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INSIDE: Museums Are For Kids! A special section featuring an inside look at 13 area museums

Seattle’sChild J U LY/AU GUST 2021

YO U R G U ID E TO A KID - F R IEND LY CI T Y

E TH

T U O T GE ERE! TH U I SS

R Scenic and easy hiking

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50

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for

outdoor

FUN

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SUMMER

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FREE

R Finding

gnomes

R Exploring

tide pools

RUltimate

road trips

WHAT PARENTS ARE TALKING ABOUT

WATER safety

tips R S E AT T L E S C H I L D.C O M


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>>Contents Seattle’sChild

Y L I M A F

July/August 2021 // Issue 488

WHAT PARENTS ARE TALKING ABOUT......... 7 DAD NEXT DOOR..................11 FEATURE 50 IDEAS FOR OUTDOOR FUN..................... 14 SPECIAL SECTION MUSEUMS ARE FOR KIDS!................................ 29 q Romp, Chomp, Shop and Making Home are on vacation until September

p.29

„ Check out our

Things to Do section for more summer fun on seattleschild.com

„ Find us online at seattleschild.com Cover photo by JOSHUA HUSTON Jul y /Aug us t 2 0 2 1

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Seattle’sChild

July/August 2021 // Issue 488

“Seattle is my town. I know this city inside and out… or so I thought until I had kids.” Seattle’s Child is your guide to getting to know your city all over again. Finding things to do, places to eat, and how to get around — it’s a whole new ballgame with kids in tow. We’re interested in how parents make homes in a space-challenged urban environment, how families create community, and what parents are really talking about. Seattle’s Child reflects real Washington families and their broad range of parenting experiences. ANN BERGMAN Publisher, Founder abergman@seattleschild.com BOO BILLSTEIN Art Director boo@seattleschild.com JILLIAN O’CONNOR Managing Editor jill@seattleschild.com JULIE HANSON Website Editor jhanson@seattleschild.com ALLISON HOLM Things To Do Editor allison@seattleschild.com MIKE MAHONEY Copy Editor JOSHUA HUSTON Photographer JEFF LEE, MD Columnist ANNALISE BENDER-BROWN, FIONA COHEN, NATASHA DILLINGER, BRETT HAMIL, RENE HOLDERMAN, REBECCA MONGRAIN , WENDA REED, JASMIN THANKACHEN, NAOMI TOMKY, LEAH WINTERS, TARYN ZIER Contributors JASMIN THANKACHEN Admin Coordinator/Project Manager ADVERTISING KIM LOVE Ad Production Manager klove@seattleschild.com JULANN HILL Senior Account Manager julann@seattleschild.com 206-724-2453 KRISTIN McCONNELL Account Executive kristin@seattleschild.com 360-682-3384

Seattle’sChild Seattle’s Child has provided useful information to parents since 1979. In addition to our magazine, look for our special themed publications — FamilyPages, School and SummerTime — distributed free throughout the Puget Sound area. Seattle’s Child is published every other month.

ONLINE seattleschild.com Facebook facebook.com/seattleschild Twitter @SeaChildMag Instagram @seattleschildmag MAIL c/o Postal Plus 1211 E. Denny Way, Seattle, WA 98112 VOICE 206-441-0191

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Don’t miss these stories on seattleschild.com

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Parent Reviews Get the scoop on summer activities

Things to Do The best playgrounds and spray parks

FYI The latest local news for families

»What Parents

„ Find more local news for families on seattleschild.com

Are Talking About Education, health, development and more

Former Olympian Amanda Beard checks in on a class at her Gig Harbor swim school.

How to ‘respect the water’ Seven-time Olympic medalist Amanda Beard is on a mission to teach aquatic safety by J I L L I A N O ’ C O N N O R / photo by J O S H U A H U S T O N

Amanda Beard competed in the Olympic Games four times in swimming, so she knows a little something about being in the water. And she’s using her love of the water

to educate others — reaching out to the community about the urgent need to teach swimming and aquatic safety. Now the seven-time Olympic medalist (two gold, four silver and one bronze medal) lives in Gig Harbor with her husband and two kids and dedicates her time to her swim school, Beard Swim Co. She also serves on the board of the Hope Floats Foundation, which makes swim lessons available to children around the country whose families can’t afford to pay.

She’s the co-author of the 2012 book In the Water They Can’t See You Cry: A Memoir, a New York Times best-seller that chronicles her years as a competitive swimmer; at age 14, she became the second-youngest Olympic medal winner ever in swimming. Clearly, she started swimming quite young, and she wants to get more children into pools — not necessarily to strive for medals, but to learn to enjoy the water and understand how to stay safe around it. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >

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«What Parents Are Talking About CONTINUED

EXPLORE YOUR WATERFRONT A different adventure on every pier at your Seattle waterfront SeattleWaterfront.org

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“Our approach is we want kids to learn how to swim, and we want them to love it. I feel like if you want something good and if you want something done right, you have to nurture it and build a proper foundation for it,” says Beard. “I think it’s something that you have to be consistent with. And teach the kids how to respect the water and the environment that they’re in when they’re around water, and just love it.” Learning respect for water is certainly needed in Washington, where the accidental drowning rate is above the national average, according to the Washington State Department of Health. An average of 17 children and teens die each year in the state, according to data from the Washington State Drowning Prevention Network and Seattle Children’s Hospital. Nationally, drowning is the leading cause of accidental death for kids under 5. For parents, promoting water safety means starting kids off in the water young. “The sooner the better is usually how you want to do it with the kiddos because they start to develop fear, and they get really nervous and the older that they get, it gets a little bit harder for them to learn how to swim,” says Beard. “We start our lessons at six months.” At her school and elsewhere, there are lessons available for all ages. Group and private lessons are available all around Washington, at private facilities and at community pools that have already reopened. Private lessons are especially important if a child is frightened or uncomfortable in water, and swim-lesson scholarships are made available to families in financial need.

Water safety tips “Taking part in formal swimming lessons reduces the risk of drowning among children aged 1 to 4 years,” says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ten CDC tips to help families stay safe in the water this summer: 1..“Supervise when in and around water.” Avoid distracting activities, such as looking at a phone, “even if lifeguards are present.” 2. “Use the buddy system. Always swim with a buddy.” 3. “Learn to swim.” Swim lessons can protect young kids from drowning, but remember to carefully supervise all kids, even those who can swim. 4. Learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 5. Life jackets can cut boating risks. “Potentially, half of all boating deaths might be prevented with the use of life jackets,” according to the CDC. 6. Remember: “Air-filled or foam toys are not safety devices.” 7. “Avoid alcohol. Avoid drinking alcohol before or during swimming, boating, or water skiing. Do not drink alcohol while supervising children.” 8. “If you or a family member has a seizure disorder, provide one-on-one supervision around water, including swimming pools.” 9. “Don’t let swimmers hyperventilate before swimming underwater or try to hold their breath for long periods of time.” 10. “Know the local weather conditions and the forecast before swimming or boating.” Source: CDC.gov

The Hope Floats Foundation makes swimming lessons available to kids of all income levels. Beard is helping to get out the message that they’re vitally important for water safety and can even help kids develop more advanced motor and cognitive skills: “Everyone needs [swim lessons], so we don’t want anyone to be locked out of that just because they can’t financially afford it.”


»ToolBox

What every parent needs to have on hand

Help! Why does my kid suddenly stink? Also: How do I help my child understand microaggressions? by D R . S U S A N N A B L O C K of K A I S E R P E R M A N E N T E

While it may feel that time has stopped during the pandemic, some things are still moving forward. During all of this “togetherness,” you may have noticed new things about your children: They are taller, they can now make toast on their own, and yes — some are getting stinky. The world has been turned upside down during the pandemic, but puberty keeps on rolling. We’ll also discuss microaggressions: Are they a problem, and how do I help my kids understand them? Thank you so much for your questions. Stay safe, stay strong and remember the COVID-19 vaccine is now available for everyone ages 12 and older.

Kids and body odor Q. Why is my child stinky? What’s going on? First of all, puberty is absolutely, perfectly normal, but it can catch us by surprise. It is helpful to remember that while everyone is different, girls often begin to go through puberty around age 8 to 9 and boys start a year or two later. The common starting point is body odor. While no child (or parent) really wants to talk about it, let’s be real, we notice it. Here is some helpful information we can share with our kids so they can navigate the rocky world of puberty: Q. What causes the preteen-teenager body-odor smell? When puberty starts, hormones trigger odorless perspiration. When this perspiration comes into contact with natural bacteria that live on the skin, a reaction occurs to break down that sweat and hence, that distinctive “locker room” smell. Q. How can we help our kids? Because this is something new, kids will need support, love and a few practical tips to help them navigate this murky and often embarrassing phase. Building the practice of good personal hygiene

is a great place to start. Some kids love it, others don’t. When puberty starts, remind them that personal hygiene is really key. Here are some things to help kids steer through these changes: Body hygiene helps! The less often kids bathe, the more bacteria there are to interact with sweat and make the stinky smell. Reminding kids to wash is a great first step. Remind kids to wear clean clothing, for the same reasons. That coveted hoodie or favorite T-shirt can harbor bacteria if not washed frequently. If your kids are anything like mine, they have a favorite go-to, and sometimes I just need to sneak it into the wash. Certain foods can seep through skin pores, like garlic and onions. Limiting or reducing these foods can help, and eating right makes a difference, too. Encourage fluids. Drinking plenty of water to stay hydrated will help clear the body of toxins and can reduce body odor. Deodorant. Feel free to suggest deodorant once their body odor is noticeable. It will not harm them, and the earlier they start ingraining good hygiene habits, the better. We may not want to talk about it, or to smell it, but preparing kids early with conversations about hygiene and body odor can soften resistance and make the chat seem less embarrassing. Try sharing a personal experience and focus on encouraging good hygiene rather than on the stink.

