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ZOONOOZ

®

SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL

WALKABOUT AUSTRALIA

2018 Calendar Issue

NOVEMBER 2017


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B RA T E T H AN K S G I V I NG ZOO SAN DIEGO

SAN DIEGO ALBERT S THANKSGIVING DINNER CONTINUOUS SEATING 11 A.M. TO 3:30 P.M.

SAN DIEGO ZOO TREETOPS THANKSGIVING BUFFET CONTINUOUS SEATING 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

Join us at Albert’s Restaurant and enjoy a three-course Thanksgiving feast with all the trimmings. The menu boasts free-range turkey, slow-roasted prime rib, and vegetarian options with traditional side dishes, salads, and decadent desserts.

At the Zoo’s Treetops Banquet Room, a lavish buffet offers Thanksgiving favorites along with traditional side dishes, salads, artisan breads, and a dessert bar.

Cost is $40.95 for adults and $14.95 for children ages 3 to 11, plus tax and gratuity. Zoo admission is required for nonmembers.

Cost is $47.95 for adults and $18.95 for children ages 3 to 11, plus tax and gratuity. Zoo admission is required for nonmembers.

For reservations, please call 619-557-3964 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily and ask for Thanksgiving Day Dinner. Secure your reservation with a credit card. For complete menus and details, please visit zoo. sandiegozoo.org/dining-events.

For reservations, please call 619-557-3964 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily and ask for Thanksgiving Day Buffet. Secure your reservation with a credit card. For complete menus and details, please visit zoo. sandiegozoo.org/dining-events.

ZOO SAFARI PARK THANKSGIVING DAY BUFFET SEATINGS AT 11:30 A.M. AND 3 P.M. Celebrate Thanksgiving Day at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park’s Hunte Nairobi Pavilion, where you can enjoy a lavish buffet with Thanksgiving favorites and chef’s specialties, as well as a special selection just for the kids. Guests will be seated at their own reserved table, set for the number in your party. Cost is $47.95 for adults; $18.95 for children ages 3 to 11, plus tax and parking. Nonmembers add Safari Park admission. For reservations, call 619-718-3000. For complete menus and details, please visit sdzsafaripark.org/dining.


November 2017 VOL. XC–NO. 06

Graphically Speaking 8 Looking Sharp

Get right to the point about one of the Animal Kingdom’s most captivating subjects: the short-beaked echidna, an egg-laying mammal. BY DONNA PARHAM

Cover Story 10 Walkabout Australia

Opening in summer 2018, Walkabout Australia will bring the wonders from Down Under to the Safari Park. A stroll among kangaroos, anyone? BY KAREN E. WORLEY

2018 Calendar 14 Astonishing Australian Animals

Our 2018 calendar highlights the fascinating Aussie species that will make their homes in the Safari Park’s Walkabout Australia.

More

2 Nooz Notes 38 WorldWild Tours 40 Support 44 In the Field ON THE COVER:

Western gray kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus THIS PAGE:

Short-beaked echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus PHOTOS BY:

Ken Bohn, SDZG Photographer


N O OZ N OT E S

WHAT’S IN STORE?

Wild Holiday Gift Guide Visit us online at shopzoo.com. Free Standard USPS ground shipping on orders of $50 or more. See our website for details.

For the animal lovers on your list, we have just the thing— actually, many things! The main gift shops at the San Diego Zoo and Safari Park offer a dazzling array of gift ideas and unique items that are sure to please. Make your holiday shopping a safari, and see what you can find!

HANGING OUT Youth T-shirts, lemur (aqua) or meerkat (lime), sizes XS-L, $18.95; 45-inch-tall plush orangutan, $199.

2 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017


CHAIRMAN’S NOTE ROBERT B. HORSMAN GADGETS GALORE Elephant corkscrew, $19.95; animal multitool, $24.95.

READ ALL ABOUT IT Animalium, $35; Land Mammals, $19.95; both hardcover. ON THE GO Penguin plush, $24.95; 9-inch, rhino cotton backpack, $34.95; panda neck pillow, $24.99.

FUN AND ECO-FRIENDLY Green Toys block set, $32.95; toy recycling truck, $36.95.

ROCKIN’ DECOR 2017 penguin ornament, rhodium, $24.95.

FOR THE WELL-DRESSED PENGUIN FAN Youth-size plush penguin costume, sizes 4-10, $34.95.

Cheers to a Wonderful Year

I

t’s hard to believe that we are at the end of another year, but here we are in November, with the holidays just around the corner. As we enjoy this festive season and anticipate a new year, I look back at all that San Diego Zoo Global has accomplished in 2017, and we have much to celebrate. Significant conservation advances were achieved for species like rhinos, giraffes, Tasmanian devils, African penguins, Hawaiian forest birds, and mountain yellow-legged frogs. San Diego Zoo Global was one of the partners honored with the North American Conservation Award from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) this year, for the long-term project to save the California condor and reestablish the species in the wild. Changes at our facilities included the opening of the Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks habitats and the new bridge at the Zoo, as well as beginning construction for Walkabout Australia at the Safari Park. We are grateful to everyone who contributed to San Diego Zoo Global’s work this year and appreciate your enthusiasm for making a difference for wildlife. In December, we’ll be ringing in the holiday season with the Zoo’s festive Jungle Bells presented by California Coast Credit Union, with holiday lights, music, entertainment, family activities, and encounters with our animal ambassadors. I hope you will have a chance to enjoy this wonderful time of year with us. I especially want to thank all our members, donors, volunteers, and employees for your dedication, generosity, and support. You are the core of San Diego Zoo Global and what makes our conservation, animal care, and education efforts possible. I’m looking forward to what 2018 brings, and I wish you happy holidays and all the best in the New Year.

SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL / SANDIEGOZOO.ORG / 3


N O OZ N OT E S

NOVEMBER 4, 5, 25; DECEMBER 2, 3, 30 Sunrise Surprise Stroll Enjoy the Zoo before it opens, walk the grounds with experienced Zoo educators, learn “inside secrets,” and hear stories about special animals. Call 619-718-3000 or visit sandiegozoo.org. (Z)

Save the Date What’s happening at the Zoo and Park this month and next (Z) Zoo events (P) Park events NOVEMBER 4 Albert’s Late Harvest Winemaker Dinner Enjoy a four-course gourmet meal accompanied by exceptional wines from Duckhorn Vineyards. Call 619-718-3000, or book online at zoo.sandiegozoo.org/alberts. (Z) NOVEMBER 4, 18 Photo Workshop: Beginning Wildlife Photography Join our professional photographers at this two-session class, open to guests 16 or older. Call 619-718-3000 or visit sandiegozoo.org. (Z) NOVEMBER 4; DECEMBER 9, 16 Kids’ Wild Night Out Leave your kids at the Zoo for a wild night out with Dr. Zoolittle and animal friends. Sorry, no grown-ups allowed! For reservations, call 619718-3000, or book online at sandiegozoo.org. (Z)

NOVEMBER 10, 11; DECEMBER 15, 16 KinderNights Animal interaction and fun for children ages 3 to 6, with an adult. To make reservations, call 619-557-3962 or visit sandiegozoo.org. (Z) NOVEMBER 11, 18; DECEMBER 9, 16 KinderTots Learning fun for the little ones! Children ages 18 months to 3 years, with an adult companion, discover animals—and meet some up close. For reservations, call 619-557-3962 or visit sandiegozoo.org. (Z) NOVEMBER 23 Thanksgiving Dinner Enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings at the Zoo or Safari Park. For full details, see the information inside the front cover of this issue. (Z) (P)

NOVEMBER 25 Breakfast with Tigers Be there when our tigers start their day—and then enjoy a buffet breakfast. For reservations, call 619-718-3000 or visit sdzsafaripark.org. (P) NOVEMBER 25 Holly Jolly Jungle Roar & Snore This all-ages holidaythemed sleepover at the Safari Park offers activities and fun for the whole family. Call 619-718-3000. (P)

Time for Giving Thanks

H

NOVEMBER 18– JANUARY 1 Peruvian Art Demonstrations Watch Rodolfo Garcia Velasquez from Huancayo, Peru as he intricately carves gourds to create works of art. See him in action at the Zoo Store! (Z)

decorations, and spectacular entertainment are just some of the delights, as Jungle Bells fills the Zoo with holiday cheer. (Z)

DECEMBER 8–23; DECEMBER 25– JANUARY 1

DECEMBER 31 Albert’s Mildly Wild New Year’s Eve Dinner Join us to celebrate another fantastic year at the Zoo. For event information, see page 5. (Z)

Jungle Bells presented by California Coast Credit Union Visits with Santa, festive

PRESIDENT/CEO’S NOTE DOUGLAS G. MYERS

DECEMBER 9, 10 Breakfast with Santa Santa Claus is coming— to the Safari Park! For details, see page 43. (P)

Let’s Talk

ere we are in November, enjoying fall and looking forward to our Late Harvest Winemaker Follow Dinner at the Zoo’s Albert’s Restaurant and our annual Thanksgiving feasts at the Zoo and @sandiegozoo & the Safari Park—with festive holiday fun just around the corner. It’s been quite a year, and @sdzsafaripark. we have much to be thankful for, particularly thriving animals and conservation successes Share your helping in our fight to end extinction. The opening of Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks at the #SanDiegoZoo & Zoo has been a predominant focus for us this year—we did have setbacks and delays due to weather and #SDZSafariPark construction hurdles, but we were able to adapt and open in phases. The areas have added vibrancy to our memories Zoo, especially with the return of penguins in a permanent exhibit. For the long term, Conrad Prebys on Twitter & Instagram. Africa Rocks is a magnificent addition and provides new and different ways to get around the Zoo, with the new bridge and elevator, as well. Now, as we head into 2018, we’re excited about a new exhibit at the Safari Park: Walkabout Australia. Construction is underway at the Safari Park for an anticipated opening next summer, and this calendar issue of ZOONOOZ gives you a preview of all it will offer. I’d like to say thank you to all of you, our members and supporters, for your help and enthusiasm this year. We couldn’t do this without you! I wish you a very happy holiday season.

4 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017


IT’S HOLIDAY TIME

LATE HARVEST WINEMAKER DINNER FEATURING DUCKHORN VINEYARDS November 4, 2017

AT ALBERT’S

6 p.m. Reception with Animal Ambassadors in Treetops Banquet Room 7 p.m. Dinner at Albert’s Restaurant Executive Chef Chris Mirguet and Albert’s Chef Charles Boukas have designed a four-course meal paired with the distinctive Bordeaux varietals of Duckhorn Vineyards, Napa Valley.

FOR RESERVATIONS, BOOK ONLINE OR CALL 619-718-3000.

Price is $92 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Must be 21 years or older to attend. Menu substitutions are not available for this event.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS HAPPENS RESERVATIONS ARE NOT REQUIRED, BUT ARE RECOMMENDED. CALL 619-685-3200 TO RESERVE YOUR TABLE.

December 8 through January 1 (dark December 24) Daily from 3 to 5 p.m. Happy Holidays Happens again at Albert’s Restaurant! Enjoy select specialty cocktails, glasses of wine or beer for $6, and $7 appetizers. Stay for dinner and make it a special occasion.

ALBERT’S MILDLY WILD NEW YEAR’S EVE DINNER

FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL 619-685-3200 Sunday, December 31, 2017 BETWEEN 11 A.M. Seating begins at 5 p.m. AND 3:30 P.M. DAILY, OR BOOK Join us to celebrate another fantastic ONLINE.

year at the San Diego Zoo, and enjoy a gourmet dinner prepared by Executive Chef Chris Mirguet and Albert’s Chef Charles Boukas.

Cost is $65 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Admission required for nonmembers. Wine pairing is available for an additional $15. For complete menu and details, visit zoo.sandiegozoo.org/dining-events.


N O OZ N OT E S

Australia is home to 828 endemic bird species, including the beautiful and bold galah, or rose-breasted cockatoo.

93 Percentage of reptiles in

Australia that occur nowhere else. Australia also has more endemic mammals than any other country: 87 percent.

18.3 Inches of average

annual rainfall, making Australia the driest inhabitated continent.

SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL OFFICERS

Robert B. Horsman, Chairman Steven G. Tappan, Vice Chairman Linda Lowenstine, DVM, Ph.D., Secretary Richard B. Gulley, Treasurer BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Rolf Benirschke Sandra A. Brue Javade Chaudhri Clifford W. Hague Patricia L. Roscoe Steven S. Simpson Judith A. Wheatley

TRUSTEES EMERITI

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Distinct bioregions that make up a tapestry of grasslands, rain forests, eucalpyt forests, alpine regions, deserts, plains, and mountains.

