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Las Posadas procession draws hundreds to Plaza By Chris Quintana The New Mexican

Hundreds of locals and tourists gathered Sunday night on the Plaza to seek shelter with biblical figures Mary and Joseph. It’s not time travel. It’s called Las Posadas, which means “lodging” or “accommoda-

tions,” and it is a celebration that stems from Christian tradition and Spanish folklore. The gathering features actors playing Mary and Joseph as they journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem, struggling to find lodging before Mary gives birth to Jesus Christ. In Santa Fe, the crowd holds candles and follows the holy couple as men

Health insurance

Exchange enrollment falls short of goals

dressed as devils taunt the procession from the Plaza rooftops. At about 5:40 p.m, organizers started lighting attendees’ candles. As soon as one person’s candle was lit, onlookers crowded the new flame holder, seeking a bit of fire for themselves. After five or 10 minutes,

Please see POSADAS, Page A-4

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ star O’Toole, 81, dies The reformed, but unrepentant, hell-raiser remembered for work, love of life. Page A-12

Tech gift guide Roger Atkins, portraying a devil, tells Mary and Joseph there is no room at the inn Sunday during Las Posadas on the Santa Fe Plaza. Clyde Mueller/The New Mexican

World Too much to be gentle? bids final farewell to Mandela City’s $559K bill for prairie dog relocation evokes mixed reaction

South African peacemaker buried in hometown after elaborate state funeral

By Staci Matlock The New Mexican

Fewer than 1,000 New Mexicans had enrolled in the federal health insurance exchange by the end of November — far short of goals for the problem-plagued program — and those who have gotten through have come away with mixed feelings. One Santa Fean who finally managed to enroll in the online exchange after weeks of trying was a bit dismayed to find her health insurance will cost at least $100 more a month under the new plan. Jessica Haynie, owner of Three Stones Consulting, is among those the exchange is depending on to help balance health care costs and keep insurance premiums down — she’s young, healthy and gainfully employed. But she’s also among those who will not qualify for subsidies and will pay more for health insurance. Haynie, who couldn’t keep her insurance coverage with Humana, chose a new plan with New Mexico Health Connections that was one of the cheaper options. The plan will still cost her $1,700 more per year than she was paying for her Humana plan, but she can keep her current doctors. Haynie said she understands she’s paying extra to help cover costs for those who can’t afford health

Please see SHORT, Page A-4

Today Mostly sunny and clear. High 46, low 26. Page A-12

Obituaries Sebastian Ortega, 25, Dec. 8 Page A-10

Pasapick www.pasatiempomagazine.com

Southwest Seminars lecture Our Spiritual Relationship With the Earth, by Leo Killsback, Arizona State University assistant professor of American Indian studies, 6 p.m., Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta, $12, southwestseminars.org, 466-2775. More events in Calendar, A-2 and Fridays in Pasatiempo

Index

A quick guide to the most-wanted tablets and video games. TEcH, A-8

By Christopher Torchia The Associated Press

A prairie dog chirps a warning signal to other prairie dogs to take cover at the Railyard. An ordinance approved in 2001 protects prairie dogs within city limits and requires their ‘humane relocation’ if they live on property slated for commercial construction. New Mexican file photos

By Daniel J. Chacón The New Mexican

O

n farms and ranches across America, prairie dogs are target practice. In the city of Santa Fe, the furry little critters get bubble baths, leftover Big Macs and protection under an ordinance requiring their “humane relocation” if they live on property slated for commercial construction. Even the city government, which has a statue of its patron saint in front of City Hall making eye contact with a prairie dog, is loath to hurt the burrowing rodents. Since the ordinance passed in 2001, the city has incurred $559,000 in relocation costs, much to the chagrin of one city councilor. “I don’t hate prairie dogs, as many people have said I do. I just don’t want them in the fields, and I don’t like that this kind of money is being spent to relocate prairie dogs. The money should and could be spent better within this community,” City Councilor Ron Trujillo said. “It seems like every other place, the minute you get past Santa Fe, be it Pojoaque, Española, Taos, they kill the prairie dogs,” he said. But the city of holy faith has become a prairie dog sanctuary. Twice in recent years, visiting Tibetan Buddhist monks have blessed the prairie dog colony at Frenchy’s Field Park

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From left, Lynne Hough of People for Native Ecosystems and Paula Martin of Prairie Ecosystems try to flush out prairie dogs before relocating them from the campus of what is now the Santa Fe University of Art and Design in 2010.

on Agua Fría Street. During the monks’ first visit, in 2006, the prairie dogs “responded by coming to the surface, moving closer to the praying monks and joining into the chanting and prayers,” according to People for Native Ecosystems, a Santa Fe-based prairie dog advocacy group. Only in extreme circumstances, such as when they contract bubonic plague, will the city kill the critters. Otherwise, the city works to control the population, with methods that include relocation. For several years, the city has been sending its prairie dogs to a remote spot of El Malpais National Conservation Area near Grants, which is managed by the

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Editor: Ray Rivera, 986-3033, rrivera@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Kristina Dunham, kdunham@sfnewmexican.com

Bureau of Land Management. “As far as we know, no one has been disturbing them or bothering them at all,” said Edwin Singleton, the BLM’s district manager in Albuquerque. “They’ve got a pretty good life there.” The prairie dogs are part of a larger plan to reintroduce the endangered black-footed ferret, which preys only on prairie dogs, to El Malpais, he said. “They’re a natural and biological control of prairie dogs, and they keep the populations from exploding and [becoming] more susceptible to disease and things like that,” Singleton said. Santa Fe uses more unconventional — but gentle — methods to control the population.

Please see GENTLE, Page A-4

Police notes A-10 Sports B-1

Tech A-8

Time Out B-11

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QUNU, South Africa — His flag-draped casket resting on a carpet of animal skins, Nelson Mandela was laid to rest Sunday in the green, rolling hills of the eastern hamlet where he began his extraordinary journey — one that led him from prison to the presidency, a global symbol of endurance and reconciliation in the fight against South Africa’s racist rule. Artillery boomed and military aircraft roared overhead as the simple and the celebrated gathered to pay their final respects in Mandela’s native village of Qunu at a state funeral that blended ancient tribal rituals with a display of the might of the new, integrated South Africa. “Yours was truly a long walk to freedom and now you have achieved the ultimate freedom in the bosom of your maker,” Brig. Gen. Monwabisi Jamangile, chaplain-general of the South African military, said as Mandela’s casket was lowered into the ground at the family gravesite. “Rest in peace.” “I realized that the old man is no more, no more with us,” said Bayanda Nyengule, head of a local museum about Mandela, his voice cracking as he described the burial attended by several hundred mourners after a larger funeral ceremony during which some 4,500 people, including heads of state, royalty and celebrities, paid their last respects. The burial ended a 10-day mourning period that began with Mandela’s death on Dec. 5 at 95, and featured a Johannesburg memorial attended by nearly 100 world leaders and three days during which tens of thousands of South Africans of all races and backgrounds filed past Mandela’s casket in the capital, Pretoria. For South Africans, it was also a time for reflection about the racial integration they achieved when Mandela presided over the end of apartheid, and the economic inequality and other challenges that have yet to be overcome and seem certain to test his legacy’s endurance. The burial site marked a return to Mandela’s humble roots, but the funeral trappings were elaborate. South African honor guards from the army, navy and air force marched in formation along a winding dirt road. In contrast to the military pomp, some speakers evoked the traditions of the Xhosa tribe, to which Mandela’s Thembu clan belongs. “A great tree has fallen, he is now going home to rest with his forefathers,” said Chief

Please see MANDELA, Page A-5

Nelson Mandela’s grandson Mandla Mandela, left, watches as military soldiers stand at attention over the former South African president’s casket before his burial Sunday in Qunu, South Africa. Elmond Jiyane/The Associated Press

Two sections, 24 pages 164th year, No. 350 Publication No. 596-440


A-2

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

In brief

NATION&WORLD

Controversial testing Navy expands sonar research despite troubling signs

Many trains don’t use widely available automatic brakes NEW YORK — A train that derailed in New York City this month had an automatic breaking system that might have prevented the crash, but it wasn’t set up to enforce speed limits on the curve where the wreck happened. Four people died when a Metro-North commuter train failed to slow as it approached a tight curve in the Bronx. The driver told investigators he nodded at the controls. Metro-North trains have equipment that will sound an alarm and hit the brakes if an engineer exceeds a designated speed or blows through a red light. But like many other rail systems, it is configured mainly to keep trains from hitting each other, not regulate speeds on curves, hills or bridges. The railroad is making changes to allow automatic braking in more locations.

C. African Republic militias seek to overthrow president

A researcher tags a blue whale off the coast of Southern California. Two recent studies found certain endangered blue whales and beaked whales stopped feeding and fled from recordings of noise similar to military sonar. AP PHOTO/SOCAL-BRS PROJECT

By Alicia Chang and Julie Watson

The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO he U.S. Navy plans to increase sonar testing over the next five years, even as research it funded reveals worrying signs that the loud underwater noise could disturb whales and dolphins. Reported mass strandings of certain whale species have increased worldwide since the military started using sonar half a century ago. Scientists think the sounds scare animals into shallow waters where they can become disoriented and wash ashore, but technology capable of close monitoring has emerged only in about the last decade. Aside from strandings, biologists are concerned marine mammals could suffer prolonged stress from changes in diving, feeding and communication. Two recent studies off the Southern California coast found certain endangered blue whales and beaked whales stopped feeding and fled from recordings of sounds similar to military sonar. Beaked whales are highly sensitive to sound and account for the majority of beachings near military exercises. Scientists, however, were surprised by the reaction of blue whales — the world’s largest animal — long thought to be immune to the high-pitched sounds. It’s unclear how the change in behavior would affect the overall population,. The studies involved only a small group of tagged whales, and noise levels were less intense than what’s used by the Navy. Shy species, such as the Cuvier’s beaked whale that can dive 3,000 feet below the surface, have taken years to find and monitor.

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“This is a warning flag and deserves more research,” said Stanford University biologist Jeremy Goldbogen, who led the blue whale study published this summer in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Both studies were done by a team of independent scientists as part of a Navy-funded, five-year project launched in 2010 to understand how sonar affects marine mammals. Navy officials say it’s vital to national security that sailors receive sonar training in real-life conditions. Environmentalists have long claimed that sonar harms marine mammals, which use acoustics to mate and forage. They want more protections and accuse the Navy of rushing to obtain five-year permits under the Marine Mammal Protection Act from the National Marine Fisheries Service to increase its sonar testing in U.S. waters without considering the latest science. “If you deafen a marine mammal for even a short period time, you are affecting its ability to survive,” said Michael Jasny of the Natural Resources Defense Council, whose group has sued to force the Navy to add more protections. A federal judge in September ruled marine fisheries officials did not consider the best available data when it approved permits last year for operations stretching from Northern California to the Canadian border. The agency has until August to reassess how it will protect ocean life. The California Coastal Commission also rejected the Navy’s five-year plan for exercises that would start in January off Southern California. However,

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Monday, Dec. 16 SOUTHWEST SEMINARS LECTURE: At 6 p.m. at Hotel Santa Fe, Our Spiritual Relationship With the Earth, lecture by assistant professor of American Indian studies Leo Killsback, 6 p.m. 1501 Paseo de Peralta.

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186

Number of whales and dolphins the Navy estimates its activities could kill off the East Coast, mostly from explosives.

11K

Number of serious injuries to marine life the Navy calculates it could cause off the East Coast.

4m

Number of minor injuries the Navy predicts it causes off the East Coast, Hawaii and Southern California combined.

27m

Number of instances marine mammals might change their behavior due to Navy activity.

Coast Guard wants barges to ship fracking wastewater PITTSBURGH — The U.S. Coast Guard wants to allow barges filled with fracking wastewater to ply the nation’s rivers on their way toward disposal. Many environmentalists are horrified, but industry groups say barge transport has its advantages. Critics of the plan say that if there was an accident, it could threaten the drinking water supply of millions of people. They also cite the uncertainty around what’s in that toxic mix. The Coast Guard is proposing to address that by requiring chemical testing of each barge load before shipment. The wastewater now is usually disposed of by truck or rail. A government report notes that poses more risk for accidents than shipping by barge. The industry says far greater amounts of toxic chemicals are already being moved by barge, including oil drilling waste.

George P. takes baby steps away from Bush name AUSTIN, Texas — The latest scion of one of America’s most powerful political dynasties is trying to convince voters he’s something other than what his famous surname suggests. George P. Bush is the 37-year-old grandson of one former president and nephew of another. He’s launching his political career by running for Texas’ littleknown but powerful land commissioner post. But rather than campaigning on the mainstream Republicanism embodied by the family name, Bush says he’s “a movement conservative” more in line with the tea party and that he draws the most inspiration from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The Associated Press

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the state agency does not have the power to block the drills and the Navy has ignored the agency’s requested protections in the past. The Navy estimates that its activities could inadvertently kill 186 whales and dolphins off the East Coast and 155 off Hawaii and Southern California, mostly from explosives. It calculates more than 11,000 serious injuries off the East Coast and 2,000 off Hawaii and Southern California, along with nearly 2 million minor injuries, such as temporary hearing loss, off each coast. It also predicts marine mammals might change their behavior — such as swimming in a different direction — in 27 million instances. Navy officials said they considered the latest research available, including the two recent studies, but none proves the activities cause significant harm to the marine populations. Navy spokesman Kenneth Hess emphasized that the studies published this summer involved a small group of animals and some did not react, indicating the sound’s distance and other context may play a role. The Navy uses simulators where possible. “Overall, the activities we propose are very similar to the training and testing we have done in these areas for the past 60 years, and we have not seen major impacts on marine mammals from these activities,” Hess said. Until now, studies have measured animals’ response based on recordings similar to military sonar or depended on the tagging of marine mammals during Navy at-sea training in which scientists could not control the distance or intensity.

BANGUI, Central African Republic — The Christian militiamen fighting to oust Central African Republic’s Muslim president from power hide in the hills far on the edge of the capital. Out of the forest of banana trees, about two dozen young men slowly emerge to meet their visitors — armed with clubs, machetes and hunting rifles. As ragtag as they may appear, they pose the greatest threat to the Muslim ex-rebels now ruling the country since they seized power in the majority Christian country nearly nine months ago. And in interviews with The Associated Press, both the militiamen and a former officer in the national army before the March 2013 coup confirmed they are working together to topple rebel leader-turned-President Michel Djotodia. Although the militia movement’s hierarchy is unclear and there are divisions in its leadership, the collaboration is evidence that the opposition movement to Djotodia and his fighters is growing, and could set the stage for a protracted sectarian conflict even as 1,600 French troops on the ground in Bangui try to secure the peace. French forces are supposed to be disarming Muslim and Christian fighters, though the Christian militia hideouts in the bush have made them harder to find.

Monday, Dec. 16 COWGIRL BBQ: Cowgirl karaoke with Michele Leidig, weekly, 8 p.m. 319 S. Guadalupe St. DUEL BREWING: James Baker, Delta blues with Raven Redfox, 6-8 p.m. 1228 Parkway Drive. LA FIESTA LOUNGE AT LA FONDA: Sierra, country music, 7:30 p.m. 100 E. San Francisco St. VANESSIE: Pianist/vocalist Doug Montgomery, 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. 427 W. Water St. WEEKLY ALL-AGES INFORMAL SWING DANCING: Lessons 7-8 p.m., dance 8-10 p.m. 1125 Cerrillos Road.

SKI rESorTS Be sure to check with individual ski area for conditions before you head to the slopes. SKI SANTA FE: Distance from Santa Fe: 16 miles. Call 982-4429. Website: www. skisantafe.com and snow report: 983-9155.

Corrections PAJARITO: Distance from Santa Fe: 35 miles. Call 662-5725. Website: www.ski pajarito.com and snow report: 662-7669. SIPAPU SKI & SUMMER RESORT: Distance from Santa Fe: 75 miles. Call 575-5872240. Website: www.sipapu nm.com and snow report: 800-587-2240. TAOS SKI VALLEY: Distance from Santa Fe: 90 miles. Snowboarding is allowed. Call 575-776-2291. Website: www. skitaos.org and snow report: 776-2916. ANGEL FIRE: Distance from Santa Fe: 94 miles. Call 575-377-6401. Website: www.angelfireresort.com and snow report: 800-633-7463, ext. 4222. RED RIVER SKI AREA: Distance from Santa Fe: 106 miles. Call 575-754-2223. Website: ww.redriverskiarea. com and snow report: 575-754-2223. SKI ENCHANTED FOREST CROSSCOUNTRY SKIING & SNOW-SHOE AREA: Distance from Santa Fe: 106 miles. No downhill skiing or snowboarding. Call 800-966-9381, 575754-2374 and 800-966-9381. Website: www.enchantedfor estxc.com and snow report: 575-754-2374. SKI APACHE: Distance from Santa Fe: 200 miles. Call 575-336-4356. Website: www.

skiapache.com and snow report: 575-257-9001.

VoLUNTEEr DOG WALKERS WANTED: Join our team, get in shape and help homeless dogs. The Santa Fe animal shelter needs volunteer dog walkers for all shifts, but especially our Coffee & Canines morning shift from 7 to 9 a.m. For more information, send email to krodriguez@sfhumanesociety.org or call Katherine at 983-4309, ext. 128. AARP TAX-AIDE: Volunteer tax preparers and greeters for the tax season are needed from Feb. 1 to April 15. Volunteers work one or more 4-hour shifts a week. Training will be offered in January for those with tax preparation experience and more extensive training for those with no experience. Volunteers can work at Santa Fe Community College or at the Pasatiempo Senior Center on Alta Vista Street. For more information, send an email to taxhelpsantafe@ gmail.com or ddreschel@com cast.net or call 670-6835. THE HORSE SHELTER: If you are 16 years old or older and have some experience with horses — or a great desire to learn about horses — the Horse Shelter could use your help with a variety of chores. Volunteers receive orientation

The New Mexican will correct factual errors in its news stories. Errors should be brought to the attention of the city editor at 9863035. on the first Saturday of the month — weather permitting. Volunteers can make their own schedules — from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. For more information, send an email to info@thehorseshelter. org, visit www.thehorseshelter. org or call 471-6179. THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY: Volunteers are needed to support the Cancer Resource Center at the Christus St. Vincent Cancer Center. Training is for the various shifts that are worked during business hours Monday through Friday. Call Geraldine Esquivel with the American Cancer Society at 463-0308. BIENVENIDOS: Volunteers are needed at the tourist information window on the Plaza. Join Bienvenidos, the volunteer division of the Santa Fe chamber of Commerce. Call Marilyn O’Brien, the membership chairwoman at 989-1701. For more events, see Pasatiempo in Friday’s edition. To submit an events listing, send an email to service@sfnew mexican.com.


NATION

Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

A-3

Budget deal may signal era of tiny achievements

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going to see these shutdowns and Congress is going to get back to the business of paying the bills and prioritizing spending.” Both Murray and Ryan were interviewed on NBC’s Meet the Press. Some lawmakers see the glass half full. They hope the budget deal will cool partisan passions in 2014 and beyond. “Maybe it’s something we can build on,” said Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla. “Success begets success,

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PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE OF FILING OF APPLICATION BY THE SANTA FE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AGENCY FOR A SOLID WASTE LANDFILL PERMIT RENEWAL AND MODIFICATION INCLUDING A LATERAL AND VERTICAL EXPANSION AND ADDITION OF SPECIAL WASTES AT THE CAJA DEL RIO LANDFILL, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO Pursuant to Section 22 of the New Mexico Solid Waste Act (NMSA 1978, section 74-9-22), and Subsection G of 20.9.3.8 NMAC (the Rules), notice is hereby given to the public and other potentially affected individuals and entities that the Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency has filed an application with the Solid Waste Bureau of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) to renew and modify the solid waste facility permit (the Permit) for Caja del Rio Landfill (Landfill). The application documents will be available for review at the addresses listed in Section 5 of this Notice. Pertinent information required by the Act and the Rules is as follows: 1. Name, Address and Phone Number of Applicant

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that’s what this was about.” Sessions said he hopes the House-passed measure will stave off future budget fights “with a little more certainty, where we can aim at Obamacare, and its impact on the economy and jobs.”

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989-1362 PUBLIC NOTICE / NOTICIA PÚBLICA Discharge Permit Application / Aplicación para Permiso para Descargar: For up to 2,500 gallons per day of domestic and industrial wastewater to a treatment and disposal system / Para un máximo de 2.500 galones por dia de aguas residuales domésticas y industriales a un sistema de tratamiento y disposición. Applicant & Discharge Location / Solicitante & Sitio de Descarga: Buckman Road Recycling and Transfer Station, 2600 Buckman Rd., Santa Fe. For More Information / Para Más Información (DP-1115): Ground Water Quality Bureau / Sección de Agua Subterránea NM Environment Department / Departamento del Medio Ambiente (505) 827-2900 www.nmenv.state.nm.us/gwb (public notices) Information in this public notice was provided by the applicants and will be verified by NMED during the permit application review process.

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2. Anticipated Start-Up Date of Renewal and Modification and Hours of Operation The Landfill is an existing solid waste facility operating under Permit No. SWM-261708 and SWM030706(SP) issued by the NMED in June 1995. The Landfill will continue to operate under its existing permit until the NMED Secretary decides whether to issue, issue with conditions, or to deny the permit for renewal and modification. The anticipated start-up date for the proposed vertical and lateral expansion will be January 2015 if the renewal and modification permit is issued. Operating hours for the Landfill are 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Sunday, although these hours vary seasonally. The Landfill is closed to the public on three major holidays (Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day). 3. Description of the Facility (a) General Process: The Landfill currently accepts residential, commercial, construction and demolition debris, green waste and manure for composting, and two special wastes (sludge and petroleum contaminated soils) as defined in the Act and the Rules. The Landfill receives solid waste from registered commercial haulers and self haulers. The solid waste is placed and compacted in lined cells that are protected by environmental control systems; including, but not limited to, leachate collection systems, composite liners, landfill gas control system, and storm water management controls. Upon final receipt of solid waste, the Landfill will be capped with a final cover in accordance with the Rules. Special wastes are processed in accordance with the applicable Rules. At the end of each working day, the working face of the of the municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal area is covered with at least six inches of soil or an alternative daily cover as approved by NMED. The Landfill also has a mulching and composting program to divert green waste and manure from disposal at the Landfill. This Application for Permit Renewal and Modification is for a single facility.

The budget deal eases a harsh set of spending cuts scheduled for 2014 and 2015. But it leaves intact most of the roughly $1 trillion in automatic cuts set to hit the military, domestic agencies and Medicare providers through 2021.

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House on Thursday, and awaits Senate action, is a tiny step forward, Bixby said. “But you can’t get that excited if your kid brings home a D because it wasn’t an F,” he said. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., a chief architect of the budget deal, said the agreement helps “bring some respect to the word ‘compromise.’ ” Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, who represented Republicans in negotiating the deal, expressed hope that “the country is not

TO

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J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A

GREAT GIFT IDEAS

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California speaks about the pending bipartisan budget compromise Thursday.

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WASHINGTON — People hoping for a government that works better can’t decide whether to cheer or lament a bipartisan budget bill that legislative leaders call a breakthrough even as they acknowledge it does little. In an era of low expectations, House passage of the bill marks a rare cease-fire that should avoid a repeat of this fall’s government shutdown and flirtation with default. Yet it comes nowhere near the more ambitious efforts to address long-term spending and debt. Such comprehensive plans repeatedly collapsed in recent years despite secret White House talks, blue-ribbon panels, a congressional “supercommittee” and other devices and tactics. Several Washington insiders warn against assuming the new budget deal will lead to progress on immigration and other stalemated issues. “The president calls it a good first step, but to what?” said Bob Bixby of the bipartisan Concord Coalition, which advocates farreaching budget reforms. “My fear is that it may be the end of the search for the larger grand bargain rather than the beginning. It has that feel.” “Grand bargain” refers to a bipartisan accord that would start to slow the long-term cost projections of Social Security and Medicare while raising tax revenues to lower the deficit, among other things. The bill that passed the

and trust builds trust.” One possible area of renewed effort is a proposed immigration overhaul. The Democratic-run Senate passed a version this year, but the Republican-controlled House has stalled it. Advocates talk of a possible piecemeal House approach. But Democrats and Republicans are divided on whether millions of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally should be given a path to citizenship. Some influential lawmakers say the budget deal doesn’t necessarily brighten prospects elsewhere. “I don’t see that this is a clear channel for us to move to immigration,” said Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, chairman of the House Rules Committee. “I don’t think

VI

The Associated Press

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(b) Location: The Landfill is located approximately 7 miles west of the City of Santa Fe in Township 17 North, Range 8 East, and Sections 21, 22, 27 and 28, in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. (c) Size: The area within the permitted Landfill boundary is 495 acres. Within the permitted boundary the existing West Phase of the Landfill consists of approximately 87 acres of lined landfill used for disposal of MSW and C&D. The proposed East Phase lateral expansion is within the permitted boundary and will consist of approximately 54 additional acres of lined landfill area for disposal of MSW and C&D.

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(d) Quantities and Rate of Solid Waste: The Landfill currently receives about 450 to 500 tons of solid waste per day, but may receive more or less solid waste on a given day depending upon the volume of waste. The landfill will also accept the special wastes listed in (e) below. The estimated annual tonnage of each special waste to be received by the landfill is also included. (e) Types of Solid Wastes: The Landfill will continue to accept solid waste, including the following nonhazardous wastes: residential municipal solid waste, commercial solid waste, and construction and demolition debris. The Landfill will continue to accept sludge (1700 tons/year) and petroleum containing soils (360 tons/year), which are non-hazardous special wastes. In addition, the Landfill is requesting approval to dispose of the following non-hazardous special wastes: industrial solid waste (10 tons/year), spill of a chemical substance or commercial product (10 tons/year), treated formerly characteristic hazardous waste (1 ton/year) and vehicle wash sump waste (28 tons/year). (f) Description of the Modification: Permit modification is requested to obtain approval for disposal of four additional special wastes; to increase the final grade elevation of the West Phase 40 feet above the current permitted elevation (85 to 95 feet above ground level); to horizontally expand the current Landfill to the east, referred to as the East Phase increasing the lined landfill area by approximately 54 additional acres that extends 70 to 110 feet above ground level; to update the landfill management plans, closure/post-closure cost estimate, and related financial assurance; and to provide upgrades to the engineering plans that incorporate the most recent design philosophies and technologies. If approved in 2015, the permit would be granted until 2035. 4. Origin of Waste Currently, the Landfill only accepts waste originating within the City and County of Santa Fe as required by the Joint Powers Agreement between the City and County of Santa Fe. 5. Comments The Permit Application is available for public review at the two locations listed below. Comments regarding this Permit Application should be directed to the Applicant and the New Mexico Environment Department at the following points of contact: Applicant: Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency Caja del Rio Landfill 149 Wildlife Way Santa Fe, NM 87506 Attn: Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Tele: (505) 424-1850

New Mexico Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau 1190 St. Francis Drive PO Box 26110 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Attn: George Schuman, Permits Section Manager Tele: (505) 827-2328

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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

Short: Numbers lower than expected Continued from Page A-1 insurance, but “it doesn’t really make me feel better.” Santa Fe business owner Bryana Mares finally succeeded in enrolling through the exchange, and so far, she’s delighted. She said her premiums with Molina Healthcare will cost $150 less per month, and her deductible is lower. Lisa Estrada, another Santa Fean, is still stuck in the exchange system. She finished the application, but it has been neither accepted nor denied. “Every time I check, it just says pending,” said Estrada, a single mother. People who get fed up with the online enrollment process for the federal exchange can enroll in new insurance plans directly with insurance carriers in the state, including Presbyterian Health Services, Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico, Lovelace, Molina Healthcare and New Mexico Health Connections. While New Mexico is relying on the federal government’s troubled system for enrollment of individuals in the health insurance exchange, it has its own system for enrollment in the expanded Medicaid program and the insurance exchange for small businesses. And although those programs are faring better than the federal exchange for individuals, enrollment numbers are still lower than the state expected. A Dec. 14 deadline for individuals to enroll in the health insurance exchange for coverage beginning Jan. 1 was pushed back to Dec. 23. Individuals and businesses can enroll later, but their insurance coverage won’t start until the month after they sign up and pay their premiums. Following is a breakdown of how the exchange was faring at the end of November: u A total of 934 New Mexicans enrolled through the federal health care exchange between Oct. 1 and Nov. 30. u A federal report released Dec. 12 said 8,539 applications from New Mexicans had been completed, representing about 16,000 residents total. Of those applicants, 9,058 qualified for the individual health insurance exchange. The rest may qualify for Medicaid. The state had hoped to have 40,000 people sign up for insurance through the exchange by early next year. u A total of 523 customers had signed up for health insurance from Presbyterian Health Services through the federal exchange, said Neal Spero, vice president of marketing for the company. Another 488 had signed up outside of the exchange for Presbyterian insurance. The company has 23,000 New Mexicans on individual insurance plans. u Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico did not divulge enrollment numbers, but spokeswoman Becky Kinney said, “The pace of enrollment has improved over time as the government has addressed technical issues associated with the marketplace.” u The state-run insurance exchange for small businesses with less than 50 employees registered more than 1,000 employers. Of those, only 140 actually chose an insurance plan to offer their 600 employees. Employees had until Nov. 30 to choose an insurance plan if they wanted coverage to begin Jan. 1. They can enroll later, but the coverage won’t begin until the month after they enroll and pay their premiums. u Businesses have until March to choose an insurance plan that covers employees through the rest of the year. u State officials are working to help 1,200 of the most seriously ill New Mexicans retain their highrisk insurance coverage until they can enroll through the federal exchange. Those who have plans that cover pre-existing conditions through the federal government can opt to stay with their plans through January before switching, said Debra Hammer, spokeswoman for the state health insurance exchange. The state is working with carriers to extend the highrisk state policies through January as well. u Since Oct. 1, the state’s Human Services Department reported 25,309 Medicaid applications and 3,965 potentially eligible for the program. Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@ sfnewmexican.com. Follow her on Twitter @stacimatlock.

Mary (Sylvia Montoya) and Joseph (Ted Ortiz) stand in front of the Palace of the Governors on Sunday during Las Posadas. Hundreds attended the event, which presented a re-enactment of Mary and Joseph’s search for lodging in Bethlehem on Christmas Eve. PHOTOS BY CLYDE MUELLER/THE NEW MEXICAN

Posadas: Tradition used to be spread out over days Continued from Page A-1 most members of the crowd held burning candles, though an audible sigh erupted when a sudden gust of wind blew out half the lights. The procession started shortly after the candle-lighting, with several musicians singing as the crowd snapped photos of Mary and Joseph. The holy couple, played by Sylvia Montoya and Ted Ortiz, started on the Plaza’s north side by the Palace of the Governors, and the procession journeyed clockwise from there. They stopped several times, and at each detour, they were harassed by the demons. Wearing red face paint and makeshift horns, the three devils emerged from windows and doorways to curse at Mary, Joseph and onlookers in Spanish. The most common refrain was, “Váyanse de aqui,” which translates to “get out of here.” The crowd, undeterred, hissed, booed and cursed right back at the demons. Despite their devilish nature, or maybe because of it, the

actors portraying the demons drew many photo requests from those gathered on the Plaza. In a span of 10 minutes, at least a dozen people approached devils Roger Atkins and Maurcio Rosales asking for a photograph. They accepted every request. It was Rosales’ first year as a devil, and the third for Atkins, who said the crowd seemed bigger than in previous years. Mary and Joseph eventually found refuge at the Palace’s courtyard, where musicians played carols under a bandstand adorned with Christmas lights, organizers handed out hot chocolate and cider, and families milled about and discussed the year’s festivities. All told, the procession took less than 15 minutes. Many Northern New Mexico communities traditionally have celebrated Las Posadas from Dec. 16 to Christmas Day, according to a Traildust column by historian and former New Mexican contributor Marc Simmons. Each night, the actors portraying Mary and Joseph would go to a dif-

Brenda Fraser, visiting from New Hampshire, holds a candle on the Plaza during Las Posadas on Sunday.

ferent home, seeking refugee. A crowd would follow the pair and sing songs asking the homeowners to let them in, but the answer would always

be no for the first eight nights, Simmons said. On the final night, Simmons wrote, the biblical couple would finally find lodging,

and participants would carry a wooden baby Jesus into the home if a Nativity scene was not already on display. Simmons said that Santa Fe residents have compressed the communal celebration into a single night since the 1980s. This year’s celebration was so speedy that Las Posadas veteran Antoinette Armijo and her daughter Summer missed half the procession. Regardless, they were happy with the celebration, citing the nice weather, about 40 degrees with no wind, and large crowd. John and Kathy McMillan drove down from Denver with their sons, Wyatt, 6, and Zane, 5, just to attend the event, and they said they felt an affinity for the gathering. “There’s a connection to a real cultural event,” John McMillan said. “There’s a certain honesty here that keeps us coming back to Santa Fe. You can’t find it anywhere else.” Contact Chris Quintana at 986-3093 or cquintana@ sfnewmexican.com.

Gentle: Contractors charge up to $87 per prairie dog Continued from Page A-1 Once the prairie dogs have been targeted for relocation, city contractors pour soapy water into their burrows to force them out, said Robert Wood, the city’s pest-management manager. “The bubbles make it a little hard to breathe, but not impossible,” he said. “Depending upon how extensive their tunnels are made, they will come up out of the hole to get away from the suds, and at that point they can be caught. They’re given a very quick bath, their eyes are washed out and then they’re relocated in cages.” Before the animals are sent packing, the city fattens them up. “The way the ordinance reads, if we relocate, we need to feed them and get them as healthy as possible,” Wood said. “We do that by putting them into a quarantine period. We keep them in separate holding pens, and we feed the heck out of them. They are healthy before they go out in the field.” By the time the city releases them into the wild, “they’ve gained quite a bit of weight,” Wood said.

“They’ve very healthy and very active, both sexually and physically. And by the monitoring we’ve been doing, they’ve expanded their population out there, so we’re actually quite happy with the program the way it’s going,” he said. The city uses only certified contractors to get the prairie dogs out. Some contractors charge up to $87 per prairie dog. “Some charge $77 a dog, but like anything, some of the advocates didn’t like us using the less expensive alternative because they didn’t feel they treated them as well as the more expensive alternative,” said Isaac “Ike” Pino, director of the city’s Community Services Department. “Do I think it’s worth it? I really don’t have an answer, but I will say this: There are a lot of people in town who think it is. Conversely, there are those who think we could spend our money better,” Pino said. “It’s a classic Santa Fe emotional issue.” For Trujillo, the city councilor, it’s about dollars and cents. “That $500,000, in my opinion,

could have been spent in other places doing greater value for this community,” he said. Wood, however, said the costs were high in the beginning when the city faced a huge prairie dog population, but they have since tapered off. “We’re saving the city quite a bit of money by having relocated the majority of the populations that were exploding in certain areas,” he said. Wood said he anticipates the city’s annual costs going forward to be $17,000 — a figure that could be cut in half if people don’t feed the animals. “The biggest problem is the people that drive by that have half a leftover Big Mac or half a leftover fish sandwich that they throw off the side of the road,” he said. “The prairie dogs have actually responded now by — you can almost count on them at 11:30 every day when they’re active — coming out and standing on the sidewalks waiting for people to throw them food. The less food that comes to the particular prairie dogs, then they start going out into traffic and demand it.”