Kids and microaggressions Q. I keep hearing the term “microaggression,” but I don’t know what it is. You may have heard the term “microaggression” and wondered what it means. You or your child may also have experienced microaggression and didn’t have a term to describe what you felt. Many of us have experienced microaggression or have witnessed it as a bystander. Microaggressions target a particular group (by gender, ethnicity, race, physical ability, immigration status, etc.). It can be in the form of a “joke” directed toward you that singles you out based on the group you are in or as a “compliment” that leaves you feeling confused, hurt or bad. Over time, accumulated microaggres-

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of the Tulalip Tribes

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HibulbCulturalCenter.org 6410 23rd Ave NE Tulalip, WA 98271 360-716-2600 info@HibulbCulturalCenter.org

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >

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«ToolBox CONTINUED

sions can adversely affect selfesteem and pride, leaving a child feeling unsafe and insecure.

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Q. How can I help my child understand microaggressions? Embrace diversity from an early age: I tend to view diversity through a wide lens. To me, it means the incredible differences we all have: different abilities, ages, housing status, languages, ethnicities, race, religion, orientation, gender and more. The more children are exposed to a diverse range of people, the more comfortable they will be with diversity. Encourage questions: Being part of a diverse community will also lead to questions. Your children will likely ask lots of questions about the differences they notice in people around them. Questions are good. Questions also can put us parents in occasionally uncomfortable situations. When your child points out loudly that someone is in a wheelchair, it can feel uncomfortable. These can also be great learning opportunities that kids will remember. Keep an open conversation about how people have differences and similarities. Remind kids that diversity is what makes our community interesting and vibrant. Intervene: If you see your kids engaged in microaggression (either as the recipient or the instigator), stop the conversation and help break down what just happened. Both the instigator and the recipient can learn from gentle but direct conversation. Listen to their experience and perspective and then ask kids how they would feel if someone said something to them. Talk about empathy and the importance of apologizing. Redirect: There are some tools to help redirect microaggression. Teach kids to ask the provoker to clarify – to ask “What did you mean by that?” rather than laugh nervously and feel bad. You can even use role play to practice. Be a role model: Recognize your bias and be thoughtful of not inflicting microaggressions. If you are on the receiving end of a cringeworthy, stinging comment, show kids how to redirect it by asking the instigator to clarify. As with bullying, it takes courage to speak up. Understanding microaggressions, communicating with your kids about the behavior and modeling respect can help address the impact on kids. Sponsored by

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„ Read all of Jeff Lee’s columns on seattleschild.com

»DadNextDoor

A little encouragement from across the fence by J E F F L E E , M D

The call of the wild We all need nature, even the kids who say they’d rather be indoors using screens Our 10-year-old, Pippa, is showing some early Goth tendencies. If she had her way, she’d spend most of her time indoors, reading dark fantasy books and drawing scenes of elaborate dystopias ruled by ninjas and dragons. Sometimes, we have to practically force her out of the house just to get a little sunshine and exercise. The grounds for her resistance aren’t entirely clear, but she’s been known to mumble “I hate natural light” as she shuffles sullenly out the door. There must be a trace of vampire in that girl. In any case, we don’t give her a choice. As a parent, there are some hills you’re willing to die on, and this is one of them. Despite her purported hatred of the great outdoors, we’ve seen plenty of evidence to the contrary. We’ve seen her on backpacking trips, scrambling up steep granite slopes like a mountain goat. We’ve seen her plunge naked into ice-melt streams. We’ve watched her rappel down canyon walls, and spend long, lazy afternoons snatching frogs and garter snakes from mountain lakes. All this gives us faith that, somewhere beneath that petulant preteen veneer, the forest sprite we once knew is still hiding and waiting to re-emerge. When I was a kid, my mom used to push my brothers and me out the

door, too – mostly because there were four of us, and that was too much bottled-up energy to contain with mere wood and plaster walls. Most of my childhood was spent chasing little critters, in meadows and streams and puddles of mud, and peering at them through magnifying glasses, or smuggling them up to my bedroom in jelly jars. When we ran out of small animals to harass, we’d ride our bikes all over the neighborhood, kick field goals over the laundry line or play street hockey in some neighbor’s driveway. By the end of the day, when Mom clanged the big brass bell that was bolted to the side of the house, we’d run home and scramble through the front door, all grass stains, muddy sneakers and bloody noses, hungry enough to eat anything she plunked down in front of us. When we extol the virtues of outdoor play, we tend to do so on moral grounds. We lament the loss of nature in our lives, and its replacement with high-tech gizmos and flickering screens, mostly because it violates our sense of natural order, and contrasts with our nostalgic memories of the past. Lately, though, science has backed up our intuition. It turns out you can take the humans out of nature, but you can’t take nature out of human beings. Research shows that time spent in the natural world has profound and CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >

SUMMER YOUTH ART CAMPS REGISTER NOW! GAGEACADEMY.ORG/SUMMERCAMPS 206.323.4243 | @GAGEACADEMY

Find support, connection, and resources for your family from the comfort of your home! Join a virtual PEPS group and meet other expectant parents or parents with babies close in age to yours. Weekday, weeknight, and weekend options available. Flexible Pricing program fees offered on all groups. peps.org

EQDM

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«DadNextDoor CONTINUED

It’s so much more than a gift! Washington State Heirloom Birth Certificate A portion of the proceeds from each birth certificate benefits the Children’s Trust Fund of Washington, administered by the Washington State Department of Children, Youth & Families Strengthening Families Program. • This official birth certificate is personally signed by the Governor and State Registrar. • Certificate is 8 1/2 x 11 and includes the name, date and place of birth, as well as the name and birthplace of the parent(s). • Frameable keepsake. • For each $45 purchase of an Heirloom Birth Certificate, $20 is tax deductible. To find out more information on Children’s Trust and child abuse prevention in Washington State visit: www.dcyf.wa.gov/about/governmentcommunity/community-engagement or visit the Department of Health to order your own Heirloom Birth Certificate. DCYF FS_0013 (09-19)

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lasting effects on our physiology and health. Even a fleeting exposure to the smallest patch of greenery reduces our levels of stress hormones like cortisol and epinephrine. Housing projects whose courtyards are planted with trees experience less crime than otherwise identical projects that lack trees. Pharmacies in London fill fewer prescriptions for antidepressants when they’re located in neighborhoods with parks. One study found that a three-day vacation in a natural setting (compared to one in a luxurious urban setting) resulted in a measurable strengthening of the immune system that persisted for more than a month. Of course, none of this comes as a surprise. Zoo animals in naturalistic environments live longer and stay healthier than those we confine to concrete boxes. Just because we call our own boxes “offices,” “schools” and “homes” doesn’t mean that human animals should be any different. Every once in a while, I have a recurring dream: I’m a kid again, and I’m searching for a lake or a stream where I can go fishing. I feel my frustration build as I wander around looking for an elusive stretch of water where I can wade in and cast my line. Over the years, I’ve come to realize that I only have that dream when life is feeling cramped, predictable and constrained. I think of it as a message from my natural self – from the side of me that exists outside the concrete box. Nature isn’t something we have to get into a car and drive to. Nature is in our blood, and our bones, and in every cell of our bodies. It will wait for us, patiently, for as long as it takes. This summer, find the time to go someplace quiet and lie in the dappled light, under a tall, sturdy tree. Breathe in the smell of the grass and the dirt, and peer up at the fragments of blue between the shifting leaves. Listen. Something is calling you. It’s calling you home. ABOUT OUR COLUMNIST

Jeff Lee writes and raises vampires in Seattle.


Join Emerald City Pirates for an all-outdoor interactive pirate ship cruise this summer!  



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The Rapier-Harris family enjoys an open-air Scrabble battle at Jefferson Park on Beacon Hill.

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UTDOOR FUN

g n o

We really do get good weather in the Seattle area! (Shhh, don’t tell everyone else.) Let’s delight in perfect days and blue skies — and enjoy all the natural beauty our region does best. Here’s how! (And for even more information on these 50 activities, check out seattleschild.com)

BANISH BOREDOM

Play games in the park

1 by S E A T T L E ’ S C H I L D CONTRIBUTORS AND STAFF /

Pick a favorite park, pack a picnic lunch, bring along a blanket and a board game and you’ve got a lovely day ahead. Seattle’s Child staff favorites include checkers and chess (with big, chunky pieces that will stay put) as well as Connect 4, Scrabble and Carcassonne, and even card games like Uno, Sleeping Queens and Exploding Kittens.

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50 IDEAS for OUTDOOR FUN

— Jillian O’Connor

ROAD TRIP!

Don’t pass it up

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Need a day trip that will knock your socks off? Deception Pass State Park is about 90 minutes

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This summer, consider renting an RV — a home on wheels! It’s a vehicle that offers the flexibility to travel on your own time with your own shower, toilet, kitchen and beds. But remember, you’ll need a place to park it. Many campsites have full hookups (electricity, sewer and water services), which truly helps make the RV — wildly popular during this pandemic — your roving home away from home. You’ll likely all be sleeping in one area, so don’t forget earplugs, just in case. — Jasmin Thankachen

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Need to get away from dry land for a bit? Take a fun (and cost-effective) round trip on a ferry from downtown Seattle and end up feeling many, many miles away. In addition to riding the Bainbridge Island car ferry, which always invites pedestrians, you can try a foot ferry — take the new route to Southworth or head to Bremerton or Kingston, all three destinations across Puget Sound on the Kitsap Peninsula. It’s like owning a yacht share (for about an hour and a half). wsdot.wa.gov/ferries

FR

Take a ferry trip

north of Seattle, and with nearly 4,000 acres of forest, lakes and saltwater shoreline, there’s fun for every kid. Pro tip: Skip going over that iconic bridge with little ones, who can instead delight in trying to spot a Sasquatch elsewhere in the park. — Julie Hanson

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The Baerwaldt family gets ready to take in a screening of Back to the Future at Marymoor Park.