It’s only a number Australia is the smallest continent, but it looms large in the realm of habitat diversity, beautiful landscapes, and unique species—some that will be presented at the Safari Park’s new Walkabout Australia, opening in 2018.

12

Percentage of rainfall that drains to the sea. Much of the rest is taken up by plants—or it evaporates.

Frank C. Alexander Kurt Benirschke, M.D. Berit N. Durler Thompson Fetter Bill L. Fox Frederick A. Frye, M.D. George L. Gildred Yvonne W. Larsen John M. Thornton A. Eugene Trepte Betty Jo F. Williams James Lauth, General Counsel Douglas G. Myers, President/CEO Charles L. Bieler, Executive Director Emeritus THE FOUNDATION OF SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL OFFICERS

ZOONOOZ

®

PUBLISHED SINCE 1926 NOVEMBER 2017 | VOL. XC–NO. 06

The Zoological Society of San Diego was founded in Octo­ber 1916 by Harry M. Wegeforth, M.D., as a private, nonprofit corporation that now does business as San Diego Zoo Global.

MANAGING EDITOR

KAREN E. WORLEY

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

PEGGY SCOTT

STAFF WRITERS

WENDY PERKINS KARYL CARMIGNANI DONNA PARHAM

The printed ZOONOOZ® magazine (ISSN 0044-5282) is currently published bimonthly, in January, March, May, July, September, and November. Publisher is San Diego Zoo Global, at 2920 Zoo Drive, San Diego, CA 92103, 619-231-1515. Periodicals postage paid at San Diego, California, USA, and at additional mailing offices. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to Membership Department, P.O. Box 120271, San Diego, CA 92112.

COPY EDITOR

ESTON ELLIS DESIGNER

KERRI ABRAMS SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

KEN BOHN TAMMY SPRATT

DIGITAL IMAGING TECHNICIAN

Copyright© 2017 San Diego Zoo Global. All rights reserved. “ZOONOOZ” Reg. U.S. Pat. Office. All column and program titles are trademarks of San Diego Zoo Global. Annual Memberships: Two adults in same household $166.50, new; $135, renewal. One adult $111, new; $101, renewal. Each membership includes unlimited entrance to the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

SAN DIEGO ZOO HOURS November 1–4: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. November 5–December 7: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. December 8–23: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. December 24: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. December 25–31: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. SAFARI PARK HOURS November 1–23: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. November 24–25: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. November 26–December 31: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. WEBSITE sandiegozoo.org PHONE 619-231-1515 ZOONOOZ® ONLINE Find ourweb publication at zoonooz.sandiegozoo.org

TAMMY SPRATT

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

KAMBIZ MEHRAFSHANI KIM TURNER AMY BLANDFORD HEIDI SCHMID-ROMERO LISA BISSI JENNIFER MACEWEN

PREPRESS AND PRINTING

QUAD GRAPHICS

6 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017

Subscription to ZOONOOZ magazine: $25 per year, $65 for 3 years. Foreign, including Canada and Mexico, $30 per year, $81 for 3 years. Contact Membership Department, P.O. Box 120271, San Diego, CA 92112, for subscription information. As part of San Diego Zoo Global’s commitment to conservation, ZOONOOZ is printed on recycled paper that is at least 10% post-consumer waste, chlorine free, and is Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) certified.

FSC® is not responsible for any calculations on saving resources by choosing this paper.

Richard M. Hills, Chair Judith C. Harris, Vice Chair Susan B. Major, Secretary Susan N. McClellan, Treasurer Mark A. Stuart, President Amy B. Parrott, Vice President Robert B. Horsman, Ex officio Douglas G. Myers, Ex officio BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Christine L. Andrews Joye D. Blount Rick Bregman Douglas Dawson Berit N. Durler, Ex officio Chris L. Eddy Arthur E. Engel Valerie A. Ewell, DVM Susan Guinn Michael N. Hammes Murray H. Hutchison Nikita Kahn Joshua A. Pack Philip C. Seeger Elizabeth W. Shoemaker Ryan Sullivan Ed Wilson


Looking for the perfect holiday present for the animal lovers in your life? Our exciting tours, programs, and special experiences at the San Diego Zoo and Safari Park make truly memorable gifts! We have something for everyone, and a visit with pandas, koalas, flamingos, gorillas, tigers, rhinos, and giraffes is sure to be their favorite gift this holiday season. CALL 619-718-3000 Visit sandiegozoo.org TO RESERVE YOUR and sdzsafaripark.org HOLIDAY GIFTS to browse the many FOR FAMILY AND options and make your FRIENDS. selections today!


G R A P H I C A LLY S P E A K I N G

Looking Sharp

COMING TO WALKABOUT AUSTRALIA IN 2018 A short-beaked echidna will be joining other Aussie animal ambassadors in making special appearances at the Safari Park's newest adventure, Walkabout Australia.

Meet the fascinating short-beaked echidna (ee-KID-nuh). There are four species of echidnas, which are found in Australia and New Guinea and are related to the platypus. These are the only five mammals— called monotremes— in the world that lay eggs. In reference to their combination of traits, echidnas were named after the Greek goddess Ekhidna, who was half reptile (snake) and half mammal (woman). BY DONNA PARHAM STAFF WRITER

NOSTRILS With a keen sense of smell, an echidna sniffs out its next meal with the help of nostrils near the tip of its beak. 8 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017

BEAK An echidna’s beak is rubbery, not hard. But, it is strong enough to poke into soil, hollow logs, and termite mounds in search of insects. Sensitive electroreceptors on the beak detect very weak electrical fields, such as those produced by the small invertebrates that echidnas eat.

Multi-Tool Tongue The slender, 7-inch tongue of an echidna is a versatile power tool. The sticky tongue catches ants, termites, and grubs and quickly pulls them in. Echidnas don't have teeth, so hard pads at the base of the tongue and on the roof of the mouth grind food into a paste for swallowing.

FRONT LIMBS With its sturdy claws, short legs, and broad, powerful feet, an echidna can tear apart a termite mound or rotting log. It can also dig straight down into dirt until only a spiny rear end can be seen.


Hatching a Puggle Soft and leathery, an echidna egg is about the size of a dime—this one is actual size. As she lays her single egg, a female nudges it into her pouch, where she incubates it for about 10 days. A newly hatched echidna weighs only about half as much as a miniature marshmallow. The baby, called a puggle, remains in the pouch for another 40 days or so. Fortunately for the mother, it does not yet have spines!

