24 to the monthly bill for every 600 kilowatt-hours used. The added cost to residential customers will depend on how much power PNM discounts for large electricity users up to a five percent cap.

uuu The New Mexican will correct factual errors in its news stories. Errors should be brought to the attention of the city editor at 986-3035. For more events, see Pasatiempo in Friday’s edition. To submit an events listing, send an email to service@sfnew mexican.com.


NATION & WORLD

Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

A-3

Kerry mocks those who deny existence of climate change “ We should not allow a tiny minority of shoddy scientists ... to compete with scientific facts.”

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cious metal from the shafts. Authorities suspect the miners in Benoni were robbed by a rival group that blocked the mine exit, reported Eyewitness News, a South African media outlet. Illegal mining remains a serious concern, despite progress in curbing it, South Africa’s mineral resources department said in a statement. It attributed the improvement to “illegal mining forums,” in which stakeholders in the mining industry seal open shafts and seek to detain illegal miners, according to the South African Press Association. Some analysts say the problem could increase if legal mines close or downsize, forcing skilled workers who have lost their jobs to turn to illegal activities. South Africa’s mining industry, a pillar of the economy, is struggling with rising costs. Tens of thousands of workers in the platinum sector are currently on strike.

REP

“Should they have a change of heart and mind, they then have at least some access to get out of the shaft,” Du Plooy said. He said he didn’t know how many people were still in the By Christopher Torchia shaft. Earlier, reports said more The Associated Press than 200 miners had been trapped. But the ones who JOHANNESBURG — They emerged were tightlipped about refused to be rescued. the colleagues they left behind, Emergency workers in South apparently concerned about Africa cleared a mine shaft trouble with the police. entrance of debris on Sunday, “They don’t want to give allowing miners who had been away too much information,” trapped below the chance to Du Plooy said. It was unclear escape. The only problem was how long the holdouts, who that the miners were working seemed to have few options, illegally at the abandoned mine, planned to prolong their stay in and some stayed underground the mine. because they feared arrest if they Some of the 11 who came out came out, according to officials. were dehydrated but otherwise At least 11 miners were in good health. They were escorted to safety at the mine in believed to have been trapped Benoni, on the outskirts of Johan- since Saturday morning, and nesburg, but an undetermined police patrolling in the area number of their comrades were heard their screams for help, the still in the gold mine, emergency South African Press Association responder Kobus Du Plooy said reported. Rescue vehicles and by telephone late Sunday. equipment were brought to the Police were preparing to site to stabilize the ground before question those who came out the removal of the rubble began. about anyone left underground, Illegal mining is common in local media reported. South Africa, a major producer After nightfall, some mine of gold and platinum. Workers security officials remained at brave unsafe conditions below the site, but rescue workers ground amid reports of the had packed up and left, leaving involvement of organized crime behind a ladder in the shaft for and even clashes between rival those still below. groups seeking to extract pre-

CE

Officials unclear on how many remain in abandoned shaft

VI

Some illegal South African miners refuse to be rescued

The U.S.-China statement issued just after Kerry left Beijing on Saturday said the two countries agreed on steps to carry out commitments to curb greenhouse gases, including reducing vehicle emissions, improving energy efficiency of buildings and other measures. Beijing and Washington launched a climate change discussion last year, promising progress in five areas: reducing vehicle emissions; advanced electric power grids; capturing and storing carbon emissions; gathering greenhouse gas data; and building efficiency. Kerry was in Indonesia on the last leg of a three-nation tour of Asia that started in South Korea. After leaving Indonesia on Monday, he planned to visit Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. Before the climate change speech, Kerry toured Jakarta’s Istiqlal Mosque, one of the largest in the world, to pay his respects to Indonesia’s Muslim majority population.

EXP

Emergency rescue workers attempt to free trapped illegal miners Sunday at an abandoned gold mine shaft near Benoni, South Africa. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

John Kerry

TO

oil and coal concerns as the primary offenders. “We should not allow a tiny JAKARTA, Indonesia — U.S. minority of shoddy scientists Secretary of State John Kerry and science and extreme on Sunday called climate ideologues to compete with change perhaps the world’s scientific facts,” Kerry told the “most fearsome” destructive audience at a U.S. Embassy-run weapon and mocked those American Center in a shopping who deny its existence or ques- mall. tion its causes, comparing them “Nor should we allow any to people who insist the Earth room for those who think that is flat. the costs associated with doing In a speech to Indonesian the right thing outweigh the students, civic leaders and benefits. government officials, Kerry “The science is unequivotore into climate change skepcal, and those who refuse to tics. He accused them of using believe it are simply burying shoddy science and scientists their heads in the sand,” Kerry to delay steps needed to reduce said. “We don’t have time for a emissions of greenhouse gases meeting anywhere of the Flat at the risk of imperiling the Earth Society,” planet. Kerry said the cost of inacA day earlier, the U.S. and tion will far outweigh the sigChina announced an agreenificant expense of reducing ment to cooperate more closely greenhouse gas emissions that on combating climate change. trap solar heat in the atmoAmerican officials hope that sphere and contribute to the will help encourage others, Earth’s rising temperatures. including developing countries He outlined a litany of recent like Indonesia and India, to fol- weather disasters, particularly low suit. flooding and typhoons in Asia, China and the United States and their impact on commerce, are the biggest sources of emis- agriculture, fishing and daily sions of carbon dioxide and living conditions for billions of other gases that cause people. the atmosphere to trap solar “This city, this country, this heat and alter the climate. Sciregion, is really on the front entists say such changes are lines of climate change,” Kerry leading to drought, wildfires, said. “It’s not an exaggeration rising sea levels, melting polar to say that your entire way of ice, plant and animal extinclife here is at risk.” tions and other extreme condiHe added: “In a sense, tions. climate change can now be Also in the Jakarta speech, considered the world’s largest Kerry said everyone and every weapon of mass destruction, country must take responsibil- perhaps even, the world’s most ity for the problem and act fearsome weapon of mass immediately. destruction.” “We simply don’t have time The solution, Kerry said, to let a few loud interest groups is a new global energy policy hijack the climate conversathat shifts reliance from fossil tion,” he said, referring to what fuels to cleaner technologies. he called “big companies” that He noted the President Barack “don’t want to change and Obama is championing such spend a lot of money” to act to a shift and encouraged others reduce the risks. to appeal to their leaders to Kerry later singled out major join. By Matthew Lee

The Associated Press

& SER


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

Western states prepare for landmark year in fires By Reid Wilson

The Washington Post

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — On the first Sunday in January, Tom Hein stood on the tarmac in Humboldt County, in Northern California, watching an air tanker come in for a landing. The Grumman S-2T was one of three tankers working to put out the “Red Fire,” a blaze that caught on a mountain ridge the previous day. Hein snapped a picture of the tanker and the fire in the distance on his camera phone, which he sent to his boss: “January in Rohnerville,” the caption read. The fire, Hein said later, is one he will remember. It wasn’t the largest fire of the year, and it didn’t claim any lives. But it burned 333 acres in Humboldt County — one of the wettest places in America. The county, which averages more than 100 inches of rain every year, is dry as a bone. “We’re seeing summertime weather conditions in January,” Hein said as two of his crews continued to mop up the smoking remnants of the Red Fire. “If we don’t get some rain now, just imagine what the summer is going to be like.” Across the Western United States, officials tasked with fighting forest fires worry that a confluence of factors, including climate change and human development, are conspiring to create conditions ripe for a landmark fire year. That would mean hotter fires that burn longer and threaten more homes, sapping already-strained budgets and putting at risk the lives of thousands of firefighters. President Barack Obama traveled to Fresno, Calif., on Friday to meet with farmers and others coping with the

Watershed: Next step is to create buffer area

impact of the ongoing drought. “Things really are at critical levels in parts of the West, and while we’re hoping and praying for rain and some moisture, we are very worried,” said Tom Harbour, the U.S. Forest Service’s National Director of Fire and Aviation Management. The lack of precipitation has already become a national emergency. A threeyear drought that has spread across the West has dried out the fuel — trees, shrubs and grasses — that feeds fires. The drought is particularly acute in California, where the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada mountains is at just 12 percent of the annual average. Several rural California counties are within a few months of running out of water altogether. Snowpack across the Cascades in Washington and Oregon is also far below normal levels, according to data maintained by the Water and Climate Center, a division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture based in Portland, Ore. The severity and breadth of fire activity has increased dramatically in recent decades. More man-made structures are burning now than ever before, and more fire fighters are dying. In the 1980s, wildfires burned an average of 2.98 million acres every year. Between 2003 and 2012, an average of 7.26 million acres burned per year. Parts of the West are experiencing the driest 15-year period in 1,200 years. “In my conversations with officials from the states, they are all dealing with climate change. I can’t recall a conversation that has been any kind of a debate about whether this is effecting our landscapes. I don’t think there is a debate,” Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said in a recent interview. “They’re dealing, in

these Western states, with some real extremes.” The consequences of climate change encourage wildfires in three ways, firefighters and policymakers say. First, even modest rises in temperatures change forest ecologies and allow invasive species to take root. Second, changing weather patterns can stem much-needed precipitation. And third, global warming is extending the fire season. In the last four decades, the average fire season has grown by 78 days — more than a fifth of a year. If temperature trends continue, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns, the fire season across Canada, Russia and the United States could expand by another month over the next five decades. While winter was once the time when fire agencies repaired aircraft and cut seasonal staff, states like California have had to keep their aircraft operating all year round. Climate scientists believe a reduction in polar ice is changing atmospheric circulation patterns, which could contribute to a slowing of the jet stream, contributing to colder, wetter weather in the Eastern United States and more persistently dry conditions in the West. Rising temperatures have aided invasive pests like the mountain pine beetle in the Pacific Northwest and the goldspotted oak borer in Southern California, which turn living trees that could survive a fire into dead, dry, 20-foot tall matchsticks. Scientists hope this winter’s freezing temperatures have temporarily stemmed the spread of those bugs, though there is no way to be certain. Higher temperatures means plant life once confined to more southern

climates is creeping northward. Those new species can burn faster and at higher intensity than the species they are driving out. “As the temperature has gradually changed, we’re kind of seeing this changing vegetation dynamic,” said Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as CalFire. “We’re seeing trees throughout the foothills here, what’s called grey pine, they’re slowly dying off. They’re being replaced by brush and vegetation. That kind of a change leads to more flammable vegetation in these traditional elevations that would normally be cooler, more moist.” Fire is a natural phenomenon. It sweeps through forests on a regular basis, clearing out debris and dead foliage, refreshing vegetation and revitalizing the land. But the fire cycle is accelerating, especially in the Rocky Mountains. Reduced precipitation means forests that once burned every 100 to 150 years are now burning much more frequently. The climate, which for millenia has acted as a curb on fire activity, is becoming an accelerant. “At some point in the not so distant future, the next few decades probably, climate will no longer be the overriding constraint on the system’s ability to burn,” said Anthony Westerling, an associate professor at the University of California Merced and a faculty member at the Sierra Nevada Research Institute. “It will be dry enough in most years. The constraint will be how much fuel is on the ground.” The federal agency at the center of the fight to suppress wildfires is the National Interagency Fire Center, headquartered in a low, concrete twostory building next to the international

airport in Boise, Idaho. It overlooks a small memorial park dedicated to fallen firefighters. In Washington, Harbour wakes early to read reports on weather patterns and other data coming from Boise. And in state capitals across the country, fire chiefs like Pimlott manage their land, and their fire crews, while interacting with their federal partners. Between the federal, state and local offices, managers oversee 56,000 wildland fire fighters, with help from about 100,000 local fire fighters dedicated to protecting man-made structures. At the height of fire season, those numbers swell. Their jobs are getting harder. The recovering economy is driving a new housing boom in the buffer zone between unoccupied forest land and human settlements. As more subdivisions crop up in the suburbs of Seattle and Sacramento and in the resort towns of Sun Valley, Idaho, and Jackson Hole, Wyo., more than half the fires fought by the government now involve human structures. In parts of California, the cost of defending a single home can run as high as $600,000 — far more than many of the homes are actually worth. And while homeowners are able to get out before a fire sweeps over them, the firefighters who have to defend those homes wade into danger. Last year was especially brutal: In June 2013, 19 members of the Prescott Fire Department’s Granite Mountain Hotshots died after being trapped by a fast-moving fire while trying to protect human structures in Yarnell, a tiny town of 649 people. It was the worst single incident for wildland firefighters since a 1933 blaze in California killed 25.

legend Santa Fe Municipal Watershed Tres Lagunas Fire Pecos Wilderness

crown fire potential Low

Continued from Page A-1 through the tops of trees at a breathtaking speed, according to fire managers. Hurlocker said the next step is to create a buffer between the treated lower watershed and the high-elevation Pecos Wilderness. He said the Forest Service hopes to use prescribed burns started from a helicopter to treat about 2,900 acres in a band across the watershed from 7,000 to the 10,000 feet in elevation. Above that is the wilderness, which the Forest Service, by law, can’t thin with machines or chain saws. Hurlocker said the Santa Fe National Forest has completed an environmental assessment of the project that should be ready for public review in March. About 6,000 acres in the wilderness around Lake Peak and Penitente Peak won’t be treated at all. He said that until the past few years, the high elevations in the wilderness rarely burned. The mountain snowpack usually kept the spruce and fir forests wet. “There was a lot of heavy fuels but also a lot of moisture,” Hurlocker said. “But drought over the last three years kind of nullified that effect, as saw with the Jaroso Fire last year.” Lightning sparked the Jaroso Fire, which burned 11,149 acres in the highelevation spruce and fir forest in the Pecos Wilderness of the Santa Fe National Forest. The area is so rugged and has so little road access that fire managers couldn’t safely put firefighters close enough to battle the blaze. Firefighters monitored the blaze from the air instead and stood ready to fight it if the fire threatened towns. Hurlocker said crews would face a similar situation if a fire were to start in the wilderness or upper, untreated portion of the Santa Fe Municipal Watershed. “We want to create a buffer,” he said. “There are no roads in the area. It would be hard to get crews in there. And there are no safety zones. The way it is now, we couldn’t put anyone in there.” A safety zone is a cleared or protected area near a fire where a crew can find relative safety if a fire burns out of control and threatens to trap them. Fire crew leaders identify these safety zones before firefighters tackle any wildfire. Managing the forests, whether in the Santa Fe Municipal Watershed or elsewhere in Northern New Mexico, is a fine balance. The mixed conifer and ponderosa pine forests in the watershed are no stranger to fires. For centuries, wildfires periodically burned through the forests, up until the last 100 years, according to tree-ring scientists. Trees and other vegetation along the mountainsides in the watershed are a dual safety net for Santa Feans. The vegetation, pine needles and carpet of duff on the ground holds snowpack until it melts, then slows the speed of the runoff into the reservoirs. The combination does the same for rain. The deep web of tree and vegetation roots also protects

High

Santa Fe

Santa Fe National Forest wildfires (1970-2012)

Crown fire risk

Legend

This map of the Santa Fe Municipal Santaand Fe Watershed Watershed the city of Santa Fe shows the areas at risk of fast-moving crownTres fires,Lagunas markedFire in red. The map showsPecos conditions prior to 2010. The Wilderness map does not show the thinning, prescribed burns and other treatments Crown fire potential conducted by Santa Fe National Forest crews Low on 10,000 acres within the watershed around the Nichols and McClure reservoirs. The Santa Fe National Forest will soon release an analysis on the next project to use prescribed burns on 2,900 acres of forest in the watershed below the Pecos Wilderness.

This map shows wildfires that have burned in the Santa Fe National Forest and their proximity to the Santa Fe Municipal Watershed. The watershed is primarily the eastern portion in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. This map does not show the fires that burned in 2013 in the Santa Fe National Forest. The three largest — Thompson Ridge, Jaroso and Tres Lagunas — burned a combined 45,333 acres. MAP COURTESY FOREST GUILD

MAP COURTESY NEW MEXICO STATEWIDE RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

Wildfires in neW Mexico Year

Total fires

Acres burned

2013

1,064

221,951

2012

1,029

372,497

2011

1,875

1,286,497

2010

998

233,056

2009

1,278

421,481

2008

1,207

487,652

2007

1,418

97,750

2006

2,636

607,802

2005

1,282

67,036

the soil and prevents it from eroding into the reservoirs or downstream. But fire managers say too many trees aren’t good. Decades of fire prevention, grazing and logging created conditions in many forests that, compounded now by drought, have created the perfect place for huge, intense wildfires. Fire managers say there’s a need to thin the trees to reduce the risk of huge forest fires. Crown fires and high-intensity fires can burn so hot they melt soil and increase the risk of catastrophic flooding because they eliminate the vegetation that would otherwise slow down the water. Flooding after the Las Conchas Fire of 2011 wiped out the historic Dixon orchard and destroyed portions

legend Watershed

fire year 1970-79 1980-89 1990-99 2000-10 2011-12

of Santa Clara Canyon. Residents in Pecos Canyon had to deal with flooding after the Tres Lagunas Fire last year. Forest managers want to recreate forest conditions that once allowed frequent, low-intensity fires to naturally thin the trees. While winter isn’t over, New Mexico already has had more than two dozen wildfires on public and private land since Jan. 1. Most were only a couple of acres or less. Fire season could start earlier than normal this spring in Eastern New Mexico and West Texas, driven by drought, grass and wind, according to the Feb. 1 national fire outlook produced each month by the National Interagency Fire Center’s Predictive

Services. But spring rains in the longrange forecast could reduce the threat, according to the report. The next fire forecast is due March 1. On Sunday, a fire broke out south of Albuquerque on agricultural land on the Isleta Pueblo, according to KOATTV. The fire, fueled by 30 mph winds, moved east and jumped the Rio Grande in the bosque and was still raging as darkness fell. A second, smaller fire that also started on pueblo land was reportedly put out by fire crews earlier in the day. Last year, a total of 1,064 fires in New Mexico burned 221,951 acres of public land alone. A total of 317,000 acres burned last year in the eight largest wildfires in New

Mexico and Arizona combined, according to a report released Feb. 13 by the Forest Guild. The fires destroyed 75 percent or more of the tree canopy on about 100,000 of those acres. Almost a third of the acres burned had densely overgrown forests or other conditions that made them unhealthy. Half of the fires, including the Las Conchas blaze in the Jemez Mountains and the Tres Lagunas Fire in the Pecos Canyon, burned over portions of previous fire scars. For more information and to read the Forest Guild full report, visit www. forestguild.org. Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@sfnewmexican.com. Follow her on Twitter @stacimatlock.


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

A-5

Gun: There has been Upgrade: Critics cite high cost of program no recent law change Continued from Page A-1

engaged with computerized learning. They cite reports pointing to an increase in jobs in the computer and technological world by 2020 — meaning students must receive training for this job market. Critics point to the cost of such programs as well as the fear that computers will replace teachers in the learning environment. Other concerns include the possibility of savvy students using the hardware for purposes other than learning — playing video games and accessing social media websites, for instance — or of kids inadvertently damaging expensive equipment. Graham and fellow Santa Fe High science teacher and Derek Buschman — both of whom are already using computer technology in their classes — caution that the proper professional development practices must be put in place to ensure that instructors understand the system. Buschman sees exciting potential in “trying to figure out how to take teaching home.” Farmington Municipal Schools implemented a similar initiative for about 5,000 students in its middle and high schools several years ago, using Educational Technology Note funds — between $4.5 million and $6 million every two years since 2006 — to give every student an

In brief

hopes the ballet company’s administrative team will help with marketing, audience development and fundraising.

Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe will begin operating under the umbrella of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet in the summer of 2014. The 6-year-old flamenco group, which is next scheduled to perform in mid-July at the Lensic Performing Arts Center, says it

On Tuesday, the Santa Fe Public Schools Board of Education is slated to approve a name for the district’s upcoming International Baccalaureate school: the Nelson Mandela International Magnet School. The school will open in the fall of 2014 with

about 100 seventh- and eighth-grade students on the campus of De Vargas Middle School on Llano Street, although it may relocate to a different location in the future. Over time, the school will serve grades 7-12. The district recently announced that Tony Gerlicz, who founded Monte del Sol Charter School in Santa Fe, will serve as the new IB school’s principal. Gerlicz suggested naming the new school after Mandela, the late human rights advocate and president of South Africa.

Aspen Ballet takes over School board to pick name for IB school flamenco group

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nez, a former prosecutor who is licensed to carry a concealed There has been no recent handgun, supported the measure. change in the concealed-handBut the bill died in the Senate. gun laws, and the state issued an Proponents of new gun laws average of about 4,500 licenses had hoped to consider the annually from 2008 to 2012. background-check proposal durNearly 2.5 percent of New ing this year’s 30-day session, but Mexico’s population age 21 and Martinez didn’t place the meaolder — almost 37,600 people sure on the Legislature’s agenda. — have a license to carry a conProposals were offered to ban cealed handgun, according to firearms in parts of the Capitol, department data. but they quickly ran into strong Firearms instructors attribute opposition from those who said the license increase partly to a it would be a violation of the conpush by the Legislature and Con- stitutional right to have firearms. gress for new gun laws, including Opponents also contended the stricter criminal background Capitol is safer because people checks on people who buy can carry guns in the building. firearms and proposals to ban It’s legal to openly carry firemilitary-style assault weapons arms in New Mexico except in and high-capacity ammunition certain places, including schools. magazines. All of the measures Rep. Brian Egolf, D-Santa Fe, have stalled in the statehouse and said he’ll renew efforts next year in the nation’s capital. to ban guns in the Capitol. “A majority of the time, what I Egolf and another Santa Fe lawhear from a lot of people is, ‘We maker proposed the restrictions want to get our permit now, buy after constituents said they were our firearms now because we afraid to attend legislative hearnever know when the current ings because gun-rights supportadministration is going to do ers carried guns in the Capitol. some rule and start taking away Egolf said he’s not troubled by our guns,’ ” said Murrae Haynes the increase in licenses. of Santa Fe, who teaches classes “One of the good things that for people seeking concealedSusana Martinez has done is carry permits. strictly enforce New Mexico’s Clovis firearms instructor concealed-carry laws so that Steve Aikens agreed. we do not have reciprocity with “When people see that at the other states whose concealed federal level and then they see carry laws are weaker than ours. similar legislation trying to be So long as she continues to do introduced within our state, that and so long as the training they start recognizing the fact and background checks are in that if they don’t start becoming place, I think it’s fine for people involved, if they don’t start doing to do what the law allows and get what’s necessary to retain their these permits,” Egolf said. rights and privileges and the privileges granted by the state for concealed carry, they have a really, really good chance of losing them,” Aikens said. New Mexico allows concealedhandgun permits for its residents who are 21 or older, are U.S. citizens and meet other requirements, including completion of a firearms training course and a criminal background check. New Mexico has reciprocal agreements with about two dozen states to honor thier permits. President Barack Obama advocated tougher gun measures after a deadly shooting in December 2012 at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn. In the Legislature, the House approved a measure last year that would have required criminal background checks for private sales of firearms at a gun show. Republican Gov. Susana Marti-

Continued from Page A-1

including those about teacher training and choice of vendor. Rhonda Gardner, the district’s director of teaching and learning, said, “We are looking at summer jump-start, quickstart training sessions for teachers in the initial schools coming online.” She said, however, that the district cannot put out a request for proposals to prospective vendors until it formally approves the plan. The district does have connections to Apple since a summer 2012 investment in new Apple computers and technology in some of the secondary schools Braeden LaBounty, 17, works on a — including Santa Fe High. chess game that he made in engineerOn Friday, school board President Linda ing class at Santa Fe High School. Trujillo expressed support for the plan, notJANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN ing that teachers are excited about the possibilities. Apple laptop. Those computers need to But at least one board member — Glenn be updated every four years, according to Wikle — likely will not support the idea. “I Robert Emerson, assistant superintendent don’t think we need to move as fast as they for educational services with the district. think we do,” he said earlier this week. “I Still, that district began training its teachdon’t believe that the educational commuers several years in advance of the initiative nity has figured out how to use technology and strictly focused on the secondary school at this price in the classroom in a productive level. Spotty Internet service for many stuway.” dents in the region has been a challenge, He asked if it is too soon to gauge results he said, but teachers have been working to from other districts that have taken this download material so students can work at approach, then “is it the right time to spend home even if they can’t submit their work $55 million on it?” via email. Contact Robert Nott at 986-3021 In Santa Fe, district leaders acknowledge a lot of questions have yet to be answered, or rnott@sfnewmexican.com.

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MEETING LIST WEEK OF FEBRUARY 17, 2014 THROUGH FEBRUARY 21, 2014 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 3:30 PM ETHICS & CAMPAIGN REVIEW BOARD – City Council Chambers, City Hall, 200 Lincoln Avenue 5:00 PM FINANCE COMMITTEE – City Council Chambers TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 11:00 AM CITY BUSINESS & QUALITY OF LIFE COMMITTEE – City Council Chambers 2:30 PM SUSTAINABLE SANTA FE COMMISSION – City Councilors’ Conference Room, City Hall 3:00 PM PARKS AND OPEN SPACE ADVISORY COMMISSION – The Barn at Frenchy’s Field, Corner of Osage and Agua Fria Streets 4:00 PM PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE – City Council Chambers 4:30 PM SANTA FE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD – Main Library, Pick Room, 145 Washington Avenue WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 9:30 AM DIVISION OF SENIOR SERVICES SENIOR ADVISORY BOARD OF DIRECTORS – Mary Esther Gonzales Senior Center, 1121 Alto Street 10:00 AM LEAD OPERATIONS TEAM – The Life Link, Training Building Conference Room, 2325 Cerrillos Road 5:30 PM BICYCLE AND TRAIL ADVISORY COMMITTEE – City Council Chambers THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 9:00 AM COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION – Market Station, Engine Conference Room, 500 Market Street, Suite 200 10:00 AM MAYOR’S COMMITTEE ON DISABILITY – Genoveva Chavez Community Center, Classroom 1, 3221 Rodeo Road 12:00 PM SANTA FE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AGENCY JOINT POWERS BOARD – Santa Fe County Administration Building, 102 Grant Avenue 3:00 PM MARTY SANCHEZ LINKS DE SANTA FE ADVISORY COMMITTEE – Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe Administration Building, 205 Caja del Rio 5:15 PM SANTA FE REGIONAL JUVENILE JUSTICE BOARD – CYFD Offices, 1920 Fifth Street FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2014 NO MEETINGS SCHEDULED

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A-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

2014 Legislature

Alternate budget proposal clears Senate Finance Committee Measure would let school districts choose to take part in reform initiatives By Patrick Malone The New Mexican

School districts could take or leave the education reform initiatives Gov. Susana Martinez is promoting under an alternate budget proposal unveiled Sunday in the New Mexico Senate. While the House budget wallows in gridlock over the Republican governor’s education agenda, the Senate could vote as soon as Monday on its own spending plan with hopes that the

In brief

Senate passes indigent care bill

The Senate passed a measure Sunday that aims to keep struggling New Mexico hospitals open by directing the state Human Services Department to reach for its wallet to cover indigent care costs. In July 2015, the federal government will cease providing the Sole Community Provider funding stream that hospitals have come to rely on to provide care to indigent patients. Counties historically have voluntarily contributed 0.063 percent of gross receipts tax to supplement support for that cause, a portion of the 0.125 percent of gross receipts tax counties spend on mandated services associated with indigent health care. Coming into Sunday’s debate, Senate Bill 268 would have authorized counties to increase gross receipts taxes by 0.125 percent more to pay for indigent care at hospitals. Hospitals favored that level of taxing authority. But bill sponsor Sen. Nancy Rodriguez, D-Santa Fe, said hiking the counties’ taxing authority to that level would only serve to divert indigent-care funds to hospitals at the expense of other indigent-care services counties are required by law to provide. She amended the bill to limit the counties’ taxing authority for purposes of indigent care at hospitals to 0.083 for

Legislature can agree to a $6.2 billion package before the 30-day session ends at noon Thursday. Budget discussions in the House broke down more than a week ago along near party lines over $20 million the governor and House Republicans wanted to give the Public Education Department to implement merit pay for teachers and principals, teacher evaluations, online portals for parents to check students’ progress and other steps aimed at improving students’ academic performance. Democrats favored leaving discretion over those funds in the hands of school districts. By a 9-0 vote Sunday, the Senate Finance Committee forwarded Senate Bill 313 to the full Senate with a up to three years. The Senate passed the bill 38-4 at that level of county taxing authority, with another amendment that required the Human Services Department to find millions of dollars in its budget for the indigent-care program.

Senate OKs local option for tax hike The Senate passed a bill Sunday that would allow counties to impose an excise tax on liquor to fund drug and alcohol treatment and prevention programs. SB 263 would authorize county commissioners to ask their local voters to raise taxes by up to about 5 cents per bottle of beer, glass of wine or cocktail. The bill’s sponsor, Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, D-Belen, said McKinley County inspired the legislation. It imposed a tax on alcohol to fund substance-abuse treatment and prevention programs a decade ago and has experienced dramatic decreases in drunken-driving deaths and arrests. Questionable spending within the McKinley County program worried some Republican senators, and others objected to the tax increase and its potential impact on businesses. Democrats defended the legislation as a local option with proven success reducing substance abuse. The bill passed 27-14, with nine Republicans and five Democrats voting against it. Now it moves to the House. The New Mexican

“do pass” recommendation. The Senate budget aims to strike a balance between the clashing ideologies that doomed the House budget. It would provide $17.5 million to the Public Education Department for the governor’s favored reforms. However, individual school districts would be able to decide whether to take part in the initiatives, and likely would need to negotiate them with their local teachers unions. “[Reform initiatives] would be administered through the local school districts where there are collective bargaining agreements. They would, in effect, bargain for those,” said Senate Finance Committee member Sen. Carlos Cisneros, D-Questa. “It meets, I think, a midway point between extremes. It settles

at least most of the controversial issues, which were predominantly about ideology more than money.” The Governor’s Office is reviewing the latest proposal and revealed little about its initial perception of it. “We’ve been able to review part of the [Senate] budget proposal, but are continuing to review language and other aspects of it,” Martinez’s spokesman, Enrique Knell, said in an email. “There is, of course, a long way left to go in the process.” The Senate budget also calls for $11.5 million to support the lottery scholarship program at its current level through the spring semester of 2015. Revenue declines for the lotteryfunded scholarships to in-state stu-

dents have left it underfunded to meet its obligation. Numerous bills aiming to improve the fund’s long-term prospects for solvency are pending in the Legislature. Some options under consideration include reducing tuition awards and length of the scholarships, raising the qualifying grade-point average and other steps to mitigate the fund’s future obligations. “We can’t guarantee that any of the lottery scholarship bills will pass,” Cisneros said. “Should they not, there’s money in this budget to offset that margin.” Contact Patrick Malone at 986-3017 or pmalone@sfnewmexican.com. Follow him on Twitter @pmalonenm.

Skandera: Full Senate will get final say Floor, which has ultimate approval of the action. the end of the year makes its way to At one point last year Skandera the Senate Floor for a vote. called the proceedings “a circus.” Gov. Susana Martinez appointed Shortly after last year’s session, Skandera as education secretary Lopez asked Attorney General Gary shortly after taking office early in King to weigh in with an opinion 2011. Skandera has become a polaron whether the Public Education izing figurehead as she continues to Department, under Skandera’s watch, promote the governor’s educational violated state law in several areas. reform policies, which include an Among Lopez’s concerns: that SkanA-F school-grading system, a new dera sidestepped the New Mexico teacher evaluation plan that factors in Charter Schools Act by allowing the three years of student test score data, Farmington Municipal School District and a plan to end to social promotion to contract with K12 Inc., a national if a third-grader cannot read at grade for-profit company, to provide adminlevel. istrative and education services to The Legislature approved the the New Mexico Virtual Academy; A-F system. Martinez used her execu- that the department repeatedly erred tive powers to initiate the teacher with some procurement-code policies evaluation system. So far, state lawand that Skandera illegally redirected makers have blocked attempts to give about $1.7 million in 2010 general the state the ultimate right to retain a obligation bond money from purchasstudent, although some reading/reme- ing supplies to financially rewarding diation/retention bills are still making some of the state’s top schools. their way through the Legislature. Skandera told lawmakers that Lopez did not schedule a confirma- Farmington’s own board of education tion hearing for Skandera in either approved the Virtual Academy, which 2011 or 2012. She held three such hear- is not a state-chartered school. The ings during the 60-day 2013 session, education department acknowledged which mostly consisted of testimony it had conducted some procurementfrom Skandera’s critics and supportcode violations and vowed to fix ers. However, Lopez did not allow the those problems. Skandera has said the committee a chance to vote to move department has the right to reprioriSkandera’s confirmation to the Senate tize the general obligation bond funds.

Continued from Page A-1

While state lawmakers can request an opinion from the attorney general, these opinions do not carry the force of law. So far the Attorney General’s Office has not issued a response to Lopez’s query. State law allows unconfirmed Cabinet secretaries to serve until the Senate makes a final vote. Democrats hold a 25-17 advantage in the Senate. If that body votes to not confirm Skandera, she will immediately be removed from her post — although the governor could then keep Skandera on in another position, such as deputy secretary. Larry Behrens, spokesman for the Public Education Department, said via email Sunday that Skandera has broad support from education and business leaders within New Mexico. “She is well-qualified for a position she has held for three years now and if she wasn’t, the Senate would have taken action long ago,” he said. “Last year, Senator Lopez staged a politically motivated and prolonged political circus at taxpayer expense that did nothing to help improve student achievement in New Mexico.” He said Skandera is looking forward to a “fair confirmation process.” Contact Robert Nott at 986-3021 or rnott@sfnewmexican.com.


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

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Tax TIp BroughT To you By: NaEa MosT CoMMoN TaxpayEr MIsCoNCEpTIoNs Provided by Monica Hardeman at H&R Block WashINgToN, DC (February 3, 2014). an informal poll of enrolled agents (federally-licensed tax practitioners) revealed many common misconceptions among taxpayers. perhaps those listed below may help clarify some issues.

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HOW DO YOU MISS A BILLION DOLLARS? That’s how much was left behind when Americans prepared their own tax returns last year.

“My broker sold some stock this year and reinvested the money in another stock – I never got any money, so it’s not taxable, right?” stock sales (outside of retirement accounts) are required to be reported. gain or loss on each individual stock transaction stands on its own. sales of mutual funds also apply here.

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“I don’t have to pay taxes on my social security benefits.” unfortunately, social security benefits may be required to be included in income. The amount, if any, is based on the amount of all other income as required to be reported on the tax return. The maximum amount of social security benefits that may be included in income is 85 percent. “I own an s Corporation and was told I can take dividends in lieu of wages and save myself payroll taxes”. In regard to monies paid to shareholders/ employees of an s Corporation, reasonable compensation must be paid before any dividends or loan repayments are permitted. Failure to properly report wages could result in a reclassification of the dividends/ loan repayments as wages and subject you to penalties. “I am a student who only works part-time, so I don’t have to file a tax return.” In addition to age, tax filing requirements are reliant on filing status, dependency status, amount of income and whether it is earned or unearned. student status is not a factor. “My relative lives in one of my rentals but pays little if any rent. I can still treat it as a rental since I have so many expenses.” renting to relatives at amounts below fair market rental value is subject to limitations in that expenses cannot exceed income. There may be other limitations as well. The Tax Court has suggested that for a family member, a fair rent may be up to 20 percent less than market rent.