NIGHT OF NOSTALGIA

See a movie by moonlight

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The drive-in theater, a 1930s American invention, made a quick comeback during the pandemic. Older parents likely remember the many drive-ins in the U.S. during their childhoods: kids piling into the car with sleeping bags, in their jammies. In the Seattle area, we’re fortunate to have a couple of traditional legacy drive-in theaters, as well as newcomer drive-ins from organizations that made a quick pandemic pivot, serving families’ needs for COVID-safe entertainment. — Jillian O’Connor Here are some great options in Seattle for seeing flicks in your car this summer:

3 Rodeo Drive-In, Highway 3,

3 BECU Drive-In Movies at

3 Blue Fox Drive-in Theater,

Marymoor Park, 6046 West Lake Sammamish Parkway NE, Redmond, epiceap.com/ movies-at-marymoor/

3 Vasa’s Drive-In Theatre

3549 West Lake Sammamish Parkway SE, Bellevue, vasa parkresorteventcenter.com

3 Discover Burien Drive-In 16

Theatre, 610 SW 153rd St., Burien, discoverburien.org

near the Bremerton Airport, Bremerton, rodeodrivein.com 1403 N. Monroe Landing Road, Oak Harbor, bluefoxdrivein.com

3 Skyline Drive-In Theater,

(since 1964), 182 SE Brewer Road, Shelton, skylinedrive-in.com

3 Wheel-In Motor Movie

Drive-In, (since 1953), 210 Theatre Road, Port Townsend, ptwheelinmotormovie.com

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PEDAL POWER

Teach your child to ride a bike

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You remember learning how to ride a bike; most adults do. The rattle of training wheels, the first wobbly attempts at pedaling forward without them, the apprehension at the feeling of being unsupported, the many failures — and the euphoria upon succeeding. Now, there’s a better way to teach it: No training wheels. No pedals. Instead of clattering around on bikes with training wheels, beginners learn to kick, coast and balance, either on specially made coaster bikes or bikes with the pedals removed; only when they have

the feel of how the bike should move do they attempt pedals. With beginning cyclists, it’s essential to provide them time and space to mess around on their own and get used to their bikes. “The more time you let your kids ride around a little bit and try out, the better,” says Amy Korver, an education instructor at Cascade Bicycle Club. — Fiona Cohen

SIMPLE FUN

Chalk it up

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Here’s a fun communitybuilding effort: Make sidewalk chalk art! Create a giant rainbow in your driveway for pedestrians to enjoy, or (practicing letters and handwriting) spell out happy messages and decorate them with colorful doodles. — Leah Winters


„ Find our low-tide

exploration guide on seattleschild.com

WANDER INTO WHIMSY

The garden that’s so much more

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The Bellevue Botanical Garden, not surprisingly, is teeming with flowers, but it also has sculpture gardens and a suspension bridge. With many things to see, it’s easy to keep little legs moving along paved pathways to catch the next attraction. Some highlights: Waterfalls, a curious little door built into a stone wall, a chair statue named “The Nature of Sitting” and the Ravine Experience, that 150-foot suspension bridge hanging over a rushing stream, surrounded by native foliage and tall trees. Bonus: “Night Blooming,” a huge hivelike structure that captivates child and adult visitors alike. Open from dawn until dusk daily; parking and admission are free. 12001 Main St., bellevuebotanical.org — Jasmin Thankachen

BYO FUN

Prepare for picnics

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Impromptu picnics will happen more often if you get organized early and keep your supplies stocked. Gather reusable plates, utensils, napkins, a picnic blanket, lots of food storage bags and a cooler. Be extra prepared with sunscreen, a first-aid kit, masks and hand sanitizer. Pack it all in a picnic basket and you’ll be ready to picnic at a moment’s notice! — Rebecca Mongrain

Koree and Kamryn Cotton get up close with slippery seaweed during low tide at Carkeek Park.

LOW TIDE THRILLS

Explore local tide pools and spot the sea creatures

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A few days a month, Seattle’s beaches offer a glimpse into a world we seldom get a chance to see. Extreme low tides decrease the water level, revealing a colorful, varied group of plants and animals that spend most of their time under the surface of Puget Sound. Almost any of the beaches that line our city’s coastline can reveal wonders, if you know where to look. Eight great beaches to explore at low tide are Richmond Beach Saltwater Park in Shoreline; Carkeek, Golden Gardens, Discovery Park, Charles Richey

Sr. Viewpoint, Me-Kwa-Mooks Park and Lincoln Park in Seattle; and Seahurst Park in Burien. For more fun, see when and where Seattle Aquarium

naturalists will be out to sneak a little learning into your beach walk: seattleaquarium.org/ beach-naturalist-program — Fiona Cohen

MAGICAL MISSION

Find the gnomes

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Want an enchanted summer? Wander into a forest in Maple Valley or on Bainbridge Island and look for gnomes! (Well, statues of gnomes.) A Maple Valley park area has a delightful halfmile Gnome Trail, while the Bainbridge Island gnome homes are more far-flung: A mysterious builder has installed shoebox-size gnome homes in parks all over the island and left clues on the Instagram account PNWGnomeHome. You can hop the Bainbridge Island ferry and go find the gnomies hanging out in B.I. parks — on the Fort Ward to Blakely Harbor Trail, Peter’s Trail and the Forest to Sky Trail, among others. Where to find Maple Valley gnomes: 25719 Maple Valley Black Diamond Road SE. — Compiled from reports by Natasha Dillinger and Jasmin Thankachen

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„ No reservation?

THAT’S FRESH!

Stock up at a farmers market

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No problem! Find last-minute campsites on seattleschild.com

Nothing says “summer is coming” like the opening day of a Seattle-area farmers market. Shop locally grown produce, browse bountiful bouquets, and chat with the hardworking farmers at your favorite stands. Here are 10 Seattle-area favorites:

3 Columbia City Farmers Market

(Wednesdays, 3 pm to 7 pm) 37th Avenue South and South Edmunds Street, just off Rainier Avenue South in South Seattle seattlefarmersmarkets.org/ccfm

3 Queen Anne Farmers Market

(Thursdays, 3 pm to 7 pm) Queen Anne Avenue North and West Crockett Street, Seattle qafm.org

3 Ballard Farmers Market

(Sundays, 9 am to 2 pm), Ballard Avenue NW between Vernon Place and 22nd Avenue NW, Seattle, sfmamarkets.com/ visit-ballard-farmers-market

3 Mercer Island Farmers Market,

(Sundays, 10 am to 2 pm), 7700 SE 32nd St., Mercer Island Mifarmersmarket.org

3 Redmond Farmers Market

(Saturdays, 9 am to 2 pm), 9900 Willows Road NE, Redmond redmondsaturdaymarket.org

3 Kirkland Farmers Market

(Wednesdays, 3 pm to 7 pm) 25 Lakeshore Plaza, Kirkland kirklandmarket.org

3 Renton Farmers Market

(Tuesdays, 3 pm to 7 pm), Piazza Park, 233 Burnett Ave. S., Renton rentonfarmersmarket.com

3 Tacoma Farmers Market at

Point Ruston (Sundays, 10 am to 3 pm), 5105 Ruston Way, Tacoma tacomafarmersmarket.com

3 Edmonds Farmers Market

(Saturdays, 9 am to 2 pm) 5th and Bell St., Edmonds historicedmonds.org/ summer-market

Isa Salazar and Nathanael CardonaRosado pitch a tent complete with a digital campfire.

3 Everett Farmers Market

(Sundays, 11 am to 3 pm) 2930 Wetmore Ave., Everett everettfarmersmarket.com — Natasha Dillinger

ROAD TRIP!

Head east to the Old West

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If you’re looking for a change of pace and scenery, Winthrop couldn’t be more different from Seattle. Depending on which of two scenic routes you choose, the drive should take around four hours — and it won’t be boring. In tiny Winthrop, kids and families will get a kick out of the Old West-themed town, the new Homestream Park, the National Fish Hatchery and Pearrygin Lake State Park, which has a great roped-off swim area. — Julie Hanson

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CHILDHOOD CLASSIC

Camp out in your own backyard

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Sleeping under the stars is delightful as a child (and for some, as adults). Let your kids set up camp with a simple tent and some blankets. If you’re worried about soggy ground, set them up on a patio, deck or use old wood pallets covered in blankets. Dress them up with twinkle lights for a real show-stopping tent. (For extra excitement, make it a movie night with a screening on a tablet, a laptop or — if you have access to one — a big outdoor screen.) — Rebecca Mongrain


50 ideas for OUTDOOR FUN

HOMEMADE HAPPINESS

Enjoy ice pops on the steps

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You can pour some pink lemonade or orange juice into an ice-pop mold, or you can go fancy: “I make simple ice pops out of fruit and whatever else I feel like blending up,” says Caroline Wright, a local cook and writer who blogs at The Wright Recipes (carolinewrightbooks. com). “I make them for a few weeks and store them in our chest freezer. Then, we choose our preferred flavor and eat them out on our front steps after the kids ride their bikes.” Here’s her delicious recipe for icy treats:

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GET YOUR HANDS DIRTY

Plant a garden

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Plant cucumbers, melons, berries, tomatoes, peppers, beans and greens this season! It’s too late for seeds. You’ll need starts to do this in summer. Buy plant starts at a local nursery and use nutrient-rich soil to feed your veggies. (Fun fact: Container gardening is an easy way to garden while keeping bunnies and deer away.) Help little ones dig holes, place the plants, and cover them with soil, then water. On hot summer days, water the plants in the evenings to help with moisture retention. After a few weeks, pick your fruits and veggies for a feast! — Jasmin Thankachen

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Preheat broiler. Halve and remove pits from 1 pound apricots (about 10) and arrange on a parchment or foil-lined baking sheet. Drizzle apricots with 2 tablespoons honey and sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt and another of ground cinnamon or cardamom. Broil on top rack until charred in spots and softened, about 5 minutes. Transfer apricots and 1 cup heavy cream into a blender jar. Blend until

smooth. Pour pop base into 10 (2.5-ounce) pop molds, leaving ½-inch space at the top. Freeze according to mold manufacturer’s instructions. — Sydney Parker

SEATTLE CULTURE

Take a selfguided art tour of Fremont

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Check out the two ivy dinosaurs that live almost canalside in Fremont. They roam the earth by the Burke-Gilman Trail, just south of North 34th Street and Phinney Avenue North. While you’re in the area, make sure to say “Hi” to the Fremont Troll (on 34th under the Aurora Bridge) and the six people and a dog waiting for the bus (“Waiting for the Interurban” by Richard Beyer) on North 34th Street near the Fremont Bridge. Look out for the Fremont Rocket and the planet Saturn! And tell them Lenny sent you. (You’ll see that colossal, puzzling, oh-so-Seattle statue of former Soviet premier Vladimir Lenin at 3526 Fremont Place.) — Jillian O’Connor

ROAD TRIP!