BACK FEET An echidna’s hind feet point backward. The extra-long claw—called a grooming claw—on an echidna’s second toe can “comb” or scratch out dirt and bugs that get wedged between the echidna’s spines.

Hidden Pouch Mother echidnas don’t have teats, but they do make milk. During breeding season, a female’s mammary glands grow, forming a pocket-like pouch. Milk is secreted from numerous pores on milk patches inside the pouch, and the developing offspring suckles milk from hairs over these pores.

HAIRS AND SPINES Like other mammals, echidnas have hair. In fact, they’re nearly covered with it. Among the hair, sharp, twoinch spines provide some protection from predators. If an alarmed echidna can’t run away or hide, it curls into a prickly ball. SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL / SANDIEGOZOO.ORG / 9


2018 will be the year to “go on walkabout,” at the Safari Park’s new Australian adventure


Cassowaries

Zeust Family Station

Tree kangaroos

Bridge to Devil's Marbles and waterwise garden

Wetlands pond, ducks, and geese

Animal ambassador experience

Kangaroos, wallabies, and brush turkeys Australian country road

Entrance Billabong

BY KAREN E. WORLEY | MANAGING EDITOR

PHOTOS BY KEN BOHN | SDZG PHOTOGRAPHER

wirls of red earth stir as you stroll down the country road, long grasses rippling with the breeze on either side. Welcoming eucalyptus and pine trees cast shade on the road ahead, where a bright yellow sign announces “Caution: Kangaroo Crossing.” The native, brightly colored bottlebrush ushers you around the bend, and you come upon a savanna meadow, where kangaroos and wallabies wander, munching on the grasses, hopping to and fro, and stretching out on their sides to nap in the sun. You’ve been transported Down Under—this is Walkabout Australia! THE SAFARI PARK’S NEWEST LAND OF DISCOVERY Walkabout Australia, opening in summer 2018, will add a new dimension to the Safari Park’s adventures. Designed to represent Australia’s rural landscapes and the animals, plants, and habitats encountered along backcountry roads, Walkabout Australia explores the unique species that call this place home, how they interact with the humans that share their world, and the challenges they face in finding water, food, and shelter in a changing environment. The journey—or “walkabout,” as the Australians say—will take you through four different types of habitat, as you also encounter aspects of the rural life and traditions

of the people who live there, and discover what makes this place so extraordinary. SUNNY SAVANNA The wide-open grasslands of Australia are home to one of its iconic species: the kangaroo. These hopping marsupials—along with their scientific family members, wallaroos and wallabies—are grazers, adapted to feed on various types of grasses and other low-growing plants. They fill the same habitat role in Australia that hoofed herbivores do in other parts of the world. At Walkabout Australia, you’ll encounter an expanse of grassland that is home to a large group of western gray kangaroos and red-necked wallabies. A pathway leads you into their world, meandering through the

grasses and allowing close viewing of the bouncy inhabitants. There are no barriers, so the animals may even come right up to interact with you! Interpretive volunteers will be on hand to answer questions and to point out the unique characteristics and behaviors of these macropod species. There is also an animal interaction area at the far side of the grasslands, where you’ll have the opportunity to meet other Australian animal ambassadors, from an echidna or wombat to a blue-tongued skink or sugar glider. In addition to the kangaroos and wallabies, you may see the Australian brush turkeys that wander freely throughout Walkabout Australia. They’re hard to miss, with their red heads and yellow wattles. From September to March, you SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL / SANDIEGOZOO.ORG / 11


on the ground. They have long, sharp claws on all four feet for climbing, and instead of hopping, their strong legs and tail help them leap and balance in the treetops. Some tree kangaroos live in Australia, but Walkabout Australia’s Matschie’s tree kangaroos are native to Papua New Guinea, where they are an endangered species. Three lush exhibits in Walkabout Australia are home to a bird that is elusive and mysterious, yet also famous for its ferocity: the southern, or double-wattled, cassowary. Tall, crested, and prehistoric looking, flightless cassowaries stalk through the forest underbrush looking for fruit and fungi. With a specialized digestive system, they can eat things that would be poisonous to other animals. Cassowaries are shaped just right to crash through brush in a hurry— but if cornered, the cassowary can display the characteristic that gives it the nickname “most dangerous bird in the world.” The cassowary has an elongated and razorsharp claw on each foot that can slice an impressive gash in any potential predator, including a human! Clockwise from left: Southern cassowaries are set to impress; Matschie's tree kangaroos love the arboreal life; a sugar glider will be one of the animal ambassadors to meet guests.

may even see them constructing their big mound nests, where their eggs incubate from the warmth of the surrounding leaves and soil—no egg sitting required! LIFE-GIVING WATER In this era of changing climate conditions, Australia—like California—is experiencing longer and more widespread periods of drought, along with an increase in wildfires. As a result, water is a more precious resource than ever. Walkabout Australia explores the vital connection between water and the animals and people that depend on it. A stream runs through the grassland area, pooling in a pond—called a billabong by Australians—where animals gather to drink, and waterfowl like radjah shelducks, freckled ducks, and magpie geese paddle. The size and depth of billabongs varies with the seasons and conditions. In some areas, they may only appear and spring to life briefly with the rains, then dry up again, similar to California’s vernal pools. Past the grassland habitat of Walkabout Australia, you’ll come upon the source of the stream: a larger pond with more waterfowl and the signs of human habitation. A water conservation tank, like one that might be used by local farmers or ranchers, demon12 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017

strates how collecting water during the rains can be a valuable source during dry times, and provides suggestions for how to collect and save water at your own home. A children’s area allows kids (and adults) to take a break and play in shallow, lapping water at the pond’s edge while watching the birds. The pond is at the foot of Walkabout Australia’s central gathering place: the Zeust Family Station, a building representing the wool shearing sheds found on Australia’s many sheep ranches, which are called “stations.” Here, you can stop for a bite to eat and a cool drink—including a beer—then take a look around the themed building to learn about the various techniques and traditions of sheep ranching and wool production practiced in Australia for more than 200 years. DELVE INTO THE RAIN FOREST On the other side of the Zeust Family Station, Walkabout Australia takes you into rain forest habitat to meet two more amazing animals: the tree kangaroo and cassowary. Tree kangaroos have evolved differently from their other kangaroo cousins, with adaptations that allow them to spend their lives in the trees rather than

DESERT SENTINELS After leaving the forest of Walkabout Australia, a new path beckons, taking you into more arid habitat. Looming against the sky are enormous, rounded rocks similar to those found in the Australian desert, known as Devil’s Marbles. They usher you into a garden of water-wise and droughttolerant plants, some native to Australia and some found in California, but all masters at making the most of what little moisture is available. From here, Walkabout Australia has opened up new routes that can take you to World Gardens, or to Condor Ridge, making it easier than ever to explore all the Safari Park has to offer. Mark your calendar for next summer—it’s time to go on walkabout!


