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Four justices recused in judicial pay suit

Area of suspected radiation leak found Crews find contamination underground where nuclear waste was recently stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. PAge B-1

Fifth justice will help appoint panel to rule on veto of 8 percent raise

City plans to offload impounds at auction

By Patrick Malone

The New Mexican

The New Mexico Supreme Court is taking a rare action in an effort to avoid a situation in which members of the high court would have to rule

More than 100 vehicles, of various makes and models, will go to the highest bidders Saturday. PAge B-1

GOP lures support with gun giveaways

seeks to overturn Gov. Susana Martinez’s veto of an 8 percent pay raise for magistrates, district judges and Supreme Court justices that the Legislature included in the state budget. Justices Petra Jimenez Maes, Edward Chavez, Charles Daniels and Chief Justice Barbara Vigil are bowing out, while Justice Richard Bosson will serve as acting chief justice to preside over the case and appoint temporary justices to decide it.

on how much they get paid. Four justices have recused themselves from hearing a lawsuit that could affect not only their own their own pay but also that of other judges throughout the state. A fifth justice nonetheless will remain involved with the case in order to seat a temporary panel of appointed justices to rule on the matter. The suit, filed Monday by a group of judges and two state legislators,

“Reality is also the myths of the common people. I realized that reality isn’t just the police that kill people, but also everything that forms part of the life of the common people.” Gabriel García Márquez, 1927-2014

Survivors recall sharp turn, chaos aboard ferry

Nobel laureate, literary pioneer dies at age 87 Novelist Gabriel García Márquez seen as master of magic realism

By Choe Sang-Hun, Su-Hyun Lee and Jiha Ham The New York Times

JINDO, South Korea — It was a trip that the second-year students at Danwon High School had been eagerly awaiting, a last chance for fun before a grueling year of studying for the national university entrance exam. Soon after their ship left the port of Incheon on Tuesday night, the students celebrated by launching fireworks from the deck. About 12 hours later, everything went terribly wrong. Their ferry, the 6,825-ton Sewol, bound for the resort island of Jeju, tilted to the left for as-yet-unexplained reasons shortly before 9 a.m. Wednesday and began sinking in the blue-gray waters off southwestern South Korea. There were 325 students among the 475 people believed aboard the ship, and more than 24 hours later, with bad weather having largely stymied a second day of search operations, 285 passengers were still missing. As of Thursday evening, the confirmed death toll was at 25, and 179 had been rescued. Rain, strong currents and poor visibility underwater hampered the efforts of divers from South Korea’s navy and coast guard to search the sunken ship. It is unclear why the Sewol leaned so far to port before sinking, and why so many aboard the ship were unable to escape, even though it took nearly 21/2 hours for the vessel to capsize and

By Jonathan Kandell Acoma Pueblo resident Monica Pasquale walks with daughter Mari Chino, 12, on U.S. 84/285 on their way to the Santuario de Chimayo on Thursday. The pair have been walking from Sky City Casino Hotel, located about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, since Sunday and estimate they will make it to Chimayó on Friday evening. PHOTOS BY LUIS SÁNCHEZ SATURNO/THE NEW MEXICAN

Paul Leyba of Rio Rancho walks on U.S. 84/285 on Thursday near The Santa Fe Opera on his way to the Santuario de Chimayó. Leyba, a former Marine, started his walk from the Santa Fe National Cemetery.

he state Department of Transportation has posted signs and traffic control devices along the most popular routes to El Santuario de Chimayó this week as the faithful began making their annual trek to the shrine in Northern New Mexico. Thousands are expected to make the Good Friday pilgrimage. Paul Leyba of Rio Rancho, a former Marine, started his walk Thursday from the Santa Fe National Cemetery. “I’m walking for all my brothers who can’t walk,” he said as he walked along U.S. 84/285. The Transportation Department is closing the right traffic lane on northbound U.S. 84/285 and on N.M. 599. Signs and electronic message boards also have been placed along parts of N.M. 76 and N.M. 503 to alert drivers. The New Mexican

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Hundreds oppose Aamodt water-rights settlement Objectors say contract is incomplete, ask judge to stay deadline By Staci Matlock

Today

The New Mexican

Scattered afternoon storms. High 73, low 47.

Hundreds of New Mexicans are objecting to a water-rights settlement between the state and four pueblos, saying they’re being asked to sign off on an incomplete contract and potentially give up water, without having all their questions answered. People and businesses with domestic well rights in the NambePojoaque-Tesuque River Basin had until April 7 to object to the terms

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Gabriel García Márquez, the Colombian novelist whose One Hundred Years of Solitude established him as a giant of 20th-century literature, died Thursday at his home in Mexico City. He was 87. His death was confirmed by Cristóbal Pera, his former editor at Random House. García Márquez, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, wrote fiction rooted in a mythical Latin American landscape of his own creation, but his appeal was universal. His books were translated into dozens of languages. He was among a select roster of canonical writers — Dickens, Tolstoy and Hemingway among them — who were embraced both by critics and by a mass audience. “Each new work of his is received by expectant critics and readers as an event of world importance,” the Swedish Academy of Letters said in awarding him the Nobel. García Márquez was considered the supreme exponent, if not the creator, of the literary genre known as magic realism, in which the miraculous and the real converge. In his novels and stories,

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PILGRIMS BEGIN TREK TO CHIMAYÓ SHRINE

Candidates are using high-powered pistols and rifles to build their donor lists. PAge A-2

Index

An order issued by the Supreme Court on Wednesday said it would be unprecedented for a case before the Supreme Court to be decided by a panel that didn’t include at least one active justice to preside with the authority to appoint temporary justices, and Bosson agreed to take on that role. The Martinez administration, however, maintains that keeping Bosson

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of the Aamodt settlement at U.S. District Court in Albuquerque. The 2010 settlement reached by the state, city and county of Santa Fe and the pueblos of Nambe, Tesuque, San Ildefonso and Pojoaque establishes water rights for the pueblos in a case that stretches back more than half a century. Many of those objecting to the settlement are asking the federal judge assigned to the case, Judge Martha Vázquez, to stay the deadline until concerns and questions from those with domestic wells have been answered. “Why are they wasting my time trying to sell me on this when they haven’t finished everything?” said

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Santa Fe County Commissioner Kathy Holian and Pojoaque Pueblo Gov. George Rivera sign the historic Aamodt water-rights pact during a ceremony March 14, 2013, at the Santa Fe Indian School. Also shown, from left, are other officials at the time: Tesuque Pueblo Gov. Mark Mitchell, Nambe Pueblo Gov. Phillip Perez, Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn, San Ildefonso Pueblo Gov. Terry Aguilar, Santa Fe Mayor David Coss and Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. CLYDE MUELLER/THE NEW MEXICAN

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

NATION&WORLD

GOP uses allure of free guns Candidates embrace firearms sweepstakes to get supporter data By Jeremy W. Peters The New York Times

Hand over your email address to a political campaign, and typically all you can expect in return is an endless stream of solicitations for money. But one supporter of Greg Brophy, a state senator who ran for governor in Colorado, got something else: a Smith & Wesson M&P15 rifle. It was the top prize in “Greg Brophy’s Gun Club Giveaway,” an online contest last month in which people handed over personal information that is the currency of modern political campaigns — first and last names, email addresses and phone numbers — and in exchange, one lucky winner would get the gun. “I tricked this baby out,” said Brophy, a Republican, boasting about how he had added all manner of accessories — extra grips, a backup sight and a strap so it could be slung easily over the shoulder. Online gun sweepstakes have become one of the most useful tools for campaign outreach in the 2014 Republican primaries. Across the country, from a race for sheriff in California to the U.S. Senate primary in South Carolina, candidates are using high-powered pistols and rifles as a lure to build up their donor lists and expand their base of support. The method may be new, but the concept is actually a durable campaign device. Take a group of possible supporters who are highly motivated around an issue, in this case gun ownership and Second Amendment rights, and pique their interest with good marketing. Then, once you have their attention, solicit their personal information and follow up to ask for support and money. For Brophy, the entries came pouring in. “Thousands of people,” he said. “It was awesome.” For the drawing, he used a website that generated a random number. It stopped on No. 775, and the winner was a deputy in a county sheriff’s office. Once he passed a background

check, the gun was his. The National Rifle Association, which has been doing Publishers Clearinghouse-style gun sweepstakes since the 1980s, figured out the allure of free guns years ago. Back then, it used direct mail. Now, it employs a range of online campaigns, including Facebook-based contests that provide the organization not just with people’s names, but also with their information-rich public profiles and lists of their friends. Millions of people have entered these contests, the group said. In a Republican primary, there are few constituencies more politically motivated — and therefore more important to reach — than passionate gun owners. And with today’s campaigns making critical contact with voters online, free guns seemed to be one of the easiest ways to cut through the noise. “This is just a more aggressive version of things campaigns are already doing,” said Zac Moffatt, who oversaw Mitt Romney’s digital strategy in 2012 and founded the firm Targeted Victory, which develops online campaigns. “You’ve got to break through,” he added, noting that guns would undoubtedly draw in potential voters who could be invaluable to a Republican candidate. “It could get you a couple extra thousand votes you didn’t otherwise know about.” Lee Bright, a state senator from South Carolina who is challenging Sen. Lindsey Graham in the Republican primary, has given away two guns, one online and one by direct mail. In the online drawing, the prize was an AR-15 rifle. “We thought it was right in our wheelhouse,” Bright said. “We’re as strong Second Amendmentists as they come. And we wanted to reach out to like-minded folks.” As a lot of candidates have learned, giving a gun away is not easy. First, the campaign has to make sure the winner is legally allowed to own a firearm. All those interviewed for this article said that background checks were being conducted through proper channels like licensed firearms dealers so a weapon did not fall into the wrong hands. “You definitely don’t want to do that,” Bright said. “Not in the middle of the campaign.” There is the issue of acquiring the gun,

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and if bought, making sure it is done through the proper channels. In Brophy’s case, the Smith & Wesson was donated by a supporter who is a firearms dealer. Under the law, Brophy has to report it on his campaign finance disclosure as an in-kind contribution. Other campaigns just buy the weapons. For its drawings, the NRA said it relied on a combination of donated and purchased guns. Sometimes gun sweepstakes have drawn outrage, like when the Pima County Republican Party in Arizona announced a raffle for a new Glock in 2011. The problem, as many saw it, was that a member of the congressional delegation, Gabrielle Giffords, had been shot in the head with a Glock early that year in a rampage in Tucson that left six dead. And they do not always work; Brophy failed to make the ballot. Gun control advocates have noted what they say is a rich irony. Second Amendment-rights groups have fiercely resisted any laws that document the names of gun owners, which they fear could turn into some sort of gun registry. The risk of a backlash to gun sweepstakes, however, has proved to be a limited deterrent to campaigns. Rep. Paul Broun of Georgia, who is running in a crowded Republican primary for an open Senate seat, offered participants in his gun giveaway their choice of two weapons: a Colt Marine pistol or a Colt Magpul 6920, complete with a tactical flashlight. President Barack Obama and Michelle Nunn, a Democrat running for the Senate in Georgia, “would like nothing more than to destroy the Second Amendment,” Broun said. Brophy was not the only Republican in the governor’s race who held a gun raffle. Tom Tancredo, the former congressman and presidential candidate, had a contest for a rifle. His pitchman, the rocker and NRA board member Ted Nugent, had a dark message. “We all better wake up and fight back together before it’s too late,” Nugent wrote in an email to Tancredo supporters. “Enter to win a semiautomatic AR-15 — when you’re done, consider making a donation of $25 or more to help Tom keep our freedoms protected.”

By the end of April, American Eagle planes flying between Santa Fe Municipal Airport and the Dallas/Fort Worth airport will have a small “Operated by Envoy Air” decal on the side. The regional carrier that operates out of the Dallas hub is changing its name from American Eagle Airlines Inc. to differentiate itself from other regional carriers that have contracts with American Airlines to operate American Eagle service, such as SkyWest Airlines, which operates American Eagle flights between Santa Fe and Los Angeles. The Envoy name already is noted on American’s online reservation system. The Dallas Morning News reported that other regional carriers that have contracts with American Airlines to operate American Eagle service include Republic Airlines, ExpressJet and Chautauqua Airlines. A statement by Envoy Air president and CEO Pedro Fabregas said that as the integration of American Airlines and US Airways continues, “additional regionals now flying for legacy US Airways using the US Airways Express brand will take on the American Eagle brand. Our new name will help us avoid any potential confusion among the public or regulatory agencies.”

Snowden asks Putin about spying MOSCOW — American fugitive Edward Snowden made a surprise appearance during Russian President Vladimir Putin’s annual call-in meeting with the nation on Thursday, submitting what critics considered a softball question about domestic surveillance in the country where Snowden has taken refuge. “Mr. Snowden, you are a former agent, a spy,” Putin said in greeting him. “I used to work for an intelligence service. We can talk one professional language.” Snowden, posing his question in English, asked whether Russia collected the communications of millions of its citizens in a manner similar to the U.S. surveillance. Putin responded by saying that said such surveillance is conducted under the law. “You have to get court permission to stalk a particular person,” he said. After the exchange with Putin, Snowden’s critics scoffed at the episode. “Snowden celebrates Pulitzer by turning into Putin’s propaganda tool,” former NSA general counsel Stewart Baker said in a comment

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Friday, April 18 GOOD FRIDAY — THREE SERVICES: At 7 a.m. Mass of the Pre-sanctified; from noon to 3 p.m., a service titled “The Seven Last Words from the Cross: Meditations, Hymns, Prayers” by the Rev. Kenneth J.G. Semon and the Very Rev. Peggy Patterson. At 7 p.m., Good Friday Liturgy and Veneration of the Cross, at the Church of the Holy Faith, Episcopal, 311 E. Palace Ave. GOOD FRIDAY: At 3 p.m., Good Friday liturgy will be offered at the Carmelite Monastery, 49 Mount Carmel Road. GOOD FRIDAY: From 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the Creation Care Pilgrimage; at noon, the Good Friday service, featuring pianist Jacquelyn Helin at the United Church of Santa Fe, 1804 Arroyo Chamiso. Call 988-3295. GOOD FRIDAY REFLECTIONS — SACRED MUSIC CONCERT: Starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Santuario de Guadalupe, 417 Agua Fría St., SCHOLA Cantorum of Santa Fe presents “Good Friday Reflections.” Concert preview at 6:30 p.m., followed by the concert. PASSOVER: Events are held at the temporary Chabad Jewish Center of Santa Fe, 509 Camino de Los Marquez, Suite 4. For more information,

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posted on Twitter, referring to the Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The Washington Post and Guardian US this week for their Snowden coverage..

Death penalty survives N.H. vote A repeal of New Hampshire’s death penalty fell just one vote short Thursday, in a 12-12 tie in the state Senate. State House lawmakers passed the repeal last month in a 225-104 vote, and Gov. Maggie Hassan had said she would sign the measure, making it the 19th state without a death penalty. The state’s last execution was in 1939, but the measure before the Senate would have preserved the penalty for the state’s only death row inmate, The Associated Press reports. Since the Supreme Court reinstated the punishment in the mid-1970s, more than 1,300 people have been executed, according to data from the Death Penalty Information Center.

Texas agents seize polygamists’ ranch ELDORADO, Texas — State agents have seized a polygamous group’s Texas ranch where hundreds of children were removed during a 2008 FBI raid prompted by child sex abuse allegations. The group’s leader, Warren Jeffs, is serving life in prison after being convicted of sexually assaulting two girls he took as child brides. The Texas Department of Public Safety says its agents took possession of the secluded property near Eldorado on Thursday. A judge in January ordered the forfeiture of the Yearning For Zion Ranch, which was owned by the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The state sought to seize the property over allegations of mismanagement by Jeffs.

Avalanche buries five on Everest KATMANDU, Nepal — About five climbers are feared buried by an avalanche that swept the slopes of Mount Everest on Friday and hit a route used to ascent the world’s highest peak, officials said. The avalanche hit the area just below Camp 2 Friday morning, said Nepal Tourism Ministry official Madhu Sudan Burlakoti. Rescuers and a helicopter were sent from Katmandu. Hundreds of climbers, their guides and support guides had gathered at the base camp, gearing up for their final attempt to scale the 29,035-foot peak early next month when weather conditions turn favorable.

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Colorado state Sen. Greg Brophy, who is in the Republican primary race for governor, shooting an AR-15 rifle on his family farm in Wray, Colo., in July. Brophy conducted an online contest in which people handed over personal information — the currency of modern political campaigns — and in exchange, one lucky winner would receive the gun.

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Lotteries visit www. ChabadSantaFe. com : u Saturday, 10 a.m.: Shabbat Minyan and Kiddush. u Monday, 10 a.m.: Yom Tov Minyan and Kiddush. u Tuesday, 10 a.m.: Yom Tov Minyan with Yizkor and Kiddush. u Tuesday,,7:15 p.m.: End of Passover Dinner — Moshiach meal, please RSVP. PIANO RECITAL: At 12:10 p.m. in the Junior Common Room, Peterson Student Center, Peter Pesic; music of Chopin and Debussy at St. John’s College, 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca. RANDALL DAVEY HOUSE TOURS: Docent-led tours, weekly on Fridays, 2 p.m., 1800 Upper Canyon Road. JOHN SCARIANO: At 6 p.m., the author discusses Marsh Township Sanitary District at Collected Works Bookstore, 202 Galisteo St.

NIGHTLIFE Friday, April 18 BATTLE OF THE BANDS: 6-10 p.m. at Warehouse 21, 1614 Paseo de Peralta. CAFÉ CAFÉ: Trio Los Primos, 6 p.m., 500 Sandoval St. COWGIRL BBQ: Bill Hearne, 5-7:30 p.m.; Jay Boy Adams & Zenobia, with Mister Sister, R&B, 8:30 p.m.-close, 319 S. Guadalupe St. DUEL BREWING: Rocker Les

Malzman, 5:30-7:30 p.m., 1228 Parkway Drive. EL FAROL: Guitarist/singer John Kurzweg, 9 p.m., 808 Canyon Road. HOTEL SANTA FE: Guitarist/ flutist Ronald Roybal, 7-9 p.m., 1501 Paseo de Peralta. JUNCTION: La Junta’s Nick Peña, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., 530 S. Guadalupe St. LA FIESTA LOUNGE AT LA FONDA: Honky Tonk Delux, 8-11 p.m., 100 E. San Francisco St. LODGE LOUNGE AT THE LODGE AT SANTA FE: Pachanga! Club Fridays with DJ Gabriel “Aztec Sol” Ortega, 8:30 p.m. 750 N. St. Francis D.ive PIZZERIA DA LINO: Accordionist Dadou, 6-9 p.m., 204 N. Guadalupe St. PRANZO ITALIAN GRILL: David Geist, 6-9 p.m., 540 Montezuma Ave. SECOND STREET BREWERY: Paw Cole & The Clinkers, 6-9 p.m., 1814 Second St. SECOND STREET BREWERY AT THE RAILYARD: Roots-rock guitarist Jono Manson, 7-10 p.m., 1607 Paseo de Peralta. THE DEN: Ladies night with DJ Luna, 9 p.m., 132 W. Water St. TINY’S: Chris Abeyta, 5:30 p.m.; The Jakes, 8:30 p.m.-close, 1005 St. Francis Drive, Suite 117. VANESSIE: Bob Finnie, 6:30 p.m., 427 W. Water St.

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Corrections A photo that ran in the April 4, 2014, issue of Generation Next about a teen photographer using feminism as a theme was incorrectly credited to Natasha Browne, the teen profiled in the story. The photo was actually taken by Heather Nelson.

uuu The New Mexican will correct factual errors in its news stories. Errors should be brought to the attention of the city editor at 986-3035.

uuu For more events, see Pasatiempo in Friday’s edition. To submit an events listing, send an email to service @sfnewmexican.com.


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Young adults push sign-ups past targets, Obama says By Mark Landler

The New York Times

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama on Thursday announced that 8 million people have signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and that 35 percent are younger than 35, countering the criticism that it would attract mainly older and sicker people. In detailing the statistics, the White House said that 18- to 34-year-olds made up 28 percent of enrollees. The 35 percent number included children who would typically be covered by a parent’s policy. While the number of younger applicants has risen, it remains lower than the level that some private analysts said is necessary for the long-term viability of the insurance marketplace. Obama also said that millions of the enrollees had purchased private insurance for the first time, strengthening the administration’s case that the new health law was expanding coverage, not simply moving people from one insurance plan to another. “This thing is working,” Obama said. The president’s remarks, delivered in the White House briefing room, amounted to a second victory lap after he announced two weeks ago that more than 7 million people had signed up for insurance during the government’s first open enrollment period. The administration extended the sign-up period for two weeks, until the middle of April.

InsIde u State health exchange official trades ideas with Obama at White House event. PAge B-3

Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

U.S., Russia agree on pact to defuse Ukraine crisis Obama skeptical on whether nations will follow through By Michael R. Gordon

The New York Times

GENEVA — The United States, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union reached an agreement here Thursday that calls for armed pro-Russian bands to give up the government buildings they have seized in eastern Ukraine and outlines other steps to deescalate the crisis. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry described the package of measures as an important first step to avert “a complete and total implosion” in eastern Ukraine and said it could be followed by negotiation of more far-reaching steps to ease a crisis in which violence seems to be growing. Kerry’s Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, said the deal was “largely based on compromise” and that a settlement of the crisis was primarily the responsibility of Ukraine. Lavrov made the remarks at a news conference that he gave before Kerry had spoken. But President Barack Obama sounded a cautious if not skeptical note. “I don’t think we can be sure of anything at this point,” he said, but there is a chance “that diplomacy may de-escalate the situation.” He added: “We’re not going to know if there is follow through for several days.” The agreement, described in a joint statement, does not specifically require Russia to remove the approximately 40,000 troops it has on Ukraine’s border, as President Barack Obama has demanded. Nor does it commit Russia to holding direct talks with the interim Ukrainian government, which has been another U.S. demand. The agreement also does not mention the Russian

annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea Peninsula last month. The agreement on “initial concrete steps to de-escalate tensions and restore security” in Ukraine followed more than six hours of talks that involved Kerry; Lavrov; Ukraine’s acting foreign minister, Andrii Deshchytsia; and Catherine Ashton, the EU foreign policy chief. It calls on all sides in Ukraine to refrain from violence or provocative behavior and rejects all forms of intolerance, including anti-Semitism, which Kerry said had emerged as a worry in eastern Ukraine. “All illegal armed groups must be disarmed,” the statement declares. “All illegally seized building must be returned to legitimate owners; all illegally occupied streets, squares and other public places in Ukrainian cities and towns must be vacated.” In recent days, the U.S. and other Western nations have repeatedly charged that Russian agents had orchestrated the seizure of government buildings in eastern Ukraine.

Three die, 63 captured in firefight SLOVYANSK, Ukraine — Ukrainian security forces killed three pro-Russian activists, wounded 13 and took 63 captive in a firefight overnight in the eastern city of Mariupol, the interim Ukrainian interior minister said Thursday. The clash was the most lethal so far in the east of the country. The minister, Arsen Avakov, said the protesters had tried to storm a base used by troops in the newly formed National Guard, which has

President Vladimir Putin of Russia denied the allegations in a question-and-answer session Thursday on Russian television. But he also said Russia reserved the right to intervene militarily and he used new language that asserted Russia’s historical claims to parts of eastern Ukraine. Under the agreement, the Ukrainian government would

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capital crimes. International monitors from the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe, a 57-nation group that includes Russia, are to play a “leading role” in helping Ukrainians carry out the de-escalation measures. Ukraine, the agreement says, should also ensure that reform of its constitution involves “outreach to all of Ukraine’s regions and political constituencies.” And the statement endorses the importance of economic support to Ukraine. Kerry said at a news conference that it was critical that the measures be “translated immediately into action” and that he hoped more far-reaching steps could follow. “None of us leave here with the sense that the job is done,” he added. “We do not envision this as the full measure of deescalation.”

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drawn from volunteers who took part in last winter’s protest movement against the government. A crowd made up of civilians as well as militants formed outside the base, he said. Avakov’s description of the conflict indicated another challenge for the new government, as in other cases where pro-Russian groups have seized administrative buildings and police stations. The New York Times

grant amnesty to protesters who leave the government buildings they have occupied and agree to give up their arms, unless they are suspected of murder or other

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

Novelist: Work well-received by critics, readers Continued from Page A-1 storms rage for years, flowers drift from the skies, tyrants survive for centuries, priests levitate and corpses fail to decompose. And, more plausibly, lovers rekindle their passion after a half-century apart. Magic realism, he said, sprang from Latin America’s history of vicious dictators and romantic revolutionaries, of long years of hunger, illness and violence. In accepting his Nobel, García Márquez said: “Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination. For our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable.” Like many Latin American intellectuals and artists, García Márquez felt impelled to speak out on the political issues of his day. He viewed the world from a left-wing perspective, bitterly opposing Gen. Augusto Pinochet, the right-wing Chilean dictator, and unswervingly supporting Fidel Castro in Cuba. Castro became such a close friend that García Márquez showed him drafts of his unpublished books. No draft had more impact than the one for One Hundred Years of Solitude. García Márquez’s editor began reading it at home one rainy day, and as he read page after page by this unknown Colombian author, his excitement mounted. Soon he called Argentine novelist Tomás Eloy Martínez and summoned him urgently to the home. Eloy Martinez remembered entering the foyer with wet shoes and encountering pages strewn across

the floor by the editor in his eagerness to read through the work. They were the first pages of a book that in 1967 would vault García Márquez onto the world stage. One Hundred Years of Solitude would sell more than 20 million copies. Chilean poet Pablo Neruda called it “the greatest revelation in the Spanish language since Don Quixote.” The novelist William Kennedy hailed it as “the first piece of literature since the Book of Genesis that should be required reading for the entire human race.” García Márquez was rattled by the praise. He grew to hate One Hundred Years of Solitude, he said in interviews, because he feared his subsequent work would not measure up to it in readers’ eyes. He need not have worried. Almost all his 15 other novels and short-story collections were lionized by critics and devoured by readers. Gabriel García Márquez was born in Aracataca, a small town near Colombia’s Caribbean coast, on March 6, 1927. His father, a postal clerk and telegraph operator, could barely support his wife and 12 children; Gabriel, the oldest, spent his early childhood living in the large, ramshackle house of his maternal grandparents. It influenced his writing; it seemed inhabited, he said, by the ghosts his grandmother conjured in the stories she told. García Márquez moved to Bogotá as a teenager. He studied law there but never received a degree; he turned instead to journalism. The late 1940s and early ’50s in Colombia were a period of civil strife known as La Violencia. The ideological causes were nebulous

but the savagery was stark: as many as 300,000 deaths. La Violencia would become the background for several of his novels. García Márquez eked out a living writing for newspapers in Cartagena and then Barranquilla, where he lived in the garret of a brothel and saw a future in literature. He read intensely — the Americans Hemingway, Faulkner, Twain and Melville; the Europeans Dickens, Tolstoy, Proust, Kafka and Virginia Woolf. “I cannot imagine how anyone could even think of writing a novel without having at least a vague of idea of the ten thousand years of literature that have gone before,” García Márquez said. But, he added, “I’ve never tried to imitate authors I’ve admired. On the contrary, I’ve done all I could not to imitate them.” García Márquez alternated between journalism and fiction in the late 1950s. While working for newspapers and magazines in Venezuela, he wrote a short-story collection, Big Mama’s Funeral, which incorporates the kind of magical elements he would master in One Hundred Years of Solitude. From 1959 to 1961, he supported the Castro revolution and wrote for Prensa Latina, the official Cuban press agency. In 1961, he moved to Mexico City, where he would live on and off for the rest of his life. It was there, in 1965, that García Márquez began One Hundred Years of Solitude. The inspiration for it, he said, came to him while he was driving to Acapulco. Returning home, he began an almost undistracted 18 months of writing while his wife, Mercedes, looked after the household. “When I was finished writing,” he recalled,

“my wife said, ‘Did you really finish it? We owe $12,000.’ ” With the book’s publication in 1967, the family never owed a penny again. One Hundred Years of Solitude was sold out within days. In following the rise and fall of the Buendía family through several generations of war and peace, affluence and poverty, many saw the novel as the defining saga of Latin America’s social and political history. García Márquez made no claim to have invented magic realism; he pointed out that elements of it had appeared before in Latin American literature. But no one before him had used the style with such artistry, exuberance and power. Magic realism would soon inspire writers on both sides of the Atlantic, most notably Isabel Allende in Chile and Salman Rushdie in Britain. “Reality is also the myths of the common people,” García Márquez told an interviewer. “I realized that reality isn’t just the police that kill people, but also everything that forms part of the life of the common people.” Dozens of television and film adaptations were made of García Márquez’s works, but none achieved the critical or commercial success of his writing, and he declined requests for the movie rights to One Hundred Years of Solitude. The novel’s readers, he once said, “always imagine the characters as they want, as their aunt or their grandfather, and the moment you bring that to the screen, the reader’s margin for creativity disappears.” Besides his wife, Mercedes, his survivors include two sons, Rodrigo and Gonzalo.

Ferry: Boat’s captain could face criminal charges Continued from Page A-1 all but disappear underwater. Interviews on Thursday with survivors, relatives, crew members and investigators offered a vivid picture of how the trip turned into a catastrophe, and possibly into South Korea’s worst disaster in decades. “The government floundered, unable even to count the number of those missing correctly,” the country’s leading conservative daily, Chosun Ilbo, which has been mostly supportive of the government of President Park Geun-hye, said in an editorial Thursday. “Above all, the people must have felt deeply that South Korea is a country that doesn’t value human lives.” It cited “unspeakable mistakes and errors” in the ferry’s operation and in the rescue efforts. “Bring my child back alive!” some parents yelled Thursday, when Park visited an indoor gymnasium on Jindo Island, 11 miles from the site of the sinking, that local officials had turned into a shelter for grieving families. Park promised “all available resources” for the rescue, and a “thorough investigation and stern punishment for those responsible.” According to survivors, the students were having a morning break, roaming through the floors in small groups and taking pictures on the deck, when the ship began tipping. When the situation became critical, survivors said, many students were still on the third floor, where the cafeteria and game rooms were. “I don’t remember that there was any safety instruction before we boarded the ship,” said Kim Su-bin, 16, a Danwon student who climbed out of the sinking ship and jumped into the water. “Life jackets were on the fourth floor where the sleeping cabins were, but those who were on the third floor at the time had no life jackets.” Han Hee-min, another 16-year-old student, said all had gone smoothly

South Korean Coast Guard officers search for missing ferry passengers in the waters off the southern coast of South Korea on Thursday. AHN YOUNG-JOON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

until he felt the ship “turning too sharply” around 9 a.m. Wednesday. Investigators who questioned the ferry’s captain, Lee Jun-seok, 69, on Thursday said the vessel had made a sharp turn to the left around the time it began to tilt. The Sewol had been sailing slightly off its usual course, they said, and Lee had apparently tried to steer it back. The captain, in a brief appearance Thursday, provided little clarity. “I can’t raise my face before the passengers and family members of the missing,” he said. Officials have said Lee, who has been criticized for being among the first to leave the ship, could face criminal charges. Inside the ship, chaos unfolded, survivors said, as a wall and the floor seemed to exchange positions. The ship’s twisting stairways suddenly became almost impossible to negotiate. Passengers were tossed to one side as if they were riding a slide. Trays and soup bowls overturned, said Song Ji-cheol, a college student who worked at the cafeteria. “The gas burst and all of a sudden, we were submerged,” he said. “I tried to hold on to the tables but they were moving around, too.” At some point, some survivors said, the lights went out. “When the ship began tilting, there was a thudding noise and I

thought it was the noise made by students bumping into the walls,” one passenger, Han Hee-min, said Thursday in a hospital in Ansan, the city south of Seoul where Danwon High School is situated. “I had a life jacket so I floated. Some friends grabbed my leg and I don’t know what happened to them.” Grainy smartphone video footage sent to a relative while the ship was sinking, showed passengers huddled in the corner of a room as a voice on the ship’s intercom urged people to “stay inside and wait because the cabins are safer.” Another student, Gwon Ji-hyuck, 16, said he had heard that broadcast. Sixty to 70 students clogged a narrow corridor while their teacher shouted at them to remain calm, he said. “My teacher distributed life jackets to the last minute and led us calmly,” said Han Sang-hyuk, 16, in tears, referring to Nam Yun-cheol, one of two teachers found dead. Han Sang-hyuk, a student, blamed the ship crew’s instruction for the high number of missing people, saying that those who stayed in their rooms or were caught in small alleyways between corridors would not have been able to escape. But Kim Su-bin, the Danwon student who survived by climbing out of the ship, thanked Park Ji-young, a crew mem-

ber who was found dead Wednesday, for helping students get out. The ship’s communications officer, Kang Hae-seong, 32, said he and Park had to make a quick decision. They thought that if passengers fled in a panicked rush, it could make matters worse, he said. Kang said the ship’s crew had studied the manual on fire drills but never had an evacuation simulation. Few of the ship’s 60 life rafts were used. “I repeatedly told people to calm themselves and stay where they were for an hour,” he said from his hospital bed. “I didn’t have time to look at the manual for evacuation.” Shin Seong-hee, a Danwon student, was among those who heeded the advice. In a text message she sent to her father, she said she had been told by the ship’s crew that “it was more dangerous to move.” Her father texted back: “I know the rescuers are coming but why don’t you try to come outside?” “I can’t because the ship is tilting too much,” she replied in a text that was shown to a reporter by her sister, Shin Seong-ah, on Thursday. Shin Seong-hee has not been heard from since. The indoor gymnasium on Jindo Island was a caldron of emotion Thursday as parents waited for news. Hundreds of mothers, fathers and relatives sat dejectedly on the floor, some wrapped in blankets. Some shrieked and collapsed, and were tended to by medical workers. The police were investigating fabricated lists of survivors circulating online that gave parents false hopes. At one point, a police officer came to apologize for delays in a plan to pump oxygen into the sunken ship, in case some passengers were still alive. “You liar!” a father shouted at the police officer, before jumping onto the podium and punching and kicking him. “My child is alive in there!” the man shouted repeatedly until he was hauled away by other parents.