The more people feed them, the more they will reproduce, he said. “With a standard food supply, a prairie dog will produce four pups per mating couple. In other words, you double the number of mating couples out there every year,” he said, adding that prairie dogs give birth to twice that number when they have access to a lot more food. Trujillo said he tried unsuccessfully to pass an ordinance prohibiting the public from feeding prairie dogs. “The prairie dogs, they’re foragers,” he said. “When you’re bringing a buffet to the prairie dogs week after week, as a forager, why are they going to leave?” Wood estimates the city’s prairie dog population at 3,000, down from 12,000 in 2001. “That sounds like a high figure, but there were a lot of prairie dogs located in small pockets all over the city,” he said. “They had reached kind of a crisis point.” Contact Daniel J. Chacón at 986-3089 or dchacon@sfnewmexican.com. FAR LEFT: Paula Martin of Prairie Ecosystems waits for Jim Polk, left, to fill a burrow with biodegradable dishsoap before sticking her hand into the burrow to capture a Gunnison’s prairie dog in September 2003. Prairie Ecosystems was hired to capture and relocate prairie dogs from a lot at the corner of Galisteo Street and San Mateo Road. LEFT: Martin holds one of the prairie dogs she captured. Robert Wood, the city’s pest-management manager, estimates the city’s prairie dog population now stands at about 3,000, down from 12,000 in 2001. NEW MEXICAN FILE PHOTOS


Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

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Mandela: Common and celebrated alike gathered for ceremony Continued from Page A-1

ground at the request of the family, which often talked of how it Ngangomhlaba Matanzima, a had to share its patriarch with the representative of Mandela’s fam- nation and the world. ily who wore an animal skin. “We His body was buried around thank them for lending us such noon, “when the sun is at its an icon.” highest and the shadow at its Another speaker, Zolani shortest,” said Cyril Ramaphosa, Mkiva, served for many years as deputy leader of the African Mandela’s praise singer, a tradiNational Congress. tional role in which he shouted Mandela spent 27 years as out the leader’s attributes to audi- a prisoner of apartheid, then ences, prefacing Mandela’s many emerged to lead a delicate transistations in life with the words tion to democracy when many “very important:” person, prince, South Africans feared the counpatriot, politician, prisoner, phitry would sink into all-out racial losopher, president, pensioner, conflict. He became president in patient, papa. the first all-race elections in 1994 “The bones of our ancestors and served one five-year term. are vibrating. The waves of AfriAt the funeral ceremony, Mancan oceans are reverberating,” dela’s portrait looked over the Mkiva said. assembly from behind a bank In keeping with Xhosa tradiof 95 candles representing each tions, Mandela’s casket arrived year of his life. His casket, transin Qunu draped in a lion skin, an ported to the tent on a gun carhonor bestowed upon those of a riage and draped in the national high rank like Mandela. His body flag, rested on cow skins. lay Saturday night in his family Mandela’s widow, Graca home before burial, a time when Machel, and his ex-wife, Wintradition dictates family elders nie Madikizela-Mandela, were “talk” to the body to explain to dressed in black Xhosa head his spirit what is happening. wraps and dresses. Guests South African television included veterans of the military wing of the ANC, as well as U.S. showed Mandela’s casket at the Ambassador Patrick Gaspard and family gravesite, but the broadother foreign envoys. cast was stopped just before Britain’s Prince Charles, the coffin was lowered into the

Monaco’s Prince Albert II, Oprah Winfrey, billionaire businessman Richard Branson and former Zimbabwean Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai also attended. At one spot overlooking Mandela’s compound, several hundred people gathered to watch the ceremony. A group of Zulu traditional dancers with spears and shields gathered nearby to pay their respects to Mandela. “He’s a first-class guy in the world,” dancer Musa Ngunbane said. Ahmed Kathrada, an antiapartheid activist who was jailed

on Robben Island with Mandela, remembered his old friend’s “abundant reserves” of love, patience and tolerance. He said it was painful to see Mandela months ago in his hospital bed. “He tightly held my hand, it was profoundly heartbreaking,” Kathrada said, his voice breaking at times. “How I wish I never

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had to confront what I saw. I first met him 67 years ago and I recall the tall, healthy strong man, the boxer, the prisoner who easily wielded the pick and shovel when we couldn’t do so.” Recalling her grandfather’s simple roots, Nandi Mandela said he went barefoot to school as a boy in Qunu, where he herded cattle

long before he was president and a figure of global renown. “It is to each of us to achieve anything you want in life,” she said. In the Xhosa language, she referred to her grandfather by his clan name: “Go well, Madiba. Go well to the land of our ancestors, you have run your race.”

New Mexican

PHOTO y Holida CONTEST

City of Santa Fe MEETING LIST WEEK OF dEcEMBER 16, 2013 THROUGH dEcEMBER 20, 2013 MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2013 4:00 PM

ETHICS & CAMPAIGN REVIEW BOARD – City Council Chambers, City Hall, 200 Lincoln Avenue

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013 2:30 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM

SUSTAINABLE SANTA FE COMMISSION – City Councilors’ Conference Room, City Hall PARKS AND OPEN SPACE ADVISORY COMMISSION – The Barn at Frenchy’s Field, Corner of Osage and Agua Fria Streets PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE – City Council Chambers SANTA FE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD – Main Library, Pick Room, 145 Washington Avenue MUNICIPAL TREE BOARD - The Barn at Frenchy’s Field, Corner of Osage and Agua Fria Streets

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2013 NO MEETINGS SCHEDULED SUBJECT TO CHANGE For more information call the City Clerk’s office at 955-6520

Beautiful, funny, heartwarming, festive… enter your uniquely New Mexican holiday photos for a chance to be featured in The Santa Fe New Mexican and 2014’s Winterlife magazine. Tweet or instagram your pic with hashtag

#newmexicanholiday

and be automatically entered. Or, upload your photo from the contest tab on our Facebook page, where you can also view a gallery of current entries.

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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

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Lunes, el 16 de deciembre, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

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EL NUEVO MEXICANO

Enseñando a Honduras De Uriel J. Garcia The New Mexican

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espués de graduarse de una universidad de Texas en 1998, Michael Buttram recibió una beca del Programa Fullbright para estudiar en Alemania, donde aprendió sobre educación comparada — un ejemplo, cómo los maestros son capacitados en Europa respecto a países como Estados Unidos. La experiencia despertó su interés para convertirse en un maestro, dice. Buttram comenzó su carrera en una escuela primaria en Denver. Dos años más tarde, mientras asistía a una feria internacional de trabajo en la ciudad, el oriundo de Ratón descubrió una oportunidad como maestro que lo llevaría hacia su pasión — ayudar a educar a niños de escasos recursos en Honduras. “Mi intención era ir a Latinoamérica debido a que crecí en Nuevo México y la afinidad entre las culturas y mi aprecio por su gente,” comenta Buttram, 37, quien vive ahora en Santa Fe. “Además del idioma, quería realmente mejorar mi habilidad [en español.]” Buttram siempre mostró un interés en el idioma español y la cultura de Latinoamérica, así que cuando tuvo la oportunidad de mudarse a Centroamérica para una posición como maestro en una escuela privada en Honduras, estaba muy emocionado, dice. Enseñó música en una escuela privada de Honduras, operada por maestros de habla inglesa. “Cuando obtuve el trabajo, me dije, ‘Voy a ir y voy a ver el mundo, desde ahí descubriré cuál es mi destino.’ ” Los estudiantes de la escuela eran primordialmente niños de familias ricas hondureñas, comenta, pero algunos estudiantes coreanos también estaban inscritos. “Al llegar, estaba muy feliz ahí,” dice Buttram. “Pero me desilusionó el pensar que iba a servir a una sección diferente de la población, porque yo sabía que Honduras era un país muy pobre.” Buttram recuerda viendo a los estudiantes llegar a la escuela privada en autos blindados. Incluso, algunas sirvientas cargaban las mochilas de los estudiantes a su salón, comenta. Fue así que comenzó a buscar oportunidades para trabajar con niños que carecían de los recursos que sus alumnos tenían. “Los fines de semana y los veranos,” dice, “comencé a buscar oportunidades como voluntario.” Pronto, Buttram descubrió una organización sin fines de lucro con sede en Estados Unidos llamada Bilingual Education for Central America (BECA), siglas que en español significan beca. Educadores de habla inglesa en la organización enseñaban a

Michael Butrram, el segundo de la derecha, habla con un grupo de padres. FOTO CORTESÍA

los niños hondureños de comunidades de escasos recursos en un ambiente bilingüe. Mientras que Buttram continuaba enseñando en la escuela privada, comenzó como voluntario en las escuelas BECA. Después de casarse con otra maestra estadounidense que vivía en su colonia en Honduras, Katie de Dakota del Norte, Buttram dejó su trabajo como maestro y regresó con su esposa a Estados Unidos. Pero en 2009, la pareja regresó a Honduras, donde los dos trabajaron de tiempo completo en una escuela BECA. En el 2011, Buttram se convirtió en el director ejecutivo de la organización, la cual se fundó en el 2001. “No estamos tratando de prepararlos para que vengan a Estados Unidos ilegalmente”, dice Buttram sobre la gente que trabaja para las escuelas BECA. “Lo que queremos es que sean la fuerza laboral y la clase media del mañana en Honduras. … Queremos que sean los agentes de cambio en un país que tanto lo necesita.” Cuando la esposa de Buttram quedó embarazada con su primer hijo, se mudaron a Santa Fe para estar cerca de sus padres, comenta. Su hijo ahora tiene 2 años y recientemente se dieron cuenta que su esposa espera otro bebé. Algún día, la pareja desearía regresar a vivir a Honduras por unos años, así los niños podrían tener fluidez en español y

Verticales 1. Uno de los cinco continentes. 2. Longitud de la nave desde el codaste a la roda por la parte de adentro. 3. Embrollado, complicado. 4. Rey de Egina, hijo de Júpiter. 5. Símbolo del curio.

apreciar la cultura Latinoamericana, menciona Buttram. El primer año de BECA, tuvo 70 alumnos inscritos en una sola escuela. Recientemente, la organización construyó su tercera escuela debido a la demanda de los padres, comenta Buttram. Ahora son 25 los maestros de habla inglesa. La mayoría de Estados Unidos pero otros son de Canadá e Irlanda, de acuerdo al sitio de internet de la organización. Todos los maestros de BECA son voluntarios y deben comprometerse al menos a un año de enseñanza, dice Buttram. La organización paga su alojamiento y comidas, costos de traslado al país y su pago por la visa. Buttram dice que sólo cuesta $2,000 el operar un salón de clases BECA al año. El dinero se obtiene en E.E.U.U. por medio de recaudación de fondos y donativos, incluyendo eventos con cena y rifa como el programado para el Domingo 15, en una casa en Santa Fe, comenta. Para mayor información sobre Bilingual Education for Central America o BECA, contacte a Buttram al 660-2009 o visite su sitio www.becaschools. org. Traducción de Patricia De Dios para The New Mexican.

Canutito wants to ‘pedir mis Crismes’

E

www.angelfreire.com

6. Retintín. 7. Formen masa. 9. (... I, de Aragón, 10001063) Primer rey de Aragón. 10. Baezano, de Baeza. 11. Nombre de varias especies de hongos ficomicetos que se crían en la superficie de algunos cuerpos orgánicos. 12. Especie de capa corta que se pone al cuello y cubre los hombros. 15. Interjección que denota alivio. 17. Camina con velocidad. 20. Cerrar con lacre. 21. Antiguamente, dar prestado sobre prenda o sin ella. 23. Remar hacia atrás. 24. Gayuba. 25. Sur (punto cardinal y viento). 27. Perezoso americano. 28. Elemento químico, metal

Las normas cuentan: Veamos a México The New Mexican

CRUCIGRAMA NO10725 10725 Crucigrama No. Horizontales 1. Embuste, engaño. 6. Consonancia o consonante. 8. Antiguo nombre de Tailandia. 9. Nota musical. 10. Cuaderno, bloque. 11. Quite la vida. 13. Aceitoso. 14. Negligentes y descuidadas. 16. Arete, pendiente. 17. Insecto heteróptero, de color rojo obscuro y cuerpo deprimido, casi elíptico, que segrega un líquido fétido y chupa la sangre del hombre. 18. Parte posterior y superior de las caballerías. 19. Loa, alabanza. 22. Agrio, áspero. 24. Cara posterior del iris. 26. Color cano del pelo. 29. En números romanos, 56. 30. Trenza hecha de los tallos de ajos o cebollas. 31. Perro de raza mezclada de dogo y lebrel (pl.). 32. Preparar las eras para sembrar. 33. De Media, antigua región de Persia (fem.). 34. Dirigirse. 35. En la creencia hindú los 14 progenitores de la humanidad. 36. Familiarmente, período corto de tiempo. 37. Monte de poca altura en terreno llano.

NUESTRA OPINIÓN

Solución del No. 10725 SOLUCION DEL NO 10724

trivalente de las tierras raras. 29. Que contiene todo lo que su capacidad permite. 31. (Manuel de ... y Junyent) Virrey del Perú entre 1761 y 1766. 35. Abreviatura usual de “mililitro”.

Tuesday has LOCAL BUSINESS

“Pedir ‘mis Crismes’ meant that ra la very noche before Christchildren my age would get up early, mas y Canutito estaba todo dress murre warm and my mom excited. He was wondering would give us una funda de almoqué presentes he might get de Santo hada.” Clós este año. He looked “Pero why did your around por toda la cocina mom give you a pillow por something sweet to case, grampo?” Canutito munch on, pero he didn’t asked him. find nada. “Pues it was porque we “Oiga grama,” he said needed something para to Grama Cuca who was todos los dulces that we making empanaditas de would gather de casa en carne at the table, “¿Qué casa. A whole bonche de no tiene algo sweet para Larry Torres nosotros would walk por comer?” Growing up la nieve and the minute “There are some manSpanglish we got to the neighborzanas en el pantry,” she hood door, we would yell said. “By the way, you ‘mis Crismes’ real loud. still haven’t hung up your Los vecinos would open their doors, Christmas media.” let us into la cocina and nos daban “I remember una vez cuando yo peanuts in the shell, hard candies era niño,” said Grampo Caralampio, y manzanas. Si las familias tenían a coming into la cocina, “que después de que I had hung up my stocking, mi little more money they would give us old brother fue y he stole it and took naranjas.” “Wow!” Canutito exclaimed, “An it down pa’ corral donde la hizo fill orange! It must have been un treat con estiércol de los caballos.” muy grande. Es como ‘trick or treat’ “Did su hermano mayor really fill nomás que without masks and on your Christmas media con horse Christmas morning.” poop, grampo?” Canutito asked him. “We would walk across las snow“Simón que sí,” Grampo Caracovered fields,” Grampo Caralampio lampio affirmed. Y luego the next reminisced, “dragging our candymorning cuando I went to see qué filled pillow cases por la nieve. Los había en mi stocking, among todo el estiércol, I found una notita que decía dulces were all stuck together by the time que we returned pa’la casa. ‘Merry Christmas from Rudolph’. El moco coming out of our noses I was little so yo pensé que Rudolfo formed little icicles so we had el el Venadito had left me poop en la stocking and lloré until mi mamá told moco helado.” “Really, grampo?” teased Canutito. me que era un joke de mi hermano.” “Did you really have snot-cicles “I hope de que yo agarre lots under your naretas?” of candy in my media,” Canutito “Sí,” grampo said. “Cuando hacíaremarked. mos lick our upper lip, el moco helado “Cuando yo estaba chiquito,” tasted poco salty.” Grampo Caralampio said, “en una “I’d like to go pedir ‘mi Crismes’ noche como this night, I would get mis guantes, mis orejeras y mis calzon- grampo,” Canutito said. “¡Uuu, ya qué, m’hijo!” grampo cillos ready para la mañana porque I had to get up murre early to go pedir exclaimed. “Ya those days are gone forever. Ya los niños have cuánto ‘mis Crismes’.” dulce y cuánto toy imaginable. Nadien “So you got your gloves, your is interested in hard candy o walkear muffs and long johns en orden ing por la nieve. No, m’hijo, el mundo to go ask for what? ¿What are ‘mis changes and so do los tiempos …” Crismes’?”

¿Crees que las normas son una carga innecesaria impuesta a la industria por un gobierno entrometido? Echa un vistazo a lo que está pasando en México cuando se trata de la manufactura de autos de exportación. Sin reglas o estándares, las corporaciones internacionales harán su mejor esfuerzo en hacer lo mínimo, incluso a costa de vidas. En México — actualmente el cuarto exportador más grande de autos — los coches y las camionetas son fabricados seguros sólo cuando General Motors o Nissan los exportan a aquellos países que lo demandan. Los autos más seguros están equipados con dispositivos de seguridad como frenos antibloqueo (ABS), control electrónico de estabilidad (ESC) y más bolsas de aire por auto o camioneta. Los vehículos que van hacia Estados Unidos o Europa cumplen con esos estándares. Nuestras leyes los exigen. Pero los autos vendidos en México o el resto de Latinoamérica no los llevan (aunque nuevas leyes en Brasil y Argentina van a comenzar a demandarlos, incluyendo doble bolsa de aire al frente y sistemas de frenos ABS, el próximo año). Debido a que el precio al que se venden es similar al de E.E.U.U o Europa — algunas veces mayor — las compañías incrementan sus ganancias con los autos más baratos y poco seguros. Pero hay un costo. Más mexicanos están muriendo en accidentes automovilísticos. Un artículo de Adriana Gómez Licón para La Prensa Asociada puso en perspectiva el tema: “En 2011, casi 5,000 conductores y pasajeros en México murieron en accidentes, un 58 porciento más desde el 2001, de acuerdo con la última información del Departamento de Transporte. En la misma década, E.E.U.U. redujo su número de fatalidades un 40 porciento. El índice de muertes en México, comparando fatalidades con el parque vehicular, es más de 3.5 veces que el de Estados Unidos.” Pensemos en esos números. Las muertes por accidentes automovilísticos en Estados Unidos cayó un 40 porciento. En México ese porcentaje subió un 58 porciento. Con una industria automotriz de $30 billones para la economía de México, incluso defensores del consumidor creen que un cambio en el sistema resulta muy difícil. El cambio no necesita nuevas leyes. Las compañías automotrices transnacionales y sus ejecutivos necesitan hace lo correcto, poner las vidas de los automovilistas antes de la ganancia. O el gobierno tendría que hacer su trabajo y regular a las industrias que eligen ganancia sobre vidas. Sin leyes, sin estándares, las compañías se concentran en hacer dinero. Sabemos esto por nuestra historia en Estados Unidos. En Estados Unidos, los ciudadanos estamos seguros gracias a un iconoclasta llamado Ralph Nader, que en 1965, escribió Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile o En Riesgo a Cualquier Velocidad: Los Peligros en los Automóviles de América. Él mostró el patrón de las compañías de manufactura de autos. Ellos no querían gastar dinero en hacer los autos más seguros. Su libro amarillista condujo a la Legislación de Seguridad en el Auto o National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act en 1966, leyes sobre cinturones de seguridad en 49 estados y otras iniciativas de seguridad en el camino. México y los mexicanos necesitan encontrar el modo de mejorar la seguridad de los autos. Las trasnacionales fabricantes de automóviles, desde luego, pueden cambiar su manera de hacer negocios y hacer autos más seguros para todos. ¡Increíble! El hacer lo correcto, no requiere de normas. Traducción de Patricia De Dios para The New Mexican.


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

TECH GIFT GUIDE

Tablets Stories by Hayley Tsukayama The Washington Post

Apple iPad Air Apple’s newest full-size tablet is thinner than a pencil and quicker than its predecessors, making it Apple’s fastest and lightest full-size iPad to date. That may not sound like much, but it makes a difference when you actually pick up the iPad Air. Now light enough to hold for extended periods with one hand, the iPad is much more portable and capable as a magazine or newspaper stand-in. Taken with a crisp screen and long battery life, the iPad Air is much easier to carry and use on the go than its predecessors. There are some spots for improvement. The iPad’s camera, in particular, could use an upgrade from 5 MP to at least bring it in line with the iPhone’s 8 MP. Some were expecting the tablet to incorporate the touch-based security features that are in the new flagship version of the iPhone, the 5S. That wasn’t a necessity, but would have been a nice feature as the average person puts more information on a tablet. The iPad Air isn’t a “must upgrade now” addition to the Apple tablet lineup but should make those who’ve been mulling an upgrade — or looking to get into the tablet market — more than happy. Get it: If you want a super-portable, fullsize tablet Skip it: If you’re on the fence about a tablet upgrade Price: $499 and up

Apple iPad mini with retina display For those who are interested in the smaller end of the tablet scale, Apple’s newest iPad mini gives you a lot of per-pound power, figu-

Kindle Fire HDX

Microsoft Surface 2

ratively speaking. Technically speaking, the tablet is just under three-quarters of a pound and comes with a very portable 7.9-inch screen that will tuck easily into a smaller purse or briefcase pocket. The main news in this update is that Apple has finally added the “retina” display, which is the company’s way of saying that its screen’s individual pixels can’t be seen with the naked eye. Translated out of tech speak, that means that the iPad mini — like the newest iPhones, iPads, iPods and some Macs — has a supersharp screen that’s good for reading and watching movies. Its small screen cuts down on the ability to do work, so keep in mind that this is probably a tablet meant more for play than work. The iPad mini isn’t the best value tablet of its size — competitors offer similar features for less money — but it does stand out because of its high-quality construction and because of its access to Apple’s extensive app market. Get it: If a fuzzy screen is all that’s been keeping you from this tablet Skip it: If a low price tag is a high priority Price: $399 and up

Amazon Kindle Fire HDX

iPad mini

Amazon’s been upping the quality of its hardware with each new generation of its Kindle Fire tablets. With its newest HDX models, the company puts forward its best efforts to date. While the tablets don’t have the same premium feel of Apple’s iPads, both the 8.9-inch and seven-inch versions are lighter than their respective counterparts from Cupertino, thanks to smaller screen sizes and plastic — rather than glass and aluminum — construction. The HDX addresses many of the

Video games ‘Grand Theft Auto V’ While much of the focus on this holiday’s game lineup is on titles for the latest consoles, the latest games for the Microsoft Xbox 360 and Sony PlayStation 3 certainly shouldn’t be overlooked — especially because they’re still the primary consoles in most homes. Grand Theft Auto V shattered sales records when it was released in October, and for good reason: If you’re a GTA fan, it’s a heckuva lot of fun. The satirical bite that runs through all the games in this blockbuster series from Rockstar Games is evident in its latest installment, which is set in a fictional version of Los Angeles post-economic crisis and lets carjacking players soak up a setting where citizens are dealing with foreclosures, online privacy and affordable health care. Sound familiar? As always, this series isn’t going to win any prizes for its fine role models or showcasing good values. While the game provides raucous — and unabashedly violent — fun, it’s certainly not a title for all ages. Some of the scenes, particularly a controversial title depicting torture, can make even the mosthardened gamer a little uncomfortable to be holding the controller. Get it: If you like your satire served raw Skip it: If you’re at all squeamish about digital violence Price: $54.99, for Microsoft Xbox 360 and Sony PlayStation 3

nearly as often as they will land on a normal ground level. The graphics are impressive, as is the attention that has gone into setting the tone of the game. Danger feels real, even when you’re fully aware that you’re really safe on the couch. Still, the game’s storyline — while better than previous games — feels a little stilted, which hurts the flow of the single player. As with most Call of Duty games, Call of Duty: Ghosts finds its real stride in the multiplayer, where the game’s designers have poured their efforts into making bigger maps and new multiplayer modes. These include Cranked, which pits teams against each other and makes players pick off opponents in rapid succession. Another, Grind, requires players to collect the dog tags of those they kill and deposit them in “banks.” All in all, Call of Duty: Ghosts is a strong addition to the series, though those who like to see sequels get bigger to get better may see this as playing it a little too safe. In many ways, the title steps back from the blockbuster brink and opts for a simpler focus on the action. Get it: If you love multiplayer games Skip it: If you want the story to do the driving Price: $59.99, for Microsoft Xbox 360 and Xbox One; Sony PlayStation 3 and 4; Nintendo Wii U; and PC

most common gripes about previous models, including a smarter placement of its few buttons and much faster processing and Web surfing. The tablets also carry a smart feature for first-time tablet owners — built-in 24/7 video tech support, through a customer service feature it calls “Mayday.” Tap on the Mayday life-preserver icon, and you’ll see a real, live person ready to help you with your tablet problems — and no worries, the help desk can’t see you. Still while the Kindle Fire HDX is Amazon’s strongest tablet yet, it most benefits people who are deeply hooked into the Amazon ecosystem and want to shop at the online marketplace. And it’s still not a great tablet for working; there’s some lag in typing, so email can be a frustrating experience. In other words, these tablets are great for reading books and watching movies but not for writing your own novels or screenplays. Get it: If you’re an Amazon loyalist or a first-time tablet buyer Skip it: If you want a tablet to do a lot of work Price: $299 and up

Google Nexus 7 Google has held the crown in the tiny tablet space with its Nexus products, thanks to its relatively low cost and high performance. The firm has kept that up with the latest iteration of the Nexus 7, its seven-inch tablet, which is better than its predecessor in all the important ways: faster, lighter and thinner. As is true of many Google products — or, really, any products running Google’s Android operating system — the experience on the Nexus 7 is best if you’re a true Google convert.

‘Knack’ PlayStation 4 launch title Knack introduces players to a tiny titular protagonist that they’ll love off the bat. But don’t be deceived: He packs a significant punch. Knack is a robotlike creature powered by ancient relics that appear everywhere in this world; and the more relics you find, the bigger he gets. In a relic-heavy level, you may find that the adorable little guy you started off with has grown up quickly to punch through mountains. Part of Knack’s charm — and by Knack, we mean both the game and the character — is that it’s best for players to be big or small at different times. That disrupts the normal progression of games, in which players bulk up over time, but it also runs the risk of getting tedious as you wend your way through the plot. And while Knack is fun, it’s not terribly challenging. Even when going through levels where you have to jump on crumbling tiles or dodge traps, the game doesn’t throw too many unexpected punches. Players do have the option to turn up the difficulty, but you’re likely to fall into patterns easily even in those modes. For a game that provides consistent fun for every member of the family, Knack is a charming choice. Get it: If you want a cute, fun game Skip it: If you’re looking for a real challenge Price: $59.99, for Sony PlayStation 4

‘Wonderful 101’ The Wii U, now a year old, isn’t getting the billing that its competitors from Microsoft and Sony are — and gamers have yet to fully embrace its two-screen style of play.

‘Call of Duty: Ghosts’ Call of Duty is one of the biggest franchises out there, which can be a double-edged sword. On one hand, it puts pressure on developers to please a huge fanbase game after game. On the other, it also means that relying on fan favorites can make each successive title feel a little warmed over. Call of Duty: Ghosts is largely successful in navigating between the two, by offering a game that’s just familiar enough to please. The game play is fast, fluid and varied; players will find themselves in the air, underwater and up the side of a building

Those who use Google for mail, maps, browsing and more will find that the Google experience is baked deeply into the tablet. The tablet, which has front- and rear-facing cameras, is now also a good option for video-conferencing, which improves its utility with college students, parents and anyone who’s far-removed from loved ones. The screen also has been improved on this generation of the Nexus 7, which makes it great for personal viewing, though crowding around the tablet’s seven-inch screen is a less-than-ideal experience. Still, Google has turned out another strong, solid product with the Nexus 7, and it’s a great choice for anyone looking to pick a new tablet. Get it: If you want a smaller tablet at a good price Skip it: If you’re not that into Google’s Web services Price: $229

Grand Theft Auto V

Microsoft’s first experiment to breaking into the tablet world hit some bumps — in brief: poor sales, lukewarm reviews and general ridicule. But the firm has soldiered on and created a new generation of its Surface tablets to bridge the gap between tablet and laptop. All Surface models have an optional keyboard cover, which makes the tablets a credible — though not total — laptop replacement, especially since they run Microsoft Office programs. With the Surface 2, a successor to the much-knocked Surface RT, Microsoft has moved the product forward by leaps and bounds. They’ve done this in a few significant ways, including extending the tablet’s battery life and bumping up its internal specs so it runs faster and cooler. Putting the tablet into sleep mode, the company says, keeps it from drawing any additional power, so you can reasonably expect to use it on a single charge over many days. Microsoft also has added a second angle to the tablet’s built-in kickstand so that the Surface 2 is more stable on an actual lap when in laptop mode. That said, it does still have limits. Surface 2 does a fine job of showing off what Microsoft has to offer with its touch-based Windows 8 operating system, but navigating has a learning curve. And while Surface 2 has plenty of productivity apps, it lags behind Apple and Google on the breadth of other apps on offer, which means that you may not be able to pick up exactly the program you want. That’s something that will improve — and if you can wait another cycle, it might be worth seeing what other improvements Microsoft has up its sleeve. Get it: If getting work done is your primary aim for a tablet Skip it: If you want a really wide selection of apps Price: $449 and up; keyboard covers start at $79.99

Wonderful 101, however, takes on the second screen with gusto. Players control an everexpanding horde of tiny superheroes in this whimsical title, and players control the mob using the tabletlike GamePad controller as a sort of central command. By drawing on the GamePad, users can fashion weapons out of the little heroes — swords, axes, guns, etc. — to fight enemies throughout the game. Special superheroes let you form special weapons, which can be useful against particular types of enemies. While a little unwieldy in the beginning, patient Wonderful 101 players may find themselves falling into a rhythm, ultimately getting a big kick out of their itty-bitty super army. Get it: If you want to see what the Wii U can do Skip it: If you’re not a fan of a learning curve Price: $59.99, for Nintendo Wii U

‘Forza Motorsport 5’ One of Microsoft’s most-anticipated exclusives for the Xbox One, Forza brings in all the goodies that gearheads want from a racing game, with gorgeous graphics and a ton of lens flare. It’s hard to make a truly innovative racing game; it’s often best just to try and make the basics as fun as possible. To that aim, Forza is successful, upholding its reputation as more of simulation-style racer than one that feel like an arcade game. Users can shift among a few views — behind the wheel, on the hood or over the car — to suit their tastes. In the cockpit view, there’s been plenty of attention to detail, and players can even check out the rear-view mirror for a realistic touch that makes races that much more fun. Even the damage is a little bit real, though players do have the option to turn back the clock for really bad wrecks. But the cars do get dirty and dinged, so there is at least some reward in driving safely. It’s certainly the kind of title that will have users taking advantage of the recording features on the Xbox, which let you brag about — er … share — clips of the previous 30 seconds of game play. Of course, if racing doesn’t tickle your fancy, than there’s not much else to Forza Motorsport 5. It’s all about beautiful cars, fast driving and burning rubber that you can almost smell. Get it: If you’re into high-octane fun Skip it: If cars just aren’t your thing Price: $59.99, for Microsoft Xbox One


Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

Potty train early for best results

FAMILY

Too pricey for a toy

Question: My 18-month-old kicks me and hits me when I try to change his diaper. He doesn’t do this for his father or grandparents. Should I hold his legs down until he gives up, or will this worsen things? Answer: Holding his legs will definitely make matters worse. The solution, of course, is to toilet train him. I know, the current pediatric party line is he’s too young, he hasn’t shown certain “readiness signs,” and if you just leave him to his own devices, he’ll toilet train himself. Baloney. The fact is, just as it’s much, much easier to housetrain a 4-month-old puppy than a 1-year-old dog, it is much, much easier to toilet train an John 18-month-old human than one who’s Rosemond 30 months old or older. The older the Living With dog/child, the more difficult it will be Children to teach the new “trick.” The further fact is that the standard list of toileting readiness signs is bogus. As I point out in my book on toilet training, these “signs” were snatched out of thin air by certain professionals — the “pioneers” were pediatricians Ben Spock and T. Berry Brazelton — who were trying to lend an air of science to what is a relatively simple, straightforward process. The only readiness sign a pre-1960s mom (before the toilet-babblers began babbling) paid any attention to was her own readiness to stop changing and washing diapers. Here is my one-paragraph, less-than-150-words toilet training program: Purchase a toddler potty. Put it in the bathroom. Show your son how to sit on it. If you haven’t already, let him see you using the “big potty.” Toss the diapers and dress him in thin cotton underwear only (no pants when at home) so that his “stuff” goes down his legs and otherwise causes discomfort. Purchase a kitchen timer. Tell your son it’s the “potty bell.” Set it to ring every hour, on the hour. Load your son up with liquids and drink lots of water yourself. When the timer rings, tell your son it’s time for the two of you to sit on your potties. Take him into the bathroom and help him sit. Then sit yourself (when dad’s in charge and whenever your son’s around to watch, he should also sit). Make using the toilet a family affair! In no time, your little kickboxer should be using the potty with minimal help from you. If for whatever reason you’re not ready to toilet train, then the backup plan is to let his dad and grandparents change him as often as possible. When there’s no alternate diaper changer available, then just change him, kicking and all. Don’t say anything while doing so. Just work around his kicking as well as you can. To maintain your cool, try singing a song. May I suggest 19th Nervous Breakdown by The Rolling Stones? I remember going through the same thing with our son, who was also our first. We used cloth diapers with him. They required pins. His struggling was cured rather quickly after a few pins accidentally pricked his skin. The old technology did have its merits.

Kid-friendly tablet options for parents who are reluctant to hand over their own devices Web-filtering system does an excellent job, and you can set up as many as eight unique profiles, each with its own time limits and app/game restrictions. And besides the Kurio App Store, you have access to a variety of other Android app stores. kd-inter active.com/.

By Armin Brott and Samantha Feuss McClatchy-Tribune

G

iven that full-featured tablets aren’t cheap, it’s no big surprise that a lot of parents are somewhat reluctant to turn one over to a child. There are some tablets, though, that are fun enough to keep the kids entertained, yet safe and cheap enough to keep mom and dad from pulling out too much of their hair.

ClickN KIDS Tablet (ClickNKIDS)

Meep! (Oregon Scientific) Meep! is a good choice for very young kids or slightly older ones (up to fourth grade) who have no experience with tablets. If they’ve played on your iPad or other adult tablet, they’ll be frustrated. What sets Meep! apart, though, are the attachable accessories (purchased separately), such as a mic and piano keyboard. One especially great feature: The Meep! Store (for purchasing or downloading additional apps) takes only Meep! Coins, which you (the adult) purchase. You can then set a budget,

Adam Cohen watches as his son Marc, 5, uses a tablet Dec. 3 at home in New York. Some parents who are reluctant to let their children use expensive tablets may choose to go with more kid-friendly options. BEBETO MATTHEWS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

which the kids can’t exceed. www.meeptablet.com.

Kurio 7s (KD iNteractive) While it looks similar to the other kids’ tablets, the Kurio has some very unique features,

including front and rear cameras and the preloaded full (commercial-free) versions of some of the most popular apps and games (including Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja) and great educational apps from Mr. Nussbaum. Kurio also has the best parental controls on this list. The Genius

This tablet takes ClickN KIDS’ award-winning reading programs and wraps them in a tablet. The emphasis is definitely on education — the ClickN KIDS comes with more than 100 reading lessons — but there’s plenty of opportunity for entertainment too. Unlike most of the other tablets in this category, which were designed mostly for kids, the ClickN KIDS will appeal to teens and adults as well. Once you log into the password-protected Grown Ups interface, you’ve got a small but full-featured tablet that you can use for email, Skype, Netflix, etc. At 5 hours, battery life is a little short, but the tablet charges quickly. www.clicknkids tablet.com/.

Family top picks Tuesday, Dec. 17

El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, handmade gifts; proceeds benefit needy families in the Adelante program. 555 Camino de la Familia. NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS STORYTIME: At 6:30 p.m. at Bee Hive Kids Books, for ages 3 and up; option PJs dress code, 6:30 p.m. 328 Montezuma Ave. ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: Santa Fe Playhouse

THE LIGHTER SIDE OF CHRISTMAS: At 6 p.m. at LewAllen Contemporary, a “Rat Pack Christmas” with members of the Desert Chorale, 6 p.m. 125 W. Palace Ave.

Thursday, Dec. 19

presents Charles Dickens’ classic adapted by Doris Baizley, 7:30 p.m., Santa Fe Playhouse,

ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR: From 4 to 7 p.m. at

142 E. De Vargas St., $20; discounts available; santafeplayhouse.org, 988-4262. GLOW: Special outdoor lighting event running Thursday-Saturday through Jan. 4; includes an exhibit by ceramic sculptor Christy Hengst, 5-8 p.m., Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 725 Camino Lejo, $8 in advance and at the door, children 12 and under no charge, santafebotanicalgarden. org, 471-9103

© 2013 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 30, No. 1

Replace the missing words in this story about a shelter elter pet.

The Adventurous Justin ustin by Kyra C.

It’s a sad fact that every year, millions of unwanted pets wind up in animal shelters. Why are there so many unwanted animals? What can you do to help? Find out on today’s Kid Scoop page. Controlling the pet population in this country is a good place to start being truly kind to animals. animals Each year, year a thousands of dogs and cats are abandoned and then killed. Sometimes people get a pet and find out, too late, that they can’t care for it. All too often, the pet is then abandoned or left at a shelter.

1. Don’t get a pet unless you are really prepared to care for it. Read at the library about how to care for the pet you want, and then decide if you truly have the time it takes. 2. If you have a cat or dog, get it spayed or neutered so that it won’t breed and produce young.

A-9

Justin is an adventurous, cute ute 4-week-old kitten. He is a brown tabby with a white _______. _. He has black stripes on his head, and nd his feet look like socks. I chose to write about Justin n because he ________ my heart when I walked in. He has a _________ meow, w, and he bounces when he eats his food. He crawls around his cage, and it’s like he’s __________, __, “Let me out!”

But wait, it gets worse. Some people do not spay or neuter their pets, which means the ne animals keep producing unwanted young. k Sadly, not enough good homes exist for all the puppies and kittens born into this world. So these unwanted pets also end up in shelters, where many of them must be put to death.

A good home for Justin would be a big house so he could __________ around. You will have fun if you get him. He will win over a bunch of people. Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Follow simple written directions.

One female cat that is not spayed can have eight to ten kittens a year. If each of her kittens has kittens, and all of those kittens have kittens, after five years, the one female cat you started with will have brought over 100,000 cats into the world. If you could get 100,000 cats in one line, it would be about 25 miles long!

Spaying is the operation that prevents female cats and dogs from breeding. Neutering is the operation that prevents male cats and dogs from breeding.

POPULATION SHELTER CLINIC SPAYED PUPPIES KITTENS KIND NEED NEUTER LOST COUNTRY CARE COOL CATS

Find the words in the puzzle. Then look for each word in this week’s Kid Scoop stories and activities.

Are you an eagle-eyed reader? Read the article below and circle the six errors you find. Then rewrite the article correctly on the lines below the article.

While many hotels and motels don’t allow pets at all, some hotles are doing amazing things to attract guests with pets. The Westin, W and Sheraton hotel chains will provide you pooch with a plush robe, a food bwol, an ID tag, treats and a toy when you stay their. At the Vanderbilt Hotel in Nashville, a pet can be treeted to The Hound of Music program that includes a massage, a limo ryde and a trip to a recording studio with a voice coach!

S T A C S D E E N S N C B S B P R E H K E I A N E E A E D K T C B R T I L Y C I T T I U E T P O E N I O E N E A O P S D K N S R I L N I U T N O I T A L U P O P Y R T N U O C M A L Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.

