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State Employees Association of North Carolina, SEIU Local 2008 1621 Midtown Place, Raleigh, NC 27609 • www.seanc.org 800-222-2758 • 919-833-6436 • Circulation 55,000

September 2014

• Vol. 32, Issue 9

Final Budget Includes Raises, COLAs, Bonus Leave By Jonathan Owens

SEANC Executive Director Dana Cope discusses pay raises and the state budget with Rep. Tim Moore (R-Cleveland) at the General Assembly in July. Moore was named one of SEANC’s Legislators of the Year in 2013 for his efforts to improve the lives of state workers.

After many proposals, tense negotiations and hundreds of phone calls from SEANC members, legislators finally agreed on a budget in late July that increases most active employees’ salaries by $1,000 and retirees’ pension checks with a 1-percent cost-of-living adjustment. SEANC fought for and secured five extra vacation days in the final budget. These five days have no expiration and can be carried over from year to year. The salary increase is the largest for state employees in the last six years. This figure represents a 2.7-percent increase for a state worker making the median salary of $37,000. Add to that the five bonus vacation days, and many state employees will see a total compensation increase of 4.7 percent — the largest such increase since 2007-2008. The impact is even more pronounced for an early career worker making $25,000. For these employees, the pay increase is a 4-percent raise, with a total compensation increase of 6 percent. In addition, Highway Patrol officers, magistrates and clerks of court received a one-step pay increase. Gov. Pat McCrory and the Senate’s proposed budgets contained no bonus vacation days and an $809 pay raise for state employees. SEANC lobbyists worked with lead House budget writer Rep. Nelson Dollar and Senate leader Phil Berger to secure five bonus vacation days in addition to the pay increase. SEANC members stepped up to the plate as budget negotiations dragged on

PHOTO BY TONI DAVIS

SEANC Asst. Director of Communications

Budget Highlights

The amended state budget includes: • $1,000 base salary increase for most active state employees, excluding non-certified education employees, who will see a $500 increase. The pay raise will be retroactive to July 1. • Five bonus days of leave that will not expire for most active state employees. The vacation days go into effect Sept. 1. • One-step pay increases for state troopers, magistrates and clerks of court. • A 1-percent cost-of-living increase for state retirees.

into the summer. Reports from legislative staff members indicate that hundreds of calls came from members concerned that state employees would be left behind in the debate. The budget compromise also allowed state employees to maintain their longevity pay in addition to their pay raise. While some teachers will receive an average of a 7-percent pay increase, that amount is not being shared equally among all. A majority of teachers will receive less than 3 percent

— and some less than 1 percent. Their longevity is also figured into that pay scale. Teacher assistant positions were originally eliminated, but the legislature passed the buck to local government by funding those positions but cutting elsewhere in education, forcing local governments to make hard decisions on whether to keep assistants or pay for teacher raises. All non-certified school personnel were caught in politics, and part of the funds that would have given them an equal raise to other state employees were used for teachers. They will only receive a $500 raise this year. The General Assembly has not adjourned in the traditional sense, and may return to session in mid-November, after the elections, to discuss Medicaid and other matters.As always, SEANC’s lobbyists will be on the ground from gavel to gavel to ensure that your voices are heard. jowens@seanc.org, Twitter @jonbowens


President’s Message By Sidney M. Sandy SEANC President

It’s a Matter of Transparency for SEANC

The following is a letter sent from SEANC President Sidney M. Sandy to the editors of the News & Observer in response to an editorial unfairly accusing SEANC Executive Director Dana Cope of waging a personal war with State Treasurer Janet Cowell. This letter was published in the June 19 edition of the News & Observer.

I

read with great dismay your June 17 editorial “Let it go” on SEANC’s investigation into State Treasurer Janet Cowell’s mishandling of our pension fund. This is not a personal crusade against Cowell. This is a SEANC membership-led effort to make sure that 6 percent of state employees’ paychecks is safe and to ensure the retirement security of state employees who have dedicated a lifetime of public service to North Carolina. Sandy Let’s get something straight: That’s our money in the retirement system. It’s not Cowell’s to use as a bargaining chip to gain political favors in the General Assembly and campaign contributions from Wall Street. You say that our fund is “secure – thanks to a conservatively managed pension fund.” That is incorrect. It is one of the best-funded pensions in the country thanks to our contributions and those recently from the General Assembly, not because Cowell is a master investor. Last year her investments netted over 2-percent less than the median public pension system nationwide, which equates to about $2 billion in unrealized gains for our system. That’s why our retiree council and executive committee unanimously approved hiring former SEC attorney and pension expert Ted Siedle to investigate the fund. Executive Director Dana Cope didn’t call for this investigation. We, the membership, did. A few years ago, SEANC spoke out against then-Treasurer Richard Moore’s pay-to-play shenanigans. It turned out we were right then, by Cowell’s own recent admission. We’re right on this one, too. It’s always best to look at who stands to benefit the most. If SEANC is right, what do we gain? We gain transparency for our hard-earned pension dollars and peace of mind for our members. What does Cowell