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financial advisors This is My Century. Theresa Lucero, Branch Manager Century Bank, Santa Fe

another taxpayer misconception is that tax preparers simply fill out forms and push a button. The real value of licensed professionals is that they keep up with countless tax laws and regulations and have the expertise to know how to apply these rules for the benefit of the taxpayer. a good preparer will provide you with a checklist that will help reveal missing documents or information so that a complete and accurate tax return is prepared. It is important to note that no matter who prepares your taxes, you are the one who is legally responsible for what’s on your return—making it even more important to hire a licensed tax professional. This brings us to one more misconception: that all return preparers are federally licensed. In fact, the only federally-licensed tax professionals are enrolled agents (Eas), who must pass a rigorous, three-part competency test and a background check. And in order to maintain the enrolled agent license, Eas must complete annual continuing education requirements in tax law and ethics. To find an Ea in your area, go to the “Find an Ea” directory at www.naea.org. about the National association of Enrolled agents (NaEa): NaEa is a non-profit membership organization composed of tax specialists licensed by the us Department of the Treasury.

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My wife and I separated last year and lived apart for most of the year. I should be able to file single now, correct?” Couples who are not legally divorced or separated as of the end of the year are precluded from filing single. unfortunately, taxpayers who prepare their own returns or deal with unlicensed preparers may fail to include important information simply because they overlook it, a document was never received, or more commonly, just from lack of knowledge of the tax laws.

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“My uncle has a foreign bank account and I’m also a signer on it – but he owns the account. I don’t have to disclose this information on my tax return since I don’t own the account.” Full disclosure of foreign accounts is an area that is under heavy scrutiny right now. There are several factors in determining disclosure of these accounts/assets. The penalties for failure to disclose are severe.

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Financial planner = financial doctor Financial planners are a little like family doctors. They can be generalists or specialists, and the best ones help you keep your affairs nicely in balance so that you can live a long, enjoyable life. Legitimate professional financial planners have a college diploma or university degree, along with specialized training. Ask which professional

associations they belong to. Be sure to check that their advice is given independently; that means find out who pays them. It is recommended that you meet at least once a year with your financial planner, so that they can put a human face to your file and so that you can continue to be assured that he or she is a trustworthy professional.

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THE NEW MEXICAN Lunes, el 17 de febrero, 2014

EL NUEVO MEXICANO Hombre recibe Estrella de Bronce Por Robert Nott The New Mexican

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l oriundo de Santa Fe Philip Aubrey — actualmente un sargento del Ejército Norteamericano — se unió a la Guardia Nacional en el 2000 mientras asistía a Santa Fe High School. Entonces, él sólo tenía una meta: “No veía la hora de salir de Santa Fe. Estaba contando los días,” comparte durante una entrevista telefónica. Pero después de su servicio de 13 años en el Ejército, incluso algunos combates en el exterior, Aubrey se dio cuenta de que no hay mejor lugar que su casa. “Irónicamente, para muchos de nosotros que estábamos ansiosos por salir, ahora lo único que queríamos era regresar. Mi esposa y yo bromeamos porque cada vez que el Ejército nos da la oportunidad de ir a algún lado, siempre pensamos en regresar a Santa Fe.” Hace sólo unas semanas, Aubrey recibió la medalla Estrella de Bronce al valor en Fort Bragg, N.C., donde vive con su esposa, Emma, dos perros y tres gatos. De los 32 años de edad, sirve en la Brigada Médica del Ejército. Al principio, el deseaba ser un oficial naval y después trató de unirse a las Fuerzas Especiales del Ejército. Pero el destino tenía otros planes para Aubrey al igual que otros factores — incluyendo un cuello roto mientras participaba en un simulacro de las Fuerzas Especiales — lo mantuvieron trabajando como médico del Ejército. Se unió a la Guardia Nacional del Ejército en Nuevo México como médico en combate porque necesitaba el dinero para asistir a la universidad. “Me dieron una asignación, lo cual hizo imposible que terminara la escuela a tiempo,” recuerda. Una asignación dio paso a otra, incluidas la Operaciones Libertad Iraquí y Nuevo Amanecer — ambas en Irak – Operación Resistiendo la Libertad en Afganistán y Operación Más Allá del Horizonte en Trinidad. Este veterano militar, con su pecho condecorado de medallas de servicio, recuerda haber sido un adolecente muy

Olimpíadas aumentan ganancias de Aeroflot Por Elena Popina y Halia Pavliva

Bloomberg News

OAO Aeroflot y Yandex NV son dos de las compañías rusas que más podrán beneficiarse con las Olimpíadas de Invierno de Sochi, según Otkritie Financial Corp. Si bien ayer Moody’s Investors Service dijo que es improbable que las Olimpíadas den lugar a un crecimiento más veloz en Rusia, los juegos generarán mayores ganancias para Aeroflot, la línea aérea más grande del país, y Yandex, el principal servicio de motor de búsqueda online, según Otkritie. Aeroflot aumentó la cantidad de vuelos diarios regulares de Moscú a Sochi de cinco a quince, según los datos que aparecen en su sitio web. Aeroflot dio un salto de 56 por ciento en Moscú desde fines de agosto. Yandex, que se duplicó el año pasado, tuvo un alza de 1.1 por ciento. El Índice Bloomberg Russia-US Equity de las acciones rusas más negociadas en los Estados Unidos avanzó 1 por ciento, mientras que los futuros sobre índices accionarios de la RTS subieron 0,2 por ciento, a 131.970. “Sus ingresos aumentarán aunque el impacto de los juegos en la economía total por ahora no sea significativo,” dijo Vladimir Tikhomirov, economista jefe de Otkritie, en una entrevista telefónica desde Moscú. “Hay muchas personas que vienen a los juegos. Todas usarán electricidad, transporte y otros servicios, y todas enviarán fotos a través del teléfono celular, llamarán a sus familiares y amigos en el extranjero y navegarán en Internet.” El gobierno prevé que 3 millones de turistas viajarán a ver los juegos en Sochi. Las Olimpíadas de Invierno 2014, que costaron alrededor de U.S. $50.000 millones, son la mayor inversión individual en infraestructura desde la caída de la Unión Soviética en 1991.

inquieto. “Nada peor que ausentismo escolar, quedarse rondando por las calles hasta tarde y manejar a alta velocidad,” dice. “Pasé mucho de mi tiempo en la preparatoria con el Cuerpo de Reserva [ROTC por sus siglas en inglés]. Quizá eso fue lo que me definió en la preparatoria.” Aún recuerda con cariño a dos maestras que dejaron una huella en él: la maestra Gutiérrez, su maestra de quinto grado en Atalaya Elementary School y la maestra Joan Kendrick, su maestra de inglés en la Santa Fe High School. Gutiérrez, dice, “fue una de las mejores maestras que he tenido. Hacía las clases interesantes y divertidas. Sabías que estabas con alguien que realmente se preocupaba por ti.” Respecto a Kendrick, “Quizá ella es la responsable de mi interés y apreciación por la escritura y la lectura.” En conversación telefónica, Kendrick comentó que todavía recuerda a Aubrey como un estudiante memorable porque él era “un poco más serio pensando sobre su vida que muchos de los estudiantes de su edad. Era honesto, directo y compasivo con sus compañeros.” Aubrey y su esposa intentan operar un centro de terapia para los veteranos que han sufrido de trastornos causados por el estrés postraumático. “Hay un estigma en el ejército contra buscar ayuda y hay mucha gente que lo necesita. En el ojo público, todos asumen que hay algo mal en ti, pero nadie quiere hacer algo al respecto.” Su madre, Karen Aubrey, vive y trabaja actualmente en Santa Fe como abogada. “Me siento afortunado de haber salido de Santa Fe y vivido la vida que llevé, ahora me encantaría regresar,” dice. “Santa Fe tiene su propia energía. No hay muchos lugares en el mundo donde tus papás te pueden dejar vagar con un galón de agua y caminar todo el día en las montañas. Esa independencia y apreciación por la naturaleza en un regalo que me dio Santa Fe.” Traducción de Patricia De Dios para The New Mexican.

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El Sgto. del Ejército Norteamericano Philip Aubrey, oriundo de Santa Fe, recibió recientemente la medalla Estrella de Bronce al valor en Fort Bragg, N.C., donde vive con su esposa, Emma. FOTO CORTESÍA

O 10779 Crucigrama No.N10779 CRUCIGRAMA Horizontales 1. Acción de puntuar. 7. Símbolo del fermio. 9. Prefijo “detrás”, “después de”. 10. Se dice de aquello distinto de que se habla. 12. Símbolo del galio. 14. Pandero árabe. 15. Prueba el gusto de una cosa. 17. Arbol venezolano de madera imputrescible. 19. (A ...) Por completo, con todo rigor. 20. Región desértica de Israel, que abarca la mitad sur del país. 22. Dios egipcio del sol. 23. Hermano de Caín. 24. El pico más alto del mundo, situado en la cordillera del Himalaya. 27. Tercer hijo de Adán y Eva. 28. Sacro. 30. Elevar plegaria. 34. Nota musical. 35. Que actúa o se hace en gran cantidad. 37. Estaca o rama plantada para que arraigue (pl.). 39. Plural de una vocal. 40. Municipio español de A Coruña. 41. Río de España. 43. Especie de violoncelo siamés. 44. Ser supremo y eterno, Creador del Universo. 46. Quitan algo raspando. 48. Partícula inseparable privativa. 49. Relativo a la congregación del Oratorio. Verticales 1. Gentil (fem.). 2. Símbolo del neptunio. 3. Deidad lunar egipcia. 4. Utilizaré. 5. Puestos de una parte a otra para impedir el paso.

‘Jesús tenía’ rebellious apostles

www.angelfreire.com

6. Señalaremos, marcaremos. 7. Símbolo del francio. 8. Que incluye modo o determinación particular. 11. Astrágalo, hueso (pl.) 13. Arbol ilicíneo, de hojas grandes, duras y espinosas (pl.). 15. Instrumento para medir pequeñas diferencias de altura. 16. A tempo. 18. (Vicente, 1750-1791) Patriota dominicano, que luchó contra la esclavitud. 21. Se dice del terreno húmedo. 25. Observad. 26. Inclinación o torcimiento en dirección transversal. 29. Bácara, planta labiada bienal. 31. Tipo de costa común en Galicia. 32. Del color de la rosa.

Solución del No. 10779 O

SOLUCION DEL N

10778 10779

33. Pone apodos. 36. Limpiar y acicalar. 38. Forma del pronombre de segunda persona. 42. Mostré alegría con el rostro. 45. Prefijo latino negativo. 47. Símbolo del sodio.

n día de Lent, Canutito came up to grampo después de la cena. Grama Cuca estaba washing los dishes en el sink and Grampo Caralampio estaba playing cards en la mesa. Canutito looked at grampo at said, “Oiga, grampo, I thought que you were going de hacer give up playing a la baraja como your Lenten sacrificio.” “I was, m’hijo,” grampo replied, “pero then hize realize que si if stopped Larry Torres jugando a la baraja después Growing up de dinner, I Spanglish would have to ayudarle a tu grama wash los trastes and I think que Jesus only asks por so much sacrificio pero he also wants us de estar contentos so I gave up putting mis manos into hot water instead and si hago wash dishes entonces, I am sinning.” “¡Convenencias!” Grama Cuca called to him desde el fregadero. “Tú no haces sacrifice; tú haces find ways to give up todas las cosas que you don’t like to do anyway! I’m sure de que Jesús no tenía trouble trying to get a sus apóstoles to do what he wanted.” “Did Jesus really have trouble con los apostles, grampo?” Canutito asked a su grandfather. “Sí señor,” Grampo Caralampio affirmed Canutito. “Los twelve apóstoles tenían un rebellious streak y no siempre querían hacer lo que Jesus asked of them. “Really, grampo?” Canutito asked him. “Did los apóstoles resistir Jesus’ commands? ¿Por qué did they do that?” “Es porque he didn’t know cómo hacer ask por bien,” grampo said. “Primero he said to them ‘Muchachos, would you please go traer some firewood para hacer dinner?’ And when they asked him ‘Who says?’ He answered ‘Andrew says’ — pero no, they wouldn’t move ni un muscle.” “Entonces Jesús asked a sus apóstoles, ‘Muchachos would go please go y hacer fish en el Sea of Galilee for truchas to eat?’ Pero los apóstoles asked Jesus, ‘Who says?’ and he answered ‘James says,’ and they replied ‘Sorry!’ — y no fueron.” Then Jesús tried to get a los apóstoles to cooperar con él once again. He said to them, ‘Vayan al río and get me some agua to change into vino.’ Otra vez los apóstoles asked him, ‘Who says?’ y Jesús respondió, ‘Matthew says,’ — y once again the apostles no querían ir and they said, ‘Lo siento.’ ” “What were los apóstoles waiting for, grampo?” Canutito asked a su grampo. “Jesús estaba asking real nice y hasta dijo ‘please’ to them.” “Sí,” grampo agreed, “pero los apostles estaban esperando something else. Entonces Jesús asked them, ‘Muchachos, por el amor de Dios, would you please go give some dinero to los pobres who don’t have nada?’ Pero cuando los apóstoles asked him again, ‘Who says?’ and he answered ‘Judas says,’ they answered ‘Absolutamente no’ — and they wouldn’t do lo que Jesús les pedía.” Canutito wracked su brain, trying to figure out lo que Jesus was doing wrong pero no podía hacer figure out por qué los apóstoles estaban todos rebellious. Jesús was being polite pero los apóstoles were just más stubborn que una mula. Finally Jesús hizo pray muncho antes de hacer ask a sus apóstoles to do un favor para él. So he approached a los doce muchachos and said, ‘Please, please, please, con un poquito de sugar on top, would you please hacer pray conmigo?’ Los apostles hicieron shrug los shoulders and asked him otra vez, ‘Who says?’ Entonces Jesús answered, ‘Simon says.’ –That’s when the los apostles all jumped up and did lo qué Jesus wanted.” “Pero, por qué, grampo?” Canutito asked him, todo confused. “Porque, he said ‘Simon says’ primero,” grampo answered. Canutito groaned …


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

TECH

GAME REVIEW

‘Final Fantasy XIII’ fizzles at the finish line

2014 WINTER OLYMPICS

By Lou Kesten

The Associated Press

Members of the United States Olympic team — many of them holding up mobile phones to record the moment — enter Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia, for the opening ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics on Feb. 7. PETR DAVID JOSEK/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tweeting for Olympians Some athletes turning over their social media accounts to sponsors By John Leicester

The Associated Press

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OCHI, Russia — Between photos and insights about their Olympic experience, some Olympians are turning over their social media accounts to sponsors, agreeing to quotas of postings on Twitter and Facebook and letting other people send commercial messages in their name. The agents for U.S. figure skaters Ashley Wagner and Gracie Gold both say sponsors draft some of their tweets, plugging their brands. “This is the first Olympics where I actually have a social media calendar, where an athlete has to tweet or mention something on a given day,” Gold’s agent, Yuki Saegusa, said in an interview. “We get a list of tweets or social media things that need to be posted and then we approve them for her,” said Saegusa, senior vice president for Olympic clients at sports management giant IMG. Although they “encourage” Gold to post the prepackaged commercial tweets to her 65,000 followers herself, sometimes others do it for her. “We want it to be from her point of view, and from her mouth and from her fingers. So we try to get her to do them — mostly,” Saegusa said. “We’re in a very new age now where a lot of advertising, or PR,

Figure skater Ashley Wagner reacts after learning results in a Feb. 8 competition at the Iceberg Skating Palace in Sochi, Russia. DARRON CUMMINGS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

or promotions, is social media. That’s becoming a very important aspect of marketing.” Wagner’s IMG agent, David Baden, said athletes’ sponsorship deals are now starting to specify “how many tweets, how many Facebook mentions and even Instagram” photos they must post. “That is part of the contract now. That is how important social media has become,” he said. “The last Olympics, that

was not the case.” Baden, an IMG vice president for Olympic clients, worked with skating bronze medalist Joannie Rochette at the 2010 Vancouver Games. He said they have access to Wagner’s account, so they can post commercial tweets to her 60,000 followers. “It’s not like Ashley doesn’t know about these. I mean we send her all these. She had to approve

all of them, and so it’s not that she does not know what is being said. She’s seen it. She’s part of this whole process,” he said. “It’s just that with her schedule, and if we can make things easier, what’s the difference?” Sponsors make sure schedules of tweets are adhered to. “We’ll get a message, usually, from the sponsor, and just say[ing] ‘Just reminding you this week, these tweets,” he said. “I’ll send it to my assistant. And she’ll just say; ‘Yes, I have it already in queue to do it.’ ” The agents did not specify which of their athletes’ tweets in recent months were drafted and posted on their behalf. The verified accounts of both Gold and Wagner — GraceEGold and AshWagner2010 — have referenced their own and U.S. Olympic Committee sponsors, in tweets and re-tweets. It’s not clear which recent postings were paid for, but after the Feb. 7 opening ceremony, Gold sent out an Instagram photo of herself holding a lipstick applier. “Couldn’t forget the red lips,” it read. As well as CoverGirl, her Twitter profile lists other sponsors: Visa, United Airlines, Procter & Gamble Family, Smucker’s, Pandora Jewelry and Airweave. Baden says to fulfill their contracts, simply retweeting a tweet first sent by a sponsor isn’t sufficient. When on one occasion he used his own account to send a sponsor’s tweet and then asked Wagner to retweet it, “they called me and said, ‘No, no. No retweets. It has to come from her.’ ”

NBC producer goes for gold with viral videos By David Bauder

The Associated Press

STAMFORD, Conn. — At 3:30 a.m. on the day before the Olympics started, Brian Gilmore was glancing at the giant television screen that dominates a workroom at NBC Sports Group’s headquarters when something caught his eye. A luge competitor from India, Shiva Keshavan, had fallen off his sled during a training run and, somewhat miraculously, had hoisted himself back on while speeding down the course. Gilmore shouted across the room for someone to capture the video and asked colleagues whether they had ever seen anything like it. No one had. Gilmore posted the video on NBC’s Olympics website and within a few days, more than 1.5 million people watched it. Gilmore, a senior director at NBC Sports, is assigned to create viral videos for the Olympics. His job is to find moments — wacky, heartbreaking or heartwarming — to break out and post in the hope of generating the most online traffic possible. “Our job is to find things that can resonate,” said Gilmore, who works with some four dozen people responsible for monitoring streams of every competition in Sochi

and breaking out clips for highlight packages. Each person sits behind multiple computer screens. Clocks on either side of a 159-inch TV screen on the wall tell the time in Sochi and Stamford. Somewhat improbably, Keshavan’s clip was the NBC Olympics site’s most popular clip for several days until Olga Graf blew by him. The Russian speedskater was captured by cameras after a race zipping down her Lycra uniform front to cool off, only to quickly zip it back up when she realized she had nothing on underneath. The clip was G-rated but still, more than 2.5 million people had to see for themselves. Other popular clips include an interview with tearful American skier Hannah Kearney, overcome at the realization her career was ending with a bronze instead of gold medal; skier Todd Lodwick “photo-bombing” NBC’s Randy Moss as Moss reported on him; luger Kate Hansen psyching herself up for competition with a dance routine; and a cross-country skier who pressed on despite a broken ski. The Russian police choir’s rendition of “Get Lucky” before the opening ceremony earned 1.6 million clicks. Gilmore’s job requires a different mindset than television producers; the “Get Lucky” performance didn’t make it on NBC televi-

sion until it became a sensation online. It’s harder to describe a moment than it is to recognize one. “You know it when you see it,” he said. “You’re looking for emotion. You’re looking for things you’ve never seen before.” Crashes, wipeouts, spills — whatever you call them — are popular. But you have to be careful. “You don’t like to celebrate injury,” Gilmore said. A key for Gilmore is being surrounded by an experienced team, with as many people as possible who have worked the Olympics before and understand the pace. The clips become viral strictly within NBC’s universe. The company keeps them for NBC’s own websites and doesn’t spread them around the Web. Success in highlighting a video that many people want to see means success financially. NBC is seeking as much traffic for its digital platform as possible, and each time these videos are opened, an advertisement plays. Clips deemed good enough are given front-page attention on the NBC Olympics websites. “Not everything can make the primetime show, but we can put what we want up there,” he said.

I love Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films, but even the biggest Tolkien geek has to admit that The Return of the King drags at the end. It’s nice to say farewell to all the dwarves and elves and hobbits we’ve come to know and love, but — heck, just wake me when it’s over. Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII (Square Enix, for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, $59.99) is like the last 20 minutes of The Return of the King stretched over a 50-hour-plus video game. So you get tearful goodbyes from Snow, Fang, Vanille and the rest of the gang you met back at the beginning of this trilogy, 2009’s Final Fantasy XIII — even though you probably already forgot about them long ago. You don’t need to have played the earlier XIII chapters to understand Lightning Returns. (Indeed, I defy anyone to make sense of the train wreck of timetravel paradoxes in 2012’s Final Fantasy XIII-2.) Here’s the essence: The heroine, a warrior named Lightning, has been reincarnated with godlike powers. The world is going to end in 13 days, and her task is to save as many souls as possible. So, every morning Lightning departs the celestial plane and enters the more Earthly realm of Nova Chrysalis. Each neighborhood is packed with pilgrims preparing for the Rapture. Some may ask you to kill a few monsters; others may present more complicated tasks, like nursing a chocobo (the giant chicken who’s sort of the mascot of Final Fantasy) back to health. The clock is always ticking, and you can’t solve everyone’s dilemmas, although which missions are more important becomes quickly apparent. I found the artificial time constraint frustrating; Lightning Returns feints toward the open-world adventure of, say, Skyrim, then punishes you if you spend too much time exploring. Battles have evolved into more fast-paced affairs. You can dress Lightning in three outfits — one heavily armored, one built for physical attacks and one built for magic. During a fight, you can switch outfits on the fly, and you’ll need to because enemies constantly change their attacks. It’s essentially like switching among three different characters, and it’s a challenging and ultimately rewarding system that makes almost every battle feel fresh. Like any Final Fantasy game, Lightning Returns kicks around some weighty ideas about fate, duty, redemption and salvation. And it offers a few nice, personal moments among Lightning and her former comrades. But as delivered over three games and 150plus hours, the story told by the Final Fantasy XIII trilogy is bloated, incoherent and ultimately silly. It aims for “wow” and settles for “huh?” Two stars out of four. uuu

Bravely Default (Nintendo, for the 3DS, $39.99) has Final Fantasy in its DNA — Square Enix published it in Japan — and fans of the older Final Fantasy epics will adore it. You are a boy named Tiz, and your hometown has been destroyed by an earthquake. Of course, supernatural forces are at work, and you must join forces with three more plucky youngsters to save your world from oblivion. Combat is what role-playing aficionados call “turnbased.” This where players select their four characters’ actions from a menu and watch them play out. The gimmick here is that any character can “default,” assuming a defensive stance and storing up energy. On the next turn, you can select “brave” to unleash that pent-up energy, making your attacks doubly effective. The brave/default strategy becomes more important in end-of-dungeon boss battles, when one wrong choice can get your entire party killed. And be warned: At its initial setting, this is one tough game. Don’t feel guilty about fiddling with the menus and dialing down the difficulty. The story drags at times and doesn’t hold many surprises, but Bravely Default does offer plenty of flexibility in building your characters as they rampage across the wilderness. It’s a beautifully executed homage to the Japanese RPGs many of us grew up on, and could even inspire younger gamers to hunt down some of those old-school gems. Three stars out of four.

On the Web u www.lightningreturns.com u bravelydefault.nintendo.com

A scene from the video game Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII. SQUARE ENIX/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Out now: Games These games were scheduled for release last week, according to Gamestop.com:

Feb. 11 u Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated T) u One Piece: Romance Dawn (Nintendo 3DS; rated T) u Toukiden: The Age of Demons (PS Vita; rated T) u Far Cry Compilation (PlayStation 3; rated M) u Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (PS Vita; rated M) Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

A-11

Hone art of listening so More talking, longer sentences help babies kids will talk

FAMILY

Dr. Gregory Ramey

Cox Media Group

New research shows connecting terms and meanings could fight ‘word gap’

TAlking Tips u The sooner you start talking with babies, the better. u The high-pitched, singsong tone that many people take with babies does get their attention, but don’t dumb it down.

By Lauran Neergaard

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The sooner you start explaining the world to your baby, the better. That doesn’t mean flash cards for tots, or merely pointing out objects: “Here’s an orange. That’s a bowl.” New research shows that both how much and how well parents talk with babies and toddlers help to tune the youngsters’ brains in ways that build crucial language and vocabulary skills — a key to fighting the infamous “word gap” that puts poor children at a disadvantage at an even younger age than once thought. The idea is to connect words and meaning, so the brain becomes primed to learn through context: “Let’s put the orange in this bowl with the banana and the apple and the grapes.” “You’re building intelligence through language,” is how Stanford University psychology professor Anne Fernald explains it. “It’s making nets of meaning that then will help the child learn new words.” And forget dumbed-down baby talk: Longer, more complex sentences are better. “The advice I give mothers is to have conversations with your babies,” said Erika Hoff, a psychology professor at Florida Atlantic University. “Children can hear lots of talk that goes over their head in terms of the meaning, and they still benefit from it.” The research, presented Thursday and Friday at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, comes

u Don’t just label things; make connections. u What matters most is speech directed to babies and toddlers, not what they overhear. u Turn off the TV. Babies and toddlers especially require personal interaction to learn.

Jennifer Rogers with her baby, Jack, last month in their home in Edmond, Okla. Studies show that both how much and how well parents talk with babies and toddlers help sharpen the youngsters’ brains. SUE OGROCKI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

amid a growing push for universal preschool to help disadvantaged youngsters catch up. But it also begs the question of whether children from lowincome, less educated families need earlier intervention, such as preschool that starts at age 3 instead of 4, or higher quality day care or even some sort of “Let’s talk” campaign aimed at new parents to stress talking, singing and reading with tots even before they can respond. That can be difficult for parents working multiple jobs, or who may not read well or who simply don’t know why it’s important. Scientists have long known that before they start kindergarten, children from middle-class or affluent families have heard millions more words than youngsters from low-income families, leaving the poorer children with smaller vocabularies and less ready to succeed academically. Fernald said by some measures, 5-year-olds from low-income families can lag two years behind their peers in

u Fit conversation into everyday activities.

tests of language development, an achievement gap that’s difficult to overcome. Brain scans support the link, said Dr. Kimberly Noble of Columbia University Medical Center. Early experiences shape the connections that children’s brains form, and kids from higher socioeconomic backgrounds devote more “neural real estate” to brain regions involved in language development, she found. How early does the word gap appear? Around age 18 months, Stanford’s Fernald discovered when she compared how children mentally process the language they hear. Lower-income kids in her study achieved at age 2 the level of proficiency that more affluent kids had reached six months earlier. To understand why language processing is so important, consider this sentence: “The kitty’s on the bench.” If the youngster knows the word “kitty,” and his brain recognizes it quickly enough, then he can figure out what “bench”

© 2012 by Vicki Whiting, Editor

Dawn Armato-Brehm, Graphics

means by the context. But if he’s slow to recognize “kitty,” then “bench” flies by before he has a chance to learn it. Next, Fernald tucked recorders into T-shirts of low-income toddlers in Spanish-speaking households to determine what they heard all day — and found remarkable differences in what’s called child-directed speech. That’s when children are spoken to directly, in contrast to television or conversations they overhear. One child heard more than 12,000 words of child-directed speech in a day, while another heard a mere 670 words, she found. The youngsters who received more child-directed speech processed language more efficiently and learned words more quickly, she reported. But it’s not just quantity of speech that matters — it’s quality, Hoff cautioned. She studied bilingual families and found that whatever the language, children fare better when they learn it from a native speaker.

Vol. 28, No. 37

DAYTON, Ohio — Communicating with your kids is all about talking in a way that they will listen, but also listening in a way that they will talk. Listening isn’t easy, as many parents ignore the Law of Moderation, either talking too much or not saying enough in response to their kids’ comments. If you say nothing, youngsters don’t know if you really understood them. If you respond too aggressively, kids feel like you may be dismissing their concerns. Here are the five keys to effective listening. u Give your full attention. Conversations with kids often seem to happen at inconvenient times, such as when you just get home from work or are busy doing something else. Postpone what you are doing and listen to your child. u Ask lots of questions. Many youngsters aren’t sophisticated in clearly articulating their thoughts and feelings. Their words may be imprecise or extreme. Instead of getting upset, ask open-ended questions such as “Can you tell me more about that?” or “What happened then?” u Summarize the main idea. Talk less so you can listen more. However, after your child has spoken for a few minutes, try to summarize the main idea of what you think you heard. “So you believe you’ve proven you’re responsible enough to drive because your grades are excellent’’ may be a good summary of a teen’s argument for getting a learner’s permit. u Summarize the main feeling. Sometimes kids just want your warm presence and acceptance, not a solution to their situation. In these types of conversations, young people are more interested in your understanding of how they feel, not what they think. You need to listen really carefully to the undertones and emotions of the conversation. Try to say back the main feeling (not idea) of what they are experiencing. “So you really want to get your learner’s permit, but you seem anxious about getting into an accident.” Don’t offer false reassurances to your child. Such comments may have the unintended consequence of actually dismissing your child’s feelings. u End the conversation. Don’t rush to a solution or feel as if it is your responsibility to solve your child’s problems. Sometimes that best way to end a conversation is simply to thank your teen for bringing up some issue and give it more time for consideration. Dr. Gregory Ramey is a child psychologist at Dayton Children’s Hospital. Email him at rameyg@ childrensdayton.org.

The Black Hills of South Dakota are home to the Crazy Horse Memorial and Mt. Rushmore. The four presidential heads carved on Mt. Rushmore would fit inside the horse’s head on the Crazy Horse Memorial!

Draw a line to each state bordering South Dakota.

be taller than the Washington Monument. Each eye is large enough to hold a car! Four thousand people can stand on its outstretched arm!

mountain in the Black Hills of South Dakota is being carved into the shape of a man. It is a giant carving of Crazy Horse, a fearless and famous warrior of the Lakota tribe. When it is finished, the Crazy Horse Memorial will be the biggest sculpture in the world. It will

Chief Standing Bear and other Native American chiefs invited sculptor, Korczak Ziolkowski to carve a mountain in memory of Crazy Horse.

MONUMENT HERE

Standards Links: Social Science: Students use map skills to determine the absolute location of places.

Find the words in the puzzle,

CRAZY then in this week’s Kid Scoop HORSE stories and activities. MEMORIAL C E R O M H S U R S SCULPTURE A M R V I N G E C K KORCZAK RUSHMORE D A E L D R S U A C DAKOTA L E L M E R L Z D A BLACK R S A V O P C I W L HILLS O M R H T R R O K B CARVE W A A U O G I A N T WORLD C N R K B Y Z A R C IOWA GIANT D E D A K O T A L Y HAND Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognizing identical GRID words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.

Standards Link: Reading comprehension: Follow simple written directions. Math: Construct models in scale.

Feather DD ft. tall

FDA ft. long Head HG 1/2 ft. tall Arm BFC ft. long

EFC ft. tall Hand CC ft. tall Mane FB ft. tall Horsesʼs head BAJ ft. tall

When the Crazy Horse Memorial is completed, it will be the largest sculpture in the world. Use the code to find out how big the sculpture will be. A= 1 E = 5 J = 9 B= 2 F = 6 K = 10 C= 3 G= 7 L = 11

Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Follow simple written directions.

D= 4 H = 8 R = 12

Choose one page of the newspaper. Give yourself a set amount of time, say one minute, to list as many words on the page as you can in ABC order. Standards Link: Spelling: Arrange words in alphabetical order.

drawing paper pencils timer landmark cards (below) 4 or more players, working in teams • paper lunchbag

HOW TO PLAY 1. Cut out the landmark cards below and place in paper lunchbag. (You can make more once you’ve used all of these.) 2. Divide into two teams of two players or more. 3. Player from Team A pulls a landmark card from the bag without showing it to anyone else. 4. Team A player has 60 seconds to silently draw the landmark as Team A players shout out guesses. If they guess correctly before time expires, that’s worth 10 points. 5. If no one on the team guesses correctly, then the other team has one guess. If they are wrong, move on to the next turn. But if they guess right, the team earns 20 points! 6. Repeat the above for Team B, and keep going until one side earns 100 points.

Look at the small drawing of Crazy Horse. It is drawn in a grid made up of small boxes. Above is a grid with larger boxes. Copy the drawing of Crazy Horse, one box at a time and you will make a drawing that is larger than the original.

STUFF YOU’LL NEED • • • • •

Standards Link: History: Students understand how heroes from long ago have made a difference in othersʼ lives; students understand the ways in which American Indians have helped define American culture.

You can make a small picture larger in much the same way Ziolkowski enlarged his small sculpture of Crazy Horse.

How well do you and your friends and family know America’s famous landmarks?

MOUNT RUSHMORE

Memory Buddies

Play this game with a buddy. Choose a picture from the newspaper. You and your buddy study the picture for one minute. Then cover the picture and take turns telling each other everything you can remember about it. Standards Link: Oral Language: Provide descriptions with detail.

HOOVER DAM GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE LIBERTY BELL GATEWAY ARCH THE ALAMO THE WHITE HOUSE OLD FAITHFUL GEYSER ROUTE 66 NIAGRA FALLS SPACE NEEDLE GRAND CANYON

If you were going to make a sculpture to honor someone or something, what would it be? Describe it in detail.

LINCOLN MEMORIAL STATUE OF LIBERTY EMPIRE STATE BUILDING WASHINGTON MONUMENT


A-12

LOCAL & REGION

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

Holiday closings

u Post offices will be closed, and regular mail delivery will be suspended. u Santa Fe Public Schools will be closed.

Hours of operation at some offices and u Some financial institutions will be closed. institutions will be affected by the observance u Santa Fe Community College will be open. of Presidents Day on Monday, Feb. 17: u The Santa Fe Trails buses and Rail Runner u Federal government offices will be Express passenger trains will run on a regular closed. However, state, city and county govweekday schedule. ernment offices will be open.

