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2012 Guidance Document for the Implementation of the New Mexico Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC)

Hanna Skandera, Secretary-Designate New Mexico Public Education Department


The State of New Mexico 2012 Guidance Document for the Implementation of the New Mexico Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC)

Susana Martinez Governor

Hanna Skandera Secretary-Designate of Education

Required Notice The contents of this document were partially developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE). However, the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the USDOE, and should not be regarded as an endorsement by the Federal Government. Copyright Notice This manual is copyright free, so no permission is needed to cite or reproduce it for non-profit purposes. If material from it is included in another non-profit publication, cite as follows: Some information in this document was adapted from 2012 Guidance Document for the Implementation of the New Mexico Alternative Demonstration of Competency which is a copyrightfree document published by the New Mexico Public Education Department. Notes This document is available at www.ped.state.nm.us. Click on the A–Z directory to locate it under “Alternative Demonstration of Competency.”

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The New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) acknowledges the important contributions of the Secretary-Designate’s Curriculum and Instruction Advisory Committee that provided both valuable input in developing the ADC guidelines, as well important feedback on this document. The members of the committee are as follows: Kara Bobroff, Native American Community Academy (NACA) Mary Beth Britton, 2012 Teacher of the Year Gloria Chavez, Grants-Cibola County Schools LuJuana Coleman, Rio Rancho Public Schools Adan Delgado, Pojoaque Valley Public Schools Diana Fesmire, 2011 Teacher of the year Keith Franklin, Indian Education Advisory Council (IEAC) Jann Hunter, Alamogordo Public Schools Sarah Miranda Sanchez, Albuquerque Public Schools (retired) Tony Monfiletto, ACE Leadership High School Dick Pool, Silver Consolidate Schools Lawrence Roybal, Hispanic Education Advisory Council (HEAC) Teresa Salazar, Moriarty-Edgewood Schools Susan Sanchez, Roswell Independent School District Linda Sink, Albuquerque Public Schools (retired) Lynn Vasquez, Loving Municipal Schools Candace Young, Farmington Municipal Schools

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Table of Contents Foreword ................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Overview of Statute and Policy .................................................................................................................................................. 6 Components of Alternative Demonstration of Competency ...................................................................................................... 10 Component One: Scores from college and career-ready assessments................................................................................. 10 Component Two: End-of-course examination demonstrating standards-based accomplishments that demonstrate competency........................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Guiding Principles for the Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC) ............................................................................ 12 Roles and Responsibilities of Key Stakeholders in the System ................................................................................................ 13 Supporting Roles and Responsibilities in the System ............................................................................................................... 14 ADC: A Shared Responsibility .................................................................................................................................................... 16 Establishing LEA and School Processes and Procedures........................................................................................................... 16 Districts—Planning ................................................................................................................................................................ 16 Districts—Implementation ..................................................................................................................................................... 18 Schools—Planning ................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Schools—Implementation ..................................................................................................................................................... 19 Counselors, Teachers, Mentors, Coaches, and Parents—Implementation ............................................................................ 19 APPENDICES ......................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Appendix A .............................................................................................................................................................................. 22 Components of Demonstration of Competency ........................................................................................................................ 22 Appendix B .............................................................................................................................................................................. 23 Guidance Memo Secretary-Designate Skandera ..................................................................................................................... 23 Appendix C .............................................................................................................................................................................. 25 Table 1: ADC Cut Scores--Based on College and Career -Readiness Cut Scores ................................................................... 25 Appendix D .............................................................................................................................................................................. 26 Table 2: Roles and Responsibilities of Stakeholders ................................................................................................................ 26 Appendix E .............................................................................................................................................................................. 27 Table 3: Supportive Roles and Responsibilities ....................................................................................................................... 27 Appendix F .............................................................................................................................................................................. 28 Graduation Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................ 28 Appendix G .............................................................................................................................................................................. 32 Indian Education Act ................................................................................................................................................................ 32 Appendix H .............................................................................................................................................................................. 37 Hispanic Education Act ............................................................................................................................................................ 37 Appendix I ............................................................................................................................................................................... 39 Public Education Rule 6.19.7.1 ................................................................................................................................................ 39 Appendix J ............................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Graduation Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................ 40 Appendix K .............................................................................................................................................................................. 42 Glossary and Acronyms ........................................................................................................................................................... 42

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Foreword This document contains technical support materials presented by the New Mexico Public Education Department and is intended to provide the guidance and rationale for planning and implementing the New Mexico Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC) in accordance with state statute.

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Overview of Statute and Policy In New Mexico, all students deserve the opportunity to graduate from high school prepared to participate successfully in careers and college. Today, about 67% of new jobs require at least some postsecondary education. The American Diploma Project, sponsored through Achieve, reports that students entering the workforce directly after high school need the same academic skill set as freshmen entering college. This is consistent with New Mexico’s adoption of Common Core of State Standards which ultimately lead to career and college readiness. To that end, New Mexico has undertaken significant redesign of the high school education system, including the requirements students need to meet in order to obtain a Diploma of Excellence. In the redesign work, New Mexico is implementing several standards-based options for students to demonstrate high school graduation competency.1 Class of 2013 Starting with the Class of 2013 (students entering 9 th grade in the 2009–2010 school year), statute (see Appendix C: 22-13-1.1 NMSA 1978) requires students to show they have achieved competence in mathematics, reading, and science with the SBA, and writing and social studies in order to graduate. The Class of 2013 will need to demonstrate competency in mathematics, reading, and science with the SBA, and writing and social studies by passing related courses. Statute requires demonstration of competency, but also that students who are unable to demonstrate competency have the opportunity to demonstrate competency through an alternative demonstration. (See Appendix A Table 1.) For math and reading, students must achieve a composite score of 73, with neither individual score below the nearing proficient performance level. For science, students must achieve a score of 38 on the science SBA taken as an H3 student. For social studies and writing, students demonstrate competency by passing the appropriate English and U.S. History course.

Class of 2014 The Class of 2014 and beyond must meet proficiency in five areas: mathematics, reading, science, writing, and social studies by passing the SBA and/or end-of-course exams (EOC) in subjects for which the SBA is not offered. Statute requires demonstration of competency, but also that students who are unable to demonstrate 1

Prior to July 1, 2010, the state of New Mexico had relied upon test scores from the New Mexico High School competency examination to determine a high school student’s readiness to graduate. Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 6


competency have the opportunity to demonstrate competency through an Alternative demonstration. (See Appendix A, Table 1.) For math and reading, students must achieve a composite score of 73, with neither individual score below the nearing proficient performance level. For science, students must achieve a score of 38 on the New Mexico SBA as an H3 student. For social studies, students must pass the social studies EOC, developed by New Mexico teachers, or its equivalent.2

New Mexico Standards Based Assessment (SBA) The New Mexico Standards Based Assessment (SBA), designed to measure competence at the 11th grade level, will be used as the High School Graduation Assessment (HSGA). This assessment replaces the High School Competency Exam, which measured student competence at an 8th grade level. All students take the SBA in the spring of H3. Students will also be given the opportunity to participate in the SBA in the spring of H2. Scores will be used for both the accountability requirements of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and to determine whether or not a student has met competency for graduation from a New Mexico high school with a diploma of excellence. The cut score for the HSGA is based on proficiency on the SBA (See Appendix B: Memo from Secretary-Designate of Education, Hanna Skandera) and applies a confidence interval. Specifically, New Mexico utilizes a composite proficiency score for math and reading of 73. A student is considered as having demonstrated competency if he or she has a combined math and reading score of 73 and neither of the individual scores are below the nearing proficienct performance level. If a student fails to meet the cut scores in one or more subjects, the student may either retake the portion(s) of the SBA failed, or the student may use the Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC). The SBA scores will be available to schools and parents by August of a student’s H4 year. A student has three opportunities to pass the math and reading HSGA—once in March of the H2, once in March of the H3, and once in the fall of H4. SBA scoring, verification, and reporting will allow retake scores to be available to a H4 student prior to spring graduation. Each student has the capability of “banking” scores, which means that a student’s highest score on any given subject area will be saved or “banked” and used to assess competency, regardless of future performance in that subject area. Students have one opportunity to pass the Science SBA as H3 students. Students must participate in all available administrations of the SBA before moving on to the ADC. Students with disabilities are also required to meet the New Mexico assessment graduation requirements. A separate document will provide additional guidance. 2

