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Volume XV, Issue Ten

April 12, 2012

The Scripps Voice Inside...

Seniors’ literary compilations are finally on display in Denison Library, marking the year with the largest number of entrants

President Bettison Varga on Life at Revelle House By Vritti Goel ‘12

While President Lori Bettison Varga is obviously seen about campus regularly, catching glimpses of her family are rarer. She attributes this to the phenomenon of living on a predominantly-female campus, a decision that set President Bettison Varga from the moment she accepted the position as President in 2009. It hasn’t been difficult to live on campus, however, she explains. Not only is the commute to work extremely short, but the president has also had a chance to intimately get to know the community she works with every day. “We don’t get bothered by much of the noise over the weekends, but we

co-Editor-in-Chief

do get people coming up and ringing our doorbell. It can get a little bothersome, especially in the middle of the night.” She bursts out laughing while retelling the story of this year’s April Fools joke played on her family, over cupcakes from Some Crust with the staff of The Scripps Voice. A group of students managed to wrestle the paper mache “Viva la Vulva” statue from the Student Union and onto the doorstep of the Revelle House, much to the horror and amusement of the entire First Family. Still, this hasn’t deterred youngest daughter Lexie from skateboarding around the campus with her friends, or middle son Will, a freshman at Chapman University, from walking fam-

ily dog Kio in the evenings. President Bettison Varga’s husband, Dr. Robert Varga, spends time at the 5Cs as a senior scholar of geology at Pomona and director of the Keck Geology Consortium, which President Bettison Varga directed from 2004 to 2007. The president’s oldest son, College of Wooster senior Matt, frequently visits home to spend time on the beautiful campus as well. However, it is Lexie who spends the most time on campus. According to Lexie, who recently celebrated her 14th birthday at Disneyland, which the family visits once a month, the beauty of the Scripps campus is her favorite aspect. She loves Scripps so much that she even has

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Senior Jenna Tico alludes to the 7 stages of grief in a contemplation of thesis pages 4-5

SASsy New Friends!

Out with the Old, In with the New! We take a look at the current and future SAS governments

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It’s all about Food, these days. Bioagriculture and where your food comes from page 9

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photo by Emily Muller

Scripps Celebrates Mellon Finally New Scripps Alcohol Policy Announced Monday, Scripps College is the proud recipient of a Copy Editor grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant amounts to $700,000 and covers three years. The Mellon Foundation offers funds to various initiatives that span higher education, arts, conservation, communication and the environment. The foundation gives about $199.5 million in grants annually. Scripps Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty Amy Marcus-Newhall, who was responsible for the writing of the grant, described in an email that the grant awarded to Scripps will go toward “[mentoring] undergraduate student research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences for pre-thesis mentored work and more traditional research fellowships.” Thus, the grant will support the student body and help it achieve its research goals. In addition to Marcus-Newhall, Executive Director of Institutional Advancement Kristin McInnis contributed to the grant proposal, as well as a faculty advisory committee including professors Theirry Boucquey, Hao Huang, Julie Liss, Jacqueline Wernimont and Stacey Wood. This is not the first time Scripps has received a grant from the Mellon Foundation. Wrote Marcus-Newhall in an email to The Scripps Voice, “The last one we received three years ago was for our interdisciplinary Core program.” The Claremont Consortium is also acquiring funding from the Mellon Foundation for the digital humanities. The College hopes to continue to develop this relationship with the Foundation. Marcus-Newhall voiced how the Foundation helps provide “tremendous opportunities” for students and faculty alike.

By Kate Pluth ‘12

In early October, the Alcohol Task Force comprised of a small group of students and SAS representatives began meeting with Dean of Students Becky Lee and other school officials in the hopes of transforming the school’s alcohol policy to encourage students to seek help when intoxicated. Six months later, an approved medical amnesty policy has been established and is currently being implemented on a trial basis for the remainder of the spring semester. The aim of the program is to eliminate the fear of getting in trouble that holds students back from getting themselves or their friends the help they need when intoxicated. The policy will officially be announced later this week in anticipation of the next Scripps-hosted party, which is scheduled to take place Saturday night. The task force’s main goal going forward is to spread awareness to students that the new policy is in effect and clarify the details. “We can protect you from judicial college action due to intoxication,” explained Dean Lee, and the amnesty extends to students under the influence of drugs and others substances as well as alcohol. It is important for students to understand that each situation is evaluated individually and the policy does not protect against police matters outside of the college’s jurisdiction. For example, students would still be held responsible for violence or property damage that occurred while they were intoxicated. The new policy also calls for medical and health awareness follow-up with students to prevent reoccurrence. The task force is currently discussing possible options to further promote the policy. Educational presentations such as question and answer sessions, posters in dorms, and having informative representatives present at Snack are in the works.Hopefully, after the many hours the committee members have put into revamping our policy, we will see an increased number of students taking advantage of the newly established amnesty and any tragedies related to alcohol poisoning will be prevented.

