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THE

P ublication of the S tate E mployees A ssociation of N orth C arolina • SEIU L ocal 2008 • N ov . 2010 • V ol . 29 N o . 1 • C irculation 55,000

Marshall For Senate

EMPAC Interviews: The Process

As our next senator, Marshall pledged to support middle class tax cuts, the Employee Free Choice Act, collective bargaining rights for public employees, full implementation of the national health insurance reform legislation, protection of Social Security and a pro-worker agenda. On Nov. 2, SEANC urges all members to go to the polls and support Elaine Marshall for U.S. Senate.

PHOTO BY TONY Booe

The SEANC Employees Political Action Committee (EMPAC) overwhelmingly and enthusiastically endorsed the candidacy of Secretary of State Elaine Marshall for the U.S. Senate on Aug. 21. Marshall, the Democratic nominee, is a long-time SEANC member and supporter who demonstrated a clear understanding of state worker issues and has what it takes to win for state employees and all working families.

EMPAC-endorsed U.S. Senate Candidate Elaine Marshall speaks to convention delegates on Sept. 10. “For those who say it can’t be done, get out of the way of those of us doing it!” Marshall told the crowd.

In August, the committee conducted a thorough endorsement process and considered all three candidates for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Republican Sen. Richard Burr. Marshall and the Libertarian candidate Dr. Michael Beitler interviewed with the committee, answering a variety of questions about their position on employee rights and related legislation. Despite multiple attempts to interview Sen. Burr, he declined to interview or provide written responses to questions.

SEANC Convention: Charting the Course Delegates Elect New Officers and Vote on Bylaws Change By Toni Davis

•P  resident – Charles Johnson of Raleigh, a correctional captain with the Department of Correction’s Central Prison, with 18 years of state service • First Vice President – Sidney Sandy of Indian Trail, retired Department of Transportation maintenance engineer, with 33 years of state service • Second Vice President – Cheryl Moon of Knightdale, a retired Department of Motor Vehicles hearings officer, with 30 years of state service • Treasurer – Marilyn Jean Martin of Salisbury, a correctional captain with the Department of Correction’s Piedmont Correctional Institution, with 29 years of state service President Johnson highlighted the importance of respect for state employees in his acceptance speech on Sept. 11 telling delegates, “Don’t let your

employer tell you you’re lucky to have a job, tell them, ‘You’re lucky to have me.’” Bylaws Change SEANC delegates voted 63 percent to 37 percent in favor of a bylaws change to pay SEIU dues from the monthly district rebate. During the May 2008 convention, SEANC’s delegates voted to pay SEIU 50 cents per member per month. Each month SEANC’s 53 districts receive a 20 percent rebate of the total dues paid to the SEANC Central Office for daily district operations including membership drives, communications and member strength activities. Convention Highlights • Ranking SEANC’s 2010 Policy Platform Objectives • Hearing from SEIU International President Mary Kay Henry and elected SEANC members: Gov. Bev Perdue, Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton, U.S. Senate Candidate Elaine Marshall and special guest, Office of State Personnel Director Linda Coleman • Giving back to our communities with $23,000 and more than 2,000 pounds of food to benefit North Carolina’s six largest food banks and $6,000 in donations to the Triangle Down Syndrome Network’s Buddy Walk

• Hosting legislative, judicial and other candidates and a record number of SEANC members during the annual legislative dessert reception •H  onoring new officers and members during “A Night with the SEANC Stars” banquet tdavis@seanc.org

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

GREENSBORO – For the third year in a row, nearly 850 delegates elected a Department of Corrections’ official to the top office in the association during the 27th Annual SEANC Convention held Sept. 9-11 at the Koury Convention Center. The officers began their one-year terms on Oct. 1.

The 2010-2011 SEANC officers celebrate their induction on Sept. 11. Pictured, left to right, are President Charles Johnson, First Vice President Sidney Sandy, Second Vice President Cheryl Moon, Treasurer Marilyn Jean Martin and Past President Tony Smith.

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

1


public policy

Politics

State Health Plan Blue Ribbon Task Force Needs A Little Less Talk and A Lot More Action…

EMPAC – No General Assembly Endorsements

There are things that are known about the State Health Plan (SHP) and things that are still a mystery. We know that the SHP operates under a “costplus” contract with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina where Blue Cross can charge almost anything they desire to the state as a “cost of business,” including multi-million dollar executive bonuses. We also know that politicians claim state employees and retirees are unusually expensive to insure. However, the SHP’s own information shows that state employees and retirees cost about 10 percent less than other insured individuals in the South. Finally, we know that for the last four years, the N.C. General Assembly has claimed an “unexpected fiscal crisis” with the SHP to the tune of $400 million - $800 million and has looked to employees to cover a large share of these costs. In short, we know the SHP is being mismanaged by the General Assembly. For what, we don’t know. Why does the legislature continue to talk about the SHP without doing anything to fix it? Rep. Hugh Holliman (D-Davidson) assured legislators on the House floor in 2009 that a Blue Ribbon Task Force would determine where to move

Photo by Erica baldwin

By Ardis Watkins, Director of Legislative Affairs

SEANC health care lobbyist Chuck Stone, left, talks with Jack Walker, executive administrator of the State Health Plan, about moving oversight to a state agency.

the SHP, acknowledging that the legislature had not done a good job overseeing it. And he said the task force would get the job done quickly. Now, more than a year after the legislature adjourned in 2009, the task force still has done nothing. SEANC supported a bill to move the SHP from the legislature’s control and into the Department of Insurance (HB 2037). Rep. Holliman did not want a vote taken on this bill and argued that the task force should have time to complete its work.

The task force met on Sept. 21 to discuss governance. After more than two hours of talking with no real direction, they adjourned. Task force member and SEANC Lobbyist Chuck Stone even pointed out, “We have not done anything to resolve the governance issue, and I’m concerned because the legislative session is only a few months away.” So why did the task force meet for eight months before even mentioning where the SHP should go for proper oversight? We don’t know. And why are members of the task force asking for information that should have been given to them last year about possible options for moving it? We don’t understand that either. Or do we? Blue Cross is a big supporter of the House and Senate leadership. Stalling any decision on moving the SHP until after the November election is probably a good move – for politicians. For state employees and retirees – and for the taxpayers – it will have very real negative economic consequences. SEANC Executive Director Dana Cope stated, “This task force has clearly demonstrated to the public that it is either unwilling or unable to make decisions.” It’s time for a little less talk and a lot more action on moving the SHP. It’s time for legislators to do their jobs. awatkins@seanc.org

Fellow SEANC Members, Traditionally the November Reporter contains EMPAC endorsements of candidates for the North Carolina General Assembly, but this year is different. On July 24, the statewide EMPAC met and made an important decision to not endorse any General Assembly candidates for this year’s election. I want to share with you why that decision was made in a nearly unanimous vote. In a budget deficit year where there was no money for raises, cost of living adjustments or benefit enhancements, legislators kept telling SEANC members they were supportive of state employees and working families – specifically supportive of moving oversight of the State Health Plan away from control of the General Assembly to an executive agency. But no one had the courage to schedule a vote! Lack of oversight by the General Assembly has allowed Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina to effectively raise our out-of-pocket health care costs and reduce our benefits. It started with a no-bid, secret contract that allows Blue Cross to charge basically whatever they want to the state and to Dearmon have us, the taxpayers, pay for it. It would have cost legislators nothing to make the change – except for campaign cash from Blue Cross. Legislators took a walk on state employees and retirees when they chose Blue Cross over working families. Now it’s EMPAC’s turn to take a walk. Legislators never seem willing to ask Blue Cross to give up even a dime in tough economic times; they only look to state employees and retirees. When it came time to vote on transferring health plan oversight, the Democratic House and Senate leadership said it wasn’t the right time. For the legislative leaders, it’s never the right time to fund the pay plan, provide affordable family health insurance and certainly not the right time for collective bargaining. I’ve been hearing this for 15 years – even in times of economic prosperity. Isn’t it odd that it never seems to be the right time for legislators to do the right thing, except when it’s time to interview for an EMPAC endorsement? We are aware that this decision may be controversial to our contributors who have built EMPAC into a force to be reckoned with in North Carolina. As a result of this decision, EMPAC should have more than $1 million to support our true friends in 2012. Individual legislators will have two years to decide who is more important – working families, big insurance or the legislative leadership. Although the state committee is making no legislative endorsements this year, we have encouraged the area EMPACs to provide opportunities for our members to get to know the legislative candidates in their areas through interviews or forums. The committee also felt it was important that legislators know we are not out of the endorsement game, just not endorsing them. So we conducted an endorsement process for the U.S. Senate and ultimately endorsed outstanding SEANC member Elaine Marshall. I hope all state employees and retirees will support her in November! Thank you for helping to make EMPAC one of the largest political action committees in North Carolina.

SEANC Protests “Pay-to-Play” Fundraiser

with Blue Cross Contractor Capstrat By Mary Adelaide Riddick Executive Director Dana Cope and more than 30 SEANC members protested Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina contractor Capstrat CEO Ken Eudy’s “pay-to-play” fundraiser for Senate Democrats on Aug. 24. SEANC members are concerned about political influence over state contracts in light of Blue Cross’ no-bid, cost-plus, sweetheart contract with the State Health Plan (SHP). The Blue Cross contract allows the SHP to be billed for everything from the CEO to public relations efforts. Capstrat also holds government contracts with the N.C. State Ports Authority, University of North Carolina at Pembroke and a multi-million dollar contract for a teen tobacco use prevention and cessation program. “It’s hypocritical for politicians to take campaign contributions from government contractors while at the same time pounding their chests talking about the ethics bill and how they’ve cleaned up government,” Cope said. An Aug. 11 Wilmington Star-News article reported that Eudy, a government contractor, was asked by a member of the North Carolina State Senate to host the fundraiser. “This fundraiser gives state employees and the public the impression that this is a ‘you scratch my back, I’ll scratch your back’ event,” Cope said. mariddick@seanc.org

Thank you,

Photo by Toni Davis

Mark Dearmon State EMPAC Chairman

SEANC members came out in droves to oppose “payto-play” politics in North Carolina state government.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: THE REPORTER, P.O. Drawer 27727, Raleigh, NC 27611-7727.

2

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Photo by Mary Adelaide Riddick

The Reporter, USPS 009-852 (ISSN 1069 2142), is published in the months of March, May, September and November for $3 per year, per member, by the State Employees Association of North Carolina, Inc., P.O. Drawer 27727, Raleigh, NC 27611-7727. Periodicals postage paid at Raleigh, N.C. and additional offices.

Stuart Glover, left, of District 71 and Walton Jones of District 17 protest in front of Blue Cross contractor Capstrat CEO Ken Eudy’s house during a fundraiser for state Democrats.

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

3


public policy

Politics

State Health Plan Blue Ribbon Task Force Needs A Little Less Talk and A Lot More Action…

EMPAC – No General Assembly Endorsements

There are things that are known about the State Health Plan (SHP) and things that are still a mystery. We know that the SHP operates under a “costplus” contract with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina where Blue Cross can charge almost anything they desire to the state as a “cost of business,” including multi-million dollar executive bonuses. We also know that politicians claim state employees and retirees are unusually expensive to insure. However, the SHP’s own information shows that state employees and retirees cost about 10 percent less than other insured individuals in the South. Finally, we know that for the last four years, the N.C. General Assembly has claimed an “unexpected fiscal crisis” with the SHP to the tune of $400 million - $800 million and has looked to employees to cover a large share of these costs. In short, we know the SHP is being mismanaged by the General Assembly. For what, we don’t know. Why does the legislature continue to talk about the SHP without doing anything to fix it? Rep. Hugh Holliman (D-Davidson) assured legislators on the House floor in 2009 that a Blue Ribbon Task Force would determine where to move

Photo by Erica baldwin

By Ardis Watkins, Director of Legislative Affairs

SEANC health care lobbyist Chuck Stone, left, talks with Jack Walker, executive administrator of the State Health Plan, about moving oversight to a state agency.

the SHP, acknowledging that the legislature had not done a good job overseeing it. And he said the task force would get the job done quickly. Now, more than a year after the legislature adjourned in 2009, the task force still has done nothing. SEANC supported a bill to move the SHP from the legislature’s control and into the Department of Insurance (HB 2037). Rep. Holliman did not want a vote taken on this bill and argued that the task force should have time to complete its work.

