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2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

Rights, Responsibilities, and Resilience: An International Discourse on Indigenous Peoples’ Jurisprudence Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples • P.O. Box 4569 Arcata, CA 95518 • 7genfund.org


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Report Acknowledgments The outstanding Ajachmem/ Tongva/Raramuri artist L. Frank Manriquez created the image on the front cover which was also the logo for the World Indigenous Law

Conference. It represents the Ajachmem and Tongva Indigenous Nations on which the 2016 WILC took place. It includes signiďŹ cant elements and symbology of those Peoples. The star is part of the Ajachmem belief system and the bear embodies the strong medicine of the Tongva. The Eagle feather indicates that we speak the truth between us. We are grateful to Dr. Laura Grenfell, Associate Professor in Law and Associate Dean (Diversity and Inclusion) and the Adelaide University in South Australia for permission to use workshop descriptions and student quotes from their report on the Conference.

Artist L. Frank Manriquez

Report photo credits: Unless otherwise noted, all photos in the report were taken by Ty Harris, Conor Handley and Victoria Gemmill. Report compiled and edited by Ravi Khanna, Philanthropy for Change. Design by Nick Thorkelson.


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Table of Contents Letter from the Directors

2

Introduction

3

Program & Workshops Opening: Wednesday October 19, 2016 Day Two: Thursday October 20, 2016 Day Three: Friday, October 21, 2016 Day Four: Saturday, October 22, 2016 Concurrent Sessions

4 6 10 20 23

Cultural Offerings Tawera Tahuri, Te Hurutea Tahuri, and Johanna Loyd Ancestral Guard Danza Azteca Anahuacalmecac

7 18 19

Keynote Presentations Sandra Creamer Margaret Lokawua Naomi Lanoi Leleto

8 12 14

Reflections Honorable Deborah Sanchez Oren Lyons Abby Abinanti Tamara Starblanket – Spiderwoman Walter Echo-Hawk Reflections by Cassie Reflections by Javina Warkill Torres Torres and Luis Macas Cañar Teen Court

5 6 10 11 20 21 22 25 26

Participants Speakers, Presenters and Visual and Performing Artists Co-Sponsors, Convening Partners, Host Committee Members Acknowledgments & Special Thanks Seventh Generation Fund Board and Staff About the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples

28 29 31 32 33

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

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Letter from the Directors Warm greetings, friends! On behalf of our Board of Directors and the committed staff of the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples, we are honored to share this report highlighting the 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference which took place on the traditional territories of the Tongva and Acjachemen Nations. Along with other Indigenous and non-Indigenous ally organizations, the 2016 conference featured programs and keynote speakers dedicated to the theme of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, Responsibilities and Resilience. We extend our sincere appreciation and thanks to the convening partners, co-sponsors, host committee, and the many accomplished participants who made significant contributions to this incredible conference. We especially recognize the vision of the keynote presenters, session panelists, and cultural performers throughout, who exemplified the theme of this conference so well. The first World Indigenous Legal Conference was coordinated in 2012 by Māori lawyers of the Te Hunga Rōia Māori o Aotearoa in Hamilton, New Zealand. Organized now every two years,

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2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

the second was coordinated by the Indigenous Law Association of Queensland in 2014 and held at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. This year’s conference included the participation from Indigenous attorneys, judges, traditional lawkeepers, and students. Overall, the 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference had over 225 participants from regions including Canada, Columbia, Ecuador, Uganda, United States, Kenya, New Zealand, Australia, and Japan. Over 60 of these participants were students. Our keynote and panel discussions included presenters from each of these regions, including the many diverse Indigenous Nations within. The following publication provides an overview of the 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference and features excerpts from presentations and personal vignettes highlighting their experiences at this world event. Thank you for this opportunity to share this report. All Our Relations, Christopher H. Peters President & CEO Tia Oros Peters Executive Director


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Introduction T

he third World Indigenous Law Conference was hosted by the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples and held on the Traditional Territories of the Tongva and Acjachemen Peoples in Southern California at the Beckman Center of the National Academies of Science & Engineering in Irvine. The conference brought together over 200 delegates from the legal practice, academic community, government organizations, and a diverse range of Indigenous Peoples from the United States of America, Australia, Africa, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, New Zealand, and Canada. Te Hunga Roia Māori o Aotearoa (The Māori Law Society) hosted the first World Indigenous Law Conference from September 5 – 9, 2012 at the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand. The theme of the Conference was “Law as a Tool for Indigenous People’s Development: Worldwide Strategies and International Perspectives.” The second conference was hosted by the Indigenous Lawyers Association of Queensland Inc., June 24 – 27, 2014 at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Gardens Point Campus, Australia. The theme of the Conference was

“Remembering the Past and Looking to the Future.” The conference is an important worldwide event for Indigenous Lawyers, community people, and academics and others interested in understanding the legal issues that affect Indigenous Peoples. The theme for this third Conference was “Rights, Responsibilities & Resilience: An International Discourse on Indigenous Peoples’ Jurisprudence.” Key elements of this conference included an international discourse on Indigenous Peoples' Jurisprudence: examining legal frameworks and strategies for selfdetermined futures. The international law convening focused on Indigenous Peoples' legal issues, rights, and strategies: Rights of Mother Earth Violence Against Indigenous Women & Children Traditional Knowledge Relationship to Lands & Territories Doctrine of Discovery & Terra Nullius Environment and Climate Change Treaties & Conventions Tribal Jurisdictions and Territorial Integrity Intellectual Property The Conference was attended by renowned legal scholars, lawyers, judges, wisdom keepers, commu-

• • • • • • • • •

nity leaders, traditional artists, cultural performers, educators, activists, and students from Indigenous communities all over the world. Some of the keynote speakers who shared their wisdom included: Abby Abinanti (Yurok), tribal judge and attorney, previously a Superior Court Commissioner for 17 years Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), highly esteemed attorney and renowned author Chase Iron Eyes (Standing Rock Sioux), member of the Standing Rock Nation and founder of Last Real Indians Beverley Jacobs (Mohawk), legal scholar, lawyer, and community leader Dr. Henrietta Mann (Southern Cheyenne), educator, scholar, and spiritual mentor Deborah Sanchez (Chumash/ O’odham), first elected Native American judge to the Superior Court of Los Angeles Naomi Lanoi Leleto (Maasai), human rights advocate A digital version of this report is available to view and download at www.7genfund.org/WILC16Report. The digital version includes additional photos and links to videos.

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Program OPENING: WEDNE SDAY OC TOBER 19, 201 6

Cahuilla Bird Singers Photo by Sandra Creamer

The World Indigenous Law Conference opened with a reception and an exhibit by Zuni artist Edward Wemytewa entitled Sawanikya Tsemakwi: Ts’umme Hon A:hoi’de Ittsu’manna (Our Resilient Spirit and Good Mind: Raising Indigenous Peoples’ Consciousness). The Conference formally began with an opening ceremony led by spiritual leader Adelia Sandoval. Adelia is a cultural leader of the Acjachemen Nation, the Indigenous Peoples of Orange County, California where the Conference took place. She graciously welcomed conference participants to her ancestral lands. Adelia’s welcoming was followed by a traditional performance by

Center: Adelia Sandoval

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2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

the Cahuilla Bird Singers and Dancers. Cahuilla People, first known inhabitants of the Coachella Valley in Southern California, used Bird Songs to pass down their language from generation to generation. The songs also tell the story of the origins of life, which the Cahuilla believe began in the Coachella Valley and surrounding mountains, and their travels in ancient times. They are called bird songs because they tell the stories from a bird’s perspective. Following the cultural performance, conference participants

Acjachemen Delegation


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Seventh Generation Fund Secretary the Honorable Deborah Sanchez (Chumash/ O’odham, North America) entitled Surviving the System: From Survival Mode to Renewal.

IJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJK O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O Honorable Deborah Sanchez O O O O Sanchez’s speech wove together all the conference O O O O themes by discussing survival, conflicting world views, O O O O genocide and renewal. For those who had come from O O outside of North America, she introduced them to the O O O O protests taking place at Standing Rock in North Dakota. O O O Participant Reflection O O O O LJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJN

Seventh Generation Fund President and CEO, Chris Peters

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DAY TWO: THURSDAY OC TOBER 20, 2016

Dr. Henrietta Mann

Oren Lyons

The second day of the Law Conference began with a welcoming by Dr. Henrietta Mann (Southern Cheyenne). Dr. Mann is Board Chairperson of the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples. Cheyenne) in 1991, Rolling Stone Magazine named her as one of the ten leading professors in the nation. In 2016, Dr. Mann became one of the first two Native American educational scholars ever elected to membership in the National Academy of Education. Henrietta is a sought out spiritual mentor and she has prayed at ceremonies ranging from Indigenous gatherings in New Zealand to Ground Zero. Dr. Mann’s welcoming was followed by a keynote address by Oren Lyons (Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan, Onondaga

Council of Chiefs, Haudenosaunee, Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy) and Board Member of the Seventh Generation Fund. Oren has been active in international Indigenous rights and sovereignty issues for over four decades at the United Nations and other international forums. He is a State University of New York (SUNY) distinguished services professor emeritus of the University at Buffalo. He is chair of the board of Plantagon International AB, designed to meet challenges of compounding human population, finite resources and global warming. In his keynote, Lyons spoke about Traditional Native Law: Relationship to Lands and Territories. An International Plenary Panel followed the Keynote by Oren. The forst panelist was Chase Iron Eyes (Dakota, the Great Sioux Nation, North America) Attorney, Coordinator, LRInspire, and Congressional Candidate,

IJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJK Two fundamental tenets of this law are to share what you have and show respect to life, yourself and each other. Language, he said is ‘the soul of a nation’ and there is a responsibility to pass on history and look after nature. For over four decades, Oren Lyons has been active in advocating for Indigenous rights at the United Nations and in other international fora. Oren explained that when he first started working in these international circles forty years ago, it was believed that Indigenous languages and identity would be completely lost but in recent times there has been a resurgence in Indigenous culture, language and rights. Participant Reflection 6

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Chase Iron Eyes speaking about Indigenous Peoples’ rights and water protectors at Standing Rock, North Dakota. Aura Benilda Tegria Cristancho (U’wa Colombia, South America) Ms. Tegria is a lead community legal advisor for the indigenous Colombian U’wa people. She is the first U’wa woman to become a lawyer. Aura spoke about

Amazonian Indigenous Peoples’ struggle to preserve homeland and cultural integrity. The panel was moderated by Tia Oros Peters (Zuni), Executive Director, Seventh Generation Fund. Tia has been engaged in community organizing, and national policy work for social, cultural and environmental justice for nearly three decades. She has extensive experience in international diplomacy including globally advancing the protection of Water as a sacred resource for Indigenous Peoples' cultural and spiritual sustainability, as well as expertise on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. She is also one of the

founding mothers of the Global Indigenous Women’s Caucus for which she has often served as cochair. A second Keynote presentation, following lunch, was by Beverley Jacobs LL.B., LL.M., PhD candidate (Kanienkehaka Mohawk Bear Clan of Haudenosaunee Confederacy) entitled Healthy Lands Equals Healthy Peoples. Beverley lives and practices law in her home community of Six Nations of the Grand River Territory in Southern Ontario. She is in the last stages of completing an interdisciplinary PhD at the University of Calgary that includes Law, Indigenous Holistic Health and Indigenous Research Methodologies. Beverley was President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada from 2004-2009.

Beverley Jacobs 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

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One of the workshops that afternoon was by Sandra Creamer

(Waanyi/Kalkadoon)

LLM,

of

the

Indigenous Law Association of Queensland, Australia. Sandra is an academic and legal officer and has worked in the legal arena for more than 15 years. She also conducted legal information workshops and assisted in cases of racial discrimination and family law. It was during this time that Sandra went to University to get her law degree and to educate Indigenous Peoples on their rights, so that they can learn how to challenge laws and policies affecting their communities. She also believes that it is important to translate the language of law so that Indigenous Peoples can understand it for their benefits. Sandra presented on Indigenous Peoples’ Human Rights, Culture and Empowerment. She spoke of Indigenous Peoples’ traditional knowledge being the core foundation of their culture and it being their preexisting inherent human rights and title. Their rights were not under the creation of Western laws nor at any time were they dependent upon or reliant upon Western law. Intellectual property law was not for a collective group such as Indigenous Peoples; it does not provide or recognize our collective rights, the western intellectual property rights system is for an individual property right, this was designed for commercial and industrial growth. “Even though the laws were not written for us,” she said, “we must challenge the system so that Indigenous Peoples can make an economic gain, ownership and empowerment from their traditional knowledge.”

Sandra Creamer 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

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DAY THREE: FRIDAY, OC TOBER 21, 2016

Brian Monongye

The third day of the Law Conference began with an opening by Brian Monongye (Hopi) Board Member of the Seventh Generation Fund titled Prophecy is Our Law. Brian is from the village of Mungapi, born from the Fire Clan. He is an artist, farmer and active community member. Brian has been engaged in issues affecting his homeland from water to mining. He is currently coordinator for the Native Youth Cultural Exchange, a community based project that helps develop and nurture young Native leaders. The Opening was followed by the Honorable Abby Abinanti (Yurok) Yurok Nation Judge speaking on Yurok Nation Restorative Justice and Tribal Courts. She was the first California tribal woman to be admitted to the California Bar. She was a Superior Court Commissioner in San Francisco for over 17 years where she was assigned to the Unified Family Court. She has been a Yurok Tribal Court Judge since 1997, and was appointed

Chief Judge in 2007, a position she still holds. An International Panel discussion followed the Plenary, participants included: Tamara Starblanket – Spiderwoman (Nehiyaw, Ahtahkakoop Cree Nation, Treaty Six Territory), LLM. Tamara coordinates the Aboriginal Justice Studies Program at the Native Education College in Vancouver. She spoke about Killing the Indian in the Child: Genocide in International Law. And Margaret Lokawua (Karamojong, Uganda, Africa) Expert Member United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (2008-2010), spoke about Indigenous Women and Girls’ Leadership and Well-being in Uganda. Chris Peters (Pohlik-lah/Karuk) President, Seventh Generation Fund, moderated the discussion.