How they voted would suspend until March 15, 2015, a law imposing a ceiling WASHINGTON — Here’s a look on the amount of debt the fedat how area members of Coneral government can assume. gress voted over the previous A supporter, Rep. Dave Camp, week. R-Mich., said the debt ceiling needed to be lifted in order to avoid a debt default, but Camp also criticized Democrats for refusing to negotiate with House vote 1 Republicans on fiscal reforms Delivering drought informa- that could diminish the pace of tion: The House has passed debt growth. The vote, on Feb. the National Integrated Drought 11, was 221 yeas to 201 nays. Information System Reauthori- Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Luján zation Act (HR 2431), sponsored Nays: Pearce by Rep. Ralph M. Hall, R-Texas. The bill would authorize House vote 5 $13.5 million of annual fundTrading securities of small ing for the National Integrated growth companies: The Drought Information System House has passed the Small through fiscal 2018 and direct Cap Liquidity Reform Act the system to work with other (HR 3448), sponsored by federal agencies and state and Rep. Sean P. Duffy, R-Wis. The local governments to combill would authorize the Securimunicate drought forecasts and information about drought ties and Exchange Commission to develop a five-year pilot conditions. Hall said the program for pricing the securireauthorization “will improve interagency coordination, early ties of companies designated as emerging growth companies warnings, critical data sharing in 5-cent and 10-cent increand decision services related to drought. The bill encourages ments, also known as tick sizes. Duffy said the pilot program further research, monitoring could increase the ability of the and forecasting, along with further development of regional emerging growth companies to access public securities early warning systems.” The markets to raise capital and vote, on Feb. 10, was 365 yeas improve their liquidity. The to 21 nays. vote, on Feb. 11, was 412 yeas Yeas: Rep. Michelle Lujan to 4 nays. Grisham, D-N.M.; Rep. Ben Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Luján, Ray Luján, D-N.M.; Rep. Steve Pearce Pearce, R-N.M. By Targeted News Service

policies aimed at protecting and advancing U.S. economic, political and security interests.” The vote, on Feb. 11, was 92 yeas to 6 nays. Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

House votes

Senate vote 4

House vote 2 Unrest in Ukraine: The House has passed a resolution (HRes 447), sponsored by Rep. Eliot L. Engel, D-N.Y., to support Ukrainians’ goal of a closer relationship with the European Union and protests against their government’s abandonment of talks for reaching an economic pact with the EU, and call on the Ukrainian government to drop charges against peaceful protesters and prosecute those who have attacked the protesters. Engel said the resolution was a message of support for Ukrainians “as they seek to build a democratic, prosperous and secure Ukraine, respecting human rights and dignity and anchored firmly in Europe.” The vote, on Feb. 10, was 381 yeas to 2 nays. Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Luján, Pearce

Senate votes Senate vote 1 Public diplomacy at State Department: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Richard Stengel to serve as under secretary of state for public diplomacy. A supporter, Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., cited Stengel’s more than 30 years of experience as an author and journalist, including, most recently, seven years as managing editor of Time magazine, and Stengel’s service as CEO of the National Constitution Center. The vote, on Feb. 11, was 90 yeas to 8 nays. Yeas: Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M.

Counterterrorism coordinator at State: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Tina S. Kaidanow to serve as coordinator for counterterrorism at the State Department. A supporter, Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., cited Kaidanow’s recent service as deputy ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan and as deputy assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs. Menendez said Kaidanow “has shown the ability to forge the types of partnerships necessary to advance the counterterrorism objectives and national security of the United States.” The vote, on Feb. 12, was unanimous with 98 yeas. Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

Senate vote 5 Intelligence at State: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Daniel Bennett Smith to serve as assistant secretary of state for intelligence and research. A supporter, Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., cited Smith’s career in the Senior Foreign Service, including highlevel positions in the State Department and a recent fouryear term as ambassador to Greece. Menendez said Smith would give State Department officials valuable advice on numerous intelligence issues and their relationship to foreign policy. The vote, on Feb. 12, was unanimous with 98 yeas. Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

Senate vote 6

Lifting debt ceiling: The Senate has concurred in the House amendment to the Temporary Debt Limit Extension Act (S 540), sponsored by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H. The bill would suspend until March 15, 2015, a law imposing a ceiling on the amount of debt the federal government can assume. A supporter, SenSenate vote 2 ate Majority Leader Harry Reid, said the bill would “avert Human rights and democa catastrophic default on our racy: The Senate has connation’s obligations — a default firmed the nomination of that would have thrown our Sarah Sewall to serve as under House vote 3 economy into a tailspin and secretary of state for civilian Military pensions: The security, democracy and human damaged this nation’s standHouse has passed the South rights. A supporter, Sen. Robert ing in the world.” An opponent, Utah Valley Electric Conveyance Menendez, D-N.J., cited Sewall’s Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said that with annual budget deficits Act (S 25), sponsored by past positions as a professor projected to increase to nearly Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah. at the Naval War College and The bill would state that director of Harvard University’s $1 trillion by 2024, Congress needed to focus on the threat military members who enlisted Carr Center for Human Rights the accumulated debt poses before 2014 will receive full Policy, and current position as to the U.S. and put the governcost-of-living adjustments for senior lecturer in public policy ment on a sustainable path for their retirement benefits, with at the John F. Kennedy School budgeting. The vote, on Feb. 12, the $6 billion cost of the benof Government at Harvard. was 55 yeas to 43 nays. efits offset by extending cuts Menendez said that as under in Medicare spending through secretary, Sewall would address Yeas: Heinrich, Udall fiscal 2024 rather than fiscal “a range of issues, including 2023. A supporter, Rep. Michael challenges to civilian security Senate vote 7 Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., said the in Latin America; Syria’s growMilitary retiree benefits: bill would “treat our veterans ing refugee problem, which is The Senate has concurred in with the honor they deserve a concern for us in terms of the House amendment to the by ensuring that they are fully the entire region and our good South Utah Valley Electric compensated for their service ally — Jordan, for example; Conveyance Act (S 25), sponduring retirement,” while the counterterrorism; counternarsored by Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, Medicare cuts would provide cotics; human trafficking; and R-Utah. The bill would state “much-needed stability for the women’s issues.” The vote, on that military members who medical community by ensurFeb. 11, was 97 yeas to 1 nay. enlisted before 2014 will ing that physicians have the Yeas: Heinrich, Udall receive full cost-of-living predictability in billing they adjustments for their retireneed to further their practice Senate vote 3 ment benefits, with the $6 biland to focus on their patients.” lion cost of the benefits offset Economic diplomacy at An opponent, Rep. Adam by extending cuts in Medicare State Department: The SenSmith, D-Wash., said the spending through fiscal 2024 ate has confirmed the nominaincrease in benefits would rather than fiscal 2023. A tion of Charles Hammerman mean a $700 million cut in the supporter, Sen. John Hoeven, Rivkin to serve as assistant military’s annual operating budsecretary of state for economic R-N.D., said the bill “ensures get, with a consequent reducour military retirees will receive and business affairs. A suption in military readiness. The their much-deserved retireporter, Sen. Robert Menendez, vote, on Feb. 11, was 326 yeas ment.” An opponent, Sen. Jeff D-N.J., said Rivkin, who was to 90 nays. Flake, R-Ariz., said “fast-growrecently U.S. ambassador to Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Pearce ing retirement pay and health France and before that the Nays: Luján benefits are threatening to CEO of entertainment compadisplace investments in the nies such as The Jim Henson House vote 4 readiness of our armed forces,” Company and Wildbrain, “has and the bill would make that Lifting debt ceiling: The demonstrated the skill and the problem worse by increasing House has passed the Tempoexperience needed to lead the benefits. The vote, on Feb. 12, rary Debt Limit Extension Act State Department’s participawas 95 yeas to 3 nays. (S 540), sponsored by Sen. tion in formulating and impleJeanne Shaheen, D-N.H. The bill menting international economic Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

Police notes The Santa Fe Police Department is investigating the following reports: u A Deming woman said someone broke into her vehicle between 9:30 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. Saturday while it was parked at the Comfort Suites, 3348 Cerrillos Road. u Someone stole about $200 in cash from Mist Skin Care, 1520 Paseo de Peralta, between 5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. Saturday. Damage to two windows was estimated at about $225. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department is investigating the following reports: u Deputies arrested Salomon Salmeron, 73, on arson charges after he allegedly set fire to a house in Cerrillos and then fled the scene. The house did not

sustain any serious damage. u Jewelry and electronic equipment were stolen from a residence on West Gutierrez Street sometime between 1 and 10:30 p.m. Saturday. u A 97-year-old man was found dead at his home in the 2000 block of Calle Vera Cruz on Saturday. Foul play is not suspected.

DWI arrest u Police arrested Oscar Rodriguez, 21, of Santa Fe on charges of aggravated DWI, reckless driving and driving with a revoked license after pulling him over at about 3:30 a.m. Sunday on Vegas Verde.

Speed SUVs u Mobile speed-enforcement

vehicles are not in use as the city negotiates its contract with Redflex Traffic Systems.

Help lines Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families hotline: 800-473-5220 St. Elizabeth Shelter for men, women and children: 982-6611 Interfaith Community Shelter: 795-7494 Youth Emergency Shelter/ Youth Shelters: 438-0502 New Mexico suicide prevention hotline: 866-435-7166 Solace Crisis Treatment Center: 986-9111, 800-721-7273 or TTY 471-1624 Police and fire emergency: 911

Funeral services and memorials WILLIAM ZECKENDORF JR. 1929-2014 William Zeckendorf Jr., one of the nation’s foremost real estate developers in the 1970s and 80s, died February 12 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He was 84. Invariably self-effacing, Zeckendorf insisted that his buildings merited the attention, not himself. Nevertheless, he was the motivating force and key player behind a broad range of outstanding real estate projects, primarily in New York City. Among his most recognizable and celebrated are Worldwide Plaza, Zeckendorf Towers (named for his father), the Four Seasons Hotel, and the Ronald Reagan Office Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C. Other projects include the renovation and sale of five major New York hotels, among them the Delmonico and the Mayfair, and the construction of luxury high-rises such as The Park Belvedere, Central Park Place, The Belaire, and The Vanderbilt, which, along with the Columbia and others, brought the city more than 4,000 new condominiums and rental apartments. Working on a smaller scale better suited to the Southwest, Zeckendorf also developed noteworthy projects for Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he later settled. Like his great-grandfather and namesake, who immigrated to Santa Fe from Germany in the 1860s to do business here, Zeckendorf was an impressive, revitalizing force. Bill Zeckendorf was born to the trade. Early on his father, William "Big Bill" Zeckendorf Sr., was the real estate industry’s shining star, with skill, vision, and daring raising the firm of Webb & Knapp to unparalleled heights. Zeckendorf Jr., a graduate of the Lawrenceville School in Princeton, New Jersey, studied at the University of Arizona and served with commendation in the U.S Army in Korea before joining his father’s firm full time in 1950. At Webb & Knapp he was well schooled in the planning, financing, and development of large-scale properties, proving himself as canny, creative, and tenacious at brokering deals as his father. Beginning in the mid-60s, the company underwent two restructurings—first as General Property Corporation, then as Zeckendorf Company—becoming New York City’s most active developers of luxury hotels, upscale condominium apartments, office towers, and mixed-use projects, in the process redefining the city’s face and skyline. Bill Zeckendorf Jr. was also president of the Federal Triangle Corporation, the firm responsible for developing the Ronald Reagan Office Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., the largest federal building to rise in the capital since the Pentagon. At the height of the Zeckendorf Company’s expansion in the 1980s, Zeckendorf was joined by his two sons—William Lie and Arthur—from his first marriage to Guri Lie, daughter of Trygve Lie, the UN’s first Secretary-General. During the next decade, the company’s portfolio was the 12th largest in the country. At the same time, Zeckendorf was busy with an entirely different portfolio, concentrated on Santa Fe and its surrounding hills. In conjunction with his second wife, Nancy—a former prima ballerina with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet and an ardent supporter of the arts—Zeckendorf became a significant presence in the area. He developed the Eldorado Hotel, the award-winning Los Miradores condominium complex, the prestigious community of Sierra del Norte, and one of his most gratifying projects, the Lensic Performing Arts Center, transforming a quaint 1930s movie house into the cultural axis of Northern New Mexico. While in New York, Zeckendorf was a trustee of Long Island University and served as its board chairman for 10 years. As his focus turned increasingly toward Santa Fe, he joined the boards of the Christus St. Vincent Hospital, the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the College of Santa Fe, and the Lensic Performing Arts Center. From the outset, he was an energizing force behind the Lensic and the preeminent guide to closing the deal on the property and getting the project off the ground. Zeckendorf’s passion throughout his adult life was fine wines, with an emphasis on the wines of Burgundy. For more than 50 years he was a member of the Confrerie des Chevaliers du Tastevin, serving for nine of those years as New York City’s Grand Senechal. During his term as president of the Tastevin Foundation, he created a Laureate Program for American students earning a degree in wine-making from the University of California, Davis, that offered them a semester’s study at French wineries. William Zeckendorf Jr. is survived by his wife, Nancy; his sister, Susan Zeckendorf Nicholson; his son William Lie and daughter-inlaw Laura; his son Arthur; and his two grandchildren, Arthur III and Jennifer Zeckendorf. The family wishes to express their deepest thanks to those who helped care for Mr. Zeckendorf with such professionalism and unstinting kindness. They are Connie Ross, who has been with the family for 12 years, Sammi Hendrix, Eric Chambers, Robert Cather, Jason Wright, John Santos, and Egis Care and Support; doctors Tom Kravitz, Vivian Lee, Poseidon Varvitsiotis, and Michael Palestine; hospital nurse Tony Engelman; and the staff of Christus St. Vincent. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 West San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501.

DAVID EARL MAEZ 8/16/1962 ~ 2/8/2014

Passed away peacefully at home with family beside him. A visitation will be held on Monday, February 17, 2014 from 6 -7p.m. at Santa Maria de La Paz Catholic Church followed by a rosary at 7 p.m. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. at Santa Maria de La Paz Catholic Church. Interment will follow at 11:15 a.m. at The Santa Fe National Cemetery.

Rivera Family Funerals and Cremations, 417 East Rodeo Rd., Santa Fe, NM 87505, Phone: (505) 989-7032, Fax: (505) 820-0435, santafefuneraloption.com

Celebrate the memory of your loved one with a memorial in The Santa Fe New Mexican

Call 986-3000

Obituary notices: Obituaries can be purchased through a funeral home or by calling our classifieds department at 986-3000, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. If you need to place a death notice after business hours, please call The New Mexican newsroom at 986-3035.

Rivera Funeral Home is Santa Fe’s only locally owned funeral home. More Service, Less Cost

You Do Have a Choice. 417 rodeo road, santa fe

Come visit with us and learn how you can save 30% – 40% off corporate owned competitor’s prices on funeral services. 505.989.7032

www.riverafuneralhome.com


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

OPINIONS

The West’s oldest newspaper, founded 1849 Robin M. Martin Owner

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Drug war needs new approach O ur approach to our drug problems has been the drug war, consuming more than a trillion dollars over the last 40 years. And what do we have to show for it? The drug scene is at least as bad as ever. The cost of interdiction and incarceration is phenomenal, and the cost in ruined lives even worse. Where is the logic in continuing to do more of the same? There must be a better way, but we won’t know if we don’t try. Drugs are terribly bad, but if we either decriminalize or legalize them, we could use the funds saved for education and rehabilitation, making a much more significant improvement in the drug scene. Serious studies have shown this to be the case. Albert Einstein said, “Insanity: Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” We need to get smarter.

That old coat How many of us have thrown away an old coat or have left it hanging in the closet because the zipper stopped working? I had two favorite coats that had been hanging unused in my closet for a long time. I looked at the zippers to see if there was any way I could get the zippers on the coats to work again. My first try failed, but one morning after a good night’s sleep, I decided to look at the zippers again. I noticed that the long parts of the zippers that fasten together to hold the coats closed looked in good shape and showed signs of little wear. Then I looked at the parts of the zippers that compress the two sides of the zippers together. It appeared they were not compressing the sides together enough to make them fasten. So I got out a pair of pliers and compressed the sides of the lever that zips up the zipper. It worked. Now my two favorite coats have been saved. James Keele

Santa Fe

Early education I am voting for Javier Gonzales for mayor. I have young children, and Gonzales’ stand on education is exciting and well thought through. He wants to extend the city’s partnership with the schools by adding more educational content to after-school and summer programs. He wants to start a Youth Service Corps to inspire leadership. He wants to work with United Way, other nonprofits, the business community and the schools to have true preschool education for children from birth to to age 6. That is something that is crucial for success in school. Javier knows a lot about education from being chairman of the Board of Regents at New Mexico Highlands University and serving as a current regent for New Mexico State University, which has some particularly impressive programs for at-risk children. I am also impressed by the fact that he was endorsed by both teachers’ unions — NEA and AFT, three current school

Ray Rivera Editor

A

A super song

Taos Pueblo member Santa Fe

Inez Russell Gomez Editorial Page Editor

Cool roofs? An urban fix

Santa Fe

Juanita Turley

Robert M. McKinney Owner, 1949-2001

OUR VIEW

Ray Nichols

I read The New Mexican’s editorial about cultural diversity and emphasizing our Native people’s talents, whether we are on stage or not, to represent the United States (“Our View: Cultural diversity strengthens U.S.,” Feb. 5). I’m very proud of Christy Bird being a part of the 2014 Super Bowl advertisement singing “America the Beautiful.” Also, your editorial page deserves a big “thank you” for supporting Christy. She should not stop her involvement, and she should continue her language and inspire other Natives to stay composed, no matter how others think. The newspaper also wrote a very beautiful editorial for my daughter, Patricia Michaels’, Project Runway experience and gave her a lot of strong community feeling from everybody. Go Christy!

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SEND US yOUR lEttERS Send your letters of no more than 150 words to letters@sfnewmexican.com. Include your name, address and phone number for verification and questions.

the Beatles arriving in the U.S. and The Ed Sullivan Show 50 years ago. Sadly, Santa Fe will say goodbye to KBAC’s evening DJ, April Reese, who will be relocating to Wisconsin to continue her journalism career. April has entertained us with music and educated us with her environmental reports for 10 years. Thanks, April! Tom Miller

board members and several past school board members. Sonia Leyba

Santa Fe

Break big money On Feb. 5, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Rep. John Sarbanes introduced the Government by the People Act — a new campaign finance reform bill to help reverse the impact of Citizens United. The Government by the People Act matches small-dollar donations under $150 with public funds 6-to-1, so that a $25 contribution turns into $175 — or $100 into $700 — amplifying the voice of everyday people. This could save taxpayers hundreds of billions in corporate welfare that results from politicians sucking up to big-money donors. I’m very proud of my representative, Ben Ray Luján, for co-sponsoring the Government by the People Act and for taking a stand against big-money interests in favor of the people. We need more actions like this in order to restore our democracy and break the corrosive influence of big money. David King

Santa Fe

Taking care of business While the city invites the country nationwide to visit, they have neglected to provide them a basic necessity while they are here — public restrooms near the Plaza! As a Bienvenidos volunteer, I know for a fact that is the single most request for help. It is not fair to expect the local businesses or museums to provide this service. Nor is it reasonable to expect visitors to stay longer and patronize areas where there are no facilities for such basic needs. With the many empty stores available, there should be one that could be retrofitted to accommodate a dozen or so clean toilets — free or otherwise. Or maybe a trailer-size port-a-john could be rented placed in one of the open parking lots. With all the time spent by council members on the question of plastic bags and pooper scoopers for dogs, one would hope human needs would get the same time, consideration and support. The new mayor should put this at the top of his or her priority “to do” list. Kathie Enz

Santa Fe

Beautiful music I’d like to thank Hutton Broadcasting (KBAC) and Ira Gordon for the great Beatles tunes this past week in celebration of

MAllARD FillMORE

Section editor: Inez Russell Gomez, 986-3053, igomez@sfnewmexican.com, Twitter @inezrussell

Eldorado/Santa Fe

Pipeline needed A recent letter stated that the Keystone pipeline would be a “disaster waiting to happen.” This is a hyperbole. Canadian crude oil is going to come into the United States one way or another, if not by pipeline then by train. The U.S. State Department’s report clearly demonstrates that shipping oil by rail is far riskier than doing so by pipeline, in which case there is minimal risk. Opinion polls have determined that an overwhelming majority of Americans are in favor of building the pipeline. The Keystone pipeline is a nobrainer. George Lukac

Santa Fe

Yes, DWIs matter This is in response to your recent article about City Council District 1 candidate Michael Segura and a letter that appeared in the Jan. 31 edition taking issue with your coverage of his three DWI convictions and past financial issues. This writer suggests that his DWIs should not matter. Seriously? With our tragic history of multiple DWI offenders killing innocents while driving drunk, voting for someone with his record to serve on our City Council would certainly send the wrong message. And as far as his “real-world business and financial experience,” it led to his personal bankruptcy and a $1.3 million tax lien from the IRS. Is this the kind of business experience we want helping to direct our city’s affairs? I do not know either candidate, but it is clear who we do not need on our City Council. Larry Davis

Santa Fe

Patti for mayor I’m for Patti Bushee for mayor. We’re lucky to have a candidate for mayor who knows the city and the city staff from 20 years of experience on the City Council. She’s smart, she’s quick and she genuinely cares about Santa Fe and its people. Some candidates accept financial support from groups that come around later to collect on the obligation. The citizens of Santa Fe approved public financing of political campaigns to prevent this sort of thing. It’s to her credit that Patti is running her campaign the way we citizens want it run — based strictly on public financing. Patti is experienced and honest, and that’s what we need in a mayor. Bob McCarthy

Santa Fe

s snow blankets the East Coast, it’s easy to forget the weather that’s just around the corner. Get ready for the heat waves of sizzling summers. Because as sure as the snow will melt and spring will vanish quickly, summer will return with elevated temperatures, including the distress caused to human beings when air conditioning fails or isn’t available at all. Researchers from Princeton and Columbia universities are finding out that tweaks to buildings and the urban environment can cool even New York City on summer’s hottest days. The benefits to a cooler city are real. By reducing the need for air conditioning, it is less likely for the electric grid to give out — and even more importantly, human beings vulnerable to high temperatures will be protected. Although many don’t think of heat waves on par with hurricanes or snowstorms, researcher Elie Bou-Zeid of Princeton says they are among the deadliest of natural disasters. The goal of the research team is to find ways to cool the concrete jungle, decreasing the hottest temperatures in New York City by 1 degree. Why? Evidently, even a slight decrease in temperature can make a difference between life and death. In fact, for every degree of increased temperature during a heat wave, the risk of death increases by 4.5 percent. Cooling cities — with an overabundance of concrete and less vegetation — can be complicated. Without vegetation, the heat waves don’t cool; that’s why such areas as Central Park in New York City can be so important to the climate of a city. To reduce the effects of city building materials — brick, concrete and asphalt, all of which trap heat — New York City has launched its Cool Roofs program. In its fourth year, the city attempts to coat 1 million square feet of roof space with white reflective paint. Inside buildings during the summer, the temperature should be cooler. That’s the goal, anyway, and Bou-Zeid’s research team found that the white coatings are working. As a measure to reduce the energy consumption for cooling, this is a fairly easy measure. Roof coatings can be used not just in New York City or other urban centers, but in the Southwest or along the West Coast city corridors, especially as climate change increases summertime temperatures. Santa Fe old-timers remember seldom needing air conditioning as children; today, it seems a necessity. More white roofs, where the sun is reflected away, could help homes in Santa Fe stay cooler and rely less on air conditioning. Importantly, according to the Department of Energy, a cool roof only slightly increases the need for heating energy in the winter — that’s important in a place like Santa Fe, where seasonal temperature extremes are common. However, as with every action, there comes a reaction. A study by Arizona State University and the Environmental Protection Agency released recently in an issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Science found that creating too many cool roofs in urban areas (or green roofs from covering roofs with plants) has unintended consequences. Those include decreasing rainfall (a disaster in the Southwest) and increasing winter heating costs. What is clear is that humans can’t yet fathom the unintended consequences of trying to abate the harm of urban sprawl. It’s obvious, though, that too much concrete covering once-natural lands is affecting our climate, both locally and globally. Stopping sprawl, avoiding asphalt and concrete and, yes, coating at least some roofs to reflect sunlight all make sense — both for dealing with climate change and saving lives when temperatures grow intense. Climate change models show that without adapting urban design, temperatures will rise 1 to 2 degrees, not just in urban areas, but across regional swaths of the United States. The key, then, is finding the right adaptions.

The past 100 years From The Santa Fe New Mexican: Feb: 17, 1964: Los Alamos — A Los Alamos teenager was treated for knife injuries and a Santa Fean was charged with disorderly conduct following a knifing fracas involving four Los Alamos and two Santa Fe youths. The Los Alamos victim was treated for hand cuts at the Recreation Hall. The incident occurred during a teenage dance following the basketball game.

DOONESBURy

BREAKING NEWS AT www.SANtAFENEwMExicAN.cOM


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

The weather

For current, detailed weather conditions in downtown Santa Fe, visit our online weather stations at www.santafenewmexican.com/weather/

7-day forecast for Santa Fe Today

Sunny much of the time

Tonight

Clear

Tuesday

Sunny

32

59

Wednesday

Thursday

Partly sunny; breezy in the p.m.

61/33

Mostly sunny

61/31

Humidity (Noon) Humidity (Midnight) Humidity (Noon)

Friday

Sunny to partly cloudy and breezy

52/26

Humidity (Noon)

Saturday

Humidity (Noon)

Sunday

Mostly sunny

56/24

Humidity (Noon)

Plenty of sunshine

50/22

57/24

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

17%

30%

18%

20%

18%

17%

21%

18%

wind: SSW 7-14 mph

wind: NNE 4-8 mph

wind: WNW 6-12 mph

wind: W 10-20 mph

wind: WNW 8-16 mph

wind: W 10-20 mph

wind: W 7-14 mph

wind: WNW 8-16 mph

Almanac

Santa Fe Airport through 6 p.m. Sunday Santa Fe Airport Temperatures High/low ......................................... 63°/32° Normal high/low ............................ 50°/23° Record high ............................... 63° in 2014 Record low ................................. -4° in 1902 Santa Fe Airport Precipitation 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.09”/0.09” Normal month/year to date ..... 0.27”/0.88” Santa Fe Farmers Market 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.07”/0.07”

New Mexico weather 64

666

40

The following water statistics of February 13 are the most recent supplied by the City Water Division (in millions of gallons). Total water produced from: Canyon Water Treatment Plant: 1.287 Buckman Water Treatment Plant: 4.090 City Wells: 1.308 Buckman Wells: 0.000 Total water produced by water system: 6.685 Amount delivered to Las Campanas: Golf course: 0.000, domestic: 0.083 Santa Fe Canyon reservoir storage: 63.3 percent of capacity; daily inflow 0.90 million gallons. A partial list of the City of Santa Fe’s Comprehensive Water Conservation Requirements currently in effect: • Irrigation water leaving the intended area is not permitted. Wasting water is not allowed. • Using water to clean hard surfaces with a hose or power washer is prohibited. • Hoses used in manual car washing MUST be equipped with a positive shut-off nozzle. • Swimming pools and spas must be covered when not in use. For a complete list of requirements call: 955-4225 http://www.santafenm.gov/waterconservation

Santa Fe 59/32 Pecos 56/32

25

Albuquerque 62/41

25

87

56

412

Clayton 59/37

AccuWeather Flu Index

25

Las Vegas 60/35

Today.........................................1, Low Tuesday.....................................1, Low Wednesday...............................2, Low Thursday...................................2, Low Friday ........................................2, Low Saturday ...................................1, Low The AccuWeather Flu Index™ combines the effects of weather with a number of other known factors to provide a scale showing the overall probability of flu transmission and severity of symptoms. The AccuWeather Flu Index™ is based on a scale of 0-10.

54

40

40

285

Clovis 63/39

54

60 60

Sunday’s rating ................................... Good Today’s forecast ................................. Good 0-50, Good; 51-100, Moderate; 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200, Unhealthy; 201-300, Very Unhealthy, 301500, Hazardous Source: EPA

64

Taos 54/23

Española 61/40 Los Alamos 56/34 Gallup 61/25

Raton 60/26

64 84

60

25

Today’s UV index

54 285 380

180

Roswell 73/39

Ruidoso 60/47

25

70

Truth or Consequences 70/46 70

Las Cruces 72/47

54

70

70

Carlsbad 76/44

0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High; 8-10, Very High; 11+, Extreme The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

285

10

Sun and moon

State extremes

Sun. High: 85 ................................ Carlsbad Sun. Low 20 ..................................... Chama

State cities City Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Cimarron Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Crownpoint Deming Española Farmington Fort Sumner Gallup Grants Hobbs Las Cruces

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo W 79/43 pc 70/39 c 54/21 s 77/41 pc 85/48 pc 55/20 pc 62/30 pc 73/30 pc 60/31 pc 77/34 pc 62/28 pc 80/42 pc 69/38 c 63/32 pc 78/35 pc 63/25 pc 67/22 pc 79/36 s 80/48 pc

Hi/Lo W 71/42 s 62/41 s 49/23 s 74/49 pc 76/44 pc 49/23 s 59/24 s 59/37 s 54/20 pc 63/39 pc 59/23 s 75/41 s 61/40 s 57/29 s 67/36 pc 61/25 s 62/33 s 70/41 pc 72/47 s

Hi/Lo W 73/42 s 66/41 s 51/20 s 81/49 s 84/46 s 49/25 s 61/24 s 64/28 s 58/32 s 73/31 s 60/24 s 78/39 s 65/40 s 60/34 pc 75/34 s 61/26 s 61/31 s 78/40 s 75/46 s

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Las Vegas Lordsburg Los Alamos Los Lunas Portales Raton Red River Rio Rancho Roswell Ruidoso Santa Rosa Silver City Socorro Taos T or C Tucumcari University Park White Rock Zuni

Hi/Lo 66/25 79/55 62/41 72/41 76/38 66/24 61/29 70/43 78/41 66/46 75/35 72/43 79/41 61/21 76/49 80/29 81/54 63/40 64/30

W s pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc pc s pc pc pc pc pc pc

Hi/Lo W 60/35 s 75/52 s 56/34 s 65/35 s 64/37 pc 60/26 s 47/24 s 63/34 s 73/39 pc 60/47 pc 66/42 s 70/45 s 68/42 s 54/23 s 70/46 s 64/37 s 73/49 s 59/34 s 61/25 s

Hi/Lo W 63/30 s 76/50 s 57/32 s 68/38 s 73/33 s 63/24 s 48/18 s 64/37 s 81/39 s 66/47 s 72/38 s 72/43 s 71/42 s 56/24 s 74/45 s 71/34 s 77/50 s 60/34 s 61/26 s

Weather (w): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sfsnow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Weather for February 17

Sunrise today ............................... 6:49 a.m. Sunset tonight .............................. 5:48 p.m. Moonrise today ............................ 8:38 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 7:58 a.m. Sunrise Tuesday ........................... 6:48 a.m. Sunset Tuesday ............................ 5:49 p.m. Moonrise Tuesday ........................ 9:36 p.m. Moonset Tuesday ......................... 8:31 a.m. Sunrise Wednesday ...................... 6:47 a.m. Sunset Wednesday ....................... 5:50 p.m. Moonrise Wednesday ................. 10:35 p.m. Moonset Wednesday .................... 9:05 a.m. Last

New

First

Full

Feb 22

Mar 1

Mar 8

Mar 16

The planets

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 21/10 63/31 36/22 53/30 20/-4 47/41 33/23 65/36 57/28 29/17 30/20 26/9 76/45 68/27 26/10 6/-6 57/32 78/71 76/51 25/20 37/25 81/50 75/54

W sn s c sn sn pc pc pc pc sn c sn c pc sn pc pc r c c c s s

Hi/Lo 23/14 62/50 33/26 50/33 42/20 52/35 30/22 63/48 51/36 29/23 40/28 32/23 74/47 62/34 27/23 -4/-22 59/23 81/70 76/60 36/24 49/33 71/51 71/52

W sf pc pc pc pc c s s pc sn r sn pc s sn c s r sh sn pc s pc

Hi/Lo 24/16 66/53 46/34 47/33 36/11 52/35 38/33 73/55 64/50 39/22 47/33 39/28 75/52 61/32 35/27 -7/-27 59/30 82/70 75/62 43/27 56/29 70/54 69/54

W s c pc c pc c sn c pc pc pc pc pc s c pc pc sh pc pc s pc pc

Rise 6:22 a.m. 4:17 a.m. 10:17 p.m. 1:49 p.m. 12:27 a.m. 8:39 a.m.

Mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus

Set 5:32 p.m. 2:45 p.m. 9:38 a.m. 4:18 a.m. 10:55 a.m. 9:04 p.m.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

National cities City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Fairbanks Flagstaff Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Richmond St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Sioux Falls Trenton Washington, DC

Hi/Lo 37/27 61/35 77/52 24/18 19/4 70/42 30/21 72/42 72/44 30/21 84/56 26/11 48/40 47/24 33/25 59/54 78/63 71/54 63/50 49/39 27/0 28/19 38/27

W c pc s sn pc pc pc pc s pc pc sn r pc c sh c pc s r sn pc pc

Hi/Lo 49/32 64/43 79/66 28/24 35/26 71/61 32/26 64/39 76/53 32/26 84/58 33/28 51/40 40/33 44/29 55/35 82/61 67/53 59/49 47/38 43/25 31/26 35/31

W r sh pc sn sn pc s pc pc pc s pc r pc i s c pc pc r s pc pc

Hi/Lo 54/37 66/46 81/68 39/22 39/16 73/60 41/34 70/42 80/58 46/34 82/57 41/33 51/38 58/44 56/31 52/38 78/58 65/56 60/51 49/35 42/19 43/34 49/41

W pc pc s pc pc pc sn s s sn pc pc r pc pc pc pc pc c r pc sn pc

World cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

National extremes

(For the 48 contiguous states) Sun. High: 89 ..................... San Angelo, TX Sun. Low: -31 ..................... Embarrass, MN

On Feb. 17, 1980, Albany, N.Y., had its only subzero temperature of the season. The next year on the same date, temperatures in nearby Connecticut soared into the 60s.

Weather trivia™

is the snowiest town in the Q: What United States? Alaska, averages over 25 feet A: Valdez, of snow each year.

Weather history

Newsmakers MIDDLESBORO, Ky. — Jamie Coots, a snake-handling Kentucky pastor who appeared on the National Geographic television reality show Snake Salvation, died Saturday after being bitten by a snake. Coots was handling a rattlesnake during a Saturday night service at his Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name Church in Middlesboro when he was bit, another preacher, Cody Winn, told WBIR-TV. “Jamie went across the floor. He had one of the rattlers in his hand, he came over and he was standing beside me. It was plain view, it just turned its head and bit him in the back of the hand … within a second,” Winn said.