Recused: Justices rarely invoke rule of necessity Continued from Page A-1 on the case constitutes a conflict of interest, according to the governor’s spokesman, Enrique Knell. A 1980 U.S. Supreme Court ruling contradicts the governor’s position, according to Marsha Baum, a professor at The University of New Mexico School of Law. She said Thursday that the “rule of necessity” cited in the state Supreme Court’s order recusing every justice except Bosson follows guidance from the case law to limit a judicial panel’s participation when it is faced with decisions that affect its members. “The action they took is exactly the action that is appropriate,” Baum said. “By limiting justices’ participa-

tion, they did everything they could. There’s no other way of doing this.” The rule of necessity that led the four justices to recuse themselves also is referenced in the state code of judicial conduct as a trump card to grounds for disqualification, and it cites judicial salary as an example. “The rule of necessity may override the rule of disqualification,” the New Mexico Judicial Code of Conduct states. “For example, a judge might be required to participate in judicial review of a judicial salary statute.” Invoking the rule of necessity is rare. Baum said she was able to find just one instance of it on the books in New Mexico, a federal court case enabling judges to decide cases

involving utilities, even though they are consumers. Baum said the state Supreme Court was the appropriate venue for the suit challenging the governor’s line-item veto. “It is a state issue,” she said. “It would be really unprecedented for state budgetary concerns to be set forth at this point in a federal court.” In her message vetoing pay raises for the judges, Martinez said she would have supported a 3 percent raise that would be in line with what other state employees received. “I cannot support the dramatic 8 percent raise requested in the budget,” Martinez wrote. In their suit, the judges claim the governor lacks legal authority to

deny them the raise. Ray Vargas, the lawyer representing the judges and legislators suing the governor, earlier this week pointed to reports from the state’s Judicial Compensation Commission that in recent years said New Mexico has consistently lagged behind other states in what it pays judges. Judges’ pay in New Mexico is calculated as a percentage of Supreme Court justices’ salaries. The chief justice’s annual salary is $126,927, and the other justices each get $124,927 a year. Contact Patrick Malone at 986-3017 or pmalone@ sfnewmexican.com. Follow him on Twitter @pmalonenm.

Aamodt: Yeas and nays being counted Continued from Page A-1 Tesuque resident Andy Welch, who has been highly involved for years with the Aamodt water-rights case in the basin north of Santa Fe. Others emphasize what they’ve argued for five years — the pueblos should get their water rights under the Aamodt settlement, but a multimillion-dollar regional water system is an unnecessary part of the deal. “Eventually you will see people in the valley get run out because they can’t afford to pay for these expensive projects,” said Joe Gutierrez, a civil engineer from El Rancho who has both surface and groundwater rights impacted by the Aamodt settlement. Attorneys are tallying up the yeas and nays. “By our count, as of today, 331 acceptance forms have been filed, and 792 objection forms,” said Edward “Ted” Bagley, an attorney with the Office of the State Engineer. Those numbers aren’t firm yet because some people filed multiple objections for the same water rights, Bagley said. The Aamodt settlement establishes the water rights of San Ildefonso, Tesuque, Nambe and Pojoaque Pueblos. A final order in the Aamodt case, which dates to the 1960s, also will settle the water rights of acequias in the valley and determine the rights of more than 2,000 domestic wells in the basin. The settlement was finalized in 2012 by the four pueblos, the state, the federal government, and the city and county of Santa Fe. A key part of the settlement calls for building a river diversion project on the Rio Grande on San Ildefonso Pueblo land, treating the water and distributing it to people in the basin. The system is likely to cost hundreds of millions of dollars, and no one can say for sure yet how much the water would cost residents who use it. Non-pueblo private well owners in the basin are being asked to choose one of three option for their private wells under the settlement. They can connect to the water system through Santa Fe County. They can keep their well but limit the use. Or they can keep elect to stop using their wells and hook into the regional water system when they transfer their property. Several businesses, including the Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa and Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado Santa Fe, have agreed to accept the Aamodt settlement. Many of the objections to the settlement are similar: u Some 6,000 packets with information on accepting or rejecting the settlement were sent by first-class mail instead of certified mail, which must be signed for by recipients. Protesters say that means the state engineer has no proof that everyone received the official court order to accept or reject the settlement. “Under New Mexico law, any legal document is supposed to be sent certified mail,” Welch said. u The settlement doesn’t include a detailed design of a regional water system, how it will be operated or the cost, so many people opposing the agreement say they can’t determine if it is a good idea to give up their wells and hook into the system or not. u Some think they are being asked to give up water rights without just compensation. u Under the settlement, the pueblos can enforce their water rights, but “there is no reciprocal right for a private non-Indian owner to enforce their rights.” That makes the settlement “lopsided and unfair,” according to a protest filed by Ramona Garcia. u An environmental impact statement for the regional water system hasn’t been completed. New Mexico water law is based on first in time, first in use. People who first used water for gardens, farming, livestock and households have the first right to the water. New Mexico pueblos and tribes were here long before other settlers and have the oldest claims to water in the state. Irrigators on historic acequias in the state usually have the next oldest water rights. But the amount of water rights for everyone in the Nambe-Pojoaque-Tesuque Basin hadn’t been determined in court, and that’s what the Aamodt fight has been about for decades. The pueblos, under the settlement, will be guaranteed water for their current and future economic development uses. A federal court ruled in 1985 that the pueblos have senior rights to both surface and groundwater in the basin because the two water sources are connected. Gutierrez and Welch, like many non-pueblo residents in the basin, say the pueblos should get their water rights. But they think there was no need to limit everyone, including the pueblos, the way the settlement does. “There is plenty of water for everyone if it is managed well,” said Gutierrez, who made a career designing nuclear power plants. Gutierrez said there are also cheaper, better ways to protect water quality than a massive regional water system. He said it would be cheaper for the state, the county and residents to instead install individual water filter systems for wells and wastewater treatment systems for septic tanks. Welch said his own Tesuque well is proof that not all water tables in the basin are declining. “I have a well drilled in 1993 that’s been monitored by the state engineer. It was 100 feet [to water] when it was drilled,” Welch said. “It has risen to 70 feet, even during the drought. Explain that. It is [because of] conservation.” Disclosure: New Mexican publisher Robin Martin is a party to the Aamodt litigation. Contact Staci Matlock at 986-3055 or smatlock@sfnewmexican.com. Follow her on Twitter @stacimatlock.


Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

The weather

For current, detailed weather conditions in downtown Santa Fe, visit our online weather stations at www.santafenewmexican.com/weather/

7-day forecast for Santa Fe Today

A t-storm in spots this afternoon

Tonight

Mostly cloudy

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

A shower or thunder- Partly sunny storm in spots

Tuesday

Mostly sunny and pleasantly warm

Wednesday

Mostly sunny

Mostly sunny and windy

Thursday

Sunny

Humidity (Noon) Humidity (Midnight) Humidity (Noon)

73

47

68/43

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

Humidity (Noon)

23%

39%

36%

31%

25%

19%

17%

19%

wind: SSW 8-16 mph

wind: SSW 8-16 mph

wind: W 8-16 mph

wind: WNW 6-12 mph

wind: WNW 6-12 mph

Almanac

Santa Fe Airport through 6 p.m. Thursday Santa Fe Airport Temperatures High/low ......................................... 64°/32° Normal high/low ............................ 67°/34° Record high ............................... 79° in 1948 Record low ................................. 17° in 1901 Santa Fe Airport Precipitation 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. Trace/0.67” Normal month/year to date ..... 0.45”/2.39” Santa Fe Farmers Market 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.02”/0.75”

The following water statistics of April 16 are the most recent supplied by the City Water Division (in millions of gallons). Total water produced from: Canyon Water Treatment Plant: 4.663 Buckman Water Treatment Plant: 2.920 City Wells: 0.000 Buckman Wells: 0.000 Total water produced by water system: 7.583 Amount delivered to Las Campanas: Golf course: 0.000, domestic: 0.167 Santa Fe Canyon reservoir storage: 46.7 percent of capacity; daily inflow 2.71 million gallons. A partial list of the City of Santa Fe’s Comprehensive Water Conservation Requirements currently in effect: • Irrigation water leaving the intended area is not permitted. Wasting water is not allowed. • Using water to clean hard surfaces with a hose or power washer is prohibited. • Hoses used in manual car washing MUST be equipped with a positive shut-off nozzle. • Swimming pools and spas must be covered when not in use. For a complete list of requirements call: 955-4225 http://www.santafenm.gov/waterconservation

77/44

64

285

64

Farmington 76/51

Española 77/50 Los Alamos 69/43 40

Santa Fe 73/47 Pecos 67/40

25

Air quality index

Albuquerque 77/51

56

412

Clayton 74/49

Pollen index

As of 4/17/2014 Juniper............................................... 14 Low Elm ...................................................... 3 Low Other Trees.......................................... 4 Low Grass......................................... 16 Moderate Total...........................................................37

25

54

40

40

285

Clovis 73/50

54

60 60

87

Las Vegas 69/44

25

Source:

60

25

Today’s UV index

54 285 380

180

Roswell 77/57

Ruidoso 66/49

25

70

Truth or Consequences 78/56 70

180

Las Cruces 80/59

70

70

380

380

Hobbs 76/54

285

Alamogordo 80/57

Carlsbad 78/61

54

0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High; 8-10, Very High; 11+, Extreme The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

285

10

Sun and moon

State extremes

Thu. High: 81 .............................. Lordsburg Thu. Low 23 ...................................... Gallup

State cities City Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Cimarron Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Crownpoint Deming Española Farmington Fort Sumner Gallup Grants Hobbs Las Cruces

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo W 77/43 s 69/47 pc 50/28 pc 72/48 s 76/53 s 58/30 pc 56/34 pc 51/38 pc 58/30 s 62/40 s 66/25 s 81/42 s 68/46 pc 69/28 s 66/43 s 72/23 s 69/24 s 72/45 s 79/46 s

Hi/Lo W 80/57 s 77/51 pc 62/35 pc 78/59 s 78/61 s 65/36 pc 71/41 pc 74/49 s 61/37 pc 73/50 s 68/42 pc 80/53 s 77/50 pc 76/51 pc 76/50 s 72/43 pc 71/44 pc 76/54 s 80/59 s

Hi/Lo W 76/48 pc 71/51 pc 56/33 pc 81/54 pc 81/55 pc 58/34 pc 68/38 pc 76/46 t 58/31 pc 74/49 pc 62/37 pc 76/49 pc 70/50 pc 67/44 pc 77/49 pc 64/38 pc 63/37 pc 77/54 c 77/56 pc

Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Las Vegas Lordsburg Los Alamos Los Lunas Portales Raton Red River Rio Rancho Roswell Ruidoso Santa Rosa Silver City Socorro Taos T or C Tucumcari University Park White Rock Zuni

Hi/Lo 53/33 81/43 60/37 72/45 65/42 50/34 59/29 69/46 73/48 61/37 64/38 75/45 75/47 63/28 75/49 62/43 79/52 63/37 69/26

W pc s s pc s pc pc pc s s pc s s pc s pc s s s

Hi/Lo W 69/44 pc 78/51 s 69/43 pc 79/49 pc 75/50 s 74/43 s 60/35 pc 77/48 pc 77/57 s 66/49 pc 76/49 s 74/49 s 77/52 pc 70/42 pc 78/56 pc 78/53 s 81/57 s 72/44 pc 71/43 pc

Hi/Lo W 67/40 pc 79/52 pc 62/39 pc 74/52 pc 75/49 pc 69/41 pc 53/31 pc 71/45 pc 81/53 pc 64/46 pc 76/47 pc 70/49 pc 75/53 pc 63/34 pc 74/53 pc 79/48 pc 80/57 pc 65/41 pc 64/38 pc

Weather (w): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sfsnow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Weather for April 18

Sunrise today ............................... 6:28 a.m. Sunset tonight .............................. 7:40 p.m. Moonrise today .......................... 11:24 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 8:58 a.m. Sunrise Saturday .......................... 6:27 a.m. Sunset Saturday ........................... 7:41 p.m. Moonrise Saturday .............................. none Moonset Saturday ........................ 9:53 a.m. Sunrise Sunday ............................. 6:26 a.m. Sunset Sunday .............................. 7:41 p.m. Moonrise Sunday ........................ 12:21 a.m. Moonset Sunday ......................... 10:53 a.m. Last

New

First

Full

Apr 22

Apr 29

May 6

May 14

The planets

Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo 51/30 66/40 52/30 64/32 48/24 75/41 40/32 73/43 64/37 62/40 67/37 66/38 63/49 64/29 63/32 55/26 69/27 85/71 73/53 65/34 51/37 91/62 71/59

W pc pc pc pc pc s pc pc pc pc s pc c pc pc sn s s c pc c pc pc

Hi/Lo 48/32 58/48 56/42 64/37 59/39 62/43 47/38 64/57 59/44 55/35 66/45 58/38 76/58 78/47 59/37 49/24 60/37 85/72 80/58 66/46 68/51 84/67 69/58

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Rise 6:13 a.m. 4:36 a.m. 6:28 p.m. 11:03 a.m. 9:23 p.m. 5:51 a.m.

Mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus

Set 6:58 p.m. 4:02 p.m. 6:10 a.m. 1:32 a.m. 7:55 a.m. 6:24 p.m.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

National cities City Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Fairbanks Flagstaff Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

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Thursday’s rating ............................... Good Today’s forecast ................................. Good 0-50, Good; 51-100, Moderate; 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200, Unhealthy; 201-300, Very Unhealthy, 301500, Hazardous Source: EPA

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Raton 74/43

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Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

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New Mexico weather

Area rainfall

Albuquerque 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.00”/0.40” Las Vegas 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace Month/year to date .................. 0.23”/0.33” Los Alamos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.28”/0.76” Chama 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.34”/3.09” Taos 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ 0.00” Month/year to date .................. 0.21”/0.85”

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Yesterday Today Tomorrow

City Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Richmond St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Sioux Falls Trenton Washington, DC

Hi/Lo 70/42 71/44 82/76 56/39 42/28 66/50 48/36 61/47 77/62 53/37 94/64 64/35 55/50 60/33 68/45 71/37 71/58 65/60 64/53 53/50 46/19 49/32 56/39

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Hi/Lo 68/50 72/52 84/74 48/32 50/42 73/57 52/44 74/54 80/65 55/44 86/66 64/42 62/40 60/46 69/51 71/46 80/58 65/60 64/51 57/40 64/51 54/40 60/47

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Hi/Lo 72/49 76/57 85/64 53/44 65/48 77/60 65/43 80/58 76/55 67/43 87/69 64/38 65/44 65/46 75/54 71/51 80/63 67/60 63/50 57/42 69/38 66/40 71/45

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World cities Yesterday Today Tomorrow

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Cold front

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National extremes

(For the 48 contiguous states) Thu. High: 104 ................. Death Valley, CA Thu. Low: 6 .................... Clayton Lake, ME

Over two dozen tornadoes occurred in the midsection of the nation on April 18, 1880. This caused $1 million damage and 65 deaths in Marshfield, Mo.

Weather trivia™

average, how many tornado deaths Q: On occur in the U.S. each year?

A: About 75.

Weather history

Newsmakers Chelsea Clinton is expecting first child

Chelsea Clinton

WASHINGTON — Chelsea Clinton says she and her husband are expecting their first child later this year. The daughter of former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced at a Clinton Foundation event in New York that she and her husband, Marc Mezvinsky, are “very excited” to be having their first child later this year.

Novak rails against the Oscar night ‘bullies’ Marc Mezvinsky

Kim Novak

LOS ANGELES — Kim Novak is speaking out about criticism about how she looked on stage at last month’s Academy Awards. The 81-year-old star of Vertigo and other classic films said the comments amounted to bullying and made her reluctant to go out into public. But Novak says she has decided to fight back against the jabs that were leveled against her and another veteran actress, Liza Minnelli. Novak says she’s determined to speak out against what she called “bullies” who shouldn’t be allowed to affect people’s lives. The Associated Press

City Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Bogota Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Ciudad Juarez Copenhagen Dublin Geneva Guatemala City Havana Hong Kong Jerusalem Lima

Hi/Lo 63/41 64/52 98/70 97/81 64/55 68/51 55/32 66/52 70/57 81/63 86/73 82/59 52/37 54/48 61/36 77/61 90/68 81/73 72/57 75/64

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TV

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Yesterday Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo W 75/57 pc 62/43 pc 82/54 s 80/54 s 45/27 pc 54/36 s 101/70 pc 70/39 s 54/27 pc 81/72 c 63/43 s 72/46 pc 69/43 c 90/79 pc 55/43 pc 70/55 s 68/55 pc 54/48 r 57/37 pc 59/32 s

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In politics, attack ads pivot to positive By Ashley Parker

The New York Times

WASHINGTON utside political groups, long known for their negative advertisements featuring ominous music and foreboding narration, are trying something new this campaign season: a pivot to the positive. Some of the largest and best-known political action committees — like Americans for Prosperity, which is backed by the conservative billionaires David H. and Charles G. Koch — are making an effort to also cast their candidates in an appealing way instead of solely attacking opponents. This year, 16 percent of Americans for Prosperity’s spots have been positive; in 2012, the group did not run a single one. An ad by the group supporting Rep. Steve Southerland II, R-Fla., focuses on his record of fighting President Barack Obama’s health care law before it concludes, “Thank Steve Southerland for fighting to keep our health care decisions in our hands.” The shift is the product of several factors — the renewed hope that positive commercials can break through the advertising clutter; lessons of the 2012 presidential race, when Mitt Romney and outside Republican groups largely failed to offer an alternate message to an onslaught of negative spots; and the increasing prevalence of stock footage made public by campaigns that makes producing positive ads easier. “Any idiot can do a negative ad badly, and many do, but a good positive ad captures a sense of the candidate and the candidate’s connection to the place where he’s running,” said Rick Wilson, a Republican strategist who advises roughly a dozen super PACs and candidates, and who made the 2002 ad tying a Democratic senator from Georgia, Max Cleland, who lost both legs and his right hand in the Vietnam War, to Osama bin Laden. “I don’t pull a punch when a punch is necessary, but there is a certain craft to introducing yourself to people in this business that can get lost in the shuffle.” By one group’s estimate, 29 percent of the spots by Karl Rove’s American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS, its affili-

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ated nonprofit group, have had a positive spin this year; at the same point in 2012, the group had run no positive spots, and during the entire previous cycle, the group produced only three positive ads — accounting for roughly 1 percent of the spots it ultimately broadcast. In all, 29 percent of the total spots by outside groups have been positive this election cycle, compared with the 20 percent that carried a positive message at the same point in 2012, according to the group, Kantar Media/CMAG, which tracks every political ad on broadcast or national cable television. Super PACs are not totally rewriting their campaign playbooks. Negative advertising works, and after the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision in 2010, which paved the way for unlimited spending by outside groups, they have largely considered themselves masters of the dark arts, preferring to leave the positive messages to the candidates themselves. So far, the change has been modest, and it remains unclear if it will hold through Election Day. But with a historic barrage of outside groups’ money pouring into crucial states and districts across the country, the all-negative, all-the-time approach seems to be changing. Positive ads, strategists say, can be particularly effective in helping an incumbent combat negative attacks, or helping lesser-known candidates define themselves. The shift toward the positive also stems partially from the lessons of 2012, when Romney was hammered with negative spots, and his campaign and outside groups were criticized for not doing enough to combat the assault with positive messages of their own. According to Kantar Media/CMAG, 62 percent of all spots run about Romney in the general campaign were negative, compared with 38 percent that portrayed him in a positive light. Bill Burton, a founder of Priorities USA, a pro-Obama group that was responsible for some of those anti-Romney ads, said, “There was a point at which Mitt Romney was really hurt by the fact that there were no positive ads or messages about his business experience.”

Today’s talk shows

top picks

7 p.m. on CBS Unforgettable The murder of a defense attorney sends Carrie and Al (Poppy Montgomery, Dylan Walsh) on the hunt for a recent parolee who may have more scores to settle. Jane Curtin, Dallas Roberts, Tawny Cypress and James Hiroyuki Liao also star in the new episode “Manhunt.” 7 p.m. on CW Whose Line Is It Anyway? Byambajav Ulambayar, a champion sumo wrestler who appeared in the film Ocean’s Thirteen and the TV series King of the Nerds is the special guest in this new episode. He joins guest comedian Gary Anthony Williams and cast regulars Ryan Stiles, Colin Mochrie and Wayne Brady in improvising sketches and songs from audience suggestions. Aisha Tyler is the host and scorekeeper who declares the evening’s winner. 8 p.m. on CBS Hawaii Five-0 A murder investigation leads McGarrett (Alex O’Loughlin) and the Five-0 team to a Texas Ranger (guest star Tim Daly), who’s come to Hawaii to look for his missing daughter. Kono and Adam (Grace Park, Ian Anthony Dale) must fight for their lives after their hiding place is discovered in “A’ale Ma’a Wau,” Hawaiian for

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City Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Prague Rio de Janeiro Rome Santiago Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Vancouver Vienna Zurich

A political ad from Restore Our Future, a pro-Romney super political action committee, proved that ads from Republican strategists using babies could project a softer side to attack ads. NEW YORK TIMES FILE PHOTO

“fish out of water.” Scott Caan and Daniel Dae Kim also star. 8 p.m. on CW Hart of Dixie Lemon and Zoe (Jaime King, pictured, Rachel Bilson) discover some common ground and turn to each other for advice. Texts from Vivian’s (Lauren Bittner) exhusband disturb Wade (Wilson Bethel), who’s planned a night out with her. News about AnnaBeth (Kaitlyn Black) distracts Lavon (Cress Williams) from bidding on bringing the county fair to BlueBell, in the new episode “Back in the Saddle Again.” 9 p.m. on NBC Hannibal Hannibal (Mads Mikkelsen) suggests that Jack (Laurence Fishburne) bring Will (Hugh Dancy) back to help investigate the curious case of a dead woman found inside a horse. The team questions a suspect in the case but has to let him go because of a lack of evidence. Alana (Caroline Dhavernas) is skeptical of Will’s claim that he has cast aside his suspicions about Hannibal in the new episode “Su-Zakana.”

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3:00 p.m. KOAT The Ellen DeGeneres Show Kristen Bell; Tony Hale; Needtobreathe performs. KRQE Dr. Phil KWBQ The Bill Cunningham Show Families try to put their issues behind them. KLUZ El Gordo y la Flaca KASY Jerry Springer CNN The Situation Room FNC The Five MSNBC The Ed Show 4:00 p.m. KOAT The Dr. Oz Show TV personalities Joan and Melissa Rivers; overeating; breakfasts that give energy in the morning. KTEL Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste KASY The Steve Wilkos Show FNC Special Report With Bret Baier 5:00 p.m. KASA Steve Harvey Holly Robinson Peete; Robin Meade; Tabatha Coffey; “Dunk an Ex Week.”

KCHF The 700 Club KASY Maury FNC On the Record With Greta Van Susteren 6:00 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360 FNC The O’Reilly Factor 7:00 p.m. KCHF The Connection With Skip Heitzig MSNBC The Rachel Maddow Show 8:00 p.m. E! E! News FNC Hannity 8:30 p.m. KNME Washington Week With Gwen Ifill 9:00 p.m. FNC The O’Reilly Factor 10:35 p.m. KRQE Late Show With David Letterman Actor Bryan Cranston; actress Melissa Rauch; Le1f performs. 10:45 p.m. KOB The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Actor/singer Justin Timberlake. 11:00 p.m. KNME Charlie Rose KOAT Jimmy Kimmel Live Tracy

Morgan; Kate Mara; Birds of Tokyo performs. FNC Hannity HBO Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist Ana Marie Cox; Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.); actor Rob Lowe. 11:37 p.m. KRQE The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson Actor William Shatner; actress Jaime Pressly. 12:02 a.m. KOAT Nightline 12:17 a.m. KOB Late Night With Seth Meyers Kenan Thompson; Johnny Weir and Tara Lipinski; Sarah Lewis. 12:30 a.m. HBO Real Time With Bill Maher Former President Jimmy Carter; actor Josh Gad; comic W. Kamau Bell; former Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.). 1:00 a.m. KASY The Trisha Goddard Show FNC Red Eye 1:18 a.m. KOB Last Call With Carson Daly Cinematographer Wally Pfister; Jake Bugg performs.


Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

OPINIONS

The West’s oldest newspaper, founded 1849 Robin M. Martin Owner

COMMENTARY: ROBERT MCCARTNEY

Ads for e-cigarettes need regulation

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he tobacco industry is sharply raising spending on advertisements and other marketing for electronic cigarettes to try to make smoking glamorous again and hook a new generation of Americans on nicotine. We shouldn’t let them get away with it. If adults choose to “vape” — inhale nicotine-laced vapor from battery-powered e-cigarettes — then they should be free to do so. But that doesn’t mean the public should allow Big Tobacco to use its billions to build a new mass market for a consumer product scientifically proved to be very addictive. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says it intends to extend its regulatory authority to include e-cigarettes and might recommend banning television and radio advertising. It should do so quickly, before a half-century of progress in combating smoking is undone. I was only vaguely aware of the debate over vaping when I recently saw a TV ad for blu brand e-cigarettes that made me gasp. It showed a slim, jeanswearing “tough guy” puffing while appearing shirtless before an urban skyline, attending a concert and strolling through Inca ruins in Peru. “For us smokers, times have changed,” the actor, B-list celebrity Stephen Dorff, says. “But a few things remain the same. Our desire to explore. To adventure. To roam without boundaries. With blu, we can still be ourselves. After all, this country was founded on free will. Embrace it. Chase it.” How’s that for combining manliness, style and individualism? I was dumbfounded to see again the psychological pitch of cigarette ads that I grew up watching before a 1970 law forced them off the airwaves. The similarity is no coincidence. Lorillard Tobacco, which makes blu, also manufactures Newport and Kent.

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Robert M. McKinney Owner, 1949-2001 Inez Russell Gomez Editorial Page Editor

Ray Rivera Editor

OUR VIEW

Audiotapes reveal another Martinez

G Another blu ad wields equally familiar sex appeal. Actress and former Playboy centerfold Jenny McCarthy, wearing a low-cut dress, vapes blus while flirting with a man in a bar. Public health authorities are especially worried about such ads’ effect on teens. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that from 2011 to 2012, the percentage of high school students who have tried e-cigarettes more than doubled to 10 percent. “It is frankly appalling,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden. “Nicotine is highly addictive. If kids have more access to nicotine, they are quite likely to have a lifetime addiction to tobacco products, including cigarettes.” Six of the largest e-cigarette manufacturers spent $59 million on advertising and other promotion in 2013, with five of them increasing their ad spending by 164 percent during the year, according to a congressional report released Monday. “The second coming of tobacco marketing is pouring millions into adland,” Advertising Age reported.

E-cigarette defenders argue that vaping is a less harmful alternative to traditional cigarettes, or “combustibles.” With the electronic version, users don’t inhale tar and smoke. But too little research has been conducted to say for sure that vaping is entirely safe. Promoting e-cigarettes also risks encouraging smoking, in general. Some current smokers will be less inclined to quit if they can vape in places where combustibles are banned. Furthermore, the CDC was unhappy to find that many former smokers are now using e-cigarettes. “We are very concerned that under the guise of reducing harm, [e-cigarettes] will actually increase smoking,” Frieden said. Still, the biggest concern about e-cigarettes is the young. Research suggests that nicotine damages adolescent brain development, and that teens are more vulnerable than adults to getting addicted. The FDA should impose a nationwide ban on selling e-cigarettes to people younger than 18. More than half the states, including Maryland and Virginia, have some form of age limit already. But other

states and the District of Columbia do not. The FDA also should prevent advertising that will lure the young to vape. E-cigarette manufacturers insist they’re not targeting teens, but some of their marketing techniques suggest otherwise. They promote e-cigarettes in sweet flavors such as “cherry crush” and “vivid vanilla.” Their ads use cartoon characters such as “Mr. Cool” and “eJuice monkey.” “E-cigarette makers are using a broad range of marketing techniques previously employed by traditional cigarette companies to entice young people to use their products,” said the new congressional report, called “Gateway to Addiction?” The report, prepared by the staffs of 11 Democratic senators and representatives, urged the FDA to regulate e-cigarettes. Vape if you want. That’s your business. But don’t give tobacco companies free rein to profit by manipulating the public’s mind and jeopardizing its health. Robert McCartney is a columnist for The Washington Post.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Ski Santa Fe wraps up another great season

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his is well-deserved fan mail about the just-ended ski season at Ski Santa Fe. Everyone — the owners, the lift people, the office staff, the ski patrol, the groomers (who are obviously magicians in disguise), the restaurant folks and everyone else I’ve missed but whose services helped create a wonderful season — all deserve great and numerous kudos. This past ski season was wonderful, wonderful, wonderful. I am so proud of all of them, I can’t even begin to tell you how much. But I’m trying. This is from someone who was on Ski Patrol when the way in and out was a dirt road. Marg VeneKlasen

Santa Fe

Protecting horses As a New Mexican, I value the welfare of horses and the horse industry in our state. We need leadership in Congress to make sure legislation works the way it should. I urge U.S. Sen. Tom Udall to cosponsor HR 1518/SB 1406, the PAST Act, which will reform the federal Horse Protection Act to end the illegal and inhumane practice of soring horses, all for the sake of a high–stepping show gait. The Horse Protection Act was passed in 1970, but the corrupt industry self-policing has allowed this cruel practice to thrive. We need meaningful reform. The PAST Act

The past 100 years

From The Santa Fe New Mexican: April 18, 1989: New Mexico veterans and a number of public officials railed against Gov. Garrey Carruthers for his recent veto of a bill that would have contributed $250,000 toward expanding the Santa Fe National Cemetery. At a news conference on Monday, Carruthers said he would reconsider his decision, which has been harshly criticized by Mayor Sam Pick and many veterans who say it demonstrates an anti-veteran and anti-Santa Fe sentiment.

will increase penalties, ban devices used in the soring process, and give the USDA the tools it needs to enforce the law. The American Horse Council, other national animal organizations and all 50 state veterinary medical associations agree that the PAST Act is the way to protect the horse industry from abuse and horses from egregious cruelty. More than 300 bipartisan members of Congress have signed on to co-sponsor the bill. It is time for Sen. Udall to join this impressive group. You can contact him at 202-224-6621 or www.tomudall.senate.gov. Tim Beckmon

Santa Fe

Outstanding symphonies We’ve recently experienced the Santa Fe Symphony’s performance of Mahler’s Symphony No. 7, and are still in the

MALLARd FiLLMoRe

Section editor: Inez Russell Gomez, 986-3053, igomez@sfnewmexican.com, Twitter @inezrussell

“wow” stage. The musicians, under the direction of maestro Steven Smith, took on the challenge of presenting a complex piece of music that demanded the most from them. They delivered brilliantly. With so many symphonies across the country struggling, the residents of Santa Fe are fortunate to have such a top-flight symphony celebrating its 30th anniversary. It not only offers high-quality performances in its regular programming, but also actively reaches out to youth and other underserved audiences to bring the pleasure of great music. The last program in this year’s series is Beethoven’s Ninth on May 17 and 18. If you haven’t discovered this community treasure yet, we hope you will join us. We look forward to being moved by many performances in the coming years. Roxanne Howe-Murphy and Jim Murphy

Santa Fe

ov. Susana Martinez took center stage, if only for a brief moment, in the nation’s political theater this week. Mother Jones, the left-leaning investigative magazine, published a not-so-flattering profile of the New Mexico governor and possible Republican vice presidential contender. Even juicier than the cover article, which described Martinez as “petty” and “vindictive” under the headline, “The Next Sarah Palin,” were the quotes of Martinez talking off the cuff with advisers. Martinez, about former Lt. Gov. Diane Denish: “That little bitch.” On teachers and their pay: “During the campaign, we can’t say it, I guess, because it’s education, but … [teachers] already don’t work, you know, two and a half months out of the year.” On the Commission on the Status of Women: “What the hell is that? What the hell does a commission on women’s Cabinet do all day long?” More troubling, aide Matt Kennicott had this to say about the late House Speaker Ben Luján: “Somebody told me he’s absolutely eloquent in Spanish, but his English? He sounds like a retard.” Even in private, that is offensive language, especially for a political operative who ended up landing a cushy state job. Kennicott works for the state agency that — wait for it — is charged with providing services for the state’s mentally disabled. He earns $84,905 as communications director for New Mexico’s Human Services Department, according to the state’s Sunshine Portal. Speaker Luján’s widow, Carmen, had this to say: “Ben committed his life to helping people, even while fighting cancer — people always came first. He had an incredible mind and heart. This makes me so sad. He was a lifelong champion of working people. He used his voice and his words to make a difference.” As Mrs. Luján pointed out, “these cruel words by Matt [Kennicott] are not just about Ben, they hurt and attack the people of our State. Anyone who speaks with an accent, anyone who speaks Spanglish and uses both English and Spanish to communicate was attacked by the governor’s staff.” Their son, U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján, put the comments in broader context: “It is sad that a Martinez official believes that New Mexicans who speak with a Spanish accent have a disability or that they use such disparaging terms. It is troubling that Governor Martinez has allowed a culture in which these comments and other offensive remarks by her staff are deemed acceptable. It is deeply disappointing that instead of speaking out against this offensive language, Governor Martinez has tolerated it and even rewarded this type of behavior by making this individual a spokesman in her administration. “The decision by Governor Martinez to surround herself with staff like this speaks volumes about her leadership and character. It sends a message that this behavior is acceptable. Using such derogatory terms for women or those who interchange English and Spanish when they speak should not be tolerated.” Kennicott has apologized — sort of, saying that, “In this private conversation four years ago, I was repeating a direct quote of what someone else had said and I apologize if that offended or hurt anyone. I was relaying this to someone in private and obviously would not have used this language otherwise, as I knew full-well that the governor’s sister is developmentally disabled.” Of course, Gov. Martinez has turned the attack into a drive to make money — and the $10 donations are pouring in. She is decrying the audiotape as “stolen” and complaining about the liberal media. But the tapes, and the attitudes, are accurate. And the pleasant image of the governor who loves reading to children is smudged. She’s considered a national frontrunner for, at the least, a GOP vice presidential nomination. Republicans hope her face can help change the face of their party, making it more welcoming to both women and minorities. Her seemingly pleasant personality and can-do image is part of that appeal. Now, thanks to the audiotapes (presumably leaked by a former ally), we see a different Martinez. As for whether this will stick, or whether it’s another political storm that will dissipate, we’ll see, left-leaning or not, Mother Jones is the same magazine that discovered and wrote about the video showing then-presidential candidate Mitt Romney bashing the “47 percent” of citizens who are nothing but “takers.” That video altered the presidential race. What the audiotapes do to Gov. Martinez’s carefully constructed image is unknown. But they have certainly moved the curtain aside so that voters can view more clearly the woman in the governor’s seat.