Judge Abby spoke of the history of Indigenous peoples of resolving their own disputes. This Tribal court system brings the values of the village into practice. She spoke of how western systems do not need to be imposed on Indigenous people, stating ‘it’s broken in their world so why should it apply to us?’ Judge Abby said that this Tribal court system has no time frames, just goals that reflect the villages’ values. Judge Abby pointed out how long time lines can be valuable. Judge Abby pointed out that it is important to be open with approaches to the

Abby Abinanti

law and to allow solutions to be offered by an offender. The Western system instead traps and narrows the scope of opportunity for rehabilitation, especially for Indigenous people. Participant Reflection

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Tamara Starblanket in her master of laws dissertation studied the legal question as to whether the Canadian state is culpable for genocide. She examined the residential school system and child welfare systems into present times. Her research shows that the state is culpable and that it violates customary international law on genocide. One of the challenges of proving the crime is the concept of cultural genocide in so far as framing the issue in this manner. States such as Canada, among others, were instrumental in deleting cultural genocide. The issues of cultural genocide were smoke screened under a human rights framework because the concern was that so called 'legitimate efforts of assimilation' might be deemed to be criminal. The delegation of cultural genocide was an attempt to render our

Tamara Starblanket

Nations invisible on our Great Turtle Island and in her view it was an attempt to block any future claims that the Original Nations of this continent might make with respect to our collective experience of colonialism and genocide. Another fundamental challenge in her research is the colonial language that the Original Nations in this Western Hemisphere and globally have been forced to think, speak, and write. Language is fundamental to our colonial experience as has been articulated in Steven Newcomb’s Pagans in the Promised Land on the domination code: “Present-day indigenous nations and peoples of this hemisphere are now compelled to utilize the language and conceptual system of the dominating society as a means of thinking, speaking, and writing about our own existences while challenging certain negative, oppressive, and dominating concepts that have been mentally and, from an Indigenous perspective, illegitimately imposed on our existence.” It was understood that framing the legal issue with euphemisms and rhetoric would be a detriment against our Nations. The so called ‘apology’ by the Canadian state in 2008 refers to words like “abuse, mistreatment and neglect”. In the case of the residential school system Roland Chrisjohn, Michael Maraun, and Sherri Young in the Circle Game term the use of the language in this manner as a “word game” or “rhetoric”. “Neglect” is an understatement of the intent to destroy. “Abuse” is an understatement of torture and starvation and so forth. Words have the ability to conceal our experience as less than genocide. Western scholarship is loaded with dehumanizing classifications against the Original Nations, such as the Nehiyaw (Cree), among many other nations. Words like “tribe, savage and heathen” are an attempt to dehumanize our people and deflect attention away from our identity as Nations. So to address the challenge of the word game and genocide denial, the dissertation developed a model that explains genocide from an Indigenous stand point. The model explains through metaphors a forced indoctrination process through the methods employed by the colonizer to force our children to speak and think and write in the language that was imposed on our existence as the Original Peoples and Nations of our Turtle Island. The truth is necessary to our self-determination and the healing of our Nations. 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

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Genocide is a global issue as is noted by a participant’s reflection on Tamara’s presentation: “I have chosen to reflect and share that the experience of genocide is arguably an experience which my family, if not every First Nation family, has been affected by. The forcible removal of First Nation children from their families with the intent to destroy all forms of culture has affected my connection to culture in many ways. Myself, like many of my family members are unable to speak our native tongue fluently and we have lost traditions which are critical to our identity. It truly saddens me that the divide and conquer mentality is still present in Australia today. One only has to consider the recent deaths in custody, the ongoing removal of children from their families (where the numbers are continuing to rise at alarming rates), the over-incarceration of our community members (also continuing to rise at alarming rates) and the proposed closure of First Nations communities.”

Margaret Lokawua (Karamojong, Uganda, Africa) was an Expert Member United Na tions Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues from 2008 to 2010. She also Served as Director of the Indigenous Women Environmental Conservation Project (WECOP), Chairperson for Civil Society for Indigenous Organization in Karamonja, Indigenous Women and Girls' Leadership and Well-being in Uganda. Margaret represented Uganda Forum at the Indigenous Permanent Forum in UN in New York in 2004; she represented WECOP at the UN for Beijing+10 in 2005. Margaret spoke of Indigenous Women and Girls’ Leadership and Well-being in Uganda. Margaret discussed the role of the international community which she said has increasingly been addressing the socio-economic

marginalization

of

Indigenous

women

through

various

declarations and conventions. Including in the International Labour Organization convention 169, which defined Indigenous Peoples as distinct peoples and emphasized the need to improve their living and working conditions. UN Declaration of Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007 establishes a vital standard Indigenous

for

eliminating

human

rights viola tions

against

Peoples worldwide, for combating discrimination and

marginalization and for advocating the protection of Indigenous livelihoods. It emphasizes rights of Indigenous Peoples to pursue development, in keeping their own needs and aspirations, including the right to maintain and foster their own institu -tions, cultures and traditions. “Most Indi -genous Peoples, such as mine,” Margaret added, “prac tice unwritten laws. Our stan -dards are not written down; they Margaret Lokawua 12

have been passed down from generations.”

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Naomi Lanoi Leleto

That afternoon’s keynote address was by Rights Advocate Naomi Lanoi Leleto (Maasai, Kenya) MBA, MLS. Naomi is a PhD Candidate at the Gender, Women, & Development Studies, Egerton University. She also teaches Gender and the Law, Women and Entrepreneur ship and Human Rights and Ethics. She has been at the forefront fighting for the rights and empowerment of indigenous women and girls. In her capacity as a teacher, mentor and women’s leader, Naomi advocates for entrepreneurship as a key component of eradicating poverty among indigenous communities and as a means of addressing various forms of violence against women in her community. In her presentation, For Our Cattle to Survive, the Grass Must Be Green, she focused on the challenges faced by the Massai People in Kenya. She spoke of how much things had changed since her childhood, when land was held communally. They fail to understand how the communal grazing land was passed into the hands of private developers. As one elder said “We don’t know who sell our land to private developers. We only realize it has been sold when we see ‘them’ erecting concrete fences and putting up structures. The concept of private ownership was, until recently, very foreign to the Maasai. The new land management system of individual ranches has economically polarized our people; wealthy government individuals acting as middlemen in selling Maasai land have substanvtially increased their wealth at the expense of the community. The largest loss of land, however, has been to national parks and reserves, in which the Maasai People are restricted from accessing critical water sources, pasture, and salt lick for the animals. Now that the Maasai have been thrust into legal land disputes, they have little choice but to accept the ever advancing modern ways. Though they maintain most traditional ways and observe centuries old customs, western society has slowly wormed its way into their day to day lives. For the survival of the Maasai traditions, for the survival of our cattle, the grass must remain green!

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Naomi’s powerful talk was followed by a cultural presentation by Ancestral Guard (Yurok and Karuk Nations). The last full day of the Conference came to a close with a silent auction, a banquet, and cultural performances by Danza Azteca Anahuacalmecac: Indigenous Song and Dance from the Heart of Mexico.

Ancestral Guard (Yurok and Karuk Nations)

Danza Azteca Anahuacalmecac 14

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DAY FOUR: S ATURDAY, OC TOBER 22, 201 6 The final day of the Conference began with opening comments by Erwin Chemerinsky, Founding Dean & Distinguished Professor of Law, and, Raymond Pryke

Founding Dean Erwin Chemerinsky

On the last day of the Conference the keynote speech was given by Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee) Attorney at Law, who spoke on ‘Strategic Law Development: The Challenge for Indigenous Rights Lawyers’. From 1973-2009, Echo-Hawk was a staff attorney of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) where he represented Indian Tribes, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians on significant legal issues in the modern era of federal Indian law, during the rise of modern Indian Nations in the tribal sovereignty movement. Participant Reflection 16

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

Professor of First Amendment Law, University of California, Irvine School of Law. Professor Chemerinsky’s opening comments were followed by a Keynote address by Walter EchoHawk, Esq. (Pawnee), legal scholar and author of Courts of the Conqueror: The 10 Worst Indian Law Cases Ever Decided, North America title: Strategic Law Development: The Challenge for Indigenous Rights Lawyers. As the 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference was coming to a close, there was a final meal shared together, and cultural performance by Tushmal Singers and Traditional Dancers and a closing ceremony.