By Taylor Healy ‘15 Section Head

1030 Columbia Avenue | Claremont CA 91711 | Box 892 email: scrippsvoice@gmail.com | website: voice.scrippcollege.edu


2 • News The Scripps Voice Editors-in-Chief Vritti Goel Lauren Prince Adviser Sam Haynes Design Editors Nancy Herrera Charlotte Rosenfield Liz Lyon

BETTISON VARGA, CONTINUED FROM PG 1 plans to attend it, one day. Her mother chimes in, “I tell her she needs to start her non-profit now, to stand out. Soon, just being my daughter won’t be enough to get into Scripps, looking at all the amazing things our students do!” But Lexie isn’t without her talents. She dreams of becoming a forensic anthropologist (like Bones) and wants to bring more publicity to Scripps. She wants to start a program to increase the awareness of science amongst 5th and 6th graders. She’s not all serious about science, however. She proudly explains her recent history project, a good-sized realistic model of a grist mill. Much to the disappointment of those present, however, she cannot show off her penchant for nail art. Previous designs have included the British flag and Pascal from Tangled. When asked whether she misses teaching, she is quick to reply. “I do miss teaching. I don’t miss being a geologist, though! I miss being with students and seeing the light go on in their eyes when they’ve connected something. But I don’t miss the grading.” As a former faculty member, however, she felt she could make a bigger difference as an administrator. One of these factors is fit. It is something President Bettison Varga is familiar with. Her younger son Will’s college hunt resulted in his current location at Chapman University. “It’s not too big or too small for him, and it’s

not too close to home, either.” Her role as a college parent is not new to her, either. She has enjoyed visiting oldest son Matt in college— who is currently working on his senior thesis in chemistry and will attend graduate school at the University of Arizona next fall—and laments the recent slip-up with Chapman University. “It doesn’t seem like we’re on the mailing list for Chapman, because we missed Parents’ Weekend!” She is relieved that she is on the mailing list of the College of Wooster, however, especially with Matt’s impending graduation. “I’m excited, but this time I’ll have to fight for a seat along with all the other parents! I’ve always had a seat set aside for me, as faculty and then as administrator. Now I get to experience graduation from the families’ points of view.” With the graduation of the Scripps Class of 2012, President Bettison Varga is equally excited. “The schedule of events in past years hasn’t been ideal, but this year we’re trying something new, with the dinner-dance happening after graduation instead of before.” This new setup can, in part, be attributed to President Bettison Varga’s request to move the graduation ceremony so she could attend her son’s graduation as well as Scripps’ events. However, she adds, the new setup also relieves the burden on staff and administrators. So what can Scripps seniors look forward to with this year’s graduation events? “It’ll be fun!”

Senior Copy Editor Tori Mirsadjadi

Copy Editors Megan Peterson Kate Pluth Section Heads Taylor Healy Michelle Nagler Web Assistant Meredith Kertzman Printer Gardena Valley Press Comments and letters can be sent to Scripps College The Scripps Voice, 1030 Columbia Ave, Box 892, Claremont, CA, 91711. You can also email The Scripps Voice at scrippsvoice@gmail.com or visit our website at voice.scrippscollege.edu. If you want to contribute to The Scripps Voice send your articles or photos to editor.scrippsvoice@ gmail.com. The Scripps Voice is a student forum and is not responsible for the opinions expressed in it.

5C Students Respond to KONY 2012 By Megan Petersen ‘15

Though Joseph Kony was relatively unknown in the United States about a month ago, thanks to a video and poster campaign by Invisible Children, Inc., his name has become a catch phrase, a slogan, a charged statement and a call to action, and students throughout the 5Cs have responded in both negative and positive ways. Kony is the leader of the Ugandan guerrilla group the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and has been indicted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for war crimes because his army kidnaps children to be used as soldiers and sex slaves. Invisible Children, an organization dedicated to bringing international attention to the LRA’s and Kony’s personal atrocities, has made 12 films on the topic. Though the Invisible Children is already relatively wellknown, the organization’s eleventh film, “KONY 2012,” was the one to catch the viral spotlight. The 30-minute film, directed and narrated by Invisible Children’s co-founder Jason Russell, includes the story of how Russell was inspired to found Invisible Children from his interactions with a Ugandan boy named Jacob. The film’s message is largely communicated through Russell attempting to explain the LRA and Kony to his young son, Gavin. Russell also outlines the campaign’s goal and its methods to make it happen. “Here’s how we’re going to make [Kony] visible,” Russell narrates. “We are going to make Joseph Kony a household name, not to celebrate him but to bring his crimes to the light. And we are starting this year, 2012. We are targeting 20 culture-makers and 12 policymakers to use their power for good.” Invisible Children’s awareness plan is scheduled to culminate on April 20 when supporters are instructed to “cover the night” with anti-Kony posters and other Copy Editor