LA CUCARACHA

BREAKING NEWS AT www.sAntAFenewMexiCAn.CoM


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TIME OUT

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

ACROSS 1 Did some aboveaverage work 6 Doesn’t just tear up 10 One way to get the beat going? 13 Master, in Mysore 14 Hostiles 16 “Well, well, well!” 17 He may be trying to unload crates 20 “Am ___ France?”: King Lear 21 Jeans reinforcer 22 They’re easily fleeced 23 Chinese dish eponym 24 See 39-Across 25 Magazine industry’s equivalent of a Pulitzer 27 Not nixed 29 Composition of some wreaths 31 Living or dead follower 32 Yom Kippur War setting 34 Dam designer: Abbr.

35 Vet 36 Mutating, highly resistant microbe 39 Lang. in which “friends” is 24-Across 40 Start of an intermission? 41 Boo Boo Bear’s co-creator 42 “___ name I love” (“America” lyric) 43 Shop spinner 44 Campus letter 45 Fence alternative 47 Old paper parts 49 Monitor option, for short 52 “___ back!” 53 Kind of training done by music majors 54 The shorter you are? 55 Tend to work without a net 58 He proclaimed “I shook up the world” 59 Gervasi who directed 2012’s “Hitchcock” 60 Shake in an opera house

Horoscope The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, April 18, 2014: This year you will be more energized than you have been in a long time. You have a sense of direction that allows you to detach. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Confusion will filter into your day, and you might be inclined to take off early. You need time to recharge your batteries. Tonight: A loved one is energized. 61 Year Charles IX was born 62 Rectangular paving stone 63 Unlikely bruiser DOWN 1 Test pilot’s protection 2 Mecca or Medina 3 1985 Ralph McInerny novel 4 Support 5 Longtime airer of “Any Questions?” 6 Place for a delivery 7 Withdrawing words

8 Withdrawing 9 Range of sizes, briefly 10 Mathematics branch associated with fractals 11 Establishing by degrees 12 Jockey Turcotte 15 Many nods 18 Biathlon need 19 Cádiz condiment 26 Twin Cities suburb 28 Jazz player Malone 30 Places for quick operations, briefly 32 Speaks to Shakespeare? 33 Not domestically

35 “In principio ___ Verbum” 37 “Tell ___ story” 38 Things to play with matches? 43 Its natives are called Loiners 46 Master’s seeker’s hurdle, briefly 48 Shell accessory 50 Holders of many selfies 51 With no sparkle 55 Flight for someone 8-Down 56 Small power sources 57 The Rams of the A-10 Conf.

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes. com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscroptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

Chess quiz WHITE TO PLAY Hint: Win the rook. Solution: 1. Qb4ch! 2. Ka6 (or Kc6) 3. Qa4ch! gets the rook [Kryvoruchko-Minasian ’14].

Hocus Focus

Super Quiz Take this Super Quiz to a Ph.D. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Subject: SCIENCE (e.g., The mineral deposits growing upward in caves are called ____. Answer: Stalagmites.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. What is a tiglon? Answer________ 2. For what is LOX an acronym? Answer________ 3. Which mathematical instrument was made obsolete by the pocket calculator? Answer________ GRADUATE LEVEL 4. What is the only rock that floats in water? Answer________ 5. What is the common name for conjunctivitis? Answer________ 6. The name for this bone disease translates to “porous bone.” Answer________ PH.D. LEVEL 7. What potent opiate drug took its name from the Greek god of dreams? Answer________ 8. Where is your glabella? Answer________ 9. What is one-tenth of a bel? Answer________ ANSWERS:

1. Offspring of a male tiger and female lion. 2. Liquid oxygen. 3. Slide rule. 4. Pumice. 5. Pink eye. 6. Osteoporosis. 7. Morphine (Morpheus). 8. Between eyebrows and above nose. 9. Decibel.

Jumble

SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? (c) 2014 Ken Fisher

Today in history Today is Good Friday, April 18, the 108th day of 2014. There are 257 days left in the year. Today’s highlight in history: On April 18, 1934, the first laundromat (called a “Washateria”) was opened by John F. Cantrell in Fort Worth, Texas; four electric washing machines were rented to members of the public on an hourly basis.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You will be delighted by a friend’s reaction to a thoughtful gift. This person seems to be at a loss for words. Tonight: Schedule some one-on-one time with a special person. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You get what you want without having to charm anyone. You might not know what to do next. Tonight: Anything could happen. You don’t need to wish upon a star. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Listen to news more openly than you have in the past. Your judgment will prevent you from hearing every detail. Tonight: Relax. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Tap into your imagination when making plans. A friend or loved one could be thrilled by the possibilities that you conjure up. Tonight: On the prowl. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH If you feel as if you need more time, ask for it. A partner or friend might not understand how much you have on your plate. Tonight: Head home early.

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Dad lets kids disrespect mom

Dear Annie: My husband keeps telling our sons they can do whatever they want when I tell them “no,” and that they don’t need to listen to me. He is never on my side. The kids make fun of me and call me names, and Dad doesn’t seem to care. When I insist that he back me up, he slaps them on the head. I’m tired of him undermining me and encouraging the kids to be disrespectful to me. It’s been 18 years, and I’m ready to throw in the towel. — Disrespected Wife Dear Wife: Your husband is a terrible parent, and we don’t know why you have put up with it for so long. He sets a horrible example for his sons, teaching them that their mother doesn’t deserve their respect, that women should be ignored, that parenting is unimportant and when kids misbehave, just hit them. And frankly, by letting him get away with this, you have reinforced those attitudes. Tell your husband to come with you for parenting classes, or you will be seeking marriage counseling, with or without him, to see what’s worth saving. Dear Annie: Last year, my sweet cousin died after a brief illness. Her two children requested donations in her memory to a charity. I was not sure which division of the organization to donate to, so I wrote a check to the charity and sent it to the eldest child, along with a card expressing my sympathy. Three months later, I asked another relative to inquire whether they had received my card, because the check had not been cashed. Their response was that they had been “too busy” and had not opened any of the cards yet. It’s now approaching 10 months, and I doubt my bank will honor the check. I am so disappointed in these well-educated yuppie kids with seven-figure incomes. Maybe your readers need a refresher course on bereavement etiquette. — Cousin Patsy

Dear Patsy: You are assuming that these kids are only marginally mourning their mother, and that Mom left things so tidy that they are simply ignoring the cards. Yes, they should have acknowledged your donation as soon as possible, but try to be forgiving. Since they have been remiss in responding and the check is too old to cash, phone the children and inform them that you will write a new check and mail it directly to the charity. (Put “in memory of” their mother on the subject line.) Ask them to please tear up or return the old one if they ever get to it. Dear Annie: In response to “Warren, Ohio,” who claims she can’t find clothes for petites, I beg to differ. I’m 4-foot-9, and I find clothes all the time — just not at my local department stores. I shop online. I highly recommend petitesource.com, which lists all the stores that offer petite wear by category. You also need to be creative if you are tiny. I discovered that Old Navy sells a ton of petite stuff, but only online, and that J. Jill stores don’t have much for me in their brick-and-mortar stores, but have a great deal online. Lands’ End sells petite nightgowns, lots of coats and, best of all, petite bathing suits. Coldwater Creek and Jones New York are for petites who are taller than I am, but the Sundance Catalog has some gorgeous and pricey tops, slacks, dresses and sweaters for petites that are both fashionable and beautifully made. Also, many major department stores sell a lot of sizes, but only online, so check the websites for Nordstrom’s, Bloomingdale’s, Talbots, Ann Taylor, Macy’s, Dillard’s and Kohl’s. And when I’m looking for a great sale, I can often find it at T.J. Maxx online. You may have to return a few things initially, but sometimes you can return online purchases without incurring shipping costs if they have a local store nearby. — Tiny Grandma in Florida

Sheinwold’s bridge

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You will be unusually assertive, and you’ll get excellent results. Ask for what you want. A boss will smile as he or she watches you in action. Tonight: At your favorite haunt. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You could be pushed to commit to spending more than you want. Make a call to a trusted friend and share what is happening. Tonight: Be reasonable when making plans. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH The planets are rooting you on. An element of the unexpected plays a role in what goes on with a loved one, new friend or child. Tonight: You are the ringmaster! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You might not be ready to explain a plan that you have been working on for a while. You could feel as if you want to continue without hearing any input from others. Tonight: With a favorite person.

Cryptoquip

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You might not believe how easily plans will fall into place. Be grateful, especially since you have a lot to do. Don’t hesitate to ask for some help, if need be. Tonight: TGIF! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You will need to organize an event or project at the last minute. There might be a snafu that could take more time than you would like to give. Tonight: Plan on running late. Jacqueline Bigar

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is by trial and error. © 2014 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


Obituaries B-2 Police notes B-2 Sports B-5 Comics B-8

FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sports,B-5

LOCAL NEWS

B

Pecos stays undefeated with win over Monte del Sol.

Crews find suspected area of radiation leak Official says more trips needed at WIPP nuclear waste facility to fully investigate accident The Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE — Two months after radiation leaked from the federal government’s half-mile deep nuclear waste dump in southeastern New Mexico, officials said Thursday that crews have found contamination underground in the area where waste was most recently being stored.

But Tammy Reynolds, the U.S. Department of Energy’s deputy recovery manager, told a community meeting in Carlsbad that more trips need to made into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant to further investigate the accident. Officials say they hope to have a lot more information next week. Crews on their fourth trip into the mine Wednesday made it into the only

active waste-storage area and found contamination, Reynolds said. The deeper they went into the area, the more widespread the contamination, she said. But the crews had to retreat before identifying the possible source because they had been underground for five hours in protective gear that retains heat and needed to make their way back above ground, Reynolds said. Waste at the plant is stored in panels, which are a series of rooms cut out of underground salt beds. Five of

those panels are full and have already been sealed. Panel 6 is full, but it has not yet been sealed. Panel 7 is the current active storage area. Crews made it into both Panels 6 and 7, and they found the contamination in Panel 7, Reynolds said. The next step is for crews, and possibly robots, to go back down to see if they can identify what caused the leak. Among the potential scenarios: a roof collapse that damaged waste-storage containers or a puncture of a container by a forklift.

The plant has been closed since mid-February, when the leak sent low levels of radiation into the air and contaminated 21 workers. That happened nine days after a truck hauling salt underground caught fire Feb. 5. A series of safety shortcomings were cited by a team that investigated the truck fire. It’s unclear if the incidents are related. The dump is the federal government’s only permanent repository for waste from decades of nuclear-bomb building.

Justices rule against House hopeful on ballot issue

City puts 118 vehicles, most from DWI forfeitures, up for bid

Court rejects appeal by former security guard over signatures By Patrick Malone The New Mexican

Sgt. Anthony Tapia of the Santa Fe Police Department shows off a Jaguar four-door sedan on Tuesday that will be sold Saturday during the city’s DWI forfeiture auction. More than 100 vehicles will be available at the auction, which starts at 9:30 a.m. at the city’s impound lot, 1142 Siler Road. PHOTOS BY CHRIS QUINTANA/THE NEW MEXICAN

On the auction block

By Chris Quintana The New Mexican

T

he 1998 cream-colored Jaguar has been sitting in the city’s impound lot for close to two years, ever since it was seized from a driver who was convicted on his sixth DWI offense. The paint is mostly unblemished, what appears to be leather seating is mostly intact, and the pouncing-jaguar hood ornament is still affixed. It’s just one of 118 vehicles that the city of Santa Fe plans to auction off Saturday as part of its DWI forfeiture program. Proceeds from the sale, which will be held beginning at 9:30 a.m. at a city impound lot at 1142 Siler Road, go to the city’s DWI prevention program, said Amanda Katz, a program coordinator. Last year’s auction generated about $110,000, she said, and the city netted $97,000 of that after paying the auctioneers. Bidders will find a smattering of most domestic and foreign makes, ranging from midpriced brands such as Ford, Chevrolet, Honda and Subaru to luxury makes such as Lexus, BMW, Lincoln and Volvo. There’s even a Mini Cooper and a Volkswagen Beetle. (A full list of the available vehicles can be found at santafenewmexican.com.)

Vehicle conditions vary greatly. Some are in pristine shape, such as the cherry-red Ford Expedition up for sale. Others are missing front bumpers or have other body damage. Some have flat tires or are missing batteries, and some have high mileage — 200,000 miles or more. A police department news release said some of the vehicles seized by the city were taken from owners caught driving on a revoked license and not DWI.

A former state Capitol security guard whose acrimonious relationship with a lawmaker led to a restraining order against him will not join her as a member of the House of Representatives in the near future. The New Mexico Supreme Court has rejected an appeal by Algin Mendez, 33, of Española and upheld a First District Court decision that Mendez failed to file enough valid signatures on his nominating petition to qualify as a candidate for the June 3 Democratic primary. In the original ruling that Mendez appealed, state District Judge Raymond Ortiz invalidated 100 of the 183 signatures that Mendez had submitted. He needed 104 signatures to qualify as a candidate. The high court’s ruling Wednesday leaves incumbent Rep. Carl Trujillo, D-Nambé, unopposed for the House District 46 seat representing northern Santa Fe County. Mendez was employed as a guard for the state Senate during this year’s legislative session but quit after Rep. Debbie Rodella, D-Española, obtained a restraining order against him, claiming he had intimidated her. Mendez formerly worked for the Rio Arriba

Please see RULe, Page B-3

u For a full list of vehicles that will be sold at the city of Santa Fe’s DWI forfeiture auction, visit santafenew mexican.com.

GOP opponents spar over charges of Web plagiarism

Four BMW motorcycles, an ATV and a Yamaha motorcycle await sale at a city auction coming Saturday.

By Steve Terrell The New Mexican

The city also plans to sell off a few patrol cars and four BMW motorcycles formerly used by patrol officers. An ATV and similar recreation vehicles also will be offered for sale. Of the 118 vehicles up for sale, the police department said, 108 are from seizure proceedings. Although first-time DWI offenders are allowed to get their vehicles back after installing an ignition interlock device, pay-

If you look at Republican U.S. Senate candidate David Clements’ website, you’ll see some striking similarities with information posted on the website of Michigan Congressman Justin Amash. A story in the politics section of BuzzFeed, a national website, says the Las Cruces lawyer “appears to have plagiarized” Amash’s site. And the campaign of Allen Weh, Clements’ opponent in the June GOP primary, charges that Clements “directly copied and pasted” Amash’s words. Clements and Weh are competing to see who will get their party’s nomination to take on Democratic incumbent Tom Udall, who is seeking his second sixyear term in the U.S. Senate. Clements, contacted Thursday, told The New Mexican he doesn’t consider it plagiarism to use similar

Please see BLocK, Page B-2

Please see cHaRGes, Page B-2

End of lawsuit spurs Taos airport project Agreement voids annexation, provides money for expansion By J.R. Logan The Taos News

TAOS — The town of Taos and Taos County governments have agreed to terms that would end litigation over a controversial annexation while providing money to fund a long-awaited airport expansion project. “Basically the lawsuit is over

and the airport will move forward,” said Dan Barrone, who is both Taos mayor and a Taos County commissioner. This week’s agreement on the airport and other town/ county issues comes after a year of acrimony between the two governments that culminated in a March municipal election that brought three new faces and a new attitude to Town Hall: Barrone was elected, as were Councilors Fritz Hahn and Judi Cantú; incumbent mayor Darren Córdova and councilor

Section editor: Howard Houghton, 986-3015, hhoughton@sfnewmexican.com

Rudy Abeyta were voted out of office. Last March, the previous Town Council, under Córdova’s leadership, voted to annex the airport and six miles of highway through El Prado. The town insisted it did not have the cash to pay its share of a runway expansion. Officials said they needed to annex the property to collect tax revenue from the $24 million project to cover the town’s $1.2 million match. County officials and El Prado residents voiced strong oppo-

sition to the annexation. The county offered to give the town tax revenue generated at the airport to avoid the annexation, but town officials insisted they could not trust the county. The county filed two lawsuits opposing the annexation, and a Taos judge voided the annexation last December. The town hired an outside attorney to take the case to the Court of Appeals and has spent at least $10,000 so far in legal fees. After a joint meeting April 10,

Please see PRoJect, Page B-3

The town of Taos and Taos County have reached an agreement that voids annexation of airport property and also provides county funding to help the town secure federal dollars for an airport expansion project. THE TAOS NEWS

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


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LOCAL & REGION

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

Police: Student ate pot cookie before fatal leap Report: Man consumed cannabis candy before fatally shooting wife

direct the state Department of Revenue to adopt rules requiring that foods be clearly marked or designed to show that they contain pot advanced in the ingly popular since Colorado By Sadie Gurman state House on Thursday. The Associated Press allowed people 21 and over to Investigators believe Pongi, a buy recreational marijuana this native of the Republic of Congo, DENVER — A Wyoming col- year at regulated stores. and three friends from Northlege student who jumped to his The pot industry tries to west College in Powell, Wyo., death at a Denver hotel had eaten educate consumers about the traveled to Colorado on spring more of a marijuana cookie than potency of marijuana-infused break to try marijuana. was recommended by a seller, foods. But despite the warnings At their hotel, the group of police records show — a finding — including waiting for up to an four friends followed the seller’s that came amid increased conhour to feel any effects — com- instructions. But when Pongi cern about the strength of popuplaints by visitors and first-time felt nothing after about 30 minlar pot edibles after Colorado users have been rampant. utes, he ate an entire cookie, became the first state to legalize Colorado lawmakers have police said. recreational marijuana. tasked regulators with setting Within an hour, he began Levy Thamba Pongi, 19, conpotency-testing guidelines to speaking erratically in French, sumed more than one cookie ensure consumers know how shaking, screaming and throwpurchased by a friend — even much pot they’re eating. ing things around the hotel though a store clerk told the Those guidelines are room. At one point he appeared friend to cut each cookie into expected to be released next to talk to a lamp. six pieces and to eat just one month. Under Colorado law, “This is a sign from God that piece at a time, said the reports a serving size for edible pot this has happened, that I can’t obtained Thursday. Pongi began shaking, scream- contains 10 milligrams of THC, control myself,” Pongi told ing and throwing things around marijuana’s intoxicating chemi- his friends, according to the cal. reports. “It’s not because of the a hotel room before he jumped Lawmakers also are trying weed.” over a fourth-floor railing into to prevent accidental ingestion Pongi’s friends tried to the hotel lobby March 11. An of pot edibles by children who restrain him before he left the autopsy report listed marijuana can’t tell the difference between room and jumped to his death, intoxication as a “significant contributing factor” in the death. a regular cookie or gummy bear police said. and the kinds infused with canMarijuana cookies and other One of his friends told invesedibles have become increasnabis. A proposal that would tigators it may have been his

first time using the drug — the only one toxicology tests found in his system. All three friends said they did not purchase or take any other drugs during their stay. “The thing to realize is the THC that is present in edibles is a drug like any drug, and there’s a spectrum of ways in which people respond,” said Michael Kosnett, a medical toxicologist on the clinical faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He said a person’s genetic makeup, health issues and other factors can make a difference, and first-time users might consume too much, unaware of how their bodies will react. “The possibility for misadventure is increased,” Kosnett said. The marijuana concentration in his blood was 7.2 nanograms of active THC per milliliter of blood. Colorado law says juries can assume someone is driving while impaired if their blood contains more than 5 nanograms per milliliter. Denver police said tests showed the cookies sold at the store were within the required THC limits.

Charges: Contest grows bitter

NTSB: Helicopter pilot reported problem with controls

Colo. lawmakers want regulators to set potency-testing guidelines for pot edibles

won’t buy clean technologies or follow environmental polilanguage as Amash to state cies if they can’t afford to do his stance on certain issues. “I so.” Amash makes the same think what you see is that Justin point on his website, stating, Amash and I have substantially “No matter what the governsimilar positions,” he said. “I ment requires, Americans have been influenced by Concan’t buy clean technologies or gressman Amash.” follow environmental policies Like Amash, Clements is part they can’t afford.” of the libertarian wing — or, as On agriculture, Clements he calls it, “constitutional consays, “New Mexico has one of servative” wing — of the GOP. the most diverse agricultural A page on Clements’ website economies in the country. Our where he addresses his stance state’s farmers and ranchers on Social Security and Medicare, as well as a two-sentence represent the best in innovation, entrepreneurship and segment of a post in which he stewardship. The future suclays out his views on educacess of New Mexico farmers tion, seem to be lifted directly from postings on Amash’s site, and ranchers are endangered, however, when the government though Clements’ education seeks to take over agricultural page includes several unique production with needless, paragraphs. uninformed and often overly Clements’ page on the enviburdensome regulations.” ronment is virtually the same Amash says the same thing as Amash’s, with only one senabout Michigan, though he tence that’s slightly different. doesn’t mention green chile Clements says on his website: and the pecan orchards, as Cle“No matter what the government requires, Americans ments does.

Continued from Page B-1

Earlier this week, BuzzFeed said another Republican Senate candidate, Dr. Greg Brannon of North Carolina, also lifted sections from Amash’s issues pages. The primary contest between Weh and Clements has grown increasingly bitter since last month, when political newcomer Clements surprised may observers by receiving nearly 47 percent of the Republican pre-primary convention delegate vote. Weh, a former state party chairman, received about 53 percent of the delegates’ support. The Weh campaign said Thursday, “The voters of New Mexico deserve to know what David Clements’ own ideas, opinions, beliefs, and values are. They do not want him to regurgitate and steal them from a congressman in Michigan.” Contact Steve Terrell at sterrell@sfnewmexican.com. Read his political blog at roundhouseroundup.com.

Block: Public preview on Friday Continued from Page B-1 ing fines and reinstating their driver’s license, repeat offenders don’t get that option. In addition, the city will sell assorted personal items — such as iPod charging cables or a DVD copy of the film Legally Blonde — recovered from vehicles. Sgt. Anthony Tapia said the city plans to sell every vehicle on the impound lot by the end of the day. It’s hard to estimate the price that will be paid for

any of the vehicles, he said, given the volatile nature of auctions, but he expects all will sell for more than $300. Any less, Tapia said, and the city could just sell a vehicle for scrap metal. Tapia said a similar auction last year finished by 3 p.m., though the auctioneers had 30 more vehicles to sell compared to this year’s inventory. The public will have a chance to preview the vehicles from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Tapia said police will monitor the lot

prior to the auction. Those looking to buy vehicles must do so with cash or money order, and purchased vehicles must be removed from the lot by 5 p.m. Monday, April 21. The past owner of the forfeited vehicle is prohibited from repurchasing his or her vehicle at the auction. For more information about the auction, call 955-5042 or visit the city website at www. santafenm.gov/dwi_vehicle_ forfeiture_auction.

The Santa Fe Police Department is investigating the following reports: u Roberto C. Borrego, 24, was arrested at about 4 a.m. Thursday on two charges of aggravated assault. A report said he tried to hit two Walgreens employees with his vehicle at 1096 St. Francis Drive and that officers found him a short time later and arrested him on the 1900 block of Cerrillos Road. u An officer reported a case of aggravated indecent exposure in connection with photos in an email sent to a south-side Santa Fe woman. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the following reports: u A man told deputies that

ALBUQUERQUE — The pilot of a medical helicopter that crashed at University Hospital in Albuquerque reported that the control pedals jammed or locked while the aircraft was taking off from the hospital’s rooftop helipad. The pilot’s statement is in the National Transportation Safety Board’s preliminary report on the April 9 crash. The report says the pilot told investigators he began making a left turn, but the heli-

five years ago, he had hired another man to restore a 1970 Dodge Charger, but when he went to see the vehicle Wednesday, he discovered that no work had been done on the car, even though he had personally delivered $36,000 worth of parts to the man. u A woman reported Wednesday that a person in Hadley, N.Y., used her personal information to open a credit card account with the clothing retailer Kohl’s. No charges had been made to the account at the time of the report.

IAN H. RASCON

Ian of Belen, 30, passed away April 12, 2014. Ian was born in Grand Junction, CO and attended Belen High School. He attended the LDS Church in Las Lunas. Ian was artistic, sweet with a wonderful "corny" sense of humor and a loving heart. He is survived by his mother Karolyn Selleck of Belen, father Ray Rascon and stepmother Louise Rascon of Hendersonville, TN, brother Ira Rascon, sisters Mikala McGee, Glory Rascon, Maria Hunter, Margarite Chesley, Anna Rascon, Christy Raines, grandmother Edith Hill, stepgrandfather Robert Robinson, extended family. Ian’s Life CelebrationSaturday, April 19th at the First Baptist Church in Belen at 11 a.m.

Speed SUVs u Mobile speed-enforcement vehicles are not in use while the city seeks a new photo-enforce-

May 31, 1952April 17, 2011 Three Year Anniversary

ment contractor.

Help lines Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families hotline: 800-473-5220 St. Elizabeth Shelter for men, women and children: 982-6611 Interfaith Community Shelter: 795-7494 New Mexico suicide prevention hotline: 866-435-7166 Solace Crisis Treatment Center: 986-9111, 800-7217273 or TTY 471-1624 Youth Emergency Shelter/ Youth Shelters: 438-0502 Police and fire emergency: 911 Graffiti hotline: 955-CALL (2255)

behavior. A detective who interviewed him after the killing noted that he appeared to be under the influence of Richard Kirk controlled substances based on his speech and inability to focus, according to the warrants. Police said Richard Kirk was rambling and confessed to killing his wife. Blood samples will be tested to see whether he was on any other drugs or medications. The Denver Police Department is also investigating whether police responded to the 911 call quickly enough. Police Chief Robert White held a news conference Thursday but refused to provide details about the shooting or the probe, or say whether he thought officers took too long to respond. The Associated Press

copter kept turning and spun several times before crashing. “The pilot added that the pedals were jammed or locked, in the neutral position,” according to the preliminary report. The helicopter came to rest on its right side, and investigators noticed damage to the roof “consistent with impact from the main rotor blades or skids,” the report says. The Associated Press

Funeral services and memorials

RONNIE A. VIGIL

Police report

DENVER — A Denver man accused of killing his wife while she was on the phone with a 911 dispatcher ate marijuana-infused candy before the attack, according to search warrants released Thursday. Kristine Kirk, 44, told dispatchers her husband bought and ate the candy and may have also taken prescription pain pills before he started hallucinating and frightening the couple’s three children, the documents state. She pleaded with dispatchers to hurry and send officers because her husband, Richard Kirk, 47, had asked her to get a gun and shoot him. She said she was “scared of what he might do.” Richard Kirk could be heard in the background of the 911 call talking about the candy he bought from a pot dispensary earlier that night, and surveillance footage from the shop captured the transaction, police said. It was unclear whether the marijuana influenced his

Vigil Mass will be held at 8 pm on Saturday, April 19, 2014 at San Isidro Church, 3552 Agua Fria Street, Santa Fe, NM. The Vigil Family

SANDRA RAMIREZ Sandra G. Ramirez went to be with her Lord and Savior on April 13, 2014, at the age of 59. She was born on September 16, 1954 to Eulalia "Lala" and Robert Maes. Sandra wed Michael Ramirez on November 8, 1975 in Santa Fe. She was preceded in death by her mother Eulalia "Lala" Maes, father Robert Maes, and brother Bobby Maes. She is survived by her dedicated husband Michael Ramirez, daughter Michaeleen Ramirez, son Erik Ramirez (Melanie), daughter Samantha Ramirez, sister Melinda Carrillo (Andy), sister Patricia McLaughlin, grandsons Isaiah Madril and Gabriel Gonzales and numerous nieces and nephews. Sandra retired as a Systems Analyst in 1997 from the Department of Public Safety, after twenty-five years of dedicated service. She was a kind-hearted, generous and loving to all she encountered and all who knew her. Sandra will be remembered for many things, especially her famous lasagna and cheesecake that we all loved. She spent the last ten years of her life caring for her grandsons while bravely battling various health conditions. Her battle was bravely fought with Mike at her left side and Jesus at her right. At the time of her passing, Mike stepped aside so Jesus could guide her into Heaven where she is now resting in peace. She will be deeply missed by all who know her and love her. Her family would like to thank Dr. Robert Kossman for his genuine care of Sandra not only as a patient but also as a person, and CSVRMC Emergency Department and ICU staff for their tireless, compassionate care they provided Sandra in her final hours. We would like to thank The City of Santa Fe Fire Department for their prompt and thoughtful care they provided during the various health challenges Sandra encountered. A visition will be held at St. John’s Catholic Church, 1301 Osage Ave in Santa Fe, at 6pm on Monday, April 21, 2014, with a Rosary to follow at 7pm. Funeral services will be held at 9am at St. John’s Catholic Church on Tuesday, April 22, 2014, and will be followed by a funeral procession and services at Memorial Gardens Cemetery. Pallbearers include Missy Gurule, Mary Rodriguez, Erik Ramirez, Jude Madril, Andy Carrillo and Alberto Gurule. Honorary Pallbearers are Isaiah Madril and Gabriel Gonzales. Rivera Family Funerals and Cremations, 417 East Rodeo Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87505. Phone: (505) 989-7032 Fax: (505) 820-0435 santafefuneraloption.com

Celebrate the memory of your loved one with a memorial in The Santa Fe New Mexican

Call 986-3000

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You Do Have a Choice. 417 rodeo road, santa fe

Come visit with us and learn how you can save 30% – 40% off corporate owned competitor’s prices on funeral services. 505.989.7032

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LOCAL & REGION

State health exchange official trades ideas with Obama at event President said to be complimentary of state’s progress

many New Mexico residents purchased insurance through the exchange before the first open-enrollment period ended March 31 have not been released. By Patrick Malone Hickey and others on the The New Mexican New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange Board support an President Barack Obama expanded open-enrollment reflected Thursday on Phase 1 period to bolster enrollment in of his signature health care over- health insurance. Members of haul, the Affordable Care Act, the board who have taken that with a group of about 10 CEOs stance have butted heads with from health care cooperatives the federal government over throughout the country, includ- whether the extension will be ing Dr. Martin Hickey, a memallowed. Hickey said that subber of the New Mexico Health ject was not broached during Insurance Exchange Board. his time with the president. “It was a very genuine dis“That wasn’t the forum for cussion about how things went us to bring that up,” he said. in 2014 and what we hope for Hickey said federal health in ’15,” said Hickey, CEO of the care policymakers plan to conhealth insurance nonprofit sult with administrators of the New Mexico Health ConnecNew Mexico Health Insurance tions. “We told the president, Exchange about ways to better ‘We agree the ACA is here to engage Hispanics nationally. stay. We’ve got your back.’ ” “We’re doing better in that The 90-minute discussion regard than other states, but with the president and his key I know that from [the federal health care policy staff at the government’s] point of view, Roosevelt Room in the West they’re looking for a more Wing of the White House successful effort from New focused on the role of indeMexico in 2015,” Hickey said. pendent health care cooperaHe could not ignore the tives, such as the organization magnitude of the moment. Hickey heads, in making insur“For me, it was a great honor,” ance more accessible. Hickey said. “How often do us “Both the White House and peons from New Mexico get the [Centers for Medicare and to sit across the table from the Medicaid Services] see the co- president of the United States ops across the country as really for an hour and a half?” having the capability to move The conversation with fast and innovate,” Hickey said. Obama lit a fire of enthusiasm When the discussion veered under Hickey for next year’s to state health exchanges, open-enrollment period, Hickey said Obama was comwhich kicks off in the fall. plimentary of New Mexico’s “It was nice to see his style,” progress. Hickey said of Obama. “The “The president came up to horse is out of the barn, and me and said, ‘We know you’re we’re putting on our shiny new doing great work in New saddles for 2015.” Mexico, and we appreciate it,’ ” Hickey said. Contact Patrick Malone Final numbers from the at 986-3017 or pmalone@ federal government on how sfnewmexican.com.