For more information, visit the Humane Society of the United States at: www.hsus.org

Five puppies and five kittens are identical. Can you find both sets of five?

Pet Seeks Owner

Standards Link: Visual discrimination: Observe similarities and differences in common objects.

Cats and dogs communicate with their tails. What are these animals saying? To find out, add up the numbers next to each animal. Match the answer with the tail’s message.

9 = “I’ve been a bad dog.” 14 = “Watch out, I might attack!”

7+2+5 1+2+3

13 = “I’m a cool cat.”

3+2+4

Standards Link: Number Sense: Calculate sums.

Standards Link: Language Arts: Use nouns, adjectives and verbs correctly.

Standards Link: Writing Applications: Write expository descriptions; Write from a point of view.

9+3+5

6 = “I’m so happy to see you!” 17 = “I’m a good dog!”

Imagine that animals could seek owners by running ads in the classified section of the newspaper. Pretend you are an animal. Write an ad for your ideal owner.

8 to 12 million cats and dogs end up in shelters each year. 4 to 6 million of these cats and dogs are euthanized (killed) at shelters each year.

4+5+4

Look through today’s newspaper and find 10 names that would make good pet names. Put them in alphabetical order. Standards Link: Spelling: Arrange words in alphabetical order.

Pretend you are a pet — a cat or dog or even a fish. Write a classified ad as if you are looking for a new home. Read some classified ads in the newspaper to get ideas.

I want a pet, but do I have the time it takes to care for one? ... thinking about the consequences of your actions.


A-10

LOCAL & REGION

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

Police notes The Santa Fe Police Department is investigating the following reports: u Henry Gonzales, 39, of Santa Fe was arrested on charges of battery of a peace officer, resisting or obstructing a peace officer and driving with a revoked or suspended license at 4:31 p.m. Saturday after officers stopped him following instructions to “be on the lookout” for his vehicle. Once stopped, Gonzales allegedly struck one of the officers and fled on foot, but officers stunned him with a Taser and arrested him. u Someone tried breaking into Baja Taco, 2621 Cerrillos Road, by prying open an outside door between 8 p.m. Friday and 6:20 a.m. Saturday. The suspect couldn’t make it past the inner security doors. u A pistol and change inside a cash register were stolen from a building in the 2600 block of Cerrillos Road between 10 p.m. and 6:30 a.m. Saturday. u Someone broke into Dust in the Wind, 125 E. Palace Ave., and stole an undetermined amount of clothing, jewelry and $100 in cash between 8:45 and 9:22 p.m. Thursday. u A homeowner in the 6900 block of Golden Mesa reported that her home had been burglarized between 7:45 a.m. and 8 p.m. Friday. The report didn’t specify whether any personal items were stolen. u A woman in the 2900 block of Camino del Bosque reported Saturday that her son had taken her vehicle without her consent. The vehicle was recovered after the son contacted police. u A man reportedly entered Kmart, 1712 St. Michael’s Drive, and stole candy, beef jerky and a BB gun between June and Dec. 11. u A bank employee at the

Medical problems hinder father’s ability to pay bills

Tracking alcohol abuse in Santa Fe County

DWI REPORT DWI arrests DWI/DUI crashes MUI/MIP* Seized vehicles

The New Mexican

Sheriff

SFPD

NMSP

NOV. 22 6 0 6

NOV. 40 2 3 30

NOV. 15 1 0 NA

2013 145 45 11 50

2013 380 41 92 427

TOTAL 714 98 119 477

MUI/MIP: MINORS UNDER THE INFLUENCE/MINORS IN POSSESSION OF ALCOHOL SOURCE: SANTA FE UNDERAGE DRINKING PREvENTION ALLIANCE

First National Bank of Santa Fe, 2021 Cerrillos Road, reported Friday that someone had written multiple forged and counterfeited checks worth a total of $277,000. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the following reports: u A resident in the 100 block of Llano Road in Santa Cruz reported that someone fired a gun at the home and broke a double-paned window sometime Saturday. No in one in the house was injured. u Someone stole $3,000 from a safe in a home on Calle Carino between 10 a.m. Friday and 10 p.m. Saturday. u A man reported that an unknown man stabbed him in the chest with a steak knife after he found the suspect on vacant property in the 300 block of Jemez Road early Sunday. The suspect fled on foot. Responders treated the victim for non-life-threatening injuries, and he refused further

How they voted By Targeted News Service

WASHINGTON — Here’s a look at how area members of Congress voted over the previous week.

medical treatment. u Andreana Thompson, 21, 2528 Camino San Patricio, was arrested on charges of aggravated drunken driving and possession of a controlled substance at West Alameda Street and Rincon de Torreon after officers stopped her for veering between lanes at 2:40 a.m. Sunday. Officers reported she had less an ounce of marijuana in her possession. u Allen Romero, 31, of Santa Fe was arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated after county deputies stopped him for veering between lanes on U.S. 84/285 near Tesuque sometime over the weekend. u Michael Garcia, 46, of Pojoaque, was arrested on charges of drunken driving and possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia on Los Piños Road sometime Saturday. Garcia admitted to taking “two

shouldn’t be tarnished because of a legislative technicality, and the bill before us will close this loophole.” The vote, on Dec. 11, was 398 yeas to 1 nay. Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Luján, Pearce

House vote 4

House votes

House vote 5

shots of alcohol and smoking marijuana prior to driving.”

DWI arrests

International kidnapping of Americans: The House has passed the Sean and David Goldman International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act (HR 3212), House vote 1 sponsored by Rep. Christopher H. Smith, R-N.J. The bill would require the State VA medical facility leases: The House Department to increase its measures to has passed the Department of veterans Affairs Major Medical Facility Lease Autho- ensure that other countries comply with their obligation under an international conrization Act (HR 3521), sponsored by Rep. vention on kidnapping to return American Jeff Miller, R-Fla. The bill would direct children to their families, and increase the secretary of veterans Affairs to sign information in annual reports on whether leases with 27 major medical facilities to or not other countries are complying with treat military veterans. Miller said the bill their obligation. Smith said the bill sought answered concerns by the Congressioto “protect children from the harmful nal Budget Office about how to properly effects of abduction and wrongful retention account for the facility leases, creating “a way forward for vA’s major medical facility and to assist left-behind parents to not only have access to their children, but to siglease program on behalf of the veterans of this country.” The vote, on Dec. 10, was 346 nificantly enhance the prospects of resolution.” The vote, on Dec. 11, was unanimous yeas to 1 nay. Yeas: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M.; with 398 yeas. Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Luján, Pearce Rep. Ben Ray Luján, D-N.M.; Rep. Steve Pearce, R-N.M.

House vote 2

2013 189 12 16 NA

Budget agreement: The House has agreed to a motion sponsored by Rep. Paul Pediatric research and political parRyan, R-Wis., to have the House recede ties: The House has passed the Kids First from its amendment to the Continuing Research Act (HR 2019), sponsored by Appropriations Resolution (HJ Res 59) Rep. Gregg Harper, R-Miss., which would for fiscal 2014 and concur with a budget end all taxpayer financing of presidential amendment negotiated with the Senate. campaigns and political party conventions and transfer the taxpayer funds in accounts The budget amendment would increase caps on military and non-military discremaintained for the party conventions to a new government fund to support pediatric tionary spending in fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2015, extend planned Medicare spending research programs at the National Insticuts through fiscal 2023, increase user tutes of Health. Harper said the transfer fees for air travel, and increase the conshould happen because “creating a lifetributions new government employees time of hope and opportunity for our most must make to their retirement funds. Ryan vulnerable kids is more important than said the agreement would stop the recent subsidizing weeklong political pep rallies for the Democratic and Republican parties.” trend of federal budget disputes sparking An opponent, Rep. Henry Waxman, said the political crises by “bringing stability to the budget process, and that stability will help bill was a symbolic measure that, by probuild confidence, and that confidence will viding the NIH with only about $13 million help our economy” by ending uncertainty of annual funding for pediatric research, about the budget that has discouraged would fail to make up for “the funding for investment in the economy. An opponent of pediatric research NIH lost due to Repubthe agreement, Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., lican budget cuts and sequestration.” The vote, on Dec. 11, was 295 yeas to 103 nays. said it failed to extend unemployment benefits, failed to close any tax loopholes Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Pearce and hurt government employees by cutting Nays: Luján their retirement benefits. The vote, on Dec. House vote 3 12, was 332 yeas to 94 nays. Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Luján Disinterring veterans who have comNays: Pearce mitted murder: The House has passed the Alicia Dawn Koehl Respect for National Cemeteries Act (S 1471), sponsored by Sen. House vote 6 Military spending: The House has agreed Daniel Coats, R-Ind. The bill would authoto a resolution (H Res 441) to concur with rize the Army secretary and secretary of the Senate amendment to the National veterans Affairs to disinter the remains of Defense Authorization Act (HR 3304), veterans buried in national cemeteries if sponsored by Rep. Buck McKeon, R-Calif. those veterans are found to have commitThe bill would provide $607 billion to fund ted murder or other capital crimes subject the military in fiscal 2014, including $80.7 to the death penalty. A supporter, Rep. billion for the war in Afghanistan, and Susan W. Brooks, R-Ind., said that under current law, the military lacks the authority would introduce a variety of measures to improve the military’s handling of sexual to disinter a veteran who has committed a capital crime, and “our nation’s cemeteries assault cases. McKeon said the bill met

Speed SUVs u The locations of the Santa Fe Police Department’s mobile speed-enforcement vehicles were not available Sunday.

Help lines Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families hotline: 800-473-5220 St. Elizabeth Shelter for men, women and children: 982-6611 Interfaith Community Shelter: 795-7494 Youth Emergency Shelter/ Youth Shelters: 438-0502 New Mexico suicide prevention hotline: 866-435-7166 Solace Crisis Treatment Center: 986-9111, 800-7217273 or TTY 471-1624 Police and fire emergency: 911

Congress’s obligation to provide for the defense of the U.S., and “also provides badly needed reforms to help alleviate the crisis of sexual assault in the military.” An opponent, Rep. Rush Holt, D-N.J., criticized the bill’s continuation of funding for the war in Afghanistan, its failure to stop purchases of the “flawed and hugely overpriced” F-35 fighter jet, and its continued funding of the National Security Agency’s intrusive surveillance of Americans and “a large number of unnecessary and wasteful Cold War era weapons programs.” The vote, on Dec. 12, was 350 yeas to 69 nays. Yeas: Lujan Grisham, Pearce Not voting: Luján

Senate votes Senate vote 1 Confirming D.C. Circuit Court judge: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Patricia Ann Millett to serve as a U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Circuit. The vote, on Dec. 10, was 56 yeas to 38 nays. Yeas: Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M.

Senate vote 2

Upholding majority requirement for cloture votes: The Senate has upheld a ruling finding that cloture votes by the Senate to end debate on presidential nominations for all positions other than the Supreme Court require a bare majority of one-half of all votes (typically 51 votes out of 100) to win approval, in place of the former rule that required a supermajority of three-fifths of all votes (typically 60 votes out of 100) to win approval. A supporter of the ruling, Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-vt., said the change was necessary because Republicans had taken their determined obstruction to judicial nominees to an unprecedented level, blocking nominees and thereby failing to meet the Senate’s constitutional duty to vote on nominations. An opponent of the ruling, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said that with the rules change, Democrats had “changed more than 200 years of Senate practice, taking away one of the few tools the minority has to participate in either the confirmation or legislative process.” The vote to uphold the ruling, on Dec. 10, was 51 yeas to 45 nays. Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

Senate vote 3

Head of Federal Housing Finance Agency: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Melvin L. Watt to serve as director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency for a five-year term. The vote, on Dec. 10, was 57 yeas to 41 nays. Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

Senate vote 4

Confirming appeals court judge: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Cornelia T. L. Pillard to serve as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The vote, on Dec. 11, was 51 yeas to 44 nays. Yeas: Heinrich, Udall

J

ohn recently had eye surgery, but he has suffered from recurring eye infections since the operation. As a result, he has not been able to work. John, who has two children, fell behind on his rent and utility bills because he has had to pay for his medical bills, which amount to about $2,700. He also has had to pay $100 a month for his prescriptions. John is one of many community members seeking help from The New Mexican’s Empty Stocking Fund during the holiday season.

have been changed in the stories to protect their privacy. The information from the initial application will be verified if the applicant is selected for assistance.

To donate

Make your tax-deductible donation online at www.santafenewmexican.com/empty_stocking or mail a check to: The New Mexican’s Empty Stocking Fund c/o The Santa uuu Fe Community Foundation, P.O. Box 1827, Santa Fe, N.M., 87504The Empty Stocking Fund is 1827. a project of The Santa Fe New If you can provide a needed Mexican. The Santa Fe Comservice such as roofing, car munity Foundation, the First repairs or home repairs, contact National Bank of Santa Fe, The Salvation Army and Presbyterian Roberta at Presbyterian Medical Services, 983-8968. Medical Services donate serIf you can contribute food, vices to jointly administer the clothing, toys, housewares or Empty Stocking Fund. Watch for daily stories featur- furniture in good condition, or ing requests from local residents other items or services, please contact The Salvation Army at in The Santa Fe New Mexican. The names of the applicants 988-8054.

Funeral services and memorials SEBASTIAN ORTEGA Sebastian Ortega was called to his heavenly home on December 8, 2013. He was preceded in death by his maternal grandparents Lourdes and Gilbert Abeyta, his paternal grandfather Evaristo "Tito" Ortega, aunts Josie Calles and Arlene Ortega, uncles Ted Pena and Gilbert R. Abeyta, cousins Gabriel Armijo and Christina Calles and Christine Lujan. He was born June 6, 1988 in Santa Fe and resided in Central City, CO. He graduated from SFHS in 2006 and was employed by the Lodge Casino and Resort. Sebastian enjoyed the time he spent with his immediate and extended family especially his fiancé Regina and his son, the light of his life, Estevan. He was an extremely caring, loving and proud father. He loved music, hunting, fishing, watching football and baseball. He was a very kindhearted and generous person. He will be deeply missed and remembered for his loving spirit, his outstanding working ethic, his vast intellect and his beautiful smile. He is survived by his fiancé Regina Lujan, his son Estevan Ortega, his parents Robert and Marcella Ortega, brother Enrique "Rico" Ortega, paternal grandmother Josie Ortega. He is also survived by his god parents Frances Armijo and Paul Abeyta, his many aunts and uncles on the Pena, Abeyta and Ortega families, many cousins, special cousins Kimberly Lucero and Fabian Armijo, extended family the Chavez’, Lujan’s and Ramoz’. Visitation will begin at 2- 4 p.m. at Berardinelli Funeral Services on Monday December 16, 2013 and from 6- 7 p.m. with a rosary to be recited on Monday December 16, 2013 at 7 p.m. at Cristo Rey Church. Funeral mass will be celebrated Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Cristo Rey Church with interment to follow at Rosario Cemetery. Serving as pallbearers Rico Ortega, Paul Abeyta, Fabian Armijo, Gino Chavez, Christopher Ramoz and Zion Rodriguez, honorary pallbearers are his many cousins and special extended family members.

Berardinelli Family Funeral Service 1399 Luisa Street Santa Fe, NM 87505 (505) 984-8600 Please sign our guestbook for the family at: www.berardinellifuneralhome.com

IN LOVING MEMORY

CHRISTINE V. VALDEZ 1/20/47 TO 12/16/11

If yellow roses grow in Heaven Lord, please pick a bunch for us. Place them in our loved one’s arms and tell her they’re from us. Tell her that we love her and miss her, and when she turns to smile, place a kiss upon her cheek and hold her for awhile. Because remembering her is easy, we do it everyday. But there’s an ache within our heart That will never go away. A two year anniversary mass will be celebrated on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Cathedral at 6 p.m.

Obituary notices: Obituaries can be purchased through a funeral home or by calling our classifieds department at 986-3000, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

OPINIONS

The West’s oldest newspaper, founded 1849 Robin M. Martin Owner

COMMENTARY: MARGARET CARLSON

From Francis, a cry for the poor W WASHINGTON hat would Francis do? To many in the United States, including conservatives who embrace the pope as one of their own on social issues, that question is akin to asking what would Jesus do, only with fresher answers. The pontiff used his first, personally authored apostolic exhortation to provide guidance on what he would do about the growing gap between the rich and the poor. Two days later, President Barack Obama weighed in on the same subject in his third speech about growing income inequality in the United States. The pope was more dramatic, prescriptive and moral. The president had to couch his analysis in self-interest, this being America governed by a Congress unmoved by the poor being blessed and inheriting the Earth. “The basic bargain at the heart of our economy has frayed,” the president said Dec. 4, and it is “this generation’s task” to repair it. This duty has been largely ignored by this generation and this administration, caught up as it had to be in rescuing the financial titans who got us into the worst recession since World War II. The slow recovery that followed worked to the detriment of just about everyone else. Obama tried to link the fate of the richest 1 percent, who earn a larger share of income now than at any time since the Gilded Age, to the well-being of those at the opposite end of the spectrum. Who is going to buy their products and be trusted to clean their houses if the working poor don’t have a chance of achieving the American dream? The pope took a different tack: He urged governments to stop letting the powerful “feed upon the powerless.” Add, he says, another commandment — “thou shalt not” have an economy of exclusion and inequality, because “such an economy kills.” On the heels of the pope and the president came a powerful front-page series in The New York Times about an 11-year-old girl named Dasani, one of the 22,000 desperately poor children in New York who live in the shadow of the incredibly wealthy. In his speech, Obama described the lot of such a child: Born into

Robert M. McKinney Owner, 1949-2001 Inez Russell Gomez Editorial Page Editor

Ray Rivera Editor

OUR VIEW

A nudge toward better governing

T Good thing the Vatican doesn’t get cable. The pope would have choked watching anchors dismiss the notion of a boost in the minimum wage. the bottom 20 percent, she has less than a 5 percent chance of making it to the top, and she is 10 times more likely to be stuck in place. Dasani has spunk and intelligence, and she runs like the wind, but she doesn’t have a life outside school. She lives with eight people amid rats, roaches, mold, a mop bucket for a toilet, filthy showers and with no place to call her own but a corner of a falling-apart mattress on the floor. At first, her classmates didn’t know that she is one of only six homeless kids in their midst, but it became more obvious as her clothes got dirty and there was no place to wash them. As the oldest, Dasani tries to protect her siblings from the worst degradation: being labeled as “shelter boogies” because they have neither tissues nor someone who cares enough to wipe their noses. The pope warns that the poor could rise up if we don’t fix the chasm between living like Dasani and living, relatively, like a king. Francis has shed some of the luxurious trappings of the papacy. He lives in a modest guesthouse rather than the Apostolic Palace, travels in a Ford Focus and goes out incognito at night to minister to the poor. He wants a church

that is “bruised, hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets.” He suspended a bishop for spending millions of euros on a luxurious residence in Germany. The president can’t make such gestures. He occasionally visits a shelter or a food bank. He gave his income-equality speech at a community center in a blighted neighborhood not far from the White House. His ministering is largely confined to recalcitrant members of Congress who claim they might do something if only he would wine and dine them. Irrationally hated for something as mildly redistributionist as the health care law, he must tiptoe around poverty (he rarely says the word) or be labeled a Kenyan socialist, or be called a man with “Marxism coming out of his mouth,” as the pope was by Rush Limbaugh. The pope warned of the smug rich who blame the poor for their plight. “How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses two points?” he asked. Good thing the Vatican doesn’t get cable. The pope would have choked watching anchors dismiss the notion

of a boost in the minimum wage, as if protesting fastfood workers were asking for more welfare, not catching the early bus to stand on their feet eight hours doing unforgiving, repetitive labor. Where would a wage increase end? they asked on every channel, apparently all equipped with the same talking points. Why stop at $15? Why not go to $35, $100,000 an hour? The absurd is the last refuge of a pundit without an argument. While the well-off blame the working poor for remaining poor, they cut miles of slack to the 1 percent. At the end of October, the chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, had to pay another $13 billion in fines on top of billions for misdeeds such as the London Whale debacle. The thought that he should be fired or his outsized pay cut was treated as if you’d asked him to shine his own shoes. The pope begged for leaders who are disturbed by the “lives of the poor,” and Obama showed that he shared some of that outrage, shaming the House into extending unemployment insurance. It would be so satisfying to take Limbaugh, the editors at the American Spectator and National Review, the hosts of every financial news show and Sen. Ted Cruz to Dasani’s one-room home and ask if it would be Marxism to save her. We are a better country than the one that ignores her. Margaret Carlson is a Bloomberg View columnist.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SFCC, city in a lose-lose situation

W

A-11

ho runs the Santa Fe Community College — the president or the SFCC Governing Board? What is the reason President Ana “Cha” Guzmán was fired? The SFCC board used taxpayers’ money to recruit her and entrusted her to lead SFCC. What did President Guzmán uncover that caused her to be fired? In this community, we often see great efforts to recruit, but boards are quick to fire because of differences in personalities or management styles. Give President Guzmán the opportunity to do what she was hired to do. If she does leave SFCC, where will we find another president? Who will want to lead our SFCC if they are not allowed to lead?

Whether you like President Guzmán or not, taxpayers will pay greatly for these actions. Let us remember, this college is about educating our community, not watching a leader be taken down for no reason.

Lynette Montoya

Santa Fe

Enforcement frustration I had a pithy conversation with a stranger at the Edgewood post office today. In the end, we both agreed that, since current and past state laws are not being enforced, it is a waste of time for the Legislature to convene, and also a huge waste of

MAllARD FillMORE

Section editor: Inez Russell Gomez, 986-3053, igomez@sfnewmexican.com, Twitter @inezrussell

state money. Ergo, why bother? She averred that ego alone would cause them to gather. Tragic, but true. Really, though — there is simply no point. They do not fund enough for police to enforce anything. How frustrating that must be to the state police! Personally, I’ve just been informed, after four months, that the livestock inspector who told me a neighbor was in violation of state law has just told local animal control that he won’t pursue it. It took three state policemen to even take a report. Hey out there! No one cares! So, just stay home, legislators, and save us a bunch of bucks! Julia Wood

Edgewood

he notion of a powerful elite deciding what is best for all and then using psychological tricks to herd the populace along is somewhat alarming. But Great Britain, using the latest in behavioral health techniques, is making progress with intractable problems by applying psychology. It’s all, apparently, in the nudge. The nudge is how a government, a political campaign or a private group — anyone, really — can persuade people to behave in ways that benefit the government or the group. A recent New York Times story (“The Ministry of Nudges”) outlined how the nudge works. It can prod people into better outcomes with such subtlety that they might not even notice its influence. The notion of the nudge was made popular in the 2008 best-seller, Nudge, by Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. Great Britain is taking the notion further and putting it to the test with widespread experiments: “The goal is to see if small interventions that don’t cost much can change behavior in large ways that serve both individuals and society.” Prime Minister David Cameron has even set up a Behavioral Insights Team (the nudge unit) to make government work better. There is an element of Big Brother in this whole idea — the unseen hand manipulating individuals. But the nudge could encourage some behaviors that would benefit communities. For instance, even the most ardent libertarian might agree that the government has the right to collect taxes. But how can the government improve the tax-collection rate? A “nudge” unit could help. And collecting all the money owed to the government would mean more dollars for services without the need for a tax hike. Imagine, at a local level, bringing in 98 percent of taxes — or increasing the number of people who pay outstanding traffic tickets or fines. Using the nudge, it’s possible. Letters could be personalized to improve tax payments. Even text messages could help bring in more revenue. Experiments in Britain show that a personalized text message improves payment of court fines to more than 40 percent (up from 5 percent with a reminder letter). Such techniques are cheaper than taking miscreants to court. Nudges could help persuade scofflaws to return library books on time, saving money that would be spent on replacing lost books. Nudges, perhaps, could persuade Santa Fe’s notoriously bad recyclers to do better — and imagine a full-bore campaign encouraging people to stop littering. We could see “nudges” working in the public schools — targeted text messages and phone calls could be used to alert parents whose children miss too much school. Other successes in Britain involved helping people navigate unemployment systems, persuading people to insulate their attics (turns out, they needed to clean the attics first) and placing stickers in public urinals to encourage a better aim (savings in cleaning costs). This is smart governing — as long as bureaucrats don’t get carried away. But to improve tax collections? That’s a program we don’t need a nudge to get behind.

The past 100 years From The Santa Fe New Mexican: Dec. 16, 1913: EL PASO — Two hundred more foreigners, including 60 Americans, arrived here today on a special train from Chihuahua City, Mexico. Among them were French, German, Italian and Spanish people, who had been engaged in business in Mexico. They reiterated the stories told earlier by refugees that General Francisco Villa’s attitude toward them and his action in expelling Spaniards had created a desire among all foreigners to leave the country. They said that since the Spaniards left, the property taken from their stores had been auctioned and the proceeds placed in the rebel treasury. Dec. 16, 1963: PORTALES — Sam Sanders doesn’t want state museum or university archaeologists digging in his gravel pit for prehistoric bones and tools unless he is paid. At stake in this conflict between businessman and archaeologists is the preservation of evidence showing early man’s travels through 12,000 years in Eastern New Mexico. A spear point and flint knife were left among the bones of a prehistoric mammoth by Llano Man, who waited for his prey on the bank of an ice age pond in Blackwater Draw. Some 120 centuries later, someone was scratching in Sanders’ gravel pit and uncovered the hunter’s success.

DOONESBURy

BREAKING NEWS AT www.SANtAFENEwMExicAN.cOM


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

The weather

For current, detailed weather conditions in downtown Santa Fe, visit our online weather stations at www.santafenewmexican.com/weather/

7-day forecast for Santa Fe Today

Mostly sunny

Tonight

Mainly clear

Wednesday

Mild with plenty of sunshine

26

46

Tuesday

Thursday

Plenty of sunshine

49/28

Mostly sunny and breezy

52/28

Humidity (Noon) Humidity (Midnight) Humidity (Noon)

Friday

A couple of showers possible

50/27

Humidity (Noon)

Saturday

Humidity (Noon)

44/22

Humidity (Noon)

Sunday

Mostly sunny

Plenty of sunshine

44/23

46/17

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

41%

62%

43%

30%

34%

40%

45%

40%

wind: NNW 7-14 mph

wind: N 7-14 mph

wind: NNW 6-12 mph

wind: NW 7-14 mph

wind: W 10-20 mph

wind: W 4-8 mph

wind: NW 7-14 mph

wind: NNW 6-12 mph

Almanac

Santa Fe Airport through 6 p.m. Sunday Santa Fe Airport Temperatures High/low ......................................... 45°/22° Normal high/low ............................ 44°/19° Record high ............................... 62° in 2010 Record low .................................. 0° in 1945 Santa Fe Airport Precipitation 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................ 0.20”/12.59” Normal month/year to date ... 0.43”/13.16” Santa Fe Farmers Market 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................ 0.15”/12.20”

New Mexico weather 64

666

40

The following water statistics of December 12 are the most recent supplied by the City Water Division (in millions of gallons). Total water produced from: Canyon Water Treatment Plant: 1.163 Buckman Water Treatment Plant: 0.870 City Wells: 0.000 Buckman Wells: 2.504 Total water produced by water system: 4.537 Amount delivered to Las Campanas: Golf course: 0.000, domestic: 0.083 Santa Fe Canyon reservoir storage: 65.5 percent of capacity; daily inflow 2.26 million gallons. A partial list of the City of Santa Fe’s Comprehensive Water Conservation Requirements currently in effect: • Irrigation water leaving the intended area is not permitted. Wasting water is not allowed. • Using water to clean hard surfaces with a hose or power washer is prohibited. • Hoses used in manual car washing MUST be equipped with a positive shut-off nozzle. • Swimming pools and spas must be covered when not in use. For a complete list of requirements call: 955-4225 http://www.santafenm.gov/waterconservation

Santa Fe 46/26 Pecos 50/26

25

Albuquerque 51/31

25

87

56

412

Clayton 60/30

AccuWeather Flu Index

25

Las Vegas 54/29

Today.........................................1, Low Tuesday.....................................1, Low Wednesday...............................2, Low Thursday...................................2, Low Friday ........................................3, Low Saturday ...................................2, Low The AccuWeather Flu Index™ combines the effects of weather with a number of other known factors to provide a scale showing the overall probability of flu transmission and severity of symptoms. The AccuWeather Flu Index™ is based on a scale of 0-10.

54

40

40

285

Clovis 59/31

54

60 60

Sunday’s rating ................................... Good Today’s forecast ................................. Good 0-50, Good; 51-100, Moderate; 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200, Unhealthy; 201-300, Very Unhealthy, 301500, Hazardous Source: EPA

64

Taos 43/11

Española 51/31 Los Alamos 48/29 Gallup 43/17

Raton 58/22

64 84

60

25

Today’s UV index

54 285 380

180

Roswell 62/28

Ruidoso 56/38

25

70

Truth or Consequences 56/33 70

Las Cruces 56/33

54

70

70

380

380

Hobbs 63/32

285

Alamogordo 56/32

180 10

Water statistics

285

64

Farmington 41/20

Area rainfall

Albuquerque 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.26”/9.18” Las Vegas 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................ 0.21”/16.75” Los Alamos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................ 0.11”/12.08” Chama 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................ 0.22”/17.81” Taos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date ................ 0.07”/11.63”

Air quality index

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Carlsbad 61/32

0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High; 8-10, Very High; 11+, Extreme The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

285

10

State extremes

State cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Cimarron Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Crownpoint Deming Española Farmington Fort Sumner Gallup Grants Hobbs Las Cruces

Hi/Lo W 54/23 s 49/22 s 40/2 s 57/27 s 62/22 s 41/4 s 49/10 s 58/24 s 46/15 s 55/23 s 43/13 s 55/23 s 48/21 s 41/13 s 60/27 s 50/13 s 49/12 s 57/23 s 55/22 s

Hi/Lo W 56/32 s 51/31 s 45/14 s 62/32 s 61/32 s 44/9 s 55/21 s 60/30 s 52/23 s 59/31 s 44/18 s 58/28 s 51/31 s 41/20 s 63/29 s 43/17 s 50/20 s 63/32 s 56/33 s

Hi/Lo W 59/29 s 53/30 s 48/18 s 64/34 s 64/34 s 46/17 s 58/23 s 61/35 s 55/24 s 61/33 s 47/22 s 61/25 s 52/30 s 43/24 s 64/30 s 46/18 s 52/22 s 65/36 s 61/31 s

Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Las Vegas Lordsburg Los Alamos Los Lunas Portales Raton Red River Rio Rancho Roswell Ruidoso Santa Rosa Silver City Socorro Taos T or C Tucumcari University Park White Rock Zuni

Hi/Lo 50/24 56/28 42/20 49/26 57/27 52/15 38/5 49/21 57/22 46/28 56/30 50/25 51/23 41/5 50/24 59/20 56/28 46/19 47/14

W s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

Hi/Lo W 54/29 s 63/36 s 48/29 s 53/26 s 61/30 s 58/22 s 44/14 s 51/26 s 62/28 s 56/38 s 59/29 s 60/35 s 58/31 s 43/11 s 56/33 s 61/31 s 59/33 s 50/29 s 43/18 s

Hi/Lo W 56/34 s 66/36 s 52/32 s 54/25 s 62/33 s 60/25 s 47/13 s 53/27 s 63/26 s 59/40 s 62/34 s 62/30 s 59/29 s 46/12 s 59/31 s 63/33 s 62/37 s 52/31 s 47/19 s

Weather (w): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sfsnow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Weather for December 16

Last

New

First

Dec 17

Dec 25

Jan 1

Jan 7

The planets

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 20/12 53/36 46/32 53/28 8/2 34/21 38/23 61/59 55/39 23/11 30/28 27/23 61/26 58/25 25/19 -1/-7 47/21 79/66 58/32 22/19 43/16 62/38 80/44

W Hi/Lo W Hi/Lo W sn 5/-5 s 8/-4 s r 53/37 s 58/37 s pc 32/22 pc 42/30 sn pc 42/30 c 47/35 pc sn 36/16 c 26/12 pc pc 36/26 pc 38/26 pc i 26/11 pc 32/22 sn r 60/38 s 64/40 s pc 51/31 s 58/34 s sf 21/18 sn 34/17 pc c 33/27 sf 39/25 pc sf 23/22 sf 34/21 sn s 63/36 s 65/42 s pc 59/28 s 61/38 s sf 22/17 sf 33/17 sn sn -33/-40 s -21/-27 c s 48/23 s 50/22 s sh 81/67 sh 82/70 s s 64/38 s 68/45 s sn 29/24 sn 35/21 pc pc 46/29 pc 46/32 s s 65/44 pc 64/42 pc s 84/56 pc 78/52 pc

Set 4:21 p.m. 7:23 p.m. 12:45 p.m. 8:53 a.m. 2:49 p.m. 1:08 a.m.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

National cities City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Fairbanks Flagstaff Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Rise 6:39 a.m. 9:26 a.m. 12:39 a.m. 6:30 p.m. 4:14 a.m. 12:47 p.m.

Mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus

Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Richmond St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Sioux Falls Trenton Washington, DC

Hi/Lo 31/28 40/33 86/74 15/12 4/-1 51/44 40/22 62/27 73/70 43/31 71/45 31/28 45/39 54/38 37/22 34/9 65/31 75/47 60/40 53/47 13/3 40/26 51/37

W c pc pc pc pc r c s t pc s sf sh pc pc pc s pc pc r sn pc pc

Hi/Lo 41/32 54/38 75/63 20/18 27/19 60/39 28/22 65/33 67/46 31/22 75/50 23/22 48/31 41/29 39/31 37/17 66/37 75/54 65/45 48/35 33/19 28/17 34/27

W pc s sh sn sn s pc s s pc s pc pc pc pc s s pc pc c c pc pc

Hi/Lo 44/32 59/40 77/65 32/17 26/14 66/42 38/28 63/36 71/48 40/28 76/49 35/23 46/37 53/30 47/32 39/17 68/45 71/54 66/43 49/42 31/18 39/27 45/30

W pc s pc pc c s sn s s sn s sn c pc s pc s pc s r pc sn pc

World cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

National extremes

(For the 48 contiguous states) Sun. High: 88 .................... Lake Forest, CA Sun. Low: -32 ......... International Falls, MN

On Dec. 16, 1917, one of the worst ice jams occurred on the Ohio River between Warsaw, Ky., and Rising Sun, Ind. It lasted 58 days.

Weather trivia™

is the warmest it has been in Q: What Antarctica?

A: 59(F) at Vanda Station on Jan. 5, 1974

Weather history

Newsmakers WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Director James Cameron says he plans to make three sequels to his 2009 sci-fi blockbuster movie Avatar in New Zealand. Cameron made the announcement Monday with producer Jon Landau and New Zealand Prime Minister John Key. The films will be made by Lightstorm Entertainment and Twentieth Century Fox. Cameron says he plans to complete principal shooting on the three movies at one time, perhaps over a period of about nine months.

Tom Laughlin of ‘Billy Jack’ dead at age 82

Tom Laughlin

Hi/Lo 48/43 61/43 52/39 91/79 59/39 44/24 43/34 66/39 93/72 59/44 85/69 57/28 46/36 54/43 34/28 72/63 86/66 68/62 46/29 75/65

W Hi/Lo W c 52/40 sh pc 55/43 sh s 54/38 s pc 92/72 sh s 55/42 c s 42/22 pc pc 46/38 pc pc 72/50 pc s 100/72 pc pc 61/45 s pc 83/67 pc s 57/36 s sh 45/41 c r 45/34 pc pc 55/36 pc pc 70/58 t pc 76/67 sh r 61/54 r s 51/37 s pc 78/65 pc

Hi/Lo 43/37 52/42 57/39 84/66 56/42 35/16 46/35 69/52 99/73 60/44 84/67 61/32 44/37 45/43 50/31 70/58 75/66 59/50 51/37 77/65

W r pc s c c pc pc t pc c pc s r pc s pc pc r s pc

Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Prague Rio de Janeiro Rome Santiago Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Vancouver Vienna Zurich

Hi/Lo 59/46 54/46 59/30 71/51 10/7 19/13 75/47 52/40 39/33 81/72 57/45 82/55 30/10 88/75 41/37 75/66 50/39 50/43 48/28 34/28

W s r s pc c sn s pc s pc s s s r r sh s c pc pc

Hi/Lo 62/52 52/39 54/34 74/43 5/-9 27/23 79/49 53/41 48/36 81/65 57/41 90/55 34/21 90/75 43/36 78/64 52/39 46/39 45/35 54/36

W pc r s pc s c pc pc s sh s s pc r sh sh s c s s

Hi/Lo 59/50 46/39 50/34 74/44 10/0 34/30 78/49 48/41 44/31 79/63 59/41 90/54 39/25 89/75 39/32 82/63 52/41 45/38 44/30 49/33

W sh pc pc s sf c pc pc pc pc s s c sh pc s pc r s s

Friday talk shows

Three ‘Avatar’ sequels to be shot in New Zealand

James Cameron

City Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Bogota Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Ciudad Juarez Copenhagen Dublin Geneva Guatemala City Havana Hong Kong Jerusalem Lima

NEW YORK — Tom Laughlin, whose production, marketing and making of Billy Jack set a standard for breaking the rules on and off screen, has died. He was 82. Billy Jack was released in 1971 after a long struggle by Laughlin to gain control of the film. He wrote, directed and produced Billy Jack and starred as the ex-Green Beret who defends a progressive school against the racists of a conservative Western community. The Associated Press

3:00 p.m. KOAT The Ellen DeGeneres Show Colin Farrell; Kathryn Hahn; a disabled breakdancer; Kings of Leon perform; guest DJ tWitch. KRQE Dr. Phil KTFQ Laura KWBQ The Bill Cunningham Show Guest confront their fitness fanatic mates. KLUZ El Gordo y la Flaca KASY Jerry Springer A pair who met on a dating website want to meet, but they both have secrets to reveal. CNN The Situation Room FNC The Five MSNBC The Ed Show 4:00 p.m. KOAT The Dr. Oz Show KTEL Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste KASY The Steve Wilkos Show Tracy is desperate to prove to Kanecha that he is not gay and has never been intimate with a man. FNC Special Report With Bret Baier 5:00 p.m. KASA Steve Harvey KCHF The 700 Club

KASY Maury FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 6:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC The O’Reilly Factor 7:00 p.m. CNN Piers Morgan Live MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show 8:00 p.m. CNN AC 360 Later E! E! News FNC Hannity 9:00 p.m. KCHF The Connection With Skip Heitzig FNC The O’Reilly Factor TBS Conan 9:30 p.m. KCHF Life Today With James Robison James and Betty Robison. 10:00 p.m. KASA The Arsenio Hall Show KTEL Al Rojo Vivo CNN Piers Morgan Live MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show 10:30 p.m. TBS Conan 10:34 p.m. KOB The Tonight Show With Jay Leno Journalist Meredith Vieira; Jake Bugg performs. 10:35 p.m. KRQE Late Show With David

PETER O’TOOLE, 1932-2013

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ actor dies at age 81 By Gregory Katz

Sunrise today ............................... 7:07 a.m. Sunset tonight .............................. 4:53 p.m. Moonrise today ............................ 4:43 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 6:20 a.m. Sunrise Tuesday ........................... 7:08 a.m. Sunset Tuesday ............................ 4:53 p.m. Moonrise Tuesday ........................ 5:33 p.m. Moonset Tuesday ......................... 7:08 a.m. Sunrise Wednesday ...................... 7:08 a.m. Sunset Wednesday ....................... 4:54 p.m. Moonrise Wednesday ................... 6:25 p.m. Moonset Wednesday .................... 7:53 a.m. Full

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

The Associated Press

Sun and moon

Sun. High: 62 ................................ Carlsbad Sun. Low -2 ................................ Eagle Nest

Actor Peter O’Toole places his handprints in cement as he is honored April 11, 2011, during the TCM Classic Film Festival at Graumans Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles.