Districts can submit EOCs for consideration for use as EOCs. These must demonstrate the same rigor as those developed for the state by NM teachers. An EOC evaluation rubric will be forthcoming. Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 7


The ADC may include assessment scores of work in English, Spanish, and/or a New Mexico Native American language. Native American language use must honor restrictions set by the tribe. Submissions demonstrating competency in reading standards must be submitted in English. Students must have previously participated in standardized assessments required for their year. All EOC examinations must meet the minimum rigor of standards through H3. Subsection b of 22-13-1.1 NMSA 1978 provides direction on alternatives for students with disabilities (see Appendix C: 2213.1.1 NMSA 1978). Districts are responsible for storing ADC end-of-course examinations and/or their results for a minimum of five years.3 The PED will set requirements, as well as submission and archiving procedures, and LEAs must ensure an ADC is complete. The scores of the ADC must be uploaded to the PED through STARS. Specifically: Students Graduating in 2013 Traditional demonstration of competency For math and reading, students must achieve a composite score of 2273 on the New Mexico Standards Based Assessment (SBA), with neither individual score below nearing proficient. Students who have not met this requirement through any combination of math and reading assessments as H3, H4, or H5 students can use the ADC. For science, students must achieve a score of 38 on the science SBA taken as an H3 student. For social studies and writing, students demonstrate competency by passing the appropriate English and U.S. History course. Alternative demonstration of competency For each subject area that has a related college readiness/placement exam, a student can demonstrate competency by meeting the appropriate cut score in one of the following: AP exam, ACT, SAT, PSAT, or AccuPlacer, or International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum. For math, students can demonstrate competency by passing the appropriate math course: Algebra II, Integrated Math 3, or its equivalents or the corresponding existing-district End of Course (EOC) exam.4 For reading, students can demonstrate competency by passing the appropriate English course: English 3 or its corresponding existing-district EOC exam.

3

Districts can store electronic (scanned) copies or minimally EOC score reports electronically. Demonstration of competency has been broadened since Dr. Goldschmidt’s 3/20/2012 memo regarding exit exam requirements to afford students maximum opportunity to demonstrate competency, while maintaining rigor. 4

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For science, students can demonstrate competency by passing an appropriate science course alone or that course’s existing-district EOC exam. Courses are Biology or Chemistry. For social studies, students can demonstrate competency by passing an appropriate U.S. History course or that course’s existing-district EOC exam. For writing, students can demonstrate competency by passing an appropriate English course or that course’s existing-district EOC exam. Courses are English 3 or its equivalent. Students Graduating in 2014 Traditional demonstration of competency For math and reading, students must achieve a composite score of 2273 on the New Mexico SBA, with neither individual score result below nearing proficient. Students who have not met this requirement through any combination of math and reading assessments as H2, H3, or H4 students can use the ADC. For science, students must achieve a score of 38 on the New Mexico SBA as an H3 student. For social studies, students must pass the social studies EOC, developed by New Mexico teachers, or its equivalent.5 For writing, students demonstrate competency by passing the writing EOC, developed by New Mexico teachers, or its equivalent.6 Alternative demonstration of competency For each subject area that has a related college readiness/placement exam, a student can demonstrate competency by meeting the appropriate cut score in one of the following: AP exam, ACT, SAT, PSAT, AccuPlacer, or International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum. For math, students can demonstrate competency by passing the appropriate EOC exam in Algebra II, Integrated Math 3, or its equivalent.7 For reading, students can demonstrate competency by passing the English 3 EOC exam. For science, students can demonstrate competency by passing the EOC exam in Biology or Chemistry. For social studies, students can demonstrate competency by passing an appropriate U.S. History EOC exam. For writing, students can demonstrate competency by passing the writing EOC, which can be taken at the end of English 3 or its equivalent. 5

Districts can submit EOC for consideration for use as EOCs. These must demonstrate the same rigor as those developed for the state by New Mexico teachers. An EOC evaluation rubric will be forthcoming. 6 Districts can submit an EOC for consideration for use as EOCs. These must demonstrate the same rigor as those developed for state by New Mexico teachers. An EOC evaluation rubric will be forthcoming. 7 The EOC for equivalent courses must be aligned with common core state standards in mathematics. Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 9


Components of Alternative Demonstration of Competency Students who fail to meet the HSGA cut score for one or more subjects and who have participated in all available administrations of the SBA may complete an ADC for the standard(s) missed. There are two possible components of the ADC. Component One is an examination of student scores from standardized college and career-ready assessments: Advanced Placement (AP) exams, ACT, PLAN, PSAT, SAT, Accuplacer, or International Baccalaureate curriculum (detailed in Appendix C, Table 1). If a student’s college and career ready assessment scores do not demonstrate competence in the standards for which he or she failed to meet SBA proficiency, then Component Two of the ADC may be used. Component Two includes EOC examinations on the standards for which they failed to meet the SBA cut score for the class of 2013 and beyond. (See Appendix C, Table 1.) Additionally, the PED will work with districts to resolve unique circumstances related to appeals, waivers, and other extenuating circumstances falling outside of the guidance provided here. Component One: Scores from college and career-ready assessments Component One provides for a review of standardized college and career ready assessments that the student may have taken. The PED, the College Board, and the ACT are studying the relationships among standardized college and career-ready assessments and New Mexico students’ SBA performance. Benchmarks are provided in Appendix C, Table 1. Final cut scores will be provided as soon as the linking studies are complete. However, if there is no assessment for the subject area or the student’s score does not meet the cut, then the student may not use Component One to demonstrate competency and may attempt to utilize Component Two. Component Two: End-of-course examination demonstrating standards-based accomplishments that demonstrate competency If a student fails to achieve proficiency on the HSGA and is unable to demonstrate competencies through Component One, then the student may use Component Two. The student may demonstrate competency through an EOC examination administered in a standardized fashion (Table 1 below). Table 1: EOC Exams Available for ADC Math Algebra II and Integrated Math 3 Social Studies U.S. History with NM and U.S. Constitution

Reading and Writing English III with Writing Science Biology and Chemistry

During the summer of 2012 the PED brought together content area high school teachers to develop state end-of-course exams for the subjects outlined in Table 1. In 2013 districts may utilize their existing EOC exams. In 2014 and beyond, districts must Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 10


use either the state-developed EOC exams or a PED-approved equivalent EOC exam to meet the requirements of the ADC. The PED's approval depends on the demonstrated quality of the submitted EOC exam. The process and requirements are outlined below. The PED will provide additional detail specifying the EOC evaluation rubrics separately.

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Guiding Principles for the Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC) In establishing the ADC, the following guiding principles apply: The New Mexico ADC is: Aligned to New Mexico’s Content Standards and Benchmarks (2013)/Common Core State Standards (2014) Comparable in rigor, depth of knowledge, and cognitive demand to the SBA Scored with a standard scoring rubric Monitored and reported by schools, districts, and the state as appropriate Grounded by a fair, equitable, and transparent process in which all key stakeholders are held accountable In addition, the ADC includes the following: Sufficient evidence to demonstrate competency in meeting standards-based indicators Must, at a minimum, address the areas of the standards and indicators the student did not meet on the SBA Reflects independent work of the student District-developed EOC exams must be as follows: Submitted for review by the PED Aligned to the New Mexico Content Standards and Benchmarks for 2013 and the Common Core State Standards for 2014 and beyond in math and English language arts Aligned to the New Mexico Content Standards and Benchmarks in social science and science for 2013 and beyond Deemed reliable o Research-based reliability evidence based on prior administrations, and o Plan to evaluate the reliability using matched scores from evidence and procedures to address inadequacies Deemed valid score interpretation o Test blueprint Cognitive demand review o Content review o Fairness and accessibility review o Bias review o Alignment review Conducted with standardized administration and scoring procedures

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Roles and Responsibilities of Key Stakeholders in the System (See Appendix D, Table 2.)

Role of the PED The PED is responsible for establishing the ADC requirements and defining the process in accordance with statute and rule. In addition, it must ensure that local systems are designed and implemented in accordance with these requirements. These responsibilities require the state to perform several functions: 1) disseminating information to all stakeholders regarding the requirements in statute and rule; 2) developing the process of pursuing an ADC that local districts are required to follow; 3) monitoring local districts to ensure compliance with the law; and 4) reporting to track and measure outcomes of the ADC. In addition, the PED provides training and technical assistance, as needed, to help local education agencies and charter schools in designing and implementing their local systems. Help can include ongoing guidance, resources, tools, and sample instruments as support documents from which local education agencies can draw in implementing their systems at the local level. In sum, the state has the primary responsibility for design and development of the ADC.