Go see Jetty Island

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What’s 2 miles long, a three-minute ferry ride from shore and loads of fun? J ­ etty Island! A quick jaunt from Everett, the island offers an expanse of sandy beach, tidelands and saltwater marshes to explore. (Swimming is allowed on the west shore, but there are no lifeguards.) The ferries run starting on July 5, then continue from Wednesday through Sunday from July 7 through Labor Day. Reservations required. Fee: $3 per person. Kids under 2 free. Departs from Jetty Landing, adjacent to the boat launch at 10th Street and West Marine View Drive in Everett. visiteverett.com — Taryn Zier

Paul Kisicki and family enjoying a Sunday ride.

MILES OF SMILES

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Bike the Burke-Gilman

Once your little one gets the hang of riding a bicycle, take it out for a spin! The Burke-Gilman Trail, which wraps around the northern segment of the city from Ballard to Bothell, offers a 27-mile-long expanse, with no cars allowed. It’s for bikes, bladers, runners and non-motorized scooters only, but be on the lookout for motorized bikes and scooters.

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50 IDEAS for OUTDOOR FUN ROAD TRIP!

a few first-come, first-served campsites on public lands in Washington. Be prepared — and flexible. Pay attention to the campground’s amenities; you might need to pack water. Olympic, North Cascades and Mount Rainier national parks all offer some first-come, firstserved spots. These state campsites below are ALL first-come, first-served:

Visit an ancient fossil bed

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At the Ginkgo Petrified Forest Interpretive Center, see an ancient fossil bed as you hike a 1.25-mile interpretive trail, and look out for nearly two dozen exposed petrified logs at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park, which spans 7,124 acres, roughly 140 miles east of Seattle. Fun fact: petrified wood is Washington’s official state gem. There’s also a campground at Wanapum Recreation Area, inside the park. 4511 Huntzinger Road, Vantage.

3 Joemma Beach State Park:

19 primitive tent sites on the Key Peninsula in the middle of south Puget Sound. Eight standard sites and more than 12,000 acres to explore in Eastern Washington.

— Jillian O’Connor

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If every campground you usually visit is completely booked in advance, there’s hope. Even if you don’t have a reservation, there are quite

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Small Orcas Island park with 10 primitive sites; take your car on the ferry or arrive by boat or kayak.

3 Sucia Island Marine State Park:

Horseshoe-shaped island in the San Juan archipelago; 60 standard sites accessible only by watercraft.

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3 Obstruction Pass State Park:

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3 Wallace Falls State Park:

You’ll need to set out early to score one of the two prime sites at this park in Snohomish County.

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Aly and Layla Mohamed play competitive mini golf at Interbay Miniature Golf.

CHILDHOOD CLASSIC

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Get out on the (mini)green

Here’s an activity the whole family can do together, whether you want to be competitive or just have fun. You can enjoy a beautiful natural setting or play through a quirky fantasy land at a variety of Puget Sound-area courses. Golf is a fresh-air activity well-suited to social distancing. Check policies at any place you choose to go. — Wenda Reed 3 Family Fun Center,

7300 Fun Center Way, Tukwila.

3 Kent Valley Ice Centre,

6015 South 240th St., Kent.

3 Seattle Parks Department:

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3 Interbay Miniature Golf,

2501 15th Ave. W., Seattle.

3 Rainbow Run course at Wil-

lows Run Golf Course, 10402 Willows Road NE, Redmond.

3 Mike N Terry’s Outdoor Green Lake Pitch and Putt, Fun Park, 6326 113th Ave. 5701 East Green Lake Way N. Court E., Puyallup. New for 2021: Tee times are required, and must be made 3 Parkland Putters Mini Golf, 10636 Sales Road S., Tacoma. byEphone 20 S AS TE TA L(206-632-2280). E TT ’ SL E C’H SI L CD HIL JuDly/Au Ju ly/Au gu st gu 2 0st 21 2 0 21

MARCH TO MUNCHIES

Enjoy a stroll and an outdoor meal

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Explore the concept of a walk followed by a stop for sustenance at a place with kid-friendly outdoor dining. Here are a few of our favorite Seattle-area spots to stretch your legs, see some sights and then have a treat:

3 West Seattle’s Alki Beach, then

Pegasus Pizza. 2768 Alki Ave. SW, pegasuspizza.com

3 Stroll through Beacon Hill, then

stop at Perihelion, 2800 16th Ave. S., perihelion.beer

3 Downtown Seattle waterfront

and Pike Place, then Old Stove Brewing, 1901 Western Ave., oldstove.com

3 Explore Burien’s Eagle Landing

Park, then stop at Elliott Bay Brewhouse. 255 SW 152nd St., elliottbaybrewing.com

3 Walk Magnolia’s Discovery

Park, then visit Dirty Couch Brewing, 2715 W. Fort St., dirtycouchbrewing.com

3 Hike the Des Moines Creek Trail,

then hit Quarterdeck. 22307 Dock Ave. S., quarterdeckdm.com

3 Walk Green Lake, then hit Bongos

Cafe for Caribbean food, 6501 Aurora Ave. N., bongosseattle.com

— Julie Hanson and Jillian O’Connor


„ Find short hikes for short legs on seattleschild.com

FREE FOR EVERYONE

Visit a food forest

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The Beacon Food Forest is open to all for self-guided walks from dusk until dawn. And for harvesting! Visitors to the Beacon Hill farm are welcome to come and forage at any time in the open harvest zones. Remember to take only what you need, make sure it’s ripe, leave plenty for others and clean up when you’re done! 15th Avenue South and South Dakota Street, beaconfoodforest.org — Jillian O’Connor

GET CRAFTY

Rock out with painted rocks

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Take a walk around the neighborhood and collect a few smooth rocks that fit in the palm of your (or your child’s) hand. Use paint or paint pens to decorate them, then hide them again on your walking route. Leaving little treasures for others to find is a great way to build community. — Leah Winters

ROAD TRIP!

Coast on down to Oregon

27 The Mengistu family takes in the views on a hike at Lincoln Park. The park’s level trails are perfect for tiny hikers.

NATURE’S THRILLS

Go for a hike

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Whether you’ve got a big kid or a little one, there’s a trek for you. There are fantastic hikes under 2 miles to be found at Snoqualmie Falls, Franklin Falls, Tiger Mountain, Carkeek Park, Schmitz Preserve Park and Mount Rainier. For big kids ready for a greater challenge, try these steeper, much longer trails: North Bend’s Annette Lake (7.5 miles), Boulder River Wilderness (8.6 miles), Little Si (4.7 miles) and Talapus Lake (6.2 miles). — Researched by Rebecca Mongrain and Annalise Bender-Brown

It feels like a small town, but there’s still lots to do. Oceanside, Oregon, is a town with beautiful, quiet beaches, great hiking options and fun nearby attractions. You can rent a house or stay in a condo, steps away from the cool water and ocean breeze. Local restaurants Roseanna’s Cafe and the Blue Agate Cafe offer seaside dining. About 10 miles east, the Tillamook Creamery offers amazing, rich dishes like hot, gooey mac and cheese and fried cheese curds. A self-guided tour will make you an expert in the factory line — slicing, dicing and packaging the cheese. The kids will love “driving” the company van. They’ll love the large factory ice cream shop, too. — Jasmin Thankachen

MINIATURE MAGIC

Make a fairy garden

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Kids love fairy gardens almost as much as fairies — and they’re quite simple to make. Find a secluded and protected area in your backyard or a park. Decorate the area with a simple fairy house by using a plain birdhouse and glamming it up with moss, real or fake flowers and other decorations. Fill the area with small trinkets, yarn and shiny objects. This is one project that should be as unique as your child. — Rebecca Mongrain

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50 IDEAS for OUTDOOR FUN „ Find the best

summer beaches on seattleschild.com

READY, SET, ROLL!

Go for a scoot

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Grab a scooter and a helmet and see your park (or even just your block) in a whole new way. Some fun, flat places to get rolling near the beach are Seward Park in southeast Seattle, Golden Gardens in Ballard and Matthews Beach Park in northeast Seattle. For a beginner skate-park experience, try Jefferson Park on Beacon Hill or Dahl Playfield in Wedgwood. — Jillian O’Connor

COOL AND CALM

Go wading at a sandy beach

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Here in the PNW, we’re used to rocky beaches. They’re great for tide-pooling, but not so much for building sandcastles. But who says you need to hop a plane to Hawaii to find soft sand and warm(ish)

water that stays shallow 100 yards out? Kirkland’s Juanita Beach is perfect for toddlers and kids just learning to swim: the water stays fairly shallow all the way out to the wrap-around dock. Further east, Idylwood Beach Park on Lake Sammamish is beautiful: There’s crystal-blue water, white sand and a great playground. Angle Lake in SeaTac has sandy, shallow waters, plus a cool spray pad, and Jetty Island off the Everett waterfront has an ideal sandy beach. (See “Road trip: Jetty Island” on page 19.) — Allison Holm

BACK TO BASICS

Make a sand castle

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Step 1: Get a bucket. Step 2: Find a shovel. Step 3: Find water near sand. Step 4: Fill up said bucket with sand and a little water and build. Use your imagination and play all day! (Make sure to bring a hat and sunscreen.) Warning: Some kids might not ever want to leave the beach. — Jillian O’Connor

Duthie Hill has something for riders of all levels.

LIFE JACKET NOT OPTIONAL

Get out on the water in the city

HOLD ON TIGHT!

Go for a spin on a mountain bike

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Issaquah’s Duthie Hill Park, one of the country’s first progressive mountain biking parks, has a mountain biking trail for all skill levels. The easiest trails are designed for the most novice riders; riders can gradually build up to expert trails. Each trail takes about 10 to 15 minutes to ride and meets back up in the central clearing, making it easy for families with varied abilities to split up and connect again later. 26300 SE Issaquah-Fall City Road, Issaquah.