Letterman Actor Will Ferrell; the 2013 Heisman Trophy winner; Chris Cornell and Joy Williams perform. 11:00 p.m. KNME Charlie Rose KOAT Jimmy Kimmel Live CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC Hannity 11:30 p.m. KASA Dish Nation 11:37 p.m. KRQE The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson Sportscaster Joe Theismann. 12:00 a.m. CNN AC 360 Later E! Chelsea Lately FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 12:02 a.m. KOAT Nightline 12:06 a.m. KOB Late Night With Jimmy Fallon 12:30 a.m. E! E! News 1:00 a.m. KASY The Trisha Goddard Show CNN Piers Morgan Live FNC Red Eye 1:06 a.m. KOB Last Call With Carson Daly

LONDON — Known on the one hand for his starring role in Lawrence of Arabia, leading tribesmen in daring attacks across the desert wastes, and on the other for his headlong charges into drunken debauchery, Peter O’Toole was one of the most magnetic, charismatic and fun figures in British acting. O’Toole, who died Saturday at age 81 at the private Wellington Hospital in London after a long bout of illness, was nominated a record eight times for an Academy Award without taking home a single statue. He was fearsomely handsome, with burning blue eyes and a penchant for hard living that long outlived his decision to give up alcohol. Broadcaster Michael Parkinson told Sky News television it was hard to be too sad about his passing. “Peter didn’t leave much of life unlived, did he?” he said. A reformed — but unrepentant — hell-raiser, O’Toole long suffered from ill health. Always thin, he had grown wraithlike in later years, his famously handsome face eroded by years of outrageous drinking. But nothing diminished his flamboyant manner and candor. “If you can’t do something willingly and joyfully, then don’t do it,” he once said. “If you give up drinking, don’t go moaning about it; go back on the bottle. Do. As. Thou. Wilt.” O’Toole began his acting career as one of the most exciting young talents on the British stage. His 1955 Hamlet, at the Bristol Old Vic, was critically acclaimed. International stardom came in David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia. With only a few minor movie roles behind him, O’Toole was unknown to most moviegoers when they first saw him as T.E. Lawrence, the mythic British World War I soldier and scholar who led an Arab rebellion against the Turks. His sensitive portrayal of Lawrence’s complex character garnered O’Toole his first Oscar nomination, and the spectacularly photographed desert epic remains his best known role. O’Toole was tall, fair and strikingly handsome, and the image of his bright blue eyes peering out of an Arab headdress in Lean’s film was unforgettable. Playwright Noel Coward once said that if O’Toole had been any prettier, they would have had to call the movie Florence of Arabia. Prime Minister David Cameron said Sunday the movie was his favorite film, calling O’Toole’s performance “stunning.” In 1964’s Becket, O’Toole played King Henry II to Richard Burton’s Thomas Becket and won another Oscar nomination. Burton shared O’Toole’s fondness for drinking, and their offset carousing made headlines. O’Toole played Henry again in 1968 in The Lion in Winter, opposite Katharine Hepburn, for his third Oscar nomination. Four more nominations followed: in 1968 for Goodbye, Mr. Chips, in 1971 for The Ruling Class, in 1980 for The Stunt Man, and in 1982 for My Favorite Year. It was almost a quarter-century before he received his eighth and last, for Venus. Seamus Peter O’Toole was born Aug. 2, 1932, the son of Irish bookie Patrick “Spats” O’Toole and his wife, Constance. There is some question about whether Peter was born in Connemara, Ireland, or in Leeds, northern England, where he grew up, but he maintained close links to Ireland, even befriending the country’s now-president, Michael D. Higgins. Ireland and the world have “lost one of the giants of film and theater,” Higgins said in a statement.

TV

top picks

1

6:25 p.m. on ESPN NFL Football Two teams in the thick of playoff races in their respective conferences clash tonight at Ford Field in Detroit, where Matthew Stafford and the Lions welcome in Joe Flacco (pictured) and the Baltimore Ravens. In the midst of a career year, Stafford will face a Ravens pass defense that ranks among the NFL’s best. The same can’t be said for the Lions’ pass “D”, a No. 28-ranked unit that Flacco will certainly try to exploit. 7 p.m. on ABC Disney Prep & Landing Santa’s elves suffer job burnout, too. In this charming animated special, Dave Foley gives voice to Wayne, a member of the elite elf team that prepares for and oversees Santa’s arrival at children’s houses. He was hoping for a promotion; instead, he has to stay where he is and train an annoyingly overzealous new assistant (voice

2

of Derek Richardson). Of course, no Christmas special would be complete without a crisis and a lesson to be learned. 7 p.m. on CBS How I Met Your Mother Marshall (Jason Segel) finally hitchhikes his way to the Farhampton Inn, where he and the gang encounter a wedding guest who’s determined to stir up trouble among them. Andrew Rannells (The New Normal) guest stars in the new episode “Bass Player Wanted.” 7:30 p.m. on ABC Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice The yuletide adventures of Christmas elves Lanny and Wayne continue with this special. With the Big 2-5 fast approaching, Wayne and Lanny must race to recover classified North Pole technology that has fallen into the hands of a Naughty Kid. Desperate to prevent Christmas from descending into chaos, Wayne seeks out the foremost Naughty Kid expert to aid in the mission, a bombastic member of the Coal Elf Brigade who’s also his estranged brother, Noel. 8:30 p.m. on CBS Mom Bonnie (Allison Janney) has a new love interest: Chef Rudy (French Stewart), who happens to be Christy’s (Anna Faris) co-worker. So guess who is caught in the middle of this arrangement. Nate Corddry, Matt Jones, Sadie Calvano and Blake Garrett Rosenthal also star in the new episode “Corned Beef and Handcuffs.”

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

Scoreboard B-2 Prep schedule B-3 NFL B-4 Classifieds B-6 Time Out B-11 Comics B-12

SPORTS COLLEGE FOOTBALL

B

College basketball: No. 2 Syracuse beats St. John’s. Page B-3

DOLPHINS 24, PATRIOTS 20

Miami foils New England’s comeback bid 3rd straight win boosts Dolphins’ AFC chances By Steven Wine

The Associated Press

Texas coach Mack Brown calls for a timeout during a game against West Virginia in Austin, Texas, in 2012. Brown stepped down as head coach, the school announced Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

Brown set standards, but failed to meet them Texas head coach to step down Dec. 30 after Alamo Bowl vs. Oregon

MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — When Tom Brady’s day ended with an errant final pass, he hung his head, unsnapped his chin strap and looked up at the scoreboard, which summarized his frustrating afternoon. Dolphins 24, Patriots 20. A late drive and the Patriots’ latest

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady looks to pass the ball to running back LeGarrette Blount during the second half of Sunday’s game against the Dolphins in Miami Gardens, Fla. The Dolphins won 24-20.

comeback bid came up short Sunday, and they missed a chance to clinch their fifth consecutive AFC East title. Brady was intercepted in the end zone on fourth down with 2 seconds left by Dolphins newcomer Michael Thomas. That was the last in a series of squandered scoring chances for the Patriots (10-4), and a miffed Brady answered only two questions at his postgame news conference before ending the session. “We didn’t do a good job in the red

J PAT CARTER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Please see foiLs, Page B-4

NFL PACKERS 37, COWBOYS 36

flynn finishes Dallas

By Jim Vertuno

The Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — For a decade, Mack Brown and the Texas Longhorns won more games than almost any other program in the country. It was the inability to meet those lofty expectations over the past four years that pushed Brown to resign after 16 years, ending an era that included the national championship following the 2005 season. “The standard is really high here,” Brown said Sunday at a campus news conference to explain his decision. “We set a standard at this place. You’d better win all of them. I understand that. … The standard is really high here, and I’m proud of being part of setting that standard.” From 2000-09, Brown’s teams averaged more than 10 wins a season, captured two Big 12 titles, won a national title and played for another. But the program dipped sharply to 5-7 in 2010, Brown’s only losing season, and the Longhorns have lost

Please see BRown, Page B-3

HEISMAN TROPHY Green Bay quarterback Matt Flynn celebrates the game-winning touchdown against the Cowboys during the second half of Sunday’s game in Arlington, Texas. Flynn helped the Packers match their biggest comeback in franchise history with a 37-36 win over Dallas. TIM SHARP/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Backup QB leads Green Bay in second-half rally to stun Cowboys By Schuyler Dixon Jameis Winston

Johnny Manziel

Manziel passes torch to Winston By Ralph D. Russo The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Famous Jameis has replaced Johnny Football as the face of college football. Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston won the Heisman Trophy on Saturday night. Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel, last year’s winner, finished fifth in the voting and seemed to enjoy a relaxing trip to Manhattan, playing the role of supporting actor to Winston’s leading man. Manziel was the first freshman to win the Heisman, and it helped turn him into one of the biggest celebrities in sports. Not all the attention he got after winning the award was good. Winston is now the second freshman to win the Heisman. He has a chance to lead the top-ranked Seminoles to a national championship next month against No. 2 Auburn, though the entire story of his season has included an unsettling chapter. In many ways, Manziel has been where Winston is headed. “Life’s going to change,” Manziel said. “This is an extremely big deal.” Manziel basked in the spotlight

Please see toRcH, Page B-3

The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas f this was Matt Flynn’s last start in place of Aaron Rodgers, it was quite a memorable one. Flynn threw four touchdown passes in the second half, Eddie Lacy had the winning score on a 1-yard plunge after an interception by Tony Romo gave them one more chance, and the Green Bay Packers matched the biggest comeback in franchise history in a 37-36 win over the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday. Romo tossed two interceptions in the final three minutes, the first one

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giving Green Bay a chance for the go-ahead score with the Cowboys in position to run out the clock with a 36-31 lead. Lacy scored with 1:31 to go for Green Bay’s first lead since the first quarter and after the Packers trailed 26-3 at halftime. “It took me everything not to cry,” said Packers coach Mike McCarthy, whose team won its second straight without Rodgers after going winless in the first five, including the Chicago game when the star QB got hurt. “I’m just drained. Just the sheer emotion. It was incredible.” Playing on the same field where

Rodgers was the MVP when they won the 2011 Super Bowl, the Packers matched the 1982 team in a September game against the Los Angeles Rams for the largest rally. The Packers (7-6-1) kept their playoff hopes alive with Rodgers possibly returning next week. He was close to medical clearance, but he missed his sixth straight game with a broken collarbone. He was wearing a headset on Green Bay’s sideline. “Most guys would pack it in — ‘Guys, it’s not our season. Let’s go home and get ready for next year,’ ” said Green Bay cornerback Tramon Williams, who had an interception

overturned on review before a gameclinching pick that was ruled incomplete and reversed on replay. “It’s not that vibe here.” The vibe in Dallas could be negative for a while, with Dez Bryant walking off the field before the game ended and refusing to talk to reporters in the locker room, simply shaking his head at them after finishing with 153 yards and a touchdown. “This is one of the hardest losses that I’ve experienced,” Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said. “That’s a shame that we’ve lost that ballgame.” The Cowboys (7-7) blew a great

Please see finisHes, Page B-4

MEN’S COLLEGE SOCCER

Notre Dame tops Maryland to win 1st NCAA title Notre Dame players celebrate Sunday after defeating Maryland 2-1 during the championship game of the NCAA men’s soccer tournament at PPL Park in Chester, Pa. RICH SCHULTZ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sports information: James Barron, 986-3045, jbarron@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Carlos A. López, clopez@sfnewmexican.com

By Dave Zeitlin Associated Press

CHESTER, Pa. — Confetti rained down, the Notre Dame fight song “Victory March” blasted over the loudspeakers, and everyone on the Notre Dame 2 Fighting Irish’s Maryland 1 soccer team ran to one side of the field to celebrate. For the first time in the school’s proud athletic history, Notre Dame was on top of the men’s college soccer world. Led by goals from Andrew O’Malley and Leon Brown, and another big game from College Cup, co-Most Outstanding Player Harri-

son Shipp, Notre Dame won its first men’s soccer title with a 2-1 victory over Maryland on Sunday at PPL Park. The Fighting Irish finished the season 17-1-6. “We’re all smiling big smiles,” said 68-year-old coach Bobby Clark, who won his first title in 27 years coaching at Dartmouth, Stanford and Notre Dame. Patrick Mullins, the nation’s leading scorer, scored for Maryland (17-4-5). The Terrapins were trying to win their fourth national championship and third under coach Sasho Cirovski. “They are worthy winners, and I’m genuinely happy for Bobby for all

Please see titLe, Page B-3

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


B-2

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

thunder 101, Magic 98

BASKETBALL basketball

Nba eastern Conference

atlantic Boston Toronto Brooklyn New York Philadelphia southeast Miami Atlanta Charlotte Washington Orlando Central Indiana Detroit Chicago Cleveland Milwaukee

W 11 9 8 7 7 W 17 12 10 9 7 W 20 11 9 9 5

l 14 13 15 16 18 l 6 12 14 13 17 l 3 14 13 14 19

Pct .440 .409 .348 .304 .280 Pct .739 .500 .417 .409 .292 Pct .870 .440 .409 .391 .208

Western Conference

Gb — 1/2 2 3 4 Gb — 51/2 71/2 71/2 101/2 Gb — 10 101/2 11 151/2

southwest W l Pct Gb San Antonio 19 4 .826 — Houston 16 9 .640 4 Dallas 14 10 .583 51/2 New Orleans 11 11 .500 71/2 Memphis 10 13 .435 9 Northwest W l Pct Gb Portland 21 4 .840 — Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 1 Denver 14 9 .609 6 Minnesota 12 12 .500 81/2 Utah 6 20 .231 151/2 Pacific W l Pct Gb L.A. Clippers 16 9 .640 — Phoenix 14 9 .609 1 Golden State 13 12 .520 3 L.A. Lakers 11 12 .478 4 Sacramento 7 15 .318 71/2 sunday’s Games Sacramento 106, Houston 91 Minnesota 101, Memphis 93 Portland 111, Detroit 109, OT Oklahoma City 101, Orlando 98 Phoenix 106, Golden State 102 Denver 102, New Orleans 93 saturday’s Games L.A. Clippers 113, Washington 97 L.A. Lakers 88, Charlotte 85 Miami 114, Cleveland 107 New York 111, Atlanta 106 Toronto 99, Chicago 77 Portland 139, Philadelphia 105 Dallas 106, Milwaukee 93 San Antonio 100, Utah 84 Monday’s Games Detroit at Indiana, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Utah at Miami, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 5:30 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 6 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. tuesday’s Games Portland at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Charlotte, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Denver, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Golden State, 8:30 p.m.

Nba CaleNdar

Jan. 6 — 10-day contracts can be signed. Jan. 10 — Contracts guaranteed for rest of season. Feb. 14-16 — All-Star weekend, New Orleans. Feb. 20 — Trade deadline, 1 p.m. April 16 — Last day of regular season. April 19 — Playoffs begin. May 20 — Draft lottery. June 5 — NBA Finals begin.

Nba boxsCores sunday timberwolves 101, Grizzlies 93

MINNesota (101) Brewer 4-8 0-2 9, Love 11-21 4-4 30, Pekovic 6-12 7-8 19, Rubio 3-9 4-5 12, Martin 0-3 0-0 0, Cunningham 2-7 0-2 4, Shved 2-4 1-1 6, Barea 5-10 2-2 15, Mbah a Moute 1-2 1-1 3, Hummel 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 35-79 19-25 101. MeMPHIs (93) Prince 1-5 0-0 2, Randolph 7-19 6-8 20, Koufos 1-4 0-0 2, Conley 12-20 0-1 28, Allen 3-4 1-2 7, Miller 2-5 1-1 5, Leuer 7-13 0-0 15, Bayless 4-9 6-8 14, Davis 0-2 0-0 0, Calathes 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 37-83 14-20 93. Minnesota 28 28 21 24 —101 Memphis 17 29 27 20 —93 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 12-26 (Love 4-8, Barea 3-5, Rubio 2-3, Shved 1-2, Hummel 1-2, Brewer 1-4, Martin 0-2), Memphis 5-15 (Conley 4-8, Leuer 1-3, Bayless 0-2, Miller 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 49 (Brewer 12), Memphis 53 (Randolph 12). Assists—Minnesota 22 (Barea 5), Memphis 17 (Randolph 5). Total Fouls—Minnesota 17, Memphis 20. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Davis. A—15,417.

kings 106, rockets 91

HoUstoN (91) Parsons 7-15 5-6 19, Jones 1-3 0-2 2, Howard 4-7 5-13 13, Beverley 2-7 2-2 6, Harden 8-18 6-7 25, Smith 3-5 0-0 6, Casspi 1-5 1-2 4, Brooks 4-8 3-4 13, Garcia 1-6 0-0 3, Motiejunas 0-1 0-2 0, Brewer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-75 22-38 91. saCraMeNto (106) Gay 10-20 5-6 26, Thompson 4-7 1-2 9, Cousins 7-14 7-7 21, Thomas 7-12 4-5 19, McLemore 1-4 2-2 4, Williams 3-10 4-6 11, Outlaw 3-7 2-2 8, Acy 2-2 0-0 4, Fredette 1-2 0-0 2, Thornton 1-3 0-0 2, McCallum 0-0 0-0 0, Ndiaye 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-81 25-30 106. Houston 28 21 22 20—91 sacramento 28 29 24 25—106 3-Point Goals—Houston 7-27 (Harden 3-9, Brooks 2-4, Casspi 1-3, Garcia 1-5, Motiejunas 0-1, Parsons 0-2, Beverley 0-3), Sacramento 3-13 (Thomas 1-3, Williams 1-3, Gay 1-3, McLemore 0-2, Outlaw 0-2). Fouled Out—Smith. Rebounds—Houston 53 (Howard 10), Sacramento 54 (Cousins 10). Assists— Houston 15 (Parsons 5), Sacramento 17 (Thomas 8). Total Fouls—Houston 26, Sacramento 25. A—15,606.

trail blazers 111, Pistons 109 (ot)

PortlaNd (111) Batum 7-13 1-2 18, Aldridge 11-25 5-6 27, Lopez 5-8 2-2 12, Lillard 6-21 11-12 23, Matthews 5-13 3-4 14, Williams 3-10 0-0 8, Freeland 2-3 0-0 4, Wright 1-2 0-0 3, Robinson 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 41-99 22-26 111. detroIt (109) Smith 13-17 5-6 31, Monroe 7-14 3-4 17, Drummond 6-15 1-5 13, Jennings 6-16 2-3 15, Caldwell-Pope 1-5 2-3 5, Stuckey 7-18 3-4 17, Singler 2-3 0-0 5, Billups 2-6 2-2 6, Harrellson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-94 18-27 109. Portland 29 21 23 26 12—111 detroit 22 29 33 15 10—109 3-Point Goals—Portland 7-26 (Batum 3-7, Williams 2-5, Wright 1-2, Matthews 1-5, Lillard 0-7), Detroit 3-15 (Singler 1-2, Caldwell-Pope 1-2, Jennings 1-4, Stuckey 0-1, Drummond 0-1, Smith 0-2, Billups 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 61 (Lopez 13), Detroit 60 (Drummond 14). Assists—Portland 24 (Lillard 7), Detroit 19 (Jennings 10). Total Fouls— Portland 21, Detroit 22. Technicals— Portland defensive three second. A—13,003.

orlaNdo (98) Afflalo 9-20 5-5 25, Davis 4-11 3-5 11, Vucevic 6-9 1-2 13, Nelson 4-11 1-2 13, Oladipo 5-12 5-8 15, Harkless 3-5 0-0 7, Nicholson 1-3 0-0 2, Moore 1-2 0-0 2, Harris 3-8 2-4 8, O’Quinn 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-82 17-26 98. oklaHoMa CItY (101) Durant 11-18 4-5 28, Ibaka 2-6 0-0 4, Perkins 1-4 2-3 4, Westbrook 7-22 6-6 20, Sefolosha 3-8 0-0 6, Collison 1-3 0-0 2, J.Lamb 7-10 0-0 16, Adams 2-3 2-2 6, Jackson 4-10 2-2 10, Fisher 1-3 2-2 5. Totals 39-87 18-20 101. orlando 22 27 22 27—98 oklahoma City 28 28 27 18—101 3-Point Goals—Orlando 7-24 (Nelson 4-7, Afflalo 2-7, Harkless 1-2, Davis 0-1, Moore 0-1, Oladipo 0-3, Harris 0-3), Oklahoma City 5-19 (Durant 2-3, J.Lamb 2-3, Fisher 1-3, Jackson 0-2, Sefolosha 0-3, Westbrook 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 53 (Vucevic 16), Oklahoma City 51 (Westbrook 12). Assists—Orlando 19 (Nelson 8), Oklahoma City 23 (Westbrook 6). Total Fouls—Orlando 18, Oklahoma City 19. Technicals— Nelson, Perkins. A—18,203.

Nuggets 102, Pelicans 93

NeW orleaNs (93) Aminu 4-5 1-4 9, Anderson 10-21 4-4 26, Smith 4-10 0-0 8, Holiday 6-13 0-0 12, Gordon 4-11 1-1 10, D.Miller 0-0 0-0 0, Amundson 1-3 0-2 2, Rivers 5-9 5-7 17, Morrow 0-4 1-1 1, Roberts 3-9 0-0 8, Withey 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-85 12-19 93. deNVer (102) Chandler 7-14 3-4 19, Faried 5-9 2-2 12, Hickson 8-12 3-6 19, Lawson 4-9 3-4 12, Foye 2-9 2-2 7, Hamilton 1-8 0-0 2, Arthur 1-3 0-0 2, Mozgov 0-2 6-8 6, Robinson 5-10 2-2 14, A.Miller 4-9 0-0 9. Totals 37-85 21-28 102. New orleans 27 25 16 25—93 denver 24 28 23 27—102 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 7-24 (Roberts 2-3, Rivers 2-4, Anderson 2-7, Gordon 1-4, Holiday 0-3, Morrow 0-3), Denver 7-24 (Chandler 2-4, Robinson 2-5, A.Miller 1-2, Lawson 1-3, Foye 1-6, Hamilton 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 42 (Amundson 8), Denver 68 (Hickson 11). Assists—New Orleans 23 (Holiday 7), Denver 23 (Lawson 8). Total Fouls—New Orleans 23, Denver 24. Technicals—Denver defensive three second. A—15,111.

suns 106, Warriors 102

GoldeN state (102) Barnes 2-7 2-4 8, Lee 7-18 4-5 18, Bogut 4-6 1-6 9, Curry 8-17 10-11 30, Thompson 7-17 3-3 19, D.Green 2-4 0-0 5, Speights 2-6 0-0 5, Douglas 2-3 2-2 7, Bazemore 0-2 1-2 1. Totals 34-80 23-33 102. PHoeNIx (106) Tucker 2-7 2-2 7, Frye 7-12 1-2 20, Plumlee 2-6 2-2 6, Bledsoe 7-16 8-12 24, Dragic 6-11 5-8 21, Mark.Morris 3-9 1-2 7, G.Green 3-7 3-4 10, Goodwin 0-1 0-0 0, Marc.Morris 5-10 1-2 11. Totals 35-79 23-34 106. Golden state 27 26 27 22—102 Phoenix 33 26 22 25—106 3-Point Goals—Golden State 11-22 (Curry 4-7, Barnes 2-4, Thompson 2-4, D.Green 1-1, Douglas 1-2, Speights 1-2, Bazemore 0-2), Phoenix 13-27 (Frye 5-7, Dragic 4-4, Bledsoe 2-5, G.Green 1-3, Tucker 1-3, Goodwin 0-1, Mark.Morris 0-1, Marc.Morris 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 57 (Bogut 14), Phoenix 54 (Plumlee 10). Assists—Golden State 19 (Curry 7), Phoenix 17 (Bledsoe 8). Total Fouls—Golden State 25, Phoenix 24. A—14,393.

NCaa basketball Men’s top 25

sunday’s Games No. 2 Syracuse 68, St. John’s 63 No. 10 Villanova 73, La Salle 52 No. 24 Missouri 66, West. Michigan 60 saturday’s Games No. 1 Arizona 72, Michigan 70 No. 3 Ohio St. 79, North Dakota St. 62 No. 4 Wisconsin 86, E. Kentucky 61 No. 5 Michigan State 67, Oakland 63 No. 6 Louisville 79, West. Kentucky 63 No. 7 Oklahoma State 70, Louisiana Tech 55 No. 18 N. Carolina 82, No. 11 Kentucky 77 No. 12 Wichita State 70, Tennessee 61 No. 13 Kansas 80, New Mexico 63 No. 15 Oregon 71, Illinois 64 No. 20 Gonzaga 68, South Alabama 59 No. 22 UMass 80, Northern Illinois 54 Monday’s Game No. 8 Duke vs. Gardner-Webb, 5 p.m.

Men’s division I

sunday’s Games east Boston College 67, Philadelphia 50 Fairfield 64, Northeastern 60 Hartford 84, Sacred Heart 72 Hofstra 72, CCSU 67 Howard 64, Delaware St. 62, OT Norfolk St. 86, Boston U. 82, OT Quinnipiac 80, Vermont 67 Stony Brook 67, New Hampshire 48 Syracuse 68, St. John’s 63 Villanova 73, La Salle 52 south Bowling Green 67, Morehead St. 61 Drexel 72, Davidson 58 Manhattan 77, UNC Wilmington 72 Marist 69, Coll. of Charleston 62 N. Kentucky 87, Chattanooga 71 Tennessee St. 108, Fisk 85 UAB 84, Georgia Southern 62 UNC Asheville 73, SC-Upstate 63 Winthrop 80, Appalachian St. 72 southwest Stephen F. Austin 87, North Texas 53 TCU 57, Texas-Pan American 48 Tennessee Tech 79, Lamar 74 Texas Tech 79, Cent. Arkansas 57 Midwest DePaul 77, Chicago St. 70, OT Kansas St. 72, Troy 43 Miami (Ohio) 59, Wright St. 56 Missouri 66, W. Michigan 60 North Dakota 78, Presentation 32 Far West Cal St.-Fullerton 87, Texas Southern 80 Denver 64, Wyoming 61 Montana St. 72, Portland 69 Oregon St. 98, Md.-Eastern Shore 66 Seattle 66, Pacific Lutheran 38 UC Irvine 70, E. Washington 61 UC Santa Barbara 72, San Diego 61 Washington St. 78, Pepperdine 61 USC 63, CSU Bakersfield 59

NCaa Women’s top 25

sunday’s Games No. 5 Kentucky 73, East Tennessee State 56 No. 9 Baylor 100, Houston Baptist 57 No. 12 Penn State 66, No. 24 Texas A&M 58 No. 13 LSU 58, Arkansas-Little Rock 51 No. 16 Georgia 91, Kennesaw State 32 No. 18 Purdue 71, Kansas 68 No. 20 Oklahoma 105, Md.-Eastern Shore 46 No. 22 California 70, CSU Bakersfield 51 Monday’s Games No. 6 Stanford vs. New Mexico, 8 p.m. No. 15 N. Carolina vs. N. Orleans, 4:30 p.m. No. 23 Gonzaga vs. UC Riverside, 7 p.m. No. 25 Syracuse vs. Temple, 5 p.m.

NATIONAL SCOREBOARD Women’s division I

sunday’s Games east Boston College 65, New Hampshire 40 Drexel 53, Prairie View 45 Fordham 57, Illinois St. 32 James Madison 64, St. John’s 51 Northeastern 81, Maine 55 Penn St. 66, Texas A&M 58 Pittsburgh 63, Old Dominion 49 Princeton 84, Delaware 80, OT Quinnipiac 74, Albany (NY) 53 Rutgers 71, Sacred Heart 51 Toledo 64, St. Bonaventure 62 Vanderbilt 65, Hartford 56 Villanova 83, La Salle 47 southwest Baylor 100, Houston Baptist 57 LSU 58, UALR 51 Oklahoma 105, Md.-Eastern Shore 46 Stephen F. Austin 92, Grambling St. 55 TCU 73, Texas-Pan American 47 Texas 109, Sam Houston St. 48 Texas St. 70, Houston 63 UTEP 87, SE Louisiana 65 Midwest Butler 53, N. Kentucky 47 Cincinnati 64, Ohio St. 49 Dayton 87, Washington St. 76 E. Michigan 104, Detroit 96 Indiana 51, IUPUI 45 Kansas St. 73, UC Santa Barbara 64 Marquette 71, Milwaukee 52 Michigan St. 80, Oakland 62 Missouri St. 87, Lamar 60 Purdue 71, Kansas 68 S. Dakota St. 87, Cent. Michigan 82 UMKC 80, Texas Southern 79, OT Wichita St. 63, Green Bay 58 Wright St. 79, Xavier 54 Far West Arizona 65, Texas Tech 56 California 70, CS Bakersfield 51 Hawaii 81, Pacific 70 N. Colorado 75, North Texas 69 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 88, UC Davis 71 UCLA 56, San Diego St. 55 Washington 83, Montana St. 60 south Auburn 92, Florida A&M 55 Bethune-Cookman 57, Jacksonville 49 Furman 79, Coastal Carolina 72 Georgia 91, Kennesaw St. 32 Kentucky 73, ETSU 56 Miami 63, Coppin St. 58 Savannah St. 79, Longwood 55 Tennessee St. 92, Martin Methodist 61 VCU 76, Cleveland St. 75 Virginia Tech 65, SC-Upstate 61 W. Kentucky 83, Jackson St. 48

GolF GOLF

PGa toUr Franklin templeton shootout

sunday at tiburon Golf Club (Gold Course) Naples, Fla. Purse: $3 million Yardage: 7,271; Par: 72 Final Money winnings per player Harris English/Matt Kuchar, $385,000 64-60-58—182 R. Goosen/F. Jacobsen, $242,500 67-61-61—189 Ian Poulter/Lee Westwood, $145,000 70-61-59—190 C. DiMarco/Billy Horschel, $115,000 68-64-60—192 Sean O’Hair/Kenny Perry, $100,000 64-69-60—193 R. Sabbatini/Scott Verplank, $90,000 69-64-61—194 C. Howell III/Justin Leonard, $85,000 64-67-64—195 Jonas Blixt/Greg Norman, $80,000 72-63-62—197 Jerry Kelly/Steve Stricker, $80,000 71-65-61—197 Graham DeLaet/Mike Weir, $80,000 73-64-60—197 J. Dufner/Dustin Johnson, $75,000 68-69-61—198 M. Calcavecchia/C. Campbell,$72,500 72-66-63—201

Web.CoM toUr Qualifying

sunday la Quinta, Calif. Purse: $510,000 s-PGa West stadium Course; Yardage: 7,300; Par: 72 j-PGa West Jack Nicklaus Course; Yardage: 7,321; Par: 72 Fourth round (a-amatuer) Scott Pinckney 68j-67s-67s-65j—267 Jimmy Gunn 68j-70s-64s-66j—268 Steve Saunders 67s-65j-67s-70j—269 Andy Pope 68j-65s-72s-66j—271 Tony Finau 69s-67j-68s-68j—272 Max Homa 72s-64j-67s-69j—272 Zack Fischer 75s-67j-66s-65j—273 B. Burgoon 69s-68j-70s-66j—273 Carlos Ortiz 70j-66s-70s-67j—273 a-Michael Kim 68j-69s-66s-70j—273 Sung Joon Park 72s-68j-69s-65j—274 Brad Schneider 67j-69s-70s-68j—274 Jeff Gove 70s-68j-70s-67j—275 Cam Burke 67j-72s-67s-69j—275 Blayne Barber 67j-71s-67s-70j—275 Albin Choi 69s-71j-67s-69j—276 Derek Gillespie 71s-67j-72s-67j—277 Chris Parra 66s-68j-75s-68j—277 Chris Baker 70s-66j-71s-70j—277 Sam Saunders 68j-75s-70j-64s—277 Chris Epperson 65s-63j-76s-73j—277 Daniel Berger 71j-75s-63j-68s—277 Nick Taylor 69j-70s-72s-67j—278 Roberto Diaz 71s-68j-71s-68j—278 Steve Allan 72s-65j-75s-66j—278 Chase Wright 70j-69s-71s-68j—278 Carlos Sainz Jr 65j-72s-71s-70j—278 Si Woo Kim 73j-69s-71s-65j—278 Jeff Klauk 70s-68j-69s-71j—278 Ryan Armour 68j-69s-68s-73j—278 Nathan Tyler 66s-66j-71s-75j—278 Josh Broadaway 67j-70s-74s-68j—279 Manuel Villegas 70j-67s-72s-70j—279 Jason Millard 65j-71s-73s-70j—279 H. Varner, III 69s-70j-70s-70j—279 Joey McLister 71s-71j-72s-65j—279 Kevin Penner 75s-68j-67j-69s—279 Julian Etulain 73s-64j-73s-70j—280 Justin Shin 64j-74s-73s-69j—280 Roger Sloan 68j-70s-72s-70j—280 Justin Hueber 69s-69j-72s-70j—280 C. Clendenon 70j-70s-72s-68j—280 Matt Ryan 72s-68j-67s-73j—280 Brent Witcher 72s-65j-77s-66j—280 Matt Fast 69s-71j-66s-74j—280 Scott Hend 70s-73j-71s-66j—280 Tyler Weworski 71s-74j-68j-67s—280 R. Tambellini 72j-71s-68j-69s—280 Matt Hendrix 71j-69s-71s-70j—281 Jon Curran 70s-70j-70s-71j—281 Jonathan Fricke 65j-71s-75s-70j—281 J. F.-Valdes 72s-67j-71s-71j—281 Abraham Ancer 70j-69s-74s-68j—281 Colt Knost 69j-71s-73s-68j—281 Justin Lower 69j-77s-69j-66s—281 Sam Beach 68j-70s-76s-67j—281 Joe Panzeri 70j-73s-71s-67j—281 Jake Younan 77s-70j-66j-68s—281 Mark Hubbard 73s-70j-70j-68s—281 Jon. Randolph 73j-70s-69j-69s—281 Zach Fullerton 73s-70j-66j-72s—281 Sunny Kim 68j-73s-71s-70j—282 Kevin Johnson 68s-69j-76s-69j—282 Trevor Murphy 69j-74s-71j-68s—282 A. Echavarria 71s-69j-70s-73j—283 Jason Allred 72s-67j-72s-72j—283 Frank Adams 73j-68s-70s-72j—283 Devin Carrey 68j-71s-71s-73j—283 Neil Johnson 68j-72s-72s-71j—283 Brian Prouty 70j-69s-75s-69j—283 Brent Long 71s-73j-70j-69s—283

lightning 3, red Wings 0

HOCKEY HoCkeY

NHl eastern Conference

atlantic GP Boston 33 Montreal 35 Tampa Bay 33 Detroit 35 Toronto 34 Ottawa 34 Florida 34 Buffalo 33 Metro GP Pittsburgh 34 Washngtn 33 Carolina 34 N.Y. Rngrs 34 Columbus 33 Philadelphia 33 New Jersey 34 N.Y. Islandrs 34

W 22 20 19 15 17 13 12 7 W 23 18 14 16 14 14 13 9

l 9 12 11 11 14 15 17 23 l 10 12 13 17 15 15 15 19

ol 2 3 3 9 3 6 5 3 ol 1 3 7 1 4 4 6 6

Pts 46 43 41 39 37 32 29 17 Pts 47 39 35 33 32 32 32 24

GF Ga 92 70 88 75 90 80 89 94 97 99 96 111 78 109 55 96 GF Ga 105 74 105 97 79 94 76 91 85 92 76 91 78 85 83 118

Western Conference

Central GP W l ol Pts GF Ga Chicago 36 24 7 5 53 135 101 St. Louis 31 22 6 3 47 110 73 Colorado 31 21 9 1 43 88 73 Minnesota 35 19 11 5 43 81 81 Dallas 31 15 11 5 35 90 93 Nashville 33 16 14 3 35 77 92 Winnipeg 34 14 15 5 33 90 100 Pacific GP W l ol Pts GF Ga Anaheim 35 23 7 5 51 111 89 Los Angeles 34 22 8 4 48 94 68 San Jose 33 20 7 6 46 108 82 Vancouver 35 20 10 5 45 98 83 Phoenix 32 18 9 5 41 104 100 Calgary 33 13 15 5 31 86 106 Edmonton 35 11 21 3 25 93 120 Note: Two points are awarded for a win; one point for an overtime or shootout loss. sunday’s Games Washington 5, Philadelphia 4, SO N.Y. Rangers 4, Calgary 3, SO Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 0 Florida 2, Montreal 1 Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Anaheim 3, Edmonton 2 saturday’s Games Minnesota 2, Colorado 1, SO Calgary 2, Buffalo 1, OT Los Angeles 5, Ottawa 2 Dallas 6, Winnipeg 4 Toronto 7, Chicago 3 Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 1 New Jersey 3, Tampa Bay 0 Montreal 1, N.Y. Islanders 0, OT St. Louis 4, Columbus 3, OT Nashville 3, San Jose 2 Carolina 3, Phoenix 1 Vancouver 6, Boston 2 Monday’s Games Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Columbus, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m. tuesday’s Games Calgary at Boston, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

NHl CaleNdar

Dec. 19-27 — Holiday roster freeze. Dec. 24-26 — Holiday break. Dec. 26Jan. 5 — IIHF World Junior Championship, Malmo, Sweden. Jan. 1 — NHL Winter Classic: Toronto Maple Leafs vs. Detroit Red Wings at Michigan Stadium. Jan. 25 — NHL Stadium Series: Anaheim Ducks vs. Los Angeles Kings at Dodger Stadium. Jan. 26 — NHL Stadium Series: New York Rangers vs. New Jersey Devils at Yankee Stadium.