Role of the Local Education Agency (LEA)—District, Charter Schools, State-Supported Schools The LEA must adopt policies and procedures that comply with state statute, rule, and ADC procedures. The LEA must participate in monitoring and reporting activities for state accountability purposes, be responsible for communicating with stakeholders (students, parents, and the community) and ensure equitable access to this option for all eligible students. The LEA needs to secure supplies and equipment, as necessary, and provide professional development. Transparency is critical to ensure a fair and consistent process in determining whether student demonstrations of competency meet criteria set by the state and the LEA for high school graduation. LEAs and their communities should ensure adherence to the Indian Education Act (Appendix F: 2223A-1 through 22-23A-8 NMSA 1978) by developing local policies in collaboration with tribal communities, including urban Indian communities. They should also address the provisions of the Hispanic Education Act (see Appendix H: 22-23B-1 through 22-23B-3 NMSA 1978.) The LEA assumes all costs for implementation.

The Role of the School While the state and the LEA establish the conditions under which the ADC will be administered, the implementation of the ADC plays out at the school level. Each school must adhere to state and district’s policies and procedures. Each school must develop a plan to meet the implementation requirements set forth by the state and the LEA, Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 13


including establishing an electronic submissions and storage system. The school must also engage in communication, transparency, monitoring, and reporting to provide necessary information to both their community and LEA. The school also has the responsibility to the students to ensure that each one 1) is aware of his or her options in meeting New Mexico graduation requirements, and 2) is provided the opportunity to be successful. Additional assistance may include mentoring, coaching, and/or guided supervision of the student’s plan and development of his or her demonstration of competency that meets the graduation requirements.

The Role of the Student At the center of the ADC process is the student, and the student must remain at the center of this effort. In doing so, the ADC must be a student-driven endeavor. The student has the responsibility of ownership. Working with his/her teachers and counselors, the student needs to lead all aspects of the work, from the planning stage to reflecting on outcomes. Although parents, teachers, and school administrators can support the student’s efforts, demonstrating competency must be based on the student’s own work. By understanding and taking ownership of this responsibility, students can take full advantage of the opportunity to demonstrate what they know and can do in a variety of ways. There is no cost to the student.

Supporting Roles and Responsibilities in the System (See Appendix D, Table 3.)

The roles and responsibilities of supporting players’ and key stakeholders’ are essential factors in safeguarding the success of students and system supports. For a description of these supporting entities see Appendix D, Table 3.

The Role of Counselors and Teachers Students must be aware of their options and the opportunity the ADC provides in meeting graduation requirements as defined by the PED. Thus, it is crucial that school counselors and teachers discuss these options with all students, particularly those who are eligible for the ADC, that is, who have not successfully met the passing score on the SBA in 11th grade. Information provided by school counselors and teachers can assist students in determining if this is an appropriate course of action for them and ensure they are on track to meet requirements, if, in fact, they choose this option.

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The Role of Mentors or Coaches Although the student is responsible for the work involved, a mentor or coach can provide valuable guidance in the planning, review, and feedback of the student’s demonstration of competency. Whether required or optional, the mentor or coach can provide assurance that the student’s planned course of action will meet state and LEA requirements and criteria if the student completes it successfully. The mentor or coach can also redirect students if it appears they are veering off track of their planned course of action.

The Role of Parents Parents can and should be actively involved in the student’s course of action, both in assisting in decision making and supporting their child’s effort. This does not mean the parent does the work with or for the student, but rather, offers encouragement, monitors progress, and demonstrates interest in outcomes the student is pursuing.

The Role of Community Served by the LEA The degree of community involvement and active participation in aspects of ADC implementation will be determined by local education agencies. However, the role of the community as an important stakeholder in successful high school completion rates and its implied preparation for postsecondary college and/or careers cannot be ignored. At a minimum, the local community should be aware of the LEA policy and procedures for alternative demonstrations of competency, provide input and feedback through appropriate channels to the local school board as warranted, and willing to participate in the process if called upon.

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ADC: A Shared Responsibility Implementation of an effective system for Alternative demonstration of competency will require active participation and commitment from all levels of the system. Each entity has an important and critical role to play. Ongoing monitoring, data collecting, reviewing, adjusting, and enhancing aspects of the system will not only ensure sustainability, but also ensure the system is effectively providing opportunities for students to meet expectations and succeed. This section defined what those roles and responsibilities are. The next section will provide aspects of these responsibilities LEAs should consider in developing their own local system.

Establishing LEA and School Processes and Procedures Districts and schools face a number of decisions in establishing an ADC. What follows are considerations and suggestions for successful implementation. They are not meant to be prescriptive, but only a stimulus for helping districts and schools think through what they need to do. The considerations and suggestions are presented for those most directly involved in planning and implementing the ADC. Districts—Planning What group establishes the policies and processes to implement the ADC? District officials will need to establish a group to develop the policies and processes related to the ADC. The Indian and Hispanic Education Acts provide guidance for including these populations. Policies will need to be approved by the district’s school board or the school’s governing council. How does the district communicate the ADC option to students, parents, and the community? The ADC presents an option for fulfilling graduation requirements that is new to the education community. What is the district’s plan for informing the community about this option? How is the ADC likely to be received—positively or negatively or with indifference? The anticipated response should help frame the communications plan. Districts will need to work closely with the PED and the schools in developing a communications plan.

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What technical assistance does the district and schools need in order to implement the ADC? What help do they need (perhaps assistance in identifying eligible students or in developing end of course exams), and where does that help come from? Since the state has major responsibility for designing the ADC process, the NM PED can help the district (see NM PED roles and responsibilities), but the district will have to help their schools. What professional development is necessary for successful implementation of the ADC? The district will need to provide professional development for school personnel although the type and extent will vary by role. Some individuals simply need to be knowledgeable of the policies and procedures while others may need to have more in-depth knowledge to assist the schools in implementation. For example, some individuals will need to know how to identify eligible students and how to determine what end-of-course examination is needed for ADC. The district also has a responsibility for helping schools plan and conduct professional development at the building level. What are some components of the ADC process that districts need to have in place? The district will need to enact a policy on the development of an end-of-course examination as an alternative to completing requirements for graduation. The policy should cite the governing statutes and rules along with local provisions related to development of the end-of-course examination, assistance provided, timeline, and other factors. Districts should determine a process for identifying students eligible for the ADC, orienting them to the process, and providing guidance and assistance as the student develops goals to meet graduation requirements. A key issue is equity: ensuring that all students have an equitable opportunity to be successful in pursuing the ADC. How are students prepared for the ADC? Students that are on the pathway for needing the ADC should have an educational plan/SAT in place. These students should also receive the necessary intervention courses/tutoring (which ever the district offers) to help them become/remain on track and successful. Review of student progress should be completed per grading period.

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Districts—Implementation What does a district have to do after implementation of the ADC starts? The district’s main function is one of monitoring—making sure that the policies and procedures of the ADC are implemented with quality, fidelity, consistency, and accountability within all of the schools in the district. Districts correct any deficiencies they find. Such review is conducted annually. What records should a district keep? Districts need to keep accurate data on the number of students submitting a request for an ADC, completion rates by type, and time required for completion. ADC data must be maintained for individual students through use of the unique STARS IDs. Data should be broken down by race/ethnicity, gender, ELL status, and other relevant factors. Schools—Planning What is the relationship between the district’s responsibilities and those of the school? The school’s responsibility is to implement the ADC policies and procedures that the state and district have established. Examples include appointing a coordinator or committee responsible for school-based implementation and developing support structures such as mentors, teachers, counselors, or others who can assist students. The school is also responsible for making sure that staff, students, and parents know that the state allows districts to define an appeals process and how students access that process. What professional development is needed at the school level? Some measure of professional development will be necessary for all staff members to speak knowledgeably regarding the ADC and additional training for those working directly with students opting for the ADC. Helping a student select the best option requires a detailed understanding of the options available along with an understanding of the knowledge and skills of the particular student.