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The Reporter • September 2014

“The needs of 800,000 North Carolinians should outweigh the personal desires of one politician.” stand to lose? A whole bunch of campaign donations, for one. The potential of a million-dollar job when she leaves office, just like Moore received, for another. The needs of 800,000 North Carolinians should outweigh the personal desires of one politician. Your mentioning that Cowell worked in the financial industry and has a degree from Wharton only furthers our point. She’s entrenched with Wall Street. She’s not looking out for us. Instead of taking personal shots at our executive director, you should actually read our report and comb through the reports we received from the Treasurer’s office in response to our public records request. You would see the treasurer does not include the “fees and expenses of investment managers” paid by the system in her annual report. You would see the many heavily redacted “reports” from money managers that we received from her office. You would see that she has the power to move more than $30 billion of our money to secret accounts that would never see the light of day under today’s laws – all the while calling it “trade secrets.” All we want is openness. After all, it’s our money at stake. sandman4seanc@aol.com

The Reporter, USPS 009-852 (ISSN 1069 2142), is published nine times a year in the months of February, March, April, May, June, July, September, November and December for $2.50 per year, per member, by the State Employees Association of North Carolina, Inc., 1621 Midtown Place, Raleigh, NC 27609. Periodicals postage paid at Raleigh and additional offices. POSTMASTER Send address changes to: THE REPORTER 1621 Midtown Place Raleigh, NC 27609


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The Reporter • September 2014

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PUBLIC POLICY

A Look Back at the Legislative Session By Toni Davis

SEANC Director of Communications

Each year SEANC advocates for legislative policies as determined by SEANC members during the annual convention held each September. As of Aug. 6, SEANC had achieved five of the Top Ten Policy Platform Objectives and numerous other items important to public services and the people who provide them.

Pay

n Won Five Bonus Vacation Days — Gov. Pat McCrory and the Senate’s proposed budgets contained no bonus vacation days and an $809 pay raise for state employees. SEANC lobbyists worked with lead House budget writer Rep. Nelson Dollar and Senate leader Phil Berger to secure five bonus vacation days in addition to a larger increase in base pay. These five days have no expiration and can be carried over from year to year. n Secured $1,000 Pay Raise — After months of SEANC advocacy and lengthy negotiations, the compromise budget included a $1,000 pay raise for most state employees. This represents a 2.7-percent increase for a state worker making the median salary of $37,000. Add to that the five bonus vacation days, and many state employees will see a total compensation increase of 4.7 percent – the largest such increase since 20072008. The impact is even more pronounced for an early career correctional officer or Department of Transportation worker making $25,000. For these employees, the pay increase is a 4-percent raise, with a total compensation increase of 6 percent. In addition, state Highway Patrol troopers, magistrates and clerks of court received a one-step pay increase. n Maintained Longevity Pay — State employees maintained their longevity pay in addition to their pay raise. n Secured a 1-percent COLA for retirees — After the Senate’s budget proposal included just an 0.8-percent increase, SEANC worked with the lawmakers to increase the costof-living adjustment.

Jobs

n Preserved Children’s Developmental Services Agencies — This year SEANC was able to halt consolidation of the Department of Health and Human Services Children’s Developmental Services Agencies contained in the Senate and the original House Budget. These CDSAs provide toddlers

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The Reporter • September 2014

who have developmental delays with occupational, speech and physical therapy, among other services, and have been under attack for months. SEANC worked with Rep. Jean Farmer-Butterfield (D-Wilson), who sponsored an amendment which eliminated the requirement to close four Southeastern CDSA Regional offices and allows DHHS to consider alternative means to achieve required budget cuts. n Saved Family Court Jobs — SEANC successfully advocated for funding in the House budget to restore family court services after members contacted the association for assistance.