‘Tis the season to ring in holiday merriment at the San Diego Zoo! We’re transforming the Zoo with animal-shaped light sculptures and festive decorations, holiday treats and entertainment, and fun animal experiences. The holiday magic includes decorated trees, music, and visits with Santa—he’ll be here November 24 through 26, December 2 and 3, and December 8 through 25. Check our website for all the holiday happenings!

sandiegozoo.org/junglebells

Wondering what to get for those hardto-shop-for people? Give them an animal adventure! This year’s stunning gift card features our festive, multi-animal design and can be used toward any purchases at the San Diego Zoo or Safari Park. Purchase a gift card of $50 or more and receive a FREE plush animal, which can be shipped to any domestic street address you specify (shipping and handling charges will apply). What could be better than giving that special someone a visit with their favorite Zoo or Park animals?


Adapted to spend most of their time in trees, these marsupials live in misty cloud forests at elevations of up to 11,000 feet.

MATSCHIE’S TREE KANGAROO


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Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Last Quarter Moon T

Full Moon @

New Year’s Day

Jungle Bells Ends (Zoo)

MONDAY

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Champagne Brunch (Park)

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SUNDAY

New Moon 0

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Full Moon @

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THURSDAY

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DECEMBER 2017 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

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FRIDAY

FEBRUARY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

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Albert’s Winter Brewmaster Dinner (Zoo)

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SATURDAY


If a cassowary is approached, it usually stands its ground. Equipped with an elongated and sharp innermost claw on each foot, the bird uses it to strike and slash at an intruder.

SOUTHERN CASSOWARY


Rosa Parks Day

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JANUARY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

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SUNDAY

Washington’s Birthday

Presidents Day

Lincoln’s Birthday

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MARCH S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

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MONDAY

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International Polar Bear Day

Love Your Pet Day

Maha Shivaratri

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TUESDAY

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Purim begins

National Science Day

Ash Wednesday

Valentine’s Day

28

21

Valentine’s Day Dinner (Park)

Albert’s Valentine’s Celebration of Love Dinner (Zoo)

Last Quarter Moon T

7

31

WEDNESDAY

New Moon 0

1

22

15

8

1

THURSDAY

First Quarter Moon G

Chinese New Year

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

World Wetlands Day

Groundhog Day

16

9

2

2

23

FRIDAY

3

24

Breakfast with Tigers (Park)

17

10

3

SATURDAY


An echidna’s snout can sense electrical signals from insects. Once located, the echidna uses its sharp claws and sturdy limbs to dig them up, and then eats them with its long, sticky tongue.

SHORT-BEAKED ECHIDNA


Palm Sunday

Butterfly Jungle Breakfast (Park)

Daylight Saving Time begins

Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

26

19

12

11

18

5

APRIL S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

26

MONDAY

4

25

FEBRUARY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

25

SUNDAY

Spring Equinox

27

20

13

6

27

TUESDAY

28

21

14

7

28

WEDNESDAY

World Water Day

8

29

22

15

International Women’s Day

Full Moon @

Holi begins

1

THURSDAY

9

2

17

Full Moon @ César Chávez Day

Spring Event begins, through April 8 (Zoo)

First Quarter Moon G

New Moon 0

St. Patrick’s Day

31

24

Spring Brewmaster Dinner (Park)

Passover begins

30

23

16

Butterfly Jungle begins (Park)

Albert’s Spring Winemaker Dinner (Zoo)

10

3

SATURDAY

Good Friday

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

Last Quarter Moon T

Butterfly Preview Dinner (Park)

Dr. Seuss Day

FRIDAY


These geese congregate in huge flocks, often made up of thousands of birds. They differ from most waterfowl species in having only partially webbed feet and strong claws.

MAGPIE GOOSE


11

4

Yom HaShoah

12

5

THURSDAY

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

FRIDAY

13

6

22

Full Moon @

29

First Quarter Moon G

Earth Day

New Moon 0

Butterfly Jungle ends (Park)

15

30

23

16

1

24

17

World Penguin Day (Zoo)

2

25

18

3

26

19

MARCH S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Arbor Day

4

27

20

MAY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Breakfast with Elephants (Park)

5

28

21

14

7

SATURDAY

Isra and Mi’raj

10

3

WEDNESDAY

Last Quarter Moon T

9

2

TUESDAY

Nativescapes Garden Tour (Park)

8

1

MONDAY

Spring Event ends (Zoo)

April Fool’s Day

Easter Sunday

Easter Brunch (Park)

Easter Brunch (Zoo)

SUNDAY


gait and powerful back legs allow them to cover 25 feet in a single leap and to jump 6 feet high.

Eastern Gray Kangaroo These kangaroos can reach speeds of over 35 miles an hour.WESTERN Their bounding gateGRAY and powerful back legs allow KANGAROO kangaroos speeds themThese to cover 25 feetcan in areach single leap of over 35 miles an hour. Their bounding and to jump 6 feet high.


13

Champagne Brunch (Park)

27

Memorial Day

28

Full Moon @

Ramadan begins

Mother’s Day

20

New Moon 0

21

14

8

1

29

22

15

Teacher Appreciation Day

TUESDAY

Mother’s Day Brunch (Park)

First Quarter Moon G

Last Quarter Moon T

7

6

Mother’s Day Brunch (Zoo)

Epiphyllum Show and Sale (Park)

30

MONDAY

29

SUNDAY

World Turtle Day

30

23

16

9

2

WEDNESDAY

31

24

17

10

3

THURSDAY

18

11

4

1

25

APRIL S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Bike to Work Day

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

FRIDAY

19

12

26

JUNE S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

2

Breakfast with Tigers (Park)

Shavuot begins

Armed Forces Day

Endangered Species Day

International Migratory Bird Day

Nativescapes Garden Tour (Park)

Cinco de Mayo

Epiphyllum Show and Sale (Park)

Tequila Dinner (Park)

5

SATURDAY


Wombats are built for digging. Their barrel-shaped bodies and wide feet with long claws enable them to excavate extensive tunnels and chambers, moving up to three feet of dirt in a single day.