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— Naomi Tomky

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One quintessentially Seattle summer must-do: Boat rentals and tours. With so much of our city surrounded by water, trying your hand at sailing (or at least one of those foot-pedal boats) is a rite of passage. Here are 5 great ways to get out on the water in the city:


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Green Lake Boathouse offers many options for getting out on the water.

3 Agua Verde Café & Paddle Club:

Kayaks and stand-up paddleboard rentals. 1303 NE Boat St., aguaverdepaddleclub.com

3 Boat rentals at the Green Lake Boathouse:

Two- and four-seater pedal boat rentals. Also rowboats, sailboats and stand-up paddleboards. 7351 E. Green Lake Drive N., greenlakeboatrentals.net

3 Stand-up paddleboard rentals at

Surf Ballard: 6300 Seaview Ave. NW, surfballard.com

3 UW Canoe and Rowboat: Rentals at

UW Waterfront Activities Center, directly behind Husky Stadium. Rent canoes or rowboats. washington.edu/ima/ waterfront/boat-rentals/

3 CastOFF! Sunday Public Sail at the

Center for Wooden Boats: Various wooden boat rentals, plus free one-hour wooden rowboat rentals. 1010 Valley St., cwb.org/public-sail And across Lake Washington: 3 Mercer Slough by Canoe, canoe rentals. 3519 108th Ave. SE, Bellevue; ci.bellevue. wa.us/mercer_slough.htm or canoekayak.com — Taryn Zier and Natasha Dillinger

ROAD TRIP!

Visit Mount Rainier

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Get to the mountain, up close! Highlight for parents: The easy Nisqually Vista Trail affords spectacular views of our crown jewel of mountains in the Pacific Northwest — 14,411-foot Mount Rainier. The only catch, of course, is that it’s about a two-hour drive to get to the park from Seattle, so if this is a day trip, you need to be prepared for a long day of travel. The farthest point provides the best and final viewpoint with signage describing the Nisqually Glacier, which has receded greatly in recent years. On foggy days, you’ll be able to walk amidst the clouds. Cloud cover can be disappointing, but patience pays off as morning clouds often dissipate by afternoon. Fairy Pond will entice young hikers. If you’re lucky, there may still be a few wildflowers to be spotted. — Rebecca Mongrain

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North Seattle Colleges Cooperative Preschools and Parent Education Program

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northseattlecoops.org A program for children from birth to 5 years and their caregivers.

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NOW ENROLLING FOR 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR

The Sammamish Montessori School In Redmond

Call 425-883-3271 for a tour.

in g N o w E n r o ll

• Child-centered, joyful atmosphere with strong academic focus • Experienced, Montessori-certified teachers • Preschool, kindergarten, and STEAM Enrichment • Family owned and operated since 1977 • Summer, before & after school programs • Prep Program, (starting ages 2 1/2-3)

www.sammamishmontessori.com • 425-883-3271

CANINE JOY

Go to a dog beach

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If you’ve got a dog with great recall, and a child who follows instructions well, you’ll love scenic Double Bluff Beach on Whidbey Island, where you can let your pups run free on about 2 miles of beach. Another great bet is the Off Leash Area Edmonds, where unfettered canines can swim and meet new four-legged pals, too. whidbeycamanoislands. com, 6325 Double Bluff Road, Freeland; 498 Admiral Way S., Edmonds, olae.org — Jillian O’Connor

KID BUSINESS

Open a flower stand

SOUNDVIEW SCHOOL now accepting applications www.soundview.org A small, independent school in Lynnwood, WA (425) 778-8572 24

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Since COVID-wary patrons might be a little hesitant to purchase lemonade outside this season, your child can instead consider creating a stand for flowers. We might as well not let all those local blooms go to waste, and truth be told, neighbors are often delighted even to see dandelions for sale. If your kid has a small table or box and a few jars, they’re in business! — Jillian O’Connor


50 IDEAS for OUTDOOR FUN ZOO ADVENTURE

ROAD TRIP!

„ Find 9 hidden

things to not miss at PIke Place Market on seattleschild.com

Hit peak potential

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Olympic National Park is a gem on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and a perfect place for a family trip. It’s sprawling and varied, home to mountains, a rainforest, beautiful lakes and hot springs, to name just a few attractions. There are many, many ways to explore and enjoy it all. If your child is up for a long drive the first day, one great short vacation itinerary is to start at Kalaloch Lodge and see the park; next head to Port Angeles, followed by the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge and Port Townsend the next day. Finally, catch the KingstonEdmonds ferry back. — Julie Hanson

WATER WONDERS

Sit back, sail away

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If you want to enjoy your time in the water without risking a single blister, try out these options. (They’re also perfect for babies and kids too young to play captain.)

3 Seattle Water Tours Ice Cream

Maggie and Molly ride Rachel, the Pike Place Market pig.

Cruise: Departs from the northwest side of the Museum of History and Industry in Lake Union Park. seattlewatertours.com/ ice-cream-cruises

Play tourist in your own city

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If you don’t already have visitors coming, there’s no reason not to pretend that you do as you tour your city’s finest features. Look out at the cityscape from Kerry Park, meander through Pike Place Market (go early to avoid the crowds and snag a tasty breakfast), and go for a walk through the locks in Ballard. — Naomi Tomky

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The Woodland Park Zoo is welcoming evening guests back to the meadow this summer for its 37th annual ZooTunes concert season. During the day, children and their adults can check out the 22 life-size robotic dinosaurs that are staying in the zoo all summer, including the 35-foot-tall brachiosaurus… and a truly amazing T-rex. zoo.org

WET ’N’ MILD

Splish and splash

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Spray parks and wading pools are gold for parents of the under-5 crowd. Little sunbathers can splish, splash and paddle without the risks of a deep end or sudden drop-offs. You can find both spray parks and wading pools all over the Seattle area, and here are a few tried-and-true faves: 3 Spray parks: Crossroads Spray Park (Bellevue), Grasslawn Park (Redmond), Forest Park (Everett), Willis Tucker Park (Snohomish), Tukwila Spray Park, Northacres Park (North Seattle) 3 Wading Pools: Green Lake wading pool, Lincoln Park wading pool, Volunteer Park wading pool — Allison Holm

3 Emerald City Pirates Family

Treasure Cruise: Meet at Lake Union Park on the northwest side of MOHAI (see above). emeraldcitypirates.com/cruises

3 Electric Boat Company: Electric

RIGHT UNDER YOUR NOSE!

See a show — with towering dinosaurs

boats for rent on Lake Union; you’ll be driving yourself. 2046 Westlake Ave. N., theelectricboatco.com

3 Argosy Cruises: Harbor cruises

and Blake Island ferries departing from Pier 55. The Locks Cruise departs either from Pier 55 or from the AGC Marina on South Lake Union. argosycruises.com

3 West Seattle Water Taxi: On

weekdays, departs every 35 minutes from Pier 50 in Seattle and Seacrest Park in West Seattle. On weekends, the schedule is reduced to hourly sailings. Beautiful views of downtown. kingcounty.gov/ depts/transportation/water-taxi — Taryn Zier and Natasha Dillinger

ROAD TRIP!

Take a day trip to a small town

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Take a ferry to Winslow on Bainbridge Island, drive to La Conner, or hop on over to Ellensburg: Simply spend a day in a new place, wandering the streets and spoiling the family with milkshakes and silly souvenirs. You’ll come back with a little bit of buyer’s remorse and a lot of great memories. — Naomi Tomky

THAT’S FRESH!

Pick your own summer berries

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Visiting a U-pick berry farm is the quintessential summer activity, and we have many great berry-picking options around Puget Sound. July and August yield blueberries, blackberries and raspberries, all of which you can pick straight from the plants at a local U-pick. Here are some of our favorites: 3 Biringer: 21412 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, biringerfarm.com 3 Bryant: 5628 Grandview Road, Arlington, bryant blueberries.com 3 Remlinger: 32610 NE 32nd St., Carnation, remlinger farms.com 3 Harvold: 5207 Carnation Duvall Road NE, Carnation, harvoldberryfarm.wixsite.com/ harvoldberryfarm 3 Blue Dog: 7125 W. Snoqualmie Valley Road NE, Carnation, bluedogfarm.com 3 Larsen: Larsen Lake, 700 148th Ave. SE, Bellevue, bellevuewa.gov 3 Canter-Berry: 19102 SE Green Valley Road, Auburn, canterberry farms.com — Allison Holm

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ROAD TRIP!

See Whidbey and Camano islands

— Allison Holm

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Whidbey Island is accessible by ferry or car. To the north, Deception Pass Bridge boasts some of the most stunning views you’ll ever see. Fort Ebey State Park’s west-facing shoreline is a must. Next, head over to adorable Coupeville to see its historic waterfront and wharf. Just east of town, the Price Sculpture Forest, a whimsical blend of nature and art, spans 16 acres. To the south lies Langley, the “village by the sea.” Grab a pint at the Whidbey Island Distillery, and learn about whales at the Whale Center. (Don’t miss: Whidbey Island Fair, July 15 to 18.) No need for a ferry to get to Camano Island — it’s just a 50-minute drive from Seattle. The island is home to two state parks — Cama Beach State Park (check out the 1930s-era fishing cabins and the Center for Wooden Boats) and nearby Camano Island State Park. Build driftwood forts at sandy Iverson Beach or spot gnomes along the Hobbit Trail at Iverson Spit. Make sure to stop by Freedom Park for playground time before the drive home.

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Find a frozen treat. Eat it!

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Seattle doesn’t have all that many really hot days, but it does have a delightful array of frozen-treat options to enjoy when the sun starts beating down. Whether you’re reconnecting with your kids after picking them up from day camp, or taking a pit stop between weekend activities, these times over ice cream are great moments to bond and chat. Here are some favorite spots.