Retirement System

n Fully Funded Retirement System — For the fourth year in a row, SEANC helped secure full funding for the Teachers’ and State Employees’ Retirement System. This year the state is contributing 9.15 percent. n Maintained Defined Benefit Retirement Plan — In order to maintain a self-supporting and sustainable retirement system, SEANC

THE

Toni Davis, Editor-In-Chief Jonathan Owens, Managing Editor Alicia Miller, Associate Editor Beth Dew, Associate Editor Matthew Whittle, Associate Editor State Employees Association of North Carolina 1621 Midtown Place • Raleigh, NC 27609 Telephone 919-833-6436, 800-222-2758 www.seanc.org

Advertising Policy SEANC accepts advertising material from companies and persons seeking to communicate with SEANC members. Acceptance of this advertising does not indicate SEANC approval or endorsement of any representation that the message, product or service is as represented by the advertiser. SEANC accepts no responsibility and shall not be liable for any use of or reliance on any such information, product or service. SEANC is a private entity and is under no obligation to carry advertisements of any nature, political or otherwise, that may be viewed as contrary to the interests of the association and its membership.


PUBLIC POLICY hired expert forensic investigator Ted Siedle to examine transparency and governance concerns with TSERS and to determine how much members paid in investment fees. Siedle’s estimated investment fees paid by the retirement system at an astounding $1 billion. The report sparked a flurry of legislation about transparency necessary to maintain a defined benefit plan. n First Independent Audit of TSERS — Siedle’s report pointed out that the $87 billion retirement system had never been audited. Lawmakers took notice and included an item in the budget requiring the State Auditor to hire an independent auditor to conduct the first-ever audit of TSERS for 2016. n Denied Treasurer Pension Secrecy Bill — Wall Street and state Treasurer Janet Cowell pushed for HB1209 - a bill that would have kept contracts secret for at least five years after they end. Most of these contracts are a minimum of 10 years, meaning secrecy for at least 15 years. Not only would it be unlikely to hold politicians accountable through the elections process, but the statute of limitations would have expired, preventing any legal recourse. HB1209 passed the House State Personnel Committee but never made it to the House floor. A companion bill in the Senate, SB878, was heard in the Senate Pensions and Retirement Committee but was pulled before a vote after SEANC spoke against the bill as “anti-taxpayer” and Sen. Shirley Randleman (R-Wilkes) noted that she had asked for investment information herself from the Treasurer’s Office years ago and still had not received it. n Return to Five-Year Pension Vesting — A bill was signed into law that moves the time frame for vesting in the retirement system from 10 to five years for all employees hired on or after Aug. 1, 2011. This measure takes effect on Jan. 1, 2015.

Health Care

n No State Health Plan Premium Increases for the PPO 80/20 — The State Health Plan’s finances were healthy in large part because of the wellness surcharges paid by members, as recommended by the Treasurer’s office. SEANC was the only group to speak out against premiums for the PPO 80/20 plan during State Health Plan board meetings. The good news is that there will be no premium increases in 2015. Unfortunately $22 million in surplus funds from the State Health Plan were used for pay raises at the suggestion of state Treasurer Janet Cowell rather than decreasing premiums. SEANC believes that State Health Plan surpluses should be used to benefit State Health Plan members. n Continued State Health Plan Premium-Free Option — The PPO Basic 70/30 Plan continues to be a premium-free health care option with no benefit reductions.

n Autism treatment covered in the State Health Plan — Effective Jan. 1, 2015, the State Health Plan will begin to cover Applied Behavioral Analysis therapy for dependent children of State Health Plan members diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. This was a two-year advocacy effort with Autism Speaks, and SEANC spoke out on behalf of these children and their families before the State Health Plan Board of Trustees and the General Assembly. n Defeated separate UNC health plan — Buried in the Senate’s budget proposal was a provision that would allow the University of North Carolina System to establish its own health insurance plan for non-permanent adjunct faculty/ teaching and graduate assistants, separate from that covering other part-time employees in other state agencies and public schools. This would have weakened the State Health Plan by opening the door for all UNC system employees to be moved to a separate health plan.

Worker Rights

n Due Process Rights Maintained — SEANC worked with Rep. Tim Moore (R-Cleveland) and House Speaker Thom Tillis’ staff to take out an entire section of a bill that would have adversely impacted state employee due process under the State Human Resources Act. The removed section likely would have made substantive changes to the State Human Resources system. The changes would have affected the powers of the State Human Resources Commission, rules about how exempt employees may be transferred, demoted or separated from their positions and rules about how employees may challenge material in their files. The concern was that without an appropriate amount of time to review the changes, state employees could have been harmed. n Unfair Grievance Proposal Defeated — Gov. Pat McCrory attempted in his budget to take away the right of state employees to have employment cases heard by an impartial Administrative Law Judge and instead have those cases heard by Office of State Human Resources political appointees. SEANC successfully fought to keep this language out of the final budget despite repeated attempts by the administration.