Rule: Head-butting caught on videotape Continued from Page B-1 County Sheriff’s Office, where Rodella’s husband, Tommy Rodella, is sheriff. Mendez resigned from that job while he was on suspension during an internal investigation. It stemmed from news reports in 2011 that Mendez had been caught on video head-butting another man during a drunken skirmish at a casino. Before Tommy Rodella became sheriff of Rio Arriba County, Mendez was hired there. Prior to that, he was fired from a job as a state police officer and lost his law enforcement certification. An ex-Marine who saw combat action in Iraq and

Afghanistan, Mendez also has participated in mixed martial arts cage fights. The fate of another challenge to a legislative candidate’s petitions is expected to be decided Friday in state District Court in Gallup. Threeterm incumbent Rep. Sandra Jeff, D-Crownpoint, faces a hearing to determine whether she submitted enough valid signatures to remain on the primary election ballot. On Monday, the state Supreme Court remanded the case back to District Court for a decision. Contact Patrick Malone at 986-3017 or pmalone@ sfnewmexican.com.

Project: Council still to vote on deal Continued from Page B-1 town and county elected officials and staff agreed to settlement terms meant to put the issue to rest. Under the deal: u The town will dismiss the appeal. u The county will provide up to $375,000 for the town to use as its match for the federal grant. u The annexation will be voided. The county approved the terms as written. The Town Council will consider a final agreement at a future meeting. The town began collecting a 1.5625 percent gross receipts tax at the airport after the annexation was approved last year. That tax will eventually revert to the county once the annexation issue is resolved. The county has agreed to make quarterly payments to the town equal to the amount the town would have otherwise collected in gross receipts tax generated by the project. Taos County Finance Director Leandro Córdova said quarterly payments will make it easier for the county to provide the funds without straining its budget.

“We really want to partner with them, and we really want to make sure we can afford to give them what we promised them,” Córdova said. The Taos News is a sister paper of The Santa Fe New Mexican.

Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

B-3

Contribution draws criticism Rael campaign to donate $25 possibly given by sex offender

By Steve Terrell The New Mexican

Two Albuquerque Republican lawmakers defending Gov. Susana Martinez following a highly critical magazine profile this week attacked some Democrats for alleged “hypocrisy.” One of those under attack was gubernatorial candidate Lawrence Rael. “In a finance report filed just this week, Lawrence Rael accepted a contribution from Larry Neely, a convicted sex offender who now travels the country opposing child sex offender laws, including Megan’s Law,” said the news release from Republican state

Reps. Paul Pacheco and Monica Youngblood. “This prosex offender activist has even testified against sex Lawrence abuse bills in Rael front of the New Mexico Legislature. … Why would this man support Lawrence Rael and why would Rael accept his support if he’s such a defender of women’s rights?” A spokesman for the Rael campaign said Thursday that the campaign contribution in question was for $25 and that Rael would contribute that amount to the CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which helps crime victims. “Lawrence would not knowingly take money from a con-

victed sex offender,” said Kyle Armstrong. The campaign received money from more than 500 donors during the last reporting period, Armstrong said. He said the first the campaign had heard of the contribution was in a New Mexican article Thursday morning. There was a link in the Pacheco/Youngblood news release to an October 2013 story in the New York Times quoting a man named Larry Neely, who was convicted of multiple counts of sexual indecency with a child dating to 2003. Neely had a attended a conference in Los Angeles for a group that believes laws aimed at all sex offenders are unconstitutional and ineffective. According to the Reform Sex Offender Laws Inc. website, there is a New Mexico resident named Larry Neely listed as

In brief

Kewa man gets 12 years in murder A Kewa Pueblo man on Thursday was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison for second-degree murder in connection with a 2011 case in which prosecutors said he beat another man to death outside the victim’s home at the pueblo, also known as Santo Domingo. Dennis J. Lovato, 29, also will be under supervised release for five years after his prison sentence and must pay $160,000 in restitution, according to a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Albuquerque. Lovato admitted to killing the victim by beating the man with his hands and feet April 15, 2011.

La Cienega man dies in accident A 53-year-old La Cienega man died Wednesday night at Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center, where he was taken after he was injured while operating a small tractor, a Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office spokesman said Thursday. The man was doing yard work at his house and was moving dirt with his tractor when he went into an embankment and

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Contact Steve Terrell at sterrell@sfnewmexican.com. Read his political blog at roundhouseroundup.com.

delay in the identification of the fatal sepsis from which she died the next day, the lawsuit says. Had she received proper treatment that morning — including hydration and administration of antibiotics — the complaint claims, she would have survived.

Randall to lead visitors bureau

Randy Randall, who has had a 45-year career in the tourism industry, will become executive director of the Santa Fe Convention and Visitor’s Bureau on Monday. His hiring by interim City Manager Brian Snyder was announced in a city news release Thursday evening. The statement said Randall’s experience includes 10 years as general manager of the Eldorado Hotel, serving on the board of directors of the American Hotel and Lodging Association and chairing the New Mexico Lodging Association, as well as working on the Civic Center Advisory Committee, which conducted a feasibility study for the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. As executive director of the bureau, he will oversee sales and marketing for the city of Santa Fe, operation of the Santa Fe Community Convention Center and the city Arts Commission.

part of the group’s administrative team. The website says Neely also is on the board of the New Mexico chapter of the group. There are several people named Larry Neely listed in Albuquerque, so it’s not clear that Rael’s contributor is the same one associated with the group. The state sex offender registration does not list anyone with that name. But whether or not the contributor is the same Larry Neely, Armstrong said Rael would make the donation to CASA. The same contributor also donated $10 to secretary of state candidate Maggie Oliver and $25 to the Conservation Voters New Mexico Action Fund.

Bandelier offers fee-free days People can visit Bandelier National Monument for free this weekend. No entry fees will be charged Saturday and Sunday as part of the National Park Week celebration. There also will be a guided hike by a park archaeologist Amadeo Montoya of the city’s Water Division closes a on the Burnt Mesa Trail on hydrant Thursday after flushing it on the corner of Guadalupe and Johnson streets. Flushing clears the sediments from Saturday to look at mesa-top the main line. LUIS SANCHEZ SATURNO/THE NEW MEXICAN Ancestral Pueblo sites. Officials suggest participants in the fourmile round-trip, three-hour hike should bring water, sunscreen, a hat, food and good shoes. For was thrown off the vehicle. her immune system and made details and to sign up, call the Sheriff’s deputies who arrived her susceptible to an infection, at the scene at about 5:30 p.m. according to the complaint filed visitor center at 505-672-3861, ext. 517. found the man had suffered in state District Court. head and internal injuries. The On Sunday, there will be a But, the complaint says, the man died hours later at the hos- medics “did not properly assess strenuous fire and flood hike pital, a deputy said. the seriousness of Mitra’s condi- to Upper Alamo crossing, up Alamo Canyon. Hikers should tion, did not inform her of the meet at the Ponderosa Group seriousness of her condition, Campground at 8:30 a.m., with and did not advise her of the an expected return at about necessity that she be evaluated 4:30 p.m. No signups are needed, in a medical facility capable of A California couple is suing but participants are asked to addressing potential infection the city of Santa Fe, claiming or other life-threatening condi- bring hiking gear, water and food. paramedics who treated their The hike is 10 miles round trip. tions.” daughter at a hotel last year That negligence caused a The New Mexican didn’t recognize the severity of her situation and that she died as a result. Court documents say the COUNSELING for family called for an ambulance POSITIVE CHANGE to come to their Santa Fe hotel Most insurance, Medicare in April 2012 because their 30-year-old daughter, Mitra 110 Del Rio Dr. LP LISW | 946-8288 Zamani Heydari — who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis — wasn’t feeling well. Santa Fe Fire Department INC. medics examined the woman and were told she was taking prednisone, which suppressed

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B-4

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

REGION

GAY MARRIAGE

Colo. judge key in Okla. ban decision

Holmes seen as swing vote in case By Kristi Eaton and Nicholas Riccardi The Associated Press

DENVER — A judge in Colorado who will play a pivotal role deciding whether gays should be allowed to wed in the United States asked pointed questions Thursday about whether Oklahoma can legally ban the unions. U.S. Circuit Judge Jerome Holmes is seen as the swing vote on the three-judge panel that heard the Oklahoma appeal and a similar case from Utah last week. The two cases are the first to reach an appellate court since the U.S. Supreme Court last year struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Since then, gay rights lawyers have successfully convinced eight federal judges that the ruling means courts must strike down laws against gay marriage because they deprive same-sex couples of a fundamental right. During Thursday’s hearing before the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel, Holmes suggested he interpreted the Supreme Court’s ruling the same way. “The state cannot define marriage in any way that would trample constitutional rights,

legal standing for the court to intervene. The case has taken 10 years to reach this point, partly because another 10th Circuit panel in 2009 ruled the plaintiffs incorrectly sued the governor and attorney general and directed them to name a different party. The panel allowed the hearing to run 13 minutes over its 30-minute limit so it could further question Campbell on his arguments. Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly approved that state’s gay marriage ban in 2004. A federal judge in January ruled that the ban violated the constitutional rights of gays, triggering the Sue Barton, left, a plaintiff challenging Oklahoma’s gay marappeal. That is almost identiriage ban, gets a hug Thursday from her pastor, Tulsa-based cal to the Utah case, in which a Rev. Leslie Penrose of the United Church of Christ, after leav- federal judge struck down that ing court following a hearing at the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of state’s 2004 voter-approved gay Appeals in Denver. BRENNAN LINSLEY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS marriage ban in December. Legal experts say the Oklacourt rulings that struck down right?” Holmes asked Jim homa and Utah cases are almost Campbell, the attorney reprethe Oklahoma and Utah bans, identical, though Utah does not senting the defendant in the and another appearing skeptihave the same standing issues case, the Tulsa County clerk. cal of them, all eyes were on as Oklahoma. The justices’ Holmes to see where the panel Campbell, however, condecision likely will pivot on the might come down. Holmes last level of deference they believe a tended the court must defer to week said that if the yardstick is court should give voters to deny the democratic process if there is a rational reason for the state whether the state has a rational a group of people the ability to reason to single out gay couples, marry. to choose who can get married and who cannot. the same-sex plaintiffs would It might be months before a lose. But if the standard was any written ruling is issued. Similar “The natural, procreative higher, they would win. potential of opposite-sex couappeals are working their way ples distinguishes that group On Thursday, the judges through four other appellate from same-sex couples,” Camp- spent most of their time either court circuits, and it is unclear bell said. questioning Campbell or debat- which case would next reach the ing whether the plaintiffs sued With one judge strongly Supreme Court, which likely will the correct person and had hinting he supported the lower have the final word on the issue.

Proposition 8 lawyer’s views evolving Attorney learned stepdaughter is gay

Other politicians have also voiced support for same-sex marriage after By Julie Pace learning that The Associated Press their own children were WASHINGTON — The gay, including lawyer who argued before Charles former Vice Cooper the Supreme Court in favor of President Dick upholding California’s ban on Cheney, whose position was at gay marriage learned while he odds with President George W. was handling the case that one Bush. of his children is gay and now In June, Cooper’s daughter is helping her plan her wedding plans to marry her partner in with another woman. Attorney Charles Cooper says Massachusetts, one of 17 states plus the District of Columbia his view of same-sex marriage where same-sex marriage is is evolving after having argued legal. In a statement to The in court that gay unions could Associated Press, Cooper said undermine marriages between a his family “is typical of families man and a woman. all across America.” The revelation is an unex“My daughter Ashley’s path pected footnote in the yearsin life has led her to happiness long debate over Proposition 8, with a lovely young woman the California measure struck named Casey, and our family down by the Supreme Court and Casey’s family are looking last year. forward to celebrating their It is also offers a glimpse, marriage in just a few weeks,” through the eyes of one family, he said. of the country’s rapidly shifting California voters backed the opinions of gay marriage, with Proposition 8 marriage ban in most public polls now showing 2008, but the measure quickly majorities in favor of allowing faced legal challenges. Cooper the unions. was hired to defend the law Cooper learned that his step- by the organization Protect daughter Ashley was gay as the Marriage.com, eventually takProposition 8 case wound its ing the case all the way to the way through appellate court, Supreme Court. according to a forthcoming Throughout the case, Coobook about the lengthy legal per kept a lower public profile battle. And with the Supreme than the two lawyers he argued Court ruling now behind him, against at the Supreme Court: Cooper cast his personal opinDavid Boies and Ted Olson, the ion on gay marriage as an evolv- political odd-couple who were ing process. on opposite sides of the 2000 “My views evolve on issues of presidential recount fight but this kind the same way as other came together to add bipartisan people’s do, and how I view credibility to the push for gay this down the road may not be marriage rights. the way I view it now, or how I Olson cast Cooper’s evolving viewed it ten years ago,” Cooper views on the issue as part of a said in journalist Jo Becker’s broader cultural shift. book Forcing the Spring: Inside “Every day, people around the Fight for Marriage Equality. the country are looking at the Cooper’s words are reminismarriage issue afresh and chalcent of the language President lenging their long-held assumpBarack Obama used throughtions,” Olson said. out his first term to describe As the marriage ban’s legal battle weaved through the court his “evolving” views on gay system, Becker writes that Coomarriage. In 2012, Obama announced publicly that he did, per’s family began to consider the plaintiffs in the case, Kris in fact, support the rights of Perry and Sandy Stier, as an same-sex couples to marry.

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inspiration for their daughter. “We were so moved to hear of the Cooper family’s constant love and support of their own daughter, even as the Perry case was in full swing and Mr. Cooper was spending his days planning Prop 8’s defense,” Perry and Stier said in a state-

ment to AP. “Some may find this contrast between public and private jarring, but in our opinion, loving an LGBT child unequivocally is the single most important thing any parent can do. We are overjoyed for Ashley and her fiancée, and we wish them the very best.”

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Utah police enlist FBI to help in baby death case plastic bags and then packed them SALT LAKE CITY — Utah inside boxes authorities are enlisting the in the garage help of the FBI to analyze DNA of her home from seven babies found dead south of Salt in the garage of a woman who Lake City has been arrested on six counts over a decade Megan of murder. Huntsman from 1996 to None of the labs in Utah can 2006. She told analyze the type of DNA that police one of the babies was has been taken from the tiny stillborn. corpses, which were found in Investigators still believe various stages of decomposithat timeline to be true, Robtion, Pleasant Grove Police erts said. Capt. Mike Roberts said Thursday. Her estranged husband, DarAuthorities are hoping DNA ren West, lived with her during will reveal who the parents are the decade she says this hapand the sex of the babies. pened, but he was in federal It’s unknown when results prison on drug charges from will be back, but they aren’t 2006 until January. expected anytime soon, RobWest told police in his initial erts said. interview that he knew nothMegan Huntsman, 39, was ing about the pregnancies, arrested Sunday and is being but he has since obtained an held on $6 million bail. She is attorney and investigators due in court Monday in Provo, haven’t spoken with him again, Utah, for an arraignment. Roberts said. After her estranged husband They are trying to determine discovered one of the infant his knowledge or involvement. corpses in the garage of their Investigators have an initial Pleasant Grove home this past weekend, Huntsman acknowl- theory on Huntsman’s motive but aren’t discussing it publicly, edged to police that she killed Roberts said. six of the babies, put them in By Brady McCombs The Associated Press

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The City of Santa Fe is proposing to develop multi-use (bicycle and pedestrian) urban trail connections and improvements at a number of locations along the Santa Fe River Trail as described below: 1. Improved trail connection from Camino de Chelly, across Agua Fria Street, to the walkways at Frenchy’s Park. 2. Improved trail connection from Paseo de la Conquistadora to the River Trail immediately west of Camino Alire; 3. Improved trail connection between La Madera Street and the River Trail (Thru Alto/Bicentennial Park); 4. Trail connections from the River Trail, across West Alameda, to Camino del Campo and Candelario; 5. Widening of the existing River Trail (sidewalk) between St. Francis Drive and Camino del Campo; In response to comment received at previous public meetings, please join us to review proposed designs at each location. In addition to input on bicycle and pedestrian issues, input will be received on natural and cultural resources.

Thank you

After 22 years of service to the Santa Fe area, Dr. Elizabeth Lakind will be closing her practice due to health issues. Our office closure is effective immediately. With written patient authorization a copy of medical records will be available thru May 30, 2014. We would like to thank you for the trust you have given us over the years for your neurological care. It has been an honor serving you. For further information, please contact (505) 989-4600.

If you have any questions regarding these meetings or are interested in the project but are unable to attend, you may mail, fax, or email comments to Denise Weston, Bohannan Huston Inc, 7500 Jefferson St. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87109, phone (505)923-3321, fax (505)7987988 or email dweston@bhinc.com Accommodations for ADA accessibility will be provided upon request; please contact Denise Weston at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.


FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

SPORTS

B-5

MLB: Tigers hold on for win over Indians. Page B-6

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Duke freshman Jabari Parker declares for NBA draft School’s highest-scoring freshman in history By Aaron Beard

The Associated Press

Jabari Parker is hoping to become Duke’s latest one-and-done star to become the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft. The 6-foot-8 All-American forward said Thursday he’ll enter the NBA draft after being the highest-scoring freshman in Duke history. He was also the first freshman to lead the Blue Devils in scoring and rebounding, and the first freshman in three decades to be selected team MVP.

NHL PLAYOFFS

Stastny leads Avs to OT win over Wild

Now he has the chance to do what Kyrie Irving did in 2011: follow a oneyear stay at Duke by being the first name called in the June draft. Coach Mike Krzyzewski said in a statement Thursday it was “an honor for us to have him in our program.” In an essay posted on SI.com, Parker said the NBA offers him the best chance to develop both as a player and off the court. “I realize how much of a privilege and an honor it is to join the ranks of the NBA,” Parker wrote. “I will do everything in my power to help deliver championships to the franchise that drafts me. At the same time, I recognize the obligation to represent the league in an admirable way off the court.”

Parker played in high school at Chicago’s Simeon Career Academy and was frequently mentioned along with Kansas’ Andrew Wiggins as possible No. 1 picks before ever playing a college game. Parker led the Atlantic Coast Conference with an average of 8.7 rebounds while his 19.1 points were second only to North Carolina State’s T.J. Warren, who entered the NBA draft last week. “Jabari could not have been better,” Krzyzewski said. “He is the epitome of what you would want a basketball player to be — outstanding every day on the practice court and in the class-

Duke’s Jabari Parker tries to shoot over Virginia’s Darion Atkins during the first half of the March 16 Atlantic Coast Conference championship game in Greensboro, N.C. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

Please see PaRKeR, Page B-7

PREP BASEBALL PECOS 4, MONTE DEL SOL 3

tutti comes through

Archuleta helps Pecos stay undefeated with win over Monte del Sol

By Pat Graham

The Associated Press

DENVER — Paul Stastny scored 7:27 into overtime after tying the game with 13.4 seconds remaining in regulation, liftAvalanche 5 ing the Colorado Avalanche to a Wild 4 5-4 win over the Minnesota Wild in the opener of the Western Conference quarterfinals on Thursday night. Gabriel Landeskog, Ryan O’Reilly and Jamie McGinn also added goals for Colorado in Patrick Roy’s postseason debut behind the bench. The Hall of Fame goaltender led the Avalanche to two Stanley Cup titles as a player. Erik Haula, Charlie Coyle, Ryan Suter and Kyle Brodziak scored for the Wild. Game 2 is Saturday. Stastny beat Ilya Bryzgalov with a close-in wrist shot in overtime, the same type of play Stastny used to tie

Please see aVs, Page B-6

NBA

Can Spurs get back at Heat? San Antonio hopes to survive the West By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

To get another shot at LeBron James, the San Antonio Spurs may have to go through Dirk Nowitzki, then Dwight Howard and James Harden, and finally Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. Survive all that, and maybe they can avenge that NBA Finals heartbreak. “There’s definitely that burning desire in the back of your mind that really wants to get back there,” Spurs guard Patty Mills said. They get started Sunday, right before James and the Heat begin what they hope is a run to a third straight championship. Miami’s path seems much easier, but James’ team also appears more vulnerable than the one that was an overwhelming favorite in last year’s playoffs. Maybe that was boredom, though. Count on the Heat to pick it up now. “This is why we’re all here,” Heat forward Shane Battier said. “The regular season is great and all, but this is the fun part. You wake up and you’re excited for the challenge of the playoffs. There’s no better time than right now.”

Please see sPURs, Page B-7

Pecos sophomore Arthur Archuleta pitches against Monte del Sol during Thursday’s game at Fort Marcy Ballpark. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

By Edmundo Carrillo

The New Mexican

a

rthur Archuleta is affectionately called “Tutti” by his teammates, but he could just as well be called “Houdini” for his ability to get himself out of tough situa-

tions. Archuleta, Pecos’ sophomore pitcher, survived multiple bases loaded situations, including the bottom of the seventh inning, to get his first win of

the season and help the Panthers overcome Monte del Sol 4-3 in a District 6AA baseball game at Fort Marcy Ballpark on Thursday. Down by a run with two outs in the bottom of the seventh, Monte del Sol ace Eduardo Rivas stepped to the plate with runners on second and third base. Despite Archuleta’s inexperience, Pecos head coach Augustine Ruiz contemplated if he should load the bases. “We talked about putting Rivas on intentionally so we could have the bases loaded and have a force

out everywhere because we figured Tapia would be swinging away,” Ruiz said. Ruiz decided to abandon that plan, but as fate would have it, Rivas walked and senior first basemen Antonio Tapia had bases loaded with the chance to win the game for the Dragons (9-6 overall, 2-1 in 6AA). While Ruiz hoped Tapia would put the ball in play and leave it up to the Panthers’ defense, Tapia struck out swinging instead and the

Please see tUtti, Page B-7

SFHS faces even stiffer competition next year

I

s this the end, or merely the begin- state, but no one can take a district ning of something for Santa Fe title away just for that — and made High athletics? the playoffs for the second straight For all the machinations and hand- year. The winter saw the girls basketball wringing about the school heading team live up to lofty expecto Class AAAAAA for the tations and win the school’s 2014-15 school year, what first state title since the has emerged from the volleyball team did it in background over the past 1996. Two weeks after that, five months are signs that the cheer team won its first the athletic programs have blue trophy. ignored the talk about what is to come — for now. And the good vibes haven’t ended there. The The girls soccer team softball team is nipping at made it to Albuquerque James the heels of Bernalillo in and gave Albuquerque Barron district play. The girls track Academy all it could handle Commentary team is emerging as a conin the Class AAAA quartertender, and the girls tennis finals. The volleyball team won the District 2AAAA Tournament team is very stout. for the first time in nine years and Now, this is not to say that the reached the quarterfinals as well. The concerns of the school moving into football team won the district title the largest classification in the state — yes, it was the worst district in the — and one of the toughest districts,

Sports editor: James Barron, 986-3045, jbarron@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Eric J. Hedlund, ehedlund@sfnewmexican.com

to boot — are being overblown. Don’t expect Santa Fe High to bring home as much hardware next year as it might this season. But the one issue that many outsiders, and maybe a few insiders, worried about was the school’s ability to compete against competition that is bigger (both in athletes and school size), better funded and more prepared to compete on a yearly basis. Still, what can’t be overlooked is that Santa Fe High has grown athletically during its stay in AAAA. When the school moved to AAAA in 2010, there wasn’t a program anyone could pinpoint as legitimately competitive (OK, maybe cheer). But in four years, the Demons and Demonettes have seen success come in bits and pieces. This year will represent a high-water mark for the school in at least 15 years, if not more. Maybe, the school that seemed to

embrace being a small fish in a big pond so cooly the first time around can develop a different mindset this time. Maybe, the city and supporters need to shed the “woe is us” mentality and take on the challenge head-on, like another similarly challenged school. Albuquerque Valley is actually smaller (1,335 enrollment over a threeyear period versus Santa Fe High’s 1,506), but has not backed down from the bgger schools. In fact, it had the top-seeded football team this school year and won state titles in boys basketball and dance in AAAAA. Valley might benefit from being in Albuquerque, but it still has to compete with area schools for talent. Santa Fe High needs to take an “usversus-the world” mentality, too. It’s not like the rest of the state is expecting the school to make waves next fall. So make them anyway.

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


B-6

NATIONAL SCOREBOARD

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

Thursday Tigers 7, Indians 5

BASEBALL baseball

Major league baseball american league

Cleveland

east W l Pct Gb New York 10 6 .625 — Toronto 8 8 .500 2 Baltimore 7 7 .500 2 Boston 7 9 .438 3 Tampa Bay 7 9 .438 3 Central W l Pct Gb Detroit 7 5 .583 — Minnesota 8 7 .533 ½ Chicago 8 8 .500 1 Kansas City 7 7 .500 1 Cleveland 7 8 .467 1½ West W l Pct Gb Oakland 10 5 .667 — Texas 9 7 .563 1½ Los Angeles 7 8 .467 3 Seattle 7 8 .467 3 Houston 5 11 .313 5½ Thursday’s Games Detroit 7, Cleveland 5 Minnesota 7, Toronto 0, 1st game Texas 8, Seattle 6 N.Y. Yankees 10, Tampa Bay 2 Minnesota 9, Toronto 5, 2nd game Boston 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Kansas City 5, Houston 1 Wednesday’s Games Baltimore 3, Tampa Bay 0 Cleveland 3, Detroit 2 Texas 3, Seattle 2 Boston 6, Chicago White Sox 4 (14) Kansas City 6, Houston 4, 11 innings Toronto at Minnesota, ppd., rain L.A. Angels 5, Oakland 4, 12 innings Friday’s Games Toronto (Hutchison 1-1) at Cleveland (Masterson 0-0), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2) at Detroit (Smyly 1-0), 5:08 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 1-1) at Boston (Lackey 2-1), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Bedard 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-1) at Texas (M.Perez 2-0), 6:05 p.m. Minnesota (Nolasco 1-1) at Kansas City (Vargas 1-0), 6:10 p.m. Houston (Cosart 1-1) at Oakland (Gray 2-0), 8:05 p.m.

National league

east W l Pct Gb Atlanta 10 5 .667 — Washington 9 7 .563 1½ New York 8 7 .533 2 Philadelphia 7 8 .467 3 Miami 6 10 .375 4½ Central W l Pct Gb Milwaukee 11 5 .688 — St. Louis 10 6 .625 1 Pittsburgh 8 8 .500 3 Cincinnati 6 9 .400 4½ Chicago 4 10 .286 6 West W l Pct Gb Los Angeles 10 6 .625 — San Francisco 10 6 .625 — Colorado 8 9 .471 2½ San Diego 7 9 .438 3 Arizona 4 14 .222 7 Thursday’s Games Philadelphia 1, Atlanta 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1 Colorado 3, San Diego 1 Pittsburgh 11, Milwaukee 2 St. Louis 8, Washington 0 Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 0; Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 1; N.Y. Mets 5, Arizona 2; Atlanta 1, Philadelphia 0; Washington 6, Miami 3; San Diego 4, Colorado 2; San Francisco 2, L.A. Dodgers 1 Friday’s Games Cincinnati (Simon 1-1) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-1), 12:20 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 2-1) at Pittsburgh (Morton 0-1), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (Wacha 2-0) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 2-1), 5:05 p.m. Atlanta (Harang 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (C.Young 0-0) at Miami (Eovaldi 1-1), 5:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Pettibone 0-0) at Colorado (Chatwood 0-0), 6:40 p.m. Arizona (Miley 2-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 3-0), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 0-2) at San Diego (T.Ross 1-2), 8:10 p.m.

ab r Bourn cf 4 1 Swisher 1b4 0 Kipnis 2b 2 0 Aviles 2b 2 2 CSantn 3b 4 0 Brantly lf 5 1 ACarer ss 4 1 DvMrp rf 3 0 YGoms c 4 0 Chsnhll dh 4 0 Totals

hbi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 2 0 1 1 0 0 4 0

Detroit

ab r Kinsler 2b 5 1 TrHntr rf 4 1 MiCarr 1b 4 1 VMrtnz dh 3 0 AJcksn cf 2 0 Cstllns 3b 3 0 AnRmn ss 0 1 Avila c 3 1 AlGnzlz 3b 3 1 RDavis lf 3 1

36 5 10 5 Totals

Rangers 8, Mariners 6

seattle

hbi 2 4 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1

30 7 9 7

Cleveland 000 120 200—5 Detroit 000 141 01x—7 E—C.Lee (1), Y.Gomes (4), Al.Gonzalez (3), Verlander (1), Castellanos (1). DP—Detroit 2. LOB—Cleveland 9, Detroit 6. 2B—Mi.Cabrera (4). HR— Brantley (2), Kinsler (2). SB—Bourn (1), Aviles 2 (3), Kinsler (3), An.Romine (1). CS—Bourn (1), Kinsler (1). SF—A. Jackson 2. Cleveland IP H R eR bb sO Salazar L,0-2 4 2-3 6 5 5 3 3 C.Lee 2-3 1 1 0 1 0 B.Wood 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 0 Atchison 1 2 1 1 0 1 Detroit IP H R eR bb sO Verlander W,2-1 5 6 3 0 4 7 Coke H,1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 Alburquerque H,1 2-3 0 1 1 1 1 Krol H,3 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 Chamberlain H,1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 Nathan S,2-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by C.Lee (R.Davis). T—3:38. A—25,990 (41,681). atlanta

Phillies 1, braves 0

ab r Heywrd rf 4 0 BUpton cf 4 0 Fremn 1b 3 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 Smmns ss 3 0 Laird c 3 0 A.Wood p 2 0 Totals

hbi 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

Philadelphia ab r Revere cf 4 0 Rollins ss 4 0 Utley 2b 3 0 Byrd rf 3 0 Mayrry 1b 3 0 DBrwn lf 3 1 Nieves c 2 0 Nix 3b 3 0 ABrntt p 2 0

30 0 4 0 Totals

hbi 3 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

27 1 8 1

atlanta 000 000 000—0 Philadelphia 000 000 01x—1 DP—Atlanta 3, Philadelphia 1. LOB— Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 4. 2B—Laird (1). CS—Simmons (2), Revere (1). S—Nieves. atlanta IP H R eR bb sO A.Wood L,2-2 8 8 1 1 1 7 Philadelphia IP H R eR bb sO A.Burnett 7 3 0 0 2 5 Bastardo W,2-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 Papelbon S,4-5 1 0 0 0 0 2 T—2:28. A—25,750 (43,651).

Yankees 10, Rays 2

New York

ab r Ellsury cf 4 2 Jeter ss 4 0 Anna ss 0 0 Beltran rf 5 0 Gardnr lf 0 0 ASorin dh 5 2 McCnn c 5 2 Solarte 3b 5 1 SSizmr 1b 3 1 KJhnsn ph 2 0 BRorts 2b 5 2 ISuzuki lf 4 0 Totals

hbi 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 2 3 2 1 0 0 0 3 2 0 0

Tampa bay ab r Zobrist 2b 3 0 DJnngs dh 3 0 Forsyth lf 4 1 Longori 3b 4 0 Myers rf 2 0 SRdrgz 1b 3 1 Joyce ph-lf 1 0 Guyer cf 4 0 YEscor ss 4 0 JMolin c 4 0

42 101610 Totals

hbi 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0

32 2 7 1

New York 130 021 102—10 Tampa bay 000 100 100—2 E—B.Roberts (1), Y.Escobar (1). DP— New York 1, Tampa Bay 1. TP—New York 1. LOB—New York 7, Tampa Bay 7. 2B—Jeter (3), Solarte (7), S.Sizemore (1), B.Roberts (1), Longoria (4), Y.Escobar (3). 3B—Ellsbury (1), B.Roberts (1). HR—A.Soriano (4), McCann (3), Solarte (1), S.Rodriguez (2). SF—Ellsbury. New York IP H R eR bb sO Sabathia W,2-2 7 7 2 1 2 6 Betances 2 0 0 0 2 3 Tampa bay IP H R eR bb sO Price L,2-1 5 10 6 6 1 6 H.Bell 1 2-3 3 2 1 0 1 Lueke 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 2 2 2 0 0 PB—McCann, J.Molina. T—3:13. A—28,085 (31,042).

ab r Almont cf 5 1 BMiller ss 4 1 Cano dh 5 1 Hart rf 3 1 Seager 3b 4 0 Frnkln 2b 3 1 Smoak 1b 4 1 Ackley lf 4 0 Buck c 4 0 Totals

hbi 1 0 2 0 1 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 1 0

Texas

ab r Choo lf 5 1 Andrus ss 4 1 Rios rf 5 0 Fielder 1b 3 1 Kzmnff 3b 5 2 Morlnd dh 3 2 DMrph 2b 3 1 LMartn cf 2 0 Arencii c 4 0

36 6 10 6 Totals

Rockies 3, Padres 1

hbi 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 2 3 2 0 1 0 0 2

34 8 12 7

seattle 006 000 000—6 Texas 312 020 00x—8 E—Buck (1), Wilhelmsen (1). DP— Seattle 1, Texas 1. LOB—Seattle 8, Texas 9. 2B—B.Miller (3), Hart (1), Ackley (4), Andrus (4), Kouzmanoff 2 (5), Moreland (3). HR—Cano (1), Hart (4), Choo (1). SB—Andrus 2 (6), Rios (4). S—L.Martin 2. seattle IP H R eR bb sO E.Ramirez 2 6 5 5 2 2 Leone 2 2 1 1 1 2 Beimel L,0-1 1 1 2 2 1 1 Farquhar 2 2 0 0 0 0 Wilhelmsen 1 1 0 0 1 1 Texas IP H R eR bb sO Scheppers 2 1-3 6 6 6 3 2 Noesi 2 3 0 0 1 1 Figueroa W,2-1 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Frasor H,2 1 0 0 0 1 1 Ogando H,3 1 1 0 0 0 0 Soria S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 E.Ramirez pitched to 1 batter in the 3rd. WP—Beimel. T—3:28. A—29,024.