Chelsea Clinton: Gay rights have made progress

Chelsea Clinton

Hi/Lo 46/43 64/41 68/46 91/79 57/51 45/27 50/45 70/43 81/68 64/53 89/74 82/53 43/39 46/34 45/37 77/57 77/55 69/57 52/44 80/68

W pc s sh pc pc pc sh sh pc pc s pc pc sh c s s sh sh s

Hi/Lo 48/39 70/51 65/49 92/77 56/43 41/22 46/32 69/49 81/68 68/51 88/72 75/47 42/33 48/37 44/33 74/54 83/58 75/66 56/43 83/67

W pc s c s pc pc c r pc s s s pc sh s pc s pc pc pc

Hi/Lo 50/43 71/50 70/50 94/77 62/50 36/23 48/36 66/48 84/68 71/51 88/72 77/51 41/37 49/39 53/39 74/55 84/63 73/51 60/45 83/67

W c s s pc pc c c sh t s s s c pc c pc s sh s pc

City Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Prague Rio de Janeiro Rome Santiago Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Vancouver Vienna Zurich

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 57/43 50/39 52/39 77/45 23/3 36/27 66/47 50/40 45/37 82/75 64/50 84/57 45/25 88/77 43/36 74/70 52/41 43/39 50/32 45/37

W pc s pc s pc c pc pc pc c s s pc pc sh r pc c r c

Hi/Lo 54/45 50/41 50/37 77/43 14/7 36/28 70/44 52/37 46/30 83/72 64/50 86/58 48/30 88/77 37/29 73/63 48/32 46/39 45/35 46/31

W r r pc s pc sf pc pc s r pc s pc c c sh pc r sh s

Hi/Lo 57/46 54/37 54/36 78/43 27/19 36/30 72/47 51/40 45/35 83/71 69/54 82/55 43/27 88/77 37/25 77/67 45/32 45/34 50/43 51/36

W s pc pc s sn sf pc c pc sh pc s c c s sh c r c c

Today’s talk shows

Snake-handling pastor dies from snake bite

Jamie Coots

City Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Bogota Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Ciudad Juarez Copenhagen Dublin Geneva Guatemala City Havana Hong Kong Jerusalem Lima

Former first daughter Chelsea Clinton says the gay-rights cause made “incredible progress” on political and legal fronts in 2013, but progress should not be mistaken for success. Clinton called lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues “the unfinished business of the 21st century” in an address at a national conference Sunday in Las Vegas, Nev. The Associated Press

3:00 p.m. KOAT The Ellen DeGeneres Show Bradley Cooper (“American Hustle”). KRQE Dr. Phil KTFQ Laura KWBQ The Bill Cunningham Show KLUZ El Gordo y la Flaca KASY Jerry Springer CNN The Situation Room FNC The Five MSNBC The Ed Show 4:00 p.m. KOAT The Dr. Oz Show KTEL Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste KASY The Steve Wilkos Show E! Beyond Candid with Giuliana FNC Special Report With Bret Baier 5:00 p.m. KASA Steve Harvey KCHF The 700 Club KASY Maury FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 6:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC The O’Reilly Factor 7:00 p.m. CNN Piers Morgan Live MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show

JOEL RYAN/INVISION

‘12 Years a Slave’ named best film at UK awards The Associated Press

Hobbs 70/41

285

Chiwetel Ejiofor, winner of best actor, poses for photographers Sunday in the winners room at the EE British Academy Film Awards held at the Royal Opera House in London.

By Jill Lawless 380

380

Alamogordo 71/42

180 10

Water statistics

285

64

Farmington 57/29

Area rainfall

Albuquerque 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.18”/0.18” Las Vegas 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.04”/0.08” Los Alamos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.02”/0.02” Chama 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.74”/1.11” Taos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.09”/0.10”

Air quality index

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

8:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC Hannity 9:00 p.m. KCHF The Connection With Skip Heitzig FNC The O’Reilly Factor TBS Conan James Franco; Neal McDonough; Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers. 9:30 p.m. KCHF Life Today With James Robison James and Betty Robison. 10:00 p.m. KASA The Arsenio Hall Show CNN Piers Morgan Live MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show TBS The Pete Holmes Show Guests: Marc Maron; Rob Bell. 10:30 p.m. TBS Conan James Franco; Neal McDonough; Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers. 10:35 p.m. KRQE Late Show With David Letterman 11:00 p.m. KOB The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Actor Will Smith; U2 performs. KNME Charlie Rose KOAT Jimmy Kimmel Live Singer Jen-

nifer Lopez; Silversun Pickups perform. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 E! Beyond Candid with Giuliana Melissa Joan Hart; how she got where she is today and balances work and motherhood. FNC Hannity 11:30 p.m. KASA Dish Nation 11:37 p.m. KRQE The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson Gary Oldman; Keke Palmer; Roddy Hart & The Lonesome Fire. 12:00 a.m. CNN AC 360 Later E! Chelsea Lately Guest host Ross Mathews; comic Jeff Wild; comic Arden Myrin; comic Josh Wolf; actress Jackie Collins. FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren MTV Wolf Watch Brian Patrick Wade, Stephen Lunsford and Haley Webb. 12:02 a.m. KOAT Nightline 1:00 a.m. KASY The Trisha Goddard Show

LONDON — The force of Gravity was strong at the British Academy Film Awards on Sunday — but it was unflinching drama 12 Years a Slave that took the top prize. Steve McQueen’s visceral, violent story of a free black man kidnapped into servitude in the 19th-century U.S. South was named best picture. Its star, Chiwetel Ejiofor, took the male acting trophy. Ejiofor thanked McQueen, a visual artist who turned to filmmaking with Hunger and Shame, for bringing the story to the screen. Holding the trophy, the British actor told McQueen: “This is yours. I’m going to keep it — that’s the kind of guy I am — but it’s yours.” McQueen reminded the ceremony’s black-tie audience that, in some parts of the world, slavery is not a thing of the past. “There are 21 million people in slavery as we sit here,” he said. “I just hope 150 years from now our ambivalence will not allow another filmmaker to make this film.” The prizes, coming two weeks before Hollywood’s Academy Awards, are watched as an indicator of likely Oscars success. It was a good night for lost-in-space thriller Gravity, which won six prizes, including best director for Alfonso Cuarón. The 3-D special effects extravaganza also took the awards for sound, music, cinematography and visual effects. And despite its mixed parentage — made in Britain by a Mexican director and starring American actors — it was named best British film. Cuarón paid tribute to star Sandra Bullock, who is alone onscreen for much of the film. “Without her performance, everything would have been nonsense,” he said. Con-artist caper American Hustle charmed its way to three prizes, including original screenplay and supporting actress for Jennifer Lawrence. Its spectacular 70s stylings took the hair and makeup award. The best-actress prize went to Cate Blanchett for her turn as a socialite on the slide in Blue Jasmine. She dedicated the award to her friend and fellow actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who died this month, calling him “a monumental presence who is now sadly an absence.” “Phil, buddy, this is for you, you bastard. I hope you’re proud,” Blanchett said. The supporting actor prize went to Barkhad Abdi, who made an explosive screen debut as a Somali pirate in Captain Phillips. The 28-year-old called his experience of going from obscurity in Minnesota to stardom — complete with an Oscar nomination — “surreal.” In the past few years, the British prizes, known as BAFTAs, have helped underdog films, including Slumdog Millionaire, The King’s Speech and The Artist, gain Oscars momentum. The prize for adapted screenplay went to Philomena, based on the true story of an Irish woman’s decades-long search for the son she was forced to give up for adoption. The awards have become an essential stop for many Hollywood stars before the Academy Awards, held this year on March 2. The temperature in London was hardly Hollywood, but Britain’s fickle weather relented ahead of Sunday’s ceremony. The sun shone as nominees including Wolf of Wall Street star Leonardo DiCaprio and 12 Years a Slave performer Lupita Nyong’o — striking in a green Dior gown — walked the red carpet outside London’s Royal Opera House. Best-actress nominee Amy Adams wore a black dress by Victoria Beckham and revealed the inspirations for her American Hustle character’s faux-British accent: “Marianne Faithfull and Julie Christie.”

TV

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6 p.m. FAM Switched at Birth It’s party time in this new episode. Kathryn (Lea Thompson) throws a murder mystery bash where she and John (D.W. Moffett) learn something new about each other. Daphne (Katie Leclerc) throws a 21st birthday celebration for Campbell (RJ Mitte). Bay (Vanessa Marano) tries to get herself invited to Tank’s (Max Adler) fraternity luau. Constance Marie and Lucas Grabeel also star in “The Scream.” 7 p.m. on NBC XXII Winter Olympics One of the hottest rivalries of these Games gets another chapter today in Sochi, Russia, in the finals of ice dance. Canada’s Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir will defend their gold medal from the 2010 games in Vancouver against reigning World Champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the United States, tandems who share practice space, a coach and friendship. There are also gold-medal finals in men’s snowboard cross and men’s aerials of freestyle skiing. 7 p.m. on The CW Star-Crossed This new drama series puts a sci-fi spin on Romeo and Juliet. Emery (Aimee Teegarden) is human. Roman (Matt Lanter, pictured) is an alien and her childhood friend,

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who she thought was dead. He’s alive and attending her school, where they rekindle their bond — amid much disapproval. 7 p.m. FAM The Fosters Callie (Maia Mitchell) makes a life-changing decision aimed at securing a better future and earning back her loved ones’ trust. Stef (Teri Polo) faces a decision of her own that could jeopardize her job when she’s called to testify in Mike’s (Danny Nucci) case. Mariana (Cierra Ramirez) goes all out to attract Chase’s (Garrett Clayton) attention in the new episode “Us Against the World.” David Lambert and Hayden Byerly also star. 9 p.m. on ABC Castle Castle and Beckett (Nathan Fillion, Stana Katic) investigate the murder of a mean girl at a high school Castle once attended. They’re surprised to find the evidence pointing to a student with telekinetic powers, a la Carrie, in the new episode “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” Penny Johnson Jerald and Jon Huertas also star.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

Scoreboard B-2 Prep schedule B-3 Winter Olympics B-4 Classifieds B-6 Time Out B-11 Comics B-12

SPORTS

NFL

Scouts to put focus on Manziel and Sam

2014 WINTER OLYMPICS MEN’S ICE HOCKEY

NBA ALL-STAR GAME

East gets by Durant, Griffin

Workouts for pre-draft event begin Saturday By Michael Marot

Irving nets 31 points, earns MVP title in record-setting game

The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Johnny Manziel and Michael Sam will be the headliners at the NFL’s scouting combine. Workouts for the league’s pre-draft event begin Saturday. The most important aspects of the combine are often the ones that get the least publicity — Johnny players measuring Manziel in, going through the medical checks and the team interviews that could put many questions to rest or raise an entirely new set of concerns. So with more than 300 NFL draft hopeMichael fuls attending the Sam second biggest offseason event on the NFL calendar — and the only that draws team owners, team executives, league officials, coaches, agents and potential future stars to the same venue— this week

By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

Please see fOCuS, Page B-3

INSIDe u NFL mulls its next step following the release of bullying report. pAGe B-3

BASEBALL

Teixeira: ‘We’re back to being the Yankees’ By Ronald Blum

The Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — Mark Teixeira took swings from the right side of the plate and then the left, his first time batting outdoors since a wrist injury ended his 2013 season almost before it began. He pronounced himself ready to return and gave what seemed like a warning to the rest of Major League Baseball. Last year was an aberration, when the New York Yankees missed the playoffs for only the second time in 19 years. In his mind, an offseason spending spree transformed Murmurers’ Row back into Murderers’ Row. “You look at our lineup, we’re back to being the Yankees again,” he said Sunday. “Last year, we weren’t the Yankees.” Brian McCann, Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran were signed to fortify a batting order that dropped from a team-record 245 homers in 2012 to an un-Bronx Bomber-like 144 last year, the largest falloff in baseball history for a nonstrike season.

Please see yANKeeS, Page B-4

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NASCAR: Austin Dillon wins Daytona 500 pole in No. 3. Page B-5

USA forward Phil Kessel celebrates his goal against Slovenia on Sunday during the men's ice hockey game at Shayba Arena in Sochi, Russia. PETR DAVID JOSEK/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hat-trick hero

Phil Kessel scores three to help U.S. rout Slovenia 5-1 By Larry Lage

The Associated Press

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OCHI, Russia — Phil Kessel is the first American in more than a decade to score a hat trick in an Olympic hockey tournament. He’s more interested in something no American has accomplished on Olympic ice since 1980 — winning a gold medal. Kessel scored two of his three goals within the opening five minutes to lead the U.S. to a 5-1 win against Slovenia on Sunday. The U.S. is undefeated through three games, and if it can win three more, the nation will celebrate its first Olympic championship in hockey since the “Miracle on Ice” at the Lake Placid Games. “It’s about the wins, right?” Kessel asked, rhetorically. “We just want to win games.” No members of Team USA were alive when the U.S. beat the Soviet Union in 1980 in one of the biggest upsets in sports history. But if they end up with gold around their neck on Sunday, this title won’t be regarded as a miracle. Kessel and his teammates earned an automatic spot in the quarterfinals of the 12-team tournament by routing Slovenia and Slovakia, and outlasting Russia in a shootout, to finish atop their group. They’ve scored 15 and allowed only four goals so far.

WHAT TO WATCH Find complete Olympics coverage at www.santafenewmexican.com

SOCHI HIGHLIGHTS For the Dutch, the sweep 16: The Dutch got their third sweep in speedskating — albeit a gold by Jorien ter Mors over favorite Ireen Wust in the women’s 1,500. Lottevan Beek got the bronze. The Dutch have now won 16 speedskating medals in Sochi. Shootout at the Bolshoy Corral: A day after a tough shootout loss to the United States, Russia bounced back against Slovakia, thanks to Alexander Radulov and Ilya Kovalchuk, who delivered in the shootout.

The U.S. won’t play again until Wednesday, when they’ll face the winner of the Czech Republic’s qualification-round game against Slovakia for a spot in the semifinals and the chance to play for medals. Kessel scored 1:04 after the puck dropped, removing any thought the Americans would have a hangover after their much hyped victory against the host Russians on Saturday. “I was certainly concerned after the emotional game,” said coach Dan Bylsma. “We were fortunate that we got right out of the gate with a couple great plays.” Kessel’s third goal midway through the second period made him the first U.S. player to score a hat trick at the Olympics since John LeClair did it on Feb. 15, 2002, against Finland. “I was saying right before the game, I hope somebody does something pretty cool, so that some of the focus gets off of me and onto someone else,” said T.J. Oshie, who scored on four of six attempts in an eightround shootout against Russia. “He didn’t need six shots in the shootout to do it. He did it in regular time.” Slovenia’s Marcel Rodman scored with 17.6 seconds left in the game, denying U.S. goalie Ryan Miller a

Complete listings, B-3

Please see ALL-STAr, Page B-3

Please see KeSSeL, Page B-4

INSIDe u To save the Olympic slopes, officials hastily purchase 24 tons of salt from Switzerland to save the day. u Bode Miller ties for bronze in the men’s super-G, becoming the oldest Alpine medalist. pAGe B-4

MeDAL COuNT

7 p.m., NBC SAME-DAY TAPE: Figure Skating, Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final; Men’s Snowboarding, Cross Gold Medal Final; Men’s Freestyle Skiing, Aerials Gold Medal Final; Two-Man Bobsled,Gold Medal Final Runs

NEW ORLEANS — From the first play to the final minute, LeBron James and Kyrie Irving made it clear how the East felt about this All-Star game. “We took this East 163 one personal a West 155 bit,” Irving said. Irving had 31 points and 14 assists and was voted the MVP, Carmelo Anthony made a record eight 3-pointers and scored 30 points, and the East stopped a three-game losing streak with a 163155 victory over the West on Sunday night in the highest-scoring All-Star game ever. Fed up with losing the midseason game and tired of the East being picked on for its mediocrity this season, James had a steal and dunk on the first possession, long before defense usually shows up in the AllStar game. “We wanted this win,” James said. “They beat us the last three years and they had a lot of bragging rights, so to be able to come through being down 18 was huge.” Kevin Durant and Blake Griffin each finished with 38 points, four shy of Wilt Chamberlain’s All-Star game record, for the West. But the East scored the final 10 points to pull out a game it trailed by 18. “They started making shots, and we didn’t get stops and we went a little bit cold,” said Griffin, who shot 19 of 23, setting a record for field goals made. Irving scored 15 points in the fourth quarter. James had 22 points, seven rebounds and seven assists. The 318 points broke the record of 303 set in 1987. Durant finished with 10 rebounds and six assists, but the West was shut out after his 3-pointer gave it a 155153 lead with 1:59 left. Indiana’s Paul

Netherlands Russia U.S. Norway Canada Germany Sweden Switzerland Austria China Japan

Sports editor: James Barron, 986-3045, jbarron@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Carlos A. López, clopez@sfnewmexican.com

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The East Team’s John Wall of the Washington Wizards drives to the hoop as the West Team’s Damian Lillard of the Portland Trail Blazers looks on during Sunday’s NBA All-Star game in New Orleans. GERALD HERBERT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESSS

NOrWAy IS Super. Gee. Kjetil Jansrud won the fourth straight Olympic super-G gold medal for Norway, finishing the choppy course in 1 minute, 18.14 seconds, with American skier Andrew Weibrecht 0.30 seconds behind. Bode Miller, at age 36, became the oldest Alpine skier to win a medal when he and Jan Hudec of Canada tied for bronze.

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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

OLYMPICS

OLYMPICS

Medals Table

At Sochi, Russia Through, Sunday, Feb. 16 (55 of 98 events) Nation G S Netherlands 5 5 Russia 4 7 United States 4 4 Norway 5 3 Canada 4 6 Germany 7 3 Sweden 2 5 Switzerland 5 1 Austria 2 4 France 2 0 China 3 2 Japan 1 3 Slovenia 1 1 Italy 0 2 Poland 4 0 Belarus 3 0 Czech Republic 1 2 South Korea 1 1 Latvia 0 1 Britain 1 0 Finland 0 2 Australia 0 1 Slovakia 1 0 Croatia 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 Ukraine 0 0

NATIONAL SCOREBOARD

B 7 5 8 6 4 2 2 1 1 4 0 1 3 3 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1

Sunday’s Medalists

Tot 17 16 16 14 14 12 9 7 7 6 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

ALPINE SKIING Men Super G GOLD—Kjetil Jansrud, Norway SILVER—Andrew Weibrecht, Lake Placid, N.Y. BRONZE—Jan Hudec, Canada and Bode Miller, Easton, N.H. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Men 4x10km Relay GOLD—Sweden (Lars Nelson, Daniel Richardsson, Johan Olsson, Marcus Hellner) SILVER—Russia (Dmitriy Japarov, Alexander Bessmertnykh, Alexander Legkov, Maxim Vylegzhanin) BRONZE—France (Jean Marc Gaillard, Maurice Manificat, Robin Duvillard, Ivan Perrillat Boiteux) SNOWBOARD Women Cross GOLD—Eva Samkova, Czech Republic SILVER—Dominique Maltais, Canada BRONZE—Chloe Trespeuch, France SPEEDSKATING Women 1500 GOLD—Jorien Ter Mors, Netherlands SILVER—Ireen Wust, Netherlands BRONZE—Lotte van Beek, Netherlands

Wednesday, Feb. 19 Quarterfinals Sweden vs. Slovenia-Austria winner, TBA United States vs. Czech RepublicSlovakia winner, TBA Canada vs. Switzerland-Latvia winner, TBA Finland vs. Russia-Norway winner, TBA

United States 5, Slovenia 1

United States 2 2 1 —5 Slovenia 0 0 1 —1 First Period—1, United States, Phil Kessel (Joe Pavelski), 1:04. 2, United States, Phil Kessel (Joe Pavelski, Brooks Orpik), 4:33. Second Period—3, United States, Phil Kessel (James van Riemsdyk, Joe Pavelski), 11:05. 4, United States, Ryan McDonagh (Blake Wheeler, T.J. Oshie), 12:17. Penalties—David Backes, United States (interference); Robert Sabolic, Slovenia (roughing); T.J. Oshie, United States (slashing). Third Period—5, United States, David Backes (Ryan Callahan, Dustin Brown), 3:26. 6, Slovenia, Marcel Rodman (David Rodman, Jan Urbas), 19:42. Penalties—Ziga Pavlin, Slovenia (holding); James van Riemsdyk, United States (high sticking). Shots on Goal—United States 8-119—28. Slovenia 7-4-7—18. Goalies—United States, Ryan Miller. Slovenia, Luka Gracnar. Referee—Mike Leggo, United States; Jyri Ronn, Finland. Linesmen—Miroslav Valach, Slovakia; Mark Wheler, Canada; Mikhail Buturlin, Russia; Roman Gofman, Russia.

SUNDAY’S RESULTS

ALPINE SKIING Men’s Super-G (Start position in parentheses) 2. (29) Andrew Weibrecht, Lake Placid, N.Y., 1:18.44. 3. (13) Bode Miller, Easton, N.H., 1:18.67. 14. (9) Ted Ligety, Park City, Utah, 1:19.48. 23. (25) Travis Ganong, Squaw Valley, Calif., 1:20.02. BOBSLEIGH Men’s Two-Man Through Two runs 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah, Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.), 1:53.18. 11. United States 2 (Cory Butner, Yucaipa, Calif., Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 1:53.56. 13. United States 3 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif., Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 1:53.80. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Men’s 4x10km Relay 11. United States (Andy Newell, Shaftsbury, Vt., Erik Bjornsen, Winthrop, Wash., Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., Simi Hamilton, Aspen, Colo.), 1:33:15.1. FIGURE SKATING Ice Dancing Short Dance 1. Meryl Davis, West Bloomfield, Mich., and Charlie White, Bloomfield Hills, Mich., 78.89 (Q). 8. Madison Chock, Redondo Beach, Calif., and Evan Bates, Ann Arbor, Mich., 65.46 (Q). 9. Maia and Alex Shibutani, Ann Arbor and Mich., 64.47 (Q). SNOWBOARD Women’s Cross Qualifying (First and second runs followed by best time) 2. (15) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn., (2, 1:21.40) 1:21.40, +0.79. 9. (2) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City, (9, 1:23.96) 1:23.96, +3.35. NR. (6) Jackie Hernandez, Londonderry, Vt., DNF. Quarterfinals Heat 1 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (Q). NR. (24) Jackie Hernandez, Londonderry, Vt., DNS. Heat 4 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (Q). Semifinals Heat 1 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (A). Heat 2 6. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (B). Small Final 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. Medal Final 4. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City. SPEEDSKATING Women’s 1500 7. Heather Richardson, High Point, N.C., 1:57.60. 14. Brittany Bowe, Ocala, Fla., 1:58.31. 18. Jilleanne Rookard, Woodhaven, Mich., 1:59.15.

ALPINE SKIING Men’s Super-G (Start position in parentheses) 1. (21) Kjetil Jansrud, Norway, 1:18.14. 2. (29) Andrew Weibrecht, Lake Placid, N.Y., 1:18.44. 3. (22) Jan Hudec, Canada, 1:18.67. 3. (13) Bode Miller, Easton, N.H., 1:18.67. 5. (15) Otmar Striedinger, Austria, 1:18.69. 6. (14) Max Franz, Austria, 1:18.74. 7. (16) Aksel Lund Svindal, Norway, 1:18.76. 8. (8) Peter Fill, Italy, 1:18.85. Other U.S. Finishers 14. (9) Ted Ligety, Park City, Utah, 1:19.48. 23. (25) Travis Ganong, Squaw Valley, Calif., 1:20.02. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Men’s 4x10km Relay 1. Sweden (Lars Nelson, Daniel Richardsson, Johan Olsson, Marcus Hellner), 1:28:42.0. 2. Russia (Dmitriy Japarov, Alexander Bessmertnykh, Alexander Legkov, Maxim Vylegzhanin), 1:29:09.3. 3. France (Jean Marc Gaillard, Maurice Manificat, Robin Duvillard, Ivan Perrillat Boiteux), 1:29:13.9. 4. Norway (Eldar Roenning, Chris Andre Jespersen, Martin Johnsrud Sundby, Petter Jr. Northug), 1:29:51.7. 5. Italy (Dietmar Noeckler, Giorgio di Centa, Roland Clara, David Hofer), 1:30:04.7. 6. Finland (Sami Jauhojaervi, Iivo Niskanen, Lari Lehtonen, Matti Heikkinen), 1:30:28.4. 7. Switzerland (Curdin Perl, Jonas Baumann, Remo Fischer, Toni Livers), 1:30:33.8. 8. Czech Republic (Ales Razym, Lukas Bauer, Martin Jaks, Dusan Kozisek), 1:30:36.8. U.S. Finish 11. United States (Andy Newell, Shaftsbury, Vt., Erik Bjornsen, Winthrop, Wash., Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., Simi Hamilton, Aspen, Colo.), 1:33:15.1. SNOWBOARD Women’s Cross Semifinals Heat 1 1. (1) Eva Samkova, Czech Republic (A). 2. (13) Chloe Trespeuch, France (A). 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (A). 4. (8) Nelly Moenne Loccoz, France (B). Heat 2 1. (3) Dominique Maltais, Canada (A). 2. (11) Alexandra Jekova, Bulgaria (A). 3. (18) Michela Moioli, Italy (A). 4. (14) Zoe Gillings, Britain (B). 5. (7) Belle Brockhoff, Australia (B). 6. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (B). Small Final 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. 2. (7) Belle Brockhoff, Australia. 3. (14) Zoe Gillings, Britain. 4. (20) Simona Meiler, Switzerland. 5. (8) Nelly Moenne Loccoz, France. Medal Final 1. (1) Eva Samkova, Czech Republic. 2. (3) Dominique Maltais, Canada. 3. (13) Chloe Trespeuch, France. 4. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City. 5. (11) Alexandra Jekova, Bulgaria. SPEEDSKATING Women’s 1500 1. Jorien Ter Mors, Netherlands, 1:53.51 (OR). 2. Ireen Wust, Netherlands, 1:54.09. 3. Lotte van Beek, Netherlands, 1:54.54. 4. Marrit Leenstra, Netherlands, 1:56.40. 5. Yuliya Skokova, Russia, 1:56.45. 6. Katarzyna Bachleda - Curus, Poland, 1:57.18. 7. Heather Richardson, High Point, N.C., 1:57.60. 8. Yekaterina Lobysheva, Russia, 1:57.70. Other U.S. Finishers 14. Brittany Bowe, Ocala, Fla., 1:58.31. 18. Jilleanne Rookard, Woodhaven, Mich., 1:59.15.

Preliminary Round Group A W L OTWOTLPts GFGA USA 2 0 1 0 8 15 4 1 0 1 1 6 8 5 Russia Slovenia 1 2 0 0 3 6 11 Slovakia 0 2 0 1 1 2 11 Group B W L OTWOTLPts GFGA Canada 2 0 1 0 8 11 2 Finland 2 0 0 1 7 15 7 Austria 1 2 0 0 3 7 15 Norway 0 3 0 0 0 3 12 Group C W L OTWOTLPts GFGA Sweden 3 0 0 0 9 10 5 Switzerland 2 1 0 0 6 2 1 Czech Rep. 1 2 0 0 3 6 7 Latvia 0 3 0 0 0 5 10 Sunday, Feb. 16 Group B: Austria 3, Norway 1 Group A: Russia 1, Slovakia 0, SO Group A: United States 5, Slovenia 1 Group B: Canada 2, Finland 1, OT Tuesday, Feb. 18 Qualification Playoff Round Russia vs. Norway, TBA Switzerland vs. Latvia, TBA Czech Republic vs. Slovakia, TBA Slovenia vs. Austria, TBA

Subject to change Biathlon Men’s 15km Mass start, 11 p.m. Women’s 12.5km Mass start, 8 a.m. Bobsleigh Men’s Two-Man (Run 3), 7:30 a.m. Men’s Two-Man (Run 4), 9:05 a.m. Curling Women Russia vs. Britain, 10 p.m. South Korea vs. United States, 10 p.m. Japan vs. China, 10 p.m. Men China vs. Britain, 3 a.m. Germany vs. Russia, 3 a.m. Switzerland vs. United States, 3 a.m. Norway vs Denmark, 3 a.m. Women China vs. Switzerland, 8 a.m. Denmark vs. Britain, 8 a.m. Canada vs. South Korea, 8 a.m. Sweden vs. Japan, 8 a.m. Figure Skating Ice Dancing free dance, 8 a.m. Freestyle Skiing Men’s Aerials Qualification, 6:45 a.m. Men’s Aerials Finals, 10:30 a.m. Ice Hockey Women Semifinals

US Olympians Fared

Men’s Olympics Hockey

MONDAY’S SCHEDULE

United States vs. Sweden, 5:30 a.m. Canada vs. Switzerland, 10 a.m. Ski Jumping Men’s Team (large hill) First Round, 10:15 a.m. Men’s Team (large hill) Final, 11:15 a.m. Snowboard Men’s Snowboard Cross Seeding, 12 a.m. Men’s Snowboard Cross Quarterfinals, 2:15 a.m. Men’s Snowboard Cross Semifinals, 2:30 a.m. Men’s Snowboard Cross Finals, 2:45 a.m.

TENNIS TENNIS

ATP WORLD TOUR U.S. National Indoor Championships

At The Racquet Club of Memphis Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $647,675 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Kei Nishikori (1), Japan, def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 6-4, 7-6 (0).

Copa Claro

Sunday At Buenos Aires Lawn Tennis Club Buenos Aires, Argentina Purse: $567,760 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship David Ferrer (1), Spain, def. Fabio Fognini (2), Italy, 6-4, 6-3.

ABN AMRO World Tournament

Sunday At Ahoy’ Stadium Rotterdam, Netherlands Purse: $2.05 million (WT500) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Tomas Berdych (3), Czech Republic, def. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-2.

WTA TOUR Qatar Total Open

Sunday At The Khalifa Tennis Complex Doha, Qatar Purse: $2.44 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Simona Halep (7), Romania, def. Angelique Kerber (6), Germany, 6-2, 6-3.

AUTO RACING MOTORSPORTS

NASCAR SPRINT CUP Daytona 500 Lineup

After Sunday qualifying; race Sunday, Feb. 23 At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019 mph. 2. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 195.852. Failed to Qualify 3. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 195.818. 4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.712. 5. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.296. 7. (88) Dale Earnhardt. Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211. 8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.042. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse. Jr., Ford, 195.004. 10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.919. 11. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894. 12. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 194.776. 13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658. 14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.637. 15. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582. 16. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 194.582. 17. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574. 18. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.574. 19. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544. 20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.523. 21. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502. 22. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.477. 23. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422. 24. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.410. 25. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.380. 26. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.334. 27. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108. 28. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 194.078. 29. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066. 30. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 193.815.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP Budweiser Duel 1 Lineup

After Sunday qualifying; race Thursday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019 mph. 2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 195.818. 3. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707. 4. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211. 5. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.004. 6. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894. 7. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658. 8. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582. 9. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574. 10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544. 11. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502. 12. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422. 13. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.38. 14. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108. 15. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066. 16. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 193.736. 17. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.594. 18. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.365. 19. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.798. 20. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 192.538. 21. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 192.291.

BASKETBALL BASKETBALL NBA Eastern Conference

Atlantic Toronto Brooklyn New York Boston Philadelphia Southeast Miami Atlanta Washington Charlotte Orlando Central Indiana Chicago Detroit Cleveland Milwaukee

W 28 24 20 19 15 W 37 25 25 23 16 W 40 27 22 20 9

L 24 27 32 35 39 L 14 26 27 30 38 L 12 25 30 33 43

Pct .538 .471 .385 .352 .278 Pct .725 .490 .481 .434 .296 Pct .769 .519 .423 .377 .173

Western Conference

Southwest W San Antonio 38 Houston 36 Dallas 32 Memphis 29 New Orleans 23 Northwest W Oklahoma City 43 Portland 36 Minnesota 25 Denver 24 Utah 19 Pacific W L.A. Clippers 37 Phoenix 30 Golden State 31 L.A. Lakers 18 Sacramento 18 Sunday’s Games East 163 West 155 Monday’s Games No games scheduled.

L 15 17 22 23 29 L 12 17 28 27 33 L 18 21 22 35 35

Pct .717 .679 .593 .558 .442 Pct .782 .679 .472 .471 .365 Pct .673 .588 .585 .340 .340

Women’s Division I Major Scores

GB — 31/2 8 10 14 GB — 12 121/2 15 221/2 GB — 13 18 201/2 31 GB — 2 61/2 81/2 141/2 GB — 6 17 17 221/2 GB — 5 5 18 18

East 163 West 155

EAST ALL-STARS (163) George 6-13 5-5 18, Anthony 10-18 2-2 30, James 11-22 0-0 22, Irving 14-17 0-0 31, Wade 5-6 0-0 10, Hibbert 4-5 0-0 8, Bosh 2-3 0-0 5, DeRozan 4-7 0-0 8, Wall 5-7 2-2 12, Millsap 3-5 0-0 6, Johnson 2-7 0-0 5, Noah 4-5 0-0 8. Totals 70-115 9-9 163. WEST ALL-STARS (155) Durant 14-27 4-4 38, Griffin 19-23 0-0 38, Love 5-11 1-4 13, Curry 4-14 2-2 12, Harden 3-7 0-0 8, Paul 4-9 2-2 11, Parker 2-5 0-0 4, Nowitzki 0-2 0-0 0, Howard 4-6 0-0 8, Aldridge 2-9 0-0 4, Davis 5-6 0-0 10, Lillard 3-8 0-0 9. Totals 65-127 9-12 155. East All-Stars 42 34 47 40—163 West All-Stars 44 45 37 29—155 3-Point Goals—East All-Stars 14-44 (Anthony 8-13, Irving 3-6, Bosh 1-2, George 1-5, Johnson 1-6, Wall 0-1, Hibbert 0-1, DeRozan 0-1, Millsap 0-2, James 0-7), West All-Stars 16-56 (Durant 6-17, Lillard 3-6, Harden 2-6, Love 2-7, Curry 2-11, Paul 1-4, Nowitzki 0-1, Griffin 0-2, Howard 0-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—East All-Stars 48 (James 7), West All-Stars 62 (Howard 11). Assists—East All-Stars 46 (Irving 14), West All-Stars 42 (Paul 13). Total Fouls—East All-Stars 13, West AllStars 8. A—14,727 (17,188).

NCAA Men’s Top 25

Sunday’s Results No. 4 Wichita State 84, Evansville 68 No. 18 Creighton 101, No. 6 Villanova 80 Nebraska 60, No. 9 Michigan State 51 No. 13 Louisville 102, Rutgers 54 No. 21 Wisconsin 75, No. 15 Michigan 62 Temple 71, No. 23 SMU 64 Saturday’s Results No. 1 Syracuse 56, N.C. State 55 No. 3 Florida 69, No. 14 Kentuck 59 No. 5 San Diego State 64, Air Force 56 No. 7 Kansas 95, TCU 65 No. 8 Duke 69, Maryland 67 No. 10 Cincinnati 73, Houston 62 No. 11 Iowa State 70, Texas Tech 64 No. 12 Saint Louis 54, VCU 62 No. 16 Iowa 82, Penn State 70 No. 17 Virginia 63, Clemson 58 No. 19 Texas 88, West Virginia 71 No. 24 UConn 84, No. 20 Memphis 81 No. 22 Ohio State 48, Illinois 39 North Carolina 75, No. 25 Pittsburgh 71 Monday’s Games No games scheduled.