PHOTO COURTESY OF NANCY HERRERAN

Invisible Children representatives sold Kony 2012 merchandise during the film’s screening in Balch Auditorium.

propaganda, so that the world “go to bed Friday [April 19] and wake up to hundreds of thousands of posters demanding justice on every streetcorner.” Once the film went viral, people around the world were motivated to buy posters, wristbands and T-shirts. The film also sparked fiery responses from U.S. and Ugandan reporters, scholars and average bloggers who criticized the film’s emotional rather than logical appeal, Invisible Children’s use of its funding, and the flaws in Invisible Children’s proposed solution. In some cases, the criticisms of the KONY 2012 campaign and Invisible Children went viral almost as quickly as the video itself did. Grant Oyston, the blogger behind the “Visible Children” Tumblr page, got over 2.2 million visitors to his blog; got a personal phone call from Russell asking if Oyston would like to visit Invisible Children’s headquarters in both California and Uganda and turned down media requests from Al Jazeera English, FOX, NBC’s Today show and BBC World service. All within two days of Oyston’s initial post criticizing the film.

April 12, 2012 • The Scripps Voice •Volume XV •Issue Ten

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News • 3

Senior Slocum Award Draws More Students By Liz Lyon ‘12 Design Editor

On April 2, the 76th Senior Slocum Award exhibits went up in Denison Library with the highest number of participants in the last ten years. A total of 11 seniors from the Class of 2012 entered the competition with collections as diverse as Sarah Murtaugh’s “Books that Have Been Translated into Latin,” Katie Lesnya’s “Health and Human Rights: A Collection of Books on Global Health Disparities and the Culture, History, and Politics of Africa,” and Sarah Stringer’s “Moments of Being.” Judy Harvey Sahak (’64), Sally Preston Swan Librarian and Director of Denison Library, recognizes that Slocum comes at a time when many seniors are busy with thesis and post-graduation plans, which accounts for the varying number of entrants every year. However, she believes that personal libraries are important. She said, “A thesis is over when it’s over, but libraries stay with you the rest of your life. They grow as you and your interests grow.” A personal library is something which outlasts one’s time at Scripps. Having the exhibition shown in Denison during the last six to seven weeks of the semester means that visitors see it over Alumnae Weekend, Commencement weekend and the Admission Office’s prospective student event, Spend a Day in our Shoes (SADIOS), not to mention end-of-year visits. According to Sahak’s anecdotal experience, a higher number of visitors come to see the Slocum exhibits than others. “They come and they look,” Sahak said. “Prospective students will come back after tours and look at the exhibits.” A number of the participants this year - , including Karin Weston, Sarah Stringer, and Felicia Palmer, saw the exhibits as first-years and they decided to participate. Said Catherine Parker Sweatt, whose personal collection is on philosophy and poetry, “I can mark my years and seasons here by the books I’ve read. I discovered philosophy in Core I, and about the same time I started writing poetry. Poetry allowed me to ask questions in the same way as philosophy.” Two personal collections this year have themes which Sahak has never seen before: “The Wonderful World of Disney Books” and “Assassin’s Creed and Books: A

Literary Guide to Gaming.” Absent from the collections this year are collections on one book or author and scholarly texts on feminism. Other themes, such as antiquarian illustrated books, memoir, and travel, infrequently make their way to Senior Slocum, but always with an original flare. “There’s always an original view, a twist,” Sahak said. “The collections are as individual as the collectors.” A new part of the Slocum Award this year was the Tuesday Noon Academy panel on April 10, where participants gave a panel discussion. The libraries will be judged April 24 by Director of the California Rare Book School based at UCLA Susan M. Allen, , Scripps College Professor of French Studies and Humanities Eric Haskell, and Curator of Early Printed Books at the Huntington Library Steve Tabor. Professor Haskell, who has been a judge for Senior Slocum for two decades, wrote in an email, “The judges are looking for a book collection that has a central, cohesive theme. Our evaluation includes not only a careful viewing of the collection but also reading the student essays, perusing their annotated lists of books, and – last but not least – interviewing each student.” Other changes to the Slocum Award may be coming soon. Sahak has received inquiries about virtual exhibits and compiling bibliographies for books that the compiler would like to have. Additionally, Sahak is open to ways in which to exhibit virtual books. “I think that opening up the Award digitally is absolutely inevitable. It is just a matter of finding a way to let it happen,” she said. Sahak is also working on a “Junior Slocum Award,” where a cash prize will be awarded to a first-year for her library. The goal of such an award, Sahak said, was to support students who enjoy reading, but may be constrained by time or finances. “My favorite part of the exhibition is seeing how students choose to install their books and hearing them articulate the specific features of their collection,” wrote Haskell. “The Slocum Awards present a rare and unique opportunity for our students to showcase their collections.” The exhibition runs April 2 through May 12 at Denison Library.