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Reflections by Cassie Lang, Vice President of the Indigenous Lawyers Association of Queensland The Third World Indigenous Law Conference was held on the Tongva and Acjachemen Peoples' traditional territories at the University of Irvine in California. There were three Indigenous presenters from Australia: Uncle Milton Savage, Sandra Creamer and Cassie Lang. What was amazing was that in total there were 40 representatives from all over Australia, many of these with law students. Australia had the largest delegation, only second to the United States. Over the four days, learnings were shared about protecting sacred sites, traditional language and customs and continued survival. These themes were discussed in the context of existing legal frameworks inherited from colonizing nation states. As the stories, experiences, and learnings were shared those in attendance were relating with their own experiences. It soon became clear that Indigenous Peoples all over the world have very similar histories when it comes to colonization. All delegates were inspired from what they had heard and left with a new ideas and tools to implement upon their return home. Many new friendships were made and many old friendships were re-energised. Cassie Lang (in green jacket)

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Reflections by Javina Warkill I am a proud South Sea Islander and KuKu Yalanji woman. In October 2016, I attended the World Indigenous Law Conference in North America. The conference impacted my life more than I could ever had imagined it would. I attended the conference as a community person, and I never had any intentions of studying law. The conference opened the doors to the strong cultures of Indigenous Peoples, and it was being presented at the conference that provided me with more experience and knowledge. I gained what I expected plus a lot more, which made me wish my whole family could experience it too. After the conference and getting ready to come home, my heart felt as if I had a huge responsibility once I came back to Australia. I always felt I needed to do more for my people but never really knew where to being or how to start. It made me realize, law is something I wanted and need to know for myself and to help Indigenous Peoples. I wanted to help my people in Australia and Vanuatu to rise up, by pursuing a law degree it will provide me with more knowledge and wisdom to fight. The conference made me realize that life is not just working and surviving in a world that is sometimes unclear, I learned that I have a responsibility and purpose. A responsibility to be a great ancestor and to learn, love and live our culture. To also help implement our culture back into everyday life so we can break the cycle of being a lost culture that was taken away from us by force, but reminding ourselves who we are and not to lose our identity. I encourage anyone who might have the opportunity to go to one of the law conferences to attend. What you learn not only about yourself but about the world outside our own world is life changing and it really does open your eyes and spirit. Attending this law conference is one trip that I will cherish and hold close to my heart forever.

Javina Warkill (third from left in back row) and friends 18

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Concurrent Sessions

The Gladue is a pre-sentencing and bail hearing report established in 2001, which the court may consider in cases involving an Indigenous person. Staff at Gladue courts have special training and

La Ley de Origen – The Law of Origin: The Conferación Indígena

are sensitive to issues affecting Indigenous Peoples, including

Tayrona, Nación Arahuaco,

systemic discrimination and intergenerational trauma due to the

Colombia was presented by

Gregorio Mesa Cuadros (Arahuaco), Assessor Confederación Indígena Tayrona and Asdrubal Torres (Arahuaco), Peace and Dignity Journeys and moderated by Tupac Enrique Acosta (Nahuatl-Xicano) Tonatierra, and Vice Chair of Seventh Generation Fund Board.

residential schools system. These reports offer recommendations for the judge to consider in sentencing.

IJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJK LLBSocSci, Barrister-at-law, Te Kopu Chambers

Responding to Overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in Canadian

Fishy Business: Is the Impending

Institutions Using Alternative

Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary a

Approaches to Child Welfare and

Breach of M ori Fishing Rights?

Criminal Justice

This discussion was led by Natalie Coates (Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Hine, Ngāti Tūwharetoa [ki Kawerau], Tuhourangi, Tūhoe) LLM, Kahui Legal and Kiritapu Allan (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi, Tūwharetoa) LLB, Kahui Legal

Healing & the Law: Lawyers as Healers and Peacemakers Transforming the Justice System to Focus on Healing Rather than Punishment was presented by

Attorneys Salomon Zavala, Esq. (Xicano) Ollin Law, Fabian Montes, (Xicano) Ollin Law and Pascual Torres (Xicano) Ollin Law

E tipu E rea: The Care and Protection of Indigenous M ori Children discussion was led by

Tania Williams Blyth (Ngāti Pukenga, Te Arawa-Tapuika, Waitaha) LLBSocSci, Principal, Te Kōpū Legal and Kiriana Tan (Ngāti Hangarau, Ngāti Mutunga)

Healing & the Law concurrent session led by Ollin Law

Promise Holmes Skinner (Anishinaabe) Lawyer, Senior Manager and Gladue Program Specialist, discussed Toronto’s Gladue Program Judge Deborah Sanchez (Chumash/O’odham spoke about the Teen Court she presides over at the Semillas Community School, an Indigenous charter school in Los Angeles.

Ryan Walsh (Kichesipirini Algonquin First Nation, Kichi Sibi Anishinabe) spoke about the Giiwedin Anang Council an Aboriginal Alternative Dispute Resolution program for families involved in the child welfare system. The Council is made up of a selection of volunteers from the aboriginal community in Toronto.

IJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJK Ollin Law addressed intergenerational trauma as a leading factor contributing to the incarceration of First Nation peoples. By doing this, they are able to identify the volume of help and assistance required to successfully transition inmates from prison back into their respective communities. Salomon stressed the importance of assisting offenders through the rehabilitation process, specifically by providing forms of cultural rehabilitation such as traditional therapies and mentorship. Participant Reflection 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

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Betty Lyons

Traditional Knowledge, Human Rights & Cultural Wellbeing

Christy Chapman (Zuni) RN, Juris Doctor Candidate 2016 spoke about Black Water: The Devastating Effects on the Core Values of the A:shiwi. Shannon Rivers (Akimel O’odham) MA Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles focused on The Displacement and Incarceration of Indigenous Men. Sandra Creamer (Waanyi/ Kalkadoon) LLM, Indigenous Law Association of Queensland talked of Indigenous Peoples’ Human Rights, Culture and Empowerment.

University School of Law spoke of the Indian Child Welfare Act and Protecting Native Children: Oglala Sioux Tribe v. Fleming case.

Doctrine of Discovery, Terra Nullius & Aqua Nullius Maintaining Sovereignty in the Face of Continued Colonialism and Attempted Domestication of International Law

The panel included Oren Lyons (Onondaga Nation) Onondaga Faithkeeper and Seventh Generation Fund Board Member,

Tadadaho Sid Hill (Onondaga Nation) Haudenosaunee Council of Chiefs, Jake Edwards (Eel Clan, Onondaga Nation) Onondaga Council of Chiefs and Seventh Generation Fund Board Member, and Joe Heath, General Counsel for the Onondaga Nation. Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation) Executive Director, American Indian Law Alliance, moderated the panel. The discussion focused on Terra Nullius and Aqua Nullius.