NHl sUMMarIes sunday rangers 4, Flames 3 (so)

Calgary 2 0 1 0—3 N.Y. rangers 1 1 1 0—4 N.Y. rangers won shootout 4-3 First Period—1, Calgary, Backlund 4 (Russell, Giordano), 7:28 (pp). 2, Calgary, Glencross 6 (Hudler), 15:00. 3, N.Y. Rangers, Stepan 6 (Nash, Girardi), 15:25. Penalties—B.Jones, Cal (illegal check to head minor), 1:54; Kreider, NYR (interference), 7:23; Giordano, Cal (holding), 12:27. second Period—4, N.Y. Rangers, Hagelin 6 (Pouliot, D.Moore), 7:29. Penalties—Bouma, Cal (roughing), 9:07; J.Moore, NYR (roughing), 9:07; Hagelin, NYR (interference), 9:50; McGrattan, Cal, major (fighting), 14:19; McIlrath, NYR, major (fighting), 14:19. third Period—5, Calgary, Monahan 10 (Glencross, Hudler), 4:44. 6, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 8 (Stepan, Boyle), 12:07. Penalties—McIlrath, NYR (highsticking), 9:48; Cammalleri, Cal (roughing), 16:04; Ramo, Cal, served by Stempniak (delay of game), 16:44; Kreider, NYR, double minor (highsticking), 18:04. overtime—None. Penalties—None. shootout—Calgary 3 (Colborne G, Hudler NG, Monahan NG, Stempniak G, Cammalleri NG, Byron G, Backlund NG), N.Y. Rangers 4 (Zuccarello G, Nash NG, Stepan NG, Richards G, Brassard NG, D.Moore G, Pouliot G). shots on Goal—Calgary 11-3-6-1—21. N.Y. Rangers 6-12-10-4—32. Power-play opportunities—Calgary 1 of 5; N.Y. Rangers 0 of 4. Goalies—Calgary, Ramo 6-5-2 (32 shots-29 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 10-14-1 (21-18). referees—Chris Rooney, Brad Watson. linesmen—David Brisebois, Greg Devorski. a—18,006. t—3:11.

ducks 3, oilers 2

edmonton 1 0 1—2 anaheim 1 1 1—3 First Period—1, Edmonton, NugentHopkins 8 (Hall, Eberle), 6:18. 2, Anaheim, Bonino 9 (Maroon, Palmieri), 11:22. Penalties—Joensuu, Edm (hooking), 3:24; Penner, Ana (delay of game), 16:09. second Period—3, Anaheim, Selanne 4 (Perreault, Beleskey), 15:24. Penalties—Beauchemin, Ana (holding), 1:26; Potter, Edm, served by Yakupov, major-game misconduct (check from behind), 5:40. third Period—4, Edmonton, Gagner 4 (Yakupov, Ference), 10:26. 5, Anaheim, Penner 10 (Getzlaf, Lindholm), 16:43. Penalties—None. shots on Goal—Edmonton 14-6-5—25. Anaheim 8-14-12—34. Power-play opportunities—Edmonton 0 of 2; Anaheim 0 of 2. Goalies—Edmonton, Bryzgalov 1-2-0 (34 shots-31 saves). Anaheim, Hiller 13-4-4 (25-23). referees—Mike Hasenfratz, Wes McCauley. linesmen—Don Henderson, John Grandt. a—16,301. t—2:26.

tampa bay 0 0 3—3 detroit 0 0 0—0 First Period—None. Penalties—None. second Period—None. Penalties—Johnson, TB (hooking), 2:05; Franzen, Det (unsportsmanlike conduct), 4:35; Detroit bench, served by Nyquist (too many men), 6:13; Johnson, TB (high-sticking), 6:51; Quincey, Det (tripping), 9:41. third Period—1, Tampa Bay, Johnson 8 (St. Louis, Palat), 3:13. 2, Tampa Bay, Brown 2 (Thompson), 9:16. 3, Tampa Bay, Killorn 7 (Filppula, Brewer), 18:45 (en). Penalties—Palat, TB (hooking), 12:17. shots on Goal—Tampa Bay 10-313—26. Detroit 6-13-9—28. Power-play opportunities—Tampa Bay 0 of 3; Detroit 0 of 3. Goalies—Tampa Bay, Bishop 17-5-2 (28 shots-28 saves). Detroit, Mrazek 1-1-0 (26-24). a—20,066. t—2:23.

Capitals 5, Flyers 4 (so)

Philadelphia 1 1 2 0—4 Washington 1 0 3 0—5 Washington won shootout 2-1 First Period—1, Washington, Johansson 4 (Ovechkin, Backstrom), 11:17 (pp). 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 7 (Raffl, Coburn), 19:06. Penalties—Giroux, Phi (face-off violation), 1:37; Raffl, Phi (slashing), 10:29; Chimera, Was (elbowing), 11:43. second Period—3, Philadelphia, Streit 2 (Raffl), 7:37. Penalties—Oleksy, Was (hooking), 2:45; Rinaldo, Phi, major (fighting), 6:21; Latta, Was, major (fighting), 6:21; Ovechkin, Was (interference), 8:48; Chimera, Was (interference), 19:15; Hartnell, Phi (hooking), 19:41. third Period—4, Philadelphia, Couturier 6 (Read, Downie), 2:18. 5, Philadelphia, Voracek 6 (Raffl, Giroux), 3:32. 6, Washington, Green 2 (Backstrom, Johansson), 11:20. 7, Washington, Orlov 1 (Fehr, Ward), 16:29. 8, Washington, Ovechkin 27 (Ward), 19:12. Penalties—Simmonds, Phi, major (fighting), 2:05; Oleksy, Was, major (fighting), 2:05; Read, Phi (highsticking), 6:42; Streit, Phi (delay of game), 11:42. overtime—None. Penalties—None. shootout—Philadelphia 1 (Read NG, Giroux G, Couturier NG), Washington 2 (Fehr G, Ovechkin NG, Backstrom G). shots on Goal—Philadelphia 8-9-83—28. Washington 7-7-16-3—33. Power-play opportunities—Philadelphia 0 of 4; Washington 1 of 5. Goalies—Philadelphia, Mason 11-9-4 (33 shots-29 saves). Washington, Grubauer 3-0-1 (28-24). a—18,506. t—2:50.

Panthers 2, Canadiens 1

Florida 0 2 0—2 Montreal 0 0 1—1 First Period—None. Penalties—Desharnais, Mon (holding), 3:55; Kopecky, Fla (roughing), 5:59. second Period—1, Florida, Winchester 5 (Kopecky, Goc), 4:44. 2, Florida, Bjugstad 6 (Fleischmann, Upshall), 7:11. Penalties—None. third Period—3, Montreal, Galchenyuk 10 (Gionta, Subban), 2:28 (pp). Penalties—Bergenheim, Fla (interference), 1:12; White, Mon (tripping), 3:59; Weaver, Fla (charging), 12:38; Upshall, Fla (cross-checking), 14:03. shots on Goal—Florida 14-6-5—25. Montreal 8-4-6—18. Power-play opportunities—Florida 0 of 2; Montreal 1 of 4. Goalies—Florida, Clemmensen 2-2-1 (18 shots-17 saves). Montreal, Budaj 5-2-1 (25-23). referees—Ghislain Hebert, Brian Pochmara. linesmen—Scott Cherrey, Michel Cormier. a—21,273. t—2:26.

blackhawks 3, kings 1

los angeles 0 0 1—1 Chicago 3 0 0—3 First Period—1, Chicago, Hossa 14 (Toews, Hjalmarsson), 5:45 (sh). 2, Chicago, Versteeg 6 (Kane, Seabrook), 9:59. 3, Chicago, Sharp 16 (Toews, Keith), 19:31 (pp). Penalties—Clifford, LA (tripping), 1:09; Oduya, Chi (tripping), 5:09; Stoll, LA (cross-checking), 19:18. second Period—None. Penalties—Martinez, LA (delay of game), 17:14. third Period—4, Los Angeles, Martinez 2 (Greene, Nolan), 16:06. Penalties—Kruger, Chi (tripping), 8:50; Shaw, Chi (unsportsmanlike conduct), 16:25. shots on Goal—Los Angeles 6-106—22. Chicago 10-15-15—40. Power-play opportunities—Los Angeles 0 of 3; Chicago 1 of 3. Goalies—Los Angeles, Scrivens 7-3-4 (40 shots-37 saves). Chicago, Raanta 6-1-1 (22-21). a—21,426. t—2:22.

aHl eastern Conference

atlantic GP Manchstr 29 St. John’s 29 Providnce 27 Portland 24 Worcester 22 east GP WB-Scrntn 26 Binghmtn 26 Norfolk 27 Syracuse 25 Hershey 24 Northeast GP Sprngfield 25 Albany 26 Adirondck 25 Bridgeprt 27 Hartford 26

W 19 15 14 10 10 W 16 14 13 12 10 W 18 17 12 10 9

l 5 11 9 9 10 l 7 9 9 10 9 l 4 7 11 13 14

ol 1 1 1 1 1 ol 1 0 1 1 2 ol 1 1 0 1 0

sl Pts GFGa 4 43 90 73 2 33 87 76 3 32 95 89 4 25 67 75 1 22 53 64 sl Pts GFGa 2 35 81 64 3 31 91 82 4 31 73 73 2 27 64 70 3 25 77 77 sl Pts GFGa 2 39 81 60 1 36 86 66 2 26 60 63 3 24 69 91 3 21 63 87

Western Conference

Midwest GP W l ol sl Pts GFGa Gr. Rapids 26 19 5 1 1 40 10059 Rockford 29 15 12 2 0 32 86100 Milwaukee 24 12 7 4 1 29 62 66 Chicago 26 12 12 0 2 26 72 73 Iowa 24 10 13 1 0 21 57 68 North GP W l ol sl Pts GFGa Toronto 24 14 9 1 0 29 68 60 Rochester 27 12 11 2 2 28 81 87 Lake Erie 26 12 11 0 3 27 72 82 Hamilton 27 12 12 0 3 27 69 77 Utica 25 8 15 1 1 18 56 78 West GP W l ol sl Pts GFGa Abbotsfrd 29 20 7 1 1 42 10080 Texas 28 16 8 2 2 36 96 78 Okla. City 29 10 14 0 5 25 78 94 S. Antonio 28 11 15 0 2 24 74 85 Charlotte 26 11 14 0 1 23 69 80 Note: Two points are awarded for a win; one point for an overtime or shootout loss. sunday’s Games Utica 3, Lake Erie 2, SO Manchester 3, Bridgeport 1 Toronto 3, St. John’s 2 Charlotte 4, Norfolk 3, OT Texas 5, San Antonio 2 Iowa 3, Rockford 1 Monday’s Games No games scheduled.

COLLEGE Football

NCaa Football FCs Playoffs

Quarterfinals saturday’s Games North Dakota State 48, Coastal Carolina 14 E. Washington 35, Jacksonville St. 24 New Hampshire 20, Southeastern Louisiana 17 Friday’s Game Towson 49, Eastern Illinois 39 semifinals Friday, dec. 20 New Hampshire (10-4) at North Dakota State (13-0), 6 p.m. saturday, dec. 21 Towson (12-2) at Eastern Washington (12-2), Noon Championship saturday, Jan. 4 at FC dallas stadium, Frisco, texas TBD, Noon

NaIa Playoffs

Championship saturday, dec. 21 at barron stadium, rome, Ga. Cumberlands (Ky.) vs. Grand View (13-0), 2:30 p.m.

division II Playoffs

semifinals saturday’s Games Lenoir-Rhyne 42, West Chester 14 Northwest Missouri State 27, Grand Valley State 13 Championship saturday, dec. 21 at braly Municipal stadium Florence, ala. Lenoir-Rhyne (13-1) vs. Northwest Missouri State (14-0), 10 a.m.

division III Playoffs

semifinals saturday’s Games Mount Union 41, North Central (Ill.) 40 Wisconsin-Whitewater 16, Mary Hardin-Baylor 15 amos alonzo stagg bowl Friday, dec. 20 at salem stadium salem, Va. Mount Union (14-0) vs. WisconsinWhitewater (14-0), 5 p.m.

Fbs bowls

saturday, dec. 21 New Mexico bowl at albuquerque Washington State (6-6) vs. Colorado State (7-6), Noon (ESPN) las Vegas bowl Fresno State (11-1) vs. Southern Cal (9-4), 1:30 p.m. (ABC) Famous Idaho Potato bowl at boise, Idaho Buffalo (8-4) vs. San Diego State (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) New orleans bowl Tulane (7-5) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, dec. 23 beef ’o’ brady’s bowl at st. Petersburg, Fla. Ohio (7-5) vs. East Carolina (9-3), Noon (ESPN) tuesday, dec. 24 Hawaii bowl at Honolulu Oregon State (6-6) vs. Boise State (8-4), 6 p.m. (ESPN) thursday, dec. 26 little Caesars Pizza bowl at detroit Bowling Green (10-3) vs. Pittsburgh (6-6), 4 p.m. (ESPN) Poinsettia bowl at san diego Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Utah State (8-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, dec. 27 Military bowl at annapolis, Md. Marshall (9-4) vs. Maryland (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) texas bowl at Houston Minnesota (8-4) vs. Syracuse (6-6), 4 p.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger bowl at san Francisco BYU (8-4) vs. Washington (8-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) saturday, dec. 28 Pinstripe bowl at New York Notre Dame (8-4) vs. Rutgers (6-6), 10 a.m. (ESPN) belk bowl at Charlotte, N.C. Cincinnati (9-3) vs. North Carolina (6-6), 1:20 p.m. (ESPN) russell athletic bowl at orlando, Fla. Miami (9-3) vs. Louisville (11-1), 4:45 p.m. (ESPN) buffalo Wild Wings bowl at tempe, ariz. Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5), 8:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, dec. 30 armed Forces bowl at Fort Worth, texas Middle Tennessee (8-4) vs. Navy (7-4), 9:45 a.m. (ESPN) Music City bowl at Nashville, tenn. Mississippi (7-5) vs. Georgia Tech (7-5), 1:15 p.m. (ESPN) alamo bowl at san antonio Oregon (10-2) vs. Texas (8-4), 4:45 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday bowl at san diego Arizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 8:15 p.m. (ESPN) tuesday, dec. 31 advoCare V100 bowl at shreveport, la. Arizona (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN) sun bowl at el Paso, texas Virginia Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), Noon (CBS) liberty bowl at Memphis, tenn. Rice (9-3) vs. Mississippi State (6-6), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-a bowl at atlanta Texas A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 1 Heart of dallas bowl at dallas UNLV (7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4), 10 a.m. (ESPNU) Gator bowl at Jacksonville, Fla. Nebraska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4), 10 a.m. (ESPN2) Capital one bowl at orlando, Fla. Wisconsin (9-3) vs. South Carolina (10-2), 11 a.m. (ABC) outback bowl at tampa, Fla. Iowa (8-4) vs. LSU (9-3), 11 a.m. (ESPN) rose bowl at Pasadena, Calif. Stanford (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta bowl at Glendale, ariz. Baylor (11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) thursday, Jan. 2 sugar bowl at New orleans Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 3 orange bowl at Miami Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Cotton bowl at arlington, texas Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 5:30 p.m. (FOX) saturday, Jan. 4 bbVa Compass bowl at birmingham, ala. Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 11 a.m. (ESPN) sunday, Jan. 5 Godaddy.com bowl at Mobile, ala. Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 6 bCs National Championship at Pasadena, Calif. Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)


SPORTS MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-3

Northern New Mexico

No. 2 Syracuse beats St. John’s SCOREBOARD By Jim O’Connell

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — St. John’s coach Steve Lavin kept referring to two parts of the Red Storm’s 68-63 loss to No. 2 Syracuse on Sunday. There was the first half. “With the great energy in the building and the fans in a true rivalry, this is as good Syracuse 68 as it gets, and someSt. John’s 63 how we came out tentative, kind of on our heels,” Lavin said of the first 20 minutes that ended with Syracuse leading 39-27. Then there were the final four minutes, after the Red Storm had not just tied the game but taken the lead three times. “I thought for the first 16 minutes of the second half, we played the best basketball we played this year,” Lavin said. “In that final four-minute stretch, we had untimely turnovers, a flurry of missed free throws. We didn’t get stops. On our home court, and we had the lead. I expected to win.”

C.J. Fair and freshman guard Tyler Ennis both scored 21 points for the Orange. Fair hit three big shots from the same spot — about 15 feet from the basket on the right baseline. The smooth left-handed shooter tied the game from there at 58 with 6:51 to go, then he made two more in the final 3 minutes as the Orange (10-0) were able to open a lead as big as seven points. “We went to C.J., and he made a couple of tough plays. Shots that had to be made,” Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim said. Fair smiled as he said, “I guess that’s what you say is my sweet spot.” Since 1979, this had always been a Big East Conference game. Syracuse is now a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference, and St. John’s remained in the Big East. The majority of the crowd of 16,357 was rooting for Syracuse, something they used to get to do during the Big East tournament. Now, it will be a rare visit to Madison Square Garden for the Orange. “It was a great game at the Garden,” Boeheim said.

Ennis had 15 points in the first half as Syracuse took a 39-27 lead. The Red Storm (6-3) chipped away and were able to tie it at 53 on three free throws by Rysheed Jordan with 9:16 to go. There were then four lead changes and three ties as Syracuse became the second highly ranked team to escape this weekend. No. 1 Arizona beat Michigan 72-70 on Saturday. D’Angelo Harrison led St. John’s with 21 points on 6-of-19 shooting, including 1 of 5 from 3-point range. Jordan had a careerhigh 13 points for the Red Storm and JaKarr Sampson added 12. It was the Orange’s ninth straight win in the series that Syracuse leads 51-37. The Red Storm missed their first 10 attempts from 3-point range and were 1 of 15 overall. They were coming off a 104-58 victory over Fordham in which they shot 60 percent on 3s. “The last four minutes of a game is where Syracuse separates itself,” Lavin said.

Local results and schedules ON THE AIR

Today on TV Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. All times local. NFL 6:25 p.m. on ESPN — Baltimore at Detroit

PREP SCHEDULE This week’s varsity schedule for Northern New Mexico high schools. For additions or changes, call 986-3060 or email sports@sfnewmexican.com.

Today Girls basketball — Santa Fe High at Piedra Vista, 7 p.m.

Tuesday Boys basketball — St. Michael’s at Bernalillo, 7 p.m. Pecos JV at Tierra Encantada (at Santa Fe Boys & Girls Clubs), 5:30 p.m. McCurdy at Questa, 7 p.m. Girls basketball — Pecos JV at Tierra Encantada (at Santa Fe Boys & Girls Club), 4 p.m. Santa Fe Indian School at Taos, 7 p.m. West Las Vegas at Española Valley, 7 p.m. Penasco at McCurdy, 7 p.m.

Wednesday Boys basketball — Capital at Grants, 7 p.m.

Brown: Coach to stay on as consultant Continued from Page B-1 at least four games for four consecutive years. Brown said he knew that wasn’t good enough. It was time to find a new coach to guide the Longhorns back among the national elite and heal a fractured fan base that had grown impatient. His final game will be the Dec. 30 Alamo Bowl against Oregon. Brown was under contract until 2020 with a salary at more than $5 million per year. He will stay on as a special consultant to President Bill Powers, a role that his current contract stipulates would pay him up to $500,000. Details of any further compensation for Brown were not immediately available. Texas had expected a return to championship form this season, but a 1-2 start ignited months of speculation that Brown would retire or be forced out. Texas rallied

with six straight wins, then dropped two of its last three games. A chance to win the Big 12 title was lost to Baylor in the finale. Brown met with Powers and athletic director Steve Patterson on Friday to discuss his future. Brown said both told him he could stay, but after sleeping on it Friday night and talking it over with his wife, he decided it was the right time to resign. “I felt like I could stay,” Brown said. “I really felt like it wasn’t best for the university to stay.” Powers said he was not pressured by the school’s board of regents to help push Brown out of the job. “I was not given any direction at all from any regent,” Powers said. “This is the transition of one of the great football coaches in the country.” Brown said he hoped he would be remembered for “bringing joy to Texas” and doing it with integrity. Asked if he

had any regrets, Brown said the only ones were the death of player Cole Pittman in 2001 and the 1999 accident with the Texas A&M bonfire that killed 12. The search to replace Brown begins almost immediately, but Powers and Patterson gave few hints as to who may be on a list of potential candidates. Patterson, barely a month on the job after being hired from Arizona State, must find a coach who can handle the pressure of being the face of the wealthiest athletic program in the country. “And you’ve got to win. You’ve got to win big,” Patterson said. “We’ll find the best football coach we can.” Patterson gave no timeline for a hiring a coach and said he’d meet with Powers to establish the criteria for the job search. Powers insisted Patterson would be in charge of the search and “will hire the next coach.”

Thursday Boys basketball — Ben Luján Tournament at Pojoaque Valley, quarterfinals: Socorro vs. Raton, 11:30 a.m.; Peñasco vs. Laguna-Acoma, 2:30 p.m.; Santa Fe Indian School vs. Mesa Vista, 5:30 p.m.; Monte del Sol at Pojoaque Valley, 7 p.m. Springer at Mora, 7 p.m. Clayton at West Las Vegas, 7 p.m. Taos at Shiprock Round Robin, pairings TBA Girls basketball — Ben Luján Tournament at Pojoaque Valley, quarterfinals: Taos vs. Grants, 10 a.m.; Socorro vs. St. Michael’s, 1 p.m.; Tularosa vs. Santa Fe Indian School, 4 p.m.; Mesa Vista at Pojoaque Valley, 8:30 p.m. Questa at McCurdy, 5:30 p.m. Mora at Springer, 7 p.m. West Las Vegas at Bernalillo, 7 p.m.

Friday Boys basketball — Ben Luján Tournament at Pojoaque Valley, semifinals: Socorro-Raton winner vs. Peñasco-Laguna winner, 5:30 p.m.; Santa Fe Indian School-Mesa Vista winner vs. Monte del Sol-Pojoaque Valley winner, 7 p.m.; Consolation: Socorro-Raton loser vs. Peñbasco-Laguna loser, 10 a.m.; Santa Fe Indian School-Mesa Vista loser vs. Monte del Sol-Pojoaque Valley loser, 11:30 a.m. Santa Fe High at St. Michael’s, 7 p.m. Española Valley at Las Vegas Robertson, 7 p.m. Pecos at Estancia, 7 p.m. Santa Rosa at Mora, 7 p.m. Dulce at McCurdy, 7 p.m. Taos at Shiprock Round Robin, pairings TBA Girls basketball — Ben Luján Tournament at Pojoaque Valley, semifinals: TaosGrants winner vs. Tularosa-Santa Fe Indian School winner, 4 p.m.; Socorro-St. Michael’s winner vs. Mesa Vista-Pojoaque Valley winner, 8:30 p.m.; Consolation bracket: Taos-Grants loser vs. Tularosa-Santa Fe Indian School loser, 1 p.m.; Socorro-St. Michael’s loser vs. Mesa Vista-Pojoaque Valley loser, 2:30 p.m. Pecos at Estancia, 5:30 p.m. Las Vegas Robertson at Portales, 5:30 p.m. Piedra Vista at Los Alamos, 6 p.m. Dulce at Questa, 7 p.m.

Saturday

Torch: Winston says he needs to grow up Continued from Page B-1 after winning the Heisman and decided to live loud and large. His road trips made headlines. His tweets were analyzed. He got tossed from a frat party and overslept a meeting at the Manning Passing Academy. Real potential trouble came when the NCAA looked into whether he signed autographs for money. He got off with a half-game suspension. “There’s a lot of scrutiny if you don’t walk a fine line,” he said. “I was a little bit uncharacteristic, a little bit out of the box, and I caught some flak for it. Figured it out a little bit as the year went on and continued to live my life and learn as I went along. It was tough, but I had to do it.” Manziel’s missteps seem quaint considering the allegations that Winston was facing. Last month, a 1-year-old sexual assault complaint against him became public, and the Tallahassee Police gave the dormant case to the state attorney’s office for a full investigation. A female Florida State student claimed

Winston raped her. Winston’s lawyer said the sex was consensual. The state attorney determined there was not enough evidence to charge Winston, announcing that decision four days before Heisman votes were due. Winston says he felt vindicated, but also acknowledged needing to grow up some. “One thing that coach [Jimbo] Fisher has always told me, especially through this process: ‘For you to be a man, the kid in you must die,’ ” Winston said before winning the Heisman on Saturday. “I believe that kid in me has died. I’m always going to have my personality. I’m always going to have my character. But I have to become a man.” Manziel said he was impressed with the way Winston handled his business on the field while dealing with problems away from it. “I had to go through controversy, and I had to go through some things,” Manziel said. “To see him at such a young age, to put his head down and to focus on his teammates and where they are and where

they’re headed … I do give him a lot of credit for that with all the scrutiny he’s under. I feel like he’s done a tremendous job of focusing on his team and on his family and what matters most.” Manziel, a third-year junior, can declare for the NFL draft after this season. What could be his last game will be New Year’s Eve against Duke in the Chick-fil-A Bowl. In his Heisman follow-up season, Manziel’s passing stats improved as he stayed in the pocket more often. Both his completion percentage (69.1) and yards per attempts (9.5) went up. If he does go pro — and it’d be an upset if he didn’t — he’ll again be the center of attention as one of the most scrutinized players in the draft. The college game will belong to Winston, and Manziel said he should embrace his newfound fame. “Live it up. Enjoy it,” Manziel said. “Continue to be yourself and don’t let anybody change from that. You’re going to have to adapt to how life is going to be after this.”

Title: Senior O’Malley scores winning goal Continued from Page B-1 he’s done for college soccer,” Cirovski said. “I hope he enjoys this one. At Maryland, we shoot for the stars every year. We aim high. And when you aim that high and when you don’t reach it, you still end up at the moon, which is higher than most people.” Shipp, a finalist for the MAC Hermann Trophy as the nation’s best player, set up O’Malley’s winning goal with a perfectly placed free kick in the 60th minute. O’Malley leaped for Shipp’s kick and directed a header past goalkeeper Zack Steffen’s outstretched arms. Coming into Sunday’s title game, O’Malley, a senior defender, had scored just twice in his collegiate career — and, according to Clark, he missed a couple of chances throughout the season. But he didn’t miss when it counted. “The goal itself was really put on a silver platter for me,” O’Malley said. “It would have been tough for me to screw it up, I suppose. Harry just played a beautiful ball, and all I needed to do was redirect it to the back post.” O’Malley, from nearby West Chester, said it was extra special to score the championship-deciding goal in front of many of his family and friends, who made the short commute to watch him play at PPL Park.

“I kind of jokingly said after the game — but I’m a little bit serious —that people think I’m good now,” O’Malley said. “So, hopefully, I’ll just ride that.” Brown tied it at 1 in the 40th minute with a tough-angle shot. He entered the game as a reserve when Vince Cicciarelli was forced to leave when he broke his collarbone in the 10th minute. Luke Mishu and Nick Besler were both credited with assists after Besler flicked on a long Mishu throw-in right to the foot of Brown, who slid a tough-angle shot past Steffen. Mullins, Maryland’s own Hermann Trophy finalist, opened the scoring for the Terrapins in the 35th minute. Moments earlier, Mullins thought a penalty kick was warranted when a volley from Alex Shinksy from cleared off the goal line by what looked to be the arm of Notre Dame’s Patrick Hodan. But Hodan was not called for the hand ball and then Mullins used his own hand to bring the ball down and deposit a shot past goalkeeper Patrick Wall. “In the heat of the moment, I hit it down with my hand and, like any good forward, I hit it in the net,” Mullins said. “That’s not who I am and I’m very disappointed in how that play resulted. … I will regret that one for the rest of my life.” Mullins, who shared College Cup Most

Outstanding Player honors with Shipp, had 19 goals this season and finished his college career with 47, second in program history. But for Cirovski, it was the character Mullins displayed in admitting to an intentional hand ball that shows what MLS teams will be getting when the Maryland senior is likely selected as one of the top picks in next month’s draft. “When I build my stadium, I’m going to bronze a statue with him out front,” Cirovski said. “He’s made from the best stuff on earth. It affected him. It affected him a lot. … His conscience was hurting.” For Shipp — who finished his senior season with 12 goals and 11 assists, including three in the College Cup — it was not only gratifying to win a national title but to do so for Clark. “I think this program has known for the last few years that we’re headed in the right direction,” Shipp said. “We had a great regular season [last year], but I think we kind of realized that it was time for this program to take the next step. And we thought the only logical place to do that was to reach the final four and win a national championship. “And to do it for this guy — our coach — is amazing. He’s probably the most underappreciated college soccer coach in the country.”

Boys basketball — Ben Luján Tournament at Pojoaque Valley, final round: 7th place, 11:30 a.m.; 5th place, 2:30 p.m.; 3rd place, 5:30 p.m.; championship, 8:30 p.m. McCurdy at Escalante, 3:30 p.m. Taos at Shiprock Round Robin, pairings TBA Girls basketball — Ben Luján Tournament at Pojoaque Valley, final round: 7th place, 10 a.m.; 5th place, 1 p.m.; 3rd place, 4 p.m.; championship, 7 p.m. Questa at Escalante, 2 p.m. West Las Vegas at Portales, 3 p.m. Santa Rosa at Mora, 3:30 p.m. Capital at Manzano, 7 p.m.

NEW MEXICAN SPORTS

Office hours 2:30 to 10 p.m.

James Barron, 986-3045 Will Webber, 986-3060, Edmundo Carrillo, 986-3032 FAX, 986-3067 Email, sports@sfnewmexican.com

NBA ROUNDUP

Gay scores 26 to lead Kings past Rockets The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Rudy Gay scored 26 points in his first home game since coming over in Kings 106 a trade Rockets 91 from Toronto, leading the Kings past Houston Sunday night. Gay added five rebounds and four assists. He finished 10-for-20 shooting in a dazzling home debut for the Kings, who had lost eight of their past 10 games. DeMarcus Cousins had 21 points and 10 rebounds, and Isaiah Thomas added 19 points and eight assists to help Sacramento hold on to the lead for most of the final three quarters. TRAIL BLAZERS 111, PISTONS 109 (OT) In Auburn Hills, Mich., Damian Lillard hit a spinning fadeaway with one-tenth of a second left in overtime to lift Portland over Detroit. Lillard was guarded well by Rodney Stuckey as he tried to drive to the basket, but he was able to hit a tough fadeaway from about 8 feet. Detroit couldn’t get off a shot before the buzzer. TIMBERWOLVES 101, GRIZZLIES 93 In Memphis, Tenn., Kevin Love had 30 points and nine rebounds, andMinnesota hit a season-high 12 3-pointers in beating the Grizzlies.

The victory snapped Minnesota’s 11-game losing streak to the Grizzlies and also gave the Timberwolves their third win in the last four. SUNS 106, WARRIORS 102 In Phoenix, Eric Bledsoe scored seven of his 24 points in the fourth quarter, and the Suns won their fifth straight game, holding off Stephen Curry and Golden State. Bledsoe added eight rebounds and eight assists, Goran Dragic scored 21 points, and Channing Frye added 20 for the Suns. THUNDER 101, MAGIC 98 In Oklahoma City, Kevin Durant had 28 points, nine rebounds and five assists, and the Thunder held off Orlando to win their 12th straight home game to open the season. Russell Westbrook added 20 points, 12 rebounds and six assists for Oklahoma City, which has won six straight overall and 14 of its last 15. The Thunder have beaten the Magic in five straight meetings. NUGGETS 102, PELICANS 93 In Denver, J.J. Hickson had 19 points and 11 rebounds, and the Nuggets overcame a slow start to beat New Orleans. Wilson Chandler added 19 to help Denver bounce back from a rare home loss on Friday. The Nuggets are 7-3 at Pepsi Center this season after going a franchise-best 38-3 in 2012-13.


B-4

NFL

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

NFL American Conference

East W New England 10 Miami 8 N.Y. Jets 6 Buffalo 5 South W y-Indianapolis 9 Tennessee 5 Jacksonville 4 Houston 2 North W Cincinnati 9 Baltimore 7 Pittsburgh 6 Cleveland 4 West W x-Denver 11 x-Kansas City 11 San Diego 7 Oakland 4

L 4 6 8 9 L 5 9 10 12 L 5 6 8 10 L 3 3 7 10

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .714 .571 .429 .357 Pct .643 .357 .286 .143 Pct .643 .538 .429 .286 Pct .786 .786 .500 .286

PF PA 369 311 310 296 246 367 300 354 PF PA 338 319 326 355 221 399 253 375 PF PA 354 274 278 261 321 332 288 362 PF PA 535 372 399 255 343 311 295 393

National Conference

East W L T Pct PF PA Philadelphia 8 6 0 .571 364 349 Dallas 7 7 0 .500 393 385 N.Y. Giants 5 9 0 .357 251 357 Washington 3 11 0 .214 305 434 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 359 270 Carolina 10 4 0 .714 328 208 Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 258 324 Atlanta 4 10 0 .286 309 388 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 8 6 0 .571 406 391 Detroit 7 6 0 .538 346 321 Green Bay 7 6 1 .536 353 362 Minnesota 4 9 1 .321 363 425 West W L T Pct PF PA x-Seattle 12 2 0 .857 380 205 San Francisco 10 4 0 .714 349 228 Arizona 9 5 0 .643 342 291 St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 316 324 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Thursday’s Game San Diego 27, Denver 20 Sunday’s Games Minnesota 48, Philadelphia 30 Atlanta 27, Washington 26 San Francisco 33, Tampa Bay 14 Seattle 23, N.Y. Giants 0 Chicago 38, Cleveland 31 Indianapolis 25, Houston 3 Buffalo 27, Jacksonville 20 Miami 24, New England 20 Kansas City 56, Oakland 31 Carolina 30, N.Y. Jets 20 Arizona 37, Tennessee 34, OT St. Louis 27, New Orleans 16 Green Bay 37, Dallas 36 Pittsburgh 30, Cincinnati 20 Monday’s Game Baltimore at Detroit, 6:40 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 22 Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 11 a.m. Indianapolis at Kansas City, 11 a.m. Denver at Houston, 11 a.m. Miami at Buffalo, 11 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, 11 a.m. Dallas at Washington, 11 a.m. Cleveland at N.Y. Jets, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Jacksonville, 11 a.m. Arizona at Seattle, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Detroit, 2:05 p.m. Oakland at San Diego, 2:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Green Bay, 2:25 p.m. New England at Baltimore, 2:25 p.m. Chicago at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 23 Atlanta at San Francisco, 6:40 p.m.