Tessa Jacobs’ (‘12) “Illustrated Books for a Private Passion,” and a close-up of three editions of the “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”.

Sarah Stringer’s (‘12) “Moments of Being” collection, taken from the title of Woolf’s collection of autobiographical essays.

Liz Lyon’s (‘12) “Travel Texts/Traveled Texts” complete with kilt and mementos from travel.

PHOTOS BY LIZ LYON

KONY 2012 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 Invisible Children responded to that criticism with a second video, “Part II: Beyond Famous,” which is intended to probe the conflict deeper and provide more information than the first film did. At the 5Cs, students reacted both positively and negatively to the campaign. About 260 students responded “yes” to their invitations to the 5Cs’ KONY 2012 “Cover the Night” Facebook event. Over 1,500 were invited. Vicky Kim (’15) created that event shortly after watching the film. “I was very moved [by the film] because I have known about the Invisible Children group since my freshman year of high school,” Kim said. “In my head I was thinking, ‘Finally! It’s actually happening!’” Kim said that after collaborating with classmate Sarah Chung (’15) and creating the event, she noticed people were sharing both the Kony video and other articles that had been popping up criticizing the video. The articles and videos shared on the event’s Facebook page highlight Ugandans’ negative reactions to the film, filmmaker Jason Russell’s detainment and hospitalization after a show of public indecency and Invisible Children’s endorsement of the corrupt Ugandan government’s army. “After reading these discussions, I also became discouraged in holding the event due to the lack of confidence in [Invisible Children],” Kim said. But she was encouraged by the many people still interested in fighting for the cause itself, even if it meant not buying Invisible Children’s “action kit” and posters. The Student Life’s columnist Wes Haas (PO ’15) wrote in an editorial published in the March 9 edition of TSL that he was saddened by those who have

dismissed the video-sharers and bandwaggoners as ignorant or as hipster activists. He said that only getting involved after watching the Invisible Children’s film doesn’t somehow invalidate what they’re trying to accomplish. “I say good for them,” Haas wrote. “Good for them for trying to be a part of something bigger than themselves, for trying to bring attention to a cause that really needs it, for provoking everyone they reach to take a moment to think.” Students are, of course, still incredibly divided on the issue. One reader commented on Haas’ article on TSL’s website, saying that it was “a very misinformed understanding of the criticism,” citing a YouTube commentary by a Ugandan-American woman who critiques both the Invisible Children and insists that Kony is not Uganda’s biggest problem. Kim said the Claremont “Cover the Night” movement is still disorganized and mostly unofficial, so it is difficult to know how many students will actually be putting up posters on the night of April 20. However, as the discussion continues, students from the Claremont Colleges will likely be very much involved. A screening of the KONY 2012 film and discussion was held in Balch Auditorium at Scripps on March 26 after Invisible Children got in touch with SCORE. SCORE made it clear on that event’s Facebook page that it did not pay Invisible Children to come to Scripps, reimburse them for travel or donate any money to Invisible Children otherwise. SCORE also held a discussion the following day at lunch. A “KONY snackcussion” (snack plus a screening and discussion of the film) was held yesterday April 12 in Hahn 101 at Pomona College.

April 12, 2012 • The Scripps Voice •Volume XV •Issue Ten


4 • Opinions & Editorials I Am Not A Delicate Flower By Julia Behnen ‘12 Contributing Writer