Aqua Nullius refers to the legal recognition in Australia of Indigenous rights to participate in the management of inland water resources. There are ongoing attempts to overturn these rights with the aim to cultivate a new understanding of Aboriginal

Rights of Mother Earth

Alannah Acaq Hurley (Yup'ik) Executive Director, United Tribes of Bristol Bay spoke about Protecting Our Yup'ik, Dena'ina, and Alutiiq Way of Life in Bristol Bay Alaska. Manuel Pino (Acoma) PhD, Laguna Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment talked of The Legacy of Mining in Indian Country. Maia Wikaira (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāpuhi, Te Rarawa) LLB, LLM Candidate 2017 Stanford Univ., Kahui Legal presented about Negotiating Provisions for Iwi and Hapū Rights and Interests in the Reform of New Zealand’s Freshwater Allocation Framework.

water rights and interests in the context of Aboriginal water concepts and water policy development in Australia. Drawing on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal author and scholar Virginia Marshall argues that the reservation of Aboriginal water rights needs to be prioritized above the water rights and interests of other groups.

Terra Nullius under Roman law meant “nobody's land.” It referred to territory which had not been subject to the sovereignty of any state, or over which any prior sovereign has expressly or implicitly relinquished sovereignty. In 1455, Pope Nicholas V issued a papal order authorizing King Alfonso of Portugal to “invade, search out, capture, vanquish, and subdue pagans and other enemies of Christ wheresoever placed” and “to

Indigenous Child Welfare & Well-being

Stephen Pevar, Senior Counsel American Civil Liberties Union, Adjunct Professor, New York

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seize all the kingdoms, dukedoms, principalities, dominions, possessions, and all movable and immovable goods whatsoever held and possessed by them and to reduce their persons to perpetual slavery.”

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storyteller, and Executive Director, Rock House Project Malcolm B. Bowekaty (Zuni) Governor, Pueblo of Zuni (19982002), and, Board Chair, Rock House Project

First Nations Governments in Canada: Present and Future

Maggie Wente (Anishinaabe, Serpent River First Nation) LLB, MSW, Olthuis Kleer Townshend

Following a brief break after the incredible cultural presentation by Ancestral Guard (Yurok and Karuk Nation) were a series of afternoon Concurrent Sessions.

Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence and Professor of Law, University of Otago

Globalization and its Special and Significant Impacts on Indigenous Communities

Application to Indigenous

Robert Alan Hershey, Clinical Professor of Law, and, Director of Clinical Education, Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program, University of Arizona Rogers College of Law

Educating Ourselves and Fighting ‘International Law’

The Honorable Robert J. Miller (Eastern Shawnee Tribe) Court of Appeals, Grande Ronde Tribe, and, Professor of Law, Arizona State University Jacinta Ruru (Raukawa, Ngāti Ranginui) PhD, Co-Director of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga New

Te Tiriti O Waitangi: An Act of Cession or an Assertion of Tino Rangitratanga?

Doctrine of Discovery and its Peoples Around the World

Brenda Gunn (Metis) LLM, Associate Professor Robson Hall Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba

The Indian Re-organization Act (IRA) Failures: The A:shiwi Example

The Impacts of the Waitangi Tribunal Te Paparahi O Te Raki Stage One Report on Māori Sovereignty

Te Kani Williams (Tūhoe, Whakatōhea, Tainui, Ngāi Tai and Te Aupouri descent) BA/LLB, Director, Wackrow, Williams and Davies Alana Thomas (Ngāti Rēhia, Ngāti Kuri descent) LLB, Wackrow Williams and Davies Coral Linstead-Panoho (Ngā Hako, Ngāpuhi descent) LLB, Wackrow Williams and Davies

Edward Wemytewa (Zuni) Renowned visual artist and

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Señor Torres Torres spoke about the creation story of his people, the Archuaco from the Sierra Nevada, Colombia. He explained how this story informs the laws of his people and guides them in how they live in their world and with the western world. Señor Luis Macas from Saraguro, Ecuador, spoke of how his people struggle against the intrusion of international trade deals and multinational companies, despite the fact that Ecuador’s Constitution recogSeñor Torres Torres (left)

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The Teen Court is an alternative for teenagers arrested in her Inherent Sovereign Rights,

county, instead of them going through the justice system. The

Traditional Laws & Treaties

Stacey Hiria Mareroa (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Awa, Whakatōhea,Te Rarawa whakapapa) BsocSc (History), LLB, LLM (Hons), Holland Beckett discussed Navigating Past Paper Promises: Living with our Decisions – A Critical Examination of Leef v. Bidois Jake Edwards (Eel Clan, Onondaga) Onondaga Council of Chiefs, and, Board Member, Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples spoke about Haudenosaunee Treaty Making and Governance

offender attends with their parents or guardians. Twelve senior students act as jurors (the offender is not from that school to protect privacy). The jurors asks the offending teen questions, such as what was the trigger for your behavior? Have you done this before? What would stop you from doing this again? What support do you need? The jurors can also ask the parents/ guardians questions, such as do you have a curfew in place? How have you addressed this behavior before? Following deliberation jurors provide recommendations to the teen and their parents/guardian. Judge Sanchez acknowledged that the ‘teen court’ not only empowers the jurors by trusting them to carry out their role but also shows the consequences of

Milton Savage (Kaurareg People) Traditional Owner and Kaurareg Elder talked of Traditional Law and Thursday Island

entering the justice system. In her experience, it is also more intimidating for the teen to face peers their own age and they are more likely to take on the recommendations put forward in the

Tribal Sovereignty Omaha Indian Nation and Q’ajob’al Maya Nation Adoption / Bilateral Relationship

Rudi L. Mitchell (Omaha Nation) EdD, Former Chairperson, Omaha Indian Nation Luis Marcos (Q’anjob’al Maya) Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim

‘teen court’ to avoid further consequences in the justice system. Many of her peer interested in the model and its success have contacted Justice Sanchez. Loretta Romeo Participant Reflection IJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJK Traditional Knowledge &

Peace & Restorative Justice Peace and Power in Colombia

Oscar Dizu Chocué (Pueblo Nasa) Autoridad Tradicional del Resguardo Indigena San Lorenzo de Caldono, Cauca Jose Vicente Otero (Pueblo Nasa) Cooperacion y Relaciones Externas Consejo Regional Indigena del Cauca

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Intellectual Property Rights

Jacob R. Adams, Solicitor and Barrister-in-law, and LLM, PhD Candidate, University of Tromso, Norway talked of the Use of Trademark and Trademark-like Protections in an Indigenous Rights Context Lynell Tuffery-Huria (Ngāti Ruanui, Ngāruahine) Barrister and Solicitor, LLB, Special Counsel, AJ Park spoke about the Cultural

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

Intellectual Property and the Intellectual Property System – Moving Forward Marcus Lloyd (Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, Whakatōhea, Ngāti Uenuku and Tūwharetoa) First Tribe discussed Digital Natives and Data Sovereignty Repatriation & Inherent Sovereign Rights Bringing our Ainu Ancestors Home: Repatriation in Pursuit of Indigenous Rights


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Yuji Shimizu (Ainu) President, Kotan no Kai Ancestral Village Group Takayuki Hashimoto (Ainu) Ebetsu Ainu Association Ann-Elise Lewallen, Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, and Ainu Indigenous Rights Advocate / Interpreter

Taranaki) LLB, BCA, Ministry of Māori Development and Tracey Nicola Peters (Ngāti Wai, Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Hine) LLB, Senior Solicitor, Ministry of Māori Development spoke about Mātauranga Māori (Traditional Knowledge) Intellectual Property and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Action

Jurisdictions & Territorial Integrity

Cassie Lang (Bundjalung) Queensland Indigenous Law Association spoke about Native Title in Australia: A Reality Check … Not the Rights Indigenous Peoples Were Hoping For; So Where to Go from Here? Jamie Ferguson, LLB, Kāhui Legal presented their paper on Ko au te Awa, ko te Awa ko au - I Am the River and the River Is Me: Legal Personality for Rivers and Lands in New Zealand Cynthia Boshell (Kusa-KosatiMuscogee) JD, Director, Sehoy Institute, MA Candidate, Humboldt State Univ. discussed her thesis entitled The Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Doctrine of Discovery: Medieval Christian Theology at the Heart of Modern International Policy.