SEANC Operations

n Maintained SEANC Dues Deductions — SEANC worked to ensure that no legislation was filed that would remove SEANC’s ability to deduct dues from the North Carolina state payroll system. tdavis@seanc.org, Twitter @tonicdavis

The Reporter • September 2014

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2014 CONVENTION

Building a Better Work in Progress

31st Annual SEANC Convention Greensboro • Sept. 4-6, 2014 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION


2014 CONVENTION

What’s Happening @ Convention 2014! Building a Better

• Elect statewide SEANC officers • Participate in valuable training sessions that will help you in your job and life • Determine SEANC’s Top 10 Policy Platform Objectives • Attend the Carolina On My Mind banquet on Thursday evening and enjoy food, music and fun*

Work in Progress

• Enjoy the Saturday evening A Night With the SEANC Stars banquet, when officers will be inducted and SEANC awards will be presented* • Donate to the community service project to benefit the SEANC Scholarship Foundation* *Participation in all banquets and the community service project is optional for attendees.

CASH RAFFLE!

Convention Delegate Checklist

GRAND PRIZE $6,000

Get a jump start on convention activities. Visit seanc.org/convention for more information.

FIRST PRIZE $3,000

o Study the proposed policy platform objectives and bylaws amendments up for consideration o Bring funds to donate to the SEANC Scholarship Foundation through the community service project o Find out more about special events o Study the list of statewide candidates Do you have questions about convention? Contact Alicia Miller, CMP, at amiller@seanc.org 919-833-6436 or 800-222-2758

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The Reporter • September 2014

SECOND PRIZE $1,000

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Sep State Employees Association of North Carolina Thanks to your generosity, this year SEANC awarded 46 scholarships totaling $38,000!

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2014 CONVENTION

CANDIDATES FOR SEANC STATEWIDE OFFICE ANNOUNCED SEANC leadership for 2014-2015 will be determined by approximately 850 delegates at the 31st Annual SEANC Convention on Sept. 5. SEANC Bylaws require members to announce their candidacy in writing or in person to the Board of Governors no later than 45 days prior to the annual convention or nominations can be submitted from the convention floor. Statewide officer terms are for one year and begin Oct. 1, 2014, and run through Sept. 30, 2015. Officers may hold the same office for two consecutive years.

1ST VICE PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT

Anthony

Fish

Art Anthony of District 39 is a 20-year state employee and SEANC member and served the last two years as First Vice President. Anthony received his bachelor’s degree from Shaw University and works at North Carolina State University as a research specialist. He is a Raleigh resident. Wayne Fish of District 2 is a 16-year state employee and 14-year SEANC member and served the last two years as the top elected officer in EMPAC, Statewide Chairman. This year Wayne led a lobbying effort to attend legislative committee meetings to push SEANC’s Top 10 legislative priorities. He is a graduate of Asheville-Buncombe Community College and works as a correctional food service manager II with the Department of Public Safety. He is a Weaverville resident.

Gales

Hailey

Drewery

Jones

Betty “B.J.” Jones of District 42 is a 28-year state employee and SEANC member who served the last two years as Treasurer. A graduate of St. Augustine’s University, Jones also completed a master’s degree in business administration from Strayer University. Jones is a Medicaid Financial Analyst for the Department of Health and Human Services. She is a Zebulon resident.

Ross Hailey of District 58 is retired from the Department of Transportation with 27 years service as an engineer and has been a member of SEANC and NCSGEA for 40 years. He serves on the Retiree Council and Policy Platform Committee and has been District 58 Chairman through the years. He graduated from Wake Technical Community College. He is a Washington, N.C., resident.

TREASURER

2ND VICE PRESIDENT Stanley Drewery of District 67 retired with 30 years of state service with both the Department of Transportation and the Department of Public Safety and has been a member of SEANC for 32 years. He currently serves on the Executive Committee as Eastern Region Representative. He is a veteran and served six years in the Army National Guard. He is a Grifton resident.