When I was still deciding on a college to attend, I had several reservations about Scripps. One of the biggest was a subtle feeling that I could only articulate in the following way: the school felt more like a resort than a college. Obviously, I came here anyway, and I am very glad I did. I have enjoyed the quiet dorms, the clean campus, and Wednesday afternoon tea. Unfortunately, we have a problem. The best way I can explain our problem is through Humans vs. Zombies. I have been playing Humans vs. Zombies (HvZ) for the past several semesters. It is my favorite college activity. But up until this semester, the game was banned on Scripps’ campus. Though Scripps students were allowed to play on the other campuses, no play was allowed on our own turf. This meant that while all the players from the other schools were getting chased back to their dorms by zombies, Scripps players were free to wander to the dining hall without any worry. It also meant that other players were discouraged from coming to Scripps because it was considered cheating, thereby isolating us from players at the other schools. This system created several problems for me and other Scripps players. Like many Scripps students, much of my daily life is spent on the Scripps campus, and there was often no reason for me to leave except to put myself needlessly at risk of zombie attack. This meant that when the special night missions happened, no one took most Scripps players seriously. We were coddled; we were sheltered. We were given a free pass to live through each day and get to the night missions. My commitment to the game was trivialized because I was a Scripps student, but I didn’t blame the other players. They were right—I had an unearned free pass. There was nothing complex about it. To try to fit in with the rest of the players, I felt like I had to play differently than I might otherwise: play later, taunt louder and make fun of my school’s policies whenever I needed to. I had to prove that I was worthy of the game. I’m writing about this because it epitomizes what I see as the “delicate flower” problem of Scripps College. According to our website, we are a school that is proud of our strong and bold students: “Students who thrive at Scripps are women with independent and adventurous spirits, active and curious minds, and healthy appetites for both hard work and fun.” Yet there is a fundamental disconnect between the proclaimed school ideal and the way we handle ourselves as an institution. If we are independent and adventur-

By Jenna Tico ‘12

ous, then why did Scripps students receive an email in spring 2011 warning us of the game, implying that we might faint at the sight of men armed with Nerf guns? This email is of particular importance because it was not brought to my attention by a fellow Scripps student, but rather by a male CMC friend of mine who had apparently gotten a copy of the email and found it interesting enough to save. During a discussion on this topic, he forwarded me the text of the email with the preface, “I don’t know if I can ever forgive this.” Though I’m pretty sure he was joking, and I understand the need to alert students to strange zombie-related activity on campus, both of these incidents speak to the larger problem we have here. Though I believe it is done unintentionally, Scripps policies and attitudes encourage isolationism. We value our quiet and clean campus, and this sometimes takes precedence over social activities (the alcohol policy is an important subject in this matter, but that will have to wait until another time). This would not matter if we were not a women’s college in a consortium. If it were just us, we could do whatever we liked. But we are not alone, and we cannot act as if we are. The other schools pay attention. And though my friend’s message did not mention gender, it is a factor we cannot ignore. As “the women’s college” in the consortium, everything we do will inevitably be reflected back on our nature as women in the perception of the other colleges. It’s unfortunate but true. We are not yet in a post-gender society; there is fighting yet to do in the battle for full equality. So to the Scripps administration, I say this: I believe you are doing your best to create a safe and nurturing college experience. Like I said, I love tea. I love my quiet dorm. I came here because I thought a women’s college would be good for my intellectual and emotional development. And so far, I have been very pleased with what I’ve experienced. But we as a school have work to do, and I do not envy the balancing act that you have to perform between maintaining the quiet college feeling of Scripps and encouraging women with “independent and adventurous” spirits. You have taken an excellent step this semester by allowing HvZ on Scripps campus, and I deeply thank you for that. It is time to continue to reassess our policies and our behaviors as a school to make sure that we are not perpetuating a stereotype of our students and women in general as delicate flowers. We are so much more than that, and it is critical that the other schools see this.

The Seven Stages of Thesis

Contributing Writer If I could go back and do it all again, I might do a few things differently. I might have slowed down on the cookies at orientation, for example, if I’d known they would be at every Scripps event, every week of the year, for the rest of eternity. I would have learned the code to the student garden, would have mapped out all the free coffee on campus (I’m looking at you, Admissions Office) and would have invested in a plastic shower carrier to avoid being “that girl” who spilled shampoo in the Browning hallway. However, if I really had a chance to go through college again, I would have chosen a major that allowed me to write a thesis about writing a thesis: the un-nameable, the process that causes perfectly normal seniors to advance about a decade in mental capacity and regress the same number of years in general sanity. For some reason, the folklore surrounding what is essentially a really long paper snowballs from one class to the next until it has Frankenstein-ed into a force that threatens to rebel against us, its creator, the ones who have (somewhat reluctantly) given it life. Far from simple, the act of writing thesis can be separated into distinct stages and an individual timeline—not unlike the seven stages of grief. Years from now, probably from the cushy velvet of my therapist’s lounge chair, I will look back on the process that we are all dangerously close to—if not past—completing; and when I do, I hope I laugh. And I hope you do too, Scrippsie, because—despite our valiant attempts to the contrary—we did it. 1.Shock and Denial: Right after they sit us in Garrison Theatre, pump us full of iced tea and inform us that we are about to walk in the footsteps of countless “confident, courageous, and hopeful” women, Scripps tells us what’s up: we are going to