The task force met on Sept. 21 to discuss governance. After more than two hours of talking with no real direction, they adjourned. Task force member and SEANC Lobbyist Chuck Stone even pointed out, “We have not done anything to resolve the governance issue, and I’m concerned because the legislative session is only a few months away.” So why did the task force meet for eight months before even mentioning where the SHP should go for proper oversight? We don’t know. And why are members of the task force asking for information that should have been given to them last year about possible options for moving it? We don’t understand that either. Or do we? Blue Cross is a big supporter of the House and Senate leadership. Stalling any decision on moving the SHP until after the November election is probably a good move – for politicians. For state employees and retirees – and for the taxpayers – it will have very real negative economic consequences. SEANC Executive Director Dana Cope stated, “This task force has clearly demonstrated to the public that it is either unwilling or unable to make decisions.” It’s time for a little less talk and a lot more action on moving the SHP. It’s time for legislators to do their jobs. awatkins@seanc.org

Fellow SEANC Members, Traditionally the November Reporter contains EMPAC endorsements of candidates for the North Carolina General Assembly, but this year is different. On July 24, the statewide EMPAC met and made an important decision to not endorse any General Assembly candidates for this year’s election. I want to share with you why that decision was made in a nearly unanimous vote. In a budget deficit year where there was no money for raises, cost of living adjustments or benefit enhancements, legislators kept telling SEANC members they were supportive of state employees and working families – specifically supportive of moving oversight of the State Health Plan away from control of the General Assembly to an executive agency. But no one had the courage to schedule a vote! Lack of oversight by the General Assembly has allowed Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina to effectively raise our out-of-pocket health care costs and reduce our benefits. It started with a no-bid, secret contract that allows Blue Cross to charge basically whatever they want to the state and to Dearmon have us, the taxpayers, pay for it. It would have cost legislators nothing to make the change – except for campaign cash from Blue Cross. Legislators took a walk on state employees and retirees when they chose Blue Cross over working families. Now it’s EMPAC’s turn to take a walk. Legislators never seem willing to ask Blue Cross to give up even a dime in tough economic times; they only look to state employees and retirees. When it came time to vote on transferring health plan oversight, the Democratic House and Senate leadership said it wasn’t the right time. For the legislative leaders, it’s never the right time to fund the pay plan, provide affordable family health insurance and certainly not the right time for collective bargaining. I’ve been hearing this for 15 years – even in times of economic prosperity. Isn’t it odd that it never seems to be the right time for legislators to do the right thing, except when it’s time to interview for an EMPAC endorsement? We are aware that this decision may be controversial to our contributors who have built EMPAC into a force to be reckoned with in North Carolina. As a result of this decision, EMPAC should have more than $1 million to support our true friends in 2012. Individual legislators will have two years to decide who is more important – working families, big insurance or the legislative leadership. Although the state committee is making no legislative endorsements this year, we have encouraged the area EMPACs to provide opportunities for our members to get to know the legislative candidates in their areas through interviews or forums. The committee also felt it was important that legislators know we are not out of the endorsement game, just not endorsing them. So we conducted an endorsement process for the U.S. Senate and ultimately endorsed outstanding SEANC member Elaine Marshall. I hope all state employees and retirees will support her in November! Thank you for helping to make EMPAC one of the largest political action committees in North Carolina.

SEANC Protests “Pay-to-Play” Fundraiser

with Blue Cross Contractor Capstrat By Mary Adelaide Riddick Executive Director Dana Cope and more than 30 SEANC members protested Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina contractor Capstrat CEO Ken Eudy’s “pay-to-play” fundraiser for Senate Democrats on Aug. 24. SEANC members are concerned about political influence over state contracts in light of Blue Cross’ no-bid, cost-plus, sweetheart contract with the State Health Plan (SHP). The Blue Cross contract allows the SHP to be billed for everything from the CEO to public relations efforts. Capstrat also holds government contracts with the N.C. State Ports Authority, University of North Carolina at Pembroke and a multi-million dollar contract for a teen tobacco use prevention and cessation program. “It’s hypocritical for politicians to take campaign contributions from government contractors while at the same time pounding their chests talking about the ethics bill and how they’ve cleaned up government,” Cope said. An Aug. 11 Wilmington Star-News article reported that Eudy, a government contractor, was asked by a member of the North Carolina State Senate to host the fundraiser. “This fundraiser gives state employees and the public the impression that this is a ‘you scratch my back, I’ll scratch your back’ event,” Cope said. mariddick@seanc.org

Thank you,

Photo by Toni Davis

Mark Dearmon State EMPAC Chairman

SEANC members came out in droves to oppose “payto-play” politics in North Carolina state government.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: THE REPORTER, P.O. Drawer 27727, Raleigh, NC 27611-7727.

2

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Photo by Mary Adelaide Riddick

The Reporter, USPS 009-852 (ISSN 1069 2142), is published in the months of March, May, September and November for $3 per year, per member, by the State Employees Association of North Carolina, Inc., P.O. Drawer 27727, Raleigh, NC 27611-7727. Periodicals postage paid at Raleigh, N.C. and additional offices.

Stuart Glover, left, of District 71 and Walton Jones of District 17 protest in front of Blue Cross contractor Capstrat CEO Ken Eudy’s house during a fundraiser for state Democrats.

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

3


member action

Insurance Services Providing quality and affordable insurance to SEANC members for over 30 years.

Experience the court needs.

We appreciate doing business with you!

District 65 Continues Convention Giving

Toni Davis, Editor-In-Chief Cary Edgar, Managing Editor Mary Adelaide Riddick Associate Editor, Advertising Manager

Contributed by Lynn Tuthill

Doug Sutton

THE

Amber Ernst, Associate Editor State Employees Association of North Carolina, SEIU Local 2008 P.O. Drawer 27727 • Raleigh, NC 27611 1621 Midtown Place • Raleigh, NC 27609 Telephone 919-833-6436, 800-222-2758

District 65 had approximately 10 members volunteer for Habitat for Humanity on Saturday, Aug. 21. More than 20 volunteers, including the new homeowner of the house, worked that day installing all of the windows and shingles on the roof.

www.seanc.org

Advertising Policy

www.judgejanegray.com Paid for by Judge Jane Gray Committee

919-836-9993 or Toll Free: 1-800-788-7771 dougsutton@dougsuttonins.com

Photo by Lynn Tuthill

Please call us if we can be of service.

SEANC, SEIU Local 2008 accepts advertising material from companies and persons seeking to communicate with SEANC members. Acceptance of this advertising does not indicate SEANC approval or endorsement of any representation that the message, product or service is as represented by the advertiser. SEANC accepts no responsibility and shall not be liable for any use of or reliance on any such information, product or service. SEANC is a private entity and is under no obligation to carry advertisements of any nature, political or otherwise, that may be viewed as contrary to the interests of the association and its membership.

District 65 followed up their $500 food bank donation from the annual convention with an additional $500 contribution and 153 pounds of food on Sept. 23 to the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina in Greenville. The $500 contribution will provide approximately 2,125 meals, and the food, which was collected at various locations on the ECU campus, will supply 129 meals. Lynn Tuthill, District 65 volunteer chairwoman, presents the check to Neil Zingler, member of the food bank’s Greenville Regional Council. Also pictured (from left) are: Mary Esther Baker, Greenville Food Bank branch development officer, and District 65 members Gloria Highsmith, Debbie Austin and Bill Dawson.

Windows®. Life without Walls™. Dell recommends Windows 7.

Member Purchase Program

Extra Savings for SEANC Members Use this coupon* in addition n to your program discount. My name is Judge Bob Hunter, and I am running for the North Carolina Supreme Court. I would be honored to receive your vote in the non-partisan November election. Studio XPS 9100

I have been a member of SEANC ever since I joined the NC Court of Appeals 12 years ago. My wife, Nancy, is also a long time member. During my time on the Court, I have heard over 3600 cases, and personally authored over 1200 opinions.

Studio XPS 16 Available for phone orders only.

Get an additional

Select systems $999 or more

$

Use Coupon* Code:

100 off

(before taxes & fees)

RX2MSHW431?QLK

1-800-695-8133 | www.Dell.com/epp member id# US41304203 Get Dell deals right in your inbox! › dell.com/epp/signup

ALL ORDERS ARE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL AND ACCEPTANCE BY DELL. Offers subject to change, not combinable with all other offers. Taxes, shipping, handling and other fees apply. Valid for U.S. Dell Member Purchase Program new purchases only. Dell reserves the right to cancel orders arising from pricing or other errors. *$100 Off select systems $999 or above in addition to your standard member discount (before tax, shipping and handling). Offer valid 10/28/10 12am CT - 12/22/10 11:59pm CT.

Judge Hunter at the 2010 SEANC Convention

ENDORSEMENTS: Former Chief Justices Burley Mitchell, Henry Frye, & Jim Exum; NC Association of Women Attorneys; NC Association of Educators; Police Benevolent Association; NC Troopers Association; NC Advocates for Justice, NC Association of Defense Attorneys

I have been an attorney in private practice, prosecutor, NC Representative, victims’ rights advocate, and current appellate judge. With your support, I hope to put my extensive and varied legal experience to work for you on the NC Supreme Court. My Best,

Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

4

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

5


member action

Insurance Services Providing quality and affordable insurance to SEANC members for over 30 years.

Experience the court needs.

We appreciate doing business with you!

District 65 Continues Convention Giving

Toni Davis, Editor-In-Chief Cary Edgar, Managing Editor Mary Adelaide Riddick Associate Editor, Advertising Manager

Contributed by Lynn Tuthill

Doug Sutton

THE

Amber Ernst, Associate Editor State Employees Association of North Carolina, SEIU Local 2008 P.O. Drawer 27727 • Raleigh, NC 27611 1621 Midtown Place • Raleigh, NC 27609 Telephone 919-833-6436, 800-222-2758

District 65 had approximately 10 members volunteer for Habitat for Humanity on Saturday, Aug. 21. More than 20 volunteers, including the new homeowner of the house, worked that day installing all of the windows and shingles on the roof.

www.seanc.org

Advertising Policy

www.judgejanegray.com Paid for by Judge Jane Gray Committee

919-836-9993 or Toll Free: 1-800-788-7771 dougsutton@dougsuttonins.com

Photo by Lynn Tuthill

Please call us if we can be of service.

SEANC, SEIU Local 2008 accepts advertising material from companies and persons seeking to communicate with SEANC members. Acceptance of this advertising does not indicate SEANC approval or endorsement of any representation that the message, product or service is as represented by the advertiser. SEANC accepts no responsibility and shall not be liable for any use of or reliance on any such information, product or service. SEANC is a private entity and is under no obligation to carry advertisements of any nature, political or otherwise, that may be viewed as contrary to the interests of the association and its membership.

District 65 followed up their $500 food bank donation from the annual convention with an additional $500 contribution and 153 pounds of food on Sept. 23 to the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina in Greenville. The $500 contribution will provide approximately 2,125 meals, and the food, which was collected at various locations on the ECU campus, will supply 129 meals. Lynn Tuthill, District 65 volunteer chairwoman, presents the check to Neil Zingler, member of the food bank’s Greenville Regional Council. Also pictured (from left) are: Mary Esther Baker, Greenville Food Bank branch development officer, and District 65 members Gloria Highsmith, Debbie Austin and Bill Dawson.

Windows®. Life without Walls™. Dell recommends Windows 7.

Member Purchase Program

Extra Savings for SEANC Members Use this coupon* in addition n to your program discount. My name is Judge Bob Hunter, and I am running for the North Carolina Supreme Court. I would be honored to receive your vote in the non-partisan November election. Studio XPS 9100

I have been a member of SEANC ever since I joined the NC Court of Appeals 12 years ago. My wife, Nancy, is also a long time member. During my time on the Court, I have heard over 3600 cases, and personally authored over 1200 opinions.

Studio XPS 16 Available for phone orders only.

Get an additional

Select systems $999 or more

$

Use Coupon* Code:

100 off

(before taxes & fees)

RX2MSHW431?QLK

1-800-695-8133 | www.Dell.com/epp member id# US41304203 Get Dell deals right in your inbox! › dell.com/epp/signup

ALL ORDERS ARE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL AND ACCEPTANCE BY DELL. Offers subject to change, not combinable with all other offers. Taxes, shipping, handling and other fees apply. Valid for U.S. Dell Member Purchase Program new purchases only. Dell reserves the right to cancel orders arising from pricing or other errors. *$100 Off select systems $999 or above in addition to your standard member discount (before tax, shipping and handling). Offer valid 10/28/10 12am CT - 12/22/10 11:59pm CT.

Judge Hunter at the 2010 SEANC Convention

ENDORSEMENTS: Former Chief Justices Burley Mitchell, Henry Frye, & Jim Exum; NC Association of Women Attorneys; NC Association of Educators; Police Benevolent Association; NC Troopers Association; NC Advocates for Justice, NC Association of Defense Attorneys

I have been an attorney in private practice, prosecutor, NC Representative, victims’ rights advocate, and current appellate judge. With your support, I hope to put my extensive and varied legal experience to work for you on the NC Supreme Court. My Best,

Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

4

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

5


columns

columns

President’s Message

Executive Director’s Desk

by Charles Johnson

by Dana Cope

Working for Basic Rights and Family

Growing membership, one worker at a time

This article is an excerpt of SEANC President Charles Johnson’s acceptance speech on Sept. 11.

The following is an excerpt from Cope’s remarks at the SEANC Annual Convention on Sept. 9.