Twins 7, blue Jays 0 First Game

Toronto

ab r MeCarr lf 4 0 Diaz cf 0 0 Kawsk 2b 4 0 Bautist cf 3 0 Encrnc 1b 4 0 Rasms dh 3 0 Lawrie 3b 3 0 Sierra rf-lf 3 0 Thole c 3 0 Goins ss 3 0 Totals

hbi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

Minnesota ab r Dozier 2b 4 1 Mauer 1b 4 2 Plouffe 3b 4 1 Colaell rf 3 1 Mstrnn rf 0 0 Kubel lf 4 1 Pinto dh 3 0 KSuzuk c 2 0 A.Hicks cf 4 0 Flormn ss 4 1

30 0 4 0 Totals

hbi 1 0 2 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 0

32 7 10 7

Toronto 000 000 000—0 Minnesota 000 052 00x—7 E—Dickey (1), Kawasaki (1), Plouffe (2), Florimon (1). DP—Toronto 1, Minnesota 2. LOB—Toronto 4, Minnesota 8. 2B—Colabello (7), Pinto (1), Florimon (1). CS—Thole (2). SF—Plouffe, K.Suzuki. Toronto IP H R eR bb sO Dickey L,1-3 4 1-3 7 5 5 5 4 Redmond 3 2-3 3 2 0 0 3 Minnesota IP H R eR bb sO Gibson W,3-0 8 4 0 0 1 4 Swarzak 1 0 0 0 0 2 T—2:38. A—20,507 (39,021).

Dodgers 2, Giants 1

los angeles san Francisco ab r hbi ab r DGordn 2b 4 0 0 0 Arias ss 4 0 JuTrnr ss 3 1 1 0 BCrwfr ph 1 0 Puig rf 4 0 1 0 Pence rf 3 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 2 1 Sandovl 3b4 0 Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 Posey c 4 0 VnSlyk lf 3 1 1 0 Morse lf 3 0 Uribe 3b 3 0 1 0 Belt 1b 4 1 Fdrwcz c 3 0 1 1 B.Hicks 2b 2 0 Ryu p 3 0 0 0 Petit p 0 0 BWilsn p 0 0 0 0 Pagan ph 1 0 Crwfrd ph 1 0 0 0 Adrianz 2b 3 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 HSnchz ph 1 0 Blanco cf 3 0 Bmgrn p 1 0 Totals

32 2 7 2 Totals

hbi 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

34 1 6 1

los angeles 010 010 000—2 san Francisco 000 000 001—1 DP—San Francisco 2. LOB—Los Angeles 7, San Francisco 9. 2B—Ju.Turner (2), Ad.Gonzalez (6), Van Slyke (3), Adrianza (2). SB—Pence (3). los angeles IP H R eR bb sO Ryu W,3-1 7 4 0 0 1 3 B.Wilson H,2 1 1 0 0 1 1 Jansen S,5-7 1 1 1 1 1 2 san Francisco Bumgarner L,2-1 4 1-3 6 2 2 3 6 Petit 2 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 Affeldt 2 1 0 0 0 1 WP—Jansen. T—3:08. A—42,890 (41,915).

BASEBALL

Tigers hold on for win over Indians Ross hit a tiebreaking RBI double in Boston’s two-run ninth, leading the Red Sox to over the White Sox.

The Associated Press

DETROIT — Ian Kinsler homered and drove in four runs, and the Detroit Tigers held on for Tigers 7 a 7-5 victory over the Indians 5 Cleveland Indians on Thursday. Justin Verlander (2-1) allowed three unearned runs in five innings, and the Tigers trailed 3-1 before Kinsler’s three-run homer in the fifth off Danny Salazar (0-2). Detroit never gave up the lead after scoring four runs in the fifth, although Cleveland’s Michael Brantley hit a two-run homer in the seventh to make it 6-5. Joe Nathan pitched a perfect ninth for his second save. RANGERS 8, MARINERS 6 In Arlington, Texas, Kevin Kouzmanoff delivered again, doubling twice and scoring two runs as Texas won its third straight after losing the series opener. Kouzmanoff is hitting .414 since being promoted from Triple-A on April 9 after starting third baseman Adrian Beltre strained his left quadriceps. Shin-Soo Choo homered for Texas and J.P. Arencibia had a pair of RBI groundouts. Robinson Cano hit his first homer for the Mariners, going back-toback with Corey Hart. Cano is in a 3-for-18 slump. YANKEES 10, RAYS 2 In St. Petersburg, Fla., CC Sabathia pitched seven innings for a rare win at Tropicana Field, leading the Yankees past David Price and the Rays in a matchup of former AL Cy Young Award winners. Sabathia (2-2) allowed two runs and seven hits, improving to 2-7 in 12 starts at Tropicana Field since joining the Yankees

ROYALS 5, ASTROS 1 In Houston, James Shields struck out 12 in eight innings and the Royals completed a three-game sweep of the Astros. NATIONAL LEAGUE

The Tigers’ Ian Kinsler, right, is congratulated by teammate Alex Avila after Kinsler’s two-run home run during the fifth inning of Thursday’s game against the Indians in Detroit. CARLOS OSORIO/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

in 2009. TWINS 7, BLUE JAYS 0 (1ST GAME) In Minneapolis, unfazed by the subfreezing temperature at first pitch, Kyle Gibson (3-0) allowed four singles in a careerhigh eight scoreless innings in a day-night doubleheader opener. At 31 degrees, took the mound for the coldest start for an outdoor game in Twins histor. TWINS 9, BLUE JAYS 5 (2ND GAME) In Minneapolis, the Twins scored three straight runs on wild pitches by the Blue Jays’ Sergio Santos in the eighth inning, when Minnesota walked eight times off three relievers in rallying for a victory and a sweep of a day-night doubleheader. The Twins trailed 5-1 in the fifth of the night game after another lackluster start by Mike Pelfrey. RED SOX 3, WHITE SOX 1 In Chicago, Jon Lester pitched eight sharp innings and David

DODGERS 2, GIANTS 1 In San Francisco, Hyun-Jin Ryu stretched his road scoreless streak to 26 innings, and Los Angeles beat the Giants to avoid a sweep. PHILLIES 1, BRAVES 0 In Philadelphia, Ben Revere hit an RBI single with two outs in the eighth, and A.J. Burnett tossed three-hit ball over seven innings to outpitch Alex Wood (2-2). Atlanta’s Julio Teheran beat Cliff Lee 1-0 less than 24 hours earlier. ROCKIES 4, PADRES 1 In San Diego, Franklin Morales (1-1) allowed four hits in six innings, and Wilin Rosario hit a tiebreaking groundout in a three-run seventh. CARDINALS 8, NATIONALS 0 In Washington, Adam Wainwright (3-1) pitched his fourth career two-hitter and seventh shutout. He chipped in at the plate with a double and single, and St. Louis benefited from four errors in beating Washington for the eighth straight time dating to Game 5 of the 2012 NL division series. PIRATES 11, BREWERS 2 In Pittsburgh, Andrew McCutchen hit his first homer of the season and drove in three runs, Pedro Alvarez had a threerun shot and pinch-hitter Josh Harrison broke a tie with a long ball in the seventh.

Colorado

ab r Blckmn cf 4 0 Cuddyr rf 3 0 Barnes rf 1 0 Dickrsn lf 3 1 Logan p 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 Hwkns p 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 1 1 Mornea 1b 4 1 Rosario c 4 0 Arenad 3b 3 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 Morals p 2 0 Brothrs p 0 0 Stubbs ph 1 0 Totals

hbi 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

san Diego ab r ECarer ss 4 0 Denorfi rf 4 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 Nady lf 4 1 Grandl c 3 0 Medica 1b 3 0 Venale cf 3 0 Amarst 3b 2 0 Hundly ph 1 0 Alonso 3b 0 0 Kenndy p 2 0 Vincent p 0 0 Headly ph 1 0 Thayer p 0 0

30 3 4 3 Totals

hbi 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

30 1 6 1

Colorado 000 000 300—3 san Diego 000 100 000—1 DP—Colorado 3, San Diego 1. LOB—Colorado 3, San Diego 3. 2B— Dickerson (1), Morneau (4), Arenado (5), E.Cabrera (7). HR—Nady (3). SB—Arenado (1). Colorado IP H R eR bb sO Morales W,1-1 6 4 1 1 1 5 Brothers H,4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Logan H,2 1 1 0 0 0 0 Hawkins S,4-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 san Diego IP H R eR bb sO Kennedy L,1-3 7 4 3 3 2 7 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 0 Thayer 1 0 0 0 1 1 T—2:38. A—17,557 (42,302).

Pirates 11, brewers 2

Milwaukee ab r CGomz cf 4 1 Segura ss 3 0 Braun rf 4 1 ArRmr 3b 4 0 Lucroy c 3 0 KDavis lf 4 0 MrRynl 1b 4 0 Gennett 2b3 0 Gallard p 1 0 LSchfr ph 1 0 Wooten p 0 0 Duke p 0 0 Wang p 0 0 Totals

hbi 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pittsburgh ab r Marte lf 4 3 RMartn c 3 1 AMcCt cf 5 1 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 NWalkr 2b 5 0 GSnchz 1b 4 1 Snider rf 3 0 Mercer ss 4 2 Volquez p 2 0 JHrrsn ph 1 1 Melncn p 0 0 Tabata ph 1 1 Morris p 0 0

31 2 8 2 Totals

hbi 2 0 2 1 1 3 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

35 111211

Milwaukee 101 000 000—2 Pittsburgh 200 000 36x—11 E—Lucroy (1). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Braun (2), Tabata (2). HR—A.McCutchen (1), P.Alvarez (6), G.Sanchez (3), J.Harrison (1). SB— Marte 2 (5). CS—Lucroy (2), Gennett (1), P.Alvarez (1). S—Segura, Gallardo. Milwaukee IP H R eR bb sO Gallardo 6 3 2 2 4 6 Wooten L,0-1 1-3 3 3 3 1 0 Duke 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 Wang 1 6 6 6 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R eR bb sO Volquez W,1-0 7 8 2 2 1 3 Melancon H,6 1 0 0 0 0 1 Morris 1 0 0 0 0 0 WP—Gallardo, Volquez. T—3:06. A—17,584 (38,362).

Cardinals 8, Nationals 0

st. louis

ab r MCrpnt 3b 5 2 Wong 2b 6 1 Hollidy lf 3 1 Roinsn rf 1 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 T.Cruz ph 1 0 YMolin c 6 0 Craig rf-lf 5 0 JhPerlt ss 5 1 Jay cf 4 2 Wnwrg p 3 1 Totals

hbi 2 0 2 1 2 2 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 1

Washington ab r Rendon 3b 4 0 Harper lf 4 0 Werth rf 4 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 McLoth cf 3 0 Loaton c 2 0 Jordan p 2 0 Treinen p 0 0 Souza ph 0 0

43 8 14 8 Totals

hbi 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

29 0 2 0

st. louis 300 103 100—8 Washington 000 000 000—0 E—Werth (2), Desmond 2 (7), Espinosa (2). DP—Washington 1. LOB—St. Louis 15, Washington 5. 2B—Holliday (5), Jh.Peralta (3), Wainwright (1). SWainwright. st. louis IP H R eR bb sO Wainwright W,3-1 9 2 0 0 3 8 Washington IP H R eR bb sO Jordan L,0-2 5 1-3 7 7 5 2 4 Treinen 2 2-3 6 1 1 1 3 Blevins 1 1 0 0 2 0 HBP—by Jordan (Jay). WP—Treinen. T—3:10. A—28,987 (41,408).

Twins 9, blue Jays 5 second Game

Toronto

hbi 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

Minnesota ab r Dozier 2b 4 3 Mauer dh 3 2 Colaell 1b 4 0 Kubel lf 4 0 Pinto c 2 1 Hrmnn rf 4 1 Nunez 3b 3 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 Plouffe ph 0 0 Flormn pr 0 1 EEscor ss 3 0 Mstrnn pr 0 1

MeCarr lf Rasms dh Bautist rf Encrnc 1b Navarr c Lawrie 3b Gose cf Goins 2b Diaz ss

ab r 4 1 5 0 4 2 3 1 4 1 5 0 2 0 3 0 3 0

Totals

33 5 8 4 Totals

BASKETBALL basKeTball hbi 2 1 0 0 3 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

30 9 8 6

Toronto 200 030 000—5 Minnesota 100 020 06x—9 E—Deduno (1), Dozier (1). DP—Minnesota 2. LOB—Toronto 11, Minnesota 10. 2B—Colabello 2 (9). HR—Bautista (6), Dozier (5). SB—Gose (1), Dozier 2 (5), Mastroianni (1). CS—Colabello (1). S—Goins, Nunez. SF—Navarro. Toronto IP H R eR bb sO McGowan 4 6 3 3 4 3 Loup 2 0 0 0 0 2 Wagner H,3 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 Cecil H,5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Delabar H,3 1-3 0 2 2 2 0 Santos L,0-1 BS,1-5 0 0 3 3 3 0 Happ 2-3 1 1 1 3 1 Minnesota IP H R eR bb sO Pelfrey 4 1-3 4 5 4 5 1 Deduno 2 2-3 3 0 0 2 3 Fien W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 McGowan pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Santos pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. HBP—by Pelfrey (Diaz). WP— Santos 3. T—3:37. A—20,698 (39,021).

Royals 5, astros 1

Kansas City ab r Aoki rf 4 2 Infante 2b 4 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 S.Perez c 4 0 AGordn lf 4 2 BButler dh 3 1 Mostks 3b 4 0 AEscor ss 4 0 Dyson cf 3 0 Totals

hbi 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0

Houston

Fowler cf Springr rf JCastro c Altuve 2b Krauss 1b Carter dh MDmn 3b Presley lf Villar ss

34 5 9 5 Totals

ab r 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 1 3 0 2 0 2 0

hbi 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0

Red sox 3, White sox 1

ab r Pedroia 2b 4 0 Bogarts ss 3 1 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 Napoli 1b 3 1 JGoms lf 3 0 Carp ph 1 0 GSizmr pr 0 1 D.Ross c 2 0 Nava rf 3 0 RRorts 3b 3 0 JHerrr ph 1 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 Totals

hbi 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

Chicago

ab r Eaton cf 4 0 Semien 3b 4 0 Viciedo rf 4 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 De Aza lf 3 0 Abreu ph 1 0 Flowrs c 3 1 LeGarc 2b 2 0

30 3 5 3 Totals

Best-of-7; x-if necessary

easTeRN CONFeReNCe

Indiana vs. atlanta saturday, april 19 Atlanta at Indiana, 5 p.m. Tuesday, april 22 Atlanta at Indiana, 5 p.m. Miami vs. Charlotte sunday, april 20 Charlotte at Miami, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, april 23 Charlotte at Miami, 5 p.m. Toronto vs. brooklyn saturday, april 19 Brooklyn at Toronto, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, april 22 Brooklyn at Toronto, 5:30 p.m. Chicago vs. Washington sunday, april 20 Washington at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, april 22 Washington at Chicago, 6:30 p.m.

WesTeRN CONFeReNCe

san antonio vs. Dallas sunday, april 20 Dallas at San Antonio, 11 a.m. Wednesday, april 23 Dallas at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City vs. Memphis saturday, april 19 Memphis at Oklahoma City, 7:30 p.m. Monday, april 21 Memphis at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. l.a. Clippers vs. Golden state saturday, april 19 Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 1:30 p.m. Monday, april 21 Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Houston vs. Portland sunday, april 20 Portland at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, april 23 Portland at Houston, 7:30 p.m.

HOCKEY HOCKeY

NHl PlaYOFFs First Round

30 1 5 1

Kansas City 110 210 000—5 Houston 000 010 000—1 E—Springer (1). DP—Houston 1. LOB— Kansas City 3, Houston 5. 2B—Aoki (3), S.Perez (7), A.Escobar (3). SB—Aoki (2). SF—Presley. Kansas City IP H R eR bb sO Shields W,1-2 8 4 1 1 2 12 W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 1 Houston IP H R eR bb sO Feldman L,2-1 6 9 5 4 1 2 Bass 3 0 0 0 0 1 PB—S.Perez. T—2:37. A—26,333 (42,060). boston

Nba PlaYOFFs First Round

hbi 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0

33 1 8 1

boston 000 001 002—3 Chicago 000 001 000—1 DP—Chicago 2. LOB—Boston 6, Chicago 6. 2B—D.Ross (2), De Aza (1), Le.Garcia (1). HR—Bogaerts (1). S—Le. Garcia. boston IP H R eR bb sO Lester W,2-2 8 7 1 1 0 9 Uehara S,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago IP H R eR bb sO Sale 7 1 1 1 3 10 Belisario L,1-2 1 1-3 3 2 2 2 1 Downs 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Sale (Bogaerts). T—2:54. A—17,454 (40,615).

best of 7; x-if necessary

easTeRN CONFeReNCe

Detroit vs. boston Friday, april 18 Detroit at Boston, 5:30 p.m. sunday, april 20 Detroit at Boston, 1 p.m. Montreal 1, Tampa bay 0 Friday, april 18 Montreal at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m. Wednesday, april 16 Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Pittsburgh 1, Columbus 0 saturday, april 19 Columbus at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. Wednesday, april 16 Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 N.Y. Rangers 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday, april 17 N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 sunday, april 20 Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 10 a.m.

WesTeRN CONFeReNCe

Minnesota vs. Colorado Thursday, april 17 Minnesota at Colorado saturday, april 19 Minnesota at Colorado, 7:30 p.m. Chicago vs. st. louis Thursday, april 17 Chicago at St. Louis saturday, april 19 Chicago at St. Louis, 1 p.m. anaheim 1, Dallas 0 Friday, april 18 Dallas at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Wednesday, april 16 Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 los angeles vs. san Jose Thursday, april 17 Los Angeles at San Jose sunday, april 20 Los Angeles at San Jose, 8 p.m.

Avs: Wild underdog in series Continued from Page B-5 the game in regulation. Roy made a bold move with 3:01 remaining, pulling Semyon Varlamov for an extra skater. Erik Johnson saved a potential empty-net goal with over a minute left as he raced down the ice and slapped away the puck just before it crossed the goal line. Moments later, Stastny beat Bryzgalov with a shot over his shoulder — the capacity crowd erupted. The Wild took a 4-2 lead after a three-goal second period. They spent the final period trying to play a prevent defense, not allowing the Avalanche to take advantage of their quickness. O’Reilly stole the puck from Brodziak and slid it over to McGinn, who batted it past Bryzgalov to make it a onegoal game at 12:47. Roy hardly played things by the book as the team tied a franchise record with 52 wins in the regular season. That gambler’s mentality certainly didn’t change in the postseason. Roy said before the game that it was his job to “have a ‘B’ plan and a ‘C’ plan in our pocket” in case of an emergency. In this case, it was pulling Varlamov with plenty of time remaining. It almost backfired when the Wild sent a puck rolling toward the goal. Johnson chased it down and knocked the puck away before it crossed the line. He also bumped the goal off its moorings. Matt Cooke took a shot on the goal with Johnson lying in front of the net, which upset a few Avalanche players and led to some

Wild left wing Zach Parise ducks under Avalanche defenseman Jan Hejda on Thursday during the first period in Game 1 of Thursday’s first-round playoff series in Denver. JACK DEMPSEY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

pushing and shoving. Although the underdog in the series, the Wild were actually one of the hottest teams down the stretch as they fought just to get into the playoffs. Bryzgalov provided a spark after he was acquired from Edmonton in early March. He went 7-1-3 down the stretch. But Bryzgalov has been inconsistent in the postseason over his career. He’s 17-20 and has allowed 109 goals. Landeskog’s first playoff goal midway through the opening period was set up by his big hit along the boards, jarring the puck loose from Jonas Brodin. The Avs cycled it up top and then down low to Stastny, who passed the puck to an open Landeskog in front of the net. BLUES 4, BLACKHAWKS 3 In St. Louis, Alexander Steen scored at 26 seconds of the third overtime to give the Blues a 4-3 victory over the

defending Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks. Steen beat Corey Crawford off a pair of short passes from Steve Ott and David Backes to cap the longest overtime game in franchise history. Ryan Miller blanked the Blackhawks after Patrick Kane scored on a breakaway to put Chicago up 3-2 late in the first period. Both teams face a short turnaround with Game 2 Saturday afternoon. RANGERS 4, FLYERS 1 In New York, Brad Richards and Derek Stepan scored power-play goals 47 seconds apart in the third period, and the Rangers beat Philadelphia in the playoff opener to stretch their home-winning streak over the rival Flyers to nine games. The teams were locked in a 1-1 tie when Jason Akeson — playing in just his third career NHL game — was given a double high-sticking penalty for clipping Rangers forward Carl Hagelin with 7:35 remaining.


sPOrTs PREP ROUNDUP

SFIS splits doubleheader with Sandia The New Mexican

It might be spring break at Santa Fe Indian School, but it wasn’t all fun and games for the Lady Braves on the softball field on Thursday. SFIS 4, 6 While splitting a Sandia 1, 10 District 5AAA doubleheader with Albuquerque Sandia Preparatory — SFIS won Game 1 4-1, while the Lady Sundevils came back with a 10-6 win — the Lady Braves missed out on a chance to put themselves in a better position in the standings. SFIS (7-11 overall, 1-2 5AAA) took Game 1 thanks to a seven-hitter by Chastity Sam, as she struck out nine and walked just

one. It also served as the return of catcher Reyes Crespin, who hit a solo home run in the second inning to open the scoring and went 3-for-4. Sam helped her own cause with a 2-for-4 performance while scoring a run and Leeanna Martinez was 2-for-3 with two RBIs. It was a different story in Game 2, as Sandia Prep (9-6, 1-2) took control with a three-run fourth to build an 8-6 lead and held on for the win. “I think we just ran out of gas,” said Leroy Valencia, SFIS head coach. “I’m not quite sure what happened there. We played a good 11 innings, then it seemed like we were laboring those last three.”

Mccurdy 10, EsTancia 2 Mccurdy 10, EsTancia 3

The Lady Bobcats defense set the tone in the nondistrict opener, as they backed starter Alannah Sanchez up with strong defense, then the bats came alive in the second game as they overcame a 3-0 deficit after the first inning. Nathan Velasquez, McCurdy’s head coach, praised the defensive effort of some of his younger players, especially eighth graders Alissa Aguilar and Karla Santos. “We got some great defense from Alissa, our second baseman,” Velasquez said. “And our first baseman, Karla, it doesn’t matter where you throw it, she just gets it. She is amazing.”

Tutti: Dragons inconsistent at the plate Continued from Page B-5 Panthers’ perfect district record remained intact. “He’s a tough kid,” Ruiz said of Archuleta. “He made quality pitches when he needed to.” Archuleta faced a similar situation when he walked Rivas in the first inning to load the bases, but wasn’t as fortunate. He walked Tapia to bring in Jake Theis and give the Dragons a 1-0 lead. Archuleta saved himself by striking out the next two batters. “You have to dictate as a pitcher,” Archuleta said. “You try to keep the ball in play and get strikes and hope the defense comes through.” The Dragons scored two runs in the bottom of the fourth to tie the score at 3-3 after the Panthers (14-4, 4-0) scored three times in the third, but the offense never got a rally going as it was held to just four hits. “It’s hard to win a game with four hits,” Monte del Sol head coach Frank Lucero said. “This kid [Archuleta] had us offbalance, I think he did a good job. Guys just weren’t seeing the ball.” Lucero added that inconsistency at the plate sealed his

Northern New Mexico

SCOREBOARD Local results and schedules ON THE AIR

Today on TV Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. All times local. auTO racinG Midnight on NBCSN — Formula One, qualifying for Chinese Grand Prix, in Shanghai BOXinG 7 p.m. on ESPN2 — Middleweights, Vitalii Kopylenko (22-0-0) vs. Willie Monroe Jr. (16-1-0), in Verona, N.Y. 8 p.m. on FS1 — Welterweights, Ryan Karl (0-0-0) vs. James Burns (1/3-0); welterweights, Errol Spence Jr. (11-0-0) vs. Raymond Charles (12-2-2); welterweights, Alan Sanchez (12/3-1) vs. Jorge Silva (19-5-2), in San Antonio, Texas 8:45 p.m. on SHO — Welterweights, Sammy Vazquez Jr. (13-00) vs. Juan Rodriguez Jr. (11-0-0); welterweights, Felix Diaz (140-0) vs. Emmanuel Lartey (15-1-1); lightweights, Alexei Collado (18-0-0) vs. Rod Salka (18-3-0), in Monroeville, Pa. GOLF 7 a.m. on TGC — European PGA Tour, Malaysian Open, second round, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) 10:30 p.m. on TGC — Champions Tour, Greater Gwinnett Championship, first round, in Duluth, Ga. 1 p.m. on TGC — PGA Tour, The Heritage, second round, in Hilton Head Island, S.C. 4:30 p.m. on TGC — LPGA, LOTTE Championship, third round, in Kapolei, Hawaii 12:15 p.m. on MLB — Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs 12:15 p.m. on WGN — Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs 5 p.m. on MLB — Regional coverage, Baltimore at Boston or N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay nHL 5 p.m. on CNBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 2, Montreal at Tampa Bay 5:30 p.m. on NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 1, Detroit at Boston 8 p.m. on NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, game 2, Dallas at Anaheim

Monte del Sol’s Antonio Tapia, right, tries to tag out Pecos’ Eli Varela at first base during Thursday’s game at the Fort Marcy Complex. Pecos won 4-3. JANE PHILLIPS/THE NEW MEXICAN

team’s fate, especially since Monte del Sol is used to getting hits. “One at-bat didn’t lose the game for us,” Lucero said. “It certainly could have won the game for us, but it’s a long game. There were a lot of things that went on during that game and some people just didn’t do what they had to do.” Along with a strong performance by Archuleta, the

Panthers were able to advance runners thanks to the bunting drills they always gripe about in practice. Both Jody Leal and Eli Varela reached on sacrifice bunts in the third and fifth innings, respectively, and the Panthers cashed in with runs. “We had a couple of big hits that came through, but the small game helped,” Ruiz said. “I’m proud of the execution on the offensive end with those

Continued from Page B-5 It begins Saturday with four games: Top-seeded Indiana hosts Atlanta, and Brooklyn visits Toronto in the Eastern Conference, while the West series openers include Golden State at the Clippers, and Oklahoma City against Memphis. On Sunday, No. 1 overall seed San Antonio opens against Dallas, right before Miami welcomes Charlotte. Washington at Chicago, and Houston hosting Portland round out the action. The postseason came to a thrilling conclusion last year, with the Heat rallying from a five-point deficit in the final 28 seconds of regulation to win Game 6. They went on to take a tight Game 7, helped when Tim Duncan missed over Battier from point-blank range down the stretch, to hand San Antonio its first loss in five NBA Finals appearances. Many thought that was the last chance for the Spurs’ core of Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili. Instead, San Antonio won a league-high 62 games in perhaps the franchise’s finest all-around season. Even the Spurs are impressed with the way they left disappointment behind, but all that matters now is what’s ahead. “We are No. 1 overall and can’t be better than that. But it doesn’t mean anything,” Ginobili said. “The playoffs start from scratch.” And it starts with a Dallas team that won 49 games, which would have given the Mavericks the No. 3 seed in the weaker East. Houston and Portland tied for fourth with

bunts.” The Panthers are now the only undefeated team in district play, but Lucero is ready to hand over the district championship to them just yet. “I don’t think they came out and overpowered us,” Lucero said. “I think that we’re both solid teams with every opportunity to finish strong. We’ll both fight for the district crown, I have no doubt.”

In this June 18, 2013, photo, San Antonio Spurs point guard Tony Parker, right, and Miami Heat small forward LeBron James collide during the second half of Game 6 of the NBA Finals in Miami. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

54 wins — the same amount as the Heat earned to finish No. 2 in their conference. Miami lost 14 of its final 25 games, often while playing without Dwyane Wade, and finished two games behind the Pacers. ABC analyst Jeff Van Gundy is picking Indiana to win the East, in part because the Heat just don’t quite resemble the team that lost only three times after the start of February last season. “I think they have a lot of guys who are not in their prime right now and their ability to consistently play well individually is just not there,” Van Gundy said Thursday during a conference call. “And then you have the health issues that to me, if they didn’t have some of those health issues, they’d be a 60-win team and they’d be the favorite.”

Still, the betting site Bovada gave 3-1 odds of another Spurs-Heat finals, best of any possible matchup. If it happens again, San Antonio would get the decisive game at home this time — though that may not even come into play if the Spurs have to face either the Rockets or Thunder, who both went 4-0 against them. Every series in the West could be a slugfest, which would make the playoffs no different than the regular season. The East has a sub-.500 Atlanta team along with postseason novices such as Charlotte and Washington, potentially making things easier for the Heat and Pacers. But Toronto, Chicago and Brooklyn all compiled better records since Jan. 1 than Indiana and Miami, and will try to prevent the Eastern Conference finals matchup that’s been expected since November. “It’s always wide open,” Nets coach Jason Kidd told reporters in Cleveland on Wednesday. “You guys sometimes limit it to just two teams, but guys that are playing on a daily basis in the Western Conference and the Eastern Conference feel like they’ve got a chance.” The Spurs have been hoping for another one, ever since walking off the court in Miami where they were so close to victory in Game 6 that workers had already begun preparations for the celebration. “We could have easily fell in a hole and let last year’s loss kill us,” Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard said. “But we got back mentally together and trying to get the same goal accomplished.”

Parker: Plans to continue work on degree room and a very humble young man. “He had a fantastic freshman year and is so deserving of the opportunity to play in the NBA and follow his dream.” Parker is listed as the No. 2 draft prospect on Chad Ford’s Top 100 on ESPN.com, the No. 2 pick in a mock draft on NBAdraft.net and No. 3 on DraftExpress.com. It had long been believed that Duke would be a one-year

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spurs: Site gives odds to Spurs-Heat final

Continued from Page B-5

Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

pit stop for Parker on his way to the pros. But even late into the season, he insisted he was undecided, saying he wanted to play at the level that would best help him grow. When he received the USBWA’s Tisdale Award as the nation’s top freshman this week, he said he planned to meet with Krzyzewski and reach a decision Wednesday. In his SI.com essay, Parker said he had “gotten pretty attached to life at Duke and I don’t want to utter the word

goodbye.” He also noted that the careers of professional basketball players — his father, Sonny, played six seasons in the NBA — last only so long. Parker — the fifth Duke player to enter the draft as a freshman — said he planned to continue working toward a college degree. He is Mormon and said he would put a two-year mission on hold. From Day 1, he and Rodney Hood — a redshirt sophomore transfer from Mississippi State — were the focal points for a

Duke team that spent much of the season in the top 10 and looked like a Final Four contender. But Duke (26-9) ended the season with a loss to Virginia in the ACC Tournament final and a shocking loss to Mercer in its NCAA Tournament opener. Hood hasn’t announced whether he will enter the draft, though Krzyzewski said “I wish we had him for more than one year” after Duke’s ACC Tournament win against Clemson last month.

PrEP BasKETBaLL 5 p.m. on ESPN2 — Jordan Brand Classic, in Brooklyn, N.Y.

PREP SCHEDULE This week’s list of varsity high school sporting events. For additions or changes, email us at sports@sfnewmexican.com.

saturday Baseball — Los Alamos at Bernalillo, DH, 10 a.m. Santa Fe High at Española Valley, DH, 11 a.m. Albuquerque Hope Christian at St. Michael’s, DH, 11 a.m. Monte del Sol at McCurdy, DH, 11 a.m. Las Vegas Robertson at Pojoaque Valley, DH, 11 a.m. Peñasco at Santa Fe Preparatory, DH, noon Questa at Mesa Vista, 1 p.m. Softball — Los Alamos at Bernalillo, DH, 10 a.m. Santa Fe High at Española Valley, DH, 11 a.m. Las Vegas Robertson at Pojoaque Valley, DH, 11 a.m. Albuquerque Hope Christian at St. Michael’s, DH, 11 a.m. McCurdy at West Las Vegas, DH, 11 a.m. Taos at Raton, DH, 11 a.m. Track and field — Capital City Invitational, at Santa Fe High, 9 a.m.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Basketball u The Fort Marcy Recreation Complex is holding a summer league that begins May 19 with four divisions. The season lasts 10 games and includes a single-elimination tournament. Cost is $400 per team, with a limit of 10 players per roster and an additional $30 for every player after that. Registration begins Monday at the complex. For more information, contact Phillip Montaño at 955-2508 or pgmontano@santafenm.gov, or Gregory Fernandez at 955-2509 or grfernandez@santafenm.gov. u The St. Michael’s Horsemen Camp is scheduled for June 9-12 and July 14-17 in Perez-Shelley Gymnasium. The June camp is from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., and open to boys and girls between Grades 1-9. Cost is $40 for first- and second-graders and $75 for thirdninth graders. The July camp is from 9 am.-4 p.m. and open to boys and girls from Grades 3-9. Cost is $40. For more information, call 983-7353.