Michael Paul Hill (San Carlos Apache) Apache-Nde’-Nnee’ Working Group

Globalization & Indigenous Indigenous Child Welfare & Wellbeing

Doctrine of Discovery, Tribal

Margo Tamez, (Lipan Apache) MFA, PhD, Assistant Professor, Indigenous Studies, University of British Columbia | Okanagan, Unceded Territory, Apache-Nde’Nnee’ Working Group

Elsie Boudreau (Yup’ik) Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW), President of Arctic Winds Healing Winds discussed Silent No More: Relationship between Historical Trauma and Alaska Native Sexual Assault Victims

Indigenous Child Welfare and Well-being & Human Rights From Diversion to Disruption: High School Experiments with Teen Court as a Strategy to Disrupt the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Peoples International Trade Agreements: Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Responsibilities

Presented by Seventh Generation Fund Board Members Luis Macas (Saraguro) Attorney at Law, Instituto Cientifico de Culturas Indigenas, Arthur Manuel (Secwepemc) Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade, and Tupac Enrique Acosta (NahuatlXicano) Tonatierra Community Development Institute

Salomon Zavala, Esq., General Counsel for Semillas Sociedad Civil & Ollin Law Marcos Aguilar (Azteca Mexicano) Executive Director, Anahuacalmecac International University Preparatory Tecpatl Kuauhtzin (Azteca Mexicano) Student, University of California, LA

Inherent Sovereignty, International Mechanisms &

Traditional Knowledge, Intellectual Property Rights & International

Marama Broughton (Te Aitanga a Hauiti, Ngāti Porou, Ngā Puni,

Human Rights The Re-Emergence of Monster Slayer— Critical Strategies and Challenges in Nde' Decolonization: Confronting Corrupt and Necrotic states and actors at U.N. Conventions

Tupac Enrique Acosta

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Participants List of the keynote speakers, workshops leaders, panel participants, and traditional visual and performing artists. We are most grateful for their invaluable contribution to making the Conference a huge success. Abby Abinanti (Yurok) is a Tribal Court Chief Judge. She is the first California tribal woman admitted to the California Bar. She was a Superior Court Commissioner in San Francisco for over 17 years assigned to the Unified Family Court. She has been a Yurok Tribal Court Judge since 1997, and appointed Chief Judge in 2007. In conjunction with the Tribal Council, Chief Judge Abinanti was instrumental in developing the Yurok Children’s Code, Yurok Family Code, and Judicial Ordinance, significantly expanding the Yurok tribal jurisprudence. She is currently leading the effort to expand the Tribe’s concurrent jurisdictional capacity and enhance services for Yurok tribal members, families, and children. Jacob R. Adams, Solicitor and Barristerin-law, and LLM, PhD Candidate, University of Tromso, Norway Marcos Aguilar (Xicano) is co-founder and Executive Director of Semillas Sociedad Civil. In 2001 he developed Escuelas Autonomas Dignidad, a charter school by a group of parents and educators. Mr. Aguilar received a Bachelor’s degree in Chicana & Chicano Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1994. Additionally, he holds both a single subject teaching credential in Social Science and a Master’s in Education Administration from California State University, Los Angeles. Kiritapu Allan (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi, Tūwharetoa) LLB, Kahui Legal Tania Williams Blyth (Ngāti Pukenga, Te Arawa-Tapuika, Waitaha) LLB Soc Sci, Principal, Te Kōpū Legal

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Cynthia Boshell (Kusa-Kosati-Muscogee) JD, Director, Sehoy Institute, MA Candidate, Humboldt State Univ.

Seth Davis, Assistant Professor of Law, University of California, Irvine School of Law

Elsie Boudreau (Yup’ik) Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW), President of Arctic Winds Healing Winds

Walter Echo-Hawk Sr. (Pawnee) authored In The Light Of Justice: The Rise of Human Rights in Native America and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2013); In the Courts of the Conqueror: The 10 Worst Indian Law Cases Ever Decided (2010); and, Battlefields and Burial Grounds (1994). He is a Pawnee Indian with a BA in Political Science, from Oklahoma State University (1970); and JD, UNM (1973). Echo-Hawk is of counsel to Crowe & Dunlevy, Oklahoma’s oldest and largest law firm. He is chair of the board of directors for the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries and Museums (ATALM). As a staff attorney of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) from 1973-2009, he represented Indian Tribes, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians on significant legal issues in the modern era of federal Indian law, during the rise of modern Indian Nations in the tribal sovereignty movement.

Malcolm B. Bowekaty (Zuni) Governor, Pueblo of Zuni (1998-2002), and, Board Chair, Rock House Project Marama Broughton (Te Aitanga a Hauiti, Ngāti Porou, Ngā Puni, Taranaki) LLB, BCA, Ministry of Māori Development Christy Chapman (Zuni) RN, Juris Doctor Candidate 2016 Erwin Chemerinsky, Founding Dean & Distinguished Professor of Law Oscar Dizu Chocué (Pueblo Nasa) Autoridad Tradicional del Resguardo Indigena San Lorenzo de Caldono, Cauca Natalie Coates (Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Hine, Ngāti Tūwharetoa (ki Kawerau), Tuhourangi, Tūhoe) LLM, Kahui Legal Sandra Creamer (Wannyi/ Kalkadoon) is an academic and legal officer and has worked in the legal arena for more than 15 years. She also conducted legal information workshops and assisted in cases of racial discrimination and family law. It was during this time that Sandra went to University to get her law degree and to educate Indigenous Peoples on their rights, so that they can learn how to challenge laws and policies affecting their communities. She also believes that it is important to translate the language of law so that Indigenous Peoples can understand it for their benefits.

Aura Benilda Tegria Cristancho (U’wa) Attorney, U’wa Nation, Colombia, South America Gregorio Mesa Cuadros (Arahuaco), Assessor Confederación Indígena Tayrona CIT

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

Chase Iron Eyes (Standing Rock Sioux) is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. He has dedicated his career to ending the legal and economic oppression of Tribal Nations by implementing self-determination on and off the reservation. Chase also founded LastRealIndians.com, which helped lead an effort on behalf of the Oceti Sakowin (Sioux Nation) to regain control of Pe Sla, one of their most sacred sites in the Black Hills. Jamie Ferguson, LLB, Kāhui Legal Brenda Gunn (Metis) LLM, Associate Professor Robson Hall Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba Takayuki Hashimoto (Ainu) Ebetsu Ainu Association Joe Heath, General Counsel for the Onondaga Nation Robert Alan Hershey, Clinical Professor of Law, and, Director of Clinical Education,


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Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program, University of Arizona Rogers College of Law

means of addressing various forms of violence against women in her community.