After I took my oath, I got a feeling, a chill. I get that same chill when the national anthem is played, when I hear the Marine Corps hymn and when I pledge allegiance to the flag. I really appreciate this responsibility. I have no problem with leading, I feel good about it. I feel good about our future. I think together we can do great things. We can move working families forward; we can be the model of the South. We can show the rest of the world that it’s ok to be together and to say, “I’m a worker, I have rights and I stand with my brothers and my sisters, that’s ok.” I know somebody in every county in North Carolina and I know them because of SEANC. There are 100 counties in North Carolina. You go from Johnson the coast to the mountains and I know somebody there. That’s a powerful statement and that comes from this organization. I know a state worker somewhere who knows me and that if I have a problem that I can get in contact with someone. I appreciate what this organization does for me. I think it’s the best thing since sliced bread. I want to tell a story. The Member Action Coordinators teach us to tell your story, and usually you tell it to someone who is not an active SEANC member so that they can relate to what you’re saying. Once you get them to relate to it, you realize that they have the same issues that you have regardless of race, age, location or who they are. We’re all the same people, we all have the same basic needs and when you tell that story, they believe and understand that. The next thing you do is you slide that application toward them and sign them up! But I’m not going to tell you my story, I’m going to tell you my mother’s story, Theresa Johnson. My mother started working for the county hospital when she was 16 years old, a junior in high school. She would catch the school bus to the county hospital. Her first job then was washing dishes. She worked hard, she progressed and she did what she had to do. When she finally got ready to retire, she was the kitchen manager. She learned how to talk with people, deal with people and how to use a computer. Last year she got to retire after 45 years at the same job. That’s my inspiration. My family is what I live for. I work so hard for SEANC because I know the importance of being able to take care of your family. I need to educate two young ladies, my daughters. I need them to be able to get a good job and to work one job. Their father has had two jobs for 18 years – the whole time I’ve been working – not so that we could have extra, but I wanted them to have the basics. I want my kids to have new clothes, shoes and insurance. I’m not saying that my daughter who’s in college needs to drive a new car, because she’s not going to get one. When she gets one it’s going to be a beater – it’s probably not going to have any a/c. She’ll just have to get by, but that’s ok because that teaches character. I want the basics for my children and that’s what drives me, that’s what tells me SEANC is important. Legislators tell us we don’t need and we don’t deserve and we should be happy to have a job. No! You be happy to have me, because I’m a good worker. cjohnson@seanc.org

Are you friends with SEANC on Facebook? Add us now to stay up-to-date with all the latest news, member discounts, photos and more!

www.facebook.com/SEANC.SEIU.Local2008

6

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

I am so proud of the work that we do at the State Employees Association of North Carolina – whether it’s blocking pay cuts and furloughs at the General Assembly during times of budget deficits, holding politicians accountable or working with our SEIU International partners in Washington. I embrace the differences in our membership and respect your opinions because we can all agree that SEANC is nothing without our members – all 55,000 of us. As a member-run organization, SEANC needs to constantly increase our membership because whether at the General Assembly or at the ballot box, there is strength in numbers that translates into the things that matter to you such as affordable Cope health insurance and retirement security. SEANC’s greatest strength is our membership. And it’s my commitment to you as executive director to help our membership grow and increase our strength. One of the benefits of being SEANC, SEIU Local 2008 are the resources available from being part of a union that is 2.2 million members strong. This year we received a wonderful membership benefit from the International – contact information for state employees who are non-members. Now that we had our non-member list, what were we going to do with it? SEANC members planned a strategy to recruit non-members, and we wanted to be bold and do things that we had always dreamed about doing – like spend money on non-members to increase our collective voice. What a list we came up with – a non-member mailing, a top-notch survey of non-members to see what it would take for our organization to get them to join and even home visits. After the meeting, we added up the money it would take for us to achieve our goals. In total it was $300,000. One of the great things about SEIU is how they invest in membership. SEANC tried our luck and applied for a membership grant to our partners at the International to help reel those non-employees in. SEIU loved our members’ innovative ideas and funded the plan – all $300,000 of it. Halfway through the year, we encountered an unexpected membership challenge – a challenge that can be SEANC’s greatest opportunity to represent state employees. This year Gov. Bev Perdue established “Meet and Confer” in executive branch state agencies – where we can meet quarterly with the agency bosses’ and annually with the governor about issues of concern – pay, health care, retirement and overall just how to make government work better for all of North Carolina. But like everything else – there was a catch. When the Executive Order was issued, it had a 20 percent membership requirement to represent state employees at the agency level. And we knew without a doubt that SEANC met this 20 percent threshold in at least the three largest agencies – DHHS, DOT and DOC. In some agencies that the Executive Order applied to, we knew we didn’t have 20 percent – places like Crime Control and Public Safety, DENR, cultural resources and commerce. I knew if we didn’t get these numbers, someone else would. Today I’m proud to tell you we have our 20 percent in DENR, Cultural Resources, Commerce and Crime Control and Public Safety. I want to say thank you to all of you that helped grow SEANC’s membership this year. Now is the time to join together, to keep the association strong and activate our members to represent state employees in North Carolina! dcope@seanc.org

Counselor’s Comments by Tom Harris

SEANC Chief of Staff/General Counsel

Retiree COLA Options Weighed

The Experience and Knowledge to Get it Right.

Cost of living adjustments (COLAs) are essential to keep state government retirement benefits on pace with the ever rising costs. Without COLAs, your purchasing power for retirement benefits can quickly erode. Fortunately, for many years the General Assembly liberally granted COLAs. Since 2001, however, COLAs for retirement benefits have fallen behind price increases for consumer goods and services by more than 4 percent. It is time to examine why this has happened and what can be done to reverse this trend. In fact, this is exactly what the government retirement boards of trustees have asked the Future of Retirement Study Commission to do. Created Harris in October 2009 by the Boards of Trustees of the Teachers’ and State Employees’ Retirement System and the Local Governmental Employees’ Retirement System to look at all aspects of the state’s two largest retirement systems, the study commission was recently asked to recommend if and how the current statutes setting COLAs should be amended. As of the study commission’s Sept. 20 meeting, various options had been studied, but no recommendation had been made. The Statutes: Currently, the local and state employee retirement systems have identical statutes providing that the COLA in any given year shall be equivalent to the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI), with a cap of a 4 percent COLA, so long as there are sufficient investment gains to pay for the COLA. Under this formula, COLAs granted are less than the change in CPI whenever the investment gains are insufficient to support a COLA of the same amount or when the CPI is greater than the 4 percent cap for COLAs. The Options: 1. Leave the COLA statute as it is 2. Repeal the restriction that COLAs are limited to the CPI increase and by the 4% cap 3. Repeal the requirement that COLAs are to be funded only by investment gains 4. Repeal both the limits on COLA size and funding source 5. Suspend the requirement that COLAs be granted equal to the CPI increase until the employer contribution drops below a stated threshold that doesn’t overstrain the budget The Competing Interests: The retirement systems could assure that COLAs keep pace with CPI increases if COLAs were not limited to the CPI increase or by the 4 percent cap and if COLAs could be funded from other sources in addition to investment gains, such as increased employer contributions. On the other hand, using increased employer contributions might further strain the tight budgets of state and local governments, particularly in this time of recession. SEANC’s Position: SEANC supports the adoption of Option 4. Repealing the restrictions on the size of COLAs and sources for funding them will open the door to making up for COLAs that were nonexistent or granted in amounts less than the CPI increases in previous years, and even to offset changes, such as to Social Security or retiree medical benefits, that affect retiree economic well-being. The General Assembly can assure that state and local government budgets can sustain increases in employer contributions when needed in those years when investment gains alone are insufficient to fund the appropriate COLAs. Of course, any COLA must be conditioned on the provision that the increase be made with actuarial integrity. SEANC has spent significant resources in its watchdog role to assure that the state’s retirement systems are funded in the actuarially sound manner required by both statute and the resulting contract with the members of the systems, and it can only condone spending on benefit enhancements in a manner that is actuarially sound.

judgemarthageer.com Paid for by Judge Martha Geer Committee

Use payroll deduction for all your important purchases.

Purchasing Power is a unique member benefit program, which helps you purchase the new, brand-name computers, electronics and home appliances you want and need for you and your family through the ease of payroll deduction. Go online today to see the latest products Purchasing Power has to offer!

Visit www.SEANC.PurchasingPower.com or call 800-903-0703 Group Code: SNC2191

tharris@seanc.org THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

7


columns

columns

President’s Message

Executive Director’s Desk

by Charles Johnson

by Dana Cope

Working for Basic Rights and Family

Growing membership, one worker at a time

This article is an excerpt of SEANC President Charles Johnson’s acceptance speech on Sept. 11.

The following is an excerpt from Cope’s remarks at the SEANC Annual Convention on Sept. 9.

After I took my oath, I got a feeling, a chill. I get that same chill when the national anthem is played, when I hear the Marine Corps hymn and when I pledge allegiance to the flag. I really appreciate this responsibility. I have no problem with leading, I feel good about it. I feel good about our future. I think together we can do great things. We can move working families forward; we can be the model of the South. We can show the rest of the world that it’s ok to be together and to say, “I’m a worker, I have rights and I stand with my brothers and my sisters, that’s ok.” I know somebody in every county in North Carolina and I know them because of SEANC. There are 100 counties in North Carolina. You go from Johnson the coast to the mountains and I know somebody there. That’s a powerful statement and that comes from this organization. I know a state worker somewhere who knows me and that if I have a problem that I can get in contact with someone. I appreciate what this organization does for me. I think it’s the best thing since sliced bread. I want to tell a story. The Member Action Coordinators teach us to tell your story, and usually you tell it to someone who is not an active SEANC member so that they can relate to what you’re saying. Once you get them to relate to it, you realize that they have the same issues that you have regardless of race, age, location or who they are. We’re all the same people, we all have the same basic needs and when you tell that story, they believe and understand that. The next thing you do is you slide that application toward them and sign them up! But I’m not going to tell you my story, I’m going to tell you my mother’s story, Theresa Johnson. My mother started working for the county hospital when she was 16 years old, a junior in high school. She would catch the school bus to the county hospital. Her first job then was washing dishes. She worked hard, she progressed and she did what she had to do. When she finally got ready to retire, she was the kitchen manager. She learned how to talk with people, deal with people and how to use a computer. Last year she got to retire after 45 years at the same job. That’s my inspiration. My family is what I live for. I work so hard for SEANC because I know the importance of being able to take care of your family. I need to educate two young ladies, my daughters. I need them to be able to get a good job and to work one job. Their father has had two jobs for 18 years – the whole time I’ve been working – not so that we could have extra, but I wanted them to have the basics. I want my kids to have new clothes, shoes and insurance. I’m not saying that my daughter who’s in college needs to drive a new car, because she’s not going to get one. When she gets one it’s going to be a beater – it’s probably not going to have any a/c. She’ll just have to get by, but that’s ok because that teaches character. I want the basics for my children and that’s what drives me, that’s what tells me SEANC is important. Legislators tell us we don’t need and we don’t deserve and we should be happy to have a job. No! You be happy to have me, because I’m a good worker. cjohnson@seanc.org

Are you friends with SEANC on Facebook? Add us now to stay up-to-date with all the latest news, member discounts, photos and more!

www.facebook.com/SEANC.SEIU.Local2008

6

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

I am so proud of the work that we do at the State Employees Association of North Carolina – whether it’s blocking pay cuts and furloughs at the General Assembly during times of budget deficits, holding politicians accountable or working with our SEIU International partners in Washington. I embrace the differences in our membership and respect your opinions because we can all agree that SEANC is nothing without our members – all 55,000 of us. As a member-run organization, SEANC needs to constantly increase our membership because whether at the General Assembly or at the ballot box, there is strength in numbers that translates into the things that matter to you such as affordable Cope health insurance and retirement security. SEANC’s greatest strength is our membership. And it’s my commitment to you as executive director to help our membership grow and increase our strength. One of the benefits of being SEANC, SEIU Local 2008 are the resources available from being part of a union that is 2.2 million members strong. This year we received a wonderful membership benefit from the International – contact information for state employees who are non-members. Now that we had our non-member list, what were we going to do with it? SEANC members planned a strategy to recruit non-members, and we wanted to be bold and do things that we had always dreamed about doing – like spend money on non-members to increase our collective voice. What a list we came up with – a non-member mailing, a top-notch survey of non-members to see what it would take for our organization to get them to join and even home visits. After the meeting, we added up the money it would take for us to achieve our goals. In total it was $300,000. One of the great things about SEIU is how they invest in membership. SEANC tried our luck and applied for a membership grant to our partners at the International to help reel those non-employees in. SEIU loved our members’ innovative ideas and funded the plan – all $300,000 of it. Halfway through the year, we encountered an unexpected membership challenge – a challenge that can be SEANC’s greatest opportunity to represent state employees. This year Gov. Bev Perdue established “Meet and Confer” in executive branch state agencies – where we can meet quarterly with the agency bosses’ and annually with the governor about issues of concern – pay, health care, retirement and overall just how to make government work better for all of North Carolina. But like everything else – there was a catch. When the Executive Order was issued, it had a 20 percent membership requirement to represent state employees at the agency level. And we knew without a doubt that SEANC met this 20 percent threshold in at least the three largest agencies – DHHS, DOT and DOC. In some agencies that the Executive Order applied to, we knew we didn’t have 20 percent – places like Crime Control and Public Safety, DENR, cultural resources and commerce. I knew if we didn’t get these numbers, someone else would. Today I’m proud to tell you we have our 20 percent in DENR, Cultural Resources, Commerce and Crime Control and Public Safety. I want to say thank you to all of you that helped grow SEANC’s membership this year. Now is the time to join together, to keep the association strong and activate our members to represent state employees in North Carolina! dcope@seanc.org

Counselor’s Comments by Tom Harris

SEANC Chief of Staff/General Counsel

Retiree COLA Options Weighed

The Experience and Knowledge to Get it Right.