50 IDEAS for OUTDOOR FUN

3 Bottega Italiana, 1425 First Ave.,

Seattle, bottegaitaliana.com

3 Laina’s Handmade Ice Cream,

9701 Rainier Ave S., Seattle, lainasicecream.com 3 Full Tilt Ice Cream, Locations in White Center, Columbia City, and Ballard, fulltilticecream.com 3 Frankie & Jo’s (all vegan), Locations in Ballard, Capitol Hill and University Village, frankieandjos.com 3 Husky Deli, 4721 California Ave. SW, huskydeli.com 3 Bluebird Ice Cream, 7415 Greenwood Ave. N. 3 Seattle Pops, 1401 N. 45th St. (also at farmers markets), seattlepops.com 3 Sweet Alchemy Ice Creamery, Locations in University District, Ballard and Capitol Hill, sweetalchemyicecreamery.com 3 Sapling Gelato, 1223 McKenzie Ave., Bremerton, saplinggelato.com 3 Milk Drunk, 2805 Beacon Ave. S., Seattle, themilkdrunk.com 3 Medzo Gelato Bar, 917 SW 152nd St., Burien, medzogelatobar.com 3 Ambrosio Gelato, 5339 Ballard Ave. NW, dambrosiogelato.com 3 Fainting Goat Gelato, Locations in Wallingford and Fremont, faintinggoatseattle.com 3 Molly Moon’s, Multiple locations in Seattle and on the Eastside, mollymoon.com 3 Salt & Straw, Locations in Ballard, Capitol Hill and Totem Lake, saltandstraw.com 3 Nutty Squirrel Gelato, Locations in Magnolia and Phinney Ridge, nuttysquirrel.com — Fiona Cohen

WHEN IN ROME

Grab fish and chips with a view

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Ivar’s is the Seattle classic with its multiple locations and “Keep Clam!” motto. Feed the seagulls (yes, it’s allowed!) at its Alaskan Way fish bar. Watch the boats and city skyline from the deck at the Salmon House on Lake Union. See Lake Washington and Boeing from the Renton location. Multiple locations, ivars.com 3 Alki Spud Fish and Chips also has a long history and prime spot. Bring a blanket in case you can’t nab a picnic table. 2666 Alki Ave. SW, Seattle, alkispud.com. 3 Burien Fish House serves a variety of fish (plus to-die-for tacos) in a strip mall. 133 SW 153rd St., Burien, theburienfishhouse.com. 3 West Seattle Fish House (no relation) draws fans to its little storefront spot along 35th Avenue Southwest. 9005 35th Ave. SW, Seattle. 3 Emerald City Fish and Chips on Rainier Avenue adds a Southern touch – including crab puppies and shrimp po’ boys – to a Northwest favorite. 3756 Rainier Ave., Seattle, emeraldcityfishandchips.com. — Julie Hanson

EASY PARENTING WIN

Cook up a mud pie

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Get ready for some messy, muddy, pie-in-the-sky fun! Don’t throw out those old pie pans, ladles, whisks, muffin tins and mixing bowls; they’re the perfect tools for an outdoor mud kitchen. Here’s how to set that up: Use an old bench or crates as a surface. Mix dirt with water and scoop the mud into pans. Add rocks for the pie’s “berries,” pat down the tops and bake the mud pies in an imaginary oven. Serve mud pie on plastic plates for a “delicious” pretend treat. — Jasmin Thankachen

PLAYGROUND TOUR

Do the park circuit

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This summer, make it a point to visit a new park. Or get ambitious and try for one every week. Here are some must-see parks in and around Seattle: Wallingford Playfield (which has a fort!); Juanita Beach Park (a brand-new, all-abilities park with a sandy beach!); Bellevue’s Inspiration Playground (a superimaginative park built for all abilities); Exploration Park in Mill

Creek (which is nature-themed); Jefferson Park and Othello Playground (both in South Seattle, both with super-cool slides); Miner’s Corner in Bothell (which is shaded, with cool climbing structures, and is good for all ages); and Forest Park in Everett (which has a small animal farm and spray park) . — Allison Holm

ROAD TRIP!

Visit ‘kid wonderland’

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In the summer, Sunriver is sunny, hot and dry — just what some non-Northwesterners need to feel like summer is really here. Sunriver, a planned community in central Oregon that dates back to the 1960s, attracts families and keeps them coming back with a great mix of kayaks, canoes, bike paths, pools, water slides, horses, deer, stargazing, walking, sun in the summer and snow in the winter. Oh, and incredible hikes at nearby lava fields, a milelong cave, obsidian paths and pristine Paulina Lake. “A kid wonderland!” one excited Seattle parent told me years ago. It’s a 6- to 7-hour drive from Seattle, and just a 20-minute drive south of Bend, another family favorite. — Jillian O’Connor

SUMMER ADVENTURE IS ON BLAKE ISLAND High speed boat ride | Fire table rentals Activities and more! Plan your visit at ArgosyCruises.com

Credit: Steph Forrer (left), Marcus Allenbach (right)

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50 IDEAS for OUTDOOR FUN BOOK CORNER

Read a great book on a beach!

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If you’re looking for some fun beach-blanket reads, these four recommendations are sure to make waves this summer! The Worm Family Has Its Picture Taken by Jennifer Frank; illustrated by David Ezra Stein Follow along with Emma, oldest daughter of the Worm family, as she shares her excitement over the upcoming family portrait. Her endeavors to get the perfect picture will help young readers see how lovely it is just to be yourself.

A short ferry ride from downtown Seattle, there is a place where kids (and adults) of all ages can discover the wonders of Nature. Step into the ever-changing landscapes of Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island—150 acres of sculpted gardens, blooming meadows, verdant forests, water, wildlife, and comfortable trails designed especially for exploring the beauty that is the Pacific Northwest. Come discover what a walk in the woods can do. Book your visit at bloedelreserve.org/tickets.

Oona by Kelly DiPucchio; illustrated by Raissa Figueroa Join adventurous, treasure-hunting mermaid Oona as she goes after her biggest find to date, a beautiful, glittering crown! A delightful story of ingenuity and problem-solving accompanied by gorgeous art, Oona is the perfect heroine tale to take to the beach. Ship in a Bottle by Andrew Prahin Mouse is on a journey to find a new home after encountering difficulties with his previous roommate, Cat. This is a story about the hardships of finding a new place in the world that shows how taking big, brave risks can lead to big, awesome rewards. — Rene Holderman, children’s book buyer, Third Place Books

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This feature was produced by staff and contributors, from new and archival material from Seattle’s Child magazine and SeattlesChild.com

SI D E WA L K CH AL K , G N OM E , GR ASS H OP P ER , S CO OTE R, H A N DS W I TH BE RR IE S : SH UTTER STOCK

ONE OF THE 10 BEST BOTANICAL GARDENS IN THE U.S. —USA Today, 2020

A Tree for Mr. Fish by Peter Stein Mr. Fish has a tree and he is certainly not going to share branches with the likes of Bird and Cat. However, Mr. Fish will learn that there are downfalls to limiting oneself to just one point of view, and that opening up to others has some excellent payoffs.


A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FAMILY-FRIENDLY MUSEUMS OF THE PUGET SOUND REGION AND SEATTLE'S CHILD MAGAZINE

Museums

are for

KIDs! What did the world look like before I was here? Who shares the earth with me? How do things work? What does art say to me? Who do I want to become?

Museums tackle the big questions

that young SH UT TE RSTOC K

minds ask


Explore a museum with your child today!

America's Car Museum UP CO M IN G EV EN TS

Family STEAM Weekends

July 17 & 18, August 21 & 22 design a better race car Build a rocket, create biofuels or mobiles and Science, as you explore the world of auto Math! Technology, Engineering, Art and

Drive-In Movie

28 July 10, July 24, August 7, August your front seat or from ie mov y endl ly-fri fami Watch a field — either way, show our on chair or ket from a blan ot screen! 40-fo the of view t grea you’ll have a

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

In addition to the cool cars on display, kids can hop in the driver’s seat of a racing simulator or on the slot-car track in the Speed Zone. In the Family Zone, children can compete in Pinewood Derby races or climb into a 1920s car and practice their driving skills!

America’s Car Museum aims to inspire curiosity and imagination. Visitors are surrounded by vehicles ranging from horseless carriages to modern-day race cars. This non-traditional classroom provides a unique learning experience exploring the science, technology, engineering, art, history and math of automobiles through discussion and engaging hands-on projects.

MUSEUM info Website: www.americascarmuseum.org Address: 2702 E D Street, Tacoma, WA 98421 Hours: Fri–Sun 10am–5pm (check website for updates) Admission: AAT Members: FREE | Adults: $18 | Young Adult (13-18) $14 | Youth (6-12) $10 | Children (5 and under): FREE

Free/Discounted Museum Days: Seniors & Active Duty Military receive $2 discount every day

Special Events for Families/Kids: Design, build, tinker, and learn together as you explore the world of automobiles and its relation to science, technology, engineering, art and math. On the third weekend of each month, you and your child, grandchild, or family can spend quality time together exploring activities throughout the Museum during Family STEAM Weekends. www.americascarmuseum.org/learn/family-steam-days Summer Day Camps/Virtual: www.americascarmuseum.org/learn/school-programs After School: www.americascarmuseum.org/learn/athome Museum Cafe: Yes

Classroom Programs

Parent & Kid-Friendly Features: Family Zone: www.americascarmuseum.org/

School Year 2021-22 of our virtual, hybrid, Register your class today for one Students engage in ! rams prog or in-person classroom ities provided by immersive, hands-on STEM activ the Museum.

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learn/family-zone; Powering the F uture Learning Lab: www.americascarmuseum.org/ explore/exhibits/powering-future-learning-lab; Speed Zone: www.americascarmuseum. org/explore/activities

Covid-19 Rules: Our interactive exhibits are open! Touchpoints are cleaned throughout the day and sanitation stations are widely available. Masks are recommended.


Explore a museum with your child today!