Men’s Division I Major Scores

Sunday’s Games East Canisius 92, Siena 88, 3OT Drexel 74, Hofstra 63 LIU Brooklyn 69, St. Francis (NY) 68 Manhattan 90, Niagara 72 Marist 96, Monmouth (NJ) 92, 2OT Notre Dame 73, Boston College 69 Quinnipiac 74, St. Peter’s 64 St. John’s 82, Georgetown 60 Temple 71, SMU 64 Wagner 73, Bryant 61 Midwest Creighton 101, Villanova 80 Minnesota 54, Northwestern 48 Nebraska 60, Michigan St. 51 Wichita St. 84, Evansville 68 Wisconsin 75, Michigan 62 Wright St. 72, Oakland 71 Far West Colorado 83, Southern Cal 74 Oregon 93, Oregon St. 83 South Lipscomb 76, Kennesaw St. 73 Lipscomb 76, Kennesaw St. 73 Louisville 102, Rutgers 54 McNeese St. 72, New Orleans 69 Mercer 89, N. Kentucky 67 W. Carolina 82, UNC Greensboro 77, OT

Women’s Top 25

Sunday’s Results No. 1 UConn 63, South Florida 38 No. 4 Louisville 82, Memphis 66 No. 5 South Carolina 73, No. 19 LSU 57 No. 6 Stanford 74, Arizona 48 No. 7 Baylor 72, Texas 56 No. 18 Kentucky 75, No. 8 Tennessee 71 No. 17 North Carolina 89, No. 10 N.C. State 82. No. 11 Penn State 78, Wisconsin 68 No. 12 Oklahoma State 73, Oklahoma 57 No. 13 West Virginia 61, TCU 57 No. 14 Texas A&M 71, Alabama 46 No. 22 California 74 No. 15 Arizona St. 63 Mississippi State 64, No. 16 Vanderbilt 62 No. 21 Nebraska 76, Indiana 61 No. 23 Purdue 74, Iowa 73 Saturday’s Results BYU 62 No. 20 Gonzaga 52 No. 24 St. John’s 69 Villanova 56 No. 25 Michigan St. 70 Ohio St. 49 Monday’s Games No. 2 Notre Dame vs. Georgia Tech, 5 p.m. No. 3 Duke vs. No. 9 Maryland, 5 p.m.

Sunday’s Games East Albany (NY) 58, Maine 56 Delaware 52, Towson 43 Iona 73, Rider 66 James Madison 69, Drexel 58 New Hampshire 76, Hartford 71, OT Penn St. 78, Wisconsin 68 Pittsburgh 56, Clemson 43 Quinnipiac 83, Monmouth (NJ) 50 Syracuse 71, Boston College 47 UMBC 77, Vermont 62 West Virginia 61, TCU 57 South Coll. of Charleston 87, Hofstra 74 Georgia 67, Florida 58 Kentucky 75, Tennessee 71 Louisville 82, Memphis 66 McNeese St. 84, New Orleans 54 Miami 76, Florida St. 73 Mississippi St. 64, Vanderbilt 62 Missouri 68, Auburn 58 North Carolina 89, NC State 82 South Carolina 73, LSU 57 Texas A&M 71, Alabama 46 UConn 63, South Florida 38 Virginia 80, Virginia Tech 64 William & Mary 97, UNC Wilmington 44 Midwest Drake 79, Missouri St. 69 Evansville 63, Indiana St. 56 Illinois St. 68, S. Illinois 63, OT Michigan 70, Illinois 63 N. Iowa 80, Wichita St. 71 Nebraska 76, Indiana 61 Purdue 74, Iowa 73 Far West Oregon St. 58, Southern Cal 48 Stanford 74, Arizona 48 Washington 67, Utah 66 Washington St. 80, Colorado 77 Southwest Baylor 72, Texas 56 Oklahoma St. 73, Oklahoma 57

HOCKEY HOCKEY

NHL Eastern Conference

Atlantic GP W L Boston 57 37 16 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 Montreal 59 32 21 Toronto 60 32 22 Detroit 58 26 20 Ottawa 59 26 22 Florida 58 22 29 Buffalo 57 15 34 Metro GP W L Pittsburgh 58 40 15 N.Y. Rngers 59 32 24 Phildelphia 59 30 23 Columbus 58 29 24 Wshington 59 27 23 Carolina 57 26 22 New Jersey 59 24 22 N.Y. Islndrs 60 22 30

OL Pts GFGA 4 78 176 125 5 71 168 145 6 70 148 142 6 70 178 182 12 64 151 163 11 63 169 191 7 51 139 183 8 38 110 172 OL Pts GFGA 3 83 186 138 3 67 155 146 6 66 162 167 5 63 170 161 9 63 171 175 9 61 144 158 13 61 135 146 8 52 164 200

Central GP W L St. Louis 57 39 12 Chicago 60 35 11 Colorado 58 37 16 Minnesota 59 31 21 Dallas 58 27 21 Winnipeg 60 28 26 Nashville 59 25 24 Pacific GP W L Anaheim 60 41 14 San Jose 59 37 16 Los Angeles59 31 22 Phoenix 58 27 21 Vancouver 60 27 24 Calgary 58 22 29 Edmonton 60 20 33 Feb. 9 - Feb. 23 Olympic Break.

OL Pts GFGA 6 84 196 135 14 84 207 163 5 79 174 153 7 69 145 147 10 64 164 164 6 62 168 175 10 60 146 180 OL Pts GFGA 5 87 196 147 6 80 175 142 6 68 139 128 10 64 163 169 9 63 146 160 7 51 137 179 7 47 153 199

Western Conference

TRANSACTIONS TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League

BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with RHP Francisco Cordero on a minor league contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Agreed to terms with OF Josh Reddick on a oneyear contract.

National League

ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with RHP Craig Kimbrel on a fouryear contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with RHP A.J. Burnett to a one-year contract. Designated LHP Joe Savery for assignment.

COLLEGE NCAA

LAMAR — Fired men’s basketball coach Pat Knight. Promoted assistant coach Tic Price to interim coach.

ONDATE THIS DATE THIS February 17

1923 — Cy Denneny of the Ottawa Senators becomes the NHL’s all-time scorer. Denneny scores his 143rd goal to surpass Joe Malone in a 2-0 win over the Montreal Canadiens. 1924 — Johnny Weissmuller sets a world record in the 100-yard freestyle swim with a time of 52.4 seconds. 1926 — In a tournament at the Carlton Club in Cannes, France, Suzanne Lenglen beats Helen Wills 6-3, 8-6 in their only tennis match against each other. 1928 — Sweden’s Gillis Grafstrom defends his 1920 and 1924 Olympic figure skating title with Austrian Willy Bockl finishing in second place as he did four years earlier. 1941 — Joe Louis knocks out Gus Dorazio in the second round at the Convention Hall in Philadelphia to defend his world heavyweight title. 1967 — Philadelphia’s Wilt Chamberlain hits the first of what would become an NBA record 35 consecutive field goals without a miss. 1991 — Ernie Irvan, helped by Dale Earnhardt’s continuing misfortune in NASCAR’s top stock car race, wins the Daytona 500 under a caution flag. 1992 — Raisa Smetanina wins a gold medal with the Unified Team in the 20-kilometer cross-country relay to set the career Winter Olympic Games medal record with 10. Smetanina, 39, also becomes the oldest champion and the first to win a medal in five straight Winter Games. 1994 — San Antonio’s David Robinson records the fourth quadruple-double in NBA history with 34 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 blocks in the Spurs’ 115-96 win over Detroit. 1998 — The U.S. women’s hockey team wins the sport’s first-ever Olympic gold medal. Sandra Whyte scores on an empty-netter with 8 seconds left to give the United States a 3-1 victory over Canada.

GOLF GOLF

NORTHERN TRUST OPEN

Sunday At Riviera Country Club Los Angeles Purse: $6.7 million Yardage: 7,349; Par 71 Final B. Watson (500), $1,206,000 70-71-64-64—269 D. Johnson (300), $723,600 66-70-69-66—271 Jason Allred (0), $388,600 73-64-67-68—272 Brian Harman (163), $388,60067-69-68-68—272 C. Schwartzel (110), $268,000 69-68-68-68—273 Bryce Molder (89), $216,913 69-69-69-67—274 Matt Every (89), $216,913 69-69-69-67—274 William McGirt (89), $216,91369-67-65-73—274 George McNeill (89), $216,91369-68-66-71—274 Harris English (73), $174,200 70-69-69-67—275 Brendan Steele (73), $174,20068-71-67-69—275 K.J. Choi (58), $127,300 69-72-67-68—276 C. Hoffman (58), $127,300 67-71-68-70—276 Sang-Moon Bae (58), $127,30067-66-72-71—276 C. Tringale (58), $127,300 68-70-67-71—276 Jordan Spieth (58), $127,300 72-66-67-71—276 Charlie Beljan (58), $127,300 67-68-68-73—276 Aaron Baddeley (53), $97,150 69-65-72-71—277 John Senden (53), $97,150 71-70-66-70—277 Keegan Bradley (50), $80,847 68-70-72-68—278 Lee Westwood (50), $80,847 69-70-68-71—278 Jimmy Walker (50), $80,847 67-71-67-73—278 Kevin Chappell (46), $57,955 71-70-69-69—279 Kevin Stadler (46), $57,955 69-69-74-67—279 Jim Furyk (46), $57,955 68-68-71-72—279 Robert Garrigus (46), $57,955 67-67-73-72—279 H. Matsuyama (46), $57,955 70-69-69-71—279 Bill Haas (46), $57,955 72-67-67-73—279 R. Allenby (40), $42,601 71-69-71-69—280 D. Summerhays (40), $42,601 71-72-66-71—280 Geoff Ogilvy (40), $42,601 74-68-69-69—280 Blake Adams (40), $42,601 67-70-71-72—280 D. Lingmerth (40), $42,601 70-69-70-71—280 James Hahn (40), $42,601 71-72-65-72—280 Brendon Todd (34), $33,031 71-70-69-71—281 Ernie Els (34), $33,031 71-70-68-72—281 G. Fdez-Castano (34), $33,03171-70-71-69—281 K. Streelman (34), $33,031 72-69-73-67—281 John Huh (34), $33,031 71-71-72-67—281 J.J. Henry (29), $26,130 70-69-71-72—282 V. Dubuisson (0), $26,130 70-72-68-72—282 J. Vegas (29), $26,130 70-69-71-72—282 F. Molinari (0), $26,130 67-73-71-71—282

ACE GROUP CLASSIC

Sunday At TwinEagles Golf Club (Talon Course) Naples, Fla. Purse: $1.6 million Yardage: 7,193; Par: 72 Final Kirk Triplett (240), $240,000 67-67-66—200 Olin Browne (117), $117,067 66-69-66—201 B. Langer (117), $117,067 64-70-67—201 Duffy Waldorf (117), $117,067 67-68-66—201 Jay Haas (76), $76,000 68-72-64—204 Michael Allen (61), $60,800 68-71-67—206 C. Montgomerie (61), $60,800 70-67-69—206 M. Calcavecchia (46), $45,867 73-69-66—208 Mike Goodes (46), $45,867 68-72-68—208 Billy Andrade (46), $45,867 71-69-68—208 Peter Senior, $32,000 75-69-65—209 Jim Rutledge, $32,000 72-73-64—209 Wes Short, Jr., $32,000 69-73-67—209 T. Armour III, $32,000 68-72-69—209 Rod Spittle, $32,000 70-70-69—209 Bob Tway, $32,000 65-72-72—209 Tom Pernice Jr., $25,600 69-71-70—210 Mark O’Meara, $21,120 70-72-69—211 Rocco Mediate, $21,120 70-70-71—211 Tom Lehman, $21,120 70-70-71—211 Bill Glasson, $21,120 69-69-73—211 Gene Sauers, $21,120 70-69-72—211 R. Chapman, $15,337 72-73-67—212 Lee Rinker, $15,337 70-73-69—212 Steve Pate, $15,337 73-70-69—212 Tom Kite, $15,337 71-72-69—212

AFRICA OPEN

Sunday At East London Golf Club East London, South Africa Purse: $1.36 million Yardage: 6,571; Par: 72 Final Aiken won on first playoff hole Thomas Aiken, SAf 66-65-66-67—264 Oliver Fisher, Eng 66-63-66-69—264 John Hahn, USA 65-61-71-68—265 David Horsey, Eng 66-64-70-65—265 Richard Bland, Eng 64-69-64-69—266 Darren Fichardt, SAf 66-67-67-66—266 Emiliano Grillo, Arg 68-63-62-73—266 Jaco van Zyl, SAf 69-65-67-65—266 L. Bjerregaard, Den 64-67-69-68—268 Keith Horne, SAf 68-69-66-65—268 Damien McGrane, Irl67-69-67-65—268 U. Van den Berg, SAf 66-68-65-69—268 Stuart Manley, Wal 68-69-65-67—269 Adrian Otaegui, Esp 69-65-68-67—269 Fabrizio Zanotti, Par 65-66-68-70—269 Jens Dantorp, Swe 69-63-68-70—270 Jean Hugo, SAf 68-66-67-69—270 Wade Ormsby, Aus 70-64-69-67—270 JJ Senekal, SAf 66-71-69-64—270 Also Daniel Im, USA 69-67-66-69—271 Jason Knutzon, USA 71-66-72-70—279

WOMEN’S AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Sunday At Victoria Golf Club Melbourne, Australia Purse: $1.2 million Yardage: 6,480; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Karrie Webb, $180,000 C. Choi, $110,822 P. Creamer, $64,213 Karine Icher, $64,213 Lydia Ko, $64,213 Stacy Lewis, $33,068 A. Lewis, $33,068 Morgan Pressel, $33,068 Jenny Shin, $33,068 Gerina Piller, $24,573 Azahara Munoz, $21,296 Jessica Speechley, $21,296 Mi Hyang Lee, $21,296 a-Minjee Lee Trish Johnson, $17,171 Sarah Kemp, $17,171 Perrine Delacour, $17,171 Caroline Hedwall, $17,171 Sandra Gal, $14,228 Giulia Sergas, $14,228 Jessica Korda, $14,228 D. Claire Schreefel, $14,228 Cheyenne Woods, $12,742 Holly Clyburn, $12,742 Mirim Lee, $11,589

71-69-68-68—276 70-71-62-74—277 68-69-73-68—278 69-68-70-71—278 68-68-69-73—278 71-69-70-69—279 71-67-69-72—279 69-68-70-72—279 74-67-66-72—279 75-69-68-68—280 68-70-73-70—281 71-67-70-73—281 72-67-68-74—281 68-67-68-78—281 70-73-68-71—282 71-68-71-72—282 70-73-65-74—282 68-65-74-75—282 73-69-72-69—283 68-71-72-72—283 67-70-72-74—283 70-68-71-74—283 74-65-71-74—284 68-68-71-77—284 74-68-72-71—285

PACIFIC RUBIALES COLOMBIA CHAMPIONSHIP

Sunday At Bogota Country Club Bogota, Colombia Purse: $750,000 Yardage: 7,237; Par: 71 Final Final round was canceled Alex Cejka, $135,000 Andrew D. Putnam, $81,000 Carlos Ortiz, $51,000 Bill Lunde, $36,000 Sam Saunders, $27,375 Chris Wilson, $27,375 Justin Thomas, $27,375 Adam Hadwin, $19,500 Sebastian Pinzon, $19,500 Whee Kim, $19,500 Derek Fathauer, $19,500 Vaughn Taylor, $19,500 Peter Tomasulo, $19,500 Andres Gonzales, $12,000 Hugo Leon, $12,000 Manuel Villegas, $12,000 Jose Garrido, $12,000 Tony Finau, $12,000 Matt Hendrix, $12,000

68-68-63—199 68-66-68—202 67-69-67—203 66-68-70—204 69-67-69—205 69-66-70—205 65-69-71—205 69-71-66—206 68-71-67—206 69-70-67—206 72-64-70—206 69-68-69—206 67-69-70—206 69-71-67—207 66-74-67—207 69-70-68—207 70-69-68—207 69-69-69—207 68-70-69—207


SPORTS

NFL mulls next step after bullying report By Arnie Stapleton

The Associated Press

Now that the NFL knows the scope of the racially charged Miami Dolphins bullying scandal, the league has been left to grapple with what its next steps should be. A report released Friday on the Miami case concluded with a one-paragraph call to action: “As all must surely recognize, the NFL is not an ordinary workplace. Professional football is a rough, contact sport played by men of exceptional size, speed, strength and athleticism. But even the largest, strongest and fleetest person may be driven to despair by bullying, taunting and constant insults. We encourage the creation of new workplace conduct rules and guidelines that will help ensure that players respect each other as professionals and people.” League executives agree steps need to be taken, and they have vowed to take action. But it may be difficult to regulate locker room behavior by determining when something a player considers to be harmless locker room nonsense crosses the line. Players are part of a team, but they also are individuals with different levels of sensitivity. And as the report’s call to action points out, the NFL is not an ordinary workplace — and locker rooms are sanctuaries within those workplaces, where even without the kinds of vicious taunts and racist insults cited in the report, behavior that would not be accepted in society is tolerated, and even condoned or encouraged. Still, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross wants his organization to lead the way to change the culture. “I have made it clear to everyone within our organization that this situation must never happen again,” Ross said in a statement released through the team after the report was released. “We are committed to address this issue forcefully and to take a leadership role in establishing a standard that will be a benchmark in all of sports.” Before the Super Bowl, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell had said he’d be out in front on the issue of hazing. “Our No. 1 priority has to make sure that we have a workplace environment that’s professional, recognizing that we have some unique circumstances. But we have to make sure that our players, [and] other employees, have that kind of professional workplace environment,” Goodell said then. After the report was released, the NFL did not mention any possible punishment stemming from the case in a statement emailed by a league spokesman. The NFL Players Association said it will review the findings closely, confer with

will be far more than just a two-man show. Here are five things to watch this week in Indianapolis. Johnny be good: Manziel is a dynamic player who may have more on the line this week than anybody else in town. After two sensational years at Texas A&M, he’s trying to position himself to be considered the first overall pick by the Houston Texans. While the 2012 Heisman Trophy winner has said he will not work out next weekend, scouts will be looking at Manziel’s height and weight to determine if he can hold up against the NFL’s bigger, faster, stronger defenders. Coaches and team executives also will be eager to see how he handles the private interviews — the one part of the combine outsiders never see — to determine whether he’s the guy they

SCOREBOARD Today on TV Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. All times local.

BOXING 8 p.m. on FS1 — Champion Paul Mendez (14-2-2) vs. Raul Casarez (20-4-0), for IBA Continental middleweight title; featherweights, Manuel Avila (13-0-0) vs. Enrique Quevedo (15-6-1), in Salinas, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. on ESPN — North Carolina at Florida St. 5 p.m. on NBCSN — Delaware at Towson 7 p.m. on ESPN — Oklahoma St. at Baylor 7 p.m. on ESPNU — MVSU at Southern WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. on ESPN2 — Maryland at Duke

Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito and tackle Jonathan Martin look over plays during a 2013 preseason game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Miami Gardens, Fla. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

players and all relevant parties involved. The report by lawyer Ted Wells said “the behavior that occurred here was harmful to the players, the team and the league,” but he noted the investigators weren’t asked to recommend discipline or determine legal liability for the bullying. Wells concluded that offensive linemen John Jerry and Mike Pouncey joined Richie Incognito in harassing Jonathan Martin, who left the team in October, and position coach Jim Turner participated in the taunting of a second player. That player is Andrew McDonald, now with the Carolina Panthers. The report found no evidence that the Dolphins front office or head coach Joe Philbin were aware of the conduct Martin found abusive. “There are lines — even in a football locker room — that should not be crossed, as they were here,” the report said. “We leave the determination of precisely where to draw those lines to those who spend their lives playing, coaching and managing the game of professional football.” Players would like to police themselves. It is, after all, their locker room. Teams want a big say in setting those parameters. Like any other employer, they are responsible for maintaining a safe and respectful work environment that adheres to both the league’s policies and federal law. The league is taking a hard look at the report, which details homophobic invec-

tive directed at McDonald. That element in particular is a hot button issue in light of SEC co-defensive player of the year Michael Sam’s recent revelation that he’s gay, putting him in line to become the league’s first openly gay player. Being at the center of this scandal puts the Dolphins at the forefront of any bolstering of policies protecting players from bullying. The report said that in 2013, Dolphins players acknowledged receiving and understanding the personal conduct code and the workplace harassment and discrimination policies, both taken from the NFL handbook. The latter policy states that “harassment can include, but is not limited to: unwelcome contact; jokes, comments and antics; generalizations and put-downs; pornographic or suggestive literature and language. In addition, harassment and discrimination are not limited to the workplace: they example [sic], through calls, texts or emails, on a plane or team bus; at a team event; or at the team hotel.” The policy encourages reporting discrimination or harassment to the players’ union, a coach, human resources or NFL security. The report touches on a code against snitching that exists in NFL locker rooms, however, and Martin never did report the abuse before walking away from the team when he’d had enough.

equation at the top of the draft. And if Manziel doesn’t go No. 1, who will? That answer probably won’t be settled after this weekend, though most analysts believe a quarterback will once again be taken with the first pick. If the choice is not Manziel, it could be Blake Bortles or Teddy Bridgewater. The Texans recently hired Central Florida’s former college quarterback coach, and Bridgewater was considered the frontrunner to be No. 1 throughout most of the college season. A year ago, at this point the oddson favorite to go No. 1 was Utah defensive tackle Star Lotulelei. So a lot can change between now and May’s draft, and don’t rule out a possible resurgence by South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney. Junior jam: A record number of college players (102) have given up their remaining college eligibility to jump into

this year’s NFL draft. While the first-round is sure to include plenty of underclassmen draftees, led by the likes of Manziel and Clowney, dozens of other early-entry draft hopefuls must show they’re worthy of being drafted. If the underclassmen do well and go high, the trend of seeing more and more underclassmen enter the draft could continue in future years. Character counts: The toughest job this week goes to any of the players having to answer questions about their character. The list of indiscretions includes everything from arrests to drug-related suspensions to the use, or misuse, of Twitter. What scouts and team execs will try to do is sort fact from fiction as they attempt to figure out whether these were simple youthful missteps or a pattern of behavior that could continue to cause problems in the future.

All-Star: East finishes with 60% shooting George made three free throws, Anthony nailed his final 3-pointer, and James scored to make it 161-155. George closed it out with two more free throws and finished with 18 points. “Both teams played extremely well, we just lost,” Durant said. The game that usually doesn’t get tight until the final minutes was close throughout the fourth quarter, neither team leading by more than four until the final minute. Chris Paul had 11 points and 13 assists, and first-time All-Star Stephen Curry had 12 points and 11 assists for the West. But the best point guard on the floor was Irving, who shot 14 of 17 and helped the East ring up 87 points in the second half after it surrendered a record 89 in the first. In a colorful tribute to New Orleans, players wore sneakers and socks that ranged from green and blue to orange and purple, making the game look like a Mardi Gras parade. The parade was one of layups and dunks for the West, which scored 44 points in the first quarter and 45 in the second. Griffin had 18 points in the first quarter and Durant had 22 at halftime, both two shy of

Northern New Mexico

ON THE AIR

want as the face of their franchise for the next decade. Michael Sam: Last week, Sam became the first NFL draft prospect to acknowledge he is gay. This week, he’ll face a media circus in Indy. He also has some questions about his physical ability to answer. The SEC’s defensive player of the year was listed last season at 6-foot-2, 255 pounds, meaning Sam must demonstrate he has the speed and the agility to change directions to make it in the NFL. The heavy shift to 3-4 defenses has put a premium on heavier defensive ends, forcing lighter players to make the move to linebacker. If Sam demonstrates he’s quick enough to be a pass-rushing end in a 4-3 front or athletic enough to move to rush linebacker in a 3-4 front, his draft stock should improve. The No. 1 question: Manziel is only one part of the

Continued from Page B-1

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Local results and schedules

Focus: Record number of players in draft Continued from Page B-1

Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

records set by Glen Rice in 1997. And there was plenty of music, the rosters and starting lineups introduced around a concert by Pharrell Williams, who was joined by his own All-Stars in Nelly, Busta Rhymes, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Snoop Dogg. Magic Johnson led a band, too, encouraging the All-Stars to join him in singing “Happy Birthday” after the first quarter to Hall of Famer Bill Russell, the NBA’s greatest champion who was celebrating his 80th. The All-Stars played better than they sang. The East finished with 61 percent shooting, needing all sorts of offense after it simply couldn’t defend Durant and Griffin. Durant made six 3-pointers and raised his career scoring average in the All-Star games to a record 30.6 points. Outside of the ugly sleeved jerseys, it was a good look for the NBA’s midseason showcase, bouncing back strongly from an uneven All-Star Saturday night. The new format of the slam dunk contest Saturday wasn’t a hit, but every night is a dunk contest when Griffin is involved. The guy who once jumped over a car to

win a slam dunk contest had eight slams in the first 11 minutes, the backboard often barely done shaking from the last one when he threw down the next. Durant made a 3-pointer with 26 seconds left to make it 89-76 at the break, one point better than he and the West had two years ago in Orlando. He and Griffin each had 30 points by the end of the third quarter, but the East trimmed what was a West 18-point lead to 126-123 after three. James Harden started for the West in place of Kobe Bryant, who was elected by the fans but was knocked out by a broken left knee. Bryant said before the game his recovery is “coming slowly” but hopes to be back in another All-Star game. With Bryant sitting out and longtime regulars Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett not selected, it was a chance for the younger guys to make their mark. The rosters were loaded with players 25 and younger, including first-time starters George, Irving, Stephen Curry and Kevin Love. The All-Star newcomers also included official Violet Palmer, who became the first female to referee a major U.S. sports league’s All-Star game.

WINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live 2 p.m. on NBC — Men’s Biathlon, 15km Mass Start Gold Medal Final; Men’s Snowboarding, Cross Competition; Men’s Freestyle Skiing, Aerials Competition 7 p.m. on NBC — Figure Skating, Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final; Men’s Snowboarding, Cross Gold Medal Final; Men’s Freestyle Skiing, Aerials Gold Medal Final; Two-Man Bobsled,Gold Medal Final Runs 12 a.m. Tuesday on NBC — Men’s Ski Jumping, Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final 1 a.m. on NBCSN — Women’s Curling, United States vs. South Korea, Russia vs. Britain; Men’s Biathlon, 15km Mass Start Gold Medal Final 5:15 a.m. on NBCSN — Women’s Hockey - Semifinal, United States vs. Sweden (LIVE) 8 a.m. on NBCSN — Figure Skating, Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 11:30 a.m. on NBCSN — Men’s Ski Jumping, Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Women’s Biathlon, 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final 1 p.m. on NBCSN — Women’s Hockey, Semifinal, Canada vs. Switzerland 3 p.m. on NBCSN — Game of the Day: Women’s Hockey, Semifinal, United States vs. Sweden 10 a.m. on MSNBC — Women’s Hockey, Semifinal, Canada vs. Switzerland (LIVE) 3 p.m. on CNBC — Women’s Curling, Denmark vs. Britain 3 a.m. on USA — Men’s Curling, United States vs. Switzerland (LIVE)

PREP SCHEDULE

Today Boys basketball – Santa Fe Preparatory at Monte del Sol, 7 p.m. (at Christian Life) Girls basketball – Santa Fe Preparatory at Monte del Sol, 5:30 p.m. (at Christian Life) Escalante at Coronado, 5 p.m.

Tuesday Boys basketball – Mora at Pecos, 7 p.m. Evangel Christian at Santa Fe Waldorf, 6:30 p.m. (at Christian Life) Desert Academy at Jemez Valley, 6:30 p.m. Girls basketball – Bernalillo at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. Capital at Los Alamos, 7 p.m. St. Michael’s at Albuquerque Sandia Preparatory, 7 p.m. Santa Fe Indian School at Albuquerque Hope Christian, 7 p.m. Mora at Pecos, 5:30 p.m. Coronado at McCurdy, 5:30 p.m. Desert Academy at Jemez Valley, 5 p.m. Evangel Christian at Santa Fe Waldorf, 5 p.m. (at Christian Life)

Wednesday Boys basketball – Los Alamos at Capital, 7 p.m. Santa Fe High at Bernalillo, 7 p.m. St. Michael’s at Albuquerque Sandia Preparatory, 7 p.m. Santa Fe Indian School at Albuquerque Hope Christian, 7 p.m. Mesa Vista at Cuba, 7 p.m. Desert Academy at Foothill, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball – West Las Vegas at Pojoaque Valley, 7 p.m. Las Vegas Robertson at Taos, 7 p.m. Mesa Vista at Cuba, 5:30 p.m.

Thursday Boys basketball – Taos at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m. West Las Vegas at Pojoaque Valley, 7 p.m. Peñasco at Mora, 7 p.m. New Mexico School for the Deaf at Santa Fe Waldorf, 6:30 p.m. (at Christian Life) Escalante at Tierra Encantada, 5 p.m. Girls basketball – Santa Fe Indian School at St. Michael’s, 7 p.m. Peñasco at Mora, 5:30 p.m. McCurdy at Escalante, 5:30 p.m. New Mexico School for the Deaf at Santa Fe Waldorf, 5 p.m. (at Christian Life)

Friday Boys basketball – Santa Fe Indian School at St. Michael’s, 7 p.m. Pecos at Santa Fe Preparatory, 7 p.m. Tierra Encantada at McCurdy, 7 p.m. Desert Academy at Albuquerque Menaul, 5 p.m. Girls basketball – Santa Fe High at Capital, 7 p.m. Española Valley at Bernalillo, 7 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m. Pecos at Santa Fe Preparatory, 5:30 p.m. Taos at Raton, 5:30 p.m. Cuba at Mesa Vista, 5 p.m. Wrestling – State Championships, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Santa Ana Star Center, Rio Rancho) Swimming – State Championships, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Albuquerque Academy Natatorium)

Saturday Boys basketball – Bernalillo at Española Valley, 7 p.m. Capital at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. Pojoaque Valley at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m. Monte del Sol at Peñasco, 7 p.m. Taos at Raton, 5:30 p.m. Escalante at McCurdy, 5 p.m. Questa at Springer, 4 p.m. Dulce at Mesa Vista, 1 p.m. Girls basketball – Artesia at Los Alamos, 2 p.m. Dulce at Mesa Vista, 2 p.m. Questa at Springer, 4 p.m. Monte del Sol at Penasco, 5:30 p.m. Wrestling – State Championships, 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. (Santa Ana Star Center, Rio Rancho) Swimming – State Championships, 8:15 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Albuquerque Academy Natatorium)

NEW MEXICAN SPORTS

Office hours 2:30 to 10 p.m.

James Barron, 986-3045 Will Webber, 986-3060 Edmundo Carrillo, 986-3060 FAX, 986-3067 Email, sports@sfnewmexican.com


B-4

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

2014 WINTER OLYMPICS

Miller makes history as oldest Alpine medalist 36-year-old U.S. skier overcome with emotions after tying for bronze in super-G By Howard Fendrich

The Associated Press

A worker throws salt Sunday to prepare the track for the men’s 4x10-kilometer cross-country relay in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. DMITRY LOVETSKY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

24-ton sprinkle of salt saves slopes Organizers avert melting crisis with emergency shipment from Switzerland By Sam Dolnick

The New York Times

K

RASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — Late last week, a senior adviser to the Sochi Olympics convened an emergency meeting with top winter sports officials at the Park Inn hotel in the Alpine village here. A situation had grown dire. It was not security, attendance or doping that was the problem. It was salt. Four months earlier, Hans Pieren, one of the world’s leading experts on salt and snow, had told Sochi officials that the Alpine skiing events required more than 19 tons of salt, a crucial ingredient for winter sports officials who want to melt soft snow so it can refreeze into a hard surface. But to their great regret, the organizers had not listened. Now, with 10 days of competition remaining, many of the games’ signature events were in jeopardy of being compromised, and perhaps even canceled. Tim Gayda, a Canadian consultant who is a senior adviser to the Sochi organizers, called the meeting Thursday night, according to some people who were there. He told the group that the strongest kind of salt, the large-grain variety, was simply not available in Russia. Gayda asked the group an urgent question: Does anyone know how we can get 25 tons of salt — tonight? From there, a confidential international mission unspooled — a mountaintop “Ocean’s Eleven” — that just may have prevented a major Olympic embarrassment. This Sochi salt accord involved a Swiss salt salesman working late into the night; a rerouted airplane that may or may not have come from Bulgaria; an Olympian turned salt savant; and Russians powerful enough to clear months of customs bureaucracy overnight. It began with Pieren, 52, a ruddy Swiss skier who works as a senior race director for FIS, the international ski federation. He discusses the merits of different salt grains with the precision of a jeweler and often carries plastic sandwich bags with grains of salt — fine, medium and large. (He brought all three to a recent interview.) Last September, Pieren made a final inspection of the Alpine skiing courses and told Sochi organizers that he needed 19 tons of salt for the games — 2 tons of fine-grain salt, 7 tons of medium and,

most important, 10 tons of large-grain Himalaya-style salt. This was the heavyduty salt that sank deep into the snow, lasted longer and would be most effective in warm weather. In emphatic but imperfect English, Pieren placed his order in a Sept. 29 email to Yves Dimier, the head of Alpine sports for Sochi’s organizing committee. “If the conditions are incredible bad or wears than expected, we need maybe more salt and have to get more,” Pieren wrote. Pieren, who competed in Alpine skiing events at the 1988 and 1992 Olympics and now works with international competitions, was used to getting his way on matters of salt. Guided by intuition and experience, he combines different grains to find the right solution for every kind of snow. “When we order something, it is not a wish,” he said. “It is a must.” But Sochi organizers did not listen. After spending more than $50 billion on the games, they did not fill the salt order, which would have cost perhaps a few thousand dollars. Dimier and a spokesman declined to comment on his role in the decision, and the Sochi press office did not directly say why organizers did not heed Pieren’s advice. But they acknowledged the importance of the large-grained salt and its scarcity in Russia. Sochi had hardly any large salt crystals, less than a ton — nowhere near enough to harden expanses of soft snow, according to Pieren. And temperatures on the mountain were rising. Homeowners use salt to melt ice on the sidewalk, but Alpine experts cleverly use it to overcome soft snow conditions when a hard, icy surface is preferable. The salt melts the soft snow, and when the temperature drops — usually overnight — a layer of ice forms. Large-grain salt, about 5 millimeters in size, is best for soft, deep snow, because it drops farther into the snow and lasts for days, not hours. By the time of the emergency meeting, the world was watching Olympic athletes who had spent their lives training for these competitions. But their efforts could all be undone because of 5-millimeter grains of salt, or rather, the lack of them. “They didn’t recognize the importance of the salt,” Pieren said. “They don’t know anything about salt.” It was not just the Alpine skiing races

that were in trouble. Pieren fielded frantic calls from colleagues across the mountain — at cross-country, the halfpipe, Nordic combined. All were worried about the conditions. All were in need of salt. Prominent athletes began to complain about the conditions. The halfpipe is “pretty hard to ride,” said Shaun White, a U.S. snowboarder and one of the games’ biggest stars. “Once everyone gets in there, it just turns to mush.” Sochi officials had to act swiftly. When Gayda asked about arranging an emergency infusion of salt, Pieren knew where to turn. He called Schweizer Rheinsalinen, a 160-year-old company near Basel, Switzerland, that sits on the banks of the river for which it is named. On its website, the company declares salt “a world unto itself.” Pieren reached Marcel Plattner, a sales accountant who works mostly in foodgrade salt. Pieren told him he was in trouble. “Not him personally in trouble, but he told me Sochi didn’t have enough salt,” Plattner said. Pieren was relieved to hear the Swiss company had plenty of big-grain salt in a nearby warehouse; he said Olympic officials would buy 24 tons if it could be shipped immediately. At roughly $150 a ton, the bill would be more than $3,500. Plattner was on a sales call with a supermarket chain when Pieren called. He was thrilled to help — he had been watching the games and was a fan of winter sports, hockey and skiing especially. “I felt bad for the athletes,” he said. “It wasn’t their mistake.” Once Schweizer Rheinsalinen agreed to the sale, the international ski federation helped reroute a plane to Zurich, according to Jenny Wiedeke, a spokeswoman for the organization. The plane would leave Zurich at 11 a.m., with or without the salt. “If you’re too late, the show is gone,” Plattner said. “It was the time which was working against us.” The ski federation and Sochi officials declined to describe how they secured a plane on such short notice. Plattner said he was told it came from Sofia, the Bulgarian capital. Plattner worked until 11 that night to make the arrangements. He said he did not even have time to tell his boss. “It was very exciting,” he said.