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Schools—Implementation What does the school have to do once implementation begins? The principal and school coordinator or committee ensures successful implementation of the ADC by oversight and monitoring of students’ use of the alternative options. They are alert to any problems that may develop (lack of adherence to state or district policies and processes or students not submitting their own work) and take corrective actions. What data should a school keep? A school needs to keep accurate data on the number of students submitting a request for an ADC, completion rates by type, and time required for completion Data should be disaggregated by race/ethnicity, gender, ELL status, and other relevant factors. Data are to be reported to the district and also to the community and may be done so via an electronic format such as the internet. Counselors, Teachers, Mentors, Coaches, and Parents—Implementation What do those working most closely with students selecting an ADC need to know and do? Here is a list of what those helping students should keep in mind: What alternative approach is best for a student? Those closest to students need to help students select what is likely to be the best option for them. To make this determination, those advising the student need to determine as closely as possible the probability of the student passing any particular option. They also need to know the standards and benchmarks of each core content area. Is the student focused on meeting the standards that he or she failed to meet on the SBA/HSGA? To meet the requirements of the ADC, the student must demonstrate mastery of the content and standards equivalent to those missed on the state assessment. In demonstrating competency, the student may also show mastery of other areas, but the review process will not assess these. Since the option to pursue an ADC is open only to students who fail to pass the SBA, how do we avoid having the ADC being seen as a “side door” to a diploma? The state addresses this as follows: Ensuring the ADC is clearly aligned with the NM standards and is comparable in rigor Maintaining a high standard of performance and evidence of proficiency in order “to pass” Establishing a clear and coherent scoring rubric Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 19


Ensuring end-of-course examinations are administered in a manner similar to the SBA Will there be an appeal processes? Districts will determine the appeals process. Students may only submit an appeal if they believe that the scoring was done incorrectly or that the ADC administrative processes were followed incorrectly.

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APPENDICES

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Appendix A Components of Demonstration of Competency Assessment Graduation Requirements for all Subjects and the Alternative Demonstration of Competency Class of: In Year: 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Notes: H1 8th 7th 6th 5th 4th 1) The graduating class of 2011 is the last class to use the NMHSCE. This 2008 2011 class can use this exam until 2016. SBA SBA SBA SBA SBA 2) The graduating class of 2012 had no exist exam requirements. H2 H1 8th 7th 6th 5th 3) Students in the graduating class of 2012 graduating after 2012 must 2009 NMHSCE1 adhere to the class of 2013 graduation requirements (see note 6). SBA SBA SBA SBA 4) Students with only one SBA event can retake the math and reading H3 H2 H1 8th 7th 6th SBA, as necessary, if they miss the cut they use the ADC. 2010 NMHSCE 5) The ADC for the class of 2013 (only) is to demonstrate competency by SBA SBA SBA passing the corresponding math and reading course, or the EOC H4 H3 H2 H1 8th 7th 6) Students may use successful performance on a college/career 2011 NMHSCE readiness/placement test, if one exist in the required subject area, to SBA SBA SBA meet the ADC. 7) For math and reading, students must achieve a composite score of H5 H4 H3 H2 H1 8th 2 2273 on the New Mexico Standards Based Assessment (SBA), with 2012 NMHSCE SBA SBA SBA None neither individual score below nearing proficient . 3

2013

H6 NMHSCE

H5

2014

H7 NMHSCE

H6 ADC EOC

2015

H8 NMHSCE

H7 ADC EOC

2016

H9 NMHSCE

2017

H10 N/A

SBA4/ 5,6

H4

H3

SBA/course7 SBA/EOC9 8

H2

10

ADC EOC

ADC EOC

H5

H4

H3

SBA/EOC

SBA/EOC

SBA/EOC

ADC EOC

ADC EOC

H6 ADC EOC

H5 ADC EOC

H8 ADC EOC

H7 ADC EOC

H6 ADC EOC

H5 ADC EOC

H9 ADC EOC

H8 ADC EOC

H7 ADC EOC

H6 ADC EOC

to 2018

to 2019

to 2020

ADC

H1

SBA

H4

SBA/EOC ADC EOC

SBA (New Mexico) Standards Based Assessment NMHSCE New Mexico High School Exit Exam ADC Alternate Demosndtration of Competency EOC End of Course Exam Math and reading composite cut score = 2273 (73). Science cut score = 38.

H2

For Science, students must achieve a score of 38 on the science SBA taken as an H3 student. For Social Studies and Writing, students demonstrate competency by passing the appropriate English and U.S. History course.

SBA/EOC 8) Students must pass the corresponding course, or its EOC. Applicable courses : Math -Algebra II, Integrated Math 3, or equivalent; Reading/Writing - English 3 or equivalent; Science H3 PARCC Biology, Chemistry; Social Studies - U.S. History. 9) For Math and reading, students must achieve a composite score of 2273 on the New Mexico SBA, with neither individual score result H4 ADC EOC below nearing proficient . For Science, students must achieve a score of 38 on the New Mexico H5 SBA as an H3 student. ADC EOC For Social Studies, students must pass the Social Studies EOC, to 2021 developed by NM teachers, or its equivalent For Writing, students demonstrate competency by passing the writing EOC, developed by NM teachers, or its equivalent 10) Students must pass the corresponding EOC.

EOCs must be associated with the following courses : Math -Algebra II, Integrated Math 3, or equivalent; Reading/Writing - English 3 or equivalent; Science - Biology, Chemistry; Social Studies - U.S. History.

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Appendix B Guidance Memo Secretary-Designate Skandera

STATE OF NEW MEXICO PUBLIC EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 300 DON GASPAR SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 87501-2786 Telephone (505) 827-5800 www.ped.state.nm.us HANNA SKANDERA SECRETARY OF EDUCATION

SUSANA MARTINEZ GOVERNOR

July 1, 2011

MEMORANDUM TO: Superintendents, Charter School Administrators, Directors of State Educational Institutions, BIE School Administrators, and District Test Coordinators FROM:

Hanna Skandera Secretary-designate, Public Education Department

RE:

NEW SBA PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, SCALE, AND DATA

The New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) is implementing new performance standards and a new scale for the 2011 Standards Based Assessment (SBA). New performance standards are necessary because the SBA was modified in 2011 to include more multiple choice items and grade 11 items aligned with updated high school English Language Arts content standards. The new performance standards classify test scores into the four levels of performance already used by the SBA (Beginning Step, Nearing Proficiency, Proficient, and Advanced; please see attached Standards Based Assessment Performance Standards). The same performance standards apply to the English and Spanish language versions of the test. The SBA/High School Graduation Assessment also uses these performance standards. Provisional performance standards were proposed in March by committees of New Mexico teachers in English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Bilingual Education, and Special Education. The committees selected performance standards using a modified bookmark method that rank ordered items by difficulty and specified where in the continuum that Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 23


knowledge was “just enough” to fall into a certain performance level. A panel of teachers, assessment experts, and content specialists adjusted the provisional performance standards in June using data from the 2011 test. The performance standards for Reading and Science are increased modestly under my direction to remain consistent with high standards in other grades and content areas, improve alignment between SBA and NAEP standards, and improve alignment with expectations for college readiness and the Common Core State Standards. These performance standards will be used to measure student progress, guide instruction, and make school, district, and state accountability determinations. Performance standards are located on a vertically moderated scale. The new scale supports comparisons of student progress from grade to grade, just as the former scale did, and it provides significant technical improvements for sophisticated growth models. Scores on the vertically moderated scale range from 0 to 80, and a score of 40 represents Proficient performance. The first digit of a scale score identifies the grade level. For example, scale scores for grade 3 range from 300 to 380 (please see attached SBA Vertically Moderated Scale FAQ). A bridge study will be available on July 1 for converting scores between the vertical scale and vertically moderated scale. Please follow the link to the SBA Bridge Study under “What’s New”: http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AssessmentEvaluation/index.html

We are ready to answer your questions about these changes. Do not hesitate to contact Robert Romero, Acting Director of State Assessments (robert.romero1@state.nm.us or 505.827.6524) or Dr. Tom Dauphinee, Deputy Director of Assessment and Accountability (tom.dauphinee@state.nm.us or 505.827.6528). District SBA data files are available in your secure online Web Application Portal at: https://webapp.ped.state.nm.us . To access your report, log in to SBA and click on REPORTS and RUN using the credentials issued to your SOAP Administrator. If you have technical difficulties accessing the SBA SOAP website or login issues, please contact Jon Firschein at (505) 827-7950.