Cost of living adjustments (COLAs) are essential to keep state government retirement benefits on pace with the ever rising costs. Without COLAs, your purchasing power for retirement benefits can quickly erode. Fortunately, for many years the General Assembly liberally granted COLAs. Since 2001, however, COLAs for retirement benefits have fallen behind price increases for consumer goods and services by more than 4 percent. It is time to examine why this has happened and what can be done to reverse this trend. In fact, this is exactly what the government retirement boards of trustees have asked the Future of Retirement Study Commission to do. Created Harris in October 2009 by the Boards of Trustees of the Teachers’ and State Employees’ Retirement System and the Local Governmental Employees’ Retirement System to look at all aspects of the state’s two largest retirement systems, the study commission was recently asked to recommend if and how the current statutes setting COLAs should be amended. As of the study commission’s Sept. 20 meeting, various options had been studied, but no recommendation had been made. The Statutes: Currently, the local and state employee retirement systems have identical statutes providing that the COLA in any given year shall be equivalent to the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI), with a cap of a 4 percent COLA, so long as there are sufficient investment gains to pay for the COLA. Under this formula, COLAs granted are less than the change in CPI whenever the investment gains are insufficient to support a COLA of the same amount or when the CPI is greater than the 4 percent cap for COLAs. The Options: 1. Leave the COLA statute as it is 2. Repeal the restriction that COLAs are limited to the CPI increase and by the 4% cap 3. Repeal the requirement that COLAs are to be funded only by investment gains 4. Repeal both the limits on COLA size and funding source 5. Suspend the requirement that COLAs be granted equal to the CPI increase until the employer contribution drops below a stated threshold that doesn’t overstrain the budget The Competing Interests: The retirement systems could assure that COLAs keep pace with CPI increases if COLAs were not limited to the CPI increase or by the 4 percent cap and if COLAs could be funded from other sources in addition to investment gains, such as increased employer contributions. On the other hand, using increased employer contributions might further strain the tight budgets of state and local governments, particularly in this time of recession. SEANC’s Position: SEANC supports the adoption of Option 4. Repealing the restrictions on the size of COLAs and sources for funding them will open the door to making up for COLAs that were nonexistent or granted in amounts less than the CPI increases in previous years, and even to offset changes, such as to Social Security or retiree medical benefits, that affect retiree economic well-being. The General Assembly can assure that state and local government budgets can sustain increases in employer contributions when needed in those years when investment gains alone are insufficient to fund the appropriate COLAs. Of course, any COLA must be conditioned on the provision that the increase be made with actuarial integrity. SEANC has spent significant resources in its watchdog role to assure that the state’s retirement systems are funded in the actuarially sound manner required by both statute and the resulting contract with the members of the systems, and it can only condone spending on benefit enhancements in a manner that is actuarially sound.

judgemarthageer.com Paid for by Judge Martha Geer Committee

Use payroll deduction for all your important purchases.

Purchasing Power is a unique member benefit program, which helps you purchase the new, brand-name computers, electronics and home appliances you want and need for you and your family through the ease of payroll deduction. Go online today to see the latest products Purchasing Power has to offer!

Visit www.SEANC.PurchasingPower.com or call 800-903-0703 Group Code: SNC2191

tharris@seanc.org THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

7


27 th annual seanc CONVENTION

Sept. 9-11, 2010

District 67 member Bruce Jones enjoys a piece of cantaloupe during the Sept. 10 EMPAC Legislative Dessert Reception. Jones was among 500 SEANC members who came to the event to meet with legislators and enjoy delicious desserts and fruit.

PHOTO BY mary adelaide riddick

PHOTO BY sara Beth McLamb

Members of the Department of Correction’s Honor Guard present the colors during the opening day of convention.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY toni davis

EMPAC-endorsed U.S. Senate candidate Elaine Marshall is escorted into the convention hall by District 20 Chairman Cliff Brown and District 20 member Wanda Hunt. Marshall, also a District 20 member, thanked delegates for their support in the upcoming election.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

Gov. Bev Perdue and Lenell Miller of District 66 pose for a photo outside of the convention hall on Sept. 10. “We go into public service because we believe in our own small ways, we can make a difference,” Gov. Perdue told convention delegates during her speech.

SEANC’s past presidents are honored during Saturday’s convention business. This year, 10 past presidents were able to attend convention! Thank you for your SEANC service.

8

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

PHOTO BY toni davis

PHOTO BY tony booe

Executive Director Dana Cope speaks with District 17 member Andrew Murph Jr. during convention.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY tony booe

SEIU International President Mary Kay Henry speaks with Retiree Council Chairman Bob Hopper before she addresses convention delegates.

Convention delegates donated food and money to six food banks serving North Carolina as this year’s community service project. District 5, pictured, led donations with a $1,000 check. More than 2,000 pounds of food and $23,000 were donated.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

Left to right, District 42 member Alfred Johnson, and District 21 members Janice Bass, Ernestine Harris and Doris Allen discuss their hopes for the 2011 long legislative session during the EMPAC dessert reception on Sept. 10.

Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton greets convention delegates as he enters the convention hall on Sept. 10.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

District 39 member George Thiessen and the State Employees’ Credit Union Fat Cat showcase the Scholarship Foundation Board’s winning $6,000 raffle ticket.

Communications media broadcast spokesperson award winner Kim Stewart of District 57 and EMPAC Legislator of the Year winner Sen. Doug Berger (D-Franklin) discuss the 2010 legislative session and resulting budget. Stewart won the communications award for the way she discussed providing quality public services with NBC 17 in Raleigh.

This year, there was a tie! District 10 member Kim Martin and District 67 member Thomas Singleton hug after judges announced they had tied for the 2010 EMPAC’s Got Talent Competition. Compiled by Toni Davis and mary Adelaide Riddick

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

9


27 th annual seanc CONVENTION

Sept. 9-11, 2010

District 67 member Bruce Jones enjoys a piece of cantaloupe during the Sept. 10 EMPAC Legislative Dessert Reception. Jones was among 500 SEANC members who came to the event to meet with legislators and enjoy delicious desserts and fruit.

PHOTO BY mary adelaide riddick

PHOTO BY sara Beth McLamb

Members of the Department of Correction’s Honor Guard present the colors during the opening day of convention.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY toni davis

EMPAC-endorsed U.S. Senate candidate Elaine Marshall is escorted into the convention hall by District 20 Chairman Cliff Brown and District 20 member Wanda Hunt. Marshall, also a District 20 member, thanked delegates for their support in the upcoming election.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

Gov. Bev Perdue and Lenell Miller of District 66 pose for a photo outside of the convention hall on Sept. 10. “We go into public service because we believe in our own small ways, we can make a difference,” Gov. Perdue told convention delegates during her speech.

SEANC’s past presidents are honored during Saturday’s convention business. This year, 10 past presidents were able to attend convention! Thank you for your SEANC service.

8

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

PHOTO BY toni davis

PHOTO BY tony booe

Executive Director Dana Cope speaks with District 17 member Andrew Murph Jr. during convention.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY tony booe

SEIU International President Mary Kay Henry speaks with Retiree Council Chairman Bob Hopper before she addresses convention delegates.

Convention delegates donated food and money to six food banks serving North Carolina as this year’s community service project. District 5, pictured, led donations with a $1,000 check. More than 2,000 pounds of food and $23,000 were donated.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

Left to right, District 42 member Alfred Johnson, and District 21 members Janice Bass, Ernestine Harris and Doris Allen discuss their hopes for the 2011 long legislative session during the EMPAC dessert reception on Sept. 10.

Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton greets convention delegates as he enters the convention hall on Sept. 10.

PHOTO BY sophie brauns

District 39 member George Thiessen and the State Employees’ Credit Union Fat Cat showcase the Scholarship Foundation Board’s winning $6,000 raffle ticket.

Communications media broadcast spokesperson award winner Kim Stewart of District 57 and EMPAC Legislator of the Year winner Sen. Doug Berger (D-Franklin) discuss the 2010 legislative session and resulting budget. Stewart won the communications award for the way she discussed providing quality public services with NBC 17 in Raleigh.

This year, there was a tie! District 10 member Kim Martin and District 67 member Thomas Singleton hug after judges announced they had tied for the 2010 EMPAC’s Got Talent Competition. Compiled by Toni Davis and mary Adelaide Riddick

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

9


27 th annual Seanc CONVENTION

sept. 9-11, 2010

SEANC Convention Marked by Philanthropy

SEANC’s 2011 Top 10 Policy Platform Objectives (As determined by the 2010 Annual Convention)

North Carolina Food Banks and Triangle Down Syndrome Network to Benefit

1.  Seek legislation to remove oversight of the State Health Plan from under the auspices of the Majority Leaders of the Senate and House to a government agency.

By Mary Adelaide Riddick

2.  Oppose legislation that would remove state employees from the protections of the State Personnel Act through the Office of State Personnel. 3.  Seek continuation of a fully paid individual health care benefit for active qualified and retired employees. 4.  Oppose privatization and downsizing of state government services. 5. Seek an increase in the retirement accrual rate to 2.0 to provide employees with 60 percent of their final compensation upon retirement. 6.  Seek legislation that limits the distribution of state employee and retiree personnel information and specifies safeguards and procedures that will be followed to protect identifying information, health-related data, financial information, drivers’ license numbers, home telephone numbers, etc. from unauthorized distribution. 7.  Seek repeal of G.S.§ 95-98 and enact legislation permitting collective bargaining by North Carolina public employees; further, seek amendment to G.S. § 143-3.3(g) and G.S. § 135-18.8 to delete language that voids dues deduction from payroll or from retirement benefits if employee or retiree associations engage in collective bargaining. 8.  Seek legislative change from the State Treasurer serving as a sole fiduciary to a fund committee approach to managing the state pension fund for employees subject to N.C. General Statutes Section § 147-69.2(b)(8).

www.judgecressiethigpen.com Paid for by the Committee to Elect Judge Cressie Thigpen

10.  Seek consistent and uniform policies, procedures and guidelines that clearly state responsibilities and reimbursements for state employees who use personal vehicles in performance of work-related activities.

During the 27th Annual SEANC Convention, delegates voted on Sept. 10 to adopt the following bylaws amendment: The SEANC Treasurer shall, within 30 days of collection, rebate 20 percent of membership dues to the district from which they were collected except for dues paid by affiliate organizations. 8.1 Effective Oct. 1, 2010, the SEANC Treasurer shall reduce the rebate to each district by 50 cents per member per month and apply those funds to the payment of the per member dues owed by SEANC membership to SEIU.

Congratulations to the winners of the 2010 SEANC Cash Raffle! This year SEANC members sold a record 36,322 tickets at $1 per chance to benefit the Scholarship Foundation Board.

Grand Prize: $6,000 Stacy Dowdy of District 26 First Prize: $3,000 Rodney Davenport of District 45 Second Prize: $1,000 Robert M. Smith of District 6

All proceeds benefit the SEANC Scholarship Foundation.

10

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Fran Albritton, LUTCF Chris Harris Locust, NC Greenville, NC 704-485-8062 252-531-1218

Jeff Tate, LUTCF Henderson, NC 252-438-3334

Ty Cobb, CFP Angier, NC 919-639-2300

John Hill New Bern, NC 252-633-1871

Will Walters Fayetteville, NC 910-483-6210

Rob Jernigan Fayetteville, NC 910-483-6210

Scott Kittrell Sanford, NC 919-303-5976

Page Simpson Raleigh, NC 919-389-3115

Ron Jackson Raleigh, NC 919-781-6716

Mark Younts Salisbury, NC 704-637-9554

PROTECTIVE LIFE

NC State Employees Service Office 8364 Six Forks Road, Suite 200 Raleigh, NC 27615 Toll Free 800-334-1217 Local 919-844-1777 www.ncbenefits.com

mariddick@seanc.org

9.  Seek an amendment in the event of the death of a state employee, that any and all unused sick leave be paid in a lump sum, based on the employee’s salary at the time of death, to the surviving spouse or beneficiary, if the beneficiary does not elect survivor’s alternate benefits.