Stanley Gales of District 26 is a 26-year state employee and SEANC member and served the last two years as Second Vice President. He works as a maintenance supervisor in the Department of Public Safety. Gales is a veteran and completed the electrical program at Durham Technical Community College. He is a Durham resident.

Evans

Hunter

McLaurin

Gloria Highsmith Evans is the chairwoman of District 65. She has been a SEANC member and state employee for 12 years. She served as Eastern Region Representative to the Executive Committee in 2012-2013. She works at East Carolina University School of Medicine. She holds a degree from Martin Community College. She is a Greenville resident. Nicole Hunter is a member of District 43 and has been a SEANC member for 13 years. She works in the Division of Motor Vehicles. She currently serves as the treasurer of the Scholarship Foundation. She is a Raleigh resident. Darius McLaurin is chairman of District 40. He has been a SEANC member for 8 years and has worked in the Department of Public Safety for 21 years. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Johnson C. Smith University. He is a Raleigh resident.

STATEWIDE EMPAC CHAIRPERSON

Smith

Tony Smith, a District 5 member, is a 20-year state employee and SEANC member. He currently serves on the Executive Committee as Western Region Representative and served as SEANC president from 2008-2010. He is currently a member of the state EMPAC Committee. He is a Maintenance Supervisor IV for the Department of Public Safety. He is a Morganton resident.

Gloria Upperman of District 26 retired with 38 years of service in the Department of Public Safety. She has been a member of both SEANC and NCSGEA for 40 years. She is currently the Vice Chairwoman of the state EMPAC Committee. Upperman She holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Augustine’s University and a master’s degree from N.C. Central University. She is a Garner resident.

The Reporter • September 2014

9


2014 CONVENTION

Reaching the next generation of SEANC leaders On Thursday, SEANC delegates will hear from Meagan Johnson, a bestselling author and expert at bridging generational gaps. Meagan has become a leading expert for all things generational, working with companies like Harley-Davidson, Quaker Oats, Kraft Foods, Xerox, Dairy Queen, Burger King, Cadillac, American Express, Monster.com and the CIA to debunk generational myths and uncover the most effective ways to solve multi-generational clashes. Johnson will help SEANC members develop effective strategies for reaching out to new members, in building a better tomorrow for the association.

a night with the seanc stars Saturday, Sept. 6 at 7 p.m. Sheraton Greensboro Hotel at Four Seasons Koury Convention Center Dress Code - Black Tie Optional hosted by our own steve Lawson Tickets can be purchased on Wednesday, Sept. 3 at convention. Ticket price $45. For more information, please contact Alicia Miller, CMP at amiller@seanc.org.

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The Reporter • September 2014

31st Annual SEANC Convention Community Service Project President Sidney M. Sandy has selected the SEANC Scholarship Foundation as the Community Service Project for the 31st Annual SEANC Convention. Donations will be collected during a special presentation on Sept. 4 to benefit the SEANC Scholarship Foundation in order to award educational scholarships to SEANC members, their spouses and their dependent children. Give your best gift and help send the next generation of N.C.’s leaders to college.

Got Talent? EMPAC donors — can you sing, dance, play an instrument, perform magic or make people laugh? Come show off your talent!

10th Annual EMPAC Event It’s Showtime @ SEANC Friday, Sept. 5 7:30 p.m. - Legislative Reception 8:30 p.m. - Talent Competition followed by karaoke

Sign up to compete by signing up at the EMPAC table at convention by 6 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 4. Free to delegates and registered convention guests who sign up for or are currently giving through EMPAC payroll deduction or for members who make a minimum $25 annual donation to EMPAC.


MEMBER ACTION

PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY LYNN TUTHILL

District 65 members joined with ECU employees and other volunteers on Aug. 2 to help construct a Habitat for Humanity home in Greenville. District 65 also provided lunch, snacks and drinks for the volunteers during their morning break. Pictured with the homeowners are Lynn Tuthill, Debbie Austin, Cynthia Hart, Lina Johnson, Angela Easter with daughter Taylor, and ECU dental school residents who joined in on the effort.

District 65 also sponsored a blood drive on June 14 at the Eastern North Carolina Blood Donor Center in Greenville. A total of 10 pints of blood were donated.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY STEVE LAWSON

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY TIFFANY WOODARD

District 65 presented $500 checks to Riley’s Army, Habitat for Humanity and Ladies of Purpose at its annual meeting on June 16 at G&K Cafe in Greenville. Pictured are Jean Adams of Riley’s Army, Chelsey Waters and Jake Smith of Habitat for Humanity, and Tina Shelley of Ladies of Purpose.