SOUTHERN HAIRY-NOSED WOMBAT


17

Father’s Day

=

24

Father’s Day Buffet (Park)

25

18

11

10

Nighttime Zoo begins, through September 3 (Zoo)

Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

4

JULY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

28

MONDAY

3

MAY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

27

SUNDAY

World Environment Day

26

19

12

5

29

TUESDAY

Full Moon @

First Quarter Moon G

New Moon 0

Last Quarter Moon T

Member Appreciation Night (Park)

27

20

13

6

30

WEDNESDAY

Summer Solstice

World Giraffe Day (Zoo)

Eid al-Fitr begins

Flag Day

Member Appreciation Night (Park)

28

21

14

7

31

THURSDAY

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

World Oceans Day

FRIDAY

29

22

15

8

1

23

Brewmaster Dinner (Park)

30

Summer Safari begins, through August 12 (Park)

R•I•T•Z: Rendezvous in the Zoo (Zoo)

16

Albert’s “Happy Happens,” through September 3 (Zoo)

Albert’s Spirits Dinner (Zoo)

9

2

SATURDAY


Brush turkeys are the most ancient member of a family that dates back 30 million years. Their habit of laying eggs within a mound and abandoning them is closer to a crocodile’s strategy than a bird’s.

AUSTRALIAN BRUSH TURKEY


29

22

30

23

31

24

17

16

15

World Snake Day

10

9

8

Global Tiger Day (Park)

Parents’ Day

National Zookeeper Week begins

3

TUESDAY

2

MONDAY

1

SUNDAY

Independence Day

1

25

18

11

4

WEDNESDAY

First Quarter Moon G

New Moon 0

2

26

19

12

5

THURSDAY

13

6

3

27

20

JUNE S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Full Moon @

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

Last Quarter Moon T

FRIDAY

4

28

21

14

AUGUST S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Safari Park Spirits Dinner (Park)

Breakfast with Tigers (Park)

7

SATURDAY


This lizard’s main defense is to bluff: it faces a threat and opens its mouth to reveal its vivid and unexpected blue tongue, hoping to startle and confuse a would-be attacker.

BLUE-TONGUED SKINK


12

5

Full Moon @

World Orangutan Day

World Elephant Day

26

19

Summer Safari ends (Park)

Friendship Day

JULY S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

29

SUNDAY

Eid al-Adha begins

SEPTEMBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

27

20

13

6

30

MONDAY

28

21

14

7

31

TUESDAY

29

22

15

8

1

WEDNESDAY

30

23

16

9

2

THURSDAY

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

FRIDAY

31

24

17

10

3

First Quarter Moon G

Animal Ambassador Dinner (Park)

New Moon 0

Last Quarter Moon T

1

25

18

11

4

SATURDAY


Living mostly in the brackish waters of mangrove flats and paperbark tree swamps, these ducks use their beak to filter water and eat mollusks, insects, algae, and sedges.

RADJAH SHELDUCK


Full Moon @

17

Brew Fest (Park)

30

23

First Quarter Moon G

1

24

Yom Kippur begins

Muharram begins

New Moon 0

16

Patriot Day

2

25

18

11

4

28

TUESDAY

Grandparents Day

Rosh Hashanah begins

Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

Labor Day

10

International Vulture Day (Park)

Last Quarter Moon T

Albert’s “Happy Happens” ends (Zoo)

International Vulture Day (Park)

9

3

2

Nighttime Zoo ends (Zoo)

27

MONDAY

26

SUNDAY

3

26

19

12

5

29

WEDNESDAY

4

27

20

13

6

30

THURSDAY

14

7

31

5

28

21

AUGUST S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

FRIDAY

6

29

22

OCTOBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Fall Equinox

World Rhino Day (Zoo)

San Diego Zoo Food, Wine & Brew Celebration (Zoo)

15

Albert’s Fall Brewmaster Dinner (Zoo)

8

Breakfast with Tigers (Park)

International Vulture Day (Park)

1

SATURDAY


SUGAR GLIDER

These petite marsupials live in trees, and rarely touch the ground. Flaps or membranes of loose skin extend between their hands and feet, which they use like a parachute to glide up to 150 feet.


22

29

21

28

8

1

15

New Moon 0

Columbus Day

Kids Free begins, through October 31 (Park)

Kids Free begins, through October 31 (Zoo)

MONDAY

14

7

30

SUNDAY

First Quarter Moon G

Last Quarter Moon T

9

2

30

23

16

TUESDAY

Last Quarter Moon T

Halloween

Kids Free ends (Park)

Kids Free ends (Zoo)

Full Moon @

31

24

17

10

3

WEDNESDAY

1

25

Ellen Browning Scripps Day

18

11

4

THURSDAY

SEPTEMBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

FRIDAY

2

26

19

12

5

NOVEMBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Champagne Brunch (Park)

Animal Ambassador Dinner (Zoo)

3

27

20

13

6

SATURDAY


This waterfowl species prefers freshwater swamps and creeks. It is crepuscular, feeding mainly at dawn and dusk, on algae, seeds, aquatic grasses, and small invertebrates.

FRECKLED DUCK


4

Veterans Day

26

25

12

5

29

19

DECEMBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

MONDAY

18

11

Daylight Saving Time ends

OCTOBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

28

SUNDAY

Election Day

27

20

13

6

30

TUESDAY

New Moon 0 Diwali

28

21

14

7

31

WEDNESDAY

22

Last Quarter Moon T

Full Moon @

Thanksgiving Day

29

Thanksgiving Buffet (Park)

Thanksgiving Dinner (Zoo)

First Quarter Moon G

15

8

1

THURSDAY

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

FRIDAY

30

23

16

9

2

1

Breakfast with Tigers (Park)

24

Albert’s Late Harvest Winemaker Dinner (Zoo)

17

10

3

SATURDAY


Mostly solitary, these small marsupials can also be seen grazing in groups from late afternoon to dawn in grassy areas. They travel by hopping, but are also surprisingly good swimmers.