Convention Delegates Adopt Bylaws Amendment

GREENSBORO – On Sept. 9, SEANC members donated more than 2,000 pounds of food and $23,000 to six food banks serving North Carolina – MANNA Food Bank, Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina, Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina, Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina, Second Harvest Food Bank of Southeast North Carolina and The Food Bank of the Albemarle. For every dollar donated, these food banks can return more than $8 worth of food to the areas they serve. SEANC District 5 led the monetary donations with a $1,000 contribution. During SEIU International President Mary Kay Henry’s speech, she remarked on SEANC’s gift, “The international union is so impressed with the incredible generosity of SEANC leaders in the food drive that the international union is committed to match what you raise.” SEIU matched SEANC delegates’ contributions with an $11,000 check bringing SEANC’s total to $23,000 for North Carolina’s food banks. A second spontaneous service project took on a life of its own as SEANC’s Youth Council challenged delegates to donate funds to the Triangle Down Syndrome Network’s 2010 Buddy Walk in honor of Mackenzie Woodard. More than $6,000 was raised as district after district pledged funds to support Woodard who was born with Down syndrome. She is the beloved daughter of two SEANC members.

STATEWIDE SALES AND SERVICE

Typical Retiree Saves $250+ per Month Using Pension Maximization Example: Female Retiree Age 62, Husband Age 62, 30 Years Service, Ending Salary $60,000 Retirement System Payout Maximum Monthly Single Life: 100% Joint & Survivor Monthly: State’s “cost of insurance”:

Offers: $2730 $2285 $ 445

(Why does the state charge so much?)

WHERE YOUR FUTURE IS OUR FOCUS! North Carolina State University’s Distance Education offers a wide variety of courses and programs to help you optimize your future. Whether you want to update skills or prepare for a new career, NC State Distance Education options provide a quality, well-rounded education along with schedule flexibility to balance your studies with work, family, or other life responsibilities.

Pension Maximization Plan Cost: To Provide $2285 for Husband: $ 175 To Provide $2730 for Husband: $ 205 Savings to Retiree: $270 to $240 per month

You Want the Most Income You Can Possibly Receive… But You Also Want Income for Your Beneficiary Should You Die Before Them. The State Charges A Huge Amount To Continue Payments to the Beneficiary. The Pension Maximization Plan Shows You How to Choose the Maximum Payout Option AND Provide Lifetime Survivor Monthly Income.

Visit us online for more information about Distance Education learning options and possible career paths for you!

http://distance.ncsu.edu/seanc

If You pick one of the 'Survivor' Payout Options, the State could deduct Hundreds more from your monthly retirement check than could be necessary. Contact Us for a Free Personal Analysis & Quote Producers Financial Network, Inc. 800-562-8019

www.maxpensionplan.com The Pension Maximization Plan includes life insurance, and you must qualify medically for the insurance.

nc state / distance education THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

11


27 th annual Seanc CONVENTION

sept. 9-11, 2010

SEANC Convention Marked by Philanthropy

SEANC’s 2011 Top 10 Policy Platform Objectives (As determined by the 2010 Annual Convention)

North Carolina Food Banks and Triangle Down Syndrome Network to Benefit

1.  Seek legislation to remove oversight of the State Health Plan from under the auspices of the Majority Leaders of the Senate and House to a government agency.

By Mary Adelaide Riddick

2.  Oppose legislation that would remove state employees from the protections of the State Personnel Act through the Office of State Personnel. 3.  Seek continuation of a fully paid individual health care benefit for active qualified and retired employees. 4.  Oppose privatization and downsizing of state government services. 5. Seek an increase in the retirement accrual rate to 2.0 to provide employees with 60 percent of their final compensation upon retirement. 6.  Seek legislation that limits the distribution of state employee and retiree personnel information and specifies safeguards and procedures that will be followed to protect identifying information, health-related data, financial information, drivers’ license numbers, home telephone numbers, etc. from unauthorized distribution. 7.  Seek repeal of G.S.§ 95-98 and enact legislation permitting collective bargaining by North Carolina public employees; further, seek amendment to G.S. § 143-3.3(g) and G.S. § 135-18.8 to delete language that voids dues deduction from payroll or from retirement benefits if employee or retiree associations engage in collective bargaining. 8.  Seek legislative change from the State Treasurer serving as a sole fiduciary to a fund committee approach to managing the state pension fund for employees subject to N.C. General Statutes Section § 147-69.2(b)(8).

www.judgecressiethigpen.com Paid for by the Committee to Elect Judge Cressie Thigpen

10.  Seek consistent and uniform policies, procedures and guidelines that clearly state responsibilities and reimbursements for state employees who use personal vehicles in performance of work-related activities.

During the 27th Annual SEANC Convention, delegates voted on Sept. 10 to adopt the following bylaws amendment: The SEANC Treasurer shall, within 30 days of collection, rebate 20 percent of membership dues to the district from which they were collected except for dues paid by affiliate organizations. 8.1 Effective Oct. 1, 2010, the SEANC Treasurer shall reduce the rebate to each district by 50 cents per member per month and apply those funds to the payment of the per member dues owed by SEANC membership to SEIU.

Congratulations to the winners of the 2010 SEANC Cash Raffle! This year SEANC members sold a record 36,322 tickets at $1 per chance to benefit the Scholarship Foundation Board.

Grand Prize: $6,000 Stacy Dowdy of District 26 First Prize: $3,000 Rodney Davenport of District 45 Second Prize: $1,000 Robert M. Smith of District 6

All proceeds benefit the SEANC Scholarship Foundation.

10

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Fran Albritton, LUTCF Chris Harris Locust, NC Greenville, NC 704-485-8062 252-531-1218

Jeff Tate, LUTCF Henderson, NC 252-438-3334

Ty Cobb, CFP Angier, NC 919-639-2300

John Hill New Bern, NC 252-633-1871

Will Walters Fayetteville, NC 910-483-6210

Rob Jernigan Fayetteville, NC 910-483-6210

Scott Kittrell Sanford, NC 919-303-5976

Page Simpson Raleigh, NC 919-389-3115

Ron Jackson Raleigh, NC 919-781-6716

Mark Younts Salisbury, NC 704-637-9554

PROTECTIVE LIFE

NC State Employees Service Office 8364 Six Forks Road, Suite 200 Raleigh, NC 27615 Toll Free 800-334-1217 Local 919-844-1777 www.ncbenefits.com

mariddick@seanc.org

9.  Seek an amendment in the event of the death of a state employee, that any and all unused sick leave be paid in a lump sum, based on the employee’s salary at the time of death, to the surviving spouse or beneficiary, if the beneficiary does not elect survivor’s alternate benefits.

Convention Delegates Adopt Bylaws Amendment

GREENSBORO – On Sept. 9, SEANC members donated more than 2,000 pounds of food and $23,000 to six food banks serving North Carolina – MANNA Food Bank, Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina, Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina, Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina, Second Harvest Food Bank of Southeast North Carolina and The Food Bank of the Albemarle. For every dollar donated, these food banks can return more than $8 worth of food to the areas they serve. SEANC District 5 led the monetary donations with a $1,000 contribution. During SEIU International President Mary Kay Henry’s speech, she remarked on SEANC’s gift, “The international union is so impressed with the incredible generosity of SEANC leaders in the food drive that the international union is committed to match what you raise.” SEIU matched SEANC delegates’ contributions with an $11,000 check bringing SEANC’s total to $23,000 for North Carolina’s food banks. A second spontaneous service project took on a life of its own as SEANC’s Youth Council challenged delegates to donate funds to the Triangle Down Syndrome Network’s 2010 Buddy Walk in honor of Mackenzie Woodard. More than $6,000 was raised as district after district pledged funds to support Woodard who was born with Down syndrome. She is the beloved daughter of two SEANC members.

STATEWIDE SALES AND SERVICE

Typical Retiree Saves $250+ per Month Using Pension Maximization Example: Female Retiree Age 62, Husband Age 62, 30 Years Service, Ending Salary $60,000 Retirement System Payout Maximum Monthly Single Life: 100% Joint & Survivor Monthly: State’s “cost of insurance”:

Offers: $2730 $2285 $ 445

(Why does the state charge so much?)

WHERE YOUR FUTURE IS OUR FOCUS! North Carolina State University’s Distance Education offers a wide variety of courses and programs to help you optimize your future. Whether you want to update skills or prepare for a new career, NC State Distance Education options provide a quality, well-rounded education along with schedule flexibility to balance your studies with work, family, or other life responsibilities.

Pension Maximization Plan Cost: To Provide $2285 for Husband: $ 175 To Provide $2730 for Husband: $ 205 Savings to Retiree: $270 to $240 per month

You Want the Most Income You Can Possibly Receive… But You Also Want Income for Your Beneficiary Should You Die Before Them. The State Charges A Huge Amount To Continue Payments to the Beneficiary. The Pension Maximization Plan Shows You How to Choose the Maximum Payout Option AND Provide Lifetime Survivor Monthly Income.

Visit us online for more information about Distance Education learning options and possible career paths for you!

http://distance.ncsu.edu/seanc

If You pick one of the 'Survivor' Payout Options, the State could deduct Hundreds more from your monthly retirement check than could be necessary. Contact Us for a Free Personal Analysis & Quote Producers Financial Network, Inc. 800-562-8019

www.maxpensionplan.com The Pension Maximization Plan includes life insurance, and you must qualify medically for the insurance.

nc state / distance education THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

11


A night with the seanc stars

Sept. 11 Convention banquet

District 4 Chairman Jimmy Davis walks to the stage during Saturday night’s banquet to accept the 2009-2010 District Chairperson of the Year award.

District 27 member Ray Evans and District 5 member Lander Corpening (not pictured) were honored with the President’s Awards for helping Tony Smith achieve the goals of his presidency.

PHOTO BY tony booe

The Darrell Arnold Award is presented to SEANC staff members by the president for dedicated service to the association. This year, President Tony Smith honored the entire SEANC staff.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb PHOTO BY sophie brauns

Incoming SEANC President Charles Johnson gives his acceptance speech to convention delegates during the banquet on Saturday night. His daughter, Marjorie, briefly joined him on stage.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

District 6 Chairman Wayne Freeman accepts the District of the Year Award – Category A for his district during Saturday night’s banquet.

Newly-elected Treasurer Marilyn Jean Martin poses with the Member of the Year award she received during Saturday night’s banquet. This award is given to an individual who has demonstrated unselfish commitment and dedication to SEANC throughout the year.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

Teresa Canton of District 3 was honored with the Distinguished Service Award during the convention’s banquet for her 35 years of service to the state and SEANC.

District 22 Chairwoman Michele Shaw accepts the District of the Year Award – Category C for her district.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

The Member Discount committee recognized the top three member discount business recruiters during the Saturday night banquet. District 16 member Melva Daniels, left, came in third place by recruiting 11 new businesses. The second place recruiter was Douglas Ledford of District 2, not pictured, with 14 new businesses. District 7 member Henry Belada, right, who also chairs the Member Discount committee, won first place by recruiting 33 new businesses!

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

President Tony Smith, left, and Humorist Jeanne Robertson take a moment to pose for a photo following the banquet. Robertson lent the night a humorous twist with her remarks during dessert.

District 19 Chairwoman Marie Tate, left, accepted the Excellence in Communications Award – Website or Bulletin Board for her district. District 66 member Rudy Croom, right, won the Excellence in Communications Award – Print Media for his March 13 interview in The Wilson Times.

District 65 Chairman Del Kingsland, center, and member Treva Brigman, right, walk to the stage as President Tony Smith takes their photo. District 65 was honored with the District of the Year Award – Category B.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

Gov. Bev Perdue presents Parliamentarian Roy McGalliard of District 5 with the Order of the Long Leaf Pine for his many years of dedicated state service. McGalliard retired from Western Piedmont Community College with 30 years of state service.

Newly-elected First Vice President Sidney Sandy and his wife Dale pose on the red carpet as they enter “A Night with the SEANC Stars” banquet on Sept. 11. Compiled by Toni Davis and mary Adelaide Riddick

12

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

13


A night with the seanc stars

Sept. 11 Convention banquet

District 4 Chairman Jimmy Davis walks to the stage during Saturday night’s banquet to accept the 2009-2010 District Chairperson of the Year award.

District 27 member Ray Evans and District 5 member Lander Corpening (not pictured) were honored with the President’s Awards for helping Tony Smith achieve the goals of his presidency.

PHOTO BY tony booe

The Darrell Arnold Award is presented to SEANC staff members by the president for dedicated service to the association. This year, President Tony Smith honored the entire SEANC staff.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb PHOTO BY sophie brauns

Incoming SEANC President Charles Johnson gives his acceptance speech to convention delegates during the banquet on Saturday night. His daughter, Marjorie, briefly joined him on stage.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

District 6 Chairman Wayne Freeman accepts the District of the Year Award – Category A for his district during Saturday night’s banquet.