District 41 held a chicken plate fundraiser on Aug. 1 at Wake Correctional Institution to help pay for various community projects. Pictured are members James Adams, Frank Brown, Eric Ray and Emily Jones.

District 12 recruited 50 new members in a blitz in Mecklenburg and Union counties Aug. 5-7. Here, District 12 member Martha House (right) talks to a perspective member at the Mecklenburg County Courthouse.

The Reporter • September 2014

11


SCHOLARSHIP

SEANC AWARDS ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS Compiled by Jonathan Owens

In June, the SEANC Scholarship Foundation awarded 46 statewide scholarships for a total of $38,000. The five categories of statewide scholarships include:

Four-year financial — a $1,000 scholarship to attend a four-year college or university. Four-year merit — a $1,000 merit scholarship to attend a four-year college or university. Two-year financial — a $500

Four-Year Financial ($1,000)

Jasmine Outlaw Williamston

Jasmine Breanna Blair Fayetteville

School: Johnson and Wales University Daughter of District 63 member Jacqueline Outlaw Department of Public Safety

School: Campbell University Daughter of District 22 member Elaine Blair Department of Public Safety

George Clayton III Swannanoa

School: UNC-Wilmington Son of District 2 member Anita Jones Clayton Department of Health & Human Services

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The Reporter • September 2014

School: N.C. A&T State University Son of District 21 member Marilyn Slaughter Durham Technical Community College

Two-Year Financial ($500) Jordan Bullins Danbury

School: UNC-Chapel Hill Daughter of District 47 member Amanjit Paintal Department of Environment and Natural Resources

Kadey Phillips Robbinsville

School: Western Carolina University Daughter of District 1 member Tressie Phillips N.C. State Highway Patrol

Jakob Phillips Statesville

School: N.C. State University Daughter of District 65 member Donna Lilley East Carolina University

School: N.C. Central University Son of District 16 member Patricia M. Martin Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools

Patrick Slaughter Durham

Anjali Paintal Raleigh

Samantha Lilley Williamston

De’Gary Martin-Hargrave Winston-Salem

School: N.C. State University Daughter of District 20 member Nataliya Rice Department of Health & Human Services

School: William Peace University Son of District 7 member Elizabeth Page Department of Health & Human Services

School: UNC-Wilmington Daughter of District 62 member Michael Davis Department of Public Safety

School: University of Wyoming Daughter of District 69 member Amy Hassell Department of Revenue

Alina Shevchenko Holly Springs

Michael Page Shelby

Shavonne Davis Leland

Katherine Hassell Elizabeth City

scholarship to attend a community college, technical school or trade school. Two-year merit — a $500 merit scholarship to attend a community college, technical school or trade school. Member only — a $500 scholarship awarded to SEANC members.

School: Western Carolina University Son of District 9 member Kristin Phillips Iredell County Schools

Kathryn Reilly Raleigh

School: N.C. State University Granddaughter of District 39 member Zola Turner Retiree

School: Forsyth Technical Community College Son of District 16 member Gregory Bullins Department of Transportation

Hayley Hall Bladenboro

School: Cape Fear Community College Daughter of District 24 member Sherry Hall N.C. Cooperative Extension

Ryan Roman Kinston

School: Lenoir Community College Son of District 66 member Lori Roman Department of Health & Human Services

Meredith Walker Sparta

School: Wilkes Community College Daughter of District 8 member Penny Walker Appalachian State University


SCHOLARSHIP Callan Loflin Denton

Four-Year Merit ($1,000)

School: Duke University Daughter of District 16 member Cheree Loflin Davidson County Schools

Morgan Barnes Raleigh

School: UNC-Chapel Hill Daughter of District 44 member Paula Barnes Wake County Public Schools

Kathryn Bradley Sanford

School: Campbell University Daughter of District 23 member Jerry Bradley Department of Transportation

Katelyn Vause Richlands

School: Lenoir-Rhyne University Daughter of District 61 member Robert Vause Department of Transportation

Megan Mathes Morganton

Chesson Ward Williamston

School: UNC-Chapel Hill Daughter of District 7 member Eddie Mathes Department of Health & Human Services

Matthew Mault Lincolnton

Keaton Bradley Mount Olive

School: US Air Force Academy Son of District 4 member Robert Mault Department of Transportation

School: East Carolina University Daughter of District 59 member Jan Bradley Wayne Community College