RED-NECKED WALLABY


9

30

New Year’s Eve

Albert’s “Mildly Wild” New Year’s Eve Dinner (Zoo)

31

24

23

Christmas Eve

17

16

10

3

2

Breakfast with Santa (Park)

Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

Hanukkah begins

26

MONDAY

25

SUNDAY

Christmas Day

1

25

18

11

4

27

TUESDAY

Kwanzaa begins

2

26

19

12

5

28

WEDNESDAY

New Moon 0

3

27

20

13

6

29

THURSDAY

14

7

30

NOVEMBER S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Winter Solstice

Plant Day & Orchid Odyssey (Zoo)

4

28

21

Happy Holidays Happens at Albert’s, through January 6 (Zoo)

Jungle Bells begins, through January 6, 2019, except December 24 (Zoo)

Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

FRIDAY

5

29

22

JANUARY 2019 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Last Quarter Moon T

Winter Winemaker Dinner (Park)

Full Moon @

First Quarter Moon G

15

Breakfast with Santa (Park)

8

1

SATURDAY


T R AV E L TH E WO RLD WITH THE SAN DIEGO ZOO Experience the beauty of wildlife in its natural habitat. We craft our WorldWild Tour itineraries to include exhilarating encounters with nature and the animal expertise that you can only get from the San Diego Zoo. For more information, visit sandiegozoo.org/travel or call Julia Altieri at 619-685-3205.

INDIA O CTO B ER 3 0 – N OVEM B ER 1 4 , 2018 Immerse yourself in exotic India, seeking out magnificent wild tigers in their native habitat. $6,995 plus airfare (per person, double occupancy).

Coming Soon

BORNEO M AY 2 0 1 9

MADAGASCAR S EPTEMB ER 6 –23 , 2018 Explore the land of lemurs and its unique landscapes, culture, and wildlife—90 percent of which can be found only in Madagascar. $7,795 plus airfare (per person, double occupancy).

CHINA AND IT S G I A NT PA N DA S M AY 2 0 1 9

ZOOS OF EUROPE J U LY 2 0 1 9

Come face to face with giant pandas, climb the Great Wall, visit the Terra-cotta Warriors, and cruise down the Yangzi River.

B OT S WA N A M AY 2 0 1 9 Adventure is wrapped in luxury in Botswana, where you’ll encounter Africa’s exceptional birds and mammals on safari while staying in exquisite tented camps. 38 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017

AMAZON VOYAGE SEPTEMBER 2019


S U P P O RT

a wild world

of fun!

BY CAITLIN HANNAH | COPYWRITER, DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT PHOTOGRAPH BY KEN BOHN | SDZG PHOTOGRAPHER

A brand-new club just for kids is winging its way to our San Diego Zoo Global family! Beginning December 5, 2017, Koala Club will become San Diego Zoo Kids Club. This is more than just a name change—it’s a whole new world! San Diego Zoo Kids Club offers endless fun, adventure, and exciting new experiences for all the wild ones in your life—24/7, wherever they are.

adventure awaits Just like Koala Club, San Diego Zoo Kids Club offers unlimited admission to the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park all year long. And when you can’t make it to the Zoo or the Safari Park in person, you can have an adventure wherever you are, at sandiegozookids.org. Kids will love watching live animal cams and videos with keep40 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017

ers, trying new crafts, learning about their favorite animals, and so much more. And for just $10 more than a one-day child’s ticket, an annual Kids Club membership makes the perfect gift!

san diego zoo kids channel When kids are too ill to come to the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Kids channel

brings the Zoo to them! Broadcasting in children’s hospitals and Ronald McDonald houses around the world, the San Diego Zoo Kids channel offers a chance for pediatric patients to learn more about animals, connect with wildlife, and “escape” from their hospital rooms when they need it the most. We are thrilled to share that this innovative closedcircuit television channel is now streaming in more than 110 locations, in 5 different countries—with more soon to come.

shows to go Some of the content featured on the San Diego Zoo Kids television channel is now available on San Diego Zoo Kids YouTube as well. Offering inside looks, sneak peeks, behind-the-scenes secrets, quizzes about animals and their habitats, and plenty of wildlife encounters of all stripes, these videos have something for everyone. Hop on over to sandiegozookids.org/youtube to check it out!


Your Contribution, Our Future. Your legacy gift for the San Diego Zoo or Safari Park can ensure we make a difference for wildlife now and in the future. Through a planned gift, you can also take advantage of the many tax benefits available during and after your lifetime. Learn more about how you can make a difference at zoolegacy.org or by calling 619-557-3993.


The all-new 301-horsepower 2018 Camry

Options shown.


HAVE BREAKFAST

WITH SANTA! SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 & SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2017, 9 TO 11 A.M. Santa Claus is coming—to the Safari Park! He’ll be here for breakfast and would love to see you and your family. Gather at the Park’s scenic Kilima Point for a bountiful breakfast buffet with the jolly ol’ elf himself. Cost is $26.95 for adults, $16.95 for children ages 3 through 11, plus tax and Safari Park parking. Nonmembers add Safari Park admission.

CALL 619-718-3000 TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT. VISIT SDZSAFARIPARK.ORG/DINING-EVENTS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND THE MENU.

Wee Gallery is proud to support the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy. 20% of the purchase price of our Special Edition Art Cards go towards their conservation efforts. w

le t t i h l c r a a g e s n i e r l Do a m i n a n o o aftern

SH w OP w. we ON eg LI al NE le r y AT .c om

Baby’s visual learning develops first in black and white. Today’s contrast and shapes will quickly become tomorrow’s research papers.

A proud sponsor of budding biologists Wee Gallery is committing to a minimum donation of $5,000, between August 15, 2017 and February 6, 2018, to the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy whose charitable purpose is to save endangered species worldwide from extinction. *This purchase is not tax deductible.


IN THE FIELD

San Diego Zoo Global’s mission to end extinction takes place not just at the Zoo, Safari Park, and Institute for Conservation Research, but also through field projects benefiting more than 125 species around the world. Each issue, we will share an update on one of these projects. San Diego Zoo Global is working with the Australian government to help save the Tasmanian devil. Reintroducing them successfully is challenging, but utilizing their scent ecology and developing effective ways to enhance the animals’ aversion to roads and cars has greatly improved the outlook for this keystone species.