Newly-elected Treasurer Marilyn Jean Martin poses with the Member of the Year award she received during Saturday night’s banquet. This award is given to an individual who has demonstrated unselfish commitment and dedication to SEANC throughout the year.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

Teresa Canton of District 3 was honored with the Distinguished Service Award during the convention’s banquet for her 35 years of service to the state and SEANC.

District 22 Chairwoman Michele Shaw accepts the District of the Year Award – Category C for her district.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

The Member Discount committee recognized the top three member discount business recruiters during the Saturday night banquet. District 16 member Melva Daniels, left, came in third place by recruiting 11 new businesses. The second place recruiter was Douglas Ledford of District 2, not pictured, with 14 new businesses. District 7 member Henry Belada, right, who also chairs the Member Discount committee, won first place by recruiting 33 new businesses!

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

President Tony Smith, left, and Humorist Jeanne Robertson take a moment to pose for a photo following the banquet. Robertson lent the night a humorous twist with her remarks during dessert.

District 19 Chairwoman Marie Tate, left, accepted the Excellence in Communications Award – Website or Bulletin Board for her district. District 66 member Rudy Croom, right, won the Excellence in Communications Award – Print Media for his March 13 interview in The Wilson Times.

District 65 Chairman Del Kingsland, center, and member Treva Brigman, right, walk to the stage as President Tony Smith takes their photo. District 65 was honored with the District of the Year Award – Category B.

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

PHOTO BY Sara Beth McLamb

Gov. Bev Perdue presents Parliamentarian Roy McGalliard of District 5 with the Order of the Long Leaf Pine for his many years of dedicated state service. McGalliard retired from Western Piedmont Community College with 30 years of state service.

Newly-elected First Vice President Sidney Sandy and his wife Dale pose on the red carpet as they enter “A Night with the SEANC Stars” banquet on Sept. 11. Compiled by Toni Davis and mary Adelaide Riddick

12

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

13


2010 - 2011 board of governors

2010 - 2011 board of governors District 1, Teddy Greene

Executive Committee President Charles T. Johnson

A resident of Raleigh and District 45 member, he is a Correctional Captain for the Department of Correction at Central Prison. With 18 years of state service and SEANC membership, last year Johnson served at the statewide level as second vice president. He has served as District 45 chairman, vice chairman and North Central Region Representative to the Executive Committee.

First Vice President Sidney Sandy

Retired from the Department of Transportation with 33 years of state service and SEANC membership, Sandy is a resident of Indian Trail and District 11 member. He has served as first vice president, second vice president, treasurer, Area 6 EMPAC chairman, District 11 chairman, Piedmont and Western Region Representative to the Executive Committee, state membership chairman, state personnel benefits chairman and served on the Blue Ribbon committee.

Second Vice President Cheryl Moon

A Knightdale resident and District 43 member, she is a retired Department of Motor Vehicles employee with 30 years of state service. A SEANC member for more than 30 years, she has served as District 43’s chairwoman and statewide as Insurance Board of Trustees chairwoman and two years as general treasurer.

General Treasurer Marilyn Jean Martin

A resident of Salisbury, Martin is a Correctional Captain for Piedmont Correctional Institution and has more than 29 years of state service and SEANC membership. She has served as Piedmont Region Representative to the Executive Committee, district chairwoman, district vice chairwoman and as a member of the statewide Collective Bargaining Committee and Blue Ribbon Committee.

Past President Tony Smith

A resident of Morganton and District 5 member, he is a Maintenance Supervisor IV for the Department of Correction. He served two terms as president, first vice president, second vice president and as an area EMPAC chairman. On the district level, he has served as chairman, vice chairman and on all district committees. Smith has more than 18 years of state service and SEANC membership.

Secretary to the President Betty Gautier

A Benson resident and Administrative Officer III with the Department of Agriculture, she has been a state employee for 34 years and a SEANC member for 30 years. Gautier has previously served two terms as Secretary to President Tony Smith and District 38’s secretary and treasurer.

Parliamentarian Roy McGalliard

A resident of Morganton and member of District 5, he is retired from Western Piedmont Community College with 30 years of state service and is an Order of the Long Leaf Pine recipient. He has been a SEANC member for 38 years and has served as parliamentarian many times on both the state and district levels. He has also served as chairman of his district and on various state committees.

Parliamentarian Ray Evans

A resident of Hillsborough and member of District 27, he retired from the Department of Motor Vehicles as a Motor Vehicle Inspector with 27 years of state service and 45 years of SEANC membership. On the statewide level he has served as Blue Ribbon Committee chairman, Bylaws Committee chairman, Parliamentarian for six presidents and chairman of the Redistricting Task Force. He has also served as his district’s chairman.

14

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Insurance Board of Trustees Chairwoman Shanticia Hawkins

A Durham resident and member of District 26, Hawkins is a Central Region Program Manager for the Department of Correction and has 13 years of state service and SEANC membership. On the state level she has served as MAT and Awards committees chairwoman and on the Insurance Board of Trustees. For her district she has served as chairwoman, vice chairwoman and secretary treasurer.

A Right of Way Agent for Division 14 at the Department of Transportation, Greene is a resident of Bryson City and has 35 years of state service and SEANC membership. This is Greene’s second term as district chairman and he has been a convention delegate for the past 15 years.

District 12, Jim Rowell

A retired Department of Correction employee with 28 years of state service and SEANC membership, Rowell is a resident of Marshville. He has served as state Parliamentarian five times, district chairman 12 times and on the state Bylaws Committee.

District 25, Jonathan Stephenson

District 63, Marion Drake

A Program Assistant at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Stephenson is a resident of Durham. He has been a state employee and SEANC member for five years. On the statewide level he has served as Collective Bargaining Committee chairman and on the Planning Committee and Youth Council.

District 44, Sandra JohnsonLemon A Policy and Process Admin-

istrator and EEO Officer for the State Treasurers’ office, she has been a state employee and SEANC member for five years. Johnson-Lemon has served as state EMPAC secretary and on the state Scholarship Foundation and Minority Council. At the district level she has served as vice chairwoman and communications chairwoman.

A resident of Windsor, Drake is an Administrative Sergeant for the Department of Correction. With eight years of state service and SEANC membership, Drake has served her district as vice chairwoman and Membership Committee chairwoman. On the state level, she has been a member of the Membership and MAT committees.

District 2, Dodie Collins

District 13, Sue Eldridge

District 26, Stacy Dowdy

District 45, Jonathan Williams

District 65, Gloria Highsmith

District 3, Doris W. Greer

District 16, Melva Daniels

District 27, Gracie LeSane

District 46, Sharon Dobson

District 66, Lenell Miller

A retired Department of Health and Human Services employee with 30 years of state service and a resident of Morganton, Belada has been a SEANC member for 18 years. He has served as district chairman several times and as state Member Discount Committee chairman.

District 4, Jimmy Davis

District 17, Wayne Talbert

District 36, Bruce Dixon

District 56, Michael Johnson

District 67, Stanley Drewery

Piedmont Region Representative/ District 19, Angela Lyght

District 5, Melissa Freeman

District 18, Larry Miller

District 38, C.J. Stephens

District 57, Darius McLaurin

District 68, Rita Woods

District 6, Wayne Freeman

District 20, Cliff Brown

District 39, Art Anthony

District 58, Marie Stone

District 69, Keith Renner

District 8, Brent Reeves

District 21, Joel Valentine

District 40, Anne Brown

District 59, John Miller

District 70, Roland Best

District 9, Bruce McCrary

District 22, Michele Shaw

District 41, Mike Gould

District 60, Hiawatha Jones

District 71, Stuart Glover

District 10, Kimberly Martin

District 23, Jeremy Register

District 42, Betty Jones

District 61, Michael Bell

District 11, Anthony Hall

District 24, Terry Baker

District 43, Nicole Hunter

District 62, Lewis Sasser

Retiree Council Chairman Bob Hopper

Retired from the Department of Motor Vehicles with 30 years of service, Hopper is a Hickory resident and District 9 member. He has been a SEANC member for 50 years. On the statewide level he has served as Retiree Council chairman for the past five years, State Nomination Committee chairman, Member Discount Committee chairman, and as a member of the Credentialing and Blue Ribbon Committees. On the district level he has served in multiple capacities.

Western Region Representative/ District 7, Henry Belada

A Durham resident, she is an HR Facilitator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Lyght has been a state employee for 18 years and a member of SEANC for 8 years. On the statewide level, she has served as a member of the Youth Council, Communications Committee and Minority Council. At the district level she has served as secretary, second vice chairwoman, first vice chairwoman and on all district committees.

South Central Region Representative/ District 37, Joseph Qubain

A Planning Engineer for the Department of Transportation, Qubain has been a state employee and a member of SEANC for 20 years. He is a resident of Raleigh and has served on EMPAC, the Insurance Board of Trustees and is a past district chairman.

North Central Region Representative/ District 47, Doranna Anderson

A 14-year state employee and SEANC member, Anderson is the Oral Health Education and Promotion branch head for the Department of Health and Human Services. A Raleigh resident, she served her district as vice chairwoman, secretary, treasurer and chairwoman of the Scholarship, Communications and Retiree committees. She is a member of EMPAC Area 10. This is her second term as the North Central Region Representative to the Executive Committee.

Eastern Region Representative/ District 64, Gene Mills

A retired state employee of 32 years, Mills is a 29-year SEANC member who resides in Greenville. She has served as district chairwoman and vice chairwoman. She is also a member of her districts’ Policy Platform, EMPAC and Bylaws committees.

A retired state employee with 25 yeas of service and a Charlotte resident, she has 30 years of SEANC membership and has served as a member of the Membership, Planning, Personnel and Executive Director Search committees, the Insurance Board of Trustees and EMPAC.

A retired Appalachian State University employee with 36 years of state service, Greer has been a SEANC member for 36 years. On the state level, she has served as chairwoman of the Policy Platform committee and on the Scholarship Foundation Board. On the district level she has served on the Membership, Policy Platform and Bylaws committees and as district vice chairwoman. A Correctional Sergeant for the Department of Correction, Davis has been a state employee and SEANC member for 21 years. On the statewide level, he has served as Western Regional Representative to the Executive Committee and area EMPAC chairman. On the district level, he has served as chairman and vice chairman and on the Policy Platform, Bylaws, Fundraising and Membership committees. A resident of Morganton, Freeman is an Administrative Assistant at Western Piedmont Community College. She has been a state employee for six years and a SEANC member for four. In those four years, she has served on the statewide Youth Council, Policy Platform and Communications committees.

A Physician Assistant for the Department of Health and Human Services’ Broughton Hospital and a resident of Granite Falls, he has been a state employee for 11 years and SEANC member for 10 years. He is serving in his fifth year as district chairman and has previously served as chairman of his district’s Award, Membership and Communications committees. A Business Officer for the Department of Transportation and a resident of North Wilkesboro, Reeves has been a state employee and SEANC member for 34 years. He has served on the Insurance Committee.

A Correctional Captain for the Department of Correction, he has been a state employee and a SEANC member for more than 18 years. McCrary is a resident of Morganton and has previously served as his district’s Member Discount chairman.

A Correctional Sergeant with the Department of Correction and a resident of China Grove, Martin has been a state employee for more than 10 years and a member of SEANC for more than seven years. She has served as district secretary, treasurer, membership chairwoman and communication chairwoman. On the statewide level she has served on the MAT committee. A Transportation Supervisor II for the Department of Transportation, he has been a state employee for 24 years and a SEANC member for 23 years. Hall is a Morven resident; he has served as district chairman, Membership Committee chairman and on the state Policy Platform committee.

A retired state employee with eight years of service, Eldridge has been a SEANC member for 12 years. She is a Charlotte resident and has served as Membership chairwoman, secretary and vice chairwoman on the district level.

A retired state employee with 30 years of state service and 20 years as a SEANC member, Daniels is a Winston-Salem resident. She has served as district secretary, membership recruitment chairwoman, a member of the state Member Discount committee and EMPAC.

An Assistant Superintendent of Custody for the Department of Correction, he has 28 years of state service and SEANC membership. Talbert is a resident of Yanceyville, he has previously served as district chairman and state membership chairman.

A Lieutenant with the Department of Correction and a resident of Hamlet, Miller has been a SEANC member and state employee for 18 years. He previously served as a member of EMPAC.

As a retired Department of Correction employee and a resident of Aberdeen, Brown has 21 years of state service and has been a SEANC member for 25 years. At the statewide level, he has served as president for two terms, first vice president, second vice president and Area 8 EMPAC chairman.

A Maintenance Mechanic II for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources Division of Parks and Recreation, Valentine has been a state employee and a SEANC member for 10 years. He is a resident of Manson and has served as his district’s chairman and Policy Platform Committee chairman.