HS/TD/dt Enclosures (2) cc:

PED Executive Team PED Leadership Team David Abbey, Director, Legislative Finance Committee Frances Ramirez-Maestas, Director, Legislative Education Study Committee Tom Sullivan, Executive Director, NMCSA Joe Guillen, Executive Director, NMSBA STARS Coordinators SOAP Managers

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Appendix C Table 1 presents the current college and career readiness benchmarks used for school grading. In light of the continuing goal of aligning expectations to 21st century skills, cut points are set at the established college and career readiness scores. These scores align expectations for students and schools.

Table 1: ADC Cut Scores—Based on College and Career-Readiness Cut Scores ADC Cut Scores Achieving a “3”on an Advanced Placement (AP) exam (specific to subject required subject). Achieving College Readiness benchmark scores on any of four content areas of the ACT. o English Composition (18) o Social Sciences [Reading] (21) o College Algebra [Mathematics] (22) o Biology [Science] (24) Achieving College Readiness benchmark scores on any of four content areas of the PLAN. o English Composition (15) o Social Sciences [Reading] (17) o College Algebra [Mathematics] (19) o Biology [Science] (21) Achieving College Readiness benchmark scores on any of three content areas of the PSAT. o Reading (50) o Mathematics (50) o Writing (49) Achieving College Readiness benchmark scores on any of three content areas of the SAT. o Reading (450) o Mathematics (450) o Writing (450) Achieving College Readiness benchmark scores on any of four content areas of the Accuplacer. o Reading (85) o Writing (109) o Elementary Algebra (117) o College Mathematics (115) Achieving a College Readiness benchmark score on any of six areas of study from an authorized International Baccalaureate curriculum. o Literature (Language A)(4) o Language B(4) o Individuals & Society(4) o Experimental Science(4) o Mathematics(4) o Arts(4)

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Appendix D Table 2: Roles and Responsibilities of Stakeholders PED

LEA

SCHOOL

STUDENT

Eligibility

Establish eligibility criteria, clarify options, provide SBA scoring ranges

Publicize options, communicate eligibility information and promote ADC as early as 9th grade

Identify eligible students, discuss options and assist them in selecting the best one

Understand eligibility and ADC options and pursue as appropriate

Requirements

Determine expectations, acceptable evidence, review protocols, and timelines; establish clear performance standards; align with Indian Education and Hispanic Education acts

Review guidelines; establish and communicate local policy and implementation procedure

Implement all requirements in accordance with state and district policies

Understand and meet all requirements

Development

Post suggestions and/or tools for districts on the state website

Review statewide tools and ensure access, share exemplars

Help students identify appropriate courses and create a work plan

Select appropriate courses, create a work plan, and perform tasks independently

Support

Ensure development and maintenance, provide training and technical assistance

Assume costs for implementation, publicize available training and resources

Supervise, support, and monitor students; seek assistance as needed

Seek assistance as needed; no cost to students

Management

Suggest needed equipment, facilities, maintenance, and supplies; establish access, storage, submission, and archiving procedure

Secure needed equipment and supplies, ensure access to facilities, follow access and storage procedure

Help students access, organize, manage, and store evidence

Collect, select, and enter evidence

Evaluation

Review district submission of ADC results in STARS; provide necessary feedback and recommendations

Discuss LEA results, suggest improvements, refine processes, submit required data to PED

Discuss results and next steps with students, upgrade supports and systems as necessary

Reflect upon, revise, and resubmit evidence if desired

Accountability

Establish an appeals process, monitor LEA compliance, collect outcome data and report annually, facilitate continuous improvement

Follow state guidelines, provide assistance and professional development, ensure equity and access

Support students, follow state and district guidelines, assist with appeals as warranted

Meet state and district guidelines, request an appeal if warranted

SUSTAIN

IMPLEMENT

PLAN

ADC Elements

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Appendix E Table 3: Supportive Roles and Responsibilities Mentors and Coaches

Parents

Community

Informs students of LEA ADC policy and procedures, including options, components, and requirements

Assists students in planning and development, including consultation, coaching, guidance, support, and resources

Accesses information from LEA/school and student on LEA ADC policy and procedures, options, components, and requirements

Accesses information from LEA/school on LEA ADC policy and procedures, options, components, and requirements

Provides resources to students as needed and/or appropriate to inform their decisions to participate

Provides time and access by meeting regularly with students to monitor progress and provide feedback as appropriate

Assists student in making decisions regarding participation and implementation of ADC

Supports and/or participates in LEA/school implementation efforts as appropriate in accordance with local school board policy

Provides guidance to students in planning and developing ADC, helps students develop a work plan, emphasizes that students do their own work

Coaches students in preparation and delivery of final demonstration of competence, including selfreflection Emphasizes that students do their own work

Supports students as they work on demonstration of competency, monitoring student progress in meeting requirements Emphasizes that students do their own work

Engages in review of ADC implementation results and outcomes based on LEA reporting

Meets regularly with students pursuing ADC to monitor progress

Reviews results with students regarding outcomes

Reviews results with student regarding outcomes; participates in appeals process if warranted; provides input to the system

Provides input to the system as appropriate

Emphasizes that students do their own work

SUSTAIN

IMPLEMENT

PLAN

Counselors and Teachers

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Appendix F Graduation Requirements 22-13-1.1 NMSA 1978. Graduation requirements. A. At the end of grades eight through eleven, each student shall prepare an interim next-step plan that sets forth the coursework for the grades remaining until high school graduation. Each year's plan shall explain any differences from previous interim nextstep plans, shall be filed with the principal of the student's high school and shall be signed by the student, the student's parent and the student's guidance counselor or other school official charged with coursework planning for the student. B. Each student must complete a final next-step plan during the senior year and prior to graduation. The plan shall be filed with the principal of the student's high school and shall be signed by the student, the student's parent and the student's guidance counselor or other school official charged with coursework planning for the student. C. An individualized education program that meets the requirements of Subsections A and B of this section and that meets all applicable transition and procedural requirements of the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for a student with a disability shall satisfy the next-step plan requirements of this section for that student. D. A local school board shall ensure that each high school student has the opportunity to develop a next-step plan based on reports of college and workplace readiness assessments, as available, and other factors and is reasonably informed about: (1) curricular and course options, including honors or advanced placement courses, dual-credit courses, distance learning courses, career clusters, pre-apprenticeship programs or remediation programs that the college and workplace readiness assessments indicate to be appropriate; (2) opportunities available that lead to different post-high-school options; and (3) alternative opportunities available if the student does not finish a planned curriculum. E. The secretary shall: (1) establish specific accountability standards for administrators, counselors, teachers and school district staff to ensure that every student has the opportunity to develop a next-step plan; (2) promulgate rules for accredited private schools in order to ensure substantial compliance with the provisions of this section; (3) monitor compliance with the requirements of this section; and (4) compile such information as is necessary to evaluate the success of next-step plans and report annually, by December 15, to the legislative education study committee and the governor. F. Successful completion of a minimum of twenty-three units aligned to the state academic content and performance standards shall be required for graduation. These units shall be as follows: (1) four units in English, with major emphasis on grammar and literature; (2) three units in mathematics, at least one of which is equivalent to the algebra 1 level or higher; Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 28


(3) two units in science, one of which shall have a laboratory component; provided, however, that with students entering the ninth grade beginning in the 20052006 school year, three units in science shall be required, one of which shall have a laboratory component; (4) three units in social science, which shall include United States history and geography, world history and geography and government and economics; (5) one unit in physical education; (6) one unit in communication skills or business education, with a major emphasis on writing and speaking and that may include a language other than English; (7) one-half unit in New Mexico history for students entering the ninth grade beginning in the 2005-2006 school year; and (8) nine elective units and seven and one-half elective units for students entering the ninth grade in the 2005-2006 school year that meet department content and performance standards. Student service learning shall be offered as an elective. Financial literacy shall be offered as an elective. Pre-apprenticeship programs may be offered as electives. Media literacy may be offered as an elective. G. For students entering the ninth grade beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, at least one of the units required for graduation shall be earned as an advanced placement or honors course, a dual-credit course offered in cooperation with an institution of higher education or a distance learning course. H. The department shall establish a procedure for students to be awarded credit through completion of specified career technical education courses for certain graduation requirements. I. Successful completion of the requirements of the New Mexico diploma of excellence shall be required for graduation for students entering the ninth grade beginning in the 2009-2010 school year. Successful completion of a minimum of twenty-four units aligned to the state academic content and performance standards shall be required to earn a New Mexico diploma of excellence. These units shall be as follows: (1) four units in English, with major emphasis on grammar, nonfiction writing and literature; (2) four units in mathematics, of which one shall be the equivalent to or higher than the level of algebra 2, unless the parent submitted written, signed permission for the student to complete a lesser mathematics unit; (3) three units in science, two of which shall have a laboratory component; (4) three and one-half units in social science, which shall include United States history and geography, world history and geography and government and economics, and one-half unit of New Mexico history; (5) one unit in physical education; (6) one unit in one of the following: a career cluster course, workplace readiness or a language other than English; and (7) seven and one-half elective units that meet department content and performance standards. Student service learning shall be offered as an elective. Financial literacy shall be offered as an elective. Pre-apprenticeship programs may be offered as electives. Media literacy may be offered as an elective.