BY KARYL CARMIGNANI | STAFF WRITER

They are not the whirling dervishes of cartoons, but their haunting nocturnal cries (often around a carcass) will give you pause, and likely earned them the “devil” name. As the largest carnivorous marsupial in the world, you’d think the Tasmanian devil would be secure. But this pouch-packing powerhouse was hunted to near extinction until protections were implemented in the 1940s. Even as the species rallied through the decades, a new insidious threat was unfolding: devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), a highly contagious and lethal cancer that struck with a vengeance in the 1990s. Research and collaboration among organizations has led to assurance populations of disease-free devils, with the goal of bolstering wild populations. San Diego Zoo Global’s expertise in animal reintroductions will help this species recover. 44 / ZOONOOZ / NOVEMBER 2017

Using scent ecology, researchers are finding ways to “dampen the initial spike of mortality” on newly released devils, said Debra Shier, Ph.D., associate director, Recovery Ecology, Institute for Conservation Research. Areas with roads, people, domestic dogs, and existing devils are challenging for releases. Creating virtual latrines, which the animals use as a “guest book” to know who has visited, by adding scat of the introduced animals in advance, has helped to ease tensions, and reduce the transmission of DFTD through aggressive biting. “Anchoring” strategies to keep the animals away from traffic are being tried. As scavengers, the devils help clear decaying carcasses and reduce disease. By consuming feral cats, the devils help conserve native bird populations. The devils are truly angels in disguise!

PHOTOS BY (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP, LEFT): KEN BOHN, SDZG (2); COURTESY OF THE SAVE THE TASMANIAN DEVIL PROGRAM (2); TAMMY SPRATT/SDZG.

DEVILS IN THE DETAILS


There are ONLY 3 northern white rhinos left on the planet.

Decades of rampant poaching have decimated this species to the brink of extinction. But there’s hope. San Diego Zoo Global is leading the fight to save these gentle giants. And your support to the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy creates action and impact. Will you join us?

Together, we can turn things around.™

ENDextinction.org/hope


ZOONOOZ

®

SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL

Box 120551, San Diego, CA 92112

RING IN THE HOLIDAYS! JUNGLE BELLS AT THE ZOO, DECEMBER 8—JANUARY 1

Make them go wild!

Give a year of adventure, animals, and fun! The holidays are just around the corner. Check everyone off your list with a membership to the San Diego Zoo and Safari Park—they’ll go bananas! Best of all, your gift gives back, supporting the animals in our care and our conservation efforts worldwide.

Save $10

Get shopping at zoomember. com/save


Centennial Campaign for San Diego Zoo Global NOVEMBER 2017 | VOLUME 3

SAN DIEGO ZOO:

SHAPING THE FUTURE

Ending extinction is a bighearted vision that needs a blueprint for success, a plan to keep moving forward. Innovative techniques in animal care and new technologies for conservation science bring San Diego Zoo Global’s vision to life. And many of you—our wildlife philanthropists—are contributing through monthly and annual giving or legacy gifts, which help us strengthen the Zoo, Safari Park, and Institute for Conservation Research for generations to come. Reaching a big goal that transforms an organization or saves an endangered species often begins with small steps. Just imagine if giant pandas became extinct in the 1980s, when many scientists said they couldn’t be saved. Our focus on developing a special milk formula for hand-raised cubs, new ultrasound technology, and successful breeding programs all helped pandas thrive. One of our proudest moments was when giant pandas were declared “no longer endangered” in 2016! It is just one example where small steps led to a major conservation success for one of the world’s wildlife treasures.


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“The quality of our life on Earth is dependent upon how we treat the rest of life on Earth, the future of which now lies in our hands.”

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–SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH, 1986 SAN DIEGO ZOO CONSERVATION MEDAL RECIPIENT

IGNITE a passion for wildlife in every child:

Price Education Center: Offers enriching classes at the Zoo and assembly programs for 65 Title I schools and 53,000+ students. San Diego Zoo Kids: Launched through the generosity of Denny Sanford, this heartwarming TV wildlife channel brings healing and smiles to children in pediatric hospitals in the U.S. and overseas.

The Leslie Miller Healing Animal Arts Program: This therapeutic program offers hands-on wildlife art lessons and animal encounters to 5,000 young patients and their families, either at the Kaiser Zion Hospital or the Zoo.

We need Champions! GROW our worldwide

SAVE critically endangered

leadership in animal and plant care, as well as inspirational experiences:

species for future generations while working with local and global partners:

Tull Family Tiger Trail: Provides an intimate view into the world of tigers and supports breeding for endangered Sumatran tigers at the Safari Park.

Nikita Kahn Rhino Rescue Center: A unique initiative to save the critically endangered northern white rhino from extinction through assisted-reproduction efforts.

Asian Leopards: Maryanne and

Cocha Cashu Biological Station:

Irwin Pfister led the effort to build new habitat for critically endangered Amur and snow leopards at the Zoo.

Endowed by Cathy Stiefel and Keith Behner, this research station hosts international conservationists working to protect species in Peru’s Amazon region.

Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks: Highlights species from the African shore to the highlands, featuring Ernest and Evelyn Rady Falls and Madagascar Habitat, and Dan and Vi McKinney Penguin Habitat.

Wildlife Conservancy: More than 5,000 monthly donors help support 140+ research programs and projects on 6 continents.


Here’s How You’ve Already Helped Transforming Dog & Cat Canyon into spectacular Conrad Prebys Africa Rocks took time, effort, and most of all, donations from nearly 5,000 dedicated donors. Innovation and philanthropy go together for every new habitat we pioneer at the Zoo and Safari Park—and your support makes it all possible!

Because of you... SET

We set a global standard for animal welfare, and then meet or exceed that standard by consistently raising the bar on design for awardwinning exhibits that provide for the special needs of animals in our care.

ENGAGE

San Diego Global Wildlife Conservancy engages with a national and international audience to support our vision to end extinction—our No. 1 priority for both animals and plants.

BUILD

Build up our network of field sites, where we work with global partners on community conservation initiatives to ensure wildlife can thrive.


Become a Citizen Scientist!

There’s an exciting new project for volunteers, called citizen scientists, to help save reticulated giraffes in Kenya—their population has dropped 40 percent in 20 years! You can join others from around the world on the Zooniverse website and help count giraffes in thousands of photos taken by 100 trail cameras set up by Twiga Walinzi, or giraffe guards.

Visit endextinction.org/wildwatch from your computer, tablet or mobile device. There, you can examine photos and note where giraffes roam, their home range size, and if other wildlife is present. Each day, you and researchers will make discoveries together. While giraffes are a much-loved species, there are still many things we do not know about them—but we do know they are now listed as “Vulnerable” to extinction. Habitat loss and poaching are the main threats, and these photos will contribute valuable details about giraffes’ daily lives. So help us sort through photos and become a citizen scientist!

Join our pride and help us Roar Forward! roaringforward.org | 619-557-3947

ZOONOOZ November 2017  

Walkabout Australia: 2018 Calendar Issue

ZOONOOZ November 2017  

Walkabout Australia: 2018 Calendar Issue