Burke Museum MUSEUM info Website: www.burkemuseum.org Address: 4300 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA Hours: 10am–5pm Tuesdays–Sundays (closed Mondays); open 10am–8pm first Thursday of the month Admission: $22 Adult; $14 Youth; FREE for kids 3 and under and Burke members Free/Discounted Museum Days: Free for all the first Thursday of the month Special Events: Virtual field trips, at-home Fossil Fun Packs, and more year round! Summer camps: www.burkemuseum.org/education Parent & Kid-Friendly Features: Dinosaurs, animals, art, play spaces and educational activities throughout the museum Museum Cafe: Yes COVID-19: Masks required for visitors over age 2, physical distancing, extra cleaning and sanitation stations. See burkemuseum.org for the latest safety guidelines.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

The museum’s T. Rex skull and other amazing fossils! They’ll also enjoy watching scientists and artists working in the museum’s visible workrooms and labs, stepping into incredible canoes, and getting some energy out in the museum’s play space set up like a local field research campsite.

How their kids can see potential career paths in the sciences and arts in action through the visible workrooms. They’ll also love the chance to get a closer look at the cultures and wildlife that make the Pacific Northwest so special with monumental art and towering biology exhibits.

Children's Museum of Skagit County MUSEUM info Website: www.SkagitChildrensMuseum.net Address: 432 Fashion Way, Burlington, WA 98233 Hours: Check our website for current information! Admission: $7.75/person, $6.75/Military & Senior, $3.00/Museums for All/EBT, Free for children under 12 months of age (admission prices subject to change) Free/Discounted Days: Check our website for current information! Special Events: Check our website for current information! Summer Camps: www.SkagitChildrensMuseum.net/ education/camps After school: Check our website for current information! Parent/Kid friendly features: Interactive exhibits and activities for kids of all ages to learn through hands-on play. Celebrations and events throughout the year. Museum Explorers Preschool. Museum store. Memberships available. COVID-19: Check our website for current information!

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

A real tug boat, semi-truck, crane and so much more to explore in the Main Street exhibits-Café, Dental Office, Doctor’s Office, Bank, Design Studio, Grocery Store and Construction Site. Create in the Art Studio, discover the Reading Room, Toddler Farmyard, Barn, STEAM Lane, Theatre Stage, Music Studio, and Train exhibits.

The exhibits are as much fun for adults as they are for children! The museum offers opportunities and resources for parents to engage with their children, learn more about the community, in an atmosphere that feels welcoming and relaxed. Exhibits are filled with components that inspire curiosity, exploration and fun!

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Explore a museum with your child today!

Hands On Children's Museum SC AV EN GE R HU NT

discoveries Don’t miss these five exciting m at Hands On Children’s Museu

New Bouldering on the Beach Build confidence and problem-solving skills while free climbing on a giant boulder and other structures on the Puget Sound Beach.

Ballcano Get your hands wet and experience the different states of water. Play with a steam bell and launch balls into the 8-foot-tall water vortex.

Megan D Schooner Captain an authentic wooden schooner, climb a 6-foot rope ladder, play in the crow’s nest, and navigate the ship’s rickety bridge to explore the hull.

P HOTO © BILLY HUSTACE P HOTOGRAP H Y

U FIND EACH ONE! CHECK THEM OFF AS YO

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

150 interactive exhibits including new Bouldering on the Beach exhibit, Megan D Schooner, Art Studio & MakeSpace, two-story Climber and Stream Slide, Ballcano, Emergency!, and more. Plus, unique Outdoor Discovery Center, Lighthouse Lookout, outdoor tinkering stations, and water play inside and out. Summer long Summer Splash! event features themed adventures, special guests, and activities.

Washington’s award-winning museum on Olympia’s waterfront adjacent to WET Science Center and Plaza with 250’ interactive stream. Near downtown, Farmer’s Market, and Percival Landing. Clean and beautiful facility with fresh foods, in the PlayDay Café. Voted “Best Family Fun Destination” by Showcase Magazine & The Olympian Best of South Sound.

MUSEUM info Airways Maze Send scarves and yarn balls through a 25-foot Airways Maze and try to catch them! Change the airflow direction and watch how the pathway changes.

Website: www.hocm.org Address: 414 Jefferson St. NE, Olympia, WA 98501 Hours: www.hocm.org/hours-admissions Admission: General Admission (18 mo–64 yrs) $14.95, Seniors (65+) $12.95, Military/First Responder/Foster Family (with valid ID) $12.95, FREE for members

Free/Discounted Museum Days: EBT Cardholders: First 2 guests free/each add. $2 Special Events: Summer Slash! (June-Aug), Boo Bash (Oct), Noon Year’s (Dec 31), Ice Adventures (Jan), Spring Break Weeks (Mar-April)

Tides to Trees Climber

Climb to the second story and swirl down the stream slide or continue climbing to the giant eagle’s nest perched 20 feet in the air.

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Summer Camps: www.hocm.org/summercamps Weekend/After School: www.hocm.org/cal Museum Cafe: Yes Family-Friendly Features: Preschool, Sensory Friendly Hour (Sundays), Birthday Parties, Private Events

COVID-19: Please visit www.hocm.org/covid-19 for updates


Explore a museum with your child today!

hibulb cultural center and natural history preserve SC AV EN GE R HU NT

g discoveries Don’t miss these five excitin nter Ce al ltur Cu at Hibulb U FIND EACH ONE! CHECK THEM OFF AS YO

Longhouse

Traditionally, longhouses were homes made from cedar planks that were used for gatherings and communal living. Today, Tulalip Tribes has one central longhouse that is still used for ceremonies.

Point Elliott Treaty

The Point Elliott Treaty of 1855 is a living document that protects the rights and culture of the Tulalip Tribes. The signing of the Treaty is one of the most pivotal points in Tulalip history.

Dentalium shells Dentalium shells were used as currency and regalia. Mostly used for trade, these small, tubular mollusks were symbols of wealth and were commonly incorporated in traditional wear.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Stories are given as gifts to make one more knowledgeable. Young people can immerse themselves in the stories, music, canoes, cedar and salmon interactive exhibits of the Tulalip people’s past and present at the cultural center.

Our senior curator described the cultural center as the intellectual and cultural soul of the Tulalip people. The center incorporates history, language, science and art in the hands-on activities for a unique, enjoyable learning experience.

MUSEUM info Website: www.hibulbculturalcenter.org

Teaching pole Teaching poles were carvings that represented stories and the morals behind them. In the winter months, grandparents would tell stories to children in the longhouse.

Address: Hibulb Cultural Center and Natural History Preserve, 6410 23rd AVE NE Tulalip, WA 98271, 360-716-2600

Hours: Monday: Closed, Tuesday–Friday 10am–5pm, Saturday–Sunday noon–5pm Free the 1st Thursday of each month, open 10am–5pm on those days

Admission: Adult (18 and over): $10, Senior (50+): $7, Student (6-17): $6, Military & Veterans: $6, Child (5 and under): FREE, Family: $25 (2 adults and up to 4 children) Special Events for Families: Yes Summer Day Camps/Classes: Tour programs offered Afterschool/Weekend Classes: Yes

Stone net weights

Programs for Schools/Homeschoolers: Yes Family-friendly features: Interactive exhibits, hands-on activity options

Stone net weights were used to weigh down nets for beach seining and fishing. These weights helped the net sink down to catch fish, or to anchor nets in place.

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Explore a museum with your child today!

Kids Discovery Museum (KiDiMu) SC AV EN GE R HU NT

discoveries Don’t miss these five exciting DiMu) at Kids Discovery Museum (Ki U FIND EACH ONE! CHECK THEM OFF AS YO

Mission to the Moon Explore how other cultures view the moon, create your own moon story, and design, build, and test your very own spacecraft!

Nature Microscope Zoom in and out as you investigate the natural world under our microEYE microscope.

Dinosaur Bones What kind of dinosaur will you build? Buildable dinosaur bones are on our second floor, and we can’t wait to see what prehistoric creature you will create!

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Junior astronauts will blast off into outer space in our Mission to the Moon exhibit. Veterinariansin-training will love our new Ready, Vet, Go space. KiDiMu’s hands-on exhibits invite children to learn through play. Our daily art and science activities engage early learners to imagine, discover, and grow.

Just steps from the ferry, Kids Discovery Museum is in the heart of downtown Bainbridge Island. Our two-story, LEEDcertified building is surrounded by parks, restaurants, shops, and rocky beaches. Engage in play! Make patterns on our light wall and construct towers with blue blocks. You will have as much fun as your little ones!

MUSEUM info Ready, Vet, Go Tend to your cat, dog, or rabbit in our new Ready, Vet, Go exhibit. Grab your stethoscope and clipboard and begin an exam as a veterinarian-in-training!

Website: www.kidimu.org Address: 301 Ravine Lane NE, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 Hours: Summer Hours: Fri–Sun 9am–4pm, Winter Hours: Mon, Wed, Fri 1pm–4pm, Tues, Thurs, Sat, Sun 9am–4pm. Check www.kidimu.org for current hours. Cost: Single admission: $8, Members and children under 1: FREE, Museums for All: $3 Free/Discounted Museum Days: Free days offered throughout the year, check our website www.kidimu.org!

Special Events: Holidays at KiDiMu featuring gingerbread house building

Light Wall What patterns can you create or words can you spell on our giant light wall? Leave your masterpiece for all to enjoy!

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and a sock skating rink (Dec), Noon Year’s Eve (Dec. 31st)

Summer Day Camp: www.kidimu.org/camp Weekend/After-School: Daily pop-up art or science activity Family-Friendly Features: Preschool, Camps & Workshops, Birthday Parties, After-Hours Events

COVID-19: Masks for ages 3+ and hand washing upon entry


Explore a museum with your child today!

KidsQuest Children's Museum SC AV EN GE R HU NT

discoveries Don’t miss these five exciting m at KidsQuest Children’s Museu U FIND EACH ONE! CHECK THEM OFF AS YO

Mouse house

This tiny mouse house is hiding in our Bellevue Mercantile exhibit. The discovery of this tiny delight brings joy to children and adults alike. Press button for the full experience!

Story Tree quote Run your hand across this quote as you feel the words that fill the stories in our Story Tree. Climb up to find a cozy spot to enjoy a book.

Magnifying glass

The giant magnifying glass guides you to one of our unique exhibit spaces and gives children an opportunity for reflection as they realize it is also a mirror.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Kids will love that every corner of the museum offers new opportunities for hands-on play. They can drive a real truck, test their agility by climbing over 25 feet high, or get soaked in water. Join us for camp activities every day this summer in the Learning Lab.