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J. For students entering the eighth grade in the 2012-2013 school year, a course in health education is required prior to graduation. Health education may be required in either middle school or high school, as determined by the school district. Each school district shall submit to the department by the beginning of the 2011-2012 school year a health education implementation plan for the 2012-2013 and subsequent school years, including in which grade health education will be required and how the course aligns with department content and performance standards. K. Final examinations shall be administered to all students in all classes offered for credit. L. Until July 1, 2010, a student who has not passed a state graduation examination in the subject areas of reading, English, mathematics, writing, science and social science shall not receive a high school diploma. The state graduation examination on social science shall include a section on the constitution of the United States and the constitution of New Mexico. If a student exits from the school system at the end of grade twelve without having passed a state graduation examination, the student shall receive an appropriate state certificate indicating the number of credits earned and the grade completed. If within five years after a student exits from the school system the student takes and passes the state graduation examination, the student may receive a high school diploma. Any student passing the state graduation examination and completing all other requirements within five years of entering ninth grade, including a final summer session if completed by August 1, may be counted by the school system in which the student is enrolled as a high school graduate for the year in which completion and examination occur. M. Beginning with the 2010-2011 school year, a student shall not receive a New Mexico diploma of excellence if the student has not demonstrated competence in the subject areas of mathematics, reading and language arts, writing, social studies and science, including a section on the constitution of the United States and the constitution of New Mexico, based on a standards-based assessment or assessments or a portfolio of standards-based indicators established by the department by rule. The standardsbased assessments required in Section 22-2C-4 NMSA 1978 may also serve as the assessment required for high school graduation. If a student exits from the school system at the end of grade twelve without having satisfied the requirements of this subsection, the student shall receive an appropriate state certificate indicating the number of credits earned and the grade completed. If within five years after a student exits from the school system the student satisfies the requirement of this subsection, the student may receive a New Mexico diploma of excellence. Any student satisfying the requirements of this subsection and completing all other requirements within five years of entering ninth grade, including a final summer session if completed by August 1, may be counted by the school system in which the student is enrolled as a high school graduate for the year in which all requirements are satisfied. N. As used in this section: (1) "final next-step plan" means a next-step plan that shows that the student has committed or intends to commit in the near future to a four-year college or university, a two-year college, a trade or vocational program, an internship or apprenticeship, military service or a job; Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 30


(2) "interim next-step plan" means an annual next-step plan in which the student specifies post-high-school goals and sets forth the coursework that will allow the student to achieve those goals; and (3) "next-step plan" means an annual personal written plan of studies developed by a student in a public school or other state-supported school or institution in consultation with the student's parent and school counselor or other school official charged with coursework planning for the student that includes one or more of the following: (a) advanced placement or honors courses; (b) dual-credit courses offered in cooperation with an institution of higher education; (c) distance learning courses; (d) career-technical courses; and (e) pre-apprenticeship programs. O. The secretary may establish a policy to provide for administrative interpretations to clarify curricular and testing provisions of the Public School Code [22-1-1 NMSA 1978]. History: 1978 Comp., § 22-2-8.4, enacted by Laws 1986, ch. 33, § 5; 1987, ch. 320, § 2; 1988, ch. 105, § 2; 1989, ch. 220, § 1; 1990 (1st S.S.), ch. 3, § 3; 1993, ch. 68, § 3; 1993, ch. 92, § 1; 1993, ch. 226, § 7; 1993, ch. 230, § 1; 1995, ch. 174, § 1; 1995, ch. 180, § 1; 1997, ch. 234, § 2; 2001, ch. 257, § 1; 2001, ch. 276, § 1; recompiled and amended as 1978 Comp., § 22-13-1.1 by Laws 2003, ch. 153, § 58; 2004, ch. 29, § 1; 2005, ch. 314, § 1; 2005, ch. 315, § 10; 2007, ch. 305, § 1; 2007, ch. 307, § 8; 2007, ch. 308, § 8; 2008, ch. 21, § 2; 2009, ch. 256, § 1; 2009, ch. 267, § 2; 2009, ch. 268, § 1; 2010, ch. 25, § 1; 2010, ch. 110, § 1.

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Appendix G Indian Education Act from NMSA 1978 22-23A-1. Short title. Chapter 22, Article 23A NMSA 1978 may be cited as the "Indian Education Act". History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 1; 2005, ch. 299, § 1. 22-23A-2. Purpose of act. The purpose of the Indian Education Act is to: A. ensure equitable and culturally relevant learning environments, educational opportunities and culturally relevant instructional materials for American Indian students enrolled in public schools; B. ensure maintenance of native languages; C. provide for the study, development and implementation of educational systems that positively affect the educational success of American Indian students; D. ensure that the department of education partners with tribes to increase tribal involvement and control over schools and the education of students located in tribal communities; E. encourage cooperation among the educational leadership of Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and the Navajo Nation to address the unique issues of educating students in Navajo communities that arise due to the location of the Navajo Nation in those states; F. provide the means for a formal government-to-government relationship between the state and New Mexico tribes and the development of relationships with the education division of the bureau of Indian affairs and other entities that serve American Indian students; G. provide the means for a relationship between the state and urban American Indian community members to participate in initiatives and educational decisions related to American Indian students residing in urban areas; H. ensure that parents; tribal departments of education; community-based organizations; the department of education; universities; and tribal, state and local policymakers work together to find ways to improve educational opportunities for American Indian students; I. ensure that tribes are notified of all curricula development for their approval and support; J. encourage an agreement regarding the alignment of the bureau of Indian affairs and state assessment programs so that comparable information is provided to parents and tribes; and K. encourage and foster parental involvement in the education of Indian students. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 2. 22-23A-3. Definitions. As used in the Indian Education Act: A. "assistant secretary" means the assistant secretary for Indian education; B. "government-to-government" means the relationship between a New Mexico tribe and a state government; C. "indigenous" means native or tribal groups of the Americas that maintain a cultural identity separate from the surrounding dominant cultures; D. "tribal" means pertaining to urban Indians who are residents of New Mexico or to an Indian nation, tribe or pueblo located within New Mexico; E. "New Mexico tribe" means an Indian nation, tribe or pueblo located within New Mexico; and F. "urban Indian" means a member of a federally recognized tribe or an Alaskan native who lives in an off-reservation urban area and is a New Mexico resident. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 3; 2007, ch. 295, § 2; 2007, ch. 296, § 2. Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 32