Football u The Santa Fe Young American Football League will hold registration from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 29 at the YAFL headquarters, 173 Cerrillos Road. For more information, call 820-0775.

running u The third annual Amanda Lynne Byrne Memorial Run is 8 a.m. Saturday at Pecos High School. There is a 5-kilometer run/walk, a 10K run and a kids run. Cost is $20 for participants 18 and older, and $15 for those under 18. All proceeds go to the Amanda Lynne Byrne Memorial Scholarship fund. For more information, contact Chris Chavez at 470-5758 or cchavez32@comcast.net, or Leslie Byrne at 670-9247 or lbyrne@hotmail.com.

submit your announcement u To get your announcement into The New Mexican, fax information to 986-3067 or email sports@sfnewmexican.com. Please include a contact number. Phone calls will not be accepted.

nEW MEXican sPOrTs

Office hours 2:30 to 10 p.m.

James Barron, 986-3045 Will Webber, 986-3060 Edmundo Carrillo, 986-3060 FAX, 986-3067 Email, sports@sfnewmexican.com

Isotopes beat El Paso, winning three straight road games The Albuquerque Isotopes have now won three straight games over the El Paso Chihuahuas after a 2-1 win in Pacific Coast League play at Isotopes Park on Thursday night. It was scoreless before Albuquerque right fielder Mike Baxter hit a solo home run off Blaine Boyer in the top of the seventh inning. Three batters later, catcher Miguel Olivo singled to left field to bring in center fielder Joc Pederson for a 2-0 lead. Former Isotope Alex Castellanos hit a solo home run in the eighth for the Chihuahua’s only score. Yimi Garcia (3-0, 4.00 ERA) picked up the win for Albuquerque after giving up one earned run. The Isotopes (8-6) finish the four-game series with the Chihuahuas on Friday before traveling to Salt Lake City on Saturday to start an eight-game road trip. The New Mexican


THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

TUNDRA

PEANUTS

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NON SEQUITUR

DILBERT

BABY BLUES

MUTTS

RETAIL

ZITS

PICKLES

LUANN

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

THE ARGYLE SWEATER


Classifieds C-2 Puzzles C-3

FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN SECTION C

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KEIFER NACE/GENERATION NEXT

gen e

n o i t ra

Can Pope Francis — and the Bible — help bring young people closer to religion?

Gospel according to teens By Sophie Wickert Generation Next

P

ope Francis has been sending shock waves through the Catholic world while gaining much news coverage and attention for his sometimes unorthodox methods. Since he became the pontiff in March of last year, some have been angered and many have been awed by the pope’s attitude in spreading the Gospel. News of his actions trends across the Internet as he washes the feet of juvenile inmates, proclaims that atheists can be redeemed by God, poses for selfies with youth and even carries his own briefcase. The pope’s approach may be just what the Catholic Church needs to renew interest among Catholics, particularly teenagers, today. In an interview with the Jesuit journal La Civiltá Cattolica last August, Pope Francis was quoted as saying, “Let us try to be a church that finds new roads, that is able to step outside itself and go to those who do not attend Mass, to those who have quit or are indifferent.” Graham Golden, O. Praem, a Norbertine Brother who works with the Catholic Foundation of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s Regional Council Program — which focuses on outreach to rural communities and targets poverty — said that while Pope Francis is not saying anything new, “He’s emphasizing things in new ways.” And the pope’s desire for a more universal and inclusive church may be considered by how young Catholics relate to the Bible today. “A majority of the teens now don’t identify with the Bible,” said Ivanna Hernandez, a junior at The MASTERS Program and a Catechism teacher for third-graders at San Isidro Catholic Church. “There’s certain things that

you can’t relate to the Bible, not necessarily everything that happens goes by what is said in the Bible.” She points to incidents of modernday violence as an example: “A person’s mental state, all the shootings happening … we can’t turn to the Bible and [ask], ‘OK, how do you stop this?’ It’s a life-based thing that’s going on — people hurting one another — and you can’t necessarily turn to the Bible for that when it comes to how a person’s mental state is.” Yet, she said, teens who distance themselves from the Bible may still find guidance within its pages: “There are times when you have to decide for your own life what you want to do and then at the same time maybe [in] reaching out and reading the Bible there can be things that can help you and motivate you.” Rachel Lithgow, a Catholic and senior at St. Michael’s High School, said she believes that teens can find meaning in reading the Bible. “I think sometimes people get caught up in the fact that it was written thousands of years ago,” she said. “They think the parables don’t relate to their lives, but in order to get the meaning that one can apply to their everyday life, they can’t take it completely literally. Rather they must look at what the story is telling us about our lives and how we should act.” The Bible does include many stories of teen life, with the most famous being the conflict between David and Goliath, in which a young and unexpected hero emerges after David defeats the giant Goliath against all odds. “I think that God consistently chooses the unexpected, usually the people who you would think wouldn’t have a voice, would not be someone who has something to contribute, would be seen as on the margins or even as broken or too young,” Golden said. “And somehow through all of that, God manages to make the work of salvation known to the world. That’s

What is your favorite Biblical character/miracle?

Jimmy Buchanan, Santa Fe Prep “I’m not religious.”

Alicia Galvan, Santa Fe Prep “Moses parting the Red Sea.”

Natesa McGowan, New Mexico School for the Arts “Noah’s ark.”

Jasper Shorty, New Mexico School for the Arts “Jesus giving everyone kisses.”

what I think the value of the Bible is to the teenage: If you are struggling to understand who you are and your identity and are exploring and seeking and you’re moving into adulthood and you’re going through adolescence … to be able to look at thousands of years of tradition of how people have understood themselves and relate to something greater than themselves can give you great perspective in recognizing the value of your own life.” According to Golden, teens are in a unique position to illicit change, as adults become complacent in life with their careers, families and sense of identity, leaving teenagers to ask the tough questions regarding the role of society and the church. “It’s those who are asking us to look back into our social identity, which is sacred Scripture, why are we here, what are we doing, and challenge it,” he said, adding, “If you take the time and energy to invest in the exploration of who you are and who God is through the sacred tests, then it can be the most fulfilling and rewarding adventure that you can have.” Both Golden and Hernandez believe teens should conduct their own exploration in how they want to live and draw their own conclusions — ideally with the help of the Bible. Where is the best place to start? Lithgow’s favorite part of the Bible is 1 Corinthians 13:4-8. [“Love is patient, love is kind …”] “It’s about love,” she said. “I also was at a really low point a few months ago and my best friend reminded me of this verse, and it helped me through and … was what I needed to be reminded of in order to move past that low place and start to be a better person.” Sophie Wickert is a senior at St. Michael’s High School. Contact her at sophiepwickert@gmail. com.

SPEAK OUT August Markwardt, Desert Academy “Noah is pretty chill.”

Liam Kuziel, Desert Academy “Jesus getting resurrected.”

Katie Fields, St. Michael’s High School “Cain and Abel.”

COMPILED BY AARON STEVENS/GENERATION NEXT

MY VIEW

Teens can find relevance in the Bible By Austin Tyra Generation Next

T

he Bible has been in existence for thousands of years and reportedly continues to sell more than 100 million copies a year, making it perhaps the most read book in the world. Despite this, one wonders if our current generation of youth still finds the Bible relevant. The Bible can be relevant to teens today. Stories of underdogs, miracles, love, devotion to a higher power and war are universal themes that will always be relatable. Maybe this is a central reason why we are still connected to the same stories after all these years. There really is no real reason that teens would not be able to relate to these stories in the way that their parents and grandparents have in the past. Yet even though the Bible is hailed as the world’s best-seller, I have never seen teenagers flock to a local bookstore to snatch up a

copy. Why? Although the Bible is full of these universal themes, I also believe that such issues as stigmas and pressures from organized religious groups may keep some teens from enjoying stories of the Bible as much as possible — though we all know that younger generations can be counted on for new ideas and opinions that may differ from previous generations. Still, from the time we are very small, many of us are taught that the Bible is a tome to be respected and honored. This idea was very prominent in my life, and yet I never heard anyone suggest that I read the Bible for recreation. I feel like my experience with the Bible is probably quite common and that many teenagers don’t think of the Bible as a recreational read. Many teens may also be turned off by the sheer size of the Bible. All these points might make the Bible more of an errand to read rather than something that anyone, including teens, would consider for

Section editor: Robert Nott, rnott@sfnewmexican.com Design and headlines: Brian Barker, bbarker@sfnewmexican.com

pleasure or even a light lesson in morality. Yet I don’t believe that the Bible should be read for such pleasure, nor do I believe it should only be read by those who strictly follow a particular religion. I believe that the Bible should be read, including by teens, for inspiration and to allow people to study and understand religion without the commitment of cementing themselves in that religion or being intimidated by the staggering weight of the book. It is also important to understand that you do not have to read the Bible from beginning to end and certainly do not have to read every book within the Bible. No matter how much you decide to read of the Bible, I am certain most teens will be able to find something relatable and hopefully inspirational, a story or theme that will help them get through life — as so many people have done for thousands of years. Austin Tyra is a senior at the Academy at Larragoite. Contact him at austintyra@gmail.com.

for and by teens

MOVIES

Five films for Easter By Emily Davis

Generation Next

What with the recent release of Son of God and Noah — and the upcoming release of Ridley Scott’s Exodus — it seems that biblical movies, scorned by filmmakers throughout recent years, may be coming back into fashion. This latest trend serves as a reminder that a good religious epic, be it the story of Jesus or a tale of floods and arks, can include harrowing action scenes, dreamy romance and, of course, biblical references galore. In tandem with Generation Next’s Good Friday issue, here are five films featuring biblical legends and heroes for you to consider viewing this weekend. Quo Vadis (1951): Roman military commander Marcus Vinicius (Robert Taylor), a hard and cynical man, falls in love with devout Christian woman Lygia (Deborah Kerr). Though reluctant to accept her faith, his devotion to her moves him to turn against the corrupt emperor Nero (Peter Ustinov) when the latter blames the Christians for his maniacal burning of Rome. With the threat of his own death — as well as Lygia’s — facing him, Marcus must decide whether his love is strong enough for true belief in the deliverance of God. The Robe (1953): Set in a Rome poisoned by Caligula’s reign, The Robe tells the story of Tribune Marcellus Gallio (Richard Burton), the man who commands the military unit that crucifies Jesus. Though Marcellus skeptically dismisses the idea of a Messiah, his mentality changes once he wins Jesus’ robe in a drunken gambling game. Believing he is either insane or bewitched, Marcellus begins to feel a gnawing remorse despite guidance by his loyal friend Demetrius (Victor Mature) and his love for the sweet Diana (Jean Simmons). In the end, Marcellus comes to realize that only a conversation of faith will heal him forever. But can he make that leap? The Ten Commandments (1956) Director Cecil B. DeMille’s last (and some say greatest) work offers a dramatization of the life of Moses (Charlton Heston), a Hebrew boy born into an Egypt destined to be ruled by the tyrannical Pharaoh Rameses (Yul Brynner). Moses’ mother sends him down the river to free him from the fate of his despised race, but after he is adopted by an Egyptian princess, he becomes a successful and compassionate leader. Though pursued by the treacherous princess Nefretiri (Anne Baxter), Moses discovers a deeper meaning when he is exiled for his Hebrew roots and slowly begins to hear the voice of God. Though his newfound faith and the support of the gentle Sephora (Yvonne de Carlo), Moses becomes the deliverer of his Hebrew people, bringing them such miracles as the parting of the Red Sea and the creation of the Ten Commandments. This one usually pops up on television on Easter Sunday. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979): You can’t expect a serious depiction of biblical life with a title like that. Brian Cohen of Nazareth (Graham Chapman) was born in the stable next to Jesus’ and has been out of luck ever since. After inadvertently babbling some religious platitudes in the marketplace, Brian inspires a movement of his own. Brian desperately proclaims that he is not the Messiah but his followers become obsessive, viewing an event like the removal of a shoe as a divine miracle. In the end, Brian is condemned to crucifixion by Roman guards, but his fellow prisoners remind him to keep his chin up with the song “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life.” The Prince of Egypt (1998): The first film produced by DreamWorks Animation offers a new take on the Moses story as it focuses on the relationship between Moses (voiced by Val Kilmer) and Rameses (Ralph Fiennes). Complete with stirring songs and gorgeous animation, this movie masterfully shows the heartbreak that occurs when family members are separated by warring ideals. Throughout the story the well-drawn characters portray a hopeful picture of the miracles that can be accomplished through enduring faith and love. Emily Davis is a junior at Santa Fe Prep. Contact her at emilydavis@sfprep.org.

BREAKING NEWS AT www.santafenewmexican.com


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THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

to place an ad email: classad@sfnewmexican.com online: sfnmclassifieds.com

sfnm«classifieds call 986-3000 or toll free (800) 873-3362 »real estate«

MANUFACTURED HOMES RE

SANTA FE

HOUSE 3, 2 & Guesthouse 2, 1. Beautifully remodeled, 1 car garage. $265,000. Must see! Utilities separated. santafepropertyforsale.com, 505577-1626.

SANTA FE 2 RENTALS. 5600 SQ.FT WAREHOUSE, with live-in space, Southside, $295,000. 3.3 acres, La Tierra, Shared well, Paved access, $155,000. 505-4705877.

CONDO DOWTOWN CONDOMINUM, Short walk to Plaza. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Carport. Gated community. Private fenced patio. $319,000. Jay, 505-4700351.

INCOME PROPERTY

DOS SANTOS 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Fireplace, upgraded unit with granite countertops. End-unit. Low foot traffic. $109,000.

TAYLOR PROPERTIES 505-470-0818

PERMANENT, VACATION, IN CO M E producing B&B or Guest Ranch as well as ideal for Church or Youth Camp. One hour north of Santa Fe. 14 miles off I-25. Year-round access. Pond, 2 barns, guest cabin and gorgeous log home. All set up for horses. Ride right into National Forest! Please call 505-425-3580.

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED

COMMERCIAL SPACE

1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH on R u fin a Lane , balcony, fire place, laundry facility on site. $745 monthly. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH on Mann Street, front end of a duplex, near K-Mart. $750 monthly. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH on Rancho Siringo Road, Fenced yard, separate dining room, laundry facility on site. $745 monthly.

CANYON ROAD GALLERY SPACE FOR LEASE OR SHARE . Excellent location. Santa Fe style charm with superb furnishings and beautifully landscaped sculpture gardens. Current tenant artist wishes to share with one or two artist sculptors. Share expenses. No studio space, no pets, nonsmokers only. Contact Anthony 505-820-6868

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

2014 KARSTEN 16X80 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FOR SALE. $56,062 plus tax. Move-in ready! Located in the Rancho Zia MHP Space #26. Banks offer rates as low as 4.5%. Shown by appointment only. Call Tim, 505-6992955.

OUT OF TOWN ESCAPE THE COLD! Classic southern New Mexico adobe home near historic Mesilla Plaza. Indoor pool, authentic old-time elegance. Mathers Realty, Inc. 575-522-4224, Laura 575-644-0067

»rentals«

LOTS & ACREAGE

2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, clean, fresh paint. Walking distance to shopping. Non-smoking, No pets. $700 plus utilities. 505-670-9853, 505-670-9867. INCREDIBLE SANGRE VIEWS! $945. ZIA VISTAS LARGEST 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATHROOM, large walk-in closets. Fireplace. Exceptional layout. Gated. Much more. 505-316-0986.

A 1 Bedroom Apt. $0 Security Deposit For Qualified Applicants & No deposit required for Utilities, Ask me How!!

TURQUOISE

FSBO 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOME OFF OLD LAS VEGAS HIGHWAY. 2.7 acres. $298,000 (below appraisal). Lease option. twotrails.teppics.com. 505-6998727

RECENTLY REMODELED HOME. $149,000

In great area. Turn at White Swan Laundry to 203½ Tesuque Drive. Approximately 1,000 SF, 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, on small private fenced lot. Call Dave at 505986-2934, 505-660-9026 or Michael at 505-989-1855.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED (3) 2.5 Acre Lots, Senda Artemisia, Old Galisteo Road, Close to town. Easy building sites. Views, utilities, shared well. Owner financing. No Mobile homes. $119,700- $129,700 each. Greg. 505-690-8503, Equity Real Estate.

CHARMING 1 B e d r o o m . Quiet, washer & dryer, air conditioning. $800 monthly includes utilities and Direct TV. Non-smoking, no pets. 1st and deposit. 1 year lease. 505-9834734

SELL IT, BUY IT, OR FIND IT...

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED

Using

1303 RUFINA LANE: 2 bedroom, 1 full bath, laundry hook-ups, living and dining room. $765 plus utilities. No Pets! 505-471-4405

Larger Type

Only in the the SFNM Classifieds!

DOWNTOWN CASITA 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath

will help your ad 986-3000 get noticed

Fenced yard, washer, dryer. Small pet considered. Non-smoking. $980 plus utilities.

Taylor Properties 505-470-0818

TRAIL HOMES Don’t throw your money away on rent!

SAN MIGUEL COURT APARTMENTS

2 and 3 bedroom townhomes with attached garage and appliances!

( 12 Mo. Lease, required for special )

Qualifying buyers move in for $500 down

505-471-8325

FSBO, 1232 Osage Avenue. 2 bedroom, 2 bath. 1,263 squ.ft. $232,900. Open House 4/19 & 4/27, 1-4 p.m. 505930-0119.

CONDOSTOWNHOMES

CHECK THIS OUT!!

2029 CALLE LORCA

ENVIRONMENTALLY SAFE, attractive, airy home by Paula Baker-LaPorte. 2,375 sq.ft, 11 acres. 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths, private office, etc. Rancho Alegre. $515,000. 505-474-8011

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE AT 2019 G A L I S T E O , near hospital. Part of a five office suite with waiting room. Perfect for therapist, writer or other quiet use. Office is 163 sq.ft. and is $500 plus deposit. Utilities are included. Available March 1, 2014. Please call 505-577-6440 for more information.

PARK PLAZAS BEAUTIFUL 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, 2 level home. Quiet, views, kiva fireplace, small backyard, 1 car garage. 2996 Plaza Azul, $1300. 505819-8323.

$420 MOVES YOU IN

COMMERCIAL SPACE

CALL 428-0554

TurquoiseTrailHomes.com 83 Carson Valley Way

A-Poco Self Storage 2235 Henry Lynch Rd Santa Fe, NM 87507 505-471-1122

SOUTH CAPITAL RAILYARD. ONE BEDROOM, 1 BATH. Kiva, brick floors. Washer, dryer. Dishwasher. Nonsmoking, off-street parking. Fenced yard. $925 plus electric. First, last, security. Available 5/15. 734-9727772

Located at the Lofts on Cerrillos

GUESTHOUSES

this live- work studio offers high ceilings, kitchenette, and bathroom with shower, 2 separate entrances, ground, and corner unit with lots of natural lighting. $1000 plus utilities

Old Adobe Office Located On the North Side of Town

Brick floors, High ceilings large vigas, fire places, private bathroom, ample parking 1300 sq.ft. can be rented separately for $1320. plus water and CAM or combined with the adjoining unit; total of 2100 square for $2100. Plus water and CAM

GUESTHOUSES

Chic European Decor, 1 Bedroom with Den, Guesthouse. Views, walking trails, private courtyards. Pets on Approval. Quiet Neighborhood near Harry’s Roadhouse. $1,550 month. 505-699-6161 EASTSIDE, WALK TO CANYON ROAD! Furnished, short-term vacation home. Walled .5 acre, mountain views, fireplace, 2 bedroom, washer, dryer. Private. Pets okay. Large yard. 970-626-5936. TESUQUE CASITA. 1 bedroom, 1 bath in gated estate. Pets okay. References needed. All utilities. $900. jsfsilver@aol.com

HOUSES UNFURNISHED 1 BEDROOM Mountain Retreat! 860 squ.ft., 15 minutes to Plaza. Woodstove, washer, dryer, dishwasher, storage shed. Pets Ok. 1 year Lease, $995, plus 1 month deposit. Available 5/15. 505-660-8978. 2 BEDROOM, 1.75 BATH. Near Plaza and DeVargas. Privacy fence, washer, dryer, off-street parking. $1350 monthly includes utilities. Small pets considered. 505-301-4949

2 BEDROOM, 1 bath. Washroom hookups, new cabinets, portal, enclosed patio. Plenty Parking. No pets. $1,000 monthly, $1,000 deposit. 505-204-4008 3 BEDROOM 2.5 BATH. backyard borders Country Club Golf Course, AC, Garage. 6434 Paseo Del Sol. $1450 a month plus utilities. Available May 1st. Marty 505469-2573

700 sq.ft. studio guesthouse. North side, beautiful, private, high ceilings, utilities included. Available now! $850 monthly. 505-570-7322.

3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, fireplace, washer, dryer hookups, new tile and carpet. No-smoking, No Pets. $1,200 plus utilities. 505-670-9853, 505-670-9867.

BEAUTIFUL 1000 SQ.FT. 1 BEDROOM CASITA. Portals, plaster, floor heat, custom doors, built-ins, 2 fireplaces, washer, dryer, landscaped, separate drive with gate. serious inquiries only. $1300 monthly. Call Abbey 505670-2601

3 BEDROOM 2 BATH. Kachina Loop, Gated community. Cooler, radiant, fireplace. 2-car garage. washer, dryer, new carpet. Shed. $1,325. 505-4243735

ONE BEDROOM GUEST HOUSE FULLY FURNISHED, on south side of Santa Fe. $1,400 monthly includes utilities. 505-901-7415. See on-line ad

EASTSIDE NEW CASITAS, EAST ALAMEDA. Walk to Plaza. Pueblo-style. Washer, dryer. Kiva, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. 1500 sq.ft. Garage. Nonsmoking, no pets. $1900 monthly. 505-982-3907

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000

exploresantafe•com

business & service Your business in print and online for as little as $89 per month!

BUSINESS

CLEANING

90% SUCCESS RATE GRANTWRITER. Research based grant applications in social, education, economic and environmental development. marianna_king@adams.edu. 719-852-2698.

In and out. Windows, carpets. $18 an hour. Sylvia 505-920-4138. Handyman, Landscaping, Roofing. FREE estimates, BNS. 505-316-6449.

CARETAKING EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER, in-home care, medication assistance, personal care, light housekeeping, shopping. Excellent References. 505-3105790. MATURE, ABLEBODIED, DEPENDABLE couple seeks long term position, with housing. Extremely Mindful of what is under our care. 505-455-9336, 505-501-5836.

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

HANDYMAN

Clean Houses

MENDOZA’S & FLORES PROFESSIONAL MAINTENANCE

Office & Home cleaning. Janitorial, Handyman. (Home Repairs, Garden, Irrigation, Windows) Licensed, bonded, insured. References available, 505-795-9062.

CONSTRUCTION BATHROOM & KITCHEN REMODELING EXPERTS

CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS is committed to protecting your home. Creosote build-up in a fireplace or lint build-up in a dryer vent reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. Call 505989-5775. Get prepared!

COURIER KEYSTONE COURIER SERVICE, NEW in the area. Running a Pre web Special! $20 Delivery Service up to 20lbs, anywhere in Santa Fe Proper. All other deliveries, please call 505-999-1375.

LANDSCAPING

ROOFING

FREE PICK-UP of all appliances and metal, junk cars and parts. Trash runs. 505-385-0898

I CLEAN yards, gravel work, dig trenches. I also move furniture, haul trash. Call George, 505-316-1599.

LANDSCAPING

JUAN’S LANDSCAPING Coyote fences, Yard cleaning, Pruning, Tree cutting, Painting (inside, outside), Flagstone & Gravel. References. Free Estimates. 505-231-9112.

ALL-IN-ONE ROOF LEAKING REPAIR & MAINTENANCE. Complete Landscaping. Yard Cleaning, Maintenance. Gravel Driveway. Painting. Torch Down, Stucco. References Available. 505-603-3182.

THE YARD NINJA! PRUNING TREES OR SHRUBSDONE CORRECTLY! STONEWORK- PATIOS, PLANTERS, WALLS. HAUL. INSTALL DRIP. CREATE BEAUTY! DANNY, 505-501-1331.

Housecleaning, garage cleaning, hauling trash. Cutting Trees, Flagstone Patios, Driveways, Fencing, Yard Work, Stucco, Tile.. Greg, Nina, 920-0493.

Also new additions, concrete, plastering, walls, flagstone, heating, cooling, and electrical. Free estimates. 505-310-7552. LCH CONSTRUCTION insured and bonded. Roof, Plaster, Drywall, Plumbing, Concrete, Electric... Full Service, Remodeling and construction. 505-930-0084

HAULING OR YARD WORK

AFFORDABLE HOME REPAIR

REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE; PRO-PANEL & FLAT ROOF REPAIR, PAINTING, FENCING, YARDWORK. MINOR PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL. 25 years experience. Licensed. References. Free estimates. 505-470-5877

rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

and independent

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

50¢

mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

l makers gril State law r gas crisis utility ove

out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations who paid people Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded Others originated Page A-9 bin said. CITATIONS, Please see

The New

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

CALL 986-3010

TREE SERVICE DALE’S TREE SERVICE. Tree pruning, removal, stumps, hauling. Yard work also available. 473-4129

YARD MAINTENANCE

PAINTING

ARTIFICIAL TURF. High quality, remnants at a fraction of the cost. Ideal for large or small areas. Call, 505-471-8931 for more information.

COTTONWOOD LANDSCAPING TRINO’S AFFORDABLE Construction all phases of construction, and home repairs. Licensed. 505-9207583.

directory«

Full Landscaping Designs, Rock, Trees, Boulders, Brick, Flagstone. FREE ESTIMATES! 15% off! 505-9072600, 505-990-0955.

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE !! Rock walls, patios, fireplaces, etc. Over 30 years experience. Call for estimate. HENRY THE STONE MASON, 505-490-0317.

A BETTER PAINT JOB. A REASONABLE PRICE. PROFESSIONAL, INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR. 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE. RELIABLE. FREE ESTIMATES. 505-9821207

ANDY ORTIZ PAINTING

Professional with over 30 years experience. Licensed, insured, bonded Please call for free estimate, 505-6709867, 505-473-2119. MAC’S OLD MILL RESTORATIONS. Specialize in all painting and decorating needs since 1984. Call James McFeely at 505-204-1022.

HOW ’BOUT A ROSE FOR YOUR GARDEN... to clean-up, maintain, & improve. Just a call away! Rose, 4700162. Free estimates.

YARD MAINTENANCE

Seasonal planting. Lawn care. Weed Removal. Dump runs. Painting (interior, exterior). Honest & Dependable. Free estimates. References.

Berry Clean - 505-501-3395

PLASTERING 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE. Professional Plastering Specialist: Interior & Exterior. Also Re-Stuccos. Patching a specialty. Call Felix, 505-920-3853.

GET NOTICED!

Add an Attention Getter to make your ad stand out. Call our helpfull Consultants for details

CALL 986-3000

Look for these businesses on exploresantafe•com N

Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

Pasapick Art lecture

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow Constable With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating Matlock less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been Mexican Ellen Cavatoday, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put and his housemate, their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitin front of John Hubbard Near on Monday. plumbers huddled by noon stay warm. plea to to licensed naugh, were trying to on meters. out a message morning away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

The New

up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Terrell Mexican state employfor natural after “nonessential” confuLast week, home to ease demand was some sent ees were utility crisis, there a gas amid

By Steve The New

Index

Managing

Calendar

editor: Rob

A-2

Classifieds

Dean, 986-3033,

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

By Staci

agenc sion at tax sparks confu Shutdown workers may

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

B-9

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

y

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department No. 38 The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 a day of personal Taxation Publication B-7 some state will be docked for Local business employees Out B-8

Comics B-14

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Opinion A-12

Cynthia Miller,

A-11 Police notes

Sports B-1

Time

Main office:

983-3303

Late paper:

986-3010

m

cmiller@sfnewmexican.co

rdean@sfnewmexican.com

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FOR RELEASE APRILFriday, 18, 2014 April 18, 2014

sfnm«classifieds HOUSES UNFURNISHED 3 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH. Polished brick floors, kiva fireplace, wood beamed ceilings, garage, rural setting in town. $1295 monthly. 3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS. Gorgeous condition, new pergo type floors and tile throughout, gated community, 2 car garage, near Hwy 599. $1599 monthly.

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

STORAGE SPACE

Chamisa Management Corp. 988-5299

PUBLIC NOTICES

WORK STUDIOS

DETACHED ADOBE 12’ x 24’ workspace. In-town quiet residential setting. Cold water sink, toilet, 2 private parking spaces. $450 monthly, year lease. 505-982-0596.

»announcements«

THE LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA SOCIETY (LLS) has joined forces with PALLIATIVE CARE OF SANTA FE (PCS) to offer a BLOOD CANCER SUPPORT GROUP. The group meets the 2nd & 4th Tues from 2:00-3:30pm and is facilitated by Eileen Joyce, Grief Recovery Specialist and Director of Outreach for PCS. For location or more information, contact Eileen at 505428-0670. PCS is a nonprofit community-based volunteer organization providing free at-home services for people with life-threatening illnesses. More information at palliativecaresantafe.org. LLS is dedicated to funding blood cancer research and providing education and patient services. Join us for our Light The Night Walk Oct 26th at The Pit-UNM. Register as an individual walker, create or join a family & friends team or corporate team at www.lightthenight.org/nm. Contact LLS at 505-872-0141.

»jobs«

505-992-1205 valdezandassociates.com Located at the Lofts on Cerrillos

This live & work studio offers high ceilings, kitchenette, bathroom with shower, 2 separate entrances, ground, corner unit with lots of natural lighting. $1000 plus utilities

Cozy Condo

1 bedroom, 1 bath, kiva fireplace, radiant heat, washer, dryer, large balcony. $775. Plus utilities

LOST

Beautiful Views

Cabin style home with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, wood stove, carpet and tile flooring, washer, dryer, lovely deck. Country living just 15 minutes from town. $1050. Plus utilities.

ACCOUNTING

Minutes to Downtown

Renovated 3 bedroom, 2 bath, has the option for an office with a separate entrance. Location is quick access to downtown, and has wood floors, vigas, tile counters, laundry hook-up’s. $1300 plus utilities

LOST WHITE AND GRAY CAT with dark gray stripes. Missing since 4/2/14. Please call 719-510-3367.

Conveniently Located

2 bedrooms, 1 bath. 800 sq.ft., onsite laundry, $600 plus utilities. EAST SIDE 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Washer, dryer, dishwasher, radiant heat, 2 blocks from plaza. $1500 plus utilities. Call 505-982-2738.

ELDORADO New, Large 3 bedroom, 3 bath, Highend contemporary home: Super Energy efficient, hilltop views, 12.5 acres, paved access. 505-660-5603

MISSING FRIEND: Neutered male labpit. white spot on chest, paws, freckled face. micro-chip may have migrated. HELP US FIND HIM! 505-9468778.

ELDORADO New, Large 3 bedroom, 3 bath, Highend contemporary home: Super Energy efficient, hilltop views, 12.5 acres, paved access. 505-660-5603 NICE 2 BEDROOM , $1050 MONTHLY Kiva, 2 baths. Bus service close. Also, 1 BEDROOM, $750 monthly. No pets. Utilites paid. 505-204-6160 RECENTLY REMODELED. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Hardwood & tile floors. Laundry hook-ups. Fenced yard. No pets. Lease. References. $895. 505-412-0197

LIVE IN STUDIOS 2nd Street LIVE, WORK, OFFICE

1200 & 1300 SQUARE FEET. 800 square feet downstairs, 400 - 500 square foot living area upstairs. Skylights, high ceilings. Wayne Nichols, 505-6997280.

FRONTING ON 2ND STREET 2160 sq.ft on 2nd Street.

Live- Work. Studio. Gallery, or Office. High ceilings, 2-story. Handicap bath. Wayne Nichols, 505-699-7280. GREAT LOCATION, walk to Trader Joes. Big Studio, plenty of parking, laundry room. $900 monthly, utilities included. 602-481-2979.

LIVE-IN STUDIOS

S kylights, overhead doors, 2500 square feet, $975. 4100 square feet, 3 phase electric, $1175. La Mesilla. No dogs. 505-753-5906.

MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR RENT SECTION 8 ACCEPTED 2012 16X80 MOBILE HOME. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. $950 PER MONTH PLUS UTILITIES. NO DOGS. ALL APPLIANCES AND WASHER AND DRYER INCLUDED. RANCHO ZIA MOBILE HOME PARK SPACE #75. SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. CALL TIM 505-699-2955.