Adults will love that children engage in thought provoking, independent play. You’ll love that your child will once again experience the joy of making a new friend. Grab a paint brush and create something new in our Learning Lab or head up our magical Story Tree for a cozy read.

MUSEUM info Website: www.kidsquestmuseum.org

Sequence Boards in Climber

If you make it to the top of the Atrium Climber, look around for a special surprise. Sit back, relax and create! Fun fact, the Climber is 2 ½ stories!

Address: 1116 108th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98004 Adjacent to the Bellevue Library and Ashwood Park

Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Sunday 9:30am–5pm; Friday and Saturday 9:30am–7:30pm

Cost: Members: FREE, Children Under 1: FREE, Children over 1: $10, Adult Timed Ticket: $10, Seniors 60+: $10

Free/Discounted Museum Days: Discounts are available everyday! Museums For All: $3, Military/First Responder: FREE (5/28–9/6), Microsoft Prime: $5.50 Special Events: Super Science Night, Spooktacular, or monthly Family Adventures www.kidsquestmuseum.org/programs/special_activities_for_all_ages

Space Needle All aboard! Make your way to the train table in our City Scape gallery where you’ll notice some familiar landmarks. Bonus point if you can um. spot our KidsQuest’s green muse

Summer Day Camps/Classes: www.kidsquestmuseum.org/programs/summer-camp After-School/Weekend Classes: www.kidsquestmuseum.org/programs/school-age-programs-2

Programs for Schools/Homeschoolers: www.kidsquestmuseum.org/programs/field-trips

Family-Friendly Features: Take a piece of the museum home with you at our Museum Toy Store. Low sensory opportunities each month. Book a birthday party to celebrate a loved one or experience a private event with only your friends and family.

Covid-19: Check our website for updates: www.kidsquestmuseum.org

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Explore a museum with your child today!

Museum of glass MUSEUM info Website: www.museumofglass.org Address: 1801 Dock Street, Tacoma, WA 98402 Hours: Spring through July 4, Friday–Sunday, 10am–5pm Starting July 8, Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5pm Admission: $17 - Adults, $14 - Seniors (62+)/Students/ Military (with ID), $5 - Children (6–12), Free - Children (under 6), Free - Museum Members, $15 - AAA Members, $1/person; $2/family - EBT Cardholders Special Events: Family Day: Family Days at Museum of Glass invite visitors of all ages to tap into their imaginations and make their own art, guided by a MOG Educator. They occur from 1–4pm on the second Saturday of each month. Kids Design Glass: Watch as MOG’s Hot Shop Team brings a child’s drawing to life in the Hot Shop. One entry is selected to be interpreted into glass monthly. Junior Curator Academy: Join MOG educators in this interactive mini-series as they explore the creative process, influences, and materials used in individual works of art, objects, and installations at Museum of Glass. COVID-19: Museum of Glass follows state and county guidelines related to covid-19. Tacoma Pierce County Department of Health for the latest.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

The Hot Shop at Museum of Glass is an active glassblowing studio! Watching hot molten glass turn into forms is mesmerizing and appeals to kids natural sense of wonder. Leaving the Hot Shop, families can check out glass forms designed by children in MOG’s Kids Design Glass installation.

Located in downtown Tacoma, Museum of Glass is a makers space, celebrating glass art with live glassblowing, gallery exhibitions, and hands-on art projects. The combination of activities makes for a great family day trip.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Trains! Train ride, model trains, Snoqualmie depot has a climb-aboard train car

Trains! A train ride that includes a stop to view the Snoqualmie River from the top of Snoqualmie Falls; The history of how the railway changed EVERYTHING!

northwest railway museum MUSEUM info Website: TrainMuseum.org Address: 38625 SE King Street, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Hours: 10am–5pm Admission: $0–$30 (Depends on event) Free/Discounted Museum Days: Free for members Special Events: Steam Train Rides, Day Out With Thomas, Halloween Train, Santa Train Camps, classes, virtual experiences: Visit TrainMuseum.org for details Parent & Kid-Friendly Features: Trains of all sizes — Real & Models; Train Rides, Historic Snoqualmie Depot, Bookstore, Train Shed Exhibit Hall COVID-19: Everyone over the age of 5 must wear a mask that covers both nose and mouth while visiting (required by CDC’s railway requirements)

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Explore a museum with your child today!

Pacific Bonsai Museum MUSEUM info Website: www.pacificbonsaimuseum.org Address: 2515 S. 336th Street, Federal Way, WA 98001 Hours: 10am–4pm, Tuesday–Sunday (closed Mondays) Admission: By donation ($10 suggested for adults) Free days: Always accessible to all Special Events: In typical years, BonsaiFest! (spring) and A Bonsai Solstice (winter) with kid-centered programming. Summer day camps: Virtual Field Trips (see www.pacificbonsaimuseum.org/learn/field_trips)

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Parent/Kid friendly features: ~60 bonsai are on display year-round; children and parents alike find the tiny trees captivating and enchanting; experience the exhibits at your own pace; interpretive materials available to read about each bonsai; a clean, well cared for outdoor museum; flat, fine gravel walkways are stroller/wheelchair accessible.

Seeing an amazing variety of beautiful, tiny trees living outdoors year-round. Kids can see and “Be the Bonsai” by looking at the shape of a tree and mimicking its form with their posture and limbs.

Bonsai are displayed as artworks inside of a forest of bigger trees, which sets up a magical experience of nature. The Museum is a safe space to be outdoors, breathe fresh air, and appreciate living art. Free Virtual Field Trips include lesson plans and activity sheets for art, STEM, and social studies curricula.

COVID-19: Mask-wearing encouraged; hand sanitizer available; the entire exhibition area is hands-off.

washington state history museum MUSEUM info Website: www.WashingtonHistory.org Address: 1911 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma, WA 98402 Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 10am–5pm; Third Thursdays 10am–8pm Admission: Ages 5 and under, FREE; Students ages 6-18, $11; adults, $14; seniors age 65+, $11; active duty military and up to five family members, FREE through Sept. 6 (with ID). Discounted Days: Third Thursdays free admission 3–8pm; August 7 IN THE SPIRIT Festival, free all day. Special Events: Largest model train layout on public view in Washington! New “360” gallery opens in July; IN THE SPIRIT Festival August 7. Summer classes: www.WashingtonHistory.org/events Parent and Kid-Friendly Features: Family friendly exhibits, accessible museum, cafes and restaurants surrounding the museum. New “360” exhibition features a treasure hunt for dioramas. Amazing model train layout! Covid-19 Rules: WSHM follows the Dept. of Health guidelines; as of June, masks are required for museum visitors, check website for updates. Hand sanitizing stations located throughout the museum.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Kids go bananas for our huge model train layout! They also love seeing Dave and Dandy, the oxen that pulled Ezra Meeker’s covered wagon along the Oregon Trail. They’ll have fun hunting for the tiny felt mice dressed in historic costumes in the 360 gallery; and they’ll be intrigued by Galloping Gertie!

Learning history has never been more important or more fun! Your kids will be enchanted by the new 360 gallery, stories of migration and immigration, mammoth teeth and Clovis points. You’ll all feel smarter and more connected with the past and present when you explore the Washington State History Museum.

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Explore a museum with your child today!

white river valley museum MUSEUM info Website: wrvmuseum.org Address: 918 H Street SE, Auburn, WA 98002 Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, noon–4pm Admission: FREE every day for the rest of 2021! Special Events: Closets of Curiosity — A special exhibit just for families! www.wrvmuseum.org/exhibits Summer camps: Museum summer camps available through the Auburn Parks Department: www.auburnwa. gov/city_hall/parks_arts_recreation/recreation/ summer_camps Parent & Kid-Friendly Features: Free parking, friendly staff, hands on exhibits, scavenger hunts, park setting COVID-19: The Museum follows all State guidance and regulations.

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

The Museum’s new exhibit, Closets of Curiosity, was created with kids in mind and is basically a giant game of I Spy! In the permanent exhibits kids will love the hands on exhibits like the kid’s tents, smell bottles, discovery boxes, pony ride, and scavenger hunts.

Parents will love that the Museum is Free! They will appreciate that the Museum is engaging, but not overwhelming. Parents will be thrilled that the Museum is located in the awesome Les Gove Park with a fantastic playground, splashpad, and a King County Library — so much to do!

What kids will love:

What parents will love:

Kids will have fun learning about Seattle history and Asian American and Pacific Islander culture by being immersed in the ChinatownInternational District and our community curated exhibits. In our theater we host the must-see live Virtual Historic Hotel Tour showcasing the Freeman Hotel, where early Asian pioneers resided, that is above the Museum.

Give your kids an experience that opens their eyes to new cultures and perspectives in ways that textbooks can’t. Exhibits currently on display include Seattle icons like Bruce Lee and Gerard Tsutakawa, an exhibit on beauty standards on Asian culture, and ways people celebrate Lunar New Year across the world.

Wing Luke Museum MUSEUM info Website: www.wingluke.org Address: 719 S King St., Seattle, WA 98104 Hours: Friday–Sunday; 10am–5pm Admission: $17 Adult, $15 Senior, $10 Youth, $12.50 Student, Free for child under 5, Free for up to 5 individuals with EBT card

Summer camp: www.wingluke.org/summer-camp After School: www.wingluke.org/programs/#p-youth Parent and kid-friendly features: An interactive kid’s exhibit on Lunar New Year celebrations around the world, “New Years All Year Round”

COVID-19: www.wingluke.org/welcome-back

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Find fun

all summer long » seattleschild.com Get ideas for family-friendly, outdoor active fun! Spray parks are back! 15 Seattle-area spray parks to cool off in this summer

Cama Beach waterfront cabins may be just the change of scenery your family needs

On the water: 11 options for Seattle boat rentals and tours

Family whale-watching trip: A parent’s review and tips

Rattlesnake Ridge with kids: It’s not easy, but you can do it!

Hike with kids: Beautiful Nisqually refuge teems with wildlife

No reservation? No problem. Here’s where to get a last-minute campsite


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