22-23A-4. Rulemaking. A. The secretary shall ensure that the duties prescribed in the Indian Education Act are carried out and that each division within the department is collaborating to fulfill its responsibilities to tribal students. B. The secretary shall consult on proposed rules implementing the Indian Education Act with the Indian education advisory council and shall present rules for review and comment at the next semiannual government-to-government meeting pursuant to Section 22-23A-5 NMSA 1978. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 4; 2007, ch. 295, § 3; 2007, ch. 296, § 3. 22-23A-4.1. Post-secondary education. The department shall collaborate and coordinate efforts with the higher education department and institutions of higher education, including tribal colleges and teacher education institutions and tribal education departments, to facilitate the successful and seamless transition of American Indian students into post-secondary education and training. History: Laws 2007, ch. 295, § 1; 2007, ch. 296, § 1. 22-23A-5. Indian education division; created; assistant secretary; duties. A. The "Indian education division" is created within the department. The secretary shall appoint an assistant secretary for Indian education, who shall direct the activities of the division and advise the secretary on development of policy regarding the education of tribal students. The assistant secretary shall also coordinate transition efforts for tribal students in public schools with the higher education department and work to expand appropriate Indian education for tribal students in preschool through grade twenty. B. The assistant secretary shall coordinate with appropriate administrators and divisions to ensure that department administrators make implementation of the Indian Education Act a priority. C. The secretary and the assistant secretary, in cooperation with the Indian education advisory council, shall collaborate with state and federal departments and agencies and tribal governments to identify ways such entities can assist the department in the implementation of the Indian Education Act. D. The secretary and assistant secretary shall convene semiannual government-togovernment meetings for the express purpose of receiving input on education of tribal students. E. In accordance with the rules of the department and after consulting with the Indian education advisory council and determining the resources available within the department, the assistant secretary shall: (1) provide assistance, including advice on allocation of resources, to school districts and tribes to improve services to meet the educational needs of tribal students based on current published indigenous best practices in education; (2) provide assistance to school districts and New Mexico tribes in the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of curricula in native languages, culture and history designed for tribal and nontribal students as approved by New Mexico tribes; (3) develop or select for implementation a challenging, sequential, culturally relevant curriculum to provide instruction to tribal students in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade to prepare them for pre-advanced placement and advanced placement coursework in grades seven through twelve;

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(4) provide assistance to school districts, public post-secondary schools and New Mexico tribes to develop curricula and instructional materials in native languages, culture and history in conjunction and by contract with native language practitioners and tribal elders, unless the use of written language is expressly prohibited by the tribe; (5) conduct indigenous research and evaluation for effective curricula for tribal students; (6) collaborate with the department to provide distance learning for tribal students in public schools to the maximum limits of the department's abilities; (7) establish, support and maintain an Indian education advisory council; (8) enter into agreements with each New Mexico tribe or its authorized educational entity to share programmatic information and to coordinate technical assistance for public schools that serve tribal students; (9) seek funds to establish and maintain an Indian education office in the northwest corner of the state or other geographical location to implement agreements with each New Mexico tribe or its authorized educational entity, monitor the progress of tribal students and coordinate technical assistance at the public pre-kindergarten to postsecondary schools that serve tribal students; (10) require school districts to obtain a signature of approval by the New Mexico tribal governments or their government designees residing within school district boundaries, verifying that the New Mexico tribes agree to Indian education policies and procedures pursuant to federal requirements; (11) seek funds to establish, develop and implement culturally relevant support services for the purposes of increasing the number of tribal teachers, administrators and principals and providing continued professional development for educational assistants, teachers and principals serving tribal students, in conjunction with the Indian education advisory council: (a) recruitment and retention of highly qualified teachers and administrators; (b) academic transition programs; (c) academic financial support; (d) teacher preparation; (e) teacher induction; and (f) professional development; (12) develop curricula to provide instruction in tribal history and government and develop plans to implement these subjects into history and government courses in school districts throughout the state; (13) ensure that native language bilingual programs are part of a school district's professional development plan, as provided in Section 22-10A-19.1 NMSA 1978; and (14) develop a plan to establish a post-secondary investment system for tribal students to which parents, tribes and the state may contribute. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 5; 2005, ch. 299, § 2; 2007, ch. 295, § 4; 2007, ch. 296, § 4. 22-23A-6. Advisory council. A. The "Indian education advisory council" is created and shall advise the secretary and assistant secretary on implementation of the provisions of the Indian Education Act. The council consists of sixteen members as follows: (1) four representatives from the Navajo Nation; (2) two representatives, one from the Mescalero Apache Tribe and one from the Jicarilla Apache Nation; (3) four representatives, two from the southern pueblos and two from the northern pueblos; Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 34


(4) three urban Indians representing urban areas, including Albuquerque, Gallup and Farmington; and (5) three at-large representatives, one from the federal bureau of Indian affairs, one from a head start organization and one from the general public, at least one of whom shall be nontribal, but all of whom shall have knowledge of and involvement in the education of tribal students. B. Members shall be appointed by the secretary with input from New Mexico tribes and organizations involved in the education of tribal students for staggered terms so that the terms of the at-large members and of one-half of each of the tribal representatives end on December 31, 2009 and the terms of the remaining members end on December 31, 2011. Thereafter, appointments shall be for terms of four years. The terms of existing members shall expire on the effective date of this 2007 act. C. A majority of the members of the Indian education advisory council constitutes a quorum. The advisory council shall elect a chair from its membership. D. On a semiannual basis, representatives from all New Mexico tribes, members of the commission, the office of the governor, the Indian affairs department, the legislature, the secretary, the assistant secretary and the Indian education advisory council shall meet to assist in evaluating, consolidating and coordinating all activities relating to the education of tribal students. E. Members of the Indian education advisory council may receive per diem and mileage as provided for nonsalaried public officers in the Per Diem and Mileage Act [10-8-1 NMSA 1978]. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 6; 2007, ch. 295, § 5; 2007, ch. 296, § 5. 22-23A-7. Report. A. The Indian education division in collaboration with the education division of the federal bureau of Indian affairs and other entities that serve tribal students shall submit an annual statewide tribal education status report no later than November 15 to all New Mexico tribes. The division shall submit the report whether or not entities outside state government collaborate as requested. B. A school district with tribal lands located within its boundaries shall provide a districtwide tribal education status report to all New Mexico tribes represented within the school district boundaries. C. The status reports shall be written in a brief format and shall include the following information, through which public school performance is measured and reported to the tribes and disseminated at the semiannual government-to-government meetings held pursuant to Section 22-23A-5 NMSA 1978: (1) student achievement as measured by a statewide test approved by the department, with results disaggregated by ethnicity; (2) school safety; (3) the graduation rate; (4) attendance; (5) parent and community involvement; (6) educational programs targeting tribal students; (7) financial reports; (8) current status of federal Indian education policies and procedures; (9) school district initiatives to decrease the number of student dropouts and increase attendance; (10) public school use of variable school calendars; (11) school district consultations with district Indian education committees, school-site parent advisory councils and tribal, municipal and Indian organizations; and Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 35


(12) indigenous research and evaluation measures and results for effective curricula for tribal students. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 7; 2007, ch. 295, § 6; 2007, ch. 296, § 6. 22-23A-8. Fund created. A. The "Indian education fund" is created in the state treasury. The fund consists of appropriations, gifts, grants and donations and income from investment of the fund. Money in the fund shall not revert. The fund shall be administered by the department, and money in the fund is appropriated to the department to distribute awards to support the Indian Education Act. B. The department shall ensure that funds appropriated from the Indian education fund shall be used for the purposes stated in the Indian Education Act and shall not be used to correct for previous reductions of program services. C. The department shall develop procedures and rules for the award of money from the fund. Disbursement of the fund shall be made by warrant of the department of finance and administration pursuant to vouchers signed by the secretary of public education. History: Laws 2003, ch. 151, § 8; 2007, ch. 295, § 7; 2007, ch. 296, § 7.

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Appendix H Hispanic Education Act from NMSA 1978 22-23B-1. Short title. This act [Chapter 22, Article 23B NMSA 1978] may be cited as the "Hispanic Education Act". History: Laws 2010, ch. 108, § 1 and Laws 2010, ch. 114, § 1. 22-23B-2. Purpose. The purpose of the Hispanic Education Act is to: A. provide for the study, development and implementation of educational systems that affect the educational success of Hispanic students to close the achievement gap and increase graduation rates; B. encourage and foster parental involvement in the education of their children; and C. provide mechanisms for parents, community and business organizations, public schools, school districts, charter schools, public post-secondary educational institutions, the department and state and local policymakers to work together to improve educational opportunities for Hispanic students for the purpose of closing the achievement gap, increasing graduation rates and increasing post-secondary enrollment, retention and completion. History: Laws 2010, ch. 108, § 2 and Laws 2010, ch. 114, § 2. 22-23B-3. Definition. As used in the Hispanic Education Act, "liaison" means the Hispanic education liaison." History: Laws 2010, ch. 108, § 3 and Laws 2010, ch. 114, § 3. 22-23B-4. Hispanic education liaison; created; duties. A. The "Hispanic education liaison" is created in the department. B. The liaison shall: (1) focus on issues related to Hispanic education and advise the secretary on the development and implementation of policy regarding the education of Hispanic students; (2) advise the department and the commission on the development and implementation of the five-year strategic plan for public elementary and secondary education in the state as the plan relates to Hispanic student education; (3) assist and be assisted by other staff in the department to improve elementary, secondary and post-secondary educational outcomes for Hispanic students; (4) serve as a resource to enable school districts and charter schools to provide equitable and culturally relevant learning environments, educational opportunities and culturally relevant instructional materials for Hispanic students enrolled in public schools; (5) support and consult with the Hispanic education advisory council; and (6) support school districts and charter schools to recruit parents on site-based and school district committees that represent the ethnic diversity of the community. History: Laws 2010, ch. 108, § 4 and Laws 2010, ch. 114, § 4. 22-23B-5. Hispanic education advisory council. A. The "Hispanic education advisory council" is created as an advisory council to the secretary. The council shall advise the secretary on matters related to improving public school education for Hispanic students, increasing parent involvement and community engagement in the education of Hispanic students and increasing the number of Hispanic high school graduates who succeed in post-secondary academic, professional or vocational education. Guidance Document ADC – 2012 Page | 37