A Lillington resident and Correctional Sergeant for the Department of Correction, she has been a state employee and SEANC member for seven years. She has previously served as a member of the Youth Council.

A resident of Whiteville, Register is a Transportation Supervisor I for the Department of Transportation. He has been a state employee and SEANC member for 14 years. He has served as his district’s chairman, vice chairman and as chairman of his district’s Bylaws and Membership committees.

Retired from state government with 14 years of service, Baker is a resident of Elizabethtown. During his 14 years of SEANC membership, he has served as district chairman and treasurer and as chairman of his district’s Policy Platform, Membership and Fundraising committees.

A Butner resident employed with the Department of Correction, Dowdy has been with state government and a member of SEANC for nine years. She served her district as vice chairwoman and Fundraising Committee chairwoman.

A Durham resident, LeSane is an Endowment Accountant at North Carolina Central University. She has been a state employee for seven years and a SEANC member for six. LeSane has served as district chairwoman and district Scholarship chairwoman.

A Wake Forest resident, he is a Nursing Educator for the Department of Health and Human Services’ Dorothea Dix Hospital. He has been a state employee for 23 years and a SEANC member for 20 years. He has served on his district’s Awards, Planning and Bylaws committees.

A Lieutenant for the State Highway Patrol and resident of Raleigh, Stephens has been employed with the state for 22 years and a member of SEANC for 17 years. During his membership he has served as district chairman, Minority Council member and Insurance Board of Trustees representative.

A state employee for 20 years and a SEANC member for 15, Anthony is a Research Specialist for North Carolina State University and a Raleigh resident. On the statewide level, he has served as Policy Platform Committee chairman, general treasurer and on the Insurance Board of Trustees.

A state employee and SEANC member for 16 years, Brown is a Personnel Analyst at the Department of Correction. A resident of Mebane, Brown has served her district as vice chairwoman and EMPAC memberat-large.

A Raleigh resident, he is a Probation/ Parole Officer II for Wake County. Gould has 12 years of state employment and 10 years of SEANC membership. At the district level he has served as chairman and Bylaws chairman. On the statewide level he has served on the Policy Platform, Advisory and Collective Bargaining committees and EMPAC.

A resident of Zebulon and a Financial Analyst for the Department of Health and Human Services, she has 27 years of state service and 22 years of SEANC membership. She has served her district as chairwoman, nominating chairwoman and as an EMPAC member.

A Driver License Examiner for the Department of Motor Vehicles, Hunter has been a state employee for 10 years and a SEANC member for nine years. She is a resident of Raleigh and on the state level has served on the Insurance Board of Trustees and as Youth Council chairwoman. At the district level she has served as Bylaws chairwoman and on the Scholarship and Fundraising committees.

With 11 years of state service and SEANC membership, Williams is a Correctional Sergeant for the Department of Correction. A resident of Apex, he has previously served as his district’s chairman.

A Raleigh resident with 12 years of state employment and SEANC membership, Dobson has served on the Planning Committee and the MAT Committee.

With 22 years of state service and 21 years as a SEANC member, Johnson is a Program Director for the Criminal Justice Partnership Program in the Department of Correction. A Kelford resident, he has served SEANC as a member of the Policy Platform Committee.

A Knightdale resident and Assistant Director of Administrative Services for the Department of Correction Division of Alcoholism and Chemical Dependency Program, McLaurin has 16 years of state service. During his four years of SEANC membership, he has served on his district’s EMPAC and as a convention delegate.

Retired from the Wayne County Public Schools with 31 years of state service and 12 years of SEANC membership, Stone is a Goldsboro resident. She has served as district secretary, vice chairwoman and on state EMPAC.

A Housekeeping Administrator II for the Department of Health and Human Services at Cherry Hospital, he has been with the state for 37 years and SEANC for 35 years. He has served his district as vice chairman and treasurer, and has been a member of numerous committees. On the state level he served as Eastern Region Representative to the Executive Committee. He is from LaGrange. A Teacher for the Department of Health and Human Services’ O’Berry Neuro Medical Center with 32 years of state service and SEANC membership, Jones is a resident of Goldsboro. At the district level she has served as chairwoman, communications and scholarship chairwoman. On the statewide level she has served on the Communications and Policy Platform committees.

An Administrative Support Specialist at East Carolina University with eight years of state service and SEANC membership, Highsmith is a resident of Williamston. She has served as her district secretary for the last four years and as the district insurance chairwoman for the last two.

A Behavior Program Specialist II at the Caswell Development Center with 29 years of state service and SEANC membership, Miller is a Kinston resident. She has served her district as vice chairwoman, insurance chairwoman, bylaws chairwoman and volunteer action chairwoman.

A Training Instructor II for the Department of Correction with more than 27 years state service and SEANC membership, Drewery is a Grifton resident. He has served his district as Membership, Bylaws, Member Discount committees and vice chairman.

A Correctional Lieutenant with the Department of Correction with more than 19 years of state service and SEANC membership, Woods is a resident of Creswell. She has served her district as chairwoman, vice chairwoman, bylaws chairwoman, and on the district Policy Platform, Collective Bargaining and Membership committees.

A retired state employee with 31 years of state service and 10 years of SEANC membership, Renner is a resident of Elizabeth City. On the district level, he has served as chairman, Policy Platform chairman, Retiree chairman and Membership chairman.

A retired state employee with seven years of state service and 13 years of SEANC membership, Best is a resident of Kinston. He has served on EMPAC and the Bylaws Committee.

Retired from the U.S. military, Glover is a seven-year state employee and has 7 years SEANC membership. He is a Transportation Technician with the Department of Transportation and a Wilson resident. Glover has served on the Scholarship Foundation, EMPAC, Bylaws and Policy Platform committees.

A Correctional Administrator at Pender Correctional Institution, Bell is a Warsaw resident with more than 37 years of state service and 35 years of SEANC membership. He has served 12 years on the Scholarship Foundation Board, 10 years as the chairman. Additionally, Bell has served as his district chairman, vice chairman and secretary-treasurer.

Sasser is a retired Investigator for the Department of Insurance with 35 years of state service and 38 years as a SEANC member. He has served as his district chairman, vice chairman, bylaws chairman and policy platform chairman. On the state level he has served on the Retiree Council, Collective Bargaining, Awards, Planning, Policy Platform and Blue Ribbon committees.

Compiled by Amber Ernst

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

15


2010 - 2011 board of governors

2010 - 2011 board of governors District 1, Teddy Greene

Executive Committee President Charles T. Johnson

A resident of Raleigh and District 45 member, he is a Correctional Captain for the Department of Correction at Central Prison. With 18 years of state service and SEANC membership, last year Johnson served at the statewide level as second vice president. He has served as District 45 chairman, vice chairman and North Central Region Representative to the Executive Committee.

First Vice President Sidney Sandy

Retired from the Department of Transportation with 33 years of state service and SEANC membership, Sandy is a resident of Indian Trail and District 11 member. He has served as first vice president, second vice president, treasurer, Area 6 EMPAC chairman, District 11 chairman, Piedmont and Western Region Representative to the Executive Committee, state membership chairman, state personnel benefits chairman and served on the Blue Ribbon committee.

Second Vice President Cheryl Moon

A Knightdale resident and District 43 member, she is a retired Department of Motor Vehicles employee with 30 years of state service. A SEANC member for more than 30 years, she has served as District 43’s chairwoman and statewide as Insurance Board of Trustees chairwoman and two years as general treasurer.

General Treasurer Marilyn Jean Martin

A resident of Salisbury, Martin is a Correctional Captain for Piedmont Correctional Institution and has more than 29 years of state service and SEANC membership. She has served as Piedmont Region Representative to the Executive Committee, district chairwoman, district vice chairwoman and as a member of the statewide Collective Bargaining Committee and Blue Ribbon Committee.

Past President Tony Smith

A resident of Morganton and District 5 member, he is a Maintenance Supervisor IV for the Department of Correction. He served two terms as president, first vice president, second vice president and as an area EMPAC chairman. On the district level, he has served as chairman, vice chairman and on all district committees. Smith has more than 18 years of state service and SEANC membership.

Secretary to the President Betty Gautier

A Benson resident and Administrative Officer III with the Department of Agriculture, she has been a state employee for 34 years and a SEANC member for 30 years. Gautier has previously served two terms as Secretary to President Tony Smith and District 38’s secretary and treasurer.

Parliamentarian Roy McGalliard

A resident of Morganton and member of District 5, he is retired from Western Piedmont Community College with 30 years of state service and is an Order of the Long Leaf Pine recipient. He has been a SEANC member for 38 years and has served as parliamentarian many times on both the state and district levels. He has also served as chairman of his district and on various state committees.

Parliamentarian Ray Evans

A resident of Hillsborough and member of District 27, he retired from the Department of Motor Vehicles as a Motor Vehicle Inspector with 27 years of state service and 45 years of SEANC membership. On the statewide level he has served as Blue Ribbon Committee chairman, Bylaws Committee chairman, Parliamentarian for six presidents and chairman of the Redistricting Task Force. He has also served as his district’s chairman.

14

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Insurance Board of Trustees Chairwoman Shanticia Hawkins

A Durham resident and member of District 26, Hawkins is a Central Region Program Manager for the Department of Correction and has 13 years of state service and SEANC membership. On the state level she has served as MAT and Awards committees chairwoman and on the Insurance Board of Trustees. For her district she has served as chairwoman, vice chairwoman and secretary treasurer.

A Right of Way Agent for Division 14 at the Department of Transportation, Greene is a resident of Bryson City and has 35 years of state service and SEANC membership. This is Greene’s second term as district chairman and he has been a convention delegate for the past 15 years.

District 12, Jim Rowell

A retired Department of Correction employee with 28 years of state service and SEANC membership, Rowell is a resident of Marshville. He has served as state Parliamentarian five times, district chairman 12 times and on the state Bylaws Committee.

District 25, Jonathan Stephenson

District 63, Marion Drake

A Program Assistant at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Stephenson is a resident of Durham. He has been a state employee and SEANC member for five years. On the statewide level he has served as Collective Bargaining Committee chairman and on the Planning Committee and Youth Council.

District 44, Sandra JohnsonLemon A Policy and Process Admin-

istrator and EEO Officer for the State Treasurers’ office, she has been a state employee and SEANC member for five years. Johnson-Lemon has served as state EMPAC secretary and on the state Scholarship Foundation and Minority Council. At the district level she has served as vice chairwoman and communications chairwoman.

A resident of Windsor, Drake is an Administrative Sergeant for the Department of Correction. With eight years of state service and SEANC membership, Drake has served her district as vice chairwoman and Membership Committee chairwoman. On the state level, she has been a member of the Membership and MAT committees.

District 2, Dodie Collins

District 13, Sue Eldridge

District 26, Stacy Dowdy

District 45, Jonathan Williams

District 65, Gloria Highsmith

District 3, Doris W. Greer

District 16, Melva Daniels

District 27, Gracie LeSane

District 46, Sharon Dobson

District 66, Lenell Miller

A retired Department of Health and Human Services employee with 30 years of state service and a resident of Morganton, Belada has been a SEANC member for 18 years. He has served as district chairman several times and as state Member Discount Committee chairman.

District 4, Jimmy Davis

District 17, Wayne Talbert

District 36, Bruce Dixon

District 56, Michael Johnson

District 67, Stanley Drewery

Piedmont Region Representative/ District 19, Angela Lyght

District 5, Melissa Freeman

District 18, Larry Miller

District 38, C.J. Stephens

District 57, Darius McLaurin

District 68, Rita Woods

District 6, Wayne Freeman

District 20, Cliff Brown

District 39, Art Anthony

District 58, Marie Stone

District 69, Keith Renner

District 8, Brent Reeves

District 21, Joel Valentine

District 40, Anne Brown

District 59, John Miller

District 70, Roland Best

District 9, Bruce McCrary

District 22, Michele Shaw

District 41, Mike Gould

District 60, Hiawatha Jones

District 71, Stuart Glover

District 10, Kimberly Martin

District 23, Jeremy Register

District 42, Betty Jones

District 61, Michael Bell

District 11, Anthony Hall

District 24, Terry Baker

District 43, Nicole Hunter

District 62, Lewis Sasser

Retiree Council Chairman Bob Hopper

Retired from the Department of Motor Vehicles with 30 years of service, Hopper is a Hickory resident and District 9 member. He has been a SEANC member for 50 years. On the statewide level he has served as Retiree Council chairman for the past five years, State Nomination Committee chairman, Member Discount Committee chairman, and as a member of the Credentialing and Blue Ribbon Committees. On the district level he has served in multiple capacities.

Western Region Representative/ District 7, Henry Belada

A Durham resident, she is an HR Facilitator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Lyght has been a state employee for 18 years and a member of SEANC for 8 years. On the statewide level, she has served as a member of the Youth Council, Communications Committee and Minority Council. At the district level she has served as secretary, second vice chairwoman, first vice chairwoman and on all district committees.