Seahawks 23, Giants 0

Seattle 3 10 3 7—23 N.Y. Giants 0 0 0 0— 0 First Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 49, 8:33. Second Quarter Sea—Lynch 2 run (Hauschka kick), 5:30. Sea—FG Hauschka 44, :03. Third Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 24, 8:47. Fourth Quarter Sea—Baldwin 12 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 12:13. A—79,691. Sea NYG First downs 21 12 Total Net Yards 327 181 Rushes-yards 34-134 14-25 Passing 193 156 Punt Returns 7-73 1-4 Kickoff Returns 0-0 3-74 Interceptions Ret. 5-5 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 20-29-1 22-35-5 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-29 4-30 Punts 7-41.3 8-47.5 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 8-50 5-38 Time of Possession 33:58 26:02 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle, Wilson 8-50, Lynch 16-47, Turbin 9-34, Baldwin 1-3. N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 11-17, Hillis 3-8. PASSING—Seattle, Wilson 18-27-1206, Jackson 2-2-0-16. N.Y. Giants, Manning 18-31-5-156, Painter 4-4-0-30. RECEIVING—Seattle, Lynch 6-73, Baldwin 6-71, Tate 2-25, Willson 2-23, Kearse 2-21, Miller 1-8, Turbin 1-1. N.Y. Giants, Jernigan 7-67, A.Brown 4-9, Myers 3-37, Cruz 2-25, Hillis 2-24, Pascoe 2-12, Murphy Jr. 1-7, Nicks 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Panthers 30, Jets 20

N.Y. Jets 3 3 7 7—20 Carolina 3 13 0 14—30 First Quarter Car—FG Gano 35, 4:39. NYJ—FG Folk 54, :00. Second Quarter Car—FG Gano 22, 6:46. NYJ—FG Folk 33, 3:49. Car—D.Williams 72 pass from Newton (Gano kick), 3:29. Car—FG Gano 40, :08.

Third Quarter NYJ—Richardson 1 run (Folk kick), 3:04. Fourth Quarter Car—Tolbert 1 run (Gano kick), 11:05. Car—Munnerlyn 41 interception return (Gano kick), 8:17. NYJ—Cumberland 8 pass from Smith (Folk kick), 3:50. A—73,251. NYJ Car First downs 19 21 Total Net Yards 297 392 Rushes-yards 28-157 36-131 Passing 140 261 Punt Returns 1-0 1-0 Kickoff Returns 1-22 3-49 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-41 Comp-Att-Int 15-28-1 16-24-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-27 2-12 Punts 4-33.0 2-46.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-20 6-59 Time of Possession 26:59 33:01 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Jets, Ivory 11-66, Smith 6-44, Powell 8-37, Hakim 1-8, Richardson 2-2. Carolina, D.Williams 15-81, Tolbert 12-18, Ginn Jr. 1-14, Newton 7-12, LaFell 1-6. PASSING—N.Y. Jets, Smith 15-28-1167. Carolina, Newton 16-24-0-273. RECEIVING—N.Y. Jets, Powell 4-19, Cumberland 3-50, Nelson 3-44, Holmes 2-14, Kerley 1-25, Winslow 1-12, Bohanon 1-3. Carolina, Olsen 5-88, D.Williams 3-87, LaFell 3-61, Smith 3-20, Ginn Jr. 1-10, Tolbert 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Dolphins 24, Patriots 20

New England 3 7 0 10—20 Miami 0 7 3 14—24 First Quarter NE—FG Gostkowski 22, 3:53. Second Quarter NE—Hoomanawanui 13 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 1:38. Mia—Wallace 39 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), :32. Third Quarter Mia—FG Sturgis 32, 7:31. Fourth Quarter Mia—Dan.Thomas 2 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), 14:54. NE—FG Gostkowski 23, 7:45. NE—Edelman 24 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 4:07. Mia—Thigpen 14 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), 1:15. A—71,863. NE Mia First downs 29 20 Total Net Yards 453 378 Rushes-yards 22-96 23-89 Passing 357 289 Punt Returns 0-0 2-9 Kickoff Returns 1-19 2-25 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 34-55-1 25-37-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 4-23 Punts 3-48.7 4-47.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 1-2 4-21 Time of Possession 31:21 28:39 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New England, Blount 1147, Ridley 8-34, Vereen 2-13, Develin 1-2. Miami, Miller 15-61, Dan.Thomas 5-16, Wallace 1-13, Fields 1-0, Tannehill 1-(minus 1). PASSING—New England, Brady 34-551-364. Miami, Tannehill 25-37-0-312. RECEIVING—New England, Edelman 13-139, Amendola 10-131, Boyce 4-42, Vereen 3-8, Collie 2-25, Hoomanawanui 1-13, Blount 1-6. Miami, Wallace 6-105, Hartline 5-70, Matthews 5-64, Egnew 2-25, Thigpen 2-23, Mar.Moore 1-11, Clay 1-6, Sims 1-6, Dan.Thomas 1-2, Miller 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New England, Gostkowski 48 (WL).

Falcons 27, Redskins 26

Washington 7 13 0 6—26 Atlanta 14 3 7 3—27 First Quarter Atl—Jackson 3 run (Bryant kick), 8:14. Atl—Gonzalez 13 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 3:52. Was—Davis 23 pass from Cousins (Forbath kick), :48. Second Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 20, 10:39. Was—Garcon 53 pass from Cousins (Forbath kick), 6:35. Was—FG Forbath 33, :49. Was—FG Forbath 37, :00. Third Quarter Atl—Jackson 2 run (Bryant kick), 8:13. Fourth Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 51, 3:25. Was—Moss 3 pass from Cousins (pass failed), :18. A—70,069. Was Atl First downs 22 19 Total Net Yards 476 243 Rushes-yards 21-103 21-54 Passing 373 189 Punt Returns 4-15 3-25 Kickoff Returns 0-0 4-78 Interceptions Ret. 1-2 2-14 Comp-Att-Int 29-45-2 29-38-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 3-21 Punts 3-52.7 6-49.3 Fumbles-Lost 5-5 2-1 Penalties-Yards 9-66 7-73 Time of Possession 26:08 33:52 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Washington, Morris 18-98, Helu Jr. 3-5. Atlanta, Jackson 15-38, Rodgers 4-17, Snelling 1-0, Ryan 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Washington, Cousins 2945-2-381. Atlanta, Ryan 29-38-1-210. RECEIVING—Washington, Moss 8-64, Garcon 7-129, A.Robinson 4-99, Morgan 3-29, Paulsen 3-21, Davis 1-23, Morris 1-8, Helu Jr. 1-4, N.Williams 1-4. Atlanta, Gonzalez 6-62, White 5-53, Douglas 5-37, Rodgers 4-24, Jackson 4-5, D.Johnson 3-19, DiMarco 1-7, Snelling 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Bears 38, Browns 31

Chicago 0 10 7 21—38 Cleveland 3 7 14 7—31 First Quarter Cle—FG Cundiff 35, 7:26. Second Quarter Chi—FG Gould 23, 12:55. Cle—Gipson 44 interception return (Cundiff kick), 8:01. Chi—Marshall 5 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), :24. Third Quarter Chi—Bowman 43 interception return (Gould kick), 13:48. Cle—Baker 2 run (Cundiff kick), 8:20. Cle—Ward 51 fumble return (Cundiff kick), 3:40. Fourth Quarter Chi—Jeffery 45 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 10:59. Chi—E.Bennett 4 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 5:41. Chi—Bush 40 run (Gould kick), 2:17. Cle—Gordon 43 pass from Campbell (Cundiff kick), :59. A—71,513. Chi Cle First downs 23 20 Total Net Yards 440 366 Rushes-yards 31-179 17-93 Passing 261 273 Punt Returns 1-21 0-0 Kickoff Returns 4-97 4-44 Interceptions Ret. 2-43 2-79 Comp-Att-Int 22-31-2 23-39-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-4 0-0 Punts 3-36.7 5-42.2 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-40 9-90 Time of Possession 34:48 25:12 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Chicago, Forte 24-127, Bush 3-44, Cutler 3-11, Jeffery 1-(minus 3). Cleveland, Baker 8-38, Gray 2-30, Campbell 1-17, Ogbonnaya 5-7, Whittaker 1-1. PASSING—Chicago, Cutler 22-31-2265. Cleveland, Campbell 23-39-2-273. RECEIVING—Chicago, Marshall 6-95, M.Bennett 6-71, Jeffery 5-72, E.Bennett 4-23, Forte 1-4. Cleveland, Ogbonnaya 5-39, Little 4-68, Baker 4-46, Gordon 3-67, Cameron 3-23, Whittaker 2-4, Barnidge 1-17, Bess 1-9. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Chiefs 56, Raiders 31

Kansas City 21 14 14 7—56 Oakland 3 14 14 0—31 First Quarter KC—Charles 49 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 14:38. Oak—FG Janikowski 34, 11:05. KC—Charles 39 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 7:27. KC—Berry 47 interception return (Succop kick), 5:07. Second Quarter Oak—Jennings 1 run (Janikowski kick), 14:40. KC—Charles 1 run (Succop kick), 8:59. KC—Charles 16 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 5:42. Oak—Jennings 1 run (Janikowski kick), 3:00. Third Quarter Oak—Holmes 6 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 12:01. Oak—Rivera 14 pass from McGloin (Janikowski kick), 4:56. KC—Charles 71 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 3:34. KC—McGrath 6 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 1:20. Fourth Quarter KC—Davis 17 run (Succop kick), 8:19. A—49,571. KC Oak First downs 19 26 Total Net Yards 384 461 Rushes-yards 24-78 33-130 Passing 306 331 Punt Returns 1-9 1-6 Kickoff Returns 4-107 5-130 Interceptions Ret. 5-119 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 20-25-0 20-41-5 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-12 0-0 Punts 4-49.5 1-48.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-2 Penalties-Yards 8-91 10-90 Time of Possession 25:53 34:07 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Kansas City, Davis 9-34, Charles 8-20, A.Smith 4-17, Jenkins 1-5, Gray 1-3, Daniel 1-(minus 1). Oakland, Jennings 23-91, Pryor 3-19, Reece 5-18, Olawale 1-2, McGloin 1-0. PASSING—Kansas City, A.Smith 1720-0-287, Daniel 3-5-0-31. Oakland, McGloin 18-36-4-297, Reece 1-1-0-22, Pryor 1-4-1-12. RECEIVING—Kansas City, Charles 8-195, Bowe 3-24, Avery 2-33, McGrath 2-14, Davis 2-8, Gray 1-18, Sherman 1-15, Hall 1-11. Oakland, Streater 4-59, Holmes 4-58, Rivera 3-30, Jennings 3-12, Reece 2-52, D.Moore 2-46, Jones 1-52, Chekwa 1-22. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Vikings 48, Eagles 30

Philadelphia 3 6 13 8—30 Minnesota 7 10 10 21—48 First Quarter Min—Jennings 57 pass from Cassel (Walsh kick), 6:18. Phi—FG Henery 35, 2:35. Second Quarter Min—FG Walsh 21, 13:19. Phi—FG Henery 51, 8:55. Min—Asiata 1 run (Walsh kick), 1:06. Phi—FG Henery 33, :00. Third Quarter Min—Cassel 6 run (Walsh kick), 12:03. Min—FG Walsh 38, 4:43. Phi—Jackson 30 pass from Foles (Henery kick), 3:14. Phi—Ertz 3 pass from Foles (pass failed), :15.

Finishes: Despite loss, Dallas still controls its playoff chances Continued from Page B-1 chance to pull even with Philadelphia in the NFC East but still control their playoff fate. They finish with Washington and the Eagles. “We still control what we feel like we can get done,” Romo said. “It just doesn’t feel like it right now because we let it slip away.” With Dallas leading 36-31, Bryant made a lunging first down after a catch just before the twominute warning that looked as if it would Dallas help hold off a huge Green Bay rally. But Romo threw behind Miles Austin after escaping a sack, and Sam Shields intercepted at midfield. The Packers steadily moved downfield before the plunge by Lacy, who had 141 yards rushing. Behind for the first time since the first quarter, Romo threw a ball too far in front of Cole Beasley, and Williams made a diving grab that was initially called incomplete. When the video review overturned the call, Flynn ended the game with kneel-downs.

“Right now, words really have no effect,” Dallas cornerback Brandon Carr said. “Complete debacle the second half. We’ve just got to get better, man.” Williams had an earlier interception overturned on review with Dallas clinging to a 29-24 lead. He cradled a deflected pass in his arms and had a weaving return to inside the Dallas 10, but replayed showed the nose of ball hitting the turf. The Cowboys went on to score when Bryant made a leaping grab over M.D. Jennings and got two feet down in the back of the end zone for a 36-24 lead. Flynn answered with his fourth straight scoring drive to get the Packers back within five. A Dallas defense that gave up eight straight scoring drives to Chicago in a loss last week let the Packers get touchdowns on five straight drives after halftime. “What a feelin’!” said Flynn, who threw for 299 yards with one interception. “As we were taking a knee, we were thinking ‘Is this real? Is this happening?’ ”

Fourth Quarter Min—Asiata 1 run (Walsh kick), 13:01. Min—Patterson 5 pass from Cassel (Walsh kick), 6:54. Phi—Avant 16 pass from Foles (Cooper pass from Foles), 4:26. Min—Asiata 5 run (Walsh kick), 1:09. A—64,087. Phi Min First downs 25 29 Total Net Yards 475 455 Rushes-yards 13-79 35-85 Passing 396 370 Punt Returns 1-1 1-13 Kickoff Returns 2-83 5-45 Interceptions Ret. 1-2 1-30 Comp-Att-Int 30-48-1 26-35-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-32 3-12 Punts 4-41.3 2-48.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 9-94 3-25 Time of Possession 23:34 36:26 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Philadelphia, Foles 5-41, McCoy 8-38. Minnesota, Asiata 30-51, Cassel 3-19, Patterson 2-15. PASSING—Philadelphia, Foles 30-48-1428. Minnesota, Cassel 26-35-1-382. RECEIVING—Philadelphia, Jackson 10-195, Ertz 6-57, McCoy 5-68, Cooper 4-29, Avant 3-40, Celek 1-25, Smith 1-14. Minnesota, Jennings 11-163, Patterson 5-35, Wright 4-95, Asiata 3-15, Ford 2-55, Simpson 1-19. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Minnesota, Walsh 55 (WL).

Colts 25, Texans 3

Houston 3 0 0 0— 3 Indianapolis 7 13 5 0—25 First Quarter Ind—Whalen 14 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 9:31. Hou—FG Bullock 49, 1:46. Second Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 37, 12:00. Ind—Richardson 9 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 7:03. Ind—FG Vinatieri 43, 1:44. Third Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 40, 12:27. Ind—Redding safety, 1:53. A—65,470. Hou Ind First downs 12 19 Total Net Yards 239 331 Rushes-yards 25-107 36-152 Passing 132 179 Punt Returns 2-11 3-67 Kickoff Returns 4-108 2-50 Interceptions Ret. 1-32 2-38 Comp-Att-Int 18-34-2 19-32-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-36 1-1 Punts 8-49.5 6-43.0 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 14-114 4-36 Time of Possession 26:49 33:11 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Houston, Tate 16-72, Karim 4-21, D.Johnson 4-12, Keenum 1-2. Indianapolis, Richardson 19-64, D.Brown 5-38, Luck 5-29, Choice 5-18, Lynch 1-3, Rogers 1-0. PASSING—Houston, Keenum 18-34-2168. Indianapolis, Luck 19-32-1-180. RECEIVING—Houston, Griffin 6-62, A.Johnson 4-18, Hopkins 3-52, Tate 3-20, Martin 1-13, D.Johnson 1-3. Indianapolis, Hilton 8-78, Whalen 4-45, Richardson 4-38, Rogers 2-23, Doyle 1-(minus 4). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Bills 27, Jaguars 20

Buffalo 3 17 0 7—27 Jacksonville 3 7 3 7—20 First Quarter Buf—FG Carpenter 42, 13:10. Jax—FG Scobee 32, 8:07. Second Quarter Jax—Sanders 12 pass from Henne (Scobee kick), 14:54. Buf—Woods 7 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick), 7:07. Buf—Manuel 8 run (Carpenter kick), 2:14. Buf—FG Carpenter 40, :00. Third Quarter Jax—FG Scobee 55, 4:43. Fourth Quarter Jax—Lewis 13 pass from Henne (Scobee kick), 13:50. Buf—Summers 1 pass from Manuel (Carpenter kick), 9:35. A—60,085. Buf Jax First downs 25 22 Total Net Yards 366 354 Rushes-yards 44-198 31-159 Passing 168 195 Punt Returns 2-4 3-10 Kickoff Returns 2-38 1-17 Interceptions Ret. 2-34 1-28 Comp-Att-Int 17-24-1 21-36-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-25 5-42 Punts 4-45.0 3-45.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 3-2 Penalties-Yards 7-67 6-80 Time of Possession 32:35 27:25 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Buffalo, Jackson 17-80, Spiller 13-67, Manuel 10-37, Summers 4-14. Jacksonville, Todman 25-109, Robinson 2-28, Henne 4-22. PASSING—Buffalo, Manuel 17-24-1193. Jacksonville, Henne 21-36-2-237. RECEIVING—Buffalo, Woods 5-82, Chandler 5-54, Summers 3-16, Gragg 1-28, Jackson 1-8, Johnson 1-4, Spiller 1-1. Jacksonville, Lewis 4-54, Todman 4-44, Taylor 4-42, Harbor 3-52, Brown 3-20, Sanders 2-17, Ebert 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Buffalo, Carpenter 54 (WR).

49ers 33, Buccaneers 14

San Francisco 7 10 3 13—33 Tampa Bay 0 7 0 7—14 First Quarter SF—Crabtree 4 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 7:05. Second Quarter SF—FG Dawson 47, 6:12. SF—V.Davis 52 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 1:47. TB—Jackson 11 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), :29. Third Quarter SF—FG Dawson 43, 7:51. Fourth Quarter TB—Wright 24 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 14:54. SF—FG Dawson 21, 4:27. SF—Hunter fumble recovery in end zone (Dawson kick), 4:21. SF—FG Dawson 35, 2:49. A—64,142. SF TB First downs 22 13 Total Net Yards 376 183 Rushes-yards 40-187 12-39 Passing 189 144 Punt Returns 5-51 1-9 Kickoff Returns 2-29 5-83 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-29-0 18-34-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-14 4-35 Punts 4-43.3 7-47.7 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 8-62 4-32 Time of Possession 39:50 20:10 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Francisco, Gore 22-86, Hunter 8-40, Kaepernick 7-39, James 2-22, Boldin 1-0. Tampa Bay, Rainey 11-27, Leonard 1-12. PASSING—San Francisco, Kaepernick 19-29-0-203. Tampa Bay, Glennon 18-34-1-179. RECEIVING—San Francisco, V.Davis 5-79, Crabtree 5-45, Miller 4-26, Boldin 3-43, Celek 1-8, Manningham 1-2. Tampa Bay, Wright 7-82, Jackson 5-58, Owusu 3-21, Underwood 2-15, Rainey 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Cardinals 37, Titans 34, OT

Arizona 7 3 10 14 3 —37 Tennessee 10 0 7 17 0 —34 First Quarter Ten—FG Bironas 45, 9:34. Ari—Mendenhall 1 run (Feely kick), 4:30. Ten—C.Johnson 25 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas kick), :00. Second Quarter Ari—FG Feely 25, 7:21. Third Quarter Ari—FG Feely 47, 13:32. Ten—Walker 1 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas kick), 6:16. Ari—Ballard 6 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 2:14. Fourth Quarter Ari—Mendenhall 1 run (Feely kick), 6:50. Ari—Cason 20 interception return (Feely kick), 6:13. Ten—Preston 10 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas kick), 3:12. Ten—FG Bironas 24, :47. Ten—Preston 8 pass from Fitzpatrick (Bironas kick), :10. Overtime Ari—FG Feely 41, 10:18. A—69,143. Ari Ten First downs 24 32 Total Net Yards 360 460 Rushes-yards 36-145 19-66 Passing 215 394 Punt Returns 0-0 2-18 Kickoff Returns 3-72 7-140 Interceptions Ret. 2-36 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 20-30-0 36-58-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-16 3-8 Punts 4-53.0 3-48.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 9-69 3-16 Time of Possession 30:58 33:44 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Arizona, Ellington 10-71, Mendenhall 21-69, S.Taylor 3-6, Palmer 2-(minus 1). Tennessee, C.Johnson 13-40, Fitzpatrick 3-22, Greene 3-4. PASSING—Arizona, Palmer 2030-0-231. Tennessee, Fitzpatrick 36-58-2-402. RECEIVING—Arizona, Fitzgerald 6-49, Ellington 4-87, Ballard 3-13, Floyd 2-33, Roberts 2-15, Golden 1-16, Dray 1-9, Mendenhall 1-9. Tennessee, Wright 12-150, Walker 8-53, N.Washington 7-92, C.Johnson 3-51, Britt 3-29, Preston 3-27. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Tennessee, Bironas 50 (SH).

Rams 27, Saints 16

New Orleans 0 3 0 13—16 St. Louis 14 10 3 0—27 First Quarter StL—Harkey 31 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick), 11:20. StL—Kendricks 4 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick), 2:45. Second Quarter StL—FG Zuerlein 31, 14:57. NO—FG Hartley 45, 10:17. StL—Stacy 40 run (Zuerlein kick), 4:10. Third Quarter StL—FG Zuerlein 35, 2:42. Fourth Quarter NO—Brees 1 run (run failed), 11:25. NO—Colston 5 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 3:07. A—58,442.

NO StL First downs 30 17 Total Net Yards 432 302 Rushes-yards 20-61 34-144 Passing 371 158 Punt Returns 0-0 1-7 Kickoff Returns 0-0 2-53 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-5 Comp-Att-Int 39-56-2 14-20-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-22 0-0 Punts 2-53.5 4-41.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-77 4-30 Time of Possession 32:12 27:48 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New Orleans, Sproles 7-24, Thomas 8-21, Brees 2-8, Ingram 1-5, Stills 1-3, K.Robinson 1-0. St. Louis, Stacy 28-133, Bailey 1-6, Clemens 3-5, Cunningham 2-0. PASSING—New Orleans, Brees 39-562-393. St. Louis, Clemens 14-20-0-158. RECEIVING—New Orleans, Colston 8-92, Sproles 8-38, Thomas 7-62, Moore 6-78, Stills 4-47, Ingram 2-39, Graham 2-25, Watson 2-12. St. Louis, Pettis 4-41, Harkey 3-29, Bailey 2-26, Kendricks 2-13, Givens 1-31, Stacy 1-10, Cook 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New Orleans, Hartley 36 (BK), 26 (WL).

Packers 37, Cowboys 36

Green Bay 3 0 14 20—37 Dallas 13 13 3 7—36 First Quarter Dal—FG Bailey 47, 10:56. GB—FG Crosby 57, 7:40. Dal—FG Bailey 23, 4:52. Dal—Witten 25 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), :28. Second Quarter Dal—FG Bailey 43, 5:54. Dal—FG Bailey 50, 3:45. Dal—Murray 1 run (Bailey kick), :24. Third Quarter GB—Nelson 13 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 13:08. Dal—FG Bailey 50, 6:33. GB—Quarless 3 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 1:09. Fourth Quarter GB—Starks 11 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 12:47. Dal—Bryant 5 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 7:55. GB—J.Jones 3 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 4:17. GB—Lacy 1 run (pass failed), 1:31. A—91,054. GB Dal First downs 26 27 Total Net Yards 433 466 Rushes-yards 27-150 18-134 Passing 283 332 Punt Returns 1-26 1-7 Kickoff Returns 0-0 2-46 Interceptions Ret. 2-(-5) 1-21 Comp-Att-Int 26-39-1 29-48-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-16 3-26 Punts 4-49.3 2-51.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-59 7-79 Time of Possession 28:20 31:40 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Green Bay, Lacy 21-141, Starks 3-12, Flynn 3-(minus 3). Dallas, Murray 18-134. PASSING—Green Bay, Flynn 26-39-1299. Dallas, Romo 29-48-2-358. RECEIVING—Green Bay, Boykin 6-83, Quarless 6-66, Nelson 5-61, Lacy 4-30, J.Jones 3-49, Starks 1-11, Kuhn 1-(minus 1). Dallas, Bryant 11-153, Witten 4-71, Williams 4-46, Murray 4-19, Beasley 3-19, Austin 2-35, Escobar 1-15. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Steelers 30, Bengals 20

Cincinnati 0 7 0 13—20 Pittsburgh 21 6 3 0—30 First Quarter Pit—Bell 1 run (Suisham kick), 9:58. Pit—A.Brown 12 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 2:16. Pit—A.Brown 67 punt return (Suisham kick), 1:12. Second Quarter Pit—FG Suisham 25, 9:36. Cin—Bernard 1 run (Nugent kick), 5:14. Pit—FG Suisham 45, 1:14. Third Quarter Pit—FG Suisham 26, 6:18. Fourth Quarter Cin—Eifert 1 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 14:09. Cin—M.Jones 13 pass from Dalton (pass failed), 5:46. A—45,873. Cin Pit First downs 19 19 Total Net Yards 279 290 Rushes-yards 22-57 36-106 Passing 222 184 Punt Returns 0-0 2-78 Kickoff Returns 5-150 1-20 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 25-44-0 20-25-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 1-7 Punts 4-41.5 3-38.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-50 4-25 Time of Possession 28:24 31:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati, Bernard 13-33, Dalton 4-20, Green-Ellis 4-4, Huber 1-0. Pittsburgh, Bell 24-57, Dwyer 6-26, F.Jones 5-22, A.Brown 1-1. PASSING—Cincinnati, Dalton 25-440-230. Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 20-25-1-191. RECEIVING—Cincinnati, Green 9-93, M.Jones 5-48, Eifert 3-33, Gresham 3-23, Sanu 3-20, Bernard 2-13. Pittsburgh, A.Brown 5-66, Bell 5-50, Sanders 5-38, Miller 4-35, Cotchery 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Foils: Dolphins snap 7-game losing streak against Patriots Continued from Page B-1 area and didn’t do a good job finishing drives,” he said. “We came up on the short end of the stick. It wasn’t a good day. Just couldn’t make enough plays.” The Dolphins (8-6) won their third game in a row to help their AFC wild-card chances, and they snapped a streak of seven consecutive losses to the Patriots. “We were short in every area,” New England coach Bill Belichick said. “Nothing was really good enough.” Brady threw for 364 yards, but drives of 16, 15 and 13 plays produced a total of only six points. The last drive came in the final 1:15, when Brady led the Patriots from their own 20 to the Miami 14. It was familiar stuff from the Patriots, who had mounted second-half rallies to win their past three games. With New England out of timeouts, Brady threw for the end zone four times in a row. The

first three passes went incomplete, including one intended for Danny Amendola that Thomas broke up on first down. Then, Thomas stepped in front of Austin Collie to make his interception. The reserve safety, signed Tuesday off the San Francisco 49ers’ practice squad, was making his NFL debut. “I knew being the new guy that Tom Brady would come after me,” Thomas said. “He’s a great quarterback, and he’s going to exploit any weaknesses. I knew if I got in there, I would have a chance. I saw the ball in the air and I made a play.” Thomas was part of an injury-depleted secondary that also included backups at both cornerback spots on the final drive. Brady went 34 for 55 and threw two scores. Julian Edelman made 13 catches for 139 yards, and Amendola added 10 receptions for 131 yards. New England took a 20-17 lead when Edelman scored on a 24-yard reception with four minutes left, but the Dolphins caught a break when the ensuing kickoff by Stephen Gostkowski went out of bounds, allowing them to start at their 40.


NFL

Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-5

Browns drop fifth straight game to Bears The Associated Press

CLEVELAND — The home finale began with several inches of snow piled up inside the Browns’ stadium. By Bears 38 game’s end, Browns 31 the losses were at familiar depths. Cleveland’s unshakable misery endures. Unable to stop Chicago’s offense at crucial times or protect another late lead, the Browns dropped their fifth straight game, 38-31 on Sunday to the Chicago Bears, who rallied in the second half behind quarterback Jay Cutler and kept the their NFC playoff push rolling forward. The Browns (4-10) scored two defensive touchdowns and had the lead in the fourth quarter before again crumbling. They’ve lost eight of nine. It’s the sixth straight doubledigit loss season for the Browns, who were 3-2 under first-year coach Rob Chudzinski and actually had playoff potential before falling apart. “We’ve just got to find a way to finish games,” linebacker D’Qwell Jackson said. “We’ve proven we can create leads. We can dominate when we want to. It’s just we’ve got to learn how to finish games.” Cutler, who missed Chicago’s previous four games with a sprained left ankle and reclaimed his starting job from Josh McCown earlier this week, threw a 4-yard TD pass to Earl Bennett with 5:41 left as the Bears (8-6) stormed back and temporarily moved ahead of Detroit in the NFC North. The Lions (7-6) play Monday night.

ning streak. With Adrian Peterson and Toby Gerhart out, Matt Asiata rushed for the first three touchdowns of his career, and Greg Jennings caught a career-high 11 passes for 163 yards for the Vikings (4-9-1). Asiata ran for 51 yards on 30 carries.

Browns free safety Tashaun Gipson returns for a touchdown against the Bears during the first half of Sunday’s game in Cleveland. TONY DEJAK/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cutler finished 22 of 31 for 265 yards and validated firstyear coach Marc Trestman’s decision to stick with him over McCown, who had played so well while filling in for Chicago’s starter. Jason Campbell, coming off a career-best game last week in a one-point loss at New England, threw two interceptions and failed to bring the Browns back. Campbell had hoped to build off last week’s strong game, but the veteran never found a rhythm. He finished 23 of 39 for 273 yards. CHIEFS 56, RAIDERS 31 In Oakland, Calif., Jamaal Charles tied a franchise record with five touchdowns in a game and gained 215 yards from scrimmage as the Chiefs beat the Raiders and clinched at least a wild-card spot. Alex Smith threw five TD passes, going 17 for 20 for 287 yards to make the Chiefs the fourth team ever to make the playoffs a year after losing at

least 14 games. Kansas City (11-3) is tied for first place in the AFC West with Denver but needs help to win the division because the Broncos swept the season series. STEELERS 30, BENGALS 20 In Pittsburgh, Antonio Brown caught a touchdown pass and returned a punt for a score in a 64-second span in the first quarter, and Pittsburgh beat Cincinnati. Shaun Suisham added three field goals for the Steelers (6-8), who built a 24-point lead and hardly looked like a team playing out the string. Ben Roethlisberger completed 20 of 25 passes for 191 yards with a touchdown and an interception. Le’Veon Bell added 117 yards of total offense. VIKINGS 48, EAGLES 30 In Minneapolis, Matt Cassel passed for 382 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another score to lead the injury-depleted Vikings over Philadelphia, snapping the Eagles’ five-game win-

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For Death Notices after the above deadlines, please phone The New Mexican’s Newsroom at 986-3022 through Tuesday, December 31. The offices of The New Mexican will be closed on Wed., Jan.1, 2014 and will re-open on Thurs., Jan. 2 at 8am. While normal distribution will occur on the 1st, Circulation Customer Service will be closed and the call center will reopen at 6 a.m. on the 2nd.

FALCONS 27, REDSKINS 26 In Atlanta, Desmond Trufant deflected Kirk Cousins’ pass on a potential winning 2-point conversion with 18 seconds remaining, and the Falcons edged the Washington Redskins. The Falcons (4-10) scored 20 points off seven Washington turnovers. The Redskins (3-11) tied a team record with five lost fumbles. 49ERS 33, BUCCANEERS 14 In Tampa, Fla., Vernon Davis caught a touchdown pass for the fifth straight game, and Michael Crabtree scored his first TD since returning from injury to help San Francisco beat the Buccaneers. The victory was the fourth straight for Colin Kaepernick and the 49ers (10-4), who pulled away for good with a 10-minute, fourth-quarter drive that produced a field goal. Kendall Hunter put it well out of reach, scooping up a fumble on the ensuing kickoff and diving 2 yards into the end zone for a touchdown. SEAHAWKS 23, GIANTS 0 In East Rutherford, N.J., Richard Sherman had two interceptions, Marshawn Lynch scored on a twisting, triple-effort 2-yard run, and Steven Haus-

chka kicked three field goals as Seattle manhandled the Giants for their sixth road win. Russell Wilson toyed with New York’s defense, running for 50 yards and throwing for 206 and a touchdown before sitting out the last few minutes. Wilson has 23 wins, the most for a quarterback in his first two seasons in the Super Bowl era. COLTS 25, TEXANS 3 In Indianapolis, Andrew Luck threw two touchdown passes, and Robert Mathis broke Indianapolis’ single-season and career sacks records by forcing a second-half safety to lead the Colts past Houston. Luck finished 19 of 32 for 180 yards with one interception and needed only two quarters to put up 20 points, four short of Indy’s combined first-half point total from the previous six games. But the Colts (9-5) did it against a team that has lost 12 straight overall and is 0-12 all-time in Indy. BILLS 27, JAGUARS 20 In Jacksonville, Fla., EJ Manuel threw two touchdown passes and ran for another score, leading Buffalo to a victory against the banged-up Jaguars. Manuel bounced back from the worst game of his rookie season — a four-interception performance at Tampa Bay last week — and left his college state with his first win in five road starts. The former Florida State star didn’t do anything spectacular, just dinking and dunking the Jaguars for 193 yards. He also ran for 37 yards, including an

8-yard touchdown in the second quarter. Manuel completed 17 of 24 passes. PANTHERS 30, JETS 20 In Charlotte, N.C., Cam Newton threw for 273 yards and a touchdown, Captain Munnerlyn had two sacks and returned an interception for a score, and the Panthers bounced back from their most lopsided loss of the season. With New Orleans losing 27-16 to St. Louis, the Panthers (10-4) pulled even with the Saints with the rematch set for next Sunday in Charlotte. If Carolina wins its final two games, it will clinch the division and the first-round bye. The Panthers haven’t been to the postseason since 2008. RAMS 27, SAINTS 16 In St. Louis, Drew Brees threw interceptions that led to touchdowns on New Orleans’ first two possessions, Quinn had two sacks, giving him an NFC-leading 15, and his quarterback hit on the Saints’ first snap of the game altered the flight of the ball on T.J. McDonald’s interception. CARDINALS 37, TITANS 34 (OT) In Nashville, Tenn., Jay Feely kicked a 41-yard field goal in overtime, and Arizona edged the Titans in overtime after blowing a 17-point lead late in the fourth quarter. Still, the Cardinals (9-5) won their sixth in seven games. With San Francisco and Carolina winning, they remained a game back of both for a NFC wild-card berth.

AVISO PÚBLICO

AVISO PÚBLICO DE LA PRESENTACIÓN DE UNA SOLICITUD POR PARTE DE SANTA FE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AGENCY PARA LA RENOVACIÓN Y LA MODIFICACIÓN DE UN PERMISO CORRESPONDIENTE A UN RELLENO SANITARIO PARA RESIDUOS SÓLIDOS, QUE INCLUYE UNA AMPLIACIÓN LATERAL Y VERTICAL, Y EL AGREGADO DE RESIDUOS ESPECIALES PARA EL RELLENO SANITARIO CAJA DEL RIO, SANTA FE, NUEVO MÉXICO De conformidad con la Sección 22 de la Ley de Nuevo México sobre Residuos Sólidos (NMSA 1978, sección 74-9-22) y la Subsección G de 20.9.3.8 NMAC (el Reglamento), por este medio se les notifica al público y a otras personas y entidades potencialmente afectadas que Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency ha presentado ante la Oficina de Residuos Sólidos del Departamento del Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México (NMED por su sigla en inglés) una solicitud para renovar y modificar el Permiso correspondiente a un relleno sanitario para residuos sólidos (el Permiso) para el Relleno sanitario Caja del Rio (Relleno sanitario). Los documentos correspondientes a esta solicitud estarán a disposición de los interesados en la dirección que aparece en la Sección 5 de este Aviso. A continuación se detalla la información pertinente según lo exigido por la Ley y el Reglamento: 1. Nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del Solicitante Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency 149 Wildlife Way Santa Fe, NM 87506 (505) 424-1850 2. Fecha prevista para el comienzo de la renovación y modificación y horario de funcionamiento El Relleno sanitario es un vertedero de residuos sólidos existente que funciona bajo el Permiso Núm. SWM261708 y SWM-030706(SP) otorgado por el NMED en junio de 1995. El Relleno sanitario seguirá funcionando bajo su permiso ya existente hasta que el Secretario del NMED decida emitir, emitir con condiciones o negar el permiso para la renovación y modificación. La fecha prevista de comienzo para la ampliación vertical y lateral propuesta será enero de 2015 si se emitiera el permiso para la renovación y modificación. El horario de funcionamiento del Relleno sanitario es de 7 de la mañana a 5 de la tarde de lunes a domingo, aunque este horario varía según las estaciones del año. El Relleno sanitario está cerrado al público durante tres días feriados importantes (Día de Acción de Gracias, Navidad y Año Nuevo). 3. Descripción de las instalaciones (a)

Proceso general: El Relleno sanitario actualmente acepta residuos residenciales, comerciales, escombros de construcción y demolición (C&D por su sigla en inglés), residuos verdes y abono para compostaje, y dos tipos de residuos especiales (lodo y tierra contaminada con petróleo) según las definiciones de la Ley y el Reglamento. El Relleno sanitario recibe residuos sólidos de transportistas comerciales registrados y de transportistas autónomos. Los residuos sólidos son colocados y compactados en celdas revestidas que están protegidas por sistemas de control ambiental; que incluyen, entre otros, sistemas de recolección de lixiviados, revestimientos compuestos, sistema de control de gases del relleno sanitario y controles para la gestión de aguas pluviales. Al recibirse los últimos residuos sólidos, el Relleno sanitario se cubrirá con una cubierta final conforme al Reglamento. Los residuos especiales son procesados conforme al Reglamento correspondiente. Al final de cada día laboral, la superficie de trabajo del área de depósito de residuos sólidos municipales (MSW por su sigla en inglés) se cubre con un mínimo de seis pulgadas de tierra o una cubierta alternativa diaria como lo apruebe el NMED. El Relleno sanitario tiene también un programa de trituración y compostaje para desviar los residuos verdes y el abono del Relleno sanitario. Esta Solicitud de Renovación y Modificación del Permiso es para un vertedero único.