complete the Core program, and we are going to write a thesis. Core came and went; and somehow, by the time senior year crept up, we’d all managed to miraculously forget the latter. As an underclassman, every time I heard a senior moan about her thesis—or saw the telltale signs of general misery—I turned up the volume on my iPod and entered a state of blissful Schadenfreude. Oh sweet lord, that’ll never be me. So when it was, in fact, my turn to schedule an appointment with a research librarian—“at my leisure,” which is a rough translation of AS SOON AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE—I could only giggle. More than that, I cracked inappropriate jokes and made a point to develop an addiction to as many television shows as possible. I was in denial. It goes something like this: “Oh sure, I can totally work on the lawn! I can’t see my computer screen, but that’s what sunglasses are for. Plus, I don’t need to be working online…I have all this reading to do, and even though I’m sprawled out on my back and can’t actually see the words with my paper suspended over my face, it doesn’t matter—thesis isn’t due until April!” Or perhaps this: “Oh sure, I can totally take notes while on the elliptical—in fact, my handwriting is more legible when it resembles an EKG.” Or my personal favorite: “Oh sure, I can totally work in the Motley, surrounded by a swarm of ten kajillion of my closest friends. Plus, the Spice Girls are conducive to the production of deep and meaningful thought!” We’ve all lived a version of these. For me, there was the incessant monologue of “Thesis isn’t due until the end of April. That’s like…a page a day for the next eighty days!” But NO, it’s more like ten pages a day for the last eight days that reality punches you in the face and you realize someone is going to

have to turn in a thesis, and that someone is you. Apparently, “shock provides emotional protection from being overwhelmed all at once. This may last for weeks.” Or, perhaps, months. But who’s counting? 2.Pain and Guilt: In meditation, we are encouraged to sit with our suffering, acknowledge it, and let it pass through us. In thesis, we encourage ourselves to seek any means of escape—preferably with two shots of espresso as a garnish—to avoid reality at all costs. Thesis does not have to be painful, but unfortunately, it often is. It’s like parallel parking for eight months straight. The hardcore ones hole up in the library with nothing but the promise of whiny Facebook statuses to keep them going, while the rest of us only make it as far as the library café, also known as the place where they keep the complex carbohydrates. Even the act of opening Microsoft Word is ringed with pain, heavy from days of staring at the same fluorescent screen—followed by a walk out into the (cruelly beautiful) Claremont weather where, having sacrificed our peripheral vision to nineteen hours of bleeding out words, we promptly run into a tree. And when your words clot, there is the guilt—that smoldering nausea—that kicks you for taking too long to eat dinner, for not spending twenty-four hours a day writing; which besides being impossible, backs you into a corner where—instead of relaxing for an hour like you planned—you spend ten hours straight watching Glee. And you don’t even like Glee. When it’s all said and done, that might be the grand purpose of thesis: to come down with a persistent case of the I-should-be-writings and still manage to be a decent human being. But sometimes, even that feels like a stretch.

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Opinions & Editorials • 5 •

Thesis, continued From pg 4 3.Anger and Bargaining: One day, and there’s no telling when, you wake up and you’re mad; not a cute mad, not the kind of anger where you crinkle your eyebrows and pout, but the type of anger that causes you to become a complete demon toward everyone in your direct vicinity. Someone tells you that she had a “great day,” and you respond with “Oh really? I have 21,000 words written and no idea what I want to do with my life.” Alanis Morissette songs take on new significance. You fantasize about switching topics. You contemplate flushing your computer down the toilet, and get even angrier when you realize it won’t fit. And then there’s the pleading. “Just one more week? Please?” “C’mon, do I really need a works cited?” “If my thesis magically writes itself by the time I wake up tomorrow, I will devote my life to saving orphans.” “Sincerely, Your very favorite advisee and person who will babysit your kids for free if you promise not to read this draft too carefully, Jenna.”

they occur, they set you on fire. If only for a minute, you are on top of the world. You have shaped the unshapeable—and even if you haven’t, you’re close enough to the finish line that you’ve stopped caring what your body looks like while you run; you’re just running, and that’s all that matters.