South Central Region Representative/ District 37, Joseph Qubain

A Planning Engineer for the Department of Transportation, Qubain has been a state employee and a member of SEANC for 20 years. He is a resident of Raleigh and has served on EMPAC, the Insurance Board of Trustees and is a past district chairman.

North Central Region Representative/ District 47, Doranna Anderson

A 14-year state employee and SEANC member, Anderson is the Oral Health Education and Promotion branch head for the Department of Health and Human Services. A Raleigh resident, she served her district as vice chairwoman, secretary, treasurer and chairwoman of the Scholarship, Communications and Retiree committees. She is a member of EMPAC Area 10. This is her second term as the North Central Region Representative to the Executive Committee.

Eastern Region Representative/ District 64, Gene Mills

A retired state employee of 32 years, Mills is a 29-year SEANC member who resides in Greenville. She has served as district chairwoman and vice chairwoman. She is also a member of her districts’ Policy Platform, EMPAC and Bylaws committees.

A retired state employee with 25 yeas of service and a Charlotte resident, she has 30 years of SEANC membership and has served as a member of the Membership, Planning, Personnel and Executive Director Search committees, the Insurance Board of Trustees and EMPAC.

A retired Appalachian State University employee with 36 years of state service, Greer has been a SEANC member for 36 years. On the state level, she has served as chairwoman of the Policy Platform committee and on the Scholarship Foundation Board. On the district level she has served on the Membership, Policy Platform and Bylaws committees and as district vice chairwoman. A Correctional Sergeant for the Department of Correction, Davis has been a state employee and SEANC member for 21 years. On the statewide level, he has served as Western Regional Representative to the Executive Committee and area EMPAC chairman. On the district level, he has served as chairman and vice chairman and on the Policy Platform, Bylaws, Fundraising and Membership committees. A resident of Morganton, Freeman is an Administrative Assistant at Western Piedmont Community College. She has been a state employee for six years and a SEANC member for four. In those four years, she has served on the statewide Youth Council, Policy Platform and Communications committees.

A Physician Assistant for the Department of Health and Human Services’ Broughton Hospital and a resident of Granite Falls, he has been a state employee for 11 years and SEANC member for 10 years. He is serving in his fifth year as district chairman and has previously served as chairman of his district’s Award, Membership and Communications committees. A Business Officer for the Department of Transportation and a resident of North Wilkesboro, Reeves has been a state employee and SEANC member for 34 years. He has served on the Insurance Committee.

A Correctional Captain for the Department of Correction, he has been a state employee and a SEANC member for more than 18 years. McCrary is a resident of Morganton and has previously served as his district’s Member Discount chairman.

A Correctional Sergeant with the Department of Correction and a resident of China Grove, Martin has been a state employee for more than 10 years and a member of SEANC for more than seven years. She has served as district secretary, treasurer, membership chairwoman and communication chairwoman. On the statewide level she has served on the MAT committee. A Transportation Supervisor II for the Department of Transportation, he has been a state employee for 24 years and a SEANC member for 23 years. Hall is a Morven resident; he has served as district chairman, Membership Committee chairman and on the state Policy Platform committee.

A retired state employee with eight years of service, Eldridge has been a SEANC member for 12 years. She is a Charlotte resident and has served as Membership chairwoman, secretary and vice chairwoman on the district level.

A retired state employee with 30 years of state service and 20 years as a SEANC member, Daniels is a Winston-Salem resident. She has served as district secretary, membership recruitment chairwoman, a member of the state Member Discount committee and EMPAC.

An Assistant Superintendent of Custody for the Department of Correction, he has 28 years of state service and SEANC membership. Talbert is a resident of Yanceyville, he has previously served as district chairman and state membership chairman.

A Lieutenant with the Department of Correction and a resident of Hamlet, Miller has been a SEANC member and state employee for 18 years. He previously served as a member of EMPAC.

As a retired Department of Correction employee and a resident of Aberdeen, Brown has 21 years of state service and has been a SEANC member for 25 years. At the statewide level, he has served as president for two terms, first vice president, second vice president and Area 8 EMPAC chairman.

A Maintenance Mechanic II for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources Division of Parks and Recreation, Valentine has been a state employee and a SEANC member for 10 years. He is a resident of Manson and has served as his district’s chairman and Policy Platform Committee chairman.

A Lillington resident and Correctional Sergeant for the Department of Correction, she has been a state employee and SEANC member for seven years. She has previously served as a member of the Youth Council.

A resident of Whiteville, Register is a Transportation Supervisor I for the Department of Transportation. He has been a state employee and SEANC member for 14 years. He has served as his district’s chairman, vice chairman and as chairman of his district’s Bylaws and Membership committees.

Retired from state government with 14 years of service, Baker is a resident of Elizabethtown. During his 14 years of SEANC membership, he has served as district chairman and treasurer and as chairman of his district’s Policy Platform, Membership and Fundraising committees.

A Butner resident employed with the Department of Correction, Dowdy has been with state government and a member of SEANC for nine years. She served her district as vice chairwoman and Fundraising Committee chairwoman.

A Durham resident, LeSane is an Endowment Accountant at North Carolina Central University. She has been a state employee for seven years and a SEANC member for six. LeSane has served as district chairwoman and district Scholarship chairwoman.

A Wake Forest resident, he is a Nursing Educator for the Department of Health and Human Services’ Dorothea Dix Hospital. He has been a state employee for 23 years and a SEANC member for 20 years. He has served on his district’s Awards, Planning and Bylaws committees.

A Lieutenant for the State Highway Patrol and resident of Raleigh, Stephens has been employed with the state for 22 years and a member of SEANC for 17 years. During his membership he has served as district chairman, Minority Council member and Insurance Board of Trustees representative.

A state employee for 20 years and a SEANC member for 15, Anthony is a Research Specialist for North Carolina State University and a Raleigh resident. On the statewide level, he has served as Policy Platform Committee chairman, general treasurer and on the Insurance Board of Trustees.

A state employee and SEANC member for 16 years, Brown is a Personnel Analyst at the Department of Correction. A resident of Mebane, Brown has served her district as vice chairwoman and EMPAC memberat-large.

A Raleigh resident, he is a Probation/ Parole Officer II for Wake County. Gould has 12 years of state employment and 10 years of SEANC membership. At the district level he has served as chairman and Bylaws chairman. On the statewide level he has served on the Policy Platform, Advisory and Collective Bargaining committees and EMPAC.

A resident of Zebulon and a Financial Analyst for the Department of Health and Human Services, she has 27 years of state service and 22 years of SEANC membership. She has served her district as chairwoman, nominating chairwoman and as an EMPAC member.

A Driver License Examiner for the Department of Motor Vehicles, Hunter has been a state employee for 10 years and a SEANC member for nine years. She is a resident of Raleigh and on the state level has served on the Insurance Board of Trustees and as Youth Council chairwoman. At the district level she has served as Bylaws chairwoman and on the Scholarship and Fundraising committees.

With 11 years of state service and SEANC membership, Williams is a Correctional Sergeant for the Department of Correction. A resident of Apex, he has previously served as his district’s chairman.

A Raleigh resident with 12 years of state employment and SEANC membership, Dobson has served on the Planning Committee and the MAT Committee.

With 22 years of state service and 21 years as a SEANC member, Johnson is a Program Director for the Criminal Justice Partnership Program in the Department of Correction. A Kelford resident, he has served SEANC as a member of the Policy Platform Committee.

A Knightdale resident and Assistant Director of Administrative Services for the Department of Correction Division of Alcoholism and Chemical Dependency Program, McLaurin has 16 years of state service. During his four years of SEANC membership, he has served on his district’s EMPAC and as a convention delegate.

Retired from the Wayne County Public Schools with 31 years of state service and 12 years of SEANC membership, Stone is a Goldsboro resident. She has served as district secretary, vice chairwoman and on state EMPAC.

A Housekeeping Administrator II for the Department of Health and Human Services at Cherry Hospital, he has been with the state for 37 years and SEANC for 35 years. He has served his district as vice chairman and treasurer, and has been a member of numerous committees. On the state level he served as Eastern Region Representative to the Executive Committee. He is from LaGrange. A Teacher for the Department of Health and Human Services’ O’Berry Neuro Medical Center with 32 years of state service and SEANC membership, Jones is a resident of Goldsboro. At the district level she has served as chairwoman, communications and scholarship chairwoman. On the statewide level she has served on the Communications and Policy Platform committees.

An Administrative Support Specialist at East Carolina University with eight years of state service and SEANC membership, Highsmith is a resident of Williamston. She has served as her district secretary for the last four years and as the district insurance chairwoman for the last two.

A Behavior Program Specialist II at the Caswell Development Center with 29 years of state service and SEANC membership, Miller is a Kinston resident. She has served her district as vice chairwoman, insurance chairwoman, bylaws chairwoman and volunteer action chairwoman.

A Training Instructor II for the Department of Correction with more than 27 years state service and SEANC membership, Drewery is a Grifton resident. He has served his district as Membership, Bylaws, Member Discount committees and vice chairman.

A Correctional Lieutenant with the Department of Correction with more than 19 years of state service and SEANC membership, Woods is a resident of Creswell. She has served her district as chairwoman, vice chairwoman, bylaws chairwoman, and on the district Policy Platform, Collective Bargaining and Membership committees.

A retired state employee with 31 years of state service and 10 years of SEANC membership, Renner is a resident of Elizabeth City. On the district level, he has served as chairman, Policy Platform chairman, Retiree chairman and Membership chairman.

A retired state employee with seven years of state service and 13 years of SEANC membership, Best is a resident of Kinston. He has served on EMPAC and the Bylaws Committee.

Retired from the U.S. military, Glover is a seven-year state employee and has 7 years SEANC membership. He is a Transportation Technician with the Department of Transportation and a Wilson resident. Glover has served on the Scholarship Foundation, EMPAC, Bylaws and Policy Platform committees.

A Correctional Administrator at Pender Correctional Institution, Bell is a Warsaw resident with more than 37 years of state service and 35 years of SEANC membership. He has served 12 years on the Scholarship Foundation Board, 10 years as the chairman. Additionally, Bell has served as his district chairman, vice chairman and secretary-treasurer.

Sasser is a retired Investigator for the Department of Insurance with 35 years of state service and 38 years as a SEANC member. He has served as his district chairman, vice chairman, bylaws chairman and policy platform chairman. On the state level he has served on the Retiree Council, Collective Bargaining, Awards, Planning, Policy Platform and Blue Ribbon committees.

Compiled by Amber Ernst

THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

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State Employees Association of North Carolina P.O. Drawer 27727 Raleigh, NC 27611

Periodical Postage

PAID

Raleigh, NC

Charlotte/Concord, NC Williamsburg, VA

A Perk for the Whole Pack!

We suspect that you’d enjoy careening down a waterslide, having a fantastic MagiQuest™ adventure, dining in one of our northwoods themed restaurants and building great family traditions. And to show that we mean it, we’ve arranged special discounts for

State Employees Association of NC with a savings of 20% OFF our best available room rates and 15% OFF services in our spa!

So clear your calendar, pack the swimsuits and head to Great Wolf Lodge. Just imagine – colossal indoor waterpark, 100-game arcade, a luxurious spa and fantastic restaurants – all under one roof. After all, you deserve a little fun after all your hard work and this is our little way of saying, “Job well done! ”

Rent a SEANC Conference Room today. Let SEANC provide an impressive environment to make your meeting or training session a success!

Visit GREATWOLF.COM or call 1.866.925.WOLF to make reservations. Use corporate code: STAT276A

when prompted and receive 20% OFF our best available room rates and 15% OFF services in the spa

Call 704.979.3348 to make spa reservations! Offer is guaranteed when reservations are made 14 days prior to arrival date - any time of the year!

10175 Weddington Road, Concord, NC 28027 549 East Rochambeau Drive, Williamsburg, VA 23188

Offer valid only at Charlotte/Concord, NC and Williamsburg, VA locations, 1/01/10 - 12/30/10. Valid per night for single or multiple night stays, must be mentioned at time of reservation. Within 14 days of arrival date, limited number of rooms available and may not be valid during holiday and blackout periods. May not be combined with any other discount or promotional offers. Multiple night minimum stay may apply. Must stay by 12/30/10 for offer to apply. Offer based on 4 guests per room and may be terminated at any time without notice. Must have one individual 21 years of age or older staying in each room. Offer is not transferable and is not redeemable for cash. Must present valid work ID or documentation at check-in.

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THE REPORTER NOVEMBER 2010

Conference rooms for up to 100 people are available for rent at the SEANC Central Office for individuals, organizations and companies. A daily fee of $150 per room per weekday includes a professional business environment with audiovisual equipment, access to a food preparation area and room arrangement to suit your needs. Conference rooms A and B can be combined into one large room for $300 per weekday.

LOCATION: 1621 MIDTOWN PLACE, RALEIGH, NC 27609 Contact SEANC at 800.222.2758 or meetings@seanc.org to secure your conference room today.


November 2010 Reporter