Michael Paul Hill (San Carlos Apache) Apache-Ndé-Nneé Working Group

Ann-Elise Lewallen, Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, and, Ainu Indigenous Rights Advocate / Interpreter

Tadadaho Sid Hill (Onondaga Nation) Haudenosaunee Council of Chiefs Stacey Hiria Mareroa (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Awa, Whakatōhea,Te Rarawa whakapapa) BSocSc (History), LLB, LLM (Hons), Holland Beckett Alannah Acaq Hurley (Yup'ik) Executive Director, United Tribes of Bristol Bay Beverley Jacobs (Mohawk Nation, Bear Clan of Haudenosaunee Confederacy) lives and practices law at her home community of Six Nations of the Grand River Territory in Southern Ontario. She is currently in the last stages of completing an interdisciplinary PhD at the University of Calgary that includes Law, Indigenous Wholistic Health and Indigenous Research Methodologies. Beverley is also a consultant, researcher, writer, public speaker, lecturer, and is a former President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (2004 – 2009). Tecpatl Kuauhtzin (Azteca Mexicano) Student, University of California, Los Angeles Cassie Lang (Bundjalung) Vice President, Queensland Indigenous Law Association Naomi Lanoi Leleto (Maasai) is a Rights Advocate; she is a PhD Candidate at the Gender, Women, & Development Studies, Egerton University. She also teaches Gender and the Law, Women and Entrepreneurship and Human Rights and Ethics. She has been at the forefront fighting for the rights and empowerment of indigenous women and girls. In her capacity as a teacher, mentor and women’s leader, Naomi advocates for entrepreneurship as a key component of eradicating poverty among indigenous communities and as a

Coral Linstead-Panoho (NgāHako, Ngāpuhi descent) LLB, Wackrow Williams and Davies Marcus Lloyd (Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, Whakathea, Ngāti Uenuku and Tūwharetoa) First Tribe Margaret Lokawua (Karamojong) was Expert Member at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (2008-2010). She also served as Director of the Indigenous Women Environmental Conservation Project (WECOP), Chairperson for Civil Society for Indigenous Organization in Karamonja, Indigenous Women and Girls’ Leadership and Well-being in Uganda. Margaret represented Uganda Forum at the Indigenous Permanent Forum in UN in New York in 2004; she represented WECOP at the UN for Beijing+10 in 2005, where she presented a paper on the impact of conflict on Women and Children in Africa organized by the Secretariat of UNPFII and Madre. Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation) Executive Director, American Indian Law Alliance Oren Lyons (Onondaga Nation) is a Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan, Onondaga Council of Chiefs, Haudenosaunee (Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy). He has been active in international Indigenous rights and sovereignty issues for over four decades at the United Nations and other international forums. He is a State University of New York (SUNY) distinguished services professor emeritus of the University at Buffalo. Oren is chair of the board of Plantagon International AB, designed to meet challenges of compounding human population, finite resources and global warming.

Luis Marcos (Q’anjob’al Maya) Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim Dr. Henrietta Mann (Southern Cheyenne) in 1991, Rolling Stone Magazine named her as one of the ten leading professors in the nation. In 2016, Dr. Mann became one of the first two Native American educational scholars ever elected to membership in the National Academy of Education. Henrietta is a sought out spiritual mentor and she has prayed at ceremonies ranging from Indigenous gatherings in New Zealand to Ground Zero. Rudi L. Mitchell (Omaha Nation) EdD, Former Chairperson, Omaha Indian Nation Fabian Montes (Xicano) Ollin Law Jose Vicente Otero (Pueblo Nasa) Cooperacion y Relaciones Externas Consejo Regional Indigena del Cauca

Tracey Nicola Peters (Ngāti Wai, Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Hine) LLB, Senior Solicitor, Ministry of Māori Development Stephen Pevar, Senior Counsel American Civil Liberties Union, Adjunct Profes- sor, New York University School of Law Manuel Pino (Acoma) PhD, Laguna Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment

Raymond Pryke, Professor of First Amendment Law, University of California, Irvine School of Law Abigail Reyes, Director, UC Irvine Sustainability Initiative Shannon Rivers (Akimel O’odham) MA Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles Judge Deborah Sanchez (Chumash/O’odham) was an attorney with the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office for more than 18 years, before becoming the first Native American elected to serve as a Superior Court Judge in Los Angeles.

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Deborah is a faculty member of American Indian Studies at California State University, Long Beach, teaching American Indians and the Law.

Milton Savage (Kaurareg People) Traditional Owner and Kaurareg Elder Yuji Shimizu (Ainu) President, Kotan no Kai Ancestral Village Group

Promise Holmes Skinner (Anishinaabe) Lawyer, Senior Manager, Gladue Program Specialist Tamara Starblanket (Nehiyaw, Ahtahkakoop Cree Nation, Treaty Six Territory) wrote Killing the Indian in the Child: Genocide in International Law. She holds an LLM from the University of Saskatchewan, and an LLB from the University of British Columbia. She teaches and coordinates the Aboriginal Justice Studies Program at the Native Education College. She was recently elected Co-Chair of the North American Indigenous Peoples’ Caucus (NAIPC). She is a former Director of Policing and Research and Development at the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations. Margo Tamez (Lipan Apache) MFA, PhD, Assistant Professor, Indigenous Studies, University of British Columbia | Okanagan, Unceded Territory, ApacheNde’-Nnee’ Working Group Kiriana Tan (Ngāti Hangarau, Ngāti Mutunga) LLBSocSci, Barrister-at-law, Te Kopu Chambers Alana Thomas (Ngāti Rēhia, Ngāti Kuri descent) LLB, Wackrow Williams and Davies Asdrubal Torres Torres (Arahuaco), Peace and Dignity Journeys Pascual Torres (Xicano) Ollin Law Lynell Tuffery-Huria (Ngāti Ruanui,

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Ngāruahine) Barrister and Solicitor, LLB, Special Counsel, AJ Park

Ryan Walsh (Kichesipirini Algonquin First Nation, Kichi Sibinishinabe) Giiwedin Anang Council & Alternative Dispute Resolution Edward Wemytewa (Zuni) Renowned visual artist and storyteller, and, Executive Director, Rock House Project Maggie Wente (Anishinaabe, Serpent River First Nation) LLB, MSW, Olthuis Kleer Townshend Maia Wikaira (Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāpuhi, Te Rarawa) LLB, LLM Candidate 2017 Stanford Univ., Kahui Legal Te Kani Williams (Tūhoe, Whakatōhea, Tainui, Ngāi Tai and Te Aupouri descent) BA/LLB, Director - Wackrow Williams and Davies Salomon Zavala, Esq. (Xicano) is a practicing attorney and a founder of Ollin Law and is General Counsel for Semillas Sociedad Civil. As a member of the Death Penalty Clinic, Mr. Zavala worked on habeas petitions for inmates in San Quentin’s Death Row. He also focuses and has extensive knowledge on restorative justice models, particularly implementation of them in urban communities to address violence. Mr. Zavala has conducted immigration legal clinics throughout the U.S. and Mexico, including providing direct services to deportees, and has conducted various trainings on violence prevention. He also represents several educational nonprofit organizations including incarcerationbased education.