6.Reconstruction and Working Through: …Or, a little era that I prefer to call “Like Chocolate for Water.” You no longer feel bad when the cashier at Trader Joe’s, after bagging eleven chocolate bars, asks if you’re “having a party.” The days are numbered; you can count them on one hand. The sandstorm in your brain begins to settle, and when you read over the parts of your thesis that sound like they were written by a fourth grader, you smile and revise. You’ve made friends with yourself once again, decided to embrace your work—tweaking the flaws that you can, accepting the ones that you can’t—and have begun to introduce basic hygiene back into your life. Life is good. Or at least, it smells better. 7.Acceptance 4.Depression, Reand Hope: At flection, Loneliness: Scripps, we have The other day at the the “hope” thing gym, A Walk to Rememdown pat; afber came on cable; and ter all, it’s been for no apparent reaprinted on all of son, I burst into tears. I our paraphernawish I could say it was lia since day one. for Mandy, her tragic I would venture illness, her glorious to say that we are prairie dresses—but a bit too hopeful the truth was, it had sometimes—we been so long since I’d “hope” that our left my post in front of thesis will be the the computer that even best piece of writthe slightest pull on ing to grace the my heartstrings made PHOTO COURTESY OF TEENWRITERSBLOC.COM earth, instead of them hyperextend from At some point, you will probably feel this learning to accept sheer exhaustion. way, too. and love it as it The truth is, no matter is. Perhaps some how many peer reviews your department have been good at this all along; but for orchestrates, the act of writing is a solime, it has been monumental. Our theses tary one; and the process of writing thesis, are not capstones, they are not the culmithousands of words about something we nation of our four years here. Rather, they may or may not care about, is downright are the beginning—a stepping-stone, if lonely. At a certain point, a mini-existenyou will—in a lifetime of learning. tial crisis occurs: why did I choose my topEven though the act of writing thesis ic in the first place? We want our words to occasionally bears more resemblance to dance, but sometimes they belly flop. “Shark Week” than real life, when it’s And apparently, there is a limit to the said and done, we will all have something amount of hours you can spend alone damn impressive to show for ourselves. in your room before the pink elephants Furthermore, we will have the process uncreep in. The positive side is, from under der our belts: and in my opinion, that is the fog of sadness, an alien of productive the point. We have to learn to engage with procrastination may temporarily inhabit the means whereby, not so much with your body and do weird things like colorthe destination as with the act of getting code your sock drawer. For the most part, there—because what is there to get to? though, we end up shifting from desk A chance to ask strangers, “Hey, wanna to desk in desperate pursuit of the Feng read this really long paper I wrote this one Shui of thesis (I can’t possibly write here, time?” Better than the thesis itself, we will there’s a trash can blocking my creative have accomplished the arduous task—all energy center…), our backs aching from sitting in desk chairs and our hearts aching seven steps—of getting there, and if we don’t immediately block out all our refor the small amount of time we have left search in a fit of post-traumatic stress, we in them. There’s a graduation at the end will have that as well. And no one can ever of this sentence, and it’s hard to know if take it away from us. any of us will see it coming. The act of writing thesis is a lot like being in a relationship. When it’s over, 5.The Upward Turn: And then—usuyour heart allows you to forget the bad ally when you least expect it—ideas flow times—otherwise, you’d never date (or from your fingertips like water, and sudleave your house) again. And whether we denly, it is doable. This task is surmountever choose to write another paper is irable. There are words on a page, words relevant; the point is that we’ll always have that you have written, and someone has thesis, our love letter to Scripps, an affair confirmed that they are in English. (Or to remember. German. Or Spanish. Or paint.) These moments may be sparse, but when