OFFICES 2 OFFICES FOR LEASE. 2205 Miguel Chavez Road, Unit F. $350. For more information, please call Roger at 505660-7538.

COLAB AT 2ND STREET A CO-WORK OFFICE

Desks and private offices, complete facilities, conference room, $300 monthly. Wayne Nichols, 505-699-7280.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Changing Futures, One Person At A Time Become a Plasma Donor Today Please help us help those coping with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. New donors can receive $100.00 this week! Ask about our Specialty Programs! Must be 18 years or older, have valid ID along with proof of SS#, and local residency. Walk-ins Welcome! New donors will receive a 10.00 Bonus on their second donation with this ad.

Biotest Plasma Center 2860 Cerrillos Road, Ste B1 Santa Fe, NM 87507. 505-424-6250

Book your appointment online at: www.biotestplasma.com NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

Public Notice

Please to inform that Santa Fe County, New Mexico resident Angelique M. Hart was ordained as Priest in the Holy Catholic Church of the East in Brazil; Vicariate of the Nevis and Ecuador: Sacred Medical Order of The Church of Hope Ordination of the Priest in the name of the Father and the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen. To all the Faithful in Christ, Peace, Health and Divine Grace. By the Grace of God, we inform that in accordance to the canonical laws that governs our Ecclesiastical Community (Ecclesiastical Sovereign Principality) and in accordance with the traditions and laws of the Ancient and Holy Church of Christ, we certify through this instrument, the Ordination of the Reverend Mother Angelique Marie Hart according to the Ancient Rites of the Catholic Church of the East in Brazil. We sign and confirm with our hand and seal with our arms Decree of the Ordination No. 2013/047 Let it be known that from this day of November 17, 2013 and hence forth the Official Title Bestowed shall read: Reverend Mother Angelique M. Hart. This title and ordination was bestowed to Reverend Mother Angelique M. Hart by Dr. of Medicine Charles McWilliams; Vicar Bishop and Grand Master and Mar Bacillus Adao Pereira, Metropolitan Archbishop of the Holy Catholic Church of the East in Brazil. November 17, 2013

OFFICE STUDIO or Apartment. 550 squ.ft. Great Location, beamed ceilings and lots of light. $500 plus utilities. 505-470-0727.

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE

Great location and parking! $500 monthly includes utilities, cleaning, taxes and amenities. Move in incentives!

Please call (505)983-9646. ROOMMATE WANTED HOUSEMATE WANTED. Female preferred. 2 Bedroom, 1 private bath. All privileges. $600 monthly. Southside, near St. Vincent Hospital. 505-2391269

TALENTED VARIETY BAND, Paul Pino, available for weddings, graduations, etc., as heard on KANW, KSFR, KUNM. www.paulpino.com. 505-281-0127.

Third Annual Easter Eggstravaganza!! Santa Fe Community Easter Egg Hunt! Brought to you by Freedom Church of Santa Fe on April 19, 2014, 10:00 a.m., Villa Linda Park, 4250 Cerrillos Road. A free event for children up to age 12. 13,000 hidden Easter eggs, plus games and prizes. Children must have adult supervision. Everybody is welcome!

C-3

HaveCrossword a product or service to offer? Los Angeles Times Daily Puzzle

to place your ad, call

10x30 Move-in-Special, $180 monthly. Airport Cerrillos Storage. Wide, Rollup doors. U-haul Cargo Van. Professional, Resident Manager. 505-4744450. www.airportcerrillos.com

3 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH. Polished brick floors, kiva fireplace, wood beamed ceilings, garage, rural setting in town. $1295 monthly. 3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS. Gorgeous condition, new pergo type floors and tile throughout, gated community, 2 car garage, near Hwy 599. $1599 monthly.

THE NEW MEXICAN

Excellent Employment Opportunity Credit Department Specialist

Responsibilities include assisting the Credit Department Manager with all reporting and administrative duties as they relate to lending, appraisals, construction project inspectors, environmental inspectors and any other assistance as requested. Candidate will provide back up in collection efforts by contacting delinquent accounts to request payment on past due loans. Requirements: College education and two years of banking or equivalent experience; excellent verbal and written communication skills; an intermediate level of skill in Microsoft Excel and Word. Century Bank offers a competitive compensation and benefits package. Please apply online at www.centurynetbank.com. We are an EEO, AA employer. Veterans are encouraged to apply. FULL-TIME, EXPERIENCED IN ACCOUNTING, DATA ENTRY, INVOICING, PAYROLL. Must Have references, English-Spanish a plus. Please call 505-988-9876.

986-3000 our small experts today! Edited by RichCall Norris and Joycebusiness Lewis

ACROSS 1 Famiglia nickname 6 Celtic language 11 Base enforcers, briefly 14 Menu listings 15 Muse with a lyre 16 Bugler in a forest 17 Fish-derived supplement 19 Behold 20 Diners Club competitor 21 Binding promise 22 Tool that’s not for crosscuts 24 Prince Charles’ closetful 27 Title stuffed bear in a 2012 film 28 Valley where Hercules slew a lion 29 Site of the Alaska Purchase transfer ceremony 33 Blues home: Abbr. 34 Cellular messengers 37 Leaving the jurisdiction, perhaps 41 Brest pals 42 Of Mice and __ 43 Hall of Fame umpire Conlan 44 App writer 46 “... against a __ of troubles”: Hamlet 48 1982 Joan Jett & the Blackhearts hit 54 Luxury watch 55 Bailed-out insurance co. 56 Mislead 58 “The Prague Cemetery” novelist 59 Literary orphan ... and what 17-, 24-, 37- and 48Across each contains? 62 It may be fresh or stale 63 Milk source 64 Sculled 65 House and Howser 66 Bygone monarchs 67 Winemaking tool

4/18/14

By Peter Koetters

DOWN 1 Mineral found in sheets 2 Basic matter 3 Vengeful sorceress of myth 4 Appomattox bicentennial year 5 Faulkner’s “__ Lay Dying” 6 Did lawn work 7 Proofer’s find 8 Thai native 9 Last words in a drink recipe, perhaps 10 “Total patient” treatment 11 Like one expected to deliver? 12 Fabric fold 13 Slants 18 Revolting 23 __ Rico 25 Angled ltrs. 26 Not misled by 29 Where to get wraps and scrubs 30 “Are you going?” response 31 French and Italian flags 32 Disputed Balkan republic 33 Vice principle

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

35 Hunky-dory 36 __-cone 38 Taurus birthstones, perhaps 39 Florida’s __ Beach 40 Out of a jamb? 45 Pious 46 They’re often on a slippery slope 47 MIT grad, often 48 Construction girder

2721 Cerrillos Rd. | Santa Fe, NM 87507

505-473-2886

ADMINISTRATIVE

RECEPTIONIST Immediate position available. General receptionist duties and miscellaneous office duties. E-mail resume: cassie.wright@lexusofsantafe.com apply in person: Lexus of Santa Fe 6824 Cerrillos rd Santa Fe NM 87507 UNITED WAY of Santa Fe County (UWSFC) is currently seeking candidates for: Executive Administrative Assistant, Full Time & Finance & Operations Coordinator, Part Time: Learn more at www.uwsfc.org click "Home" and "Opportunity".

49 Understandable 50 Underground worker 51 Sun Tzu’s “The Art __” 52 Longest river in France 53 Gets knocked off 57 Old Fords 60 Gilbert and Sullivan princess 61 Part of an inning

LA Times Crossword Puzzle Brought to you by:

Immediate full-time position available for Entry Level Accounting Department. Data entry, payables, cashiering, filing. E-mail resume: cassie.wright@lexusofsantafe.com apply in person at Lexus of Santa fe 6824 Cerrillos rd santa fe nm 87507

MEDICAL BILLING Part-time clinic. Join 3 billing staff. Medical experience required. Billing, Medisoft & PQRS knowledge preferred. Fax resume 505-471-2908 or e-mail leolin789@gmail.com

4/18/14

www.FurrysBuickGMC.com • 2 YR / 24000 MI SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE • 4YR / 50000 MI. BUMPER TO BUMPER WARRANTY • 6YR / 70000 MI. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE

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$24640 M.S.R.P. -$3187 FURRY’S ONE PRICE DISCOUNT -$1500 AVAILABLE GM REBATES

$19,953 FURRY’S PRICE

WOW! THAT’S OVER $4600 IN TOTAL DISCOUNTS!

Or take 0.9% for 60 full months!

DISCLAIMER: Stk# 40690 - Price plus applicable tax, title and one time dealer transfer fee. 0.9% available in lieu of $500 GM rebate - $17.06 per $1000 financed for 60 months on approved credit through ALLY Financial. Not all buyers will qualify, see dealer for details and alternate options available. GM rebates - $500 C/S Cash, $500 Conquest, $500 Select Cash...not all buyers will qualify, see dealer for details.


C-4

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

sfnm«classifieds AUTOMOTIVE

to place your ad, call MANAGEMENT

EDUCATION

A TOUCH OF GLASS IS NOW HIRING AN EXPERIENCED AUTO GLASS TECHNICIAN 5 DAYS A WEEK. CALL 505471-1996 FOR INFORMATION.

CLASSIFIED SALES MANAGER

Year round full-time positions with Early Head Start (children birth to 3). See website for job requirements. Full-time Technology Instructor/IT Director and a Full-Time Early Childhood Associate Teacher (3 year olds) position beginning August 2014. The school’s curriculum is a balance between progressive and traditional with a focus on student inquiry and the needs of the individual learner. Classroom culture is infused with Responsive Classroom practices with emphasis on social emotional learning. Rio Grande School serves students from three years old to sixth grade, with class sizes ranging from 15-20 students, and a total school population of 160. Please review the full position description at www.riograndeschool.org . Competitive salaries offered, and all full-time employees receive a retirement plan with matching contributions, medical insurance, life insurance, and both short and long term disability insurance. Interested individuals should email a cover letter, resume, and 35 references to Interim Head of School, Patrick Brown, at patrick_brown@riograndeschool.o rg. Rio Grande School does not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and national or ethnic origin in its hiring practices.

HOME VISITOR Works with families, to provide case management, advocacy and education. TEACHER I Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at www.pms-inc.org Click on Jobs@PMS. Tollfree hotline 1-866-661-5491 EOE, M, F, D, V, AA. Follow us on Facebook.

SELL IT FOR $100 OR LESS AND PAY $10. Larger Using

Typeeasy! It’s that will help your ad get noticed

986-3000 Call Classifieds For Details Today!

CONSTRUCTION

986-3000

GRAPHIC DESIGN

FINISH SHEET ROCKER, Rough Carpenter needed. Experience only need apply. Pay DOE. Background check. 505-670-0269, Call 9-5.

Support Santa Fe Animal Shelter

YOU- CREATIVE- multi-tasking, PRINT AND manufacturing- knowledge. Illustrator, InDesign, photoShop, catalog and web maintenance, hands on in light manufacture. Customer service on phones, online a must. BUD@OKINASALES.COM

HOSPITALITY

Dining Service

when you buy a

2014 Pet Calendar for $5! 100% of sales donated to SFAS.

986-3000 DRIVERS

MANAGEMENT

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! MEDICAL DENTAL

MEDICAL DENTAL

MANAGING EDITOR

COMPUTERS IT

an independent elementary school in Santa Fe, seeks candidates for a

986-3000

Full-Time experienced line, production cook. Must be professional. Weekends and Holidays a must. Wonderful work environment with great medical and retirement benefits . Complete application at El Castillo, 250 E Alameda; Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. or email resume to hum anresources@ elcnm .com or fax to 505-983-3828.

HOUSEKEEPING MANAGER FORT MARCY SUITES

The Santa Fe New Mexican is looking to hire an enthusiastic, motivated person with the dual talents of managing and selling to fill the Classified Sales Manager position. The selected candidate will manage the day-to-day operations of the Classified Inside Sales Department, work with the Advertising Director to develop sales opportunities, establish sales goals and lead efforts of the sales staff to meet sales goals for The New Mexican’s award-winning print and digital products. Selected candidate will also be responsible for making sales calls and contributing to sales. Qualifications: Five years prior experience as an advertising sales supervisor or equivalent experience; experience with Macintosh and Windows operating systems; excellent communication skills, ability to lead, train and motivate an inbound, outbound sales staff to exceed sales goals, problem solve, resolve conflict and make effective decisions under pressure. Must have ability to adapt to constantly changing market and industry conditions. Proficiency with digital media and marketing platforms is preferred. Base salary and commission plan are offered with an excellent benefits package. Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014, to: Heidi Melendrez Advertising Director The Santa Fe New Mexican 202 East Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 or e-mail hm elendrez@ sfnew m exican.co m. You may also pick up a job application from 202 East Marcy Street or 1 New Mexican Plaza (off I-25 frontage road) or complete an online job application at h t t p : / / s f n m . c o / 1 e U K C c D . No phone calls, please. Equal Opportunity Employer

Food Service Director West Las Vegas Schools Summit Food Service Management is hiring for a dependable Food Service Director to lead the food service operation for the West Las Vegas School District. We offer a competitive wage and benefits package! Complete an application online today at www.aviands.com/careers > Click "Job Search" > Click "Search" under "Home Office, Food Service Management and Dietitians".

IN HOME CARE

FULL-TIME CDL DRIVER needed immediately to drive Pumper & Dump truck. Will help with plumbing jobs when not driving. Drug test required. 505-424-9191

CARETAKER FOR WOMAN IN TESUQUE AREA. 2-3 days weekly. Possible nights. Must transfer 150+ pounds, change clothing. Call Katie, 505-6904025

Qualifications: Must have a combination of experience and education that is the equivalent of: Bachelor’s degree, two years of experience as an editor, reporter or photographer in a news organization, and two years of management experience. Must be deadline oriented, able to upload the newspaper to the web, and have strong organization, leadership and communication skills. Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014, to: Lisa Morales General Manager Sangre de Cristo Chronicle 3403 Mountain View Blvd. Angel Fire, NM 87710 or e-mail lm orales@ sangrechronicle.com . Equal Opportunity Employer

WE GET RESULTS! So can you with a classified ad

CALL 986-3000

MEDICAL DENTAL

Add a pic and sell it quick! Using

Larger Type will help your ad get noticed

986-3000

LPN/ RN

WE HAVE SEVERAL OPENING FOR NURSES. ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT RAYE HIGHLAND RN/DON @505-982-2574 OR COME BY THE FACILITY TO FILL OUT AN APPLICATION. ALSO PRN AND PARTTIME SHIFTS AVALIABLE

PHYSICAL THERAPIST Works 30 hours per week with Community Home Health, the only non-profit home care program in Santa Fe.

ATTN: CNA’S

WE HAVE SEVERAL CNA POSITIONS AVALIABLE. IF INTERESTED PLEASE CONTACT RAYE HIGHLAND RN/DON, or CRAIG SHAFFER, ADMINISTRATOR, 505-982-2574. OR COME BY THE FACILITY AND FILL OUT AN APPLICATION.

Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at www.pms-inc.org Click on Jobs@PMS. Tollfree hotline 1-866-661-5491. EOE, M, F, D, V, AA Follow us on Facebook.

DIRECTOR OF NURSES (SANTA FE CARE CENTER)

Responsible for effective overall management of the Nursing Department and coordination with other disciplines to provide quality care to all patients & residents. This position is significant in facility leadership If interested in the position. Please come see Craig Shaffer Admin, or stop by our facility, and fill out a application. 635 Harkle RD Santa Fe NM 87505

Have a product or service to offer? Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

CALL 986-3000

PCM IS HIRING

PCAs, Caregivers, LPNs, RNs and RN-Case Managers for in-home care in Santa Fe. PCA $11 per hour, LPN $25 per hour, RN $32 per hour. Call 866-902-7187 Ext. 350 or apply online at: www.procasemanagement.com . EOE.

SIGN ON BONUS AVAILABLE FOR NURSES!

PMS Community Home Health Care and The Hospice Center. Home Health Aide 20 hours per week

Physical Therapist

DIRECTOR OF NURSING PROFESSIONAL HOME HEALTH CARE IS SEEKING A DIRECTOR OF NURSING. MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE IN HOME HEALTH, AND OASIS. EXCELLENT SALARY AND BENEFITS. PLEASE FAX RESUME 505-982-0788 OR CALL BRIAN, 505-982-8581 FOR DETAILS.

Full-time Dental Assistant for busy Oral Surgeon’s practice. Must be experienced, have x-ray license. Team oriented, and possess good communication skills. Fax resume to Bonita Medical Center, 505988-3160

Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action/ Minorities/ Women/ Individual with Disabilities/ Protected Veteran Employer

E-mail resume to: fortm a rcyj obs @ gm ail .com or deliver to front desk. Background check is required. Competitive salary.

DELIVERY DRIVERS Needed, apply in person at Rodeo Plaza Flowers, 2801 RODEO ROAD, SUITE A2.

The Sangre de Cristo Chronicle, an award-winning weekly newspaper in the mountain resort town of Angel Fire, New Mexico, has an immediate opening for a Managing Editor. Selected candidate will edit the newspaper, write feature stories and cover the city beat, in addition to being responsible for the pagination of the newspaper, among other duties.

INTAKE COORDINATOR Full-time positions with behavioral health programs at Valley Community Health Center in Espanola and Santa Fe Community Guidance Center. Requires independent NM professional license and 3 years treatment experience with 1 year assessment and intake. Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at www.pms-inc.org Click on Jobs@PMS. Tollfree hotline 1-866-661-5491 EOE/ M/ F/ D/ V/ AA Find us on Facebook.

LOS ALAMOS VISITING NURSE S E R V I C E is currently interviewing for full or part time or per diem Physical Therapists. Home Care experience preferred but we are willing to train the right candidate. You must have a P.T. license to apply for position.

RN 20 hours (weekends)

per

Social Worker Full-time. Requires year experience healthcare.

We have an excellent benefit package which includes a retirement plan, health and dental coverage, wellness program, continuing education as well as vacation, sick leave and 11 paid holidays.

week

one in

Benefits eligible. Apply online at www.pms-inc.org Click on Jobs@PMS. Tollfree hotline 1-866-661-5491. EOE- M- F- D- V- AA Follow us on Facebook.

If you would like to work with our team please fax your resume and/or call for an interview appointment. Los Alamos VNS 6622525 (fax 662-7390) ask for Beverly or Sarah. Don’t forget to ask about our sign on bonus!

MISCELLANEOUS JOBS

Professional Home Heath Care is looking to hire full-time Physical Therapist.

UNITARIAN CHURCH of Los Alamos seeks full time Director of Lifespan Religious Education. Full job description avaiable at: http://www.uulosalamos.org/aboutour-church/staff/job-opportunities . Resume to revjohn@uulosalamos.org .

Highly competitive salary. Great benefits package. Send Resume: 505982-0788. Attn: Brian or call 505-9828581.

Switchboard Operator For a complete description of the job and compensation, visit our website: www.stjohnscollege.edu. Go to the bottom of the home page and Click on — “Administrative Offices” under Santa Fe “Employment.” This is a full-time, 40 hours per week, contract position. Please stop by the Human Resources Office at St. John’s College, 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, NM 87505, in Weigle Hall, Room 106 to fill out an application. Applications will be accepted until interviews begin. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Call Classifieds For Details Today!

986-3000

santafenewmexican.com

CLASSIFIED SALES MANAGER The Santa Fe New Mexican is looking to hire an enthusiastic, motivated person with the dual talents of managing and selling to fill the Classified Sales Manager position. The selected candidate will manage the day-to-day operations of the Classified Inside Sales Department, work with the Advertising Director to develop sales opportunities, establish sales goals and lead efforts of the sales staff to meet sales goals for The New Mexican’s award-winning print and digital products. Selected candidate will also be responsible for making sales calls and contributing to sales. Qualifications Five years prior experience as an advertising sales supervisor or equivalent experience; experience with Macintosh and Windows operating systems; excellent communication skills, ability to lead, train and motivate an inbound/outbound sales staff to exceed sales goals, problem solve, resolve conflict and make effective decisions under pressure. Must have ability to adapt to constantly changing market and industry conditions. Proficiency with digital media and marketing platforms is preferred. Base salary and commission plan are offered with an excellent benefits package. Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014, to: Heidi Melendrez Advertising Director The Santa Fe New Mexican 202 East Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 or e-mail hmelendrez@sfnewmexican.com. You may also pick up a job application from 202 East Marcy Street or 1 New Mexican Plaza (off I-25 frontage road) or complete an online job application at http://sfnm. co/1eUKCcD. No phone calls, please. The Santa Fe New Mexican is an Equal Opportunity Employer 202 East Marcy St | P.O. Box 2048 | Santa Fe, NM 87504-2048 | 505-983-3303

MANAGING EDITOR The Sangre de Cristo Chronicle, an award-winning weekly newspaper in the mountain resort town of Angel Fire, New Mexico, has an immediate opening for a Managing Editor. Selected candidate will edit the newspaper, write feature stories and cover the city beat, in addition to being responsible for the pagination of the newspaper, among other duties. Qualifications: Must have a combination of experience and education that is the equivalent of: Bachelor’s degree, two years of experience as an editor, reporter or photographer in a news organization, and two years of management experience. Must be deadline oriented, able to upload the newspaper to the web, and have strong organization, leadership and communication skills. Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014, to: Lisa Morales General Manager Sangre de Cristo Chronicle 3403 Mountain View Blvd. Angel Fire, NM 87710 or e-mail lmorales@sangrechronicle.com. Equal Opportunity Employer


Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds PART TIME

APPLIANCES

LAWN & GARDEN

EXPERIENCED, COMPANSIONATE, MATURE, AND DEPENDABLE CAREGIVER NEEDED. Mail resume with references to: Caregiver Position: 270 Los Pinos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87507

KENMORE APARTMENT size refrigerator with ice maker- 3 years old$350. 505-920-7440

SUNSHINE LEGENG PROPANE BBQ GRILL- GRIDDLE. Wooden storage shelves. Good condition. $75 OBO. 505-231-9133

LIKE NEW KENMORE self-cleaning oven with ceramic top. $350. 505-9207440

AUCTIONS PART-TIME ARCHIVE COORDINATOR The Santa Fe New Mexican is looking for a part-time archive coordinator to oversee our print and digital archives. The selected candidate will also review requests to re-use editorial content and will supervise an archive assistant. Attention to detail is a must. Experience in TownNews, MerlinOne and NewsEdit platforms is helpful. Pay rate is dependent upon experience. Position is 20 to 24 hours a week with flexible scheduling. The New Mexican offers holiday pay and paid vacation (prorated for a part-time schedule), and eligibility to participate in our 401k plan, in addition to free gym passes. Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, May 2, 2014, to: Ray Rivera Editor The Santa Fe New Mexican 202 East Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 or e-mail rrivera@sfnewmexican.com

City of Santa Fe Seized Vehicle Public Auction Selling 125+ Vehicles! Saturday, 4-19-14, 9:30 am City of Santa Fe Maintenance Yard 1142 Siler Rd * Santa Fe Viewing: Friday, 4-18-14, 9:00am - 5:00pm Payment Terms: CASH or CASHIERS CHECKS ONLY! More Info Call Bentley’s 800-841-4087 Ext 103 bentleysauction.com BUILDING MATERIALS

PETS SUPPLIES

MULTIMEDIA ADVERTISING CONSULTANT

»cars & trucks«

I BUY ANTLERS & SKULLS, 831-8019363.

PHOTO EQUIPMENT NIKON D800 plus two lenses. Charles Brand etching press, 16x30. Epson 7600 Printer. 505-983-2141.

SPORTS EQUIPMENT 2 SCHWINN Mesa Mountain Bikes. 23", 21". Barely used. Price includes rear rack and pannier. $150 each. 505-490-2285.

GARAGE SALE NORTH HI MY name’s Claire and I’m the friendliest dog in town! I’m a 7 year old American Staffordshire Terrier who’s great indoors and out and I’m really sweet and patient. I’m looking for a special person or a family of my own. I’m the most loyal friend you’ll ever encounter!

CANOE 13’, excellent condition, hardly used. $200. 505-660-5230 GREAT LITTLE survivalist Bow. Golden Eagle Compound Bow and Deluxe case. $250. 505-983-7057. HOIST MULTI-PURPOSE Weight Lifting Bench. Asking $100, cost $300. 505-231-9133.

ANTLER BUYER COMING SOON! Top Grades and Prices! Call for information 435-340-0334.

»animals«

ALL NEW PORTABLE 8x12 METAL BUILDING. $1,700 DELIVERED! For more information please call 505-603-4644.

Hi my name is Borie. I’m a fabulous 2 year old, full grown 55 lb. neutered male Australian Shepherd, Chihuahua, APBT mix. Would you like to be my special family? If you’re interested in adopting Claire or Borie contact Mare Israel at 505-316-2089. Or you can email at gim m eahom e505@ gm ail.com or visit the website at Petabulls.com.

HORSES LOOKING TO BUY US Stamp Collections. 1847-1920. Call 603-727-8315.

This position manages relationships with clients to grow and develop their business needs. Our consultants are assigned a sales territory and must achieve monthly print and online sales goals while providing excellent customer service and creative advertising ideas and campaigns for clients. Actively seeks out new business to meet or exceed sales goals and is regularly engaged outside of the office in performing such tasks.

SEASONED FIREWOOD: PONDEROSA $80 PER LOAD. Pinion or Cedar $120 per load. CALL: 508444-0087. Delivery free!

Qualifications: Minimum of two years college education with emphasis in marketing, advertising, business administration or liberal arts and at least two years of outside sales experience, publishing industry preferred. Must have demonstrated ability to prospect qualified leads and the ability to sell a wide range of products. Knowledge of the sales process, the ability to make a professional sales presentation and to close a sale in a timely manner required. Selected candidate must understand strengths and weaknesses of competitive media. Must have demonstrated territory management experience, strong negotiation and problem-solving skills, excellent oral and written communication skills and be proficient in Microsoft Office applications. Must be driven, proactive and have a strong desire to achieve results and be successful. Must have proof of valid driver’s license, auto insurance and have reliable transportation. Base salary, team bonus and commission plan are offered with an excellent benefits package.

FIREWOOD-FUEL

FURNITURE 6’ DIning Table. Tropical Wood, with carving along apron, very beautiful. $500. 505-231-9133.

The Santa Fe New Mexican is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

TRADES JEMEZ MOUNTAIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.

4 BOXER mix pups - Adoption Saturday April 19, 12:30 - 3 p.m. Marty’s Meals, 1107 Pen Rd. Fee $175

ADORABLE, HEALTHLY multigeneration labradoodle puppies. Born 3/5/14. White- cream and chocolate. First shots. Parents on premises. $500. Located in Roswell. 575317-1237.

rights at Capitol

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

50¢

mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded Others originated Page A-9 said. bin CITATIONS, Please see

The New

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

N

ANTIQUE MAHOGANY DINING TABLE. 60" round, pedestal. 3 leaves. $1500. ANTIQUE WALNUT BOOKCASE, 8’ long, 6 shelves. $750. 505-988-5678

BUNK BEDS. Solid wood with built in drawers, desk Mattresses, some bedding included. $300, OBO. PLease text for photo, 505-670-9542. DOUBLE MATTRESS WITH BOXSPRING. USED BUT CLEAN. $75. 505-820-6174 EASY CHAIR, very comfortable, good quality, swivels, rocks. Off-white linen fabric. $40, OBO. 505-231-9133.

Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

2010 TOYOTA TACOMA front and back bumpers. Good condition. $300 for both. 505-471-8817.

AUTOS WANTED

Multi-Family Spring Garage Sale 2945 Plaza Azul 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Saturday, April 19

New king quilt, African mud cloth queen bedspreads, ethnic design jewelry, Kilim pillows, rosaries, beads and Easter items. Minolta & Pentax 35mm SLR w/ 3 lenses, Women’s Designer Clothes sizes 14, 16 and XL. Women’s shoes, 8.5M. New rice cooker, Magnalite roaster, pasta bowls w/ serving dishes, kitchen items, books, CD’s. Men’s Calvin Klein coat size M. Lots of misc, no junk. NO Early Birds, CASH only.

Benefit Santa Fe Habitat for Humanity by donating your used car, truck, boat, RV, or motorcycle, running or not! For more information call 505-9865880.

CLASSIC CARS

GARAGE SALE WEST 2709 CALLE CEDRO. 8AM TO 4PM ONE DAY ONLY - Saturday April 19 Bureaus, rugs, mirrors, old dressers, bookcases, way too many kitchen utensils, art and art supplies accumulated over many years by woman with good design sense and quirky sensibilities - plus collectible poster of Chicago 8 Trial. Also, renovation remnants and neighbors’ clearance items.

1957 CHEVY PICK-UP. Big window, Napco 4x4. 350 engine with 2100 miles. Many new parts. $33,000. Mike, 505-690-4849

Pasapick Art lecture

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow Constable With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating Matlock less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been Mexican Ellen Cavatoday, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put and his housemate, their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitin front of John Hubbard Near on Monday. plumbers huddled by noon stay warm. plea to to licensed naugh, were trying to on meters. out a message morning away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

By Staci The New

at tax agenc

CALL 986-3010

PARTS FOR 1998 CHEVY SILVERADO. Looking for extended cab window parts, scissor jack, and tool to drop the spare tire down. Please call 602-8211585.

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

y

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid Opinion A-12

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

Index Managing

Calendar editor: Rob

A-2

Classifieds

Dean, 986-3033,

B-9

Comics B-14

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Cynthia Miller,

m

cmiller@sfnewmexican.co

rdean@sfnewmexican.com

MULTIMEDIA ADVERTISING CONSULTANT AKC DOBERMANS. Excellent bloodlines, tempermants. Tails, Dewclaws, shots. Puppies Raised with love, 9 weeks. Jozette 719-5882328. Check online ad pics. BEAUTIFUL F1 GoldenDoodles M & F availablel 5/6 many colors including ULTRA-RARE F1 phantom black & gold. Serious Inquiries only. Email at goldendoodles@happyheartpuppy.c om See www.happyheartpuppy.com for more information.

BOOS BUTCHER BLOCK. Solid Maple, Natural Finish, Pencil Legs. 16" deep. 18"Wx24"L. $500. 505-690-6528

GARAGE- ESTATE SALE. SATURDAY 4/19, FROM 8-2 PM. 3346 LA AVENIDA DE SAN MARCOS. Furniture, appliance, kitchen items, vintage glassware & clothing, blankets, miscellaneous. Across from Rodeo Grounds, off Paseo de los Pueblos.

AUTO PARTS ACCESSORIES

santafenewmexican.com

BEAUTIFUL QUALITY PUPPIES Registered, shots, health gurantee, POTTY PAD trained. Great PAYMENT PLAN. Most non-shedding Hypo-allergenic. PAYPAL, Debit. Credit cards. POMERANIANS, MALTYPOOS, MINI DACHSHUNDS, CHIHUAHUAS, SHIHTZUS, POODLES, DESIGNER MALTESE AND OTHERS. All tiny. $2501000. 575-910-1818 txt4pics cingard1@yahoo.com FREE TO Good Home. 2 Adult Cats, Orange Male, Tortie Female. Current shots. Excellent health. 505-983-0288, leave message.

The Santa Fe New Mexican is seeking a dynamic multimedia advertising consultant to represent its award-winning publications and state-of-the-art digital platforms to existing and future advertising clients. This position manages relationships with clients to grow and develop their business needs. Our consultants are assigned a sales territory and must achieve monthly print and online sales goals while providing excellent customer service and creative advertising ideas and campaigns for clients. Actively seeks out new business to meet or exceed sales goals and is regularly engaged outside of the office in performing such tasks. Qualifications Minimum of two years college education with emphasis in marketing, advertising, business administration or liberal arts and at least two years of outside sales experience, publishing industry preferred. Must have demonstrated ability to prospect qualified leads and the ability to sell a wide range of products. Knowledge of the sales process, the ability to make a professional sales presentation and to close a sale in a timely manner required. Selected candidate must understand strengths and weaknesses of competitive media. Must have demonstrated territory management experience, strong negotiation and problem-solving skills, excellent oral and written communication skills and be proficient in Microsoft Office applications. Must be driven, proactive and have a strong desire to achieve results and be successful. Must have proof of valid driver’s license, auto insurance and have reliable transportation. Base salary, team bonus and commission plan are offered with an excellent benefits package.

HOOPBACK WINDSOR CHAIRS. Handmade. Rubbed black stain finish. Turned legs. Set of 4. Perfect. $500. (paid $1700). 505-690-6528

POMERANIAN puppies. Quality double coats, registered and UTD shots. Beautiful tiny Chihuahua female, chocolate, first shots, $450. 505-9012094 or 505-753-0000.

PINE DESK, 7 drawers with brass drawer pulls. $50, OBO. 505-231-9133. Set of 6 Dining chairs, tropical wood with carving. $400, cost $250 each. 505-231-9133.

MERRY FOSS Latin American ETHNOGRAPHIC & ANTIQUE DEALER moving. Selling her COLLECTION, Household FURNITURE & EVERYTHING! By appointment. 505-795-7222

and independent

l makers gril State law r gas crisis utility ove

NIGHTSTANDS: Two matching, rustic, Missionstyle, one drawer nightstands. Good condition. $50 for pair. 505-989-3916.