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — This medal mattered to Bode Miller. Not so much because his bronze in Sunday’s super-G — behind winner Kjetil Jansrud and surprise runner-up Andrew Weibrecht — makes Miller, at age 36, the oldest Alpine medalist in Olympic history. Or even because he now owns six medals in all, the second-highest total for a male ski racer and tied for second among U.S. Winter Olympians in any sport. The guy who for years and years insisted results don’t mean much to him declared he actually did care about this one. The PAST year has been a difficult one for Miller: the death of his younger brother, Chelone, in April 2013; the court fight over custody of his infant son; the work it took to come back from left knee surgery and return to the Alpine apex. “It’s almost therapeutic for me to be in these situations, where I really had to test myself, so I was happy to have it be on the right side of the hundredths,” said Miller, who grew up in New Hampshire and is now based in California. “Some days … medals don’t matter, and today was one of the ones where it does.” He wiped away tears in the finish area after someone mentioned Chelone, a charismatic snowboarder who was 29 and hoping to make the U.S. team in Sochi when he died of what was believed to be a seizure. “Everything felt pretty raw and pretty connected,” Miller said, “so it was a lot for me.” Weibrecht couldn’t help but be moved by his own journey, calling Sunday “probably the most emotional day of ski racing that I’ve ever had.” It also was an important day for the U.S. ski team. The Americans had managed to collect only one of the 15 medals awarded through the first five Alpine events of the Sochi Olympics before Weibrecht and Miller tripled their nation’s total in one fell swoop. Through 28 starters Sunday, Miller and Jan Hudec of Canada were tied for second place, about a half-second slower than Jansrud’s run of 1 minute, 18.14 seconds. But then came the 29th racer, Weibrecht, who had come out

of nowhere to win the super-G bronze behind Miller’s silver at the 2010 Olympics but since then has dealt with injury after injury, including to both shoulders and both ankles. He’s had four operations in the PAST four years, lost funding from the U.S. ski team at one point, and was not a lock to make the Sochi Olympic roster. “I’ve had to evaluate whether this is really what I want to do. Even,” Weibrecht said, then paused before adding, “as recently as yesterday.” He laughed at his own punch line. “All kidding aside,” Weibrecht said later, rubbing his left temple, “it’s been a pretty difficult four years. It’s kind of one of those things that you can only be beat down so many times before you start to really look at what you’re doing. I didn’t know how many more beatdowns I could take.” SNOWBOaRdINg Samkova won the women’s snowboardcross, the first gold of the games for the Czech Republic. Samkova led from start to finish in all three qualifying and elimination races. Lindsey Jacobellis of the U.S. crashed while leading her semifinal, the third straight disappointing Olympic finish for the eight-time X Games winner. CROSS-COuNTRY Sweden’s win in the 4x10-kilometer relay came one day after the Swedish women had won gold in the same race. No country has won both relays since the old Soviet Union did it 42 years ago. Swedish anchor Marcus Hellner skied alone for the entire fourth leg and grabbed a Swedish flag to wave as he entered the stadium. Russia took silver in front of President Vladimir Putin. France finished third. SPEEdSkaTINg Jorien ter Mors earned the gold in the Dutch sweep of the women’s 1,500. Pre-race favorite Ireen Wust settled for silver, with bronze going to Lotte van Beek. If there had been a medal for fourth place, the Dutch would have won that, too, with Marrit Leenstra finishing just after Van Beek. Ter Mors turned in a stunning time of 1 minute, 53.51 seconds, an Olympic record and the second-fastest ever at sea level. CuRLINg Sweden and Canada became the first men’s teams to qualify for the semifinals. Norway, Britain and China are battling for the other two spots. The Swedes and Canadians also advanced to the semifinals in the women’s tournament. China, Britain, Switzerland and Japan still have a chance for the remaining two semifinal spots.

Bode Miller and his wife, Morgan, wipe away tears Sunday after the men’s super-G in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. Miller, at age 36, became the oldest Alpine skier to win a medal when he and Jan Hudec of Canada tied for bronze. CHRISTOPHE ENA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

kessel: 1st American to score 4 goals in preliminary round since 1960 Continued from Page B-1 shutout. Miller made 17 saves in his Sochi debut. “Yeah, I definitely had some nerves,” Miller said. “It was an important game to ensure that we’re at the top of our pool.” With plenty of support at the other end of the rink, the 2010 silver medal winner didn’t need to worry. “They were stronger on the puck,” Slovenia coach Matjaz

Kopitar said. “They’re strong. They’re fast.” Ryan McDonagh scored about a minute after Kessel’s third goal to put the Americans up 4-0. David Backes gave them a five-goal cushion early in the third. Kessel is the first American to score four goals in the threegame preliminary round of the Olympic tournament since Bill Cleary and Roger Christian in 1960. Fittingly, the native of

Madison, Wis., and his teammates were sporting throwback jerseys in the style Cleary and Christian wore at the games in Squaw Valley — “USA” from right shoulder to left hip. “We’ve got grit and determination throughout the lineup, but that’s the type of speed and skill we need,” Bylsma said. The U.S. also has two goalies, Quick and Miller, who are potentially great, and a good one in Jimmy Howard. Who

will be in net for the quarterfinals, when it’s win-or-go-home? “I’m not going to tell you that now,” Bylsma said after Sunday’s game. Luka Gracnar made 23 saves for Slovenia, who will face Austria in the qualification playoff round Tuesday after beating Slovakia and losing to the U.S. and Russia in preliminary play. Even if Slovenia doesn’t win another game, it has been a successful appearance for a

country that earned a surprising spot in the Olympic hockey tournament for the first time. Slovenia has just one NHL player, Anze Kopitar of the Los Angeles Kings, and he didn’t play in the third period of Sunday’s game because of flu-like symptoms, according to his father and coach. Anze Kopitar later announced he was feeling much better and looking forward to Slovenia’s next game.

“He don’t feel good, because he has something with the stomach,” Matjaz Kopitar said. “He didn’t feel well. He was without the power. Hopefully, he’s going to be better.” Slovenia was also without another key player, forward Sabahudin Kovacevic, who was suspended for one game for swinging his left elbow and landing it on the head of Slovakia’s Tomas Kopecky.


SPORTS

Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-5

NASCAR

Austin Dillon wins Daytona 500 pole in No. 3 By Jenna Fryer

The Associated Press

Austin Dillon walks by his car in the garage area Sunday after he won the pole position during qualifying for the Daytona 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series in Daytona Beach, Fla. JOHN RAOUX/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yankees: N.Y. looks to Teixeira and Jeter to stabilize team Continued from Page B-1 Teixeira was limited to 15 games and Derek Jeter to 17, and Alex Rodriguez and Curtis Granderson also missed long stretches. After two days of canceled flights from New York, Teixeira started workouts four days ahead of the other position players. He fielded grounders at first base, took 53 swings off a tee and 43 more in batting practice in his first outdoor session since surgery last July 2 to repair a torn tendon sheath in his right wrist. Jeter, still recovering from the effects of a broken ankle in October 2012, has been working out at the minor complex since Jan. 20. He reports to the big league camp Wednesday, when he will hold a news conference to discuss his announcement last week that this will be his final season. With the Yankees weakened at second following the departure of Robinson Cano and at third because of Rodriguez’s season-long suspension, New York is counting on Teixeira and Jeter to stabilize an infield in flux. “They’re back in my mind, but I think you have to get them into games to see exactly where they’re at, to be fair to them and probably to alleviate any doubt that you might have,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. The retirement decision by Jeter, who turns 40 in June, shocked Teixeira. “I thought that Derek had a couple years left in him. I knew how excited he would be about this season, just the same way I am when you only play 15 or 17 games,” he said. “I really could have seen Derek playing until he was 44 or 45.” Teixeira turns 34 in April and hopes to have five more productive seasons. He might not be ready when New York’s exhibition season starts Feb. 25, but he thinks he’ll be on the field sometime during the first week, get 50 exhibition at-bats and be able to play at least 150 games during the regular season. He had more pop from his bat during his 49 righthanded swings than his 47 from the left side — although he said he felt his swing path was a lot better from the left. Given his injury, sustained while hitting off a tee last March 5, his wrist stiffness likely is more of an issue hitting left-handed — when the right hand provides most of the power.

“You can definitely tell I had surgery. But I had ankle surgery 13 years ago, and I could tell I had ankle surgery after 13 years,” he said. “So, it’s just something I’m going to have to make sure that I loosen up, and make sure I do all the proper rehab and strengthening exercises.” A two-time All-Star, Teixeira usually is a slow starter. He has a .278 career average and 341 homers, but through April 30 each year, his average has been .238 with 33 home runs in 11 seasons. A poor April wouldn’t necessarily mean he hasn’t sufficiently healed. “I can always use that ammo,” Yankees hitting coach Kevin Long said. “So that’s in our back pocket.” Teixeira said his surgeon, Dr. Keith Raskin of New York University School of Medicine, told him the wrist will continue to improve for a year after the operation. But there always will be worries of a setback until Teixeira proves to himself that the injury isn’t a hindrance, that he regularly can clear Yankee Stadium’s right-field wall with what broadcaster John Sterling calls a “Tex message.” “There’s going to be a mental part of it. He’s going to have to get over the hump,” Long said. Teixeira watched from his home in Connecticut as Yankees general manager Brian Cashman made his moves. “I was texting Cash like every two weeks, telling him congrats on another signing and great offseason,” he said. “I basically told him: You did your job, now it’s time for us to do ours. So no excuses this year. We have a team that can compete for a world championship.” Teixeira says he hasn’t been this eager for a season since he was a rookie with Texas in 2003. His bounce back could determine whether the Yankees rebound. “I take [a] silver lining in everything, and for me this year off — basically a year off — was me realizing how lucky I am to play baseball, realizing how much I loved playing baseball,” he said. “I did a lot of charity stuff this offseason and spent a bunch of time with my family, and I loved that time, but I’m a baseball player, and there’s nothing cooler than playing baseball for a living. And taking that year off really made realize that I want to do it as long as I can.”

A two-time All-Star, Teixeira usually is a slow starter. He has a .278 career average and 341 homers, but through April 30 each year, his average has been .238 with 33 home runs in 11 seasons.

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — With the famed No. 3 on his car and memories of the late Dale Earnhardt fresh in his mind, Austin Dillon took the fabled number out of hibernation and straight to the top at Daytona. Dillon reawakened the days of The Intimidator and proved he can handle the spotlight thrust on his ride in the 3, winning the pole Sunday for the season-opening Daytona 500. He took the top spot with a lap at 196.019 mph in NASCAR’s season opener in a car Richard Childress has refused to field at NASCAR’s top level since Earnhardt’s fatal accident on the last lap of the 2001 race. But with his 23-year-old grandson ready to move to the Sprint Cup Series, Childress allowed Dillon to use the number widely associated with the seven-time champion. Earn-

hardt won 67 races, six championships and the 1998 Daytona 500 driving the No. 3. Dillon was a kid when he posed for a picture with Earnhardt in Victory Lane following his breakthough 1998 win. He’ll have many more memories from this milestone, like the congratulatory handshake he received from Richard Petty when qualifying ended. NASCAR’s family roots run deep, so Childress never had to leave the family tree to find the right driver for the number. Dillon has been using it in NASCAR national competition since 2009, when he made his Truck Series debut in the No. 3. He won the Truck championship in 2011 driving the No. 3 for Richard Childress Racing, and the Nationwide title last season in the same number. So Childress knew — he always knew and has insisted that Earnhardt

gave his blessing long before his death — that Dillon could use the number if he ever made it to Cup. Dillon doesn’t take the responsibility lightly. “Everybody wants to see this number perform well, and that’s what my goals are,” Dillon said. “I love getting in that race car and driving it. I think once we get through some of these races here at the beginning of the year, everything will sink in, and I’ll get comfortable and be able to have some fun.” It’s the fourth time the No. 3 has won the pole for the Daytona 500. Buddy Baker did it in 1969, Ricky Rudd in 1983 and Earnhardt in 1996. Martin Truex Jr., driving a Chevrolet for Furniture Row Racing, qualified second with a lap at 195.852 mph. Truex’s engine is built by Earnhardt-Childress Racing, giving the company a sweep of the Daytona 500 front row.

GOLF NORTHERN TRUST OPEN

Bubba Watson drives on the second tee Sunday during the final round of the Northern Trust Open at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles. REED SAXON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Back in winner’s circle Bubba Watson wins in Riviera to capture first title since 2012 Masters By Doug Ferguson

The Associated Press

L

OS ANGELES — Bubba Watson lost track of time. He didn’t realize it had been nearly two years and 41 tournaments since his last vic-

tory. A reminder came Sunday afternoon, after he birdied the 18th hole to win the Northern Trust Open by two shots. Walking up the steps to the clubhouse he saw his son, Caleb, who was adopted shortly before Watson won the 2012 Masters. Watson was alone in his green jacket that day. This time, wife and son were at Riviera to watch a masterpiece. He played the final 39 holes without a bogey. He had a 64-64 weekend. He made up a four-shot deficit in six holes, and closed with the lowest round by a winner

of this tournament in 28 years. This wasn’t “Bubba” golf. It simply was great golf. And he couldn’t wait to celebrate. “When I won the Masters, it was just me,” Watson said. “Family members were there, but not my wife and not my son, who was just adopted at that point, and now is two weeks away from being 2 years old. What a thrill. We’ll have some pictures with him and my wife and the trophy, so it’s nice.” Watson won by two shots over Dustin Johnson, who closed with a 66 for the second straight week and got the same result — second place. Johnson finished one shot behind Jimmy Walker last week at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. “When you shoot 14 under on the weekend, it’s tough to beat that,” Johnson said. Watson, who started the final round four shots behind William McGirt, made up ground so quickly that he broke out of a four-way tie for the lead with a birdie on the eighth hole and made the turn in 30. Equally critical were a pair of par saves

with 7-foot putts on the 12th and 13th holes. It was quite a turnaround from his last event, the Phoenix Open, where Watson made two late bogeys and finished one shot behind Kevin Stadler. Presented another chance, he wasn’t about to let this one get away. Watson finished at 15-under 269, and he wasn’t the only big winner. Jason Allred, who went to college up the coast at Pepperdine, played bogey-free for a 68 and tied for third with Brian Harman, who also had a 68. Allred was a Monday qualifier, and this was his first regular PGA Tour event since he last had his card in 2008. The tie for third was a career-best for the 33-year-old Allred. He earned $388,600, which is more than he had made in his entire career, which included two full seasons on the PGA Tour. He now is exempt into the Honda Classic, which starts in two weeks — about the time his wife is due with their third child. “We’ll have fun figuring out what that looks like,” Allred said.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

No. 4 Wichita State trumps Evansville The Associated Press

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — Ron Baker scored 26 points, and Fred VanVleet finWichita St. 84 ished with Evansville 68 18 points, eight assists and five steals to lead No. 4 Wichita State to an 84-68 victory over Evansville on Sunday. The Shockers (27-0, 14-0 Missouri Valley Conference) remained one of two unbeaten teams in major college basketball and extended their schoolrecord winning streak. They are the 21st team in Division I history to go 27-0, a list that

top-ranked Syracuse could join later this week. NO. 18 CREIGHTON 101, NO. 6 VILLANOVA 80 In Omaha, Neb, Doug McDermott matched his season high with 39 points and passed Larry Bird for 13th place on the Division I career scoring chart during Creighton’s victory over Villanova. Creighton’s second lopsided win over Villanova in a month moved the Bluejays (21-4, 11-2) into first place in the Big East, a half-game ahead of the Wildcats (22-3, 10-2). NEBRASKA 60, NO. 9 MICHIGAN STATE 51 In East Lansing, Mich., Terran Petteway scored 23 points, and

Walter Pitchford added 18 as Nebraska topped Michigan State. Petteway had 16 points in the last 20 minutes after Pitchford scored 12 before the break for the Cornhuskers (14-10, 6-6 Big Ten). NO. 13 LOUISVILLE 102, RUTGERS 54 In Louisville, Ky., Luke Hancock scored a career-high 25 points, including six 3-pointers, and Louisville throttled Rutgers. The Cardinals (21-4, 10-2 American Athletic Conference) made a season-high 16 shots from beyond the arc on 30 attempts for their fourth straight win, completing a season sweep of the Scarlet Knights (10-16, 4-9).

NO. 21 WISCONSIN 75, NO. 15 MICHIGAN 62 In Ann Arbor, Mich., Frank Kaminsky had 25 points and 11 rebounds, and Wisconsin smothered Michigan in the first half before holding on. The Wolverines (18-7, 10-3 Big Ten) cut an 18-point deficit to three in the second half, but Kaminsky personally went on a 7-2 run after that, helping Wisconsin regain control. TEMPLE 71, NO. 23 SMU 64 In Philadelphia, Dalton Pepper scored 24 points to help Temple beat SMU. Temple knocked off a Top 25 opponent for the first time since March 10 last year against No. 21 VCU.


B-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

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SANTA FE 2.5 ACRES WITH 2 RENOVATED MOBILE HOME, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. Private 22 GPM well, 20 miles South of Santa Fe, Hwy 14. $185,000, $65,000 down. 505-473-1526 stanhelp@gmail.com BACK ON THE MARKET! Reduced! Spacious single-level 3 bedroom, 2 bath. New paint. All appliances. Washer, dryer. Featuring: 1494 sq.ft. with 9’ ceilings, 2-car garage. FSBO, $238,750. 505-231-8405 FSBO TOWNHOUSE, 3 bedroom, 2 baths, and garage. $179,900. Close to schools, available immediately. Owner - Broker. Please call 505-850-5005.

CHARMING, CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, $800

2014 KARSTEN 16X80 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FOR SALE. $56,062 plus tax. Move-in ready! Located in the Rancho Zia MHP Space #26. Banks offer rates as low as 4.5%. Shown by appointment only. Call Tim, 505-6992955

2014 KARSTEN 16X80 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FOR SALE. $56, 062 + tax. Movein ready! Rancho Zia MHP Space #26

Open House SUNDAY 1-3 PM ELDORADO

TAYLOR PROPERTIES 505-470-0818 rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

and independent

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

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for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

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City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid living the accounting Program and exact number from the neighborshortage fic OperationsHe’s not sure the their STOP through natural-gas not, but rected them. paid their automated about the Co. crews came they had who the of people got letters stating report MondayMexico Gas calls about a TV news by when New MEXICAN tickets and he got many phone NEW listen to passed in he admittedthis year. They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents includEllen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito from housemate, issue early of the default notices, San Ildefonso relight pilots. resulted and his lage, outside A number home near gas lines and by Sovcik, mailed to the John Hubbard received or to clear their frigid San Ildefonso ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes into Robhood over payments keeping, signs in their were deposited early city that to police for record of having during the forwarded gas service Matlock Others originated back Page A-9 By Staci bin said. turned Mexican CITATIONS, see have The New Despite may on. Please Gas Co. power calls repeated ew Mexico in its Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. Committee some legislators Resources and Natural Art lecture New Mexico, by Lois the comMonday. also asked in towns and Skin of Cady Wells Under the The committeeclaims offices author of help resiin conjunction Rudnick, to better pany to establish Modernism of New the crisis Southwestern Under the Skin(1933affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas with the exhibit Cady Wells during the dents who The Art of Art Museum, 5:30 suffered Gas Co. officials Mexico: Arts. for losses UNM Mexico link on the 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial outage. New phone line and running. A-2 p.m., Museum in Northsaid a claimswebsite is up and in Calendar, New Mexico 16,000 people company’s than two hours, legislators’ without natural More eventsin Pasatiempo among the were still They are days of For more answered and Fridays week’s Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New caused last Gas representatives their snow Constable about whatduring bitterly cold With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating questions Matlock Natural less temperatures. By Staci relit from El Pasothe huge freezing a fourth of Taos and service interruption had been Mexican An official Ellen CavaThe New Today today, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put weather. that manages gas across company and his housemate, with their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitGas, the pipeline delivering in front of John Hubbard Near Mostly cloudy, showers. on Monday. plumbers huddled interstate by noon snow also spoke. stay warm. plea to a lot more to licensed naugh, were afternoon trying to the Southwest, Gas purchased on meters. out a message morning 8. away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten New Mexico do not go Page A-10 High 37, low ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information CRISIS, front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Please see Meanwhile, FAMILIES, PAGE A-14 the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on State a 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. Pueblo just Obituaries measures Victor Manuel sponsor 87, Feb. 4 Auditor’s Baker, Martinez, A-7 Lloyd “Russ” ◆ GOP newcomers Ortiz, 92, reform. PAGE Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 for ethics Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who to according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about return Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one was expected to 4 at in Feb. sion Gay, PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. and who were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid The New

N

CALL 986-3010

Pasapick

FARMS & RANCHES

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may

at tax agenc

Easy Qualify 4.5% APR, 10 year payoff Call Tim 505-699-2955. Shown by appointment only

OUT OF TOWN

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

y

up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Index Managing

Calendar editor: Rob

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146.17 AC. 1 hour from Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Electricity, views of Sangre De Cristo Mountains and Glorieta Mesa. $675 per acre, 20 year owner financing. Toll Free 1-877-797-2624 www.newmexicoranchland.net

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MANUFACTURED HOMES 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, Highway 14 area. Peace and quiet. Partial utilities paid. $850 monthly. References, lease, and deposit required. 505-473-7155, 505699-0120.

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1425 PASEO DE PERALTA, 1 bedroom, full kitchen, bath. Tile throughout. Free laundry. $735 utilities paid. No Pets! 505-471-4405

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HORSE PROPERTY 2BR 2BA $850 . Newly remodeled manufactured home on 2 1/2 acres, Lone Butte area. Quiet country living, decks porches. First last damage. Pets Horses negotiable Available Now 505-316-5575.

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Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

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»announcements«

LOST 2/9/14 LOST set of keys on Notre Dame lanyard. Garcia Street, Canyon Rd. or West Alameda vicinity. Please call 505-690-4521!

PUBLIC NOTICES NM SENIOR Olympics is accepting cost proposals to host the Annual Summer Games for 30 individual sports for 900 participants between 2015-2018. For an RFP contact NMSO at nmso@nmseniorolympics.org or call 1-888-623-6676. Deadline 4/1/14

Seeking Office Administrative Assistant. Must possess strong skills and experience in authorizations, billing, Medicaid, Medicare, Private insurances, scheduling, computer and good friendly customer services, bilingual a plus. Salary negotiable based on experience. Send resume to cmazon@cybermesa.com

AUTOMOTIVE an Albuquerque automotive dealership, is currently seeking to hire a Certified Chevrolet Technician to join our Service Department. Mark’s Casa Chevrolet is looking for a technician with Chevrolet automotive service experience. To apply for this position, please email a resume at mbaldwin@casanet.com today or call Mark Baldwin at 505262-8600 for more details. EOE

Director of Medical Surgery, ICU Director of HIM RN Case Manager, Clinical Documentation Specialist Clinic RN, Oncology Clinic Full-time, Part-time, PRN RN positions in ER/ICU/OB Full-time Inpatient Coder, HIM Full-time, Part-time Lab Assistants Full-time Staff Accountant PRN Speech Therapist To apply please go to losalamosmedicalcenter.com

DRIVERS

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SFSWMA BuRRT Transfer Operator Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency is accepting applications for a full-time BuRRT Transfer Operator ($15.80 hourly), #2014-001 (HS diploma or GED; NM CDL Class A license; and a minimum of 1 year experience in operating commercial vehicles or heavy equipment. Job announcement and application can be found at www.sfswma.org or call Rosalie at 505-424-1850 ext. 150. EEO/AA rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

and independent

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

l makers gril State law r gas crisis utility ove

out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded Others originated Page A-9 bin said. CITATIONS, Please see

The New

Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

PELLA WINDOWS AND DOORS

is seeking a receptionist to greet Pella customers in our showroom.

* Must be presentable and a team player * Must be proficient with Microsoft applications * 30-32 hours per week * $14 per hour Email resume to: dundonj@pella.com or fax: 505-314-8869 School Receptionist Full-Time New Mexico School for the Arts is a great place to work, where faculty and staff encourage NMSA’s creative students to realize their full academic and arts potential. All positions require a willingness to work in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Please access: www.nmschoolforthearts.org/ about/careers-at-nmsa/ For detailed information on job posting.

Art lecture

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow Constable With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating Matlock less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been Mexican Ellen Cavatoday, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put and his housemate, their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitin front of John Hubbard Near on Monday. plumbers huddled by noon stay warm. plea to to licensed naugh, were trying to on meters. out a message morning away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

By Staci The New

at tax agenc

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

The Santa Fe New Mexican is seeking a multitalented editor with excellent news judgment to help anchor the presentation desk at night, including working on the front page and special projects. Our editors do it all: Write accurate, punchy headlines; spot holes in stories while editing for AP style; design clean, eye-catching pages and graphics; and keep our revamped website up-to-date and looking sharp. We’re seeking candidates proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite with at least one year of experience in editing and design, although recent college graduates with excellent clips will be considered. At night, you’ll work in a collaborative environment with an award-winning group of writers, editors and photographers. We offer a competitive salary, health, dental, vision and 401k benefits, and a free gym membership. To apply, email your cover letter, résumé and five best design clips to Presentation Editor Brian Barker at bbarker@sfnewmexican.com .

Calendar

editor: Rob

A-2

Classifieds

Dean, 986-3033,

B-9

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Cynthia

Opinion

FEED EQUIPMENT SERVICES ALFALFA BALES & ALFAFLA ORCHARD GRASS BALES. $9.50 each bale. 100 or more, $9.00 each. Barn stored in Ribera, NM. Call 505-473-5300.

MAGNIFICENT STONE Cliff Fragua sculpture, 30"high, rare 2003, $4950 firm, must sell santa fe 505-471-4316 Lowered from 6000 last chance offer ,retail 10,500

BUILDING MATERIALS PLYWOOD. CABINET GRADE. 4’x8’ sheets. Never used. Different thicknesses. 505-983-8448

Sell Your Stuff! Call and talk to one of our friendly Ad-visors today!

986-3000 PETS SUPPLIES

FIREWOOD-FUEL

DENTAL ASSISTANT OR STERILIZATION TECH wanted for busy practice. Full time, Monday - Thursday. Experience preferred. Salary DOE. Email resume to: admin@childs2thdr.com

PECOS HOUSING Authority hiring Maintence worker for 33 Units. High degree of skill in one or more trades desired. 505-757-6380, pha@cybermesa.com So can you with a classified ad

SEASONED FIREWOOD. Ponderosa $80.00 per load. Pinion or Cedar $120.00 per load. Tel# 508-4440087 Delivery free.

FURNITURE

WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000

Check out this gorgeous girl!

Hygienist,

4 days a week, excellent salary. 505-988-1616. HEAD DENTAL ASSISTANT Rare Opportunity!!! Progressive Taos Dental Office has immemdiate opening for Full-time certified head dental assistant, 575-7794532.

Healthcare Services. Full-time positions for housekeepers. Apply in person at: Casa Real Nursing and Rehab, 1650 Galisteo Street. Attention: Rosannea

RETAIL

D a l l a s is a year old spayed German Shepherd cross. She enjoys long walks, chasing balls and play time at the dog park with calm, large dogs. She would love to be part of an active family who will take her for long hikes or perhaps a daily jog. To learn even more about Dallas, call her good friend and sponsor, Katya, at 505-501-0790.

RESALE STORE POSITION

Santa Fe Animal Shelter’s resale store seeks a creative full-time Assistant with experience, computer skills. Some heavy lifting. Resumés: sward@sfhumanesociety.org

DOG IGLOO for medium to large size dogs. Good condition. $75. Please call 505-699-0150.

LAMCC seeks LPN / RN

3 DAYS a week Santa Fe, Los Alamos office. Non-smoker nonsmoking household, no weekends.

BEAUTIFUL COUCH WITH LOVELY ACCENTS. FROM A SMOKE AND PET FREE HOME. $300. PLEASE CALL, 505-238-5711 TO SCHEDULE A VIEWING.

Email resume: jperkins@cybermesa.com or call Julie at: 505-662-4351

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Comics B-14

ART

EXPERIENCED COPY EDITOR

PART TIME

DENTAL ASSISTANT, Full time. Competitive salary & excellent benefit package. Experience required. Fax resume to 505-884-0479

Dental

»animals«

y

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid A-12

Managing

ADMINISTRATIVE

Pasapick

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may

Index

PART-TIME DATA ENTRY FOR QUICKBOOKS. Basic office skills and good PR skills a must. Fax resume to 505-438-4775

CALL 986-3010

SFSWMA BuRRT Transfer Operator Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency is accepting applications for a full-time BuRRT Transfer Operator ($15.80 hourly), #2014-001 (HS diploma or GED; NM CDL Class A license; and a minimum of 1 year experience in operating commercial vehicles or heavy equipment. Job announcement and application can be found at www.sfswma.org or call Rosalie at 505-424-1850 ext. 150. EEO/AA N

ACCOUNTING

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

50¢

mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

»jobs«

Opportunities for quality careers at Los Alamos Medical Center

ANTIQUES SCHAFFER GRAND UPRIGHT PIANO, Approximately 100 years old, Ivory Keys, Solid Oak, Good Condition. Make Offer. 505-501-0646

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern New Mexico Program Supervisor

WAREHOUSE WORK SPACE AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS

MANAGEMENT

B-7

m

Miller, cmiller@sfnewmexican.co

rdean@sfnewmexican.com

PCM IS hiring a dependable RN-Case Manager for in-home care in the Santa Fe, NM area. $32 per hour. Apply at: www.procasemanagement.com or call 866-902-7187 Ext. 350. EOE.

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS SANTA FE AREA RANCH RESIDENCE CARETAKER

Seeking full-time caretaker to manage and maintain residence (not ranch operations) on Santa Fe area large ranch for absentee West Coast owners. Compensation package (a function of prior experience) including health insurance, and superior separate on-ranch home. Send resumes and cover page via email to: ResidenceCaretaker@gmail.com

THE ORIGINAL TRADING POST

2 positions available, Salesperson and Merchandiser, for friendly professional selling ladies clothing, southwestern jewelry, art, gifts. Apply at 201 W. San Francisco St.

SALES MARKETING NM’S 2ND largest insurer seeks entrepreneurial candidates with a strong desire to be successful and respected business owners in their community. Award winning training from the University of Farmers. Subsidy packages available for building your agency. For more information, please contact 954-1612.

»merchandise«

EDUCATION COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS of NM (CISNM) is seeking FullTime SITE COORDINATORS for two Kindergarten through 8th grade schools in the Santa Fe Public Schools. CISNM Site Coordinators work to redress student dropout in public schools utilizing the nationally recognized Communities In Schools integrated student services framework. Working in partnership with a school principal, the Site Coordinator is responsible for the overall planning, integration and implementation of student and family supports and services designed to increase student attendance, improve behavior and academic performance, and provide basic needs supports. Bilingual Spanish-English required. Experience working with children and or youth in an educational setting, strong interpersonal and organization skills are essential. Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree and demonstrated relevant equivalent experience in education, social work or related field. Please submit cover letter, resume, and three references by email to: johnsona@ cisnew m exico.org by February 24, 2014. No Phone Calls, please.

Get your headlines on the go!

Don’t miss the latest news right to your inbox with our new and improved Morning News Updates email newsletter! http://www.santafenewmexican.com/newsletters/

SOUTHWEST OAK TABLE with beveled glass top. 4 regular chairs, 2 armchair, matching oak hutch. $1600 both, $900 each. 505-603-8767 WROUGHT IRON beveled glass top table with 6 newly upholstered chairs, $225. Hover-round excellent condition, $485. 505-577-4006

WE’RE SO DOG GONE GOOD! Using

We always Larger get results!

Type

will help 986-3000 your ad

get noticed WE NEED A CARPET RESTORATION P E R S O N . Or person who wants to learn how to repair hand made rugs, carpets. 505-310-0660

Place an ad Today!

CALL 986-3000

FALL IN L O V E ! Don’t miss your chance to meet Abby! This terrier cuddle bug will be at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter Mobile Adoptions Events: Friday, 4-7, Look What the Cat Dragged In 2, 541 W. Cordova Road, Saturday, 11-4, PetSmart, Sunday, noon-4, PetSmart. sfhumanesociety.org

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000 RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Classifieds Where treasures are found daily

ENGLISH BULLDOG MALE Puppies, AKC Registered. First shots. Take home 2/23/14. $1,800 each. 575-7609961, 575-762-7174, 575-356-6102 for pictures and information.

ANTIQUES MERRY FOSS, Latin American ETHNOGRAPHIC & ANTIQUE DEALER moving. Selling her COLLECTION, Household FURNITURE & EVERYTHING! By appt 505-7957222.

ONLINE AUCTION, 100+ Hobart 60 Quart Mixers. Restaurants Nationwide, See website for locations near you. Must be Sold to Highest Bidder! Bid online thru 2/17, go to www.SoldTiger.com

SPORTS EQUIPMENT PRETTY IN P I N K , New Women’s Adams golf clubs in PING bag. $500 obo. 505-929-3812

SHITZU Puppies for sale! 9 weeks old. please call 505-934-1357 for details!


B-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

sfnm«classifieds PETS SUPPLIES

986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

DOMESTIC

4X4s

4X4s

4X4s

IMPORTS

2007 CHRYSLER 300-Series 4 door Sedan RWD. Gorgeous car! $10,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2001 CHEVROLET TAHOE 4 door 4WD LT. Lots of features! $6,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

2003 LAND ROVER DISCOVERY 4 door HSE. Luxury, style, off road capabilities. $7,000. Schedule a test drive today. 505-629-1357.

2010 TOYOTA Tacoma Crew Cab SR5 4x4. Another 1 owner Lexus trade! Only 25k miles, NEW tires & NEW battery, clean CarFax $26,891. Call 505-216-3800.

2007 BMW 328XI - Just 58k miles! AWD, well equipped, recently serviced, clean CarFax, truly immaculate $18,261. Call 505-2163800.

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www.furrysbuickgmc.com

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

2007 TOYOTA FJ CRUZIER 4x4. Cruz in this one. Speaks for itself! $19,288. Call 505-473-1234.

2011 HONDA CR-V EX-L - another 1owner Lexus trade-in, AWD, leather, moonroof, clean CarFax, don’t miss this one! $20,

TINY POMERANIAN PUPPIES, rare, exotic, registered, first shots $500$800. Tiny Designer PomChi Puppies, first shots, $350. Valentine Ready!! 505-901-2094, 505-753-0000.

VALENTINE’S DAY AKC REGISTERED BOXER PUPPIES. 6 females, 1 male. First shots, tails cut, dew claws removed. $750.00 Marissa or Robert 505-473-9733

to place your ad, call

2001 CHRYSLER PT C R U I S E R 4 door Wagon. WOW! Amazing deal! $3,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2001 DODGE RAM 4x4 pickup. One owner, cream of the crop. Yours for under $10,000. Call 505-4731234.