We are grateful to the Following Co-Sponsors, Convening Partners, and Host Committee Members: CO-SPONSORS

Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy, University of California at Irvine School of Law

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

Center on Globalization, Law and Society, University of California at Irvine School of Law College of Professional Studies, California State University, Humboldt Office of Inclusive Excellence, ADVANCE Program for Equity & Diversity, University of California, Irvine Sustainability Initiative, University of California, Irvine School of Social Sciences, University of California, Irvine School of Law, University of California, Irvine CONVENING PARTNERS

American Indian Law Alliance Anahuacalmecac International University Preparatory Centro Cultural Techantit Indigenous Law Association of Queensland, Australia Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade Instituto Cientifco de Culturas Indigenas Maya Vision Northern California Tribal Court Coalition Ollin Law Red Deer Consulting Rock House Project Sacred Places Institute for Indigenous Peoples Southern Diaspora Research and Information Center Te Hunga Rōia Māori o Aotearoa – The Māori Law Society Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Secwepemc'ulecw Faculty of Law Tonatierra Community Development Institute UC IRVINE HOST COMMIT TEE

Dr. Sarah Aarons (Unalakleet Village Inupiaq) Post-doctoral Fellow, Department. of Geography Professor Seth Davis, Professor, School of Law Dr. Franklin Dollar (Dry Creek Band Pomo) Assistant Professor, Department of Physics Dr. Joe Graham (Pueblo of Laguna) Director, American Indian Resource Program Dr. Kathleen Johnson (Grand Traverse Band Odawa) Associate Professor Department of Earth Systems Science Ms. Abby Reyes, Director,


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Acknowledgements & Special Thanks Acjachemen and Tongva Peoples Marcos Aguilar Evie Reyes Aguirre Ancestral Guard Scott Baxter and Aurora Projekt Domingo Belardes J. Chavez Carlos Coyes Sandra Creamer Charles Sepulveda Danza Azteca Anahuacalmecac Seth Davis Minnie Ferguson First Alaskans Institute Victoria Gemmill-Charlesworth Conor Handley Dr. John Y. Lee Noemi Linares-Ramirez Cahuilla Bird Singers and Dancers Dr. Henrietta Mann L. Frank Manriquez Angela Mooney D’Arcy Native Am. Law Students Assoc. Chisa Oros Abigail Reyes Rebecca Robles Shannon Rivers Georgiana and Fred Sanchez Adelia Sandoval Larry Smith and American Indian Airwaves Tonatierra and the Nahuacalli Tushmal Singers Katrina Vera

Conference Implementation Teams

ARTISTS AND CULTURAL PRE SENTERS

A Special Thank You to Our Conference Supporters

L.Frank Manriquez Edward Wemytewa Tawera Tahuri Ancestral Guard EAGLE FEATHER FELLOWS

WATER KEEPER

Te Hurutea-ā-Rangi Tahuri Robson Wovat

Joe Hessenius Shannon Rivers Johnny Salazar

Christensen Fund Lannan Foundation University of California, Irvine University of California, Irvine School of Law Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy Department of Social Sciences Law Center on Globalization, Law, and Society Sustainability Initiative

PRE-CONFERENCE

FIRE KEEPER

Deborah Sanchez Angela Mooney D’Arcy Marva Jones Eli Bargas Edward Wemytewa

Kalliopeia Foundation Semillas Sociedad Civil

MEDIA & LIVE STREAMING

Anahuacalmecac International University PEACE KEEPING AND WELL-BEING

SKY KEEPER

Aurora Projekt Cedar Tree Foundation Humboldt State University College of Professional Studies Indigenous People’s Fund of Tides Foundation San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Panta Rhea Foundation

REGISTRATION AND TRAVEL LOGISTICS

Heather Freitas Edgar Lazaro Louis Gordon Shenae Bishop Alice Woodworth Conor Handley Miahuatl Kuauhtzin Victoria Gemmill-Charlesworth Lucas Benitez Larry Smith

Supporters and Donors

SITE COORDINATION & UC IRVINE AGENDA PL ANNING,

LOGISTICS

COORDINATION & DE SIGN TEAM

Seth Davis

Henrietta Mann Tupac Enrique Acosta Deborah Sanchez Eli Bargas Meribeth Geiger Tia Oros Peters Christopher Peters

TRANSL ATION COORDINATION

Marcos Aguilar Johnny Salazar Evie Reyes Aguirre Tupac Enrique Acosta Tonatierra Community Development Institute Kateri Masten Abigail Reyes Meribeth Geiger Noemi Linares-Ramirez Shunya Wade Carlos Coyes

American Indian Airwaves Christopher H. Peters Coast Central Credit Union Native Cultures Fund - Humboldt Area Foundation Henrietta Mann In the name of Ely S. Parker Georgiana and Fred Sanchez Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP Sherwood Valley Rancheria Tia Oros Peters University of California Los Angeles American Indian Studies Center Table Bluff Reservation - Wiyot Tribe

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Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples Board and Staff BOARD OF DIREC TORS

STAFF

INTERNS & VOLUNTEERS

Dr. Henrietta Mann (Southern

Eli Bargas (Ohlone/Yoeme/Apache/

Carlrey Arroyo Delcastillo Joe Hessenius Rick Whitefeather (Northern

Cheyenne), Board Chair Tupac Enrique Acosta (NahuatlXicano), Board Vice-Chair

Deborah Sanchez (Chumash/O’odham), Board Secretary Jake Edwards (Onondaga), Board Member Oren Lyons (Onondaga/Seneca), Board Member Dr. Luis Macas (Saraguro), Board Member Brian Monongye (Hopi), Board Member Tāwera Tahuri (Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, Whakatohea, Ngati Uenuku), Board Member Christopher Peters (Puhliklah/Karuk), President & Chief Executive Officer

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Cheyenne), Program Assistant Shenae Bishop (Eastern Band Cherokee), Program Associate for Thriving Women’s Initiative Heather Freitas (Lusitanian descent), Advancement Manager Louis Gordon (Xicano-Purepecha), Program Director

Marva Sii~xuutesna Jones (Tolowa Deeni’/Yurok/Karuk/Wintu), Affiliate Program Officer Kateri Masten (Yurok), Executive Coordinator Chisa Oros (Zuni/Yoeme/Puhlik-lah), Project Manager in Office of the President Tia Oros Peters (Zuni), Executive Director Johnny Salazar (Salvadorian/ Ecuadorian), Operations Coordinator Alice Woodworth, Controller

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference Report

Paiute)


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The Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples Promoting Indigenous Peoples’ Self-Determination and the Sovereignty of Native Nations since 1977 From the Arctic to the Amazon, the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples is investing in the future of our peoples. Through advocacy and action, we are raising awareness of Indigenous Peoples’ issues; advancing social, environmental, and cultural justice; rebuilding sustainable communities; developing youth leadership; and protecting our people’s rights. Founded in 1977 as the first Indigenous Peoples’ initiated and led grantmaking organization of its kind in the U.S., the Seventh Generation Fund is dedicated to tribal sovereignty and grassroots empowerment. The organization is founded on the Great Law of Peace of the Haudenosaunee, which states, “In every deliberation we must consider the impact on the seventh generation to come.” Being a good ancestor... For forty years now, the Seventh Generation Fund has been serving Indigenous communities. As this work grows, with remarkable on-the-ground projects throughout our communities, so does the need for us to respond and support this vital work. Join us today by making a tax-deductible contribution in support of our Peoples. Your commitment to Indigenous Peoples self-determination is critical to this work. Together, we will uphold our responsibilities as good ancestors promoting and maintaining culturally vibrant, self-determined, healthy and sustainable Indigenous communities for future generations. To learn more and support Indigenous communities, please visit www.7genfund.org.


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QRRRRRRRRS W Warrior X W X Up W X TUUUUUUUUV Please join us in celebrating our 40th year as the oldest Native philanthropic organization. Honor the endurance and resilience of Indigenous Peoples and be ready to

Warrior Up 2017 Keeping the Homefires Burning Celebrating 40 Years November 9-11, 2017 — Yavapai Nation Scottsdale, Arizona 85264 To register or learn more about the gathering, please visit www.7genfund.org/2017-keeping-homefires-burning

2016 World Indigenous Law Conference  

The World Indigenous Law Conference is held every two years and was hosted by the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples in October...

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