(b) Ubicación: El Relleno sanitario está ubicado aproximadamente a 7 millas al oeste de la Ciudad de Santa Fe, en el Distrito Municipal (Township) 17 Norte, Zona (Range) 8 Este, y las Secciones 21, 22, 27 y 28, en el Condado de Santa Fe, Nuevo México. (c)

Tamaño: La superficie incluida dentro de los límites del Relleno sanitario autorizado es de 495 acres. Dentro de los límites autorizados, la Fase Oeste existente del Relleno sanitario consta de aproximadamente 87 acres de relleno sanitario revestido para depósito de MSW y C&D. La ampliación lateral Fase Este propuesta se encuentra dentro de los límites autorizados y constará de aproximadamente 54 acres adicionales de superficie de relleno sanitario revestido para depósito de MSW y C&D.

(d) Cantidad y frecuencia de los depósitos de residuos sólidos: El Relleno sanitario recibe actualmente alrededor de 450 a 500 toneladas de residuos sólidos por día, pero puede recibir más o menos residuos sólidos en determinados días según sea el volumen de residuos. El relleno sanitario también aceptará los residuos especiales que se detallan en el punto (e). También se incluye el tonelaje anual estimado para cada tipo de residuo especial que se recibirá en el relleno sanitario. (e)

Tipos de residuos sólidos: El Relleno sanitario seguirá aceptando residuos sólidos, incluidos los siguientes residuos no peligrosos: Residuos sólidos municipales residenciales, residuos sólidos comerciales, y escombros de construcción y demolición. El Relleno sanitario seguirá aceptando lodo (1700 toneladas/año) y tierra con petróleo (360 toneladas por año), los cuales son residuos especiales no peligrosos. Asimismo, el Relleno sanitario solicita la aprobación para el depósito de los siguientes residuos especiales no peligrosos: Residuos sólidos industriales (10 toneladas/año), derrames de sustancias químicas o productos comerciales (10 toneladas/año), residuos anteriormente peligrosos característicos tratados (1 tonelada/año) y residuos de sumideros del lavado de vehículos (28 toneladas/año).

(f)

Descripción de la modificación: Se solicita la modificación del permiso para obtener la aprobación para el depósito de cuatro tipos de residuos especiales adicionales; para aumentar la cota de nivelación final de la Fase Oeste 40 pies por encima de la cota actual permitida (85 a 95 pies por encima del nivel del suelo); para ampliar horizontalmente el Relleno sanitario actual hacia el este, llamada Fase Este, al aumentar la superficie de relleno sanitario revestido en aproximadamente 54 acres adicionales, que se extiende 70 a 110 pies por encima del nivel del suelo; para actualizar los planes de gestión del relleno sanitario, calcular los costos de cierre/posteriores al cierre y la seguridad financiera relacionada; y para proporcionar actualizaciones de los planes ingenieriles que incorporan las más recientes filosofías de diseño y tecnologías. De ser aprobado en 2015, el permiso tendría vigencia hasta el año 2035.

4. Origen de los residuos Actualmente, el Relleno sanitario sólo recibe residuos procedentes de la Ciudad y el Condado de Santa Fe según lo exigido por el Acuerdo de Autoridades Conjuntas entre la Ciudad y el Condado de Santa Fe. 5. Comentarios La Solicitud del Permiso está a disposición del público para su revisión en las dos direcciones que se indican a continuación. Los comentarios relativos a esta Solicitud de Permiso deben dirigirse al Solicitante y al Departamento del Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México en los siguientes puntos de contacto: Solicitante: Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency Caja del Rio Landfill 149 Wildlife Way Santa Fe, NM 87506 Attn: Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Tel.: (505) 424-1850

Departamento del Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México: Solid Waste Bureau 1190 St. Francis Drive PO Box 26110 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Attn: George Schuman, Permits Section Manager Tel.: (505) 827-2328


B-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

sfnm«classifieds to place an ad call

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FARMS & RANCHES 146.17 ACRES. 1 hour from Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Electricity, views of Sangre De Cristo Mnts and Glorieta Mesa. $675 per acre, 20 year owner financing. Toll Free 8 7 7 - 7 9 7 - 2 6 2 4 newmexicoranchland.net

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GUESTHOUSES

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COME IN TODAY FOR A TOUR OF your new home for the holidays! We are spreading the cheer with our amazing move-in and rent specials. The new management team at Las Palomas ApartmentHopewell Street is ready to show you the changes we’ve made both inside and out. Simply call, 888-4828216! Se habla español. CORONADO CONDOMINIUMS for Rent, 1 bedroom $600 monthly, 2 Bedroom $675 monthly, $400 deposit. 505-465-0057 or 505-690-7688 ENJOY LIFE! 2 bedroom, 1 bath, fenced, patio, fireplace, skylights, washer, dryer, super clean. $925 plus deposit. NO pets. 505-4740979.

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HOUSES UNFURNISHED

EXQUISITE SANTA FE COMPOUND PROPERTY situated on 5 acres, boasts majestic mountain views, 6200 sqft of living space, 8 bedrooms, 7 baths, 2 car garage. $3500 plus utilities. Call for personal showing QUIET AND FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, AC, 2 car garage, enclosed backyard, washer, dryer, $1200 plus utilities

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Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

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RARE 2.3 ACRE LOT. Country but Convenient to Town. Great Neighborhood. Spectacular Views. Nearby Hiking & Biking Trail. $125,000. Jennifer, 505-204-6988.

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OFFICES

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986-3000 ROOMMATE

WANTED

$1500 MONTHLY. Beautiful Rancho Viejo 3 bedroom 2 bath home with gas rock fireplace, granite counter-tops, evaporative cooler, enclosed spacious walled yard. Non-smoker. 505-450-4721. www.ranchoviejo.shutterfly.com/ pictures/16

WALKING DISTANCE TO SHOPPING 2 bedroom, plus loft, 1 bath, granite counter tops, upgraded washer, dryer, 2 car garage $1200 plus utilities

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted. Own bedroom, bathroom. $250 plus half utilities. In Glorietta, acreage, peaceful. Please call, 505-757-6372 or 505216-2852.

PRIVATE COMPOUND 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Damage, credit report required. $750. Lease required. Call Mares Realty, 505-988-5585.

STORAGE SPACE

1 BEDROOM. Walled yard, off St. Francis. Plenty of parking. $600 monthly plus split utilities, deposit. No pets. 505-901-8195

QUIET COMPOUND, Totally remodeled 2 bedroom. Downtown area. $800 plus utilities. Call Mares Realty, 505-988-5585.

2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, Adobe Housescenic Chimayo. Minutes from El Santuario. Washer, Dryer, Refrigerator. $700 monthly plus Utilities, Nonsmoking. References required. 505662-3927

SOUTH SANTA FE. 3 Bedroom 2Bath, smoke free. No pets. $1195 monthly. Orlink@juno.com. 970-389-8434.

AN EXTRA LARGE UNIT BLOWOUT SPECIAL Airport Cerrillos Storage. UHaul. Cargo Van. 505-4744330. airportcerrillos.com

2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, loft. Fenced yard, central air, heat, 1,300 squ.ft., 2 car garage, No pets. $995 monthly, plus utilities, $950 deposit. 505984-2263. 2 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH, DUPLEX. $825 plus utilities, $600 deposit. Year lease. No pets. 3133 Jemez Road. Call 505-316-4236, 505-471-2648. 2BR, 1BA newly remodeled, quaint adobe home in private compound. Available now. Washer, dryer, off street parking. Columbia St. $1050 monthly. 505-983-9722.

3 BEDROOM 2 bath, 1,900 sq.ft. $1,300 includes utilities. Month to Month, pets OK, near National Guard, Southside, deposit. 505-470-5877

LAS CAMPANAS 3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH

Furnished. AC. No pets, nonsmoking. 6 month lease minimum. $6500 monthly plus utilities. $14500 deposit. 203-481-5271

$580. 2 SMALL BEDROOMS. V e r y clean, quiet, safe. Off Agua Fria. Has gas heating. Pay only electric. No pets. 505-473-0278 BEAUTIFUL 3, 2, 2 Walled backyard, corner lot, all appliances, Rancho Viejo. Owner Broker, Available January 1. $1590 monthly. 505-780-0129

LOT FOR RENT

TESUQUE TRAILER VILLAGE

A-Poco Self Storage 2235 Henry Lynch Rd Santa Fe, NM 87507 505-471-1122 12x24 for Only $195.00. Call to reserve yours Today!!!

"A PLACE TO CALL HOME"

505-989-9133

WAREHOUSES

VACANCY 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH

Single & Double Wide Spaces

2000 SQUARE foot space with high ceilings & 2 overhead doors. Office, bath. Great for auto repair. $1600 monthly. 505-660-9523

OFFICES WORK STUDIOS 1418 LUISA STREET Office Space, 1 office within suite. Lots of parking, quiet, easy access. Available January 1st. $400, 505-504-2866. $975 PLUS UTILITIES, OFFICE SUITE, GALISTEO CENTER . Two bright, private offices plus reception area, kitchenette, bathroom. Hospital proximity. 518-672-7370

Beautiful Office Space Lots of light! Downtown! Off street parking! 500 sq.ft.! Bamboo Floors! Utilities plus Wifi included!!! $700 Per Month!! Availiable Now! Call 505-986-6164 or email pomegranatesfnm@yahoo.com

ARTIST WORKSPACE. 1,470 Sq.Ft., 8 foot overhead doors, 220volt outlets. $1,325 monthly, year lease plus utilities. South Santa Fe. 505-474-9188 COMMERCIAL WAREHOUSE SPACE WITH BIG GARAGE DOOR. Ideal for storage. Includes heat, security, wrought iron gate with plenty of parking. 1550 Square feet, $ 900.00 plus utilities. Month of December Free. The sooner you move in the better the savings. Year lease No Live In Please call 505-216-1649, visit 7504 Avenger Way Ste C or email. info@rustymesa.com

service«directory CALL 986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts to learn how we can help grow your business! CHIMNEY SWEEPING

CLEANING Clean Houses in and out. Windows, carpets. Own equipment. $18 an hour. Sylvia 505-920-4138. Handyman, Landscaping, FREE estimates, BNS. So can you with a classified ad 505-316-6449.

WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000

CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS is committed to protecting your home. Creosote build-up in a fireplace or lint build-up in a dryer vent reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. Call 505989-5775. Get prepared! So can you with a classified ad WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000

FIREWOOD

HANDYMAN

505-983-2872, 505-470-4117

CLASSIFIEDS AFFORDABLE HOME REPAIR

Housecleaning, garage cleaning, hauling trash. Cutting Trees, Flagstone Patios, Driveways, Fencing, Yard Work, Stucco, Tile.. Greg, Nina, 920-0493. YOUR HEALTH MATTERS. We use natural products. 20 years exper ence, Residential & offices. Reliable. Excellent references. Licensed & Bonded. Eva, 505-919-9230. Elena. 505-946-7655

TRINO’S AFFORDABLE Construction all phases of construction, and home repairs. Licensed. 505-9207583

ROOFING

Heating, Plumbing, Electrical specialist. Reasonable rates. Includes mobile homes. 505-310-7552.

Dry Pinon & Cedar

Free Kindling, Delivery & Stack. 140.00 pick up load.

HANDYMAN

HEATING-PLUMBING

REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, PRO-PANEL ROOFS, PAINTING, FENCING, YARDWORK. MINOR PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL. 25 years experience. Consulting. Licensed. References. Free estimates. (505)470-5877

Where treasures are found daily Place an ad Today!

CALL 986-3000

PLASTERING 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE. Professional Plastering Specialist: Interior & Exterior. Also Re-Stuccos. Patching a specialty. Call Felix, 505-920-3853.

ALL TYPES . Metal, Shingles, Composite torch down, Hot Mop, Stucco, Plaster. Free Estimates! Call Ismael Lopez at 505-670-0760. So can you with a classified ad WE GET RESULTS! CALL 986-3000


Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds »announcements«

JANITORIAL

to place your ad, call MISCELLANEOUS JOBS

986-3000

»merchandise«

B-7

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! PETS SUPPLIES

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS ADAGIO (Canada) ELECTRIC PIANO, perfect condition, full keyboard, stool, case. $475, 505-438-0008

SILVER, DOUBLE FRENCH HORN , Holton 177, $2000, 505-672-1292.

FOUND Set of Keys found in Barrio La Canada. Call 505-920-9933 to identify.

PERSONALS LOOKING FOR LOST FRIEND. Her name is Sadie, daughter’s name is Wyetta. Contact Papa: fjtj123@myway.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

A private independent school for students in early childhood through 6th grade, is seeking candidates for the following position beginning immediately: Part-time janitor, Approximately 22.5 hours per week for the 2013-14 school year (4:00pm to 8:30pm). Additional hours may be required during special school events. Minimum 6 months janitor experience required. Duties include: General cleaning of classrooms, hallways, and bathrooms. Setting up and taking down decorations, tables, and chairs to prepare the facilities for special events. Removing snow, ice, and trash-debris from walkways and parking areas to maintain a safe environment. Interested candidates should either complete an employment application, which can be picked up at the school, or email a letter of interest, resume, and three references to rich_virgin@riograndeschool.org. Materials can also be sent to: Richard Virgin Director of Finance and Operations Rio Grande School 715 Camino Cabra Santa Fe, NM 87505; Fax 505-986-0012 Rio Grande School does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and national or ethnic origin in its hiring practices.

Support Santa Fe Animal Shelter The Leukemia Lymphoma Society (LLS) is pleased to announce our partnership with Palliative Care Services of Santa Fe in offering a new Blood Cancer Support Group in the Santa Fe area. The group is scheduled to start January 2014 and will meet on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month from 2:003:30pm. Our first group meeting is scheduled to take place on January 14th. This group is facilitated by Eileen Joyce, Palliative Care Services Director and Caregiver, Hudson Institute Certified Coach, and Certified Grief Recovery Specialist. For location or more information about the group please contact Eileen at (505) 428-0670. LLS is the world’s largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding blood cancer research and providing education and patient services. We offer a wide variety of programs and services in support of our mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS provides the following services at no cost to patients and families: -Patient Financial Aid Grant -Co-Pay Assistance Program -Peer-to-Peer Support -Family Support Groups -Local Education Programs -Trish Greene Back to School Program -Free Education Materials -Online Chats & Discussion Boards -Web Seminar/Teleconferences For more information about these services, please contact our Patient Access, Education Advocacy Manager, Ana Portillo, at (505) 8720141 or at Ana.Portillo@lls.org.

»jobs«

2014 Pet Calendar for $5! 100% of sales donated to SFAS.

986-3000

(Monday- Friday, 9-4) Home Medical Equipment retail sales, patient intakes, phone & merchandising. Must be computer literate, personable, professional, friendly, can multitask & is motivated. Must live in or near the Santa Fe. Competitive wage & benefits. Fax or email resume: (505)982-0439. hanaya@armedical.com

Marketing Associate Graphic Designer

To develop and translate marketing strategies and established brand into print and electronic design solutions including advertising (print and online), brochures, fliers, invitations, annual reports and website applications. Must be able to think creatively, be solution oriented, and have a professional approach to time, costs and deadlines with the ability to prioritize, organize and manage a substantial workload. Excellent written, oral and listening skills essential. Must possess strong computer and software skills, including Adobe Creative Suite. Desire to work in a collaborative, innovative, flexible, team oriented environment. Related experience and Bachelor’s degree preferable. Fulltime, permanent position. Competitive compensation package. EOE. Send resume and cover letter to skalyani@homewise.org.

GENERAL DENTIST (Multiple Openings)

Dental Clinics seek General Dentist at the following locations: Familia Dental ROS LLC (Roswell, NM), Familia Dental Clovis LLC (Clovis, NM), Familia Dental HOB LLC (Hobbs, NM) to diagnose and treat diseases, injuries and malformations of teeth and gums and provide preventative and corrective services. Dental License Required. Multiple Open Positions. Please send hard copy Resume and cover letter to Familia Development LLC - ATTN: Vito Losuriello, 2050 East Algonquin Road, Ste. 601, Schaumburg, IL 60173. Please include the office location you wish to apply for in the cover letter.

LPNs Tired of Traditional Nursing? Try something new with an LPN role with Corizon. Corizon is an industry leader in the growing field of correctional nursing. Correctional nursing is different with every patient, every day. In this unique clinic setting you’ll get a chance to use anad enhance your nursing skills. Corizon has excellent opportunities on 12 hour Night shifts at the Penitentiary of New Mexico in Santa Fe. If you are ready for a change and enjoy learning new skills, give us a call! Corizon offers excellent compensation, great differentials, generous PTO and comprehensive benefits.

Call: Lianne Lopez or Tisha Romero 505-827-8535 Tisha.romero@ corizonhealth.com OR Quick Apply @ www.corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR

MEDICAL OFFICE Manager, needed for single doctor practice. Responsibilities include scheduling, billing and collecting with all insurance carriers, phone and computer. Full-time, excellent pay based on experience, benefits. Immediate opening. Santa Fe. Fax Resume to 505-795-7371.

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS

Receptionist, Detailer

Tired of the same old job. Looking for something new? We need a receptionist and a vehicle detailer with experience. Don’t have the work experience, we will train the right person. For more details call 505-330-4900.

BARBER BEAUTY HONEST, RELIABLE, CARING, person with a passion for your profession. Must have clientele, provide references. 505-455-7623 (leave message).

Apply in person or send application/resume to: Geri Budenholzer Human Resources Manager The Santa Fe New Mexican 202 East Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 Or e-mail gbudenholzer@sfnewmexican. com

OFFICE SUPPLY EQUIPMENT

APPLIANCES MAYTAG DRYER. White in color. $100. 505-662-6396. WHIRLPOOL FRIDGE. Almond color. $100. 505-662-6396. WHIRLPOOL WASHER. White in color. $100. 505-662-6396.

BUILDING MATERIALS PLYWOOD. CABINET GRADE. 4’x8’ sheets. Never used. Different thicknesses. 505-983-8448. STEEL BUILDING BARGAINS ALLOCATED DISCOUNTS. We do deals. 30x40, 50x60, 100x100 and more. Total Construction and Blueprints Available.www.gosteelbuildings. com Source #18X 505-349-0493

LEATHER DESK CHAIR in very good condition: $75. 505-466-9834 or 505986-3022.

LOBO, this gorgeous Siberian Husky, will be waiting for you at the Subaru Share the Love ASPCA Rescue Rides adoption event and celebration Premier Motor Cars in the Santa Fe Auto Park. Visit Lobo and all the other wonderful animals waiting to fall in love with you at the biggest adoption event of the holidays! Get a free digital photo with Santa Paws, enter a raffle for an iPod! Heated tents; hot beverages, lots of love! Friday: noon-6 p.m. Saturday: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Premier Subaru Santa Fe Auto Park 4480 Cerrillos Road

SPORTS EQUIPMENT LL BEAN SNOWSHOES, POLES, & BAG. Used once. $100. 505-490-2494 TOP-OF-THE LINE, ELECTRICAL FOLDING BIKE. Never used. $1800. DAHON MU P8 ELECTRIC BIONX. Speed 20 miles. Perfect Christmas Present! 505-466-3747

»animals«

SELL IT, BUY IT, OR FIND IT... Using

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COMPUTERS

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000

»cars & trucks« AirPort Extreme 802.11n (5th Generation) sold "as is" in excellent condition. $70. Please call, 505-470-4371 after 6 p.m.

PART TIME Clerk to assist Attorney, in organizing records. 3 hours on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, $20 hourly. Send resume 221 Soreno Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87501.

EXERCISE EQUIPMENT

HORSES

GOLD’S GYM POWER TOWER 2500. Brand new in the box. Asking $100, Sells for over $200. 505-490-2152.

FIREWOOD-FUEL

CLASSIC CARS

Front Desk Position

Needed for busy dental practice. Dental Experience A Must! Some Saturday’s and later hours. Excellent pay. Fax resume to 505424-8535.

Email resume:

A&R Medical Supply, Santa Fe. CUSTOMER SERVICE.

This position is located at our southside location off the frontage road by I25. Pay rate is dependent upon experience. Selected candidate will be eligible to participate in our insurance and 401k plans after waiting period.

MEDICAL DENTAL

jperkins@cybermesa.com or call Julie at 505-662-4351.

ADMINISTRATIVE

Candidate must have a high school diploma or equivalent; (Associates degree preferred); be computer proficient on MAC OS9/OSX; have experience with Adobe InDesign, QuarkExpress, Photoshop and Acrobat and CMYK seps; be knowledgeable in graphic files (EPS, PDF, TIF, ETC.); have complete understanding of 2-up, 4-up and 8-up page imposition; and previous film & CTP output.

when you buy a

LAMCC seeks LPN / RN

EXPERIENCED BILINGUAL TAX PREPARER WANTED . Must have prior experience and be willing to work Saturdays. Directax 505-473-4700.

Selected candidate will operate, troubleshoot and maintain platemaking equipment, Newsway and PageImposer production systems; RIPs, imagesetters, processors and printers as needed in the daily production of the newspaper; layout classified and obituary pages using QuarkXpress; and download files from SFNM FTP site and enter them into Newsway/PageImposer.

Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

3 DAYS a week Santa Fe, Los Alamos office. Non-smoker nonsmoking household, no weekends.

ACCOUNTING

The Santa Fe New Mexican is seeking a motivated candidate to join the Pre-Press team working behind the scenes in the daily production of the newspaper.

Business Opportunity

Would you like to deliver newspapers as an independent contractor for the Santa Fe New Mexican? Operate your own business with potential profits of $1,600 a month. Call 505-986-3010 to make an appointment.

METICULOUS PERFECTIONIST 2 CLEAN HISTORIC HOME & LIVE ON GROUNDS. 505-660-6440

"ROBERT REDFORD" Mustang. 1 year gelding. 14 hands. Smart. Handsome. Honest. www.mustangcamp.org. BLM adoption, $125. John, 505-4199754.

PART TIME MACHINE ATTENDANT No Prior Machine Experience Required. Responsible for loading material, and cleaning, of production equipment. Collecting and stacking down of press, bindery, and inserted papers, Keeps all production equipment supplied with the correct materials to keep machine running at maximum efficiency. Must be able to communicate well with co workers and stand for prolonged periods with repetitive bending and lifting of 20 pounds and the ability to occasionally lift up to 75 pounds. This is an entry level position with opportunities to advance to full time employment with benefits as well as advancing to other positions in the production department. Shifts will vary based on availability, but will most likely be evening, night positions. Other full time positions also available in the department for qualified candidates with a mechanical or manufacturing background.

FIREWOOD FOR SALE Mostly cottonwood. Split and cut into Stove lengths. Good for fireplaces too. Load your own in Nambe. $150 for a full-measured cord. 505-455-2562.

1977 2-DOOR OLDSMOBILE REGAL. V8. Excellent condition. Nice paint job! Good upholstery. A bargain at $1,295 OBO. 505-412-0197, OR 505-660-0165. Toy Box Too Full? CAR STORAGE FACILITY

PETS SUPPLIES 7 MONTHS old Border Collie, male. Loves people, good with other dogs, full of energy, work potential, would excel at any sports home visit, references and adoption contract nvadim@me.com Airport Road and 599 505-660-3039

FURNITURE 4X4s

AKC AKITAS, adorable, playful, bear like pups for sale. 6 weeks old, $500. 3 males, 4 females, white, black, brindle. 505-490-3523.

Submit application to: Tim Cramer 1 New Mexican Plaza No Phone Calls please. Successful completion of a drug test will be required prior to employment offer.

2000 Jeep Cherokee Classic

RETAIL FT-PT NEEDED days, evenings, weekends. Actively engage customers to tell story of our luxury fiber clothing. 6 months retail experience preferred. Email: hr@peruvianconnection.com.

SALES MARKETING EXPERIENCED WINDOW AND DOOR SALESPERSON. Base plus commission. Quality, saleable products. Contact Doug at 505-292-5665 or dthresher@daviskitchens.com

BEAUTIFUL COUCH WITH LOVELY ACCENTS. FROM A SMOKE AND PET FREE HOME. $350. PLEASE CALL, 505-238-5711 TO SCHEDULE A VIEWING. New repo Eames Chair and Ottoman, black leather still in the box. $750. 505-474-2866 or 505-4900695.

MISCELLANEOUS FAROLITOS. $7 per dozen pick up, $9 per dozen delivered. 505-660-2583.

BENGAL KITTENS, Brown and Silver from Supreme Grand Champion. Almost ready for Christmas! $950, $1,200, $3,000. 7 2 0 - 4 3 4 - 6 3 4 4 , chateauxchampagne@gmail.com BORZOI (RUSSIAN WOLF HOUND) PUPPIES FOR SALE. READY NOW. 505988-1407

MINIATURE DACHSHUND, AKC. Longhaired female. Will stay small. Black & tan. 12 weeks old, 2 shots. Champion Sire. $600. 505-473-1622

Another sweet one owner, low mileage Cherokee. Only 91k miles, accident free, smoke free, well maintained Cherokee Classic looks new. 4.0L 6 cylinder, automatic, new tires and brakes for your safety. Excellent condition inside and out. Only $7,286. 505-954-1054.

sweetmotorsales.com


B-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

sfnm«classifieds 4X4s

2006 Kia Sportage AWD

Another sweet one owner, all wheel drive Kia. Only 75k original miles, V6, automatic, CD, new tires on alloy rims. Ashtray’s never been used. Excellent condition inside and out. $8,746. 505-954-1054.

sweetmotorsales.com

IMPORTS

2008 BMW 535-XI WAGON AUTOMATiC

Local Owner, Carfax, Service Records, Garaged, Non-Smoker, XKeys, Manuals, All Wheel Drive, Heated Steering, Navigation, So Many Options, Totally Pristine Soooo Beautiful $23,750.

to place your ad, call IMPORTS

2010 Land Rover LR2 HSE SUV. Climate Comfort Package, Bluetooth and Sirius Radio. One owner. 10,178 actual miles. No accidents! Showroom condition! $26,995. 505-474-0888.

986-3000 IMPORTS

2005 SUBARU FORESTER2.5X MANUAL

Another One Owner, Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, 85,532 Miles, Timing Belt, Seals, WaterPump done, New Tires, Pristine $9,450.

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com

VIEW VEHICLE

Paul 505-983-4945

www.santafeautoshowcase.com

Paul 505-983-4945

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! IMPORTS

2008 TOYOTA SEQUOIA 4X4 PLATINUM

IMPORTS

2011 VOLKSWAGEN JETTATDI WAGON

Another One Owner, Local, Carfax, Service Records, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Navigation, Rear Entertainment, Third Row Seat, Leather, Loaded. Pristine $28,300.

Another One Owner, 54000 Miles, Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, Service Records, Manual-6Spd, Gas saver Mpg 36-45, Loaded, Pristine $19,650.

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE

VIEW VEHICLE www .santafeautoshowcase.com

Paul 505-983-4945

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com

Paul 505-983-4945

2007 Mini Cooper S. WOW! Only 34k miles! Immaculate, 1 owner clean CarFax, turbo, well-equipped only $14,981. Call 505-216-3800.

1962 MERCEDES Unimog 404 . 23,000 original miles. Completely rebuilt. Gas engine. $16,000 OBO. 505-982-2511 or 505-670-7862

2008 BMW X5 3.0si AWD. Pristine recent trade-in, factory CERTIFIED with warranty & maintenance until 9/2014, low miles, clean CarFax $25,871. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 TOYOTA PRIUS-C3

Another one Owner, Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, 14,710 Miles, Remaining Factory Warranty, Navigation, Loaded, 53 City 46 Highway, Why Buy New Pristine $19,450.

2011 Nissan Rogue S AWD. Fresh trade-in, good miles, service up-todate, very nice, clean CarFax $15,211. Call 505-216-3800.

2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid. Another 1-owner Lexus trade-in! Super clean, recently serviced, clean CarFax $13,781. Call 505-216-3800.

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICE! VIEW VEHICLE

WE GET RESULTS!

www.santafeautoshowcase.com

So can you with a classified ad

Paul 505-983-4945

CALL 986-3000

SUVs

2010 Toyota RAV4 AWD Sport Another sweet one owner, low mileage RAV 4. Only 41k miles from new. Automatic, all wheel drive, power windows and locks, CD. Roof rack, alloy wheels and more. Pristine condition, no accidents, clean title and CarFax. Only $18,300. 505-954-1054.

sweetmotorsales.com

2006 Toyota Prius III. Only 45k miles! Hybrid, back-up camera, great fuel economy, immacualte, clean CarFax. $12,871. Call 505-2163800.

2006 BMW Z4 M

One owner, accident free, M series. Only 25k well maintained miles from new. 6 speed manual, high performance model. Pristine condition throughout. Winter sale priced $25,877. 505-954-1054.

sweetmotorsales.com 2004 Nissan Murano SE AWD. Another Lexus trade-in! Low miles, loaded, leather, moonroof, new tires, just serviced! clean CarFax $10,871. Call 505-216-3800.

IMPORTS

2009 Volkswagen Tiguan SEL AWD Turbo. Navigation, panoramic roof, NICE, clean CarFax. $16,271. Call 505-216-3800.

BMW X5 2001 Only 79,000 miles! 4.4i Big engine, Fully loaded, Sports package, Wide Tires, 5-cd changer, great sound, clean inside out. $11,500. Call 505 469-5396.

2010 Toyota Venza V6 AWD. Fully loaded with leather & panoramic roof, AWD, 1 owner clean CarFax, luxurious, practical & reliable! $24,371. Call 505-216-3800.

1995 BMW i525. Needs transmission. $1500 OBO. 505-554-6244

2004 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER-SUV 4X4

Another One Owner, Local, 85, 126 Miles, Every Service Record, Carfax, Garaged, Non-Smoker, XKeys, Manuals, Third Row Seat, New Tires, Pristine. $13,950

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2002 Porsche Boxster S

2012 Audi A3 TDI. DIESEL! Fun with amazing fuel economy! Wellequipped, 1 owner clean CarFax $25,871. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 Honda Odyssey EX-L. Another 1-owner trade! Loaded with leather and navigation, like new condition, clean CarFax. $29,911. Call 505-216-3800.

Accident free with only 65k original miles. 6 speed manual, high horsepower 3.2 motor, tan leather with heated seats. Perfect electric top with glass rear window. 4 Michelin Pilots on alloy rims. Winter sale priced at $13,888. 505-954-1054.

sweetmotorsales.com

2010 Audi Q7 Premium AWD. Pristine recent trade-in, low miles, new tires, recently serviced, clean CarFax $33,781. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 Infiniti G35X AWD. Super low miles 42k! recent trade-in, 1 owner clean CarFax, fully equipped $20,871. Call 505-216-3800.

Have a product or service to offer? Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000

2010 Chevy Equinox AWD LT V6. 28,748 miles, Pioneer Audio, Leather, Backup Camera, and much more. One owner. No accidents! $20,995. Call 505-474-0888.

VIEW VEHICLE www.santafeautoshowcase.com

Paul 505-983-4945 2009 Toyota Corolla LE. Only 53k miles! Another 1 owner clean CarFax trade-in! Super nice, fully serviced $12,961. Call 505-216-3800.

Get your headlines on the go!

2007 Subaru Forester Premium

2010 BMW 535Xi AWD. Recent trade-in, factory CERTIFIED with warranty & maintenance until 3/2016, fully loaded, clean CarFax $25,741. Call 505-216-3800.

2010 BMW X5d TURBO DIESEL. White with grey & black leather interior. 59,000 miles. Great stereo, GPS, bluetooth, satellite, heated seats, moon roof, running boards. Perfect condition. Service and extended warranty valid to 100k miles. BMW Dealership maintained. $40k or best offer. 505690-1984. 1997 850 VOLVO. Automatic, FWD. White. lGood condition. Sunroof, heated leather seats. 130k highway miles. Best offer over $2,800. 505-8198997 2004 HONDA Accord LX, super clean in and out, clear title with only 86500 mi. $5200 firm. Call or even text me 717-902-9335. Thanks

2011 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE SUV. Certified Pre-Owned, Climate Comfort Package, Satellite and HD Radio, and Anigre Wood. 30,296 miles. One owner. Showroom Condition! $51,695. 505-4740888.

2011 Land Rover Range Rover Sport Supercharged SUV. 41,772 miles. Premium Logic7 Audio Package, Black Lacquer Interior Finish. One owner. Great Condition! $57,995. 505-474-0888.

Ultra clean, all wheel drive Forester. Premium package has heated seats, panoramic moon roof, power windows, locks and driver’s seat, cruise control and more. Get a sweet deal on this Subie. Only $11,187. 505-954-1054.

sweetmotorsales.com

2008 TOYOTA Sienna LE. Just 59k miles, another 1-owner Lexus trade-in! clean CarFax, immaculate condition $15,941. Call 505-2163800.

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Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSAL Cooperative Educational Services, 4216 Balloon Park Road NE, Albuquerque, NM 87109, will receive sealed proposals until 1:30 p.m. local time, Friday, January 24, 2014, for; Category 1: Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Category 2: Propane Fuel There will be a NonRequired PreProposal Conference held on Tuesday, January 07, 2014, at 1:30 p.m. local time at the Cooperative Educational Services offices, 4216 Balloon Park Road NE, Albuquerque, NM. To participate in the PreProposal Conference by phone, contact CES’ Procurement office by phone at 505344-5470. All proposals must be submitted in a sealed envelope marked “SEALED PROPOSAL – RFP 2014-001” on the front of the envelope. A list of qualifications and specifications, instructions to bidders and RFP forms can be obtained upon request by fax (505344-9343), mail, email (bids@ces.org) or by telephone (505-3445470) from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., MondayFriday, except holidays. Cooperative Educational Services reserves the express right to accept or reject any or all bids. /s/ David Chavez, Executive Director Legal# 96156 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican December 16, 23, 2013 ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSALS RFP # ’14/15/P Proposals will be received by the City of Santa Fe and shall be delivered to the City of Santa Fe Purchasing Office, 2651 Siringo Road Building "H" Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 until 2:00 P.M. local prevailing time, January 16, 2014. Any proposal received after this deadline will not be considered. This proposal is for the purpose of procuring professional services for the following: AUTOMATED OVERHEAD TRACK GATE FOR TRANSIT DIVISION BUS YARD The proponent’s attention is directed to the fact that all applicable Federal Laws, State Laws, Municipal Ordinances, and the rules and regulations of all authorities having jurisdiction over said item shall apply to the proposal throughout, and they will be deemed to be included in the proposal document the same as though herein written out in full. The City of Santa Fe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation or national origin. The successful proponent will be required to conform to the Equal Opportunity Employment regulations. Proposals may be held for sixty (60) days subject to action by the City. The City reserves the right to reject any of all proposals in part or in whole. Proposal packets are available by contacting: Shirley Rodriguez, City of Santa Fe, Purchasing Office, 2651 Siringo Road, Building "H" Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87505, (505) 9555711. Robert Rodarte, Purchasing Officer Legal #96127 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on December 16 2013 NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on Thursday December 19, 2013 the New Mexico State Agency for Surplus Property will open Store Front Operations to the public from 9:00am to 4:00pm; at 1990 Siringo Rd., Santa Fe, NM 87505. Items for sale will include: Vehicles ranging from $700.00 to $5,000 Computer equipment ranging from $10 to $300 Office furniture ranging from $5 to $300 Grab Bags $45.00 Items are subject to change. All items are used items they are "as-is" "where-is" with no guarantee or

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g warrantee. Inspection of items will be on day of sale. All sales are final no refunds or exchanges. Only Cash, debit/credit cards or Cashiers Checks will be accepted; sorry no personal checks. For questions please call our office 476-1949.

g ta Fe, N.M. 87501. By submitting a bid for the requested materials and/or services each firm is certifying that its bid is in compliance with regulations and requirements stated within the IFB package.