School: N.C. State University Daughter of District 63 member James Ward Department of Public Safety

Two-Year Merit ($500) Thomas Cowan Williamston

School: Florence-Darlington Technical College Son of District 65 member Bonnie Cowan East Carolina University

Hannah Brantham Goldsboro

School: UNC-Wilmington Daughter of District 60 member Kim Brantham Department of Health & Human Services

Tristyn Cartrette Chadbourn

School: Campbell University Daughter of District 24 member Kelly Cribb Department of Public Safety

Kayla Hardin Marble

David Morrison Hamptonville

School: N.C. State University Son of District 8 member Milton Morrison Retiree

School: Sandhills Community College Daughter of District 20 member Michael Howie Department of Public Safety

School: UNC-Wilmington Son of District 25 member Linda Nabors UNC Hospitals

School: Gardner-Webb University Daughter of District 5 member Martha Chase Caldwell County Schools

School: UNC-Chapel Hill Son of District 1 member Jeffrey Davis Western Carolina University

Jessica Howie Carthage

Jordan Nabors Apex

Mary Claire Chase Lenoir

Connor Davis Cullowee

School: Tri-County Community College Daughter of District 1 member Kenneth Hardin Department of Transportation

Jamie Berry Morganton John Nance Raleigh

School: UNC-Chapel Hill Son of District 45 member James Nance Department of Public Safety

School: Western Piedmont Community College Daughter of District 6 member James Berry Department of Health & Human Services

(Continued on Page 14)

The Reporter • September 2014

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SCHOLARSHIP Edward Lechliter Fairmont

Member Only (cont.)

School: Kaplan University Member of District 24 Department of Public Safety

Stephanie Burgess Morganton

School: Western Piedmont Community College Member of District 6 Department of Health & Human Services

Rashia Norman Darcell Carter Raleigh

School: Fayetteville State University Member of District 22 Department of Public Safety

School: Everest College Member of District 45 Department of Public Safety

Linda Swarts Jacksonville

Sherri Cook Charlotte

School: UNC-Wilmington Member of District 61 Department of Health and Human Services

School: Belmont Abbey College Member of District 12 Department of Public Safety

Mavis Fuller Goldsboro

School: Wayne Community College Member of District 59 Department of Health & Human Services

Tina Walker Goldsboro

School: Abilene Christian University Member of District 58 Wayne County Department of Social Services

Support the SEANC Scholarship Foundation! Remember to Check 1563 in the Combined Campaign! The SEANC Scholarship Foundation is included as one of the organizations you can contribute to through the State Employees Combined Campaign (SECC). This gives all SEANC members who wish to support the SECC an opportunity to designate a portion or all of their contribution to the SEANC Scholarship Foundation. Please remember to support the SEANC Scholarship Foundation when you contribute your generous and thoughtful donation to the SECC. The SEANC Scholarship Foundation’s designation number is 1563.

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The Reporter • September 2014

Six from SEANC families win SEIU scholarships by

Matthew Whittle

SEANC Communications Specialist

Service Employees International Union (SEIU), SEANC’s national affiliate, announced in late July that six students from SEANC families won scholarships. All total, the six students — all the dependents of SEANC members — will receive more than $10,000 to help further their education. Winning a $1,500 SEIU Lottery Scholarship were: • Corry Botzenhart of Jacksonville, the son of SEANC member Garry Botzenhart of District 61. • Brandon Gayle of Raleigh, the son of SEANC member Shirley Bunn of District 42. • Lauren Neville of Linden, the daughter of SEANC member Ellen Neville of District 22. Winning a renewable $1,000 SEIU Lottery Scholarship were: • Ryan Frazier of Havelock, the son of SEANC member Jamel Frazier of District 67. • Charles Hinton of Garner, the son of SEANC member Kimberly Hinton of District 37. Winning a renewable $4,000 SEIU Nora Piore Scholarship was: • Jaslina Paintal of Raleigh, the daughter of SEANC member Amanjit Paintal of District 47. SEANC congratulates all of these winners and wishes them the best of luck. mwhittle@seanc.org, Twitter @mwwhittle


PUBLIC POLICY

Quotes to Note

“As of today, I have never received any information.” N.C. Sen. Shirley Randleman (R-Wilkes), speaking on her efforts to get information about retirement investments four years ago, to her colleagues on the Senate Pensions and Retirement Committee in the July 11 WFMY-TV story “Transparency Limited In North Carolina Public Pension”

“Essentially the Treasurer is saying her proposed secrecy is slightly less secret than permanent secrecy ... The public cares about what politicians want to hide from them.”