ANTIQUES

WE LOAN on Commercial Real Estate, Income Property, Offices, Retail, Multi-Family, Motels, Storage, Land, Farms, Easy Qualify. PMIFUNDING.COM . 505-275-2244

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

AMERICAN COUNTRY COLLECTION down-blend sofa and Kilim wingback chair. Both excellent condition and have nail-head trim. $1,000 each. Smoke-free. 505-473-2656

GARAGE SALE SOUTH

FINANCIAL LOANS

Locally owned

AKC AKITAS FOR SALE. $600. White, black, black and white, brindle. 7 weeks old, first shots. 505-315-7736 or 505-490-3523.

55 CALLE SAN MARTIN. SCOUT’S LAST GARAGE SALE EVER! Come one, come all for your last chance to buy winter and summer designer clothes in size 6 and 8 ..some never worn! Buy the cutest shoes and boots you have ever seen in sz. 6, 6.5, 8, plus men’s unworn sneakers, shirts, etc. Buy antiques, jewelry, home goods, Christmas decorations, garden tools, glassware, dinnerware and just plain good stuff. Buy a fab Sam Baer table and desk ..not cheap, but wonderful. DON’T MISS THIS ONE MY LAST. MEAN IT! Saturday, April 26 and Sunday, April 27. 9:00am 2:00pm. Can’t wait to see you! Scout Gay

SATURDAY APRIL 19, 8-4. MultiHousehold Moving Sale & Garage Sale. 2837 & 2860 Cliff Palace, off Camino Carlos Rey. Household items, furniture, antique pine dining table, other antique furniture, iron coffee table, art, sofa, refrigerator, wool area rugs, outdoor furniture, clothes, books, power tools.

PETS SUPPLIES

POSTING: JOURNEYMAN LINEMAN CUBA OFFICE (FULL-TIME POSITION) DEADLINE: April 21, 2014 - 4:30 P.M. LETTER OF INTEREST AND RESUME SHOULD BE SUBMITTED TO: Rosablla Romero, Executive Administrative Assistant, r.romero@jemezcoop.org

»merchandise«

»finance«

HORSE BOARDING. OFF HWY 599. LARGE TURN OUT, CORRAL, BARN, AND ROUND PEN. TRAILER STORAGE INCLUDED. MILES TO RIDE. $275 MONTHLY INCLUDING FEED. 505-6992955

for activists rally Immigrants,

Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 18, 2014, to: Heidi Melendrez Advertising Director The Santa Fe New Mexican 202 East Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 or e-mail hmelendrez@sfnewmexican.com. You may also pick up a job application from 202 East Marcy Street or 1 New Mexican Plaza (off I-25 frontage road) or complete an online job application at http://sfnm.co/1eUKCcD. No phone calls, please.

SHIH TZU PUPPIES, 9 weeks old Rare Red. Registered, First Shots. Asking $475. 505-469-9211 or 505-469-0118.

COLLECTIBLES

The Santa Fe New Mexican is seeking a dynamic multimedia advertising consultant to represent its award-winning publications and state-of-the-art digital platforms to existing and future advertising clients.

»garage sale« 5 CALLE PINONERO Garage- Moving Sale this Saturday, April 19th from 9AM- 5PM. HUGE SALE! Household items, clothes, furniture, electronics, tools, wine racks, fans, kitchen items, art work, DVDs, books, household decor, and MORE!

Equal Opportunity Employer

SALES MARKETING

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

MISCELLANEOUS

WANT TO BUY

You may also pick up a job application from 202 East Marcy Street or 1 New Mexican Plaza (off I-25 frontage road) or complete an online job application at http://sfnm.co/1eUKCcD. No phone calls, please.

986-3000

to place your ad, call

STEARNS-FOSTER QUEEN MATTRESS. Luxury Plush Euro Pillow Top. 18 months old: perfect condition. ASKING $600. New: $1079. 505-989-3916. TALL SHELF, bamboo look. 5 shelves. $30, OBO. 505-231-9133. Tiled Kithcen Table with extendable sides, 4 chairs. Needs replacement tiles and painting. $50, OBO. 505-2319133.

C-5

Apply with cover letter and resume by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 18, 2014, to: Heidi Melendrez Advertising Director The Santa Fe New Mexican 202 East Marcy St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 or e-mail hmelendrez@sfnewmexican.com. You may also pick up a job application from 202 East Marcy Street or 1 New Mexican Plaza (off I-25 frontage road) or complete an online job application at http://sfnm. co/1eUKCcD. No phone calls, please.

PUG PUPPIES FOR SALE. Fawn. 1 girl, 3 boys. 8 weeks. Vaccinated. Healthy, Playful. Well socialized for dogs, children. $850. 505-795-6420 PAIR of Adult Female Beagles need a loving home. FREE. Please Call 516524-0388.

The Santa Fe New Mexican is an Equal Opportunity Employer 202 East Marcy St | P.O. Box 2048 | Santa Fe, NM 87504-2048 | 505-983-3303


C-6

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

sfnm«classifieds

to place your ad, call

CLASSIC CARS

DOMESTIC

DOMESTIC

2000 FORD WINDSTAR. $4,000. Please call 505-920-4078 and schedule a test drive!

2005 CHRYSLER Touring, great condition throughout. Low mileage. V6, 28mpg. Power everything, Automatic, alloy wheels. Excellent riding car. $4,950. 505-699-6161

2009 PONTIAC G6. 45,230 miles. Low miles at this price? it just doesn’t get any better! $13,394. Call us today!

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Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today!

4X4s

4X4s

4X4s

2009 GMC YUKON SLT 4WD. $26,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

2003 NISSAN X-TERRA 4WD. $7,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

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Sweet 7 Passenger, Automatic V6, Power windows & locks, cruise, tilt, CD, alloys, immaculate, CarFax, warranty. $16,995. 505-9541054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

Have a product or service to offer? Let our small business experts help you grow your business.

2012 DODGE CHARGER HEMI. $27,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

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2005 RAM 1500 CREW 4WD. $14,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

2004 SAAB 9-5. $7,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505920-4078.

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2008 BUICK ENCLAVE WITH ALL THE GOODIES, VERY SHARP RIDE, $18,999. SCHEDULE A TEST DRIVE TODAY! CALL 505-473-1234.

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE! View vehicle, Carfax:

santafeautoshowcase.com 2009 DODGE AVENGER. 100,841 miles. Don’t let the miles fool you! What a price for an ’09! $9,155. Call today!

505-983-4945

2001 JEEP CHEROKEESPORT 4X4

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2005 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER. Asking $7,200 OBO. New Kenwood stereo, headrest TVs. 124,031 miles. Runs good. 4WD. Paul, 505-204-4704.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com DODGE CARAVAN 1992. Runs well. everything works, good tires, front wheel drive, 57,500 miles, needs painting. $600. 505-986-1882

IMPORTS

2010 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD. $17,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

Sell Your Stuff!

2008 CADILLAC DTS. $13,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-920-4078.

2001 TOYOTA 4Runner SRF. Excellent running condition; maintenance records available; sliding- tilt roof vent; roof rack; new tires; 147,000 miles; $5,000. Steve, 505-231-4043.

WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

2006 LEXUS SC430 - UNREAL! Merely 35k miles, still smells new, collector quality & condition, new tires, all services complete, pristine & just absolutely PERFECT, don’t miss it $32,871. Please Call 505-216-3800.

Have an empty house or apartment you need to rent?

2005 Acura MDX AWD

Sweet MDX loaded with leather, navigation, new tires, in excellent condition. No accidents, CarFax, warranty $9,995. 505-954-1054. www.sweetmotorsales.com

Read the WANT TO RENT column for prospective tenants.

F150, 4X4, Ford pickup, 2004 XLT supercab, new tires, battery, pristine condition, 80k miles, $14,900. 505-470-2536

2014 CHEVROLET CRUZE 2 LT. 16,791 miles. Just one owner, who treated this vehicle like a member of the family. $16,989. 2011 FORD FIESTA. $10,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-920-4078.

2005 LEXUS ES330. ANOTHER ONE owner Lexus trade! A mere 60k miles! A true gem, services up-todate, clean CarFax, immaculate $13,481. Call 505-216-3800.

2011 TOYOTA RAV4 4x4. Yup, another 1 owner from Lexus! NEW tires, NEW brakes, clean CarFax, low miles, the search is over! $18,611. Call 505-216-3800.

2011 AUDI A3 TDI - DIESEL, 40+mpg, one owner, clean CarFax, this is your chance $22,341. Call 505-2163800.

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2009 PONTIAC G6. $10,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

Auto Classifieds 2 weeks in print and online for only

25!

$

*

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* Prices for 2 weeks starting at $25.


Friday, April 18, 2014 THE NEW MEXICAN

sfnm«classifieds IMPORTS

to place your ad, call IMPORTS

IMPORTS

2008 AUDI A4 black convertable Sline package. 34 mpg. 48k miles. $16,995. Please call 505-577-2335.

GET NOTICED!

2004 JAGUAR XJ8 Vanden Plas fresh trade-in, local vehicle, low miles, clean CarFax, every option, perfectly maintained, pristine British class $12,831. Call 505-2163800.

986-3000

Have a product or service to offer? Call our small business experts today! SPORTS CARS

VANS & BUSES

2012 SRT-8 DODGE CHALLENGER. FASTEST CAR IN SANTA FE, SAVE THOUSANDS $36,999 SCHEDULE A TEST DRIVE TODAY! CALL 505-4731234.

1996 GMC CONVERSION VAN. $4,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920.

IMPORTS

2006 MERCEDES-E350 WAGON AWD

2014 NISSAN VERSA. 16,603 miles. Don’t pay too much for the stunning car you want. $14,774. Call us today!

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WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

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C-7

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View vehicle, CarFax:

CALL 986-3000

santafeautoshowcase.com

505-983-4945 rights at Capitol

for activists rally Immigrants,

Locally owned

and independent

Tuesday,

February

8, 2011

Local news,

www.santafenew

A-8

SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW MEXICAN

50¢

mexican.com

for rs waiting 16,000 customeservice, heat crews to restore

to task Gas Co. taken New Mexico lack of alert system over shortage,

l makers gril State law r gas crisis utility ove

out 300 has sent by the city’s Traffic systems fines. people ticketed Redflex paid their alerting haven’t notices notices that they of those speed SUV say 20 percent FILE PHOTO MEXICAN Officials error. NEW were in

City flubs accounting of fees for speed SUV citations paid people who Dozens of default notices were sent By Julie Ann

Grimm

Mexican Fe by the Santa got nailed SUV” doing about Joseph Sovcik “speed Street Galisteo on stretch of Police Department’s School early a 25 mph 38 mph on Elementary last year. near E.J. Martinez the city morning check, and got a a Saturday he the fine by Sovcik paid in early December, fee because Then fora penalty cashed it. would be he owed letter saying late, and his case was his check a collections agency. who were of people later warded to of dozens SUV, paid up and He’s one by the speednotices of default. ticketed erroneous Robbin acknowledged Trafreceived Anthony Santa Fe Police Capt. problems in the he’s corsaid the accounting Program and exact number fic OperationsHe’s not sure the STOP not, but rected them. paid their automated they had who the of people got letters stating calls about tickets and he got many phone he admittedthis year. includfrom issue early of the default notices, resulted A number by Sovcik, mailed to the received or ing the onemade at City Hall the bank but not into Robpayments keeping, were deposited early city that to police for record during the forwarded Others originated Page A-9 bin said. CITATIONS, Please see

The New

living from the neighborshortage their through natural-gas about the Co. crews came report MondayMexico Gas a TV news by when New MEXICAN NEW listen to passed in They were BY NATALIE GUILLÉN/THE Residents Ellen Cavanaugh, VilPueblo. PHOTOS Pajarito housemate, San Ildefonso relight pilots. and his lage, outside home near gas lines and John Hubbard to clear their frigid San Ildefonso room of the weekend post Pueblo, hopes hood over signs in their of having gas service Matlock back By Staci turned Mexican have The New on. Despite Gas Co. may calls repeated ew Mexico in its power Mexico left more to New some done everything crisis that Gas Co., are to avert the homes and busifew residents than 25,000 gas for the last still depending natural the emerwoodon their stoves, nesses without or ask it didn’t communicate burning and days, but enough to its customers have, fireplaces gency fast help when it should Energy for space heaters the state on the House said for warmth. legislators

N

Committee some Resources and Natural the comMonday. also asked in towns The committeeclaims offices help resito better pany to establish the crisis affected by will be seeking compensation natural-gas during the dents who suffered Gas Co. officials for losses Mexico link on the outage. New phone line and running. said a claimswebsite is up and New Mexico company’s than two hours, legislators’ For more answered week’s caused last Gas representatives about whatduring bitterly cold questions Natural from El Pasothe huge service interruption An official weather. that manages gas across company Gas, the pipeline delivering interstate also spoke. a lot more the Southwest, Gas purchased New Mexico Page A-10 CRISIS, Please see State 2011 LEGISLATURE cut for the

OKs budget ◆ Panel Office. measures sponsor Auditor’s A-7 ◆ GOP newcomers reform. PAGE for ethics

Pasapick Art lecture

g homes: in freezin cracks’ Families h the ‘We fell throug

in North16,000 people without natural among the were still They are days of Mexico whohomes, despite five expected ern New their snow Constable With more than 20 perand Anne gas for heating Matlock less temperatures. relit freezing a fourth of Taos and had been Mexican Ellen Cavatoday, only Arriba County villages Gas Co. put and his housemate, their fireplacetheir cent of Rio New Mexico and pipefitin front of John Hubbard Near on Monday. plumbers huddled by noon stay warm. plea to to licensed naugh, were trying to on meters. out a message morning away them turn Monday they’ve posted a handwritten do not go ters to help Lucia Sanchez, public-information front gate, saying, “Please Page A-10 Meanwhile, FAMILIES, the gas company,us with no gas.” 75, live in PajaPlease see leave both again and San Ildefonso and Cavanaugh, Hubbard small inholding on a rito Village, west of the Rio Grande. Pueblo just

By Staci The New

at tax agenc

y

Lois Mexico, by Skin of New Wells and Cady Under the author of in conjunction Rudnick, Modernism of New Southwestern Under the Skin(1933Wells with the exhibit 5:30 Art of Cady Mexico: The UNM Art Museum, Arts. 1953) at the of Spanish Colonial A-2 p.m., Museum in Calendar, More eventsin Pasatiempo and Fridays

Today

with Mostly cloudy, showers. snow afternoon 8. High 37, low PAGE A-14

Obituaries Victor Manuel 87, Feb. 4 Baker, Martinez, Lloyd “Russ” Ortiz, 92, Friday, Ursulo V. Feb. 5 Jan. 25 offiup for work Santa Fe, not showingfrom top department Sarah Martinez leave for Erlinda Ursula was to e-mails New Mexican. Esquibel Feb. 2 just who according said “Ollie” by The Lucero, 85, Mahesh agency about to return to Oliver Phillip cials obtained spokesman S.U. many workleast one 4 sion in at and who was expected Gay, Feb. PAGE A-11 Departmenthe didn’t know howFriday. were “Trudy” on “essential” that afternoon Gertrude Santa Fe, next day. Monday their jobs when state a work the return to who on Thursday Lawler, 90, ers didn’t by late Thursday began Thursday because of Employees Feb. 3 “nonessential” by Gov. Susana The situation told to go home considered “essential” were Page A-9 deemed employees had been administration. means CONFUSION, 28 pages Two sections, Please see apparently Martinez’s confusion Department Terrell No. 38 By Steve The resulting and Revenue 162nd year, No. 596-440 Mexican a day of personal Taxation The New Publication B-7 state employsome state will be docked for Local business for natural employees after “nonessential” B-8 Time Out confuLast week, home to ease demand 986-3010 was some Late paper: sent Sports B-1 983-3303 ees were utility crisis, there A-11 Main office: a Police notes gas amid

sion sparks confu Shutdown workers may

CALL 986-3010

SUVs

up Some ‘essential’ for not showing get docked

2010 BMW 335Xi - Another Lexus trade! Low miles, AWD, completely loaded with Navigation, still under warranty! clean CarFax $26,717. Call 505-216-3800.

1987 JAGUAR XJ6 - WOW! only 48k miles! a TRUE classic, try to find a nicer one, accident free, amazing condition, drives great $10,931. Call 505-216-3800.

Index Managing

Calendar editor: Rob

A-2

Classifieds

Dean, 986-3033,

B-9

Comics B-14

Lotteries A-2

Design and

headlines:

Opinion A-12

Cynthia Miller,

m

cmiller@sfnewmexican.co

rdean@sfnewmexican.com

2006 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE. $11,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-321-3920. 2009 PORSCHE Cayenne - recent Lexus trade, low miles, AWD, clean CarFax, loaded, excellently maintained, wholesale-to-public price, don’t miss out! $27,891. Call 505-216-3800.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2012 MINI COOPER S COUNTRYMAN. 21,760 miles. Only one owner! Low Miles! Superb deal! $23,336. Call us today!

2010 BMW 535Xi AWD. Recent trade-in, factory CERTIFIED with warranty & maintenance until 3/2016, fully loaded, clean CarFax $21,927. Call 505-216-3800.

2012 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA. 34,991 miles. Your lucky day! Don’t pay too much for the SUV you want. $15,974. Call today!

2009 KIA SPECTRA. $8,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-920-4078.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com

Classifieds Where treasures are found daily

2008 SMART fortwo Cabriolet. Spring is here! Fun & practical, well-equipped, red interior, pristine condition, clean CarFax, $8,541. Please call 505-216-3800.

CAMPERS & RVs 2011 42’ 2 bedroom fifth wheel. 3 slideouts, washer, dryer, 2 A/Cs, bunk beds, hide-a-bed, full queen bed. $24,900. 701-340-0840. 2012 DODGE NITRO. $14,000. Schedule a test drive today! Please call 505-920-4078.

Place an ad Today!

CALL 986-3000 2009 BMW 335Ci xDrive. WOW! Merely 43k miles, just 1 owner, Premium & Cold Weather Packages, clean CarFax $24,841. Please call 505-216-3800.

»recreational«

2007 Lexus ES350 - fresh Lexus trade! good miles, heated & cooled leather seats, excellent condition, truly affordable & reliable luxury $15,981. Call 505-216-3800

2011 SUBARU Outback. Another LEXUS trade-in, local vehicle, new brakes, battery, freshly serviced, clean CarFax $16,981. Call 505216-3800.

www.furrysbuickgmc.com 2004 FLEETWOOD TOY HAULER. 26’, Sleeps 6, Generator, Gas tanks, A/C, Propane grill, Air compressor, TV, fridge, Shower, Bathtub. 505-471-2399 1999 FOREST RIVER CAMPER. 21’, duel axles, self-contained. Excellent condition. $6,500 OBO. 505-660-4079

2008 MINI Cooper Clubman. ANOTHER Lexus trade! low miles, clean CarFax, well-equipped, immaculate! $13,871. Call 505-216-

2012 FORD EXPLORER XLT. 38,768 miles. Are you still driving around that old thing? Come on down today! $28,881.

3800.

2007 BMW X5 3.0SI with options. New tires, Excellent condition. Looks new. $19,000. 505-995-6245 2007 LEXUS GX470 4WD - capable and luxurious, new tires & brakes, well maintained, NAV & rear DVD, beautiful condition, clean CarFax, the RIGHT one! $22,831. Call 505-216-3800.

2008 SILVERBACK CEDAR C R E E K . Model #30LSTS. 3 Slides, excellent condition, A/C, power awning, auto front jacks, non-smoker. Call Debbie or Paul 505-771-3623 in Bernalillo.

1985 TOYOTA DOLPHIN. Automatic transmission. 147,000 miles. Strong engine, clean interior. Needs refrigerator, hot water heater, & miscellaneous. $2500. 505-470-4711

2012 TOYOTA COROLLA. DON’T PAY MORE. LOW, LOW MILES. $13,999. SCHEDULE A TEST DRIVE TODAY! CALL 505-473-1234.

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2004 MINI COOPER-S MANUAL

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2002 HONDA XR100 dirt bike, Red. 2001 Yamaha TTR 125 dirt bike, Blue. Three motor cycle trailer for dirt bikes. $2,300 for all three. Call John at 505-988-3714.

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C-8

THE NEW MEXICAN Friday, April 18, 2014

sfnm«classifieds LEGALS

LEGALS

Legal #96776 FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SANTA FE STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF MARTHA LINDA FUNK MASSOPUST Case No. 2014-00680

D-101-CV-

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sections 40-8-1 through 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, the Petitioner, Martha Linda Funk Massopust, will apply to the Honorable Raymond Z. Ortiz, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Judge Steve Herrera Judicial Complex, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, on May 2, 2014, at 8:30 a.m., for and ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Martha Linda Funk Massopust to Linda Funk Massopust. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk Submitted by: MCCLAUGHERTY SILVER, P.C.

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LEGALS

MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTONIO SCOTT, IF ANY AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALISHA N. SHELBOURN, IF ANY, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named Defendants Antonio Scott, Alisha N. Shelbourn, The Unknown Spouse of Antonio Scott, if any, and The Unknown Spouse of Alisha N. Shelbourn, if any. GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the abovenamed Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 1084 Camino Vista Aurora, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: Lot Eight (8), VISTA AURORA SUBDIVISION PHASE 1A, as shown on plat filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, on February 12, 1988, in Plat Book 182, at page 036, Document No. 642,395.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully SubmitPublished in The San- ted, CASTLE LAW ta Fe New Mexican on THE GROUP, LLC April 11 and 18, 2014. By John K. Silver, Esq. Attorneys for Petitioner P.O. Box 8680 Santa Fe, NM 875048680 (505) 988-8804 Attorneys for Petitioner

Legal #96787 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. 02970

D-101-CV-2013-

By: /s/ __Steven J. Lucero__ Electronically Filed Steven J. Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 8489500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff NM12-03695_FC01 Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on April 4, 11, 18 2014

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED PASS- Legal #96809 FIRST JUDICIAL THROUGH CERTIFIDISTRICT COURT CATES, SERIES ARSI COUNTY OF 2006-M3, SANTA FE STATE OF Plaintiff, NEW MEXICO v.

D-101-PB-2014ANTONIO SCOTT, No. ALISHA N. 00032 SHELBOURN, ARGENT IN THE MATTER OF

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986-3000

to place legals call toll free: 800.873.3362 LEGALS

LEGALS

y THE ESTATE OF tion committee to de- ALTSD, 2550 Cerrillos GILBERT J. SINGLE- termine the lowest Road, Santa Fe, New TON, DECEASED bidder. Mexico 87505, no later than 3:00 pm NOTICE TO A mandatory Pre- (mountain daylight CREDITORS Proposal meeting and time) on May 15, site visit will be held 2014 . NOTICE IS HEREBY on April 28, 2014 at GIVEN that the under- 10:00 am (MDT). Pro- EQUAL OPPORTUNIsigned has been ap- posals (hard copy) TY EMPLOYMENT: pointed Personal will be received at All qualified offerors Representative of this the office of the Gov- will receive considerEstate. All persons ernor, Picuris Pueblo ation of contract(s) having claims against by May 16, 2014 at without regard to this Estate are re- 5:00pm (MDT). race, color, religion, quired to present sex or national origin. their claims within The Request For Pro- Proponents of this two (2) months after posal (RFP) packet work shall be rethe date of the first will be available at: quired to comply with publication of this Picuris Pueblo Trans- the President’s ExecNotice or their claims portation Depart- utive Order No. 11246 will be forever bar- ment, Pueblo View as amended. red. Claims must be Road, off State Hwy presented either to 75, Penasco, NM Requests for Proposthe undersigned Per- 87553. Contact: Syl- als will be available sonal Representative via Armijo at (575) by contacting: at P.O. Box 1575, San- 587-2017 or ta Fe, New Mexico, sarmijo@picurispuebl Julia Gil, Procurement 87504, or filed with o.org. Manager the First Judicial Dis- Published in The San- NM Aging & Longtrict Court, Judge ta Fe New Mexican on Term Services DeSteve Herrera Judicial April 18 2014 partment Complex, 225 MonteAdministrative Servzuma Ave., P.O. Box Legal #96823 ices Division 2268, Santa Fe, New Turquoise Trail Char- 2550 Cerrillos Road Mexico, 87504. ter School will take Santa Fe, New Mexico public comment on 87505 DATED: April 07, its 2014-15 operating Work: (505) 476-4786 2014. (505) 476-4836 budget at a public Fax: Shelly Jay Kinder (al- meeting of the Gover- E - m a i l : julia.gil@state.nm.us so known as Shelly nance Council on Singleton / also April 23, 2014 at 5:30 known as Shelli Sin- p.m. Meet in the PROPOSALS SUBgleton / also known school library at 13A MITTED AFTER THE as Shelly Jay Sanders San Marcos AND TIME Loop, DATE / also known as Shel- Santa Fe. For more in- SPECIFIED ABOVE ly Billian), BE DEEMED formation contact 505 WILL Personal Representa- 467-1770. NONRESPONSIVE tive AND WILL NOT BE Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on ACCEPTED. THE CULLEN LAW April 16, 18, 21 2014 I S S U A N C E : The ReFIRM, P.C. Attorneys for the Perquest for Proposals Legal #96829 sonal Representative will be issued on 2006 Botulph Road April 16, 2014 . Firms -NOTICEP.O. Box 1575 interested in obtainSanta Fe, New Mexico ing a copy may acRequest for Proposal cess and download 87504 (505) 988-7114 (of- Number: 624-15-1204 the document from fice) the Internet on A p ril TITLE: (505) 995-8694 (fac16, 2014 at the folAUDITING SERVICES simile) lowing address: http://www.nmaging. lawfirm@cullen.cc Published in The San- The State of New state.nm.us/Docume Aging & nts.aspx ta Fe New Mexican on Mexico’s Long Term Services April 11, 18 2014 Department (ALTSD) P R E - P R O P O S A L is requesting propos- CONFERENCE: A preals from qualified proposal conference LEGAL #96810 firms or offerors for will be held as indiRequest for the purpose of hiring cated in the seProposals a contractor for Au- quence of events beCivil Engineering diting Services. Pro- ginning at 10:00 am Services posals shall be valid Mountain Time on for ninety (90) days April 29, Sealed Proposals for subject to all action Tuesday the design (PS&E) of by ALTSD. ALTSD re- 2014 in the Toney Kiva Road, NP 200 serves the right to re- Anaya Building 2nd Conference Section 70, length of ject any or all propos- floor , 2550 .2 mile located within als in part or in Room Cerrillos Road, Santhe boundary of the whole. Proposals ta Fe NM 87505. PoPueblo of Picuris. De- shall be submitted in sign is to be done in a sealed container or tential Offeror(s) are encouraged to subaccordance with the envelope indicating FP-03 Specifications the proposal title and mit written questions (Standard Specifica- number along with in advance of the to the tions for the Con- the offeror’s name conference struction of Roads and address clearly Procurement Manager. The identity of the and Bridges on Feder- marked on the outal Highway Projects) side of the container organization submitand AASHTO stand- or envelope. All pro- ting the question(s) ards. Proposals will posals must be re- will not be revealed. written not be opened imme- ceived and recorded Additional may be diately but rather will by the Administrative questions submitted at the conreceive future consid- Services Division, ference. All written eration by an evalua-

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email: legalnotice@sfnewmexican.com Now offering a self-service legal platform: www.sfnmclassifieds.com

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LEGALS

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p NM 87508. The meetings begin at 7 PM. Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on April 18 2014

questions will be addressed in writing on the date listed in the Sequence of Events. A public log will be kept of the names of potential Offeror(s) that attended the pre-proposal conference.

Legal #96845 Notice is hereby given that New Mexico Connections Academy will hold a meeting of its Governing Council on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held at the offices of the school located at 4001 Office Court, Suite 201-204, Santa Fe, NM 87507. Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on April 18, 2014

Attendance at the pre-proposal conference is highly recommended, but not a prerequisite for submission of a proposal. PROPOSAL DUE DATE AND TIME: Proposals must be received by the Procurement Manager no later than 3:00 PM Mountain Standard Time on May 15, 2014. P r o posals received after this deadline will not be accepted.

y p p y p means of telephonic General 2013-14, communication. Audit Services for 2014 Audit Items included on the proposed agenda: Specifications and proposal forms may Proposed FY 2015 be obtained in the Budget Planning Purchasing DepartWorkshop, Board Res- ment, Room #204A, olution, General Up- telephone # (505) date, Lucky Numbers 467-2010 or 2011 of Bingo Game, Finan- the Santa Fe Public cial Statements, Dis- Schools, 610 Alta Visposal of obsolete, ta Street, Santa Fe, worn out or unusable New Mexico 87505. tangible personal The Santa Fe Public property and Annual Schools reserves the Audit Services. right to reject any and all proposals. Please note the agenda is subject to ONLY APPROVED INchange. A final agen- DEPENDENT PUBLIC da will be available to ACCOUNTS (IPA) ON the public at least 72 THE NEW MEXICO, hours prior to the STATE AUDITOR’S LIST meeting. Please note WILL BE CONSIDERED that agenda items FOR AWARD. may be taken out of sequence at the discretion of the Chair. Andrea Gallegos, All items on agenda Purchasing Manager may result in Board action. Published in The Santa Fe New Mexican on The New Mexico Lot- April 18, 2014. tery Authority’s Board of Directors’ meetings are open to Legal #96860 the public and your attendance is wel- Bids can be downcomed. If you are an loaded from our individual with a dis- w e b s i t e , ability who is in need www.generalservices of a reader, amplifier, .state.nm/statepurch qualified sign lan- asing , or purchased guage interpreter, or at our office, State any other form of Purchasing Division, auxiliary aid or serv- Joseph Montoya ice to attend or par- Building, Room 2016, ticipate in the meet- 1100 St. Francis Drive, ing, please contact Santa Fe, NM 87505, Wilma Atencio at 342- for $0.25 per page, 7600 at least one check or money order week prior to the only. (505) 827-0472. meeting or as soon as possible. Public Sealed bids will be documents, including opened at the State the agenda and mi- Purchasing Division nutes, can be provid- office at 2:00 PM, ed in various accessi- MST/MDT on dates inble formats. Please dicated. Request for contact our office at Proposals are due at 342-7600 if a summa- location and time inry or other type of ac- dicated on proposal. cessible format is needed. 05/09/14 No Later David Barden Than 3:00 pm MounChief Executive Offi- tain Daylight Time cer 40-350-14 05623 Published in The San- New Mexico General ta Fe New Mexican on Services Department April 18 2014 State of New Mexico OnSite Health Clinic A Pre-proposal ConLegal #96859 ference & Site Visit will be held on MonSANTA FE PUBLIC day, April 28, 2014, at SCHOOLS 10:00 am MDT in the Bldg Bid Sealed Proposals ad- Montoya dressed to the Pur- Room. chasing Department Room #204A of the Published in The SanSanta Fe Public ta Fe New Mexican on Schools, 610 Alta Vis- April 18, 2014 ta Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 will be received by said department as follows: You can view your

Legal #96851 Members of the public are invited to provide comment on hearings for the issuance of or transfers of liquor licenses as All Published in The San- outlined below. ta Fe New mexican on hearings will be conapril 16, 17 and 18, ducted at the NM Alcohol & Gaming Of2014. fice on the date specified in the Tony Legal #96839 Anaya Bldg., 2550 STATE OF Cerrillos Road, 2nd NEW MEXICO Floor, Santa Fe, NM. COUNTY OF The Hearing Officer SANTA FE for this Application is FIRST JUDICIAL Rose L. Garcia who DISTRICT COURT can be contacted at 505-476-4552 or IN THE MATTER OF A rosel.garcia@state.n PETITION FOR m.us CHANGE OF NAME OF Daniel Vigil Application No. ACase No.: D-101-CV909354 for the issu2014-00828 ance of a Restaurant NOTICE OF CHANGE Liquor License on OF NAME April 30, 2014 at 11:00 TAKE NOTICE that in a.m. Loyal Hound LLC accordance with the located at 730 St. Miprovisions of Sec. 40- chael’s Drive, #3-RW, 8-1 through Sec. 40-8- Santa Fe, New Mexico 3 NMSA 1978, et seq. Published in The Santhe Petitioner Daniel ta Fe New Mexican on Vigil will apply to the April 18, 2014 Honorable Sarah M. Singleton, District Judge at the Santa Fe Legal #96852 Judicial Complex, 100 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING Catron St., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at THE NEW MEXICO 1:15 p.m. on the 7th day of May 2014 for LOTTERY AUTHORITY an ORDER FOR Regular Board CHANGE OF NAME Meeting from Daniel Vigil to Tuesday, May 6, Daniel Lopez. 2014 STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk Submitted by: Daniel Pursuant to the Open Vigil, Petitioner, Pro Meetings Act of New Mexico, Section 10Se notice is Published in The San- 15-3(B), ta Fe New Mexican on hereby given that the New Mexico Lottery April 18, 25 2014 Authority Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board MeetLegal #96844 ing on Tuesday, May The two regular 06, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. meetings of the The meeting will be Board of Directors of held at New Mexico the Eldorado Area Lottery HeadquarWater and Sanitation ters, located at 4511 District will be held Osuna Road NE, in Alon 01 AND 15 OF MAY buquerque, New Mex2014, at the Eldorado ico. One or more Friday May 2, 2014, at Community Center in members of the the classroom, 1 Ha- Board of Directors 3:00 P.M. local time cienda Loop, Santa Fe may participate by Proposal No. 8-

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Santa Fe New Mexican, April 18, 2014  

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