2002 NISSAN Xterra SE SC. 4 wheel drive, supercharged, and lifted! $4,995. Schedule a test drive today!

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

SPECIAL

YORKIES, CHIHUAHUAS, POODLES, MINI DACHSHUNDS, DESIGNER MALTESE, YORKY-POOS, SHIHTZUS, DESIGNER SCHNAUZERS, MORKIES. Papers, shots, health guarantee, POTTY-PAD trained. Most hypo-allergic, nonshedding. PAYMENT PLAN. Debit, Credit cards or PAYPAL. $300 - $2,200. Call or text for pictures 575-9101818. cingard1@hotmail.com

2012 TOYTOA TACOMA 4x4. Only 7k miles. Save thousands! Only $19,899. Call 505-473-1234. 2008 Hummer H2 SUT - REALLY! ONLY 38k miles, totally loaded w/ leather, NAV and chrome brush guard, clean CarFax, this one’s HOT $46,731

Sell Your Stuff!

1997 DODGE RAM 1500 4WD Club Cab 6.5 Ft Box. $6,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

Call and talk to one of our friendly Ad-visors today!

IMPORTS

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

986-3000

»garage sale«

HONDA INSIGHT 2010 HYBRID. 44 mpg hwy mileage. One owner, well maintained. New tires under warranty. Great condition. 73,500 miles. Comes with Insight car cover! 505-501-2838.

2008 BMW 535-XI, WAGON AWD

Local Owner,Carfax,Garaged,NonSmoker X Keys, Manuals, Automatic, Every Service Record, Navigation, Heated Steering Wheel,Moonroof,Every Available Option, Pristine, Soooo Rare $20,450 WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2010 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID. Recent trade-in, low miles, over 42 mpg, leather, clean CarFax, truly immaculate $15,741. Call 505-2163800.

2009 HONDA CR-V AUTOMATIC

2007 PONTIAC G6 2 door Convertible GT. Immaculate condition, inside and out. 90,444 miles. $9,999. Schedule a test drive today. 2011 FORD F150 4X4 STEALS THE SPOTLIGHT, $21,995. Call 505-4731234.

SPECIAL

2011 AUDI A3 TDI - DIESEL, 40+ mpg, well equipped, clean CarFax, excellently maintained, beautiful condition $21,851

Local Owner, Carfax, 76,569 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, manuals, XKeys, Service Records, All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Pristine, Soooo Perfect $15,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2004 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER-SUV 4X4

Another One Owner, Local, Carfax, 85,126 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, X-Keys, Manuals, Every Service Record, 7 Passenger, Leather, New Tires, Loaded, Pristine, Soooo Family Oriented. $12,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

LA CASA FINA CONSIGNMENT- NEWLY EXPANDED, 7000 sq.ft.! New arrivals: French, primitive, New Mexican Antiques, and more! 821 W SAN MATEO. 505-983-0042

»cars & trucks«

2004 SAAB-9.3 SEDAN MANUAL FWD

Another One Owner, Local, Carfax, 75,843 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, X-Keys, Manuals, Every Service Record, Loaded, Sooo Affordable. $6,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2005 GMC 3500 CREW CAB DURAMAX 4WD. Awesome work truck! $22,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

HONDA ACCORD 1995EX. Runs Great. Power Everything. 6 cylinder. Needs some body work. 190,000. $1,550 OBO 505-920-8186

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

Sell your car in a hurry!

CLASSIC CARS Toy Box Too Full? CAR STORAGE FACILITY

2005.5 AUDI A4 3.2 QUATTRO. 63k miles. One owner. Always garaged. No accidents. Leather seats, navigation, cold-weather package, sports package, Bose stereo, Xenon headlights. $13,250. 505-577-5342

2004 AUDI 5 door Wagon 2.7T Quattro AWD Auto. Luxurious and functional. $7,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

Place an ad in the Classifieds 986-3000

4X4s

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

2012 Infiniti M37x AWD - Just traded! Gorgeous and loaded, good miles, navigation & technology packages, local one owner, clean CarFax $34,281. Call 505-216-3800.

2004 GMC YUKON DENALI 4 door AWD. Beautiful SUV. $10,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

Airport Road and 599 505-660-3039

2005 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 1500 4WD LT. Power everything, third row seating. $8,000 Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

2012 TOYOTA 4Runner SR5. 18,489 miles. This is an outstanding and very reliable vehicle. $32,800. Schedule a test drive today! 2010 BMW 335Xi - Another Lexus trade! Low miles, AWD, completely loaded with Navigation, still under warranty! clean CarFax $27,932 Call 505-216-3800.

DOMESTIC

2012 KIA OPTIMA SX. Sleek and dynamic. 21,225 miles. Certified pre-owned. $24,900. Call 505-9821957 to schedule a test drive today!

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

2004 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMIT E D 4WD. Great car for snow days! $8,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357. 2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT. A great car at a great price! 32,689 miles. $13,999. Schedule a test drive today.

2012 TOYOTA RAV4, 4WD, V6, 29k miles, sunroof, warranty snow tires with extra wheels, nice! $20,500. 505-699-8339 2009 NISSAN 370Z NISMO - Just 25k miles, rare performace package, collector condition, clean CarFax, don’t pass on this one! $28,471. 505-216-3800.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2012 NISSAN Frontier Crew Cab V6. White, automatic, 31,ooo miles, fully loaded. $20,000, OBO. 505-577-3473. "Runs Great!"

2012 Toyota Tundra Double Cab 4x4, rare TRD Rock Warrior, good miles, 1 owner, clean CarFax, HOT! $30,981. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 BMW 535Xi AWD. Recent trade-in, factory CERTIFIED with warranty & maintenance until 3/2016, fully loaded, clean CarFax $24,432. Call 505-216-3800.


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds IMPORTS

2008 Land Rover LR3

Top of the line HSE V8. Excellent black exterior, luxurious wood and tan leather, 7 passenger seating, 96k miles, service history, Carfax, Free Warranty. $18,995. Call 877-232-2815.

IMPORTS

2002 MERCEDES-BENZ S500V

Excellent condition , 85k miles, top of the line. $10,995. Call 505-9541054. Pictures and free Carfax at www.sweetmotorsales.com.

to place your ad, call IMPORTS

2008 SUBARU OUTBACK

Automatic, heated seats, CD, Cruise, excellent condition, timing belt done. $10,949. Call 505954-1054. Free CarFax at: www.sweetmotorsales.com

986-3000

B-9

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

IMPORTS

SUVs

VANS & BUSES

2009 VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN SE AWD, navigation, moonroof, turbo, clean CarFax, prisitine! $15,932. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 BUICK ENCLAVE FWD 4 door CXL V6. Great family vehicle. $19,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2011 FORD ECONOLINE WAGON E350 Super Duty Ext XLT. 15 passenger seating. $21,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

sweetmotorsales.com PICKUP TRUCKS

Have an empty house or apartment you need to rent?

2007 SUBARU FORESTER

2008 Land Rover Range Rover HSE. Another Lexus trade-in! low miles, clean CarFax, must see to appreciate, absolutely gorgeous $31,921. Call 505-216-3800.

Mercedes-Benz C230 Sport

Absolutely cherry, 87k miles. Loaded, heated seats, moonroof, 6 CD changer, spotless inside and out. Clean title, no accidents, includes 3 month, 3,000 mile warranty. Sweet price only $10,900. Call 877232-2815.

All-Terrain, Moonroof, CD, heated seats. $9,949. Call 505-954-1054. More pictures and free CarFax at: www.sweetmotorsales.com .

2004 CHEVROLET A V A L A N C H E 1500 4WD Crew Cab. $10,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

Read the WANT TO RENT column for prospective tenants.

2005 HONDA O D Y S S E Y EXL AT with Navigation and DVD. Perfect family car. $9,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

sweetmotorsales.com 2004 BUICK RENDEZVOUS 4 door AWD. Drive with style. $4,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357.

2011 Lexus CT200h - Recent trade! Factory Certified with 100k mile warranty, hybrid 42+ mpg, 1 owner clean CarFax, forget Prius for $23,841. 505-216-3800.

2013 TOYOTA COROLLA LE - Really, why buy new? Just 6k miles, showroom condition, clean CarFax. $15,741. Call 505-216-3800.

1995 CHEVROLET C1500 C H E Y ENNE. Lots of life left in this truck! $2,000 Schedule a test drice today, 505-629-1357.

2011 KIA SEDONA 4 door LWB LX. Room for the whole family. $14,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

www.furrysbuickgmc.com www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2006 MINI COOPER-S CONVERTIBLE MANUAL

Another One Owner, Carfax, 51,051 Miles. Garaged, Non-smoker, Manuals, X-Keys, Service Records. Drive All Season, Pristine, Soooo Beautiful $14,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2005 CHEVROLET EQUINOX AWD LT. Great family car! 145,300 miles. $6,999. Schedule a test drive today.

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945 2010 LEXUS RX 450h - Another 1 owner Lexus trade, Factory Certified with 3 year warranty, HYBRID, all the options, clean CarFax $34,971. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 TOYOTA PRIUS-C HYBRID FWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, Records, Garaged, Non-Smoker, XKeys, 14,710 Miles, City 53, Highway 46, Navigation, Remaining Factory Warranty. $18,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICE!

SPECIAL

2004 LEXUS RX-330 AWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, 80,014 Miles, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Service Records, New Tires, Chrome Wheels, Moon-Roof, Loaded. Pristine. Soooo Luxurious, $16,250. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

VIEW VEHICLE santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2001 FORD SUPER DUTY F-250 2WD Crew Cab 6-3/4 Ft Box XLT. $5,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505629-1357. 2004 HONDA CR-V AUTOMATIC. 79,810 miles, manuals, extra key, service records, AWD, moonroof, new tires, DVD player. $10,500. 505-231-4437.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER-SPORT AWD

Another One Owner, Carfax, 84,000 Miles, Garaged, NonSmoker, Service Records, New Tires, Manuals, Seven Passenger, Moon-Roof, Loaded. Pristine, Soooo Beautiful. $18,950. WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com Paul 505-983-4945

2008 ISUZU i-290 2WD Extended Cab Auto S. Tough and long lasting. $10,000. Schedule a test drive today, 505-629-1357.

2011 TOYOTA AVALON LIMITED. Another 1 owner Lexus trade, only 20k miles, loaded, navigation, clean CarFax, pristine condition $25,881. Call 505-216-3800.

2011 TOYOTA CAMRY I4 Auto SE. Drive with confidence. Excellent safety ratings. 23,864 miles. $17,999. Schedule a test drive today.

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STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Marla Eve Karmesin CASE NO.D-101-CV2014-00073 AMENDED NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 408-1 through Sec. 40-83 NMSA 1978, st seq. the Petitioner Marla Eve Karmesin will apply to the Honorable Sarah M. Singleton, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 1 p.m. on the 17th day of March, 2014 for an Order for Change of Name from Marla Eve Karmesin to Eve Kaye. Stephen T. Pacheco, District Court Clerk By: Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by:Marla Eve Karmesin Petitioner, Pro Se Legal#96455 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican on: February 17, 24, 2014

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LEGALS NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that the following properties shall be sold at public auction on Wednesday February 26th 2014 after 12.00 PM at Santa Fe Self Storage 1501 Third Street Santa Fe New Mexico 87505 505-983-6600. In satisfaction of the lien in accordance with The New Mexican Self Storage Act. Patrick Serrano 2500 Ranch Siringo Drive Santa Fe New Mexico 87505 Unit # 709 Contents: Fishing Rods, Lamps, Chest Of Drawers, Exercise Machine, Misc Plastic Totes, Camping Chairs, Cooler, Stereo Speakers, Wicker Shelf, Painting, Office Furniture, Steel Cabinet and much more. Legal #96472 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on February 10, 17 2014

LEGALS NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY SHALL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION AT 12:00 PM OR AFTER ON THE 26th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2014 AT ST. MICHAELS SELF STORAGE" 1935 ASPEN DR, SANTA FE, NM 87505 IN SATISFACTION OF LIEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE NEW MEXICO SELF STORAGE ACT. Unit #C80 Harvey, Chelsea 141 Fiesta St Santa Fe, NM 87501 Contents: bed, washer, dryer, rug, dresser, boxes Unit #J7 Jojola, Nadine PO Box 23574 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Contents: washer, ladder, boxes, bed Legal#96389 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican On: February 10, 17, 2014

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B-10

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

sfnm«classifieds CITY OF SANTA FE MARCH 4, 2014 REGULAR MUNICIPAL ELECTION NOTICE OF NAMES OF CANDIDATES, MUNICIPAL CHARTER AMENDMENTS, POLLING PLACES, PRECINCT BOARD MEMBERS AND ELECTION TRAINING 1.

Notice is hereby given that the following qualified electors are candidates for public office in the City of Santa Fe. The candidates’ names are listed below in the order they will appear on the ballot: A. For the office of Mayor (At-Large) for a four-year term: 1. Bill Dimas 2. Patti J. Bushee 3. Javier M. Gonzales A. For the office of City Councilor, District #1, for a four year term: 1. Signe I. Lindell 2. Michael J. Segura B. For the office of City Councilor, District #2, for a four year term: 1. Joe H. Arellano 2. Joseph M. Maestas 3. Mary Louise Bonney 4. Rad Acton 5. Jeff E. Green C. For the office of City Councilor, District #3, for a four year term: 1. Carmichael A. Dominguez 2. Angelo Jaramillo 3. Marie Campos E. For the office of City Councilor, District #4, for a four year term: 1. Ronald S. Trujillo

2.

Notice is hereby given that the following proposed Municipal Charter amendments are listed in the order that they will appear on the ballot: CHARTER AMENDMENT 1 Water Protection and Conservation Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article II, Section 2.03, to include in the environmental protection policy statement a provision that would mandate the governing body to protect, preserve and enhance the city’s water resources through regulation, conservation and relating development to water availability. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 2 Neighborhood Preservation Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article II, Section 2.04, to establish a policy on neighborhood preservation. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 3 Support for Local Business, the Local Economy and a Living Wage for All Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article II, to create a new Section 2.07 to establish a policy in support of local business, an enduring local entrepreneurial spirit and the rights of all to earn a living wage. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 4 Independent Citizens’ Redistricting Commission Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article VI, Section 6.03, to include the establishment of an independent citizens’ redistricting commission who shall review and revise district boundaries at least every ten years following the decennial census and requiring that the governing body adopt an ordinance to establish a procedure for the appointment and deliberations of the commission. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 5 Campaign Contribution Limits Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article IV, to create a new Section 4.07, to mandate that the governing body shall have an ordinance that limits the amount of campaign contributions that can be accepted by candidates. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 6

Timely Disclosure of the Purpose of Tax Increases or Bond Measures Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article IV, to create a new Section 4.08, to mandate that the governing body shall have an ordinance that ensures that the city shall provide and disseminate in a timely manner the purposes of proposed expenditures for any tax increase or bond measure that requires ratification by the voters. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 7 Independent Audit Committee Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article IX, to create a new Section 9.04, to mandate that the governing body shall have an ordinance that establishes an independent audit committee. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 8 Mayor’s Voting Powers Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Article V, Section 5.01, to allow the mayor to have a vote on all matters that come before the governing body. Effective Date: May 5, 2014 In Favor Of r Against r CHARTER AMENDMENT 9 Governance: Full-time Mayor; Regulating the Relationships Between the Mayor, the City Councilors and the City Manager and Defining the Authority of Each Proposing to amend the Santa Fe Municipal Charter, Articles V, VI and VIII to: • Establish mayor as a full-time position whose salary shall be set by an independent salary commission to be established by city ordinance. Until such commission is created and sets the salary for mayor, the mayor’s salary shall be $74,000; • Give the mayor supervisory authority over the city manager, city attorney and city clerk and the authority to suspend and fire the city manager, city attorney and city clerk, without council approval; • Allow the city manager to be removed by a vote of six councilors at a regularly scheduled meeting; • Remove language that requires the mayor to perform other duties compatible with the nature of the office, as the governing body may from time to time require; • Require the mayor to work with city staff to prepare an annual budget for review and approval by the finance committee and the governing body; • Require the mayor to identify his/her legislative agenda for each upcoming year and require the governing body to consider and take action on the mayor’s legislative agenda; • Require that the city manager have the necessary administrative and managerial skills to manage the municipality and have the authority to hire and fire all city employees, except for the city attorney and city clerk; Effective Date: March 12, 2018 In Favor Of r Against r

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Nancy Fay, Clerk Kevin Lancaster, Clerk Voters in District 1, Consolidated Precincts 21, 83 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda. Theresa J. Armijo, Presiding Judge Barbara Salazar, Clerk, (Translator) Gerald J. Roibal, Clerk Kathryn Koroneos, Clerk Voters in District 1, Precinct 22, within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta. Marie A. Gallegos, Presiding Judge Margaret Ulibarri, Clerk (Translator) Elvira Apodaca, Clerk Orlando Roybal, Clerk Nadine Gallegos, Clerk Voters in District 1, Precinct 24, within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street. William D. Geoghegan, Presiding Judge Kathleen M. Shapiro, Clerk Delfina Bowles, Clerk (Translator) David Chapman, Clerk Voters in District 1, Consolidated Precincts 25,33 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Aspen Community Magnet School, 450 La Madera. Craig C. Anderson, Presiding Judge Pauline B. Rodriguez, Clerk (Translator) Quiana R. Ortega, Clerk Gloria Huckabee, Clerk Voters in District 1, Consolidated Precincts 26, 27 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Tierra Encantada Charter School @ Alvord, 551 Alarid Street. Teena Marie Talachy-Portugues, Presiding Judge Lena Belle Morgan, Clerk (Translator) Precella V. Candelaria-Glover, Clerk Patricia Scalzi, Clerk Elfa Archuleta, Clerk Voters in District 1, Precinct 32 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street. Nancy Fordyce, Presiding Judge Helen O. Martinez, Clerk (Translator) Dean Milligan, Clerk Cheryl Milligan, Clerk Voters in District 2, Consolidated Precincts 36, 47 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Acequia Madre Elementary School, 700 Acequia Madre. Deanna Einspahr, Presiding Judge Rick A. Martinez, Clerk (Translator) Marcia Baker, Clerk John Paul Greenspan, Clerk Voters in District 2, Consolidated Precincts 37, 54 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Capshaw Middle School, 351 W. Zia Road. Grace Marie Olivas, Presiding Judge (Translator) Mary H. Quintana, Clerk Helen M. Henry, Clerk Katherine M. Oldroyd, Clerk Kim Padilla, Clerk Voters in District 2, Consolidated Precincts 41, 42, 43 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Public Schools Administration Building, 610 Alta Vista Street. Maria Dolores Lopez, Presiding Judge Pamela Chavez, Clerk (Translator) Robert N. Mogill, Clerk Marcia Rodda, Clerk Steven Hamp, Clerk Voters in District 2, Precinct 44 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Wood Gormley, 141 E. Booth Street. Kathy Adelsheim, Presiding Judge Joseph M. Ortega, Clerk (Translator) John R. Dowdle, Clerk Sophie G. Ortega, Clerk Forrester Carlton, Clerk Voters in District 2, Consolidated Precincts 45, 46 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Santa Fe, 107 W. Barcelona.

Edward A. Heighway, Presiding Judge Bonnie Martinez, Clerk (Translator) Michele L. Chrabot, Clerk Paul M. D’ Arcy, Clerk Voters in District 2, Precinct 52 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: E.J. Martinez Elementary School, 401 W. San Mateo Road. Tobias W. Rosenblatt, Presiding Judge Grace L. Archuleta, Clerk (Translator) Sylvinia Vigil, Clerk Anna J. Sanchez, Clerk Voters in District 2, Precinct 53 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Pasatiempo Senior Center, 664 Alta Vista Street. Milee Rotunno, Presiding Judge Margie Garcia, Clerk (Translator) Cathryn Susan Adeli, Clerk Vicente O. Vigil, Clerk Karla Vigil, Clerk Voters in District 2, Precinct 55 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Elks BPOE 460 Lodge, 1615 Old Pecos Trail. Mary Starr Charlton, Presiding Judge Rosina Boyd, Clerk (Translator) Patricia D. Ching, Clerk Jaclyn Kristen Apodaca, Clerk Voters in District 3, Consolidated Precincts 12, 67 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Sweeney Elementary School, 4100 S. Meadows Road. Jessica M. Arias , Presiding Judge Michael Gonzales, Clerk (Translator) Theodore G. Carlin, Clerk Michael L. Landavazo, Clerk Christella M. Vigil, Clerk Voters in District 3, Consolidated Precincts 31, 66 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Salazar Elementary School, 1231 Apache Avenue. Juanita Rosales, Presiding Judge Margaret M. Trujillo, Clerk (Translator) Marcella Martinez, Clerk Antoinette K. Garcia, Clerk Bernard Gross, Clerk Voters in District 3, Precinct 34 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Salazar Elementary School, 1231 Apache Avenue.

Stephen Post, Presiding Judge Sandra Bradley, Clerk Erlinda Casados, Clerk (Translator) Margaret Merdler, Clerk

Luis P. Aguirre, Presiding Judge (Translator) Linda C. Michael, Clerk Dennis L. Kadlubek, Clerk Jane D. Kadlubek, Clerk Charlene F. Benavidez, Clerk

Voters in District 1, Consolidated Precincts 11, 20 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda. Amanda Mayrant, Presiding Judge Carmella Gurule, Clerk (Translator)

Voters in District 4, Consolidated Precincts 38, 56 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Mary Schruben, Presiding Judge Jean Bustamante, Clerk (Translator) Diana M. Capshaw, Clerk Elizabeth H. Armstrong, Clerk Patrick Russell, Clerk Voters in District 4, Consolidated Precincts 39, 49 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Ron Andermann, Presiding Judge Cecilia Lopez, Clerk (Translator) Susan M. Wood, Clerk Henrietta J. Tapia, Clerk Rose A. Castellano, Clerk Voters in District 4, Precinct 50 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Nava Elementary School, 2655 Siringo Road. Kathleen Lawicki, Presiding Judge Frank Sanchez, Clerk (Translator) Gary R. Hill, Clerk Irene C. Ortiz, Clerk Voters in District 4, Consolidated Precincts 51, 76 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Chaparral Elementary School, 2451 Avenida Chaparral. Mary E. Erpelding, Presiding Judge Consuelo Rojas, Clerk Joseph S. Quintana, Clerk (Translator) Stephanie L. Pasanen, Clerk Julie A. Doolittle, Clerk Voters in District 4, Precinct 77 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Chaparral Elementary School, 2451 Avenida Chaparral. Joyce Martinez, Presiding Judge Letitia B. Koppa, Clerk (Translator) Jon D. Branch, Clerk Beatrice Dominguez, Clerk Voters in District 4, Precinct 78 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Jeffrey J. Case, Presiding Judge Felipe J. Roibal, Clerk (Translator) Tamsen Sherman, Clerk Jerry M. Kittell, Clerk ALTERNATES Ramoncita Garcia, Clerk Jeannene Basham, Clerk Rebecca Garcia, Clerk Lucia M. Blaugh, Clerk Kimberly Ulibarri, Presiding Judge Randy H. Murray, Presiding Judge

Lora Lee Freilich, Clerk Karen Boseker, Clerk Alisha Yvette Romero, Presiding Judge

Voters in the Absentee Voter and Early Voter Precinct will vote in the office of the City Clerk, Room 215, City Hall, 200 Lincoln Avenue. ABSENTEE/EARLY VOTE BOARD Peggy Doolittle, Presiding Judge Rebecca Seligman, Clerk Carol Herrera, Clerk Monica Montoya, Clerk Cecilia Gonzales, Clerk

Election School for absentee/early voting board officials will be held on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. – City Councilors’ Conference Room, 200 Lincoln Avenue.

Voters in District 3, Consolidated Precincts 62, 75 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Ortiz Middle School, 4164 S. Meadows Road.

Cyndi Catanach, Presiding Judge Bernard Valdez, Clerk (Translator) Lynn Miller, Clerk Rosalina Grace, Clerk

Patrick L. Romero, Presiding Judge Alfonso E. Cruz, Clerk (Translator) Bessie M. Cruz, Clerk George C. Burkitt, Clerk Gabrielle T. Rivera, Clerk

Voters in District 2, Precinct 48 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Elks BPOE 460 Lodge, 1615 Old Pecos Trail.

Voters in District 1, Consolidated Precincts 8, 30 Ft. Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road.

Voters in District 1, Precinct 10, within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Ft. Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road.

Voters in District 4, Consolidated Precincts 35, 74 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Nava Elementary School, 2655 Siringo Road.

Notice is hereby given that election school for precinct officials will be held on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers, 200 Lincoln Avenue

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF POLLING PLACES AND PRECINCT BOARD MEMBERS FOR THE MARCH 4, 2014 REGULAR MUNICIPAL ELECTION:

Elaine G. Heltman, Presiding Judge Anita Ortiz, Clerk Ascensio Chavez, Clerk (Translator) Lucille M. Vigil, Clerk

Voters in District 4, Precinct 29 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Mike Malinowski, Presiding Judge Christine Dominguez, Clerk (Translator) Adela Wood, Clerk Rita Marie Brito, Clerk Pauline J. Gallegos, Clerk

Victoria Romero, Presiding Judge Manuel Romero, Clerk (Translator) Jolene Lockhart, Clerk Kenneth M. Creek, Clerk George S. Madrid, Clerk

Margaret Fresquez, Presiding Judge Julie Jewel B. Cabeza De Vaca, Clerk(Translator) Maxine Davenport, Clerk Jeannie A. Sena, Clerk

Voters in District 1, Consolidated Precincts 9, 28 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta.

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Voters in District 3, Consolidated Precinct 64, 80 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Sweeney Elementary School, 4100 S. Meadows Road. Roman Garcia, Presiding Judge (Translator) Anthony G. Abeyta, Clerk Rosemarie Cano, Clerk Terry M. Simpson, Clerk Eva Barela, Clerk Voters in District 3, Consolidated Precinct 86, 89 within the municipal boundary shall vote at: Southside Library, 6599 Jaguar Drive. Susan Maslar, Presiding Judge (Translator) Les A. Francisco, Clerk Maria Elena Montoya, Clerk Luis Hernandez, Clerk Valdez Abeyta y Valdez, Clerk (Translator)

All precinct officials are required to attend. PRECINCTS AND POLLING LOCATIONS REGULAR MUNICIPAL ELECTION – MARCH 4, 2014 DISTRICT #1 Consolidated Precincts 8, 30 Consolidated Precincts 9, 28 Precinct 10 Consolidated Precincts 11, 20 Consolidated Precincts 21, 83 Precinct 22 Precinct 24 Consolidated Precinct 25, 33 Consolidated Precincts 26, 27 Precinct 32

POLLING PLACE Ft. Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta Ft. Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street Aspen Community Magnet School, 450 La Madera Tierra Encantada Charter School @ Alvord, 551 Alarid Street Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street

DISTRICT #2 Consolidated Precincts 36, 47

POLLING PLACE Acequia Madre Elementary School, 700 Acequia Madre Consolidated Precincts 37, 54 Capshaw Middle School, 351 W. Zia Road Consolidated Precincts 41, 42, 43 Public Schools Administration Building, 610 Alta Vista Street Precinct 44 Wood Gormley, 141 E. Booth Street Consolidated Precincts 45, 46 Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Santa Fe, 107 W. Barcelona Precinct 48 Elks BPOE 460 Lodge, 1615 Old Pecos Trail Precinct 52 E.J. Martinez Elementary School, 401 W. San Mateo Road Precinct 53 Pasatiempo Senior Center, 664 Alta Vista Street Precinct 55 Elks BPOE 460 Lodge, 1615 Old Pecos Trail DISTRICT #3 Consolidated Precincts 12, 67 Consolidated Precincts 31, 66 Precinct 34 Consolidated Precincts 62, 75 Consolidated Precincts 64, 80 Consolidated Precincts 86, 89 DISTRICT #4 Precinct 29 Consolidated Precincts 35, 74 Consolidated Precincts 38, 56 Consolidated Precincts 39, 49 Precinct 50 Consolidated Precincts 51, 76 Precinct 77 Precinct 78

POLLING PLACE Sweeney Elementary School, 4100 S. Meadows Road Salazar Elementary School, 1231 Apache Avenue Salazar Elementary School, 1231 Apache Avenue Ortiz Middle School, 4164 S. Meadows Road Sweeney Elementary School, 4100 S. Meadows Road Southside Library, 6599 Jaguar Drive POLLING PLACE Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road Nava Elementary School, 2655 Siringo Road Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road Nava Elementary School, 2655 Siringo Road Chaparral Elementary School, 2451 Avenida Chaparral Chaparral Elementary School, 2451 Avenida Chaparral Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road

ABSENTEE VOTER PRECINCT (All Districts) Office of the City Clerk, Room 215, City Hall, 200 Lincoln Avenue EARLY VOTER PRECINCT (All Districts) Office of the City Clerk, Room 215, City Hall, 200 Lincoln Avenue

Legal #96462 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on February 10, 17 2014


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds MUNICIPALIDAD DE SANTA FE ELECCIÓN MUNICIPAL ORDINARIA 4 DE MARZO 2014 AVISO TOCANTE A LOS CANDIDATOS, ENMIENDAS DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL, LUGARES PARA VOTAR, SOBRE LOS MIEMBROS DEL CONSEJO DE PRECINTOS Y CURSO DE INSTRUCCIÓN 1.

Se da el aviso que los siguientes votantes calificados son los candidatos para las oficinas publicas en la Municipalidad de Santa Fe. Los nombres de los candidatos en la lista que sigue aparecen en el orden en cual aparecen en la boleta: A. Para la oficina publica de un alcalde, para servir a toda la municipalidad, por un plazo de cuatro años: 1. 2. 3.

Bill Dimas Patti J. Bushee Javier M. Gonzales

B. Para la oficina publica de concejal, Distrito #1, por un plazo de cuatro años: 1. 2.

Signe I. Lindell Michael J. Segura

C. Para la oficina publica de concejal, Distrito #2, por un plazo de cuatro años: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Joe H. Arellano Joseph M. Maestas Mary Louise Bonney Rad Acton Jeff E. Green

D. Para la oficina publica de concejal, Distrito #3, por un plaza de cuatro años: 1. 2. 3.

Carmichael A. Dominguez Angelo Jaramillo Marie Campos

E. Para la oficina publica de concejal, Distrito #4, por un plazo de cuatro años: 1. 2.

Ronald S. Trujillo

Se da el aviso que los siguiente enmiendas de la carta constitucional aparecen en el orden en cual aparecen en la boleta: ENMIENDA 1 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Conservación y Protección de Agua Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Articulo II, Apartado 2.03, con el fin de incluir una disposición en la declaración de la política de protección medioambiental que obligaría al cuerpo gobernante a proteger, resguardar y realzar los recursos de agua municipales por medio de la regulación, conservación y relacionar el desarrollo a la disponibilidad de agua. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 2 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Preservación del Vecindario Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo II, Apartado 2.04, con el fin de establecer una política sobre la preservación de vecindario. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 3 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Apoyo para los Negocios Locales, la Economía Local y un Salario Digno para Todos Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo II, con el fin de crear un nuevo Apartado 2.07 para establecer una política que apoye a los negocios locales, a un espíritu empresarial perdurable local y al derecho de todos de ganar un salario digno. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 4 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL

La Comisión Independiente de Ciudadanos para la Redistribución Electoral Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo VI, Apartado 6.03 con el fin de incluir la fundación de una comisión independiente de ciudadanos para la redistribución electoral que revisará y actualizará los linderos de los distritos por lo menos cada diez años después del censo decenal y requerirá que el cuerpo gobernante adopte una ordenanza para establecer un proceso para el nombramiento y las deliberaciones de la comisión. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 5 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Limites de Contribuciones de Campaña Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo IV, con el fin de crear un nuevo Apartado 4.07 que ordene que el cuerpo gobernante tenga una ordenanza que limite la cantidad de contribución de campaña que los candidatos puedan aceptar. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 6 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL La Divulgación Oportuna de los Propósitos de los Aumentos o Medidas de Bonos Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo IV, con el fin de crear un nuevo Apartado 4.08 para ordenar que el cuerpo gobernante tenga una ordenanza que asegure que la municipalidad proporcionará y diseminará de manera oportuna, los propósitos de los gastos propuestos para cualquier aumento de impuestos o medida de bono que requieran la ratificación por los votantes. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 7 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Comité de Auditoría Independiente Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo IX, con el fin de crear un nuevo Apartado 9.04 para ordenar que el cuerpo gobernante tenga una ordenanza que establezca un comité de Auditoría Independiente. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 8 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Poder de Voto del Alcalde Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Artículo V, Apartado 5.01, con el fin de permitirle al alcalde tener un voto en todos los asuntos que se presenten ante el cuerpo gobernante. Fecha de Vigencia: 5 de mayo, 2014 A Favor r En Contra r ENMIENDA 9 DE LA CARTA CONSTITUCIONAL Gestión Pública: Alcalde de Tiempo Completo; Regula las funciones entre el Alcalde, los Concejales Municipales y el Administrador Municipal y define la autoridad de Cada Uno Propone enmendar la Carta Constitucional de la Municipalidad de Santa Fe, Apartados V, VI y VIII para: • Establecer al alcalde como empleado de tiempo completo cuyo salario se fijará por una comisión independiente que determina salarios que se establecerá por ordenanza municipal. Hasta el momento que se cree la comisión y se fije el salario para el alcalde, el salario del alcalde será de $74,000; • Proporcionarle al alcalde la autoridad supervisora sobre el administrador municipal, el abogado municipal, la escribana municipal y la autoridad de suspender o despedir al administrador municipal, al abogado municipal y a la escribana municipal sin la autorización del consejo; • Permitir que el administrador municipal sea removido por un voto de seis concejales en una reunión ordinaria; • Remover el lenguaje que le requiere al alcalde desempeñar otros deberes compatibles con la índole de su puesto, como el cuerpo gobernante puede requerir de vez en cuando; • Requerir que el alcalde colabore con el personal municipal para preparar un presupuesto anual para que sea revisado y aprobado por el comité de finanzas y el cuerpo gobernante; • Requerir que el alcalde identifique a su agenda legislativa para cada año entrante y requerir que el cuerpo gobernante considere y tome una decisión sobre el agenda legislativo del alcalde; • Requerir que el administrador municipal posea todas las destrezas administrativas y gestoras necesarias para dirigir la municipalidad y que posea la autoridad de contratar y despedir a todos los empleados municipales, menos al abogado municipal y la escribana municipal. Fecha de Vigencia: 12 de marzo, 2018 A Favor r En Contra r

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986-3000

LA SIGUIENTE LISTA INDICA LAS DIRECCIONES Y LOS LUGARES PARA VOTAR Y LOS NOMBRES DE LOS MIEMBROS DEL CONSEJO DE LOS PRECINTOS PARA LA ELECCION MUNICIPAL ORDINARIA EL 4 MARZO 2014:

Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 8, 30 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Ft. Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road. Stephen Post, Presiding Judge Sandra Bradley, Clerk Erlinda Casados, Clerk (Translator) Margaret Merdler, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 9, 28 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta. Elaine G. Heltman, Presiding Judge Anita Ortiz, Clerk Ascensio Chavez, Clerk (Translator) Lucille M. Vigil, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recinto Electoral 10, dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Ft. Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road. Cyndi Catanach, Presiding Judge Bernard Valdez, Clerk (Translator) Lynn Miller, Clerk Rosalina Grace, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 11, 20 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda. Amanda Mayrant, Presiding Judge Carmella Gurule, Clerk (Translator) Nancy Fay, Clerk Kevin Lancaster, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 21, 83 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda. Theresa J. Armijo, Presiding Judge Barbara Salazar, Clerk, (Translator) Gerald J. Roibal, Clerk Kathryn Koroneos, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recinto Electoral 22 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta. Marie A. Gallegos, Presiding Judge Margaret Ulibarri, Clerk (Translator) Elvira Apodaca, Clerk Orlando Roybal, Clerk Nadine Gallegos, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recinto Electoral 24 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street. William D. Geoghegan, Presiding Judge Kathleen M. Shapiro, Clerk Delfina Bowles, Clerk (Translator) David Chapman, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 25,33 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Aspen Community Magnet School, 450 La Madera. Craig C. Anderson, Presiding Judge Pauline B. Rodriguez, Clerk (Translator) Quiana R. Ortega, Clerk Gloria Huckabee, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 26, 27 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Tierra Encantada Charter School @ Alvord, 551 Alarid Street. Teena Marie Talachy-Portugues, Presiding Judge Lena Belle Morgan, Clerk (Translator) Precella V. Candelaria-Glover, Clerk Patricia Scalzi, Clerk Elfa Archuleta, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 1, Recinto Electoral 32 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street. Nancy Fordyce, Presiding Judge Helen O. Martinez, Clerk (Translator) Dean Milligan, Clerk Cheryl Milligan, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 36, 47 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Acequia Madre Elementary School, 700 Acequia Madre. Deanna Einspahr, Presiding Judge Rick A. Martinez, Clerk (Translator) Marcia Baker, Clerk John Paul Greenspan, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 37, 54 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Capshaw Middle School, 351 W. Zia Road. Grace Marie Olivas, Presiding Judge (Translator) Mary H. Quintana, Clerk Helen M. Henry, Clerk Katherine M. Oldroyd, Clerk Kim Padilla, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 41, 42, 43 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Public Schools Administration Building, 610 Alta Vista Street. Maria Dolores Lopez, Presiding Judge Pamela Chavez, Clerk (Translator) Robert N. Mogill, Clerk Marcia Rodda, Clerk Steven Hamp, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recinto Electoral 44 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Wood Gormley, 141 E. Booth Street. Kathy Adelsheim, Presiding Judge Joseph M. Ortega, Clerk (Translator) John R. Dowdle, Clerk Sophie G. Ortega, Clerk Forrester Carlton, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 45, 46 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Santa Fe, 107 W. Barcelona. Victoria Romero, Presiding Judge Manuel Romero, Clerk (Translator) Jolene Lockhart, Clerk Kenneth M. Creek, Clerk George S. Madrid, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recinto Electoral 48 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Elks BPOE 460 Lodge, 1615 Old Pecos Trail. Edward A. Heighway, Presiding Judge Bonnie Martinez, Clerk (Translator) Michele L. Chrabot, Clerk Paul M. D’ Arcy, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recinto Electoral 52 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en E.J. Martinez Elementary School, 401 W. San Mateo Road. Tobias W. Rosenblatt, Presiding Judge Grace L. Archuleta, Clerk (Translator) Sylvinia Vigil, Clerk Anna J. Sanchez, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recinto Electoral 53 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Pasatiempo Senior Center, 664 Alta Vista Street. Milee Rotunno, Presiding Judge Margie Garcia, Clerk (Translator) Cathryn Susan Adeli, Clerk Vicente O. Vigil, Clerk Karla Vigil, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 2, Recinto Electoral 55 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Elks BPOE 460 Lodge, 1615 Old Pecos Trail. Mary Starr Charlton, Presiding Judge Rosina Boyd, Clerk (Translator) Patricia D. Ching, Clerk Jaclyn Kristen Apodaca, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 3, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 12, 67 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Sweeney Elementary School, 4100 S. Meadows Road. Jessica M. Arias , Presiding Judge Michael Gonzales, Clerk (Translator) Theodore G. Carlin, Clerk Michael L. Landavazo, Clerk Christella M. Vigil, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 3, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 31, 66

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toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Salazar Elementary School, 1231 Apache Avenue. Juanita Rosales, Presiding Judge Margaret M. Trujillo, Clerk (Translator) Marcella Martinez, Clerk Antoinette K. Garcia, Clerk Bernard Gross, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 3, Recinto Electoral 34 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Salazar Elementary School, 1231 Apache Avenue. Margaret Fresquez, Presiding Judge Julie Jewel B. Cabeza De Vaca, Clerk(Translator) Maxine Davenport, Clerk Jeannie A. Sena, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 3, Recintos Electorales Consolidados Precincts 62, 75 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Ortiz Middle School, 4164 S. Meadows Road. Luis P. Aguirre, Presiding Judge (Translator) Linda C. Michael, Clerk Dennis L. Kadlubek, Clerk Jane D. Kadlubek, Clerk Charlene F. Benavidez, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 3, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 64, 80 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Sweeney Elementary School, 4100 S. Meadows Road. Roman Garcia, Presiding Judge (Translator) Anthony G. Abeyta, Clerk Rosemarie Cano, Clerk Terry M. Simpson, Clerk Eva Barela, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 3, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 86, 89 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Southside Library, 6599 Jaguar Drive. Susan Maslar, Presiding Judge (Translator) Les A. Francisco, Clerk Maria Elena Montoya, Clerk Luis Hernandez, Clerk Valdez Abeyta y Valdez, Clerk (Translator) Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recinto Electoral 29 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Mike Malinowski, Presiding Judge Christine Dominguez, Clerk (Translator) Adela Wood, Clerk Rita Marie Brito, Clerk Pauline J. Gallegos, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 35, 74 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Nava Elementary School, 2655 Siringo Road. Patrick L. Romero, Presiding Judge Alfonso E. Cruz, Clerk (Translator) Bessie M. Cruz, Clerk George C. Burkitt, Clerk Gabrielle T. Rivera, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 38, 56 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Mary Schruben, Presiding Judge Jean Bustamante, Clerk (Translator) Diana M. Capshaw, Clerk Elizabeth H. Armstrong, Clerk Patrick Russell, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 39, 49 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Ron Andermann, Presiding Judge Cecilia Lopez, Clerk (Translator) Susan M. Wood, Clerk Henrietta J. Tapia, Clerk Rose A. Castellano, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recinto Electoral 50 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Nava Elementary School, 2655 Siringo Road. Kathleen Lawicki, Presiding Judge Frank Sanchez, Clerk (Translator) Gary R. Hill, Clerk Irene C. Ortiz, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recintos Electorales Consolidados 51, 76 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Chaparral Elementary School, 2451 Avenida Chaparral. Mary E. Erpelding, Presiding Judge Consuelo Rojas, Clerk Joseph S. Quintana, Clerk (Translator) Stephanie L. Pasanen, Clerk Julie A. Doolittle, Clerk Los votantes del distrito 4, Recinto Electoral 77 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Chaparral Elementary School, 2451 Avenida Chaparral. Joyce Martinez, Presiding Judge Letitia B. Koppa, Clerk (Translator) Jon D. Branch, Clerk Beatrice Dominguez, Clerk Los votantes del Distrito 4, Recinto Electoral 78 dentro del lindero municipal votaran en Genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Road. Jeffrey J. Case, Presiding Judge Felipe J. Roibal, Clerk (Translator) Tamsen Sherman, Clerk Jerry M. Kittell, Clerk SUBSTITUTOS Ramoncita Garcia, Clerk Jeannene Basham, Clerk Rebecca Garcia, Clerk Lucia M. Blaugh, Clerk Kimberly Ulibarri, Presiding Judge Randy H. Murray, Presiding Judge

Lora Lee Freilich, Clerk Karen Boseker, Clerk Alisha Yvette Romero, Presiding Judge

Los votantes en ausencia y por anticipado votaran en la oficina de la Escribana de la Municipalidad, Sala 215 Ayuntamiento 200 Lincoln Avenue. EL CONSEJO DE VOTANTES EN AUSENCIA Y POR ANTICIPADO Peggy Doolittle, Presiding Judge Rebecca Seligman, Clerk Carol Herrera, Clerk Monica Montoya, Clerk Cecilia Gonzales, Clerk Se da aviso que tendra lugar en curso de instruccion electoral para los funcionarios de los precintos el martes, 25 de febrero, 2014 a las 5:30 p.m. en la Camara del Concilio Municipal, 200 Lincoln Avenue. La instruccion electoral para el consejo de votantes en ausencia se llevara a cavo el martes, 25 de febrero 2014 a las 2:00 p.m. – Edifico del Ayuntamiento, en la Camara del Concilio Municipal, 200 Lincoln Avenue. Se les exige a todos los funcionarios de los precintos que asistan estas classes electorales. LUGARES PARA VOTAR ELECCION MUNICIPAL ORDINARIA 4 DE MARZO 2014 DISTRITO #1 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 8, 30 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 9, 28 Recinto Electoral 10 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 11, 20 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 21, 83 Recinto Electoral 22 Recinto Electoral 24 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 25, 33 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 26, 27 Recinto Electoral 32

LUGAR DE VOTACION Fort Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta Fort Marcy Complex, 490 Bishops Lodge Road Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda Gonzales Community School, 851 W. Alameda Montezuma Lodge, 431 Paseo de Peralta Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street Aspen Community Magnet School, 450 La Madera Tierra Encantada Charter School @ Alvord, 551 Alarid Street Academy at Larragoite, 1604 Agua Fria Street

DISTRITO #2 Recintos Electorales Consolidados 36, 47

LUGAR DONDE VOTAR Acequia Madre Elementary School, 700 Acequia Madre Recintos Electorales Consolidados 37, 54 Capshaw Middle School, 351 W. Zia Road Recintos Electorales Consolidados 41, 42, 43 Public Schools Administration LEGAL #96461, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February 17, 2014

sfnm«classifieds

LEGALS

LEGALS

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT

the North 25 feet of Lot 45 in Tract 2, Acres Estates Subdivision, being a portion of Small Holding Claims 1178 and 2503, situated in Section 6, Township 16 North, Range 9 East, N.M.P.M., as shown on Plat of Survey of said Subdivision made by David W. Thornburg, L.S. and P.E. which said Plat of Survey was duly filed in the Office of the County Clerk of Santa Fe Courtney, New Mexico, and being more particularly described as follows:

No. 01885

D-101-CV-2010-

US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST 2005-3, Plaintiff, v. ANNA M. ROMERO, STATE FARM MUTUAL AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE COMPANY, BERNADETTE CHAVEZMONTOYA, THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND REVENUE AND OCCUPANTS, WHOSE TRUE NAMES ARE UNKNOWN, IF ANY,

Beginning at the Northeasterly concern of the tract herein described, from whence the Northeast corner of Tract No. 2 Acres Estates bears: N 20’ 23’ W, 994,20 feet:

Defendant(s).

Thence from said point and place of beginning along the folNOTICE OF SALE lowing bearings and NOTICE IS HEREBY distances: GIVEN that the undersigned Special Mas- S 20’ 32’ E, 50.00 feet; ter will on March 14, S 69’28’ E, 150.00 feet; 2014 at 9:00 AM, at N 20’ 32’ W, 50.00 feet; the front entrance of N 69’ 28 E, 150.00 feet; the First Judicial District Court, 225 Mon- The address of the retezuma, Santa Fe, al property is 3045 JeNew Mexico, sell and mez Rd, Santa Fe, NM convey to the highest 87507. Plaintiff does bidder for cash all the not represent or warright, title, and inter- rant that the stated est of the above- street address is the named defendants in street address of the and to the following described property; if described real estate the street address located in said Coun- does not match the legal description, ty and State: then the property beThe South 25 feet of ing sold herein is the Lot 47 in Tract 2 and property more partic-

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to place legals, call

986-3000

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

p p y p ularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on July 19, 2013 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $187,626.77 plus interest from March 1, 2013 to the date of sale at the rate of 7.625% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff’s costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash.

p y ment or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages.

p process, including submittal requirements and evaluation criteria. Copies of the property survey, Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment, Continued Minimum Site Assessment, zoning map, water and sewer maps, topographical map and flood zone map are included as Appendices D, E, F, G, H, I and J, respectively. The County will attempt to respond to all questions and provide necessary information at the meeting; however, the County may require questions or comments to be submitted in writing before the County responds in the form of an addenda or if a response requires the County to conduct additional inquiry or research.

y g ing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) P u b l i c welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with Office of the State Engineer, Water Rights Division, Room 102, P.O. Box 25102, Santa Fe, NM 87504, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Fascimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the fascimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, 505/8276682. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.

At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstate-

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Legal Notice

Legal Notice

ATTENTION: UNINSURED/UNDERINSURED MOTORISTS INSURANCE NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY CLASS ACTION SETTLEMENT APPROVAL, CLASS DESCRIPTION AND HEARING ON FINAL APPROVAL OF SETTLEMENT To: all Persons who, as of November 1, 2013, are or were an Insured under any auto insurance policy that was issued, renewed or effective in New Mexico on or after January 1, 1995, by any of Farmers Insurance Company of Arizona, Farmers Insurance Exchange, Truck Insurance Exchange, or any of the Mid-Century, Bristol West, 21st Century or Foremost insurance companies (collectively, “Farmers”), that did not or does/do not provide Uninsured or Underinsured Motorist (“UM”) Coverage limits equal to the policy’s liability limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage (“Equal Limits UM Coverage”), and any of such Persons’ heirs, administrators, successors and/ or assigns (the proposed “Settlement Class”). A Lawsuit against Farmers entitled Richard Stanforth Jr. et al., v. Farmers Insurance Company of Arizona, et al., No. CIV 09-1146 RB/RHS, has been pending in the United States District Court for the District of New Mexico (the “Court”). The Parties to the Lawsuit have reached a Settlement. The Court has preliminarily approved the Settlement, preliminarily certified the Settlement Class described above for Settlement purposes only, and authorized publication of this Summary Notice. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Court will hold a hearing on June 6, 2014, at 8:45 a.m., in the Guadalupe Courtroom, Suite 440, 100 N. Church St., Las Cruces, New Mexico, 88001, to determine, among other things: (1) whether the Settlement should be finally approved as fair, reasonable, and adequate; (2) whether to finally certify the Settlement for Settlement purposes only; (3) whether the Notice Procedures comply with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and due process; (4) the amount of attorneys’ fees and costs to be awarded to Class Counsel and the amount of any service awards to be paid to Class Representatives; (5) whether Settlement Class Members should be bound by the Releases in the Settlement Agreement; (6) whether the Final Judgment approving the Settlement and dismissing all claims asserted in this Lawsuit on the merits, with prejudice and without leave to amend, should be entered; and (7) other lawsuits to be enjoined or dismissed. A detailed Notice of Class Action Settlement will be mailed to potential Settlement Class Members. If you believe you could be a Settlement Class Member you may also obtain a copy of the Notice and other Settlement details (including copies of the Preliminary Approval Order and Settlement Agreement) by calling 1-888-227-0023, or visiting www.Stanforth-NM-ClassActionSettlement.com. Excluded from the Settlement Class are: any present or former officers and/or directors of Farmers, the Referees appointed for purposes of the Neutral Evaluation on Appeal process described in the Settlement Agreement, members of the Judiciary in New Mexico and their resident relatives, and Class Counsel and Defense Counsel and their respective resident relatives. The Notice of Class Action Settlement describes the Settlement and the Class Members’ rights, as further detailed in the Settlement Agreement, including the procedures that potential settlement Class Members’ must follow in order to submit a claim for a possible Settlement Class Payment, exclude themselves from the Settlement, or object to the Settlement terms. The Settlement and the upcoming Court hearing may affect those rights. Capitalized words herein have defined meanings further detailed in the Notice of Class Action Settlement and the Settlement Agreement. The Court has appointed a number of attorneys as Class Counsel (listed in the Settlement Notice), including the following individual to whom notice may be provided as Class Counsel: Geoffrey R. Romero, Esq. Law Offices of Geoffrey R. Romero 4801 All Saints Road, NW Albuquerque, NM 87120. DO NOT TELEPHONE THE COURT OR THE CLERK OF COURT. Legal #96513 Printed in The Santa Fe New Mexican on February 17, 24 and March 3, 10, 2014.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT: All qualified Offerors will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, age, physical and mental handicap, serious mental condition, disability, spousal affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity. Request for proposals will be available by contacting Bill Taylor, Procurement Manager, 142 W. Palace Avenue (Second Floor), Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, by telephone at (505) 9866373 or by email at wtaylor@santafecou ntynm.gov or on our website at http://www.santafec ounty.org/services/bi d & contracts/current solicitations

Floyd W. Lopez Special Master 524 Paseo del Pueblo PROPOSALS RESur, Suite F CEIVED AFTER THE Taos, NM 87571-5220 DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED ABOVE NM00-02040_FC01 WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED AND WILL BE Legal #96510 Published in The San- REJECTED BY SANTA ta Fe New Mexican on FE COUNTY. February 17, 24, Santa Fe County March 3 and 10, 2014. Purchasing Division I. ADVERTISEMENT Legal#96451 GALISTEO ROAD RE- Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican DEVELOPMENT R F P # 2 0 1 4 - 0 2 4 0 - on: February 17, 2014 GM/BT NOTICE is hereby givThe Santa Fe County en that on September Growth Management 30, 2013, Application SD-02161-16A Department is re- No. questing proposals (sub-file 29.20), into from qualified RG-77889, for Permit Offerors to redevelop to Change Point of Dithe 6.144 acre version and Place of C o u n t y - o w n e d Use from Surface to Galisteo Road site lo- Ground Water was cated at 2600 Galisteo filed with the OFFICE for residential devel- OF THE STATE ENGIopment with an af- NEER by Olivia Bacon, fordable housing 1384 Bishop’s Lodge component and a se- Road, Santa Fe, NM nior housing compo- 87506 and Wade C. nent. All proposals and Ann S. Harrison, submitted shall be 37 Rancho Escondido valid for one hundred Road, Tesuque, NM. twenty (120) days subject to action by The applicants seek the County. Santa Fe to discontinue use of County reserves the the Cy More Ditch right to reject any that diverts water and all proposals in from Tesuque Creek, part or in whole. A a tributary of the Rio completed proposal Grande, approximateshall be submitted in ly at a point where and a sealed container in- X=417,523 dicating the proposal Y=3,955,727, UTM NAD 1983 (meters), Zone title and number along with the 13N, for the diversion Offeror’s name and of 1.575 acre-feet per address clearly annum used for irrimarked on the out- gation of 0.47 acres of side of the container. land owned by Olivia All proposals must Bacon, and described be received by 2:00 as Tract 20, Map 29, PM on Friday, of the 1964 Upper Rio March 28, 2014 at Grande Hydrographic Nambethe Santa Fe County Survey, Purchasing Divi- P o j o a q u e - T e s u q u e sion, 142 W. Palace section. Avenue (Second Floor), Santa Fe, NM The applicants seek 87501. By submitting to change the point diversion from a proposal each of Offeror is certifying which the described that their proposal water right is divertcomplies with regula- ed to well RG-77889, tions and require- an existing domestic ments stated within well, located approxithe Request for Pro- mately at a point where X=416,927 and posals. Y=3,955,321, UTM NAD A Pre-Proposal Con- 1983 (meters), Zone ference will be held 13N, on land owned on Friday, February by Wade C. and Ann 28, 2014 at 2:00 PM at S. Harrison and dethe Santa Fe County scribed as 7.503 acres Administration Build- within S 1/2, SW 1/4, ing, 102 Grant Ave- SE 1/4 Section 31, nue, 2nd Floor Legal T18N, R10E, NMPM Conference Room. and 7.503 acres withAlthough attendance in N1/2, NW 1/4, NE at the pre-proposal 1/4 Section 6, T17N, conference is not R10E. The purpose of mandatory it is use will be irrigation, strongly recommend- livestock, and related purposes. ed that all interested outdoor Offerors attend. The The place of use is located at 37 Rancho purpose of this meeting is to explain the Escondido Road, Teproject and provide suque, NM, within detailed information Santa Fe County. about the project purpose, the County Any person, firm or role in the project corporation or other and the procurement entity having stand-

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Legal #96508 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on February 17, 24 and March 3, 2014. NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS RFP No. ’14/29/P Competitive sealed proposals will be received by the City of Santa Fe Purchasing Office, 2651 Siringo Road, Building "H", Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 until 2:00 P.M. local prevailing time on Monday, March 17, 2014. Any proposal received after this deadline will not be considered. This proposal is for the purpose of procuring services for the following: BASALT ROCK CRUSHING AND SALES OPERATION for CAJA DEL RIO LANDFILL A m a n d a t o r y preproposal meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. MDT, March 3, 2014, at the City of Santa Siringo Complex, 2651 Siringo Road, Building "E", Santa Fe, NM 87505. Failure of an Offeror to be present for the entire meeting shall render the Offeror to be deemed nonresponsive and their proposal shall not be considered. It is the Offeror’s responsibility to determine who attends and represents the Offeror or related firm. One person cannot represent more than one Offeror. Representatives of the Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency ("the Agency") will be available at the pre-proposal meeting to answer questions to the extent possible and explain the intent of this RFP. The Agency may prepare a written addendum in response to questions raised at the meeting to all prospective Offerors who were in attendance at the meeting. It is the sole responsibility of each Offeror to verify that he/she has received all addendums issued before delivering their proposal to the Purchasing Office. Acknowledgement of Addendums shall be submitted with any proposal. Offerors may participate in an optional tour of the site on March 3, 2014, after the pre-proposal meeting. The site tour will begin 2:00 p.m. MDT at the landfill administration office at 149 Wildlife Way, Santa Fe, NM.

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toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

y INVITATION The RFP process will FOR BIDS result in the selection of the best qualified MODULAR BUILDING and competent FOR Offeror most suitable THE COUNTY to the needs of the PUBLIC WORKS Agency. COMPLEX

FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE

The Offerors’ attention is directed to the fact that all applicable Federal Laws, State Laws, Municipal Ordinances, and the rules and regulations of all authorities having jurisdiction over said services shall apply to the proposal throughout, and they will be deemed to be included in the proposal document the same as though herein written out in full.

vs.

The Agency is an Equal Opportunity Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation or national origin. The successful Offeror will be required to conform to the Equal Opportunity Employment regulations. Proposals may be held for ninety (90) days subject to action by the Agency. The Agency reserves the right to reject any or all proposals in part or in whole. RFP packets are available by contacting: Shirley Rodriguez, City of Santa Fe, Purchasing Office, 2651 Siringo Road, Building "H", Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505. Telephone number is (505) 9555711. Questions related to this RFP can be directed to Randall Kippenbrock, P.E., Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency, 149 Wildlife Way, Santa Fe, NM 87506. Telephone number is (505) 4241850, ext. 100. The RFP is available at http://www.santafen m.gov/bids.aspx.

IFB# 2014-0197PW/MS The Santa Fe County Public Works Department requests bids for the purpose of procuring a Modular Building to be utilized as the administrative offices for the County Public Works, located at 424 NM 599, Santa Fe, New Mexico. The building shall be nominally 12’ X 56’, approximately 720 square feet, containing two offices, one ADA compliant unisex restroom, permitted, delivered and set-up in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Bidders must be licensed through the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing, Manufactured Housing Division and the Construction Industry Division. Bids may be held for ninety (90) days subject to all action by the County. Santa Fe County reserves the right to reject any and all bids in part or in whole. A completed bid package must be submitted in a sealed container indicating the bid title and number along with the bidding firm’s name and address clearly marked on the outside of the container. All bids must be received by 2:00 PM (MDT) on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at the Santa Fe County Purchasing Division, 142 W. Palace Avenue (Second Floor), Santa Fe, NM 87501. By submitting a bid for the requested services each bidder is certifying that its bid complies with regulations and requirements stated within the Invitation for Bid.

/s/Robert Rodarte, A Pre-Bid Conference Purchasing Officer will be held on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 Legal#96418 at 10:30 AM(MDT) at Published in the San- the Projects, Facilities ta Fe New Mexican & Open Space DiviFebruary 17, 2014 sion at 901 W. Alameda, Suite 20-C, Santa Fe, N.M. 87501. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL COURT No. 0766

D-101-DM-2013-

DEBORAH TUCKER, Petitioner v. ANTHONY BATES, Respondent AMENDED NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION STATE OF NEW MEXICO to the abovenamed Respondent, GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the abovenamed Petitioner has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled court and cause, the general object thereof being a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage, to determine property and debt allocation, award custody and timesharing of the children, and assess child support. That unless you enter your appearance on or before the 17th day of March, 2014, judgment by default will be entered against you. Petitioner’s attorney is: Mary Ann R. Burmester Atkinson & Kelsey, PA PO Box 3070 Albuquerque, NM 87190 505-883-3070 WITNESS the Honorable Matthew J. Wilson, District Judge of the First Judicial Court of the State of New Mexico, and the seal of the District Court of Santa Fe County, this 24th day of January, 2014. Stephen T. Pacheco Clerk of the District Court By: Michelle Garcia, Deputy Clerk Leadworker Legal #96362 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on February 3, 10, 17 2014

Blanca Vega Petitioner/Plaintiff,

Jose Osmaro galdames - Deras Respondent/Defenda nt. Case No.: D-101-Dm2013-00696 NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF SUIT STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO Jose Osmaro galdames Deras GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that Blanca A. the aboveVega, n a m e d Petitioner/Plaintiff, has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, The general thereof being:

object

to dissolve the marriage between the Petitioner and yourself, Unless you enter your appearance in this cause within thirty (30) days of the date of the last publication of this Notice, judgment by default may be entered against you. Blanca Vega Petitioner/Plaintiff 6600 Jaguar Dr. Apt. 302 Address Santa fe, NM 87507 City/State/Zip 505-204-2656 Phone Number WITNESS this Honorable Silvia Lamar, District Judge of the First Judicial District Court of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Santa Fe/Rio Arriba/ Los Alamos County, this 12 day of February, 2014. STEPHEN T. PACHECO CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deputy Clerk

Legal #96511 Published in The SanEQUAL OPPORTUNITY ta Fe New Mexican on EMPLOYMENT: All February 17, 24 March qualified bidders will 3, 2014. receive consideration of contract(s) without regard to race, color, religion, sex, STATE OF national origin, anNEW MEXICO cestry, age, physical COUNTY OF and mental handicap, SANTA FE serious mental condiIN THE PROBATE tion, disability, spousCOURT al affiliation, sexual orientation or gender NO. PB 2014-0009 identity. IN THE MATTER OF Information for obTHE ESTATE OF taining the Invitation NICHOLAS FROST, for Bid package is Deceased. available by contacting Maria B. Sanchez, NOTICE TO Santa Fe County PurCREDITORS chasing Division, by telephone at (505) Elsa Charlotte Kloess, 992-9864 or by email has been appointed at Personal Representambsanchez@santafe tive of the Estate of countynm.gov. The Nicholas Frost, deInvitation for Bid ceased. All persons package will also be having claims against available on the San- this estate are reta Fe County website quired to present at their claims within http://www.santafec two months after the ountynm.gov/asd/cur date of the first publirent_bid_solicitation cation of this Notice s or the claims will be forever barred. BIDS RECEIVED AFTER Claims must be preTHE DATE AND TIME sented either to JerSPECIFIED ABOVE ome M. Ginsburg, atWILL NOT BE ACCEPT- torney for Personal ED. Representative at the Legal #96479 address below or Published in The San- filed with the Probate ta Fe New Mexican on Court of Santa Fe February 17 2014 County, New Mexico.

NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that the following property shall be sold or disposed of after February 24, 2014, at AAA Self Storage, 1519 Pacheco St., Santa Fe, NM 87505 in satisfaction of lien in accordance with New Mexico Self - Service Storage Act. The units consist of stroller, vacuum cleaner, boxes. Unit # 66 ELIZABETH SIROCO 17210 Wells Branch Parkway # 7107 Austin, TX 78728 Legal #96497 Published in The Santa Fe New mexican on February 10 and 17, 2014.

Dated: 2/6/14 /s/: Jerome M. Ginsburg Attorney for Personal Representative 121 Sandoval St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-982-1792 Legal#96419 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican February 17, 24, 2014

To Place a Legal ad 986-3000


Monday, February 17, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

TIME OUT Horoscope

Crossword

The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 17, 2014: This year you evolve and grow in a new way. At times you might feel as if you do not have a choice. If you feel that way, stop and rethink your alternatives. Libra likes the way you think. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your instincts about a situation could be off. Someone might point you in the wrong direction. Tonight: Make nice, and invite others to dinner. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You could find that someone is dealing with a level of discomfort. Tonight: Remember that you’re not always comfortable with change, either. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You will clear up a problem only looking at the big picture. Once the air is cleared, you can direct your energy in a different direction. Tonight: Live life to the fullest. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Listen to your sixth sense when speaking with a close loved one. There might be more going on than meets the eye. Tonight: In the thick of the moment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might be concerned with a financial matter. Your domestic life could point to a different direction and a new possibility. Tonight: Reach out to a favorite person. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might feel strongly about a certain matter, so don’t hesitate to let others know where you are coming from. Tonight: Beam in what you want.

Super Quiz Take this Super Quiz to a Ph.D. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Subject: SONG LYRICS (e.g., “Don’t take your love to town.” To whom is he talking? Answer: Ruby.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. “He keeps on rollin’ along.” Who is he? Answer________ 2. What is it that “helps the medicine go down”? Answer________ 3. “She waltzes on her way to mass, and whistles on the stair.” Who is she? Answer________ GRADUATE LEVEL 4. “And the dreams that you dare to dream, really do come true.” Where? Answer________

5. Where is it that “the wind comes sweepin’ down the plain”? Answer________ 6. “Who am I? Who am I?” And the answer is? Answer________ PH.D. LEVEL 7. What is “the most beautiful sound I ever heard”? Answer________ 8. “Money, money, money, always sunny.” Where? Answer________ 9. “She gave your very first kiss to you.” What was her name? Answer________

ANSWERS:

1. Ol’ man river (the Mississippi River). 2. A spoonful of sugar. 3. Maria. 4. Somewhere over the rainbow. 5. Oklahoma. 6. I am Jean Valjean! 7. Maria, Maria, Maria. 8. In the rich man’s world. 9. Laura.

SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? (c) 2014 Ken Fisher

Cryptoquip

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error. © 2014 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

B-13

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Use care with your finances. Your personality and energy are likely to dominate the afternoon. You will be all smiles. Tonight: Visit with a dear loved one.

Husband acts like a perpetual teen Dear Annie: The past four years of my marriage have been difficult. My husband and I have made many poor financial decisions, and we also have intimacy issues. I’m an artist. When our kids were young, I chose to do freelance work so I could stay at home. My husband has a steady job with a 9 to 5 workday. On the side, he is a talented musician and gets low-paying gigs a few times a year. Over time, my husband’s band equipment has become worn, and he has hinted that he’d like to upgrade. While I would like him to be happy, we are not in a financial position to invest in a hobby that offers little return. On the other hand, I am extremely well paid for my artistic craftsmanship and would like to invest in some technical equipment to further my career. If I am paid more, we could then finance my husband’s future musical purchases. Unfortunately, my husband’s response to not getting what he wants has been immature. He attacks my choices, and I resent the lack of respect for the sacrifices I’ve made to raise our kids. The kids are older now, but it seems that I’m not married to an equal partner, but rather a perpetual teenager. I love my husband, but I feel stuck in a relationship that is unhealthy in more ways than one. Your thoughts? — Got the Blues Dear Blues: It is not unusual for couples in their 40s and 50s to reassess their lives, wondering where their youthful dreams went. Like you, your husband may feel stuck, believing he could have had a career as a musician instead of the one that helps provide for his family. Please don’t turn this into a standoff. Have a gentle, loving conversation. Ask for his input. But if money issues are an ongoing problem, it might help to enlist a third party with better financial acumen to referee. Dear Annie: Why do women announcers who appear on the TV

Sheinwold’s bridge

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Decisions made in the afternoon might not be as sound as you would like them to be. Recognize that you need to think about the implications. Tonight: As you like it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH In the morning, maintain your focus on a matter involving your career. Your sense of humor emerges when dealing with a friend. Tonight: Hang with your friends. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Recognize what is happening with a relationship in which information might not be properly communicated between the parties involved. Tonight: Till the wee hours. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You could discover the benefits of having a conversation. One-on-one relating resolves a problem better than any other method can. Tonight: Detach and observe. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH It can be great to act spontaneously, but sometimes you need to think more carefully about the actions you take. Tonight: A little consideration goes a long way. Jacqueline Bigar

Chess quiz

WHITE FORCES MATE Hint: Finish with the rook. Solution: 1. Qf5ch! Kh6 (or Kh4) 2. Rh8ch Rh7 3. Rxh7 mate! [Bok-Yu ’14].

Today in history Today is Monday, Feb. 17, the 48th day of 2014. There are 317 days left in the year. This is Presidents’ Day. Today’s highlight in history: On Feb. 17, 1864, during the Civil War, the Union ship USS Housatonic was rammed and sunk in Charleston Harbor, S.C., by the Confederate hand-cranked submarine HL Hunley, which also sank.

Hocus Focus

news and weather programs dress so trashy? They wear miniskirts up to their rears, bare arms and shoulders, and low necklines showing everything. The men on these same programs always look professional, with nice suits or sport jackets. I’ve heard people say that a woman’s knees are the ugliest part of the body, and yet they wear short skirts above the knees. Why don’t their bosses stop all of this vulgar dress? — Not a Prude Dear Not: What makes you think the women are selecting this clothing? More likely, the producers of the shows, encourage the women to dress this way because “sex sells.” In all fairness, national news announcers, both male and female, tend to dress more professionally. But if your local news has the men in suits and the women in low-cut blouses and miniskirts, it is sexist, and you should write the station and say so. Dear Annie: You sometimes receive letters from grandparents who feel sad because they don’t receive thank-you notes or phone calls from their grandchildren. Following retirement, my husband and I moved 12 hours away from our children and grandchildren. After upgrading our cellphones so we could text and take pictures, we quickly reaped the rewards. The teenage grandchildren ALWAYS respond within minutes when we text them (keep it brief). They often send thank-you notes via text. And the little ones love FaceTime (on their parents’ phones) and interact with us in real time. We have set up photo album streams that we can all access to share pictures. We were really amazed at how much this has kept us connected with family, and it is well worth the added cost. It’s a big step for many grandparents to take, but most providers offer free instruction, and once you get into it, it becomes easy and fun. — A Happy and Well-connected Grandma

Jumble


B-14 THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, February WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

17, 2014

THE ARGYLE SWEATER

PEANUTS

LA CUCARACHA

TUNDRA

RETAIL

STONE SOUP

KNIGHT LIFE

DILBERT

LUANN

ZITS

BALDO

GET FUZZY

MUTTS

PICKLES

ROSE IS ROSE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PARDON MY PLANET

BABY BLUES

NON SEQUITUR


Santa Fe New Mexican, Feb. 17, 2014