“Our pensions get huge amounts of money to invest from the employees. I need to be able to tell my constituents that we’re protecting their money. I need to know how much we’re paying.”

SEANC Communication Director Toni Davis in a July 13 PandoDaily story titled, “North Carolina is still suing Facebook, wants to pass law banning public from knowing what else it’s doing”

N.C. Rep. Nathan Baskerville (R-Henderson), sponsor of a bill to provide true transparency to the retirement system, in the June 26 Bloomberg story, “Secrecy in Pensions Triggers Legislative Brawl in North Carolina”

“The UNC employees are state employees. “What we don’t want to see is accusations What’s next, the Department of Labor that are false, going in a file, the employee health plan? You can’t cherry-pick what not being able to respond to those. And benefits you want to be a part of and what that being out there for the public to see. benefits you don’t. It only makes sense That puts the state up for tremendous to have the (plan) be the most powerful liability and also puts the employee up for purchaser of health care that it can be.” a lifetime of heartache that’s unnecessary.” SEANC Legislative Affairs Director Ardis Watkins in a July 22 News & Observer article, “NC to decide on new health insurance option for some state workers”

Ardis Watkins in a WFMY news report from July 24 titled, “Should Discipline Records of Public Employees Be Public?”

FROM SOCIAL MEDIA

Thank you for advocating for us ... I’m greatly appreciative of the $1000 base pay raise and the 5 days leave.

District 14 member Melinda McDonald Hefner, who works at Caldwell Community College, commenting on a post about passage of the state budget.

Thank you SEANC for everything you do for state workers. Kudos Dana Cope. District 16 member Cynthia Joel, who works at Winston-Salem State University, commenting on a post about passage of the state budget.

Flooding/Storms/Falling trees on roads-Who ya gonna call? Hardworking state ee’s on call 24 hrs a day that’s who! #theydeservearaise #ncga

A tweet from @DanaDcope on July 15.

.@ThomTillis & @SenatorBerger now talking Hollywood welfare. Budget to continue program. It’s time to #LetItGo for NC taxpayers. #ncga A tweet from @seanc2008 on July 29 asking leaders to let the wasteful film incentives program expire. The Reporter • September 2014

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Periodical Postage PAID Raleigh, NC P.O. Drawer 27727 Raleigh, NC 27611

Aflac Joins SEANC’s Roster of Insurance Programs by

Matthew Whittle

SEANC Communications Specialist

One of the many benefits of being a SEANC member is having access to a number of competitive rates for a variety of insurance plans. On Sept. 1, SEANC will debut its newest partner – Aflac! With 50 million members worldwide, Aflac is one of the world’s largest and most respected supplemental insurance companies, and now its plans are available to SEANC members at competitive rates. Aflac is not a traditional insurance company. Rather than offering major medical insurance, Aflac offers insurance for daily living, paying you cash to help with life’s unexpected expenses, with most claims processed within four business days. Most importantly, having Aflac coverage allows you to focus on healing and recuperation rather than worrying about how you’re going to pay medical and other personal bills. For more information or to enroll, visit www.seanc.org/ insurance and click on the Aflac link, or visit www.aflac.com/ seanc. You can also call 1-855-616-7302 or 1-800-222-2758. mwhittle@seanc.org, Twitter @mwwhittle

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The Reporter • September 2014

Five Aflac Plans Available to Members

Five plans are being offered to SEANC members who can access Aflac’s portal right through the SEANC website – www.seanc.org/insurance. Those plans are: • Group Critical Illness Insurance: This plan provides cash benefits when you’re facing a covered critical illness, including cancer, a heart attack or stroke. • Group Accident Insurance: This plan helps pay out-of-pocket costs that occur when you have a covered accident, including fractures, dislocations and lacerations. • Group Hospital Indemnity Insurance: This plan helps pay the out-of-pocket costs associated with a hospital stay, including benefits for hospital admission, confinement and intensive care. • Group Disability Insurance: This plan can protect your income if you are unable to work due to a covered injury or illness. • Group Whole Life: This plan, which builds cash value over time, will help you continue to take care of your family’s immediate and future financial needs, including burial and funeral expenses, uninsured medical costs and current bills and debts, as well as income replacement, education plans, ongoing family obligations, emergency funds and retirement expenses.


September 2014 Reporter