LEGALS

A Pre-Bid Conference & Site Visit will be held on Monday, DeLegal#96143 Published in the San- cember 30, 2014 at ta Fe New Mexican 2:00 PM (MST) at the Public Safety December 16, 17, 18, SFC Complex located at 2013 35 Camino Justicia (off NM 14, across SANTA FE COUNTY from State PenitentiIFB# 2014-0152ary), Santa Fe, N.M. FD/PL 87508. Attendance at CONSTRUCTION the Pre-Bid ConferSERVICES FOR THE ence & Site Visit is LA CIENEGA FIRE MANDATORY. STATION NO. 2 RENOVATION/ ADDIEQUAL OPPORTUNITY TION EMPLOYMENT: All The Santa Fe County qualified bidders will Fire Department is re- receive consideration questing bids to pro- of contract(s) withcure a licensed con- out regard to race, struction company to color, religion, sex, national origin, anc o n s t r u c t renovations and addi- cestry, age, physical tions to the La and mental handicap, Cienega Fire Station serious mental condiNo. 2 located at 136 tion, disability, spousSan Jose, Santa Fe, al affiliation, sexual N.M. 87507. The work orientation or gender consists of approxi- identity. mately 807 square feet addition as well Information on Invitaas a 2,128 square feet tion for Bid packages renovation to the ex- is available by conisting station plus t a c t i n g site work. Bids may plindsta@santafecou be held for ninety ntynm.gov. A copy of (90) days subject to the advertisement inall action by the formation will also be County. Santa Fe located on the Santa County reserves the Fe County website at right to reject any http://www.santafec and all bids in part or ountynm.gov/service in whole. A complet- s / c u r r e n t ed bid package must solicitations. be submitted in a sealed container indi- Bid documents will cating the bid title be available at ConReporter, and number along struction with the bidding 1609 2nd St. NW, AlNM firm’s name and ad- buquerque, dress clearly marked 87102, phone# 505243-9793. A deposit of on the outside of the container. All bids $150.00 per set will be must be received by required from interbidders re2:00 PM (MST) on ested Thursday, January 23, questing copies of 2014 at the Santa Fe the bid documents County Purchasing with a limit of two Division, located at sets per contractor, 142 W. Palace Ave- one set per subconnue, (2nd floor tractor. The deposit Bokum Building), San- shall be in the form of

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to place legals, call

986-3000

LEGALS

a cashier’s check, Las Cruces, NM 88007 payable to (Santa Fe County or [Bidder’s /s/: Randi Jo Roberts Name]). Personal Representative BIDS RECEIVED AFTER 8052 Renoir Drive THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED ABOVE Legal#96145 WILL NOT BE ACCEPT- Published in the SanED. ta Fe New Mexican Legal #96113 December 16, 23, 2013 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on THE POJOAQUE December 16 2013 VALLEY SCHOOLS Student Services OfSTATE OF fice has initiated the NEW MEXICO process for destrucCOUNTY OF tion of records. StuSANTA FE dents FIRST JUDICIAL who were in attendDISTRICT ance from 2004-2008 who received Special No. D-101-PB-2013Education services 00194 may pick up their Judge: Raymond Special Education reOrtiz cords at: Student Services, In the Matter of the at Pablo Roybal Estate of Jason Elementary, Room A1, Todhunter Roberts, 1574 State Road Deceased, 502, Santa Fe, NM 87506, M-F, 8-4. NOTICE IS HEREBY Please call 455-0801 GIVEN that Gregory with any questions. Todhunter Roberts Final destruction of and Randi Jo Roberts records will occur on have been appointed January 17, 2014. personal representa- Legal #96126 tive of this estate. All Published in The Sanpersons having ta Fe New Mexican on claims against the es- December 16, 17, 18, tate are required to 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26, present their claims 27, 30, 31 2013 within two months after the date of the FIRST JUDICIAL DISfirst publication of TRICT COURT this notice or the COUNTY OF SANTA claims will be forever FE barred. Claims must STATE OF NEW MEXbe presented either ICO to the undersigned personal representa- NO. D-101-CV-2013tive at the address 01321 shown in this notice or filed with the COUNTY OF SANTA court. FE, ex rel. SANTA FE COUNTY The attorney for the SHERIFF’S DEPARTpersonal representa- MENT, tive is William L. Lutz Plaintiff, of the law firm of Martin, Lutz, Roggow vs. & Eubanks, P.C., 2110 North Main Street, ONE 1996 WHITE Las Cruces, New Mex- DODGE PICKUP ico 88001. VIN NO. 1B7KF23Z7TJ151011 DATED this 3rd day of NEW MEXICO LIDecember CENSE NO. LYL537, Defendant. /s/: Gregory Todhunter Roberts NOTICE OF SUIT Personal Representative TO: ANTHONY 8052 Renoir Drive

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PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE OF FILING OF APPLICATION BY THE SANTA FE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AGENCY FOR A SOLID WASTE LANDFILL PERMIT RENEWAL AND MODIFICATION INCLUDING A LATERAL AND VERTICAL EXPANSION AND ADDITION OF SPECIAL WASTES AT THE CAJA DEL RIO LANDFILL, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO Pursuant to Section 22 of the New Mexico Solid Waste Act (NMSA 1978, section 74-9-22), and Subsection G of 20.9.3.8 NMAC (the Rules), notice is hereby given to the public and other potentially affected individuals and entities that the Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency has filed an application with the Solid Waste Bureau of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) to renew and modify the solid waste facility permit (the Permit) for Caja del Rio Landfill (Landfill). The application documents will be available for review at the addresses listed in Section 5 of this Notice. Pertinent information required by the Act and the Rules is as follows: 1. Name, Address and Phone Number of Applicant Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency 149 Wildlife Way Santa Fe, NM 87506 (505) 424-1850

LEGALS ARCHULETA The above-captioned action has been filed to seek forfeiture of the above-described motor vehicle. If no response is filed on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you in favor of the Plaintiff. The name and address of Plaintiff’s attorney: Timothy J. Vigil, Counsel for Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department, P.O. Box 276, or 102 Grant Avenue, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504, (505) 986-6279. WITNESS the HONORABLE RAYMOND Z. ORTIZ, District Judge of the First Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Santa Fe County, this date of November 18, 2013. Legal #96038 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican on December 2, 9, and 16, 2013 Santa Fe County is Seeking Citizens to Serve on the Santa Fe County DWI Planning Council (DWIPC) Santa Fe, NM - November 14, 2013 Santa Fe County is seeking community members with a background in law enforcement, emergency services, media, or courts/judicial

toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com LEGALS

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j to serve on the DWI Planning Council. Members are volunteers appointed by the Santa Fe Board of County Commissioners (BCC).

( 9841 E - M a i l : mgarcia@santafecou ntynm.gov

g scheduled for December 12, 2013, January 9, 2014, and February 13, 2014.

Anyone interested in being appointed to the DWI Planning Council must attend at least two DWI Planning Council meetings in order to be eligible to be recommended for appointment. The meetings are held every second (2nd) Thursday of each month at 9:00am and will be held at 2052 Galisteo Street, Suite B Conference Room. The next meetings are scheduled for December 12, 2013, January 9, 2014, and February 13, 2014. A background check will be required for all applicants chosen to serve on the DWIPC. Anyone interested in being appointed to the DWIPC should submit a letter of interest, resume, questionnaire, and conflict of interest form (Please call or send an email requesting questionnaire and conflict of interest form) to: Santa Fe County Health & Human Services Division Attention: Marie Garcia 2052 Galisteo Street Suite A Santa Fe, NM 87505 Phone #: (505)-992-

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Application Deadline A background is February 14, 2014 at check will be re5 p.m. quired for all applicants chosen to Legal#95974 serve on the DWIPC. Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican Anyone interested in November 19, Decem- being appointed to ber 16, 2013 the DWIPC should submit a letter of inSanta Fe County is terest, resume, quesSeeking Citizens to tionnaire, and conflict interest form Serve on the Santa Fe of County DWI Planning (Please call or send an email requesting Council (DWIPC) questionnaire and conflict of interest Santa Fe, NM – No- form) to: vember 14, 2013 Fe County Santa Fe County is Santa & Human seeking community Health members with a Services Division background in law Attention: Marie Garenforcement, emer- cia gency services, me- 2052 Galisteo Street – dia, or courts/judicial Suite A to serve on the DWI Santa Fe, NM 87505 Planning Council. Phone #: (505)-992Members are volun- 9841 teers appointed by E - M a i l : the Santa Fe Board of mgarcia@santafecou County Commission- ntynm.gov ers (BCC). Application DeadAnyone interested in line is February 14, 2014 at 5 p.m. being appointed to the DWI Planning Council must attend Legal #96031 at least two DWI Published in the SanPlanning Council ta Fe New Mexican on meetings in order to November 20 & Debe eligible to be rec- cember 16, 2013 ommended for appointment. The meetings are held every second (2nd) Thursday of each month at 9:00am and will be held at 2052 Galisteo Street, Suite B Conference Room. T h e next meetings are

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To Place a Legal ad 986-3000

AVISO PÚBLICO AVISO PÚBLICO DE LA PRESENTACIÓN DE UNA SOLICITUD POR PARTE DE SANTA FE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AGENCY PARA LA RENOVACIÓN Y LA MODIFICACIÓN DE UN PERMISO CORRESPONDIENTE A UN RELLENO SANITARIO PARA RESIDUOS SÓLIDOS, QUE INCLUYE UNA AMPLIACIÓN LATERAL Y VERTICAL, Y EL AGREGADO DE RESIDUOS ESPECIALES PARA EL RELLENO SANITARIO CAJA DEL RIO, SANTA FE, NUEVO MÉXICO De conformidad con la Sección 22 de la Ley de Nuevo México sobre Residuos Sólidos (NMSA 1978, sección 74-9-22) y la Subsección G de 20.9.3.8 NMAC (el Reglamento), por este medio se les notifica al público y a otras personas y entidades potencialmente afectadas que Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency ha presentado ante la Oficina de Residuos Sólidos del Departamento del Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México (NMED por su sigla en inglés) una solicitud para renovar y modificar el Permiso correspondiente a un relleno sanitario para residuos sólidos (el Permiso) para el Relleno sanitario Caja del Rio (Relleno sanitario). Los documentos correspondientes a esta solicitud estarán a disposición de los interesados en la dirección que aparece en la Sección 5 de este Aviso. A continuación se detalla la información pertinente según lo exigido por la Ley y el Reglamento: 1. Nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del Solicitante Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency 149 Wildlife Way Santa Fe, NM 87506 (505) 424-1850 2. Fecha prevista para el comienzo de la renovación y modificación y horario de funcionamiento El Relleno sanitario es un vertedero de residuos sólidos existente que funciona bajo el Permiso Núm. SWM-261708 y SWM-030706(SP) otorgado por el NMED en junio de 1995. El Relleno sanitario seguirá funcionando bajo su permiso ya existente hasta que el Secretario del NMED decida emitir, emitir con condiciones o negar el permiso para la renovación y modificación. La fecha prevista de comienzo para la ampliación vertical y lateral propuesta será enero de 2015 si se emitiera el permiso para la renovación y modificación. El horario de funcionamiento del Relleno sanitario es de 7 de la mañana a 5 de la tarde de lunes a domingo, aunque este horario varía según las estaciones del año. El Relleno sanitario está cerrado al público durante tres días feriados importantes (Día de Acción de Gracias, Navidad y Año Nuevo). 3. Descripción de las instalaciones

2. Anticipated Start-Up Date of Renewal and Modification and Hours of Operation The Landfill is an existing solid waste facility operating under Permit No. SWM-261708 and SWM030706(SP) issued by the NMED in June 1995. The Landfill will continue to operate under its existing permit until the NMED Secretary decides whether to issue, issue with conditions, or to deny the permit for renewal and modification. The anticipated start-up date for the proposed vertical and lateral expansion will be January 2015 if the renewal and modification permit is issued. Operating hours for the Landfill are 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Sunday, although these hours vary seasonally. The Landfill is closed to the public on three major holidays (Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day). 3. Description of the Facility (a) General Process: The Landfill currently accepts residential, commercial, construction and demolition debris, green waste and manure for composting, and two special wastes (sludge and petroleum contaminated soils) as defined in the Act and the Rules. The Landfill receives solid waste from registered commercial haulers and self haulers. The solid waste is placed and compacted in lined cells that are protected by environmental control systems; including, but not limited to, leachate collection systems, composite liners, landfill gas control system, and storm water management controls. Upon final receipt of solid waste, the Landfill will be capped with a final cover in accordance with the Rules. Special wastes are processed in accordance with the applicable Rules. At the end of each working day, the working face of the of the municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal area is covered with at least six inches of soil or an alternative daily cover as approved by NMED. The Landfill also has a mulching and composting program to divert green waste and manure from disposal at the Landfill. This Application for Permit Renewal and Modification is for a single facility. (b) Location: The Landfill is located approximately 7 miles west of the City of Santa Fe in Township 17 North, Range 8 East, and Sections 21, 22, 27 and 28, in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. (c) Size: The area within the permitted Landfill boundary is 495 acres. Within the permitted boundary the existing West Phase of the Landfill consists of approximately 87 acres of lined landfill used for disposal of MSW and C&D. The proposed East Phase lateral expansion is within the permitted boundary and will consist of approximately 54 additional acres of lined landfill area for disposal of MSW and C&D. (d) Quantities and Rate of Solid Waste: The Landfill currently receives about 450 to 500 tons of solid waste per day, but may receive more or less solid waste on a given day depending upon the volume of waste. The landfill will also accept the special wastes listed in (e) below. The estimated annual tonnage of each special waste to be received by the landfill is also included.

(a) Proceso general: El Relleno sanitario actualmente acepta residuos residenciales, comerciales, escombros de construcción y demolición (C&D por su sigla en inglés), residuos verdes y abono para compostaje, y dos tipos de residuos especiales (lodo y tierra contaminada con petróleo) según las definiciones de la Ley y el Reglamento. El Relleno sanitario recibe residuos sólidos de transportistas comerciales registrados y de transportistas autónomos. Los residuos sólidos son colocados y compactados en celdas revestidas que están protegidas por sistemas de control ambiental; que incluyen, entre otros, sistemas de recolección de lixiviados, revestimientos compuestos, sistema de control de gases del relleno sanitario y controles para la gestión de aguas pluviales. Al recibirse los últimos residuos sólidos, el Relleno sanitario se cubrirá con una cubierta final conforme al Reglamento. Los residuos especiales son procesados conforme al Reglamento correspondiente. Al final de cada día laboral, la superficie de trabajo del área de depósito de residuos sólidos municipales (MSW por su sigla en inglés) se cubre con un mínimo de seis pulgadas de tierra o una cubierta alternativa diaria como lo apruebe el NMED. El Relleno sanitario tiene también un programa de trituración y compostaje para desviar los residuos verdes y el abono del Relleno sanitario. Esta Solicitud de Renovación y Modificación del Permiso es para un vertedero único. (b) Ubicación: El Relleno sanitario está ubicado aproximadamente a 7 millas al oeste de la Ciudad de Santa Fe, en el Distrito Municipal (Township) 17 Norte, Zona (Range) 8 Este, y las Secciones 21, 22, 27 y 28, en el Condado de Santa Fe, Nuevo México. (c) Tamaño: La superficie incluida dentro de los límites del Relleno sanitario autorizado es de 495 acres. Dentro de los límites autorizados, la Fase Oeste existente del Relleno sanitario consta de aproximadamente 87 acres de relleno sanitario revestido para depósito de MSW y C&D. La ampliación lateral Fase Este propuesta se encuentra dentro de los límites autorizados y constará de aproximadamente 54 acres adicionales de superficie de relleno sanitario revestido para depósito de MSW y C&D. (d) Cantidad y frecuencia de los depósitos de residuos sólidos: El Relleno sanitario recibe actualmente alrededor de 450 a 500 toneladas de residuos sólidos por día, pero puede recibir más o menos residuos sólidos en determinados días según sea el volumen de residuos. El relleno sanitario también aceptará los residuos especiales que se detallan en el punto (e). También se incluye el tonelaje anual estimado para cada tipo de residuo especial que se recibirá en el relleno sanitario. (e) Tipos de residuos sólidos: El Relleno sanitario seguirá aceptando residuos sólidos, incluidos los siguientes residuos no peligrosos: Residuos sólidos municipales residenciales, residuos sólidos comerciales, y escombros de construcción y demolición.

(e) Types of Solid Wastes: The Landfill will continue to accept solid waste, including the following nonhazardous wastes: residential municipal solid waste, commercial solid waste, and construction and demolition debris. The Landfill will continue to accept sludge (1700 tons/year) and petroleum containing soils (360 tons/year), which are non-hazardous special wastes. In addition, the Landfill is requesting approval to dispose of the following non-hazardous special wastes: industrial solid waste (10 tons/year), spill of a chemical substance or commercial product (10 tons/year), treated formerly characteristic hazardous waste (1 ton/year) and vehicle wash sump waste (28 tons/year). (f) Description of the Modification: Permit modification is requested to obtain approval for disposal of four additional special wastes; to increase the final grade elevation of the West Phase 40 feet above the current permitted elevation (85 to 95 feet above ground level); to horizontally expand the current Landfill to the east, referred to as the East Phase increasing the lined landfill area by approximately 54 additional acres that extends 70 to 110 feet above ground level; to update the landfill management plans, closure/post-closure cost estimate, and related financial assurance; and to provide upgrades to the engineering plans that incorporate the most recent design philosophies and technologies. If approved in 2015, the permit would be granted until 2035. 4. Origin of Waste Currently, the Landfill only accepts waste originating within the City and County of Santa Fe as required by the Joint Powers Agreement between the City and County of Santa Fe. 5. Comments The Permit Application is available for public review at the two locations listed below. Comments regarding this Permit Application should be directed to the Applicant and the New Mexico Environment Department at the following points of contact: Applicant: Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency Caja del Rio Landfill 149 Wildlife Way Santa Fe, NM 87506 Attn: Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Tele: (505) 424-1850

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New Mexico Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau 1190 St. Francis Drive PO Box 26110 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Attn: George Schuman, Permits Section Manager Tele: (505) 827-2328

Legal#000000 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican ????

Legal #96121 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on December 16, 2013

El Relleno sanitario seguirá aceptando lodo (1700 toneladas/año) y tierra con petróleo (360 toneladas por año), los cuales son residuos especiales no peligrosos. Asimismo, el Relleno sanitario solicita la aprobación para el depósito de los siguientes residuos especiales no peligrosos: Residuos sólidos industriales (10 toneladas/año), derrames de sustancias químicas o productos comerciales (10 toneladas/año), residuos anteriormente peligrosos característicos tratados (1 tonelada/año) y residuos de sumideros del lavado de vehículos (28 toneladas/año). (f) Descripción de la modificación: Se solicita la modificación del permiso para obtener la aprobación para el depósito de cuatro tipos de residuos especiales adicionales; para aumentar la cota de nivelación final de la Fase Oeste 40 pies por encima de la cota actual permitida (85 a 95 pies por encima del nivel del suelo); para ampliar horizontalmente el Relleno sanitario actual hacia el este, llamada Fase Este, al aumentar la superficie de relleno sanitario revestido en aproximadamente 54 acres adicionales, que se extiende 70 a 110 pies por encima del nivel del suelo; para actualizar los planes de gestión del relleno sanitario, calcular los costos de cierre/posteriores al cierre y la seguridad financiera relacionada; y para proporcionar actualizaciones de los planes ingenieriles que incorporan las más recientes filosofías de diseño y tecnologías. De ser aprobado en 2015, el permiso tendría vigencia hasta el año 2035. 4. Origen de los residuos Actualmente, el Relleno sanitario sólo recibe residuos procedentes de la Ciudad y el Condado de Santa Fe según lo exigido por el Acuerdo de Autoridades Conjuntas entre la Ciudad y el Condado de Santa Fe. 5. Comentarios La Solicitud del Permiso está a disposición del público para su revisión en las dos direcciones que se indican a continuación. Los comentarios relativos a esta Solicitud de Permiso deben dirigirse al Solicitante y al Departamento del Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México en los siguientes puntos de contacto: Solicitante:

Departamento del Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México: Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Agency Solid Waste Bureau Caja del Rio Landfill 1190 St. Francis Drive 149 Wildlife Way PO Box 26110 Santa Fe, NM 87506 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Attn: Mr. Randall Kippenbrock, P.E. Attn: George Schuman, Permits Section Manager Tel.: (505) 424-1850 Tel.: (505) 827-2328 Legal #96120 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on December 16 2013


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THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December 16, 2013

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS

LEGALS

FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SAN- The name and adTA FE STATE OF NEW dress of Plaintiff’s attorney: Timothy J. MEXICO Case No. 2013-00215

Vigil, Counsel for San-

D-0101-PB- ta Fe County Sheriff’s

Department, P.O. Box 276, or 102 Grant Ave-

IN THE MATTER OF THE nue, Santa Fe, New ESTATE OF Mexico 87504, (505) THOMAS D. REES, De- 986-6279. ceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS Notice is hereby given that Bruce Bodner, whose address is c/o Catron, Catron, Pottow & Glassman, P.A., has been appointed Personal Representative of Thomas D. Rees, deceased. Creditors of decedent must present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred. CATRON, CATRON, POTTOW & GLASSMAN, P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representative Post Office Box 788 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504 (505)982-1947 By Fletcher R. Catron Legal#96112 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican on: December 9, 16, 2013

WITNESS the HONORABLE RAYMOND Z. ORTIZ, District Judge of the First Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Santa Fe County, this date of November 18, 2013. Legal #96184 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican on December 2, 9, and 16, 2013 FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SANTA FE STATE OF NEW MEXICO NO. D-101-CV-201302388 COUNTY OF SANTA FE, ex rel. SANTA FE COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT, Plaintiff,

FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SANTA vs. FE STATE OF NEW MEX- ONE 1991 CADILLAC DEVILLE ICO VIN NO. 1G 6C D53B2M 425541 NO. D-101-CV-20130 01320 NEW MEXICO LICOUNTY OF SANTA CENSE NO. NONE, Defendant. FE, ex rel. SANTA FE COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTNOTICE OF SUIT MENT, Plaintiff, TO: GREG NERIA vs. The above-captioned ONE BROWN 1977 action has been filed to seek forfeiture of VOLKSWAGON VAN the above-described VIN NO. 2272108094 NEW MEXICO LI- motor vehicle. If no response is filed on CENSE NO. 465PAC, or before 30 days afDefendant. ter the last publication date, judgment NOTICE OF SUIT by default will be enTO: RAYMOND L. tered against you in favor of the Plaintiff. SELF, JR. The above-captioned action has been filed to seek forfeiture of the above-described motor vehicle. If no response is filed on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you in favor of the Plaintiff.

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The name and address of Plaintiff’s attorney: Timothy J. Vigil, Counsel for Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department, P.O. Box 276, or 102 Grant Avenue, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504, (505) 986-6279. WITNESS the HONO-

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to place legals, call

986-3000

LEGALS

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RABLE SARAH SINGLETON, District Judge of the First Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Santa Fe County, this date of N o v e m ber 21, 2013.

tee reports, and discuss health facility policies and quality assurance/performan ce improvement activities and reports, as well as any other business that may regularly come before the Governing Board. A copy of the agenda for the meeting will be available on January 6, 2014 in the Office of the Secretary, located at: 1190 St. Francis Dr. Suite N-3050, Santa Fe, NM 87502. Webcast is available through the Department of Health link and is listed on the open meeting web page at: http://nmhealth.org/ openmeeting/. The email address for questions is: nmdoh.openmeetings @state.nm.us If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the hearing or meeting, please contact the department at least one (1) week prior to the meeting or as soon as possible. Public documents, including the agenda and minutes, can be provided in various accessible formats. Please contact Cathy Thompson at 505-8272701 if you have any questions. The public is welcome to attend this meeting.

UNIFUND CCR PARTNERS, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF THELMA J. ULERY, IF ANY, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRISTOPHER M. ULERY, IF ANY AND MARGARET ULERY,

STEPHEN T. PACHECO CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Jill Nohl Deputy Legal #96173 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on December 9, 16 and 23, 2013. Notice of Meeting LEGAL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) will hold a Special Board Meeting on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 at 3:00 p.m. at Santa Fe Community College, President’s Conference Room #108, 6401 Richards Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87508. Please note the new time of 3:00 p.m. Board meetings are open to the public. If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of any form of auxiliary aid, service or special assistance to attend or participate in the meeting, please contact the President’s Office at 428-1148 at least 24 hours before the meeting. An agenda will be available from the President’s Office 72 hours prior to the meeting. Legal #96128 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on December 16, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE

MEETING

The Governing Board of the New Mexico Department of Health Facilities and Los Lunas Community Program will hold a regular meeting on Thursday, January 16, 2014 at 10:00am12:00pm. This meeting will be held at Turquoise Lodge hospital, located at: 5901 Zuni Rd. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108. The Governing Board will receive commit-

Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named Defendants Christopher M. Ulery and The Unknown Spouse of Christopher M. Ulery, if any. GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the abovenamed Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 38 Winding Road, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: Tract C, as shown and delineated on plat of survey entitled "Plat of Survey for Roy Crum within the Sebastian de Vargas Grant, Santa Fe County, New Mexico", filed May 3, 1974 and recorded in plat book 52, page 001, Real Property Records of Santa Fe County, New Mexico.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause Legal #96177 Published in The San- on or before 30 days ta Fe New Mexican on after the last publication date, judgment December 16, 2013. by default will be entered against you. STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE Respectfully Submitted, FIRST JUDICIAL THE CASTLE LAW DISTRICT GROUP, LLC Case No. D-101-CV2013-01929 By: /s/ __Steven J. ElectroniCITIMORTGAGE, INC., Lucero__ SUCCESSOR BY cally Filed MERGER TO ABN Steven J. Lucero AMRO MORTGAGE 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 GROUP, INC., Albuquerque, NM 87102 Plaintiff, Telephone: (505) 8489500 v. Fax: (505) 848-9516 THELMA J. ULERY, Attorney for Plaintiff CHRISTOPHER M. ULERY, DISCOVER NM13-00502_FC01 BANK, CACH LLC,

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toll free: 800.873.3362 email: legal@sfnewmexican.com

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

_

y tered against you. Legal #96178 Respectfully Submit- Legal# 96159 Published in The San- ted, Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican on ta Fe New Mexican December 9, 16 and THE ROSS FIRM, LLC December 16, 23, 2013 23, 2013. By: /s/ Gregory S.H. Ross, Esq. ElectroniSTATE OF cally Filed STATE OF NEW NEW MEXICO 532 Alto Street No. 1 MEXICO COUNTY OF Santa Fe, NM 87504 COUNTY OF SANTA SANTA FE Telephone: (505) 954FE FIRST JUDICIAL IN THE DISTRICT 1559 DISTRICT COURT THEROSSIRM@MAC.C OM No. D-101-CV-2009PROBATE NO. D-101Attorney For Petition- PB-2013-00210 02929 er IN RE 10 COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF WITNESS the Honora- THE ESTATE OF MARY ROAD 89D ble RAYMOND Z. ANN CALDWELL, DEDISTRICT CEASED Mary Edna Geraldine ORTIZ, COURT JUDGE, of the Padilla, Petitioner v. Javier Gallegos and First Judicial District NOTICE TO Robert Christopher Court, Santa Fe CounCREDITORS ty, New Mexico, this Rivera, Respondents. NOTICE OF PENDENCY 8th day of November, Bonita J. Mamp has 2013. OF SUIT been appointed PerGREETINGS JAVIER sonal Representative Legal#95973 GALLEGOS and ROBof the Estate of Mary ERT CHRISTOPHER Published in the San- Ann Caldwell, deRIVERA: You are here- ta Fe New Mexican ceased. All persons by notified that the December 9, 16, 23 having claims against above-named Peti- 2013 this estate are retioner has filed a civil quired to present action in the aboveSTATE OF their claims within entitled Court and NEW MEXICO two months after the cause, the general COUNTY OF first publication of object thereof being SANTA FE this Notice or the to quite title on propIN THE DISTRICT claims will be forever erty located at 10 COURT barred. Claims must County Road 89D, NM be presented either 87015, Santa Fe Coun- PROBATE NO. D-101- to the Personal Repty, New Mexico, said PB-2013-00205 resentative at c/o Juproperty being more dith Polich, Esq, 223 particularly descri- IN THE MATTER OF N. Guadalupe, #404, bed as: THE ESTATE OF E. Santa Fe, NM 87501 or a certain parcel of BROOKS SHERA, DE- filed with the District land, being a portion CEASED Court of Santa Fe, of Exception 377, priNew Mexico. vate claim 469 of the NOTICE TO Pojoaque Pueblo CREDITORS Dated: 12/10/2013 Grant in section 20, T19N, R9E, N.M.P.M. Karen S. Stoll has /s/: Judith Polich, Esq Said parcel is the been appointed Per- Attorney for Personal same as conveyed sonal Representative Representative from Carlota R. de of the Estate of E. Judith Polich ProfesRoybal, and Brooks Shera, de- sional Services, PC Ascencion R. de ceased. All persons 223 N. Guadalupe St Roybal, heirs of having claims against #404 Abundia Romero to this estate are re- Santa Fe, NM 87501 Jose J. Romero also quired to present 505-986-1083 heir of Abundia Ro- their claims within mero on February 21, two months after the Legal# 96160 1942 and recorded as first publication of Published in the Sandocument No. this Notice or the ta Fe New Mexican 284,653, on July 9, claims will be forever December 16, 23, 2013 1965 in Book 226, barred. Claims must page 444. Said parcel be presented either STATE OF NEW MEXIof land contains 22 to the Personal Rep- CO IN THE PROBATE yards wide and is resentative at c/o Ju- COURT SANTA FE bounded as follows, dith Polich, Esq, 223 COUNTY South Rio Tesuque, N. Guadalupe, #404, West formerly Santa Fe, NM 87501 or IN THE MATTER OF Carlota R. Roybal, filed with the District THE ESTATE OF MARIA now Jose L. Roybal, Court of Santa Fe, S. VIGIL, DECEASED. North Pojoaque Pue- New Mexico. No. 2013-0058 blo Land and public road, East formerly Dated: 12/6/2013 NOTICE TO Elviria M. Romero, CREDITORS Now Antonio Ortis. /s/: Judith Polich, Esq NOTICE IS HEREBY Unless you serve a Attorney for Personal GIVEN that the underpleading or motion in Representative signed has been apresponse to the com- Jusith Polich Profes- pointed personal repplaint in said cause sional Services, PC resentative of this eson or before 30 days 223 N. Guadalupe St tate. All persons havafter the last publica- #404 ing claims against tion date, judgment Santa Fe, NM 87501 this estate are reby default will be en- 505-986-1083 quired to present

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LEGALS q p their claims within two(2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at the following address: 102 Grant Ave., Santa Fe New Mexico 87501 Dated:December 10, 2013 Claudio A. Vigil Signature of Personal Representative 1801 Rio Grande Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104 505-842-1113 Legal#96188 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican on: December 16, 23, 2013 The New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange (NMHIX) Board of Directors will hold a Special Board Meeting at 8:30 AM to 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 at the Albuquerque Marriott Pyramid located at 5151 San Francisco Road NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico. If an individual with a disability is in need of a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the meeting, please contact the NMHIX office at 1505-314-5200 prior to the meeting. The agenda for the meeting shall be available at least seventy two (72) hours before the meeting at (1) the administrative offices of the NMHIX, located at 6301 Indian School Road NE #100, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and (2) on the NMHIX website, http://www.nmhix.co m/. Interested persons may also contact the NMHIX at 1505-314-5200 or by email at lgarcia@nmhix.com for a copy of the agenda. Legal#96052 Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican December 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 2013

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Monday, December 16, 2013 THE NEW MEXICAN

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

TIME OUT Horoscope

Crossword

The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Dec. 16, 2013: This year you experience a lot of interpersonal communication. Prioritizing becomes even more important than it has been in the past. Gemini likes to play devil’s advocate. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your inquisitiveness will come out, no matter what you do. Someone might not give you all the facts, or perhaps you could misunderstand where this person is coming from. Know that he or she might not understand that you expect such complete responses. Tonight: Hang out. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You could have an edge to your voice or a hardness in your expression that others pick up on, and you might not even be aware of it. Tonight: Off to the gym. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You’ll barrel right through a difficult moment. Know that a misunderstanding is at the base of the problem. Backtrack without reacting. Tonight: All smiles. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HH Go within yourself for answers, especially as they won’t be easily available. Be aware of the impressions that others might be receiving. Tonight: Make it early. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Confusion could to lead to taking a step off the right path. In fact, this miniblunder could give you a lot of information about someone. onight: Keep your focus. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Pressure builds, and you could go on autopilot without even realizing it. Slow down, or choose a reliable stressbuster to relieve the tension. Tonight: A force to be dealt with.

Super Quiz Take this Super Quiz to a Ph.D. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Subject: DERIVATIONS

GRADUATE LEVEL 4. Jeans

After what geographical location is the item ostensibly named?

Answer________

(e.g., Fig Newton. Answer: Newton,

5. Damask

Mass.)

Answer________ 6. Denim Answer________

FRESHMAN LEVEL

PH.D. LEVEL

1. Bikini

7. Bungalow

Answer________

Answer________

2. Tangerines

8. Muslin

Answer________

Answer________

3. Wieners

9. Pilsner lager

Answer________

Answer________

ANSWERS:

1. Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands. 2. Tangier, Morocco. 3. Vienna, Austria. 4. Genoa, Italy. 5. Damascus, Syria. 6. Nimes, France. 7. Bengal, India. 8. Mosul, Iraq. 9. Plzen, Czech Republic. SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? (c) 2013 Ken Fisher

Cryptoquip

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error. © 2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

B-11

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Keep reaching out to someone you care about. This person might have been distancing him- or herself as of late. Tonight: Use your imagination.

Teen feels forced into Confirmation

Dear Annie: I am 14 years old and facing a dilemma. My father isn’t particularly religious, but my mother is a strict Catholic, and my older sister and brother have been Confirmed. I have another six months before I am expected to go through the process of the sacrament of Confirmation. I do not want to do this. But as the time approaches, my mother has become increasingly forceful on the subject. I do not share my mother’s beliefs, although I do believe in God. My father supports my choice, and I’ve tried to explain it to my mother, but she won’t have any of it. She continues to send me to religious classes, which I consider a complete waste of my time, and it results in some very awkward conversations because I find myself hiding my beliefs. When I once refused to attend the classes, my mother threatened to call my school and have me taken off of student council and the soccer team. I know her stubbornness has other causes, including pleasing family members who are deeply religious and have always resented my father’s agnosticism. But time is running out, and Mom has only become more aggressive. If I resist, there will be huge consequences. I don’t feel I can take part in such an important religious event if I am not fully committed to it. I even talked to Mom about postponing it for a few years, which would be allowed in our diocese, but she rejected that idea. How can I convince her that she is being unreasonable? — Frustrated Son Dear Frustrated: You can’t. Your mother is in panic mode, frightened for your religious future and concerned that her family will disapprove of the way she raised you. Your best bet is to talk to your priest and ask him to intervene. While he is unlikely to support your decision not to be confirmed, he may be able to convince Mom that waiting is in everyone’s best interest, and she is

Sheinwold’s bridge

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Deal with a partner directly. Realize that you might need to have a talk about your finances and your chosen direction with a different key person in your life. Tonight: Make nice over dinner. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might feel as if you have to defer to someone else. You actually might be misreading the situation. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s suggestion. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Dive headfirst into whatever you must do, whether it involves working on a project or running errands. Tonight: Play it light and easy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Your creativity will emerge as a result of a misunderstanding. You might need to keep the peace or at least distract others from what is happening. Tonight: Pretend it is still the weekend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You might be taken aback by your anxiety. You could feel very uptight about what is going on, more so than usual. Unknowingly, you might be responding to the planetary vibes. Tonight: Head home early. Jacqueline Bigar

Chess quiz

WHITE HAS A CRUSHER Hint: Threaten checkmate. Solution: 1. Rh1! (with the lethal threat of 2. Rxh6ch gxh6 3. Qh7 mate).

Today in history Today is Monday, Dec. 16, the 350th day of 2013. There are 15 days left in the year. Today’s highlight in history: On Dec. 16, 1773, the Boston Tea Party took place as American colonists boarded a British ship and dumped more than 300 chests of tea into Boston Harbor to protest tea taxes.

Hocus Focus

more apt to listen to him. Dear Annie: I am a senior citizen with an issue regarding children who use the restroom without being educated or properly trained in etiquette. I have seen kids standing three feet from the toilet (because they are too short to use the urinal) and spraying the seat. This is not a competition to see how far away you can be and still hit the target. Some parents are concerned about germs and tell their kids not to touch the seat, so you can imagine the messes I have witnessed when using a public restroom. Also, please teach the child to flush after himself. I realize this is a particularly difficult issue for single mothers who can’t go into the men’s room with their sons. Please address this. — T.S. Dear T.S.: We appreciate your concern, and we hope parents are paying attention. However, we’re fairly certain that most parents already teach their sons how to use the toilet, because they don’t want to clean up a mess at home, either. Public restrooms pose difficulties because opposite-sex parents cannot supervise, and the kids can become either anxious or reckless. But not all accidents are caused by young children. Adults do their share, too. Dear Annie: Your response to “Concerned Cutter in N.Y.” to post a sign in his barbershop saying that cellphone use is prohibited while in the chair is good. I have a better one. There’s an old saying that time is money. It certainly takes more time to cut hair if the patron is chatting on a cellphone. How about posting a sign that says: Haircuts: $30; Haircuts While Using Cellphone: $50 The next time a customer chats, instead of being annoyed, the barber can say, “I just made another $20.” I doubt he would lose customers if he is lighthearted about it. — Benicia, Calif.

Jumble


B-12 THE NEW MEXICAN Monday, December WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

16, 2013

THE ARGYLE SWEATER

PEANUTS

LA CUCARACHA

TUNDRA

RETAIL

STONE SOUP

KNIGHT LIFE

DILBERT

LUANN

ZITS

BALDO

GET FUZZY

MUTTS

PICKLES

ROSE IS ROSE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PARDON MY PLANET

BABY BLUES

NON SEQUITUR


Santa Fe New Mexican, Dec. 16, 2013