B. The secretary shall appoint no more than twenty-three members to the council who are knowledgeable about and interested in the education of Hispanic students, including representatives of public schools; post-secondary education and teacher preparation programs; parents; Hispanic cultural, community and business organizations; other community and business organizations; and other interested persons. The secretary shall give due regard to geographic representation. Members shall serve at the pleasure of the secretary. C. The council shall elect a chairperson and such other officers as it deems necessary. D. The council shall meet as necessary, but at least twice each year. E. The council shall advise the secretary on matters related to Hispanic education in New Mexico. F. Members of the council shall not receive per diem and mileage or other compensation for their services. History: Laws 2010, ch. 108, § 5 and Laws 2010, ch. 114, § 5.

22-23B-6. Statewide status report. A. The department, in collaboration with the higher education department, shall submit an annual preschool through post-secondary statewide Hispanic education status report no later than November 15 to the governor and the legislature through the legislative education study committee. A copy shall be provided to the legislative library in the legislative council service. B. The status report shall include the following information, by school district, by charter school and statewide, which may be compiled from data otherwise required to be submitted to the department: (1) Hispanic student achievement at all grades; (2) attendance for all grades; (3) the graduation rates for Hispanic students; (4) the number of Hispanic students in schools that make adequate yearly progress and in schools at each level of school improvement or restructuring; and (5) the number and type of bilingual and multicultural programs in each school district and charter school. C. The status report shall include the following information, by post-secondary educational institution, which may be compiled from data otherwise required to be submitted to the higher education department: (1) Hispanic student enrollment; (2) Hispanic student retention; and (3) Hispanic student completion rates. History: Laws 2010, ch. 108, § 6 and Laws 2010, ch. 114, § 6.

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Appendix I Public Education Rule at 6.19.7.1 NMAC The Public Education Department is amending state rule at 6.19.7.1 NMAC. In the coming weeks, a draft amended rule will be released for 30 days of public written comment. Additionally, a public hearing will be held to accept verbal feedback, as well.

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Appendix J 9/9/2011

Graduation Requirements What New Mexico Students Must Take and Pass in Order to Graduate Freshman 2008–2009 Graduating Class of 2012

Freshman 2009–2010 Graduating Class of 2013

Freshman 2010–2011 Graduating Class of 2014

F-2011–2012 & 2012– 2013 G-Classes of 2015 & 2016

Freshman 2013–2014 Graduating Class of 2017

23 units to include: 4 units English 3 units math (one unit = or > than algebra 1) 3 units science (1 w/lab) 3 units social science, including United States history and geography, world history and geography, and government and economics .5 unit New Mexico history 1 unit physical education 1 unit communication skills or business education or language other than English 7.5 units electives

24 units to include: 4 units English 4 units math (one unit = or > than algebra 2) 3 units science (2 w/lab) 3.5 units social science, including United States history and geography, world history and geography, and government and economics, and .5 unit New Mexico history 1 unit physical education 1 unit career cluster, workplace readiness or language other than English 7.5 units electives

24 units to include: 4 units English 4 units math (one unit = or > than algebra 2) 3 units science (2 w/lab) 3.5 units social science, including United States history and geography, world history and geography, and government and economics, and .5 unit New Mexico history 1 unit physical education 1 unit career cluster, workplace readiness or language other than English 7.5 units electives

24 units to include: 4 units English 4 units math (one unit = or > than algebra 2) 3 units science (2 w/lab) 3.5 units social science, including United States history and geography, world history and geography and government and economics, and .5 unit New Mexico history 1 unit physical education 1 unit career cluster, workplace readiness or language other than English 7.5 units electives

For NM Diploma, must meet threshold for high school exit on 11th grade SBA or demonstrate competence through portfolio of standardsbased indicators

One of the above units must be honors, Advanced Placement, dual credit, or distance learning.

One of the above units must be honors, Advanced Placement, dual credit, or distance learning.

24.5 or 25 units to include: 4 units English 4 units math (one unit = or > than algebra 2) 3 units science (2 w/lab) 3.5 units social science, including United States history and geography, world history and geography and government and economics, and .5 unit New Mexico history 1 unit physical education 1 unit career cluster, workplace readiness, or language other than English .5 or 1 unit of health education* (may be taken in middle school) 7.5 units electives

SB 360 (2010) suspends the requirement for students to pass a high school exit exam for graduation in 2012.

To graduate, a student must meet the cut score for high school graduation assessment on 11th grade SBA or use a portfolio Alternative demonstration of competency.

To graduate, a student must meet the cut score for high school graduation assessment on 11th grade SBA or use a portfolio Alternative demonstration of competency.

One of the above units must be honors, Advanced Placement, dual credit, or distance learning. To graduate, a student must meet the cut score for high school graduation assessment on 11th grade SBA or use a portfolio Alternative demonstration of competency.

One of the above units must be honors, Advanced Placement, dual credit, or distance learning. To graduate, a student must meet the cut score for high school graduation assessment on 11th grade SBA or use a portfolio Alternative demonstration of competency. * Note for future classes: For students entering the eighth grade in the 2012–13 school year, a course in health education is required.

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9/9/2011

What Districts and State Charter Schools in New Mexico Must/May Offer Classes required for districts to offer (each year) as elective classes

Other offerings required for districts to offer

Driver Education* Financial Literacy as an elective* Student Service Learning

At least one Honors or similar academically rigorous class each in Mathematics and Language Arts** A program of courses for Dual Credit, in cooperation with an institution of higher education A program of distance learning courses* At least 2 years of a language other than English*

Classes that may be offered as elective classes

PreApprenticeship Programs Media Literacy* (STARS 0805)

Class that may be offered as a Mathematics requirement

Financial Literacy as a high school mathematics requirement (STARS 2097) o Financial Literacy may also be taken as a social studies class (STARS 2797) o Financial Literacy may also be taken as a Family and Consumer Science class (STARS 0517)

Health Education is required prior to graduation for students entering the 8th grade in the 2012-2013 Health Education may be required in either middle school or high school, as determined by the school district. Each school district shall submit to the department by the beginning of the 2011–2012 school year a Health Education implementation plan for the 2012– 2013 and subsequent school years; and, include in which grade Health Education will be required and how the course aligns with department content and performance standards.

*Districts may offer these courses through IDEAL-NM. **Districts may offer AP Calculus and Honors English 2 through IDEAL-NM.

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Appendix K Glossary and Acronyms Definitions are located throughout Appendices F–I. The ACT® test is a curriculum-based and standards-based educational and career planning tool that assesses students' academic readiness for college. Accuplacer A suite of tests that quickly, accurately, and efficiently, assess reading, writing, math, and computer skills. ADC Alternative Demonstration of Competency ELL English Language Learners EPSS Educational Plan for Student Success ESEA Elementary and Secondary Education Act HSGA High School Graduation Assessment IB International Baccalaureate NM New Mexico NMSQT National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test PED Public Education Department PLAN Taking PLAN® as a 10th grader is a great way to prepare for the ACT. PLAN includes four multiple-choice tests: English, Math, Reading, and Science. PSAT Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test SAT Scholastic Assessment Test (formerly Scholastic Aptitude Test) The SAT helps college admissions officers make fair and informed admission decisions. SBA New Mexico’s Standards Based Assessment STARS Student Teacher Accountability Reporting System STARS IDs Student Teacher Accountability Reporting System Identification Number ACT

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2012 Guidance Document  

2012 Guidance Document for the Implementation of the New Mexico Alternative Demonstration of Competency (ADC)