Scripps College Problem #71: To Party ... Or Also To Party? By Earnest Eleanor Staff Satirist With only four weeks of school left, I thought my Scrippsie self would be done for the year. In fact, aside from finals, I had entered that amazing period of the calm before the storm that tricks me into believing that the end of the year work won’t be too bad. It is this calm before the storm that caused me to fall into a lazy slump, not bothering to read through my homework this week–skimming would have to do. It was only as I was sun bathing on the lawn that I remembered one of the most important events of the year was happening on the 5Cs the very next day: 24 Hour Party. The answer to my dreams—24 hours of a party that was meant to be lazy: sitting in the almost-summer sun, going steady all day. I settled back onto my towel to dream of a weekend wasted away in Claremont when I heard my roommate’s very distinctive footsteps. I didn’t bother to open my eyes until she plopped down beside me. “Are you going to Club Two300 this weekend?” she asked me, opening her Econ textbook. I bolted upright, brightness glaring in my eyes. I had suddenly realized twenty-four hours of bliss also meant one painful decision: Club Two300 at Mudd or 24 Hour Party at CMC. The 24 Hour Party is a tradition, one weekend I always put aside to enjoy myself. But it always falls on the same night as Club Two300. And how can I resist one of Mudd’s most lavish parties? They even bring in a decent DJ and the entertainment of random dancers with furry boots and little else. My decision came down to: one of Mudd’s best or one of CMC’s best? I wondered whether the furry go-go boots would be preferable to the drunken delirium of North Quad at 2 p.m. Random, heel-wearing people bruising the bones of my feet? Or a lawn chair in the sun? Too hard to choose. Turning back to my roommate, I could barely muster a single sound in response to her question about my weekend party plans. I let out a pathetic whimper. “But…24 Hour Party,” I finally managed, unable to contain my pain and frustration. She shrugged and turned back to her supply curves. “Both?” she suggested. I contemplated what going to both parties would entail. It would take careful planning: a complicated drink-eat schedule, tightly enforced to allow for maximum sobriety during dinner (you know all those drunken dinner-goers you laugh at every year when the 24 Hour Party comes around? I don’t want to be one of them) and a complex consideration of what outfits to wear and when to change (like I’d wear the same outfit to both Mudd and CMC). Yes, it would be complicated. To ensure maximum partygoing enjoyment, I would have to worry about every little detail. But I am an ambitious Scripps woman, and I always like a challenge. And so it was decided. We Scrippsies do homework all day and all night. So this weekend, in a haze of glory and greatness, I rode the gentle waves in the calm before the storm. It’s a tough life at Scripps, it really is.

April 12, 2012 •The Scripps Voice •Volume XV• Issue Ten


Features • 7

6 • Features

Passing the SAS Torch Meet the Incoming Scripps Associated Students Board

s i a v o J y Emil t Presiden

I’m a first-year Art major following the PreMed track, and I’m from Sacramento, California. I am the current Dorsey Hall Council Secretary, and next year’s Vice President of Babes and Blankets! During my last two semesters at Scripps, I have been encouraged and inspired by the amazing women around me to be the person I’ve always wanted to be. I am most excited about re-vamping the SAS webpage, making it more user-friendly, picture-heavy, and fun!

ard w o H a i l u J

Class Rep r o i n u J o C

I am so excited to be the President-Elect of SAS. I am a Politics and International Relations major and a Hispanics Studies minor from Novato, California. I am a loyal horse-lover, and if I could live anywhere else, it would be Buenos Aires—with my life set to a Taylor Swift soundtrack. I have been drawn to SAS since my first week on campus because of its ability to directly affect the student experience. This will be my third year on SAS, and I am honored and thrilled to represent the student body. I am committed to making Scripps a place where students feel comfortable and heard. I am eager to begin working with the current SAS members so that we can smoothly transition and begin next year with goals and projects already in mind. I am ready to serve you and your needs, and I look forward to all the positive changes that we are going to create together! I am here for you Scripps…Call me, maybe?

Hello readers ofThe Scripps Voice! I hail from the great state of New York, growing up and currently residing just outside of the Big Apple. I am a junior double major in Psychology and Humanities (Interdisciplinary Studies in Culture), so you can almost always see me hustling back and forth between Steele and the Humanities Courtyard. In addition to co-producing Without a Box (the 5C Improvisational Group), and being a research assistant in Professor Groscup’s legal decision-making lab, I also spend a lot of my (non-work) time reading, being outdoors (any sort of water-based adventure sport is my up and coming favorite), eating apples, spending way too much time trolling the internet, skiing, practicing yoga (poorly), watching NBC comedy shows, and trying to help people any way that I can. I cannot wait to be your representative and liaison to SAS and the Scripps administration, erasing the mystique behind the procedures and policies of Scripps institutions and allowing you all to understand what’s really going on in your community!

Rachel We iner d Academ

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I’m from Mill Valley, California, and I’m a Media Studies major. I’m thrilled to be your Student Activities Chair next year! I will chair the programming board and work on SAS events such as parties, class bonding activities, or dorm events. I’m excited to work with the other programming board members to help build community on campus. I am also looking forward to working with the other colleges to find out what’s happening on the 5Cs. I’ll let you know about these events through the weekly SASsy weekend update emails! Please talk to me if you have any questions or suggestions for events next year.

I am extremely excited to continue to serve on the SAS board next year. This year I was the Sustainability Chair, and worked closely with Niel Errickson, head of facilities at Scripps, to initiate a paper recycling program within the dorms. In addition to [serving on] SAS, I am the Volunteer Coordinator for Cultivating Dreams, intern at Crossroads once a week for the Meatless Mondays program, and am a barista at the Motley Coffeehouse. I am a Sociology major, and in the spring of next year am going abroad to Ecuador (so my counterpart for junior class rep, the lovely Mia Pecora, is going to take over the position [while I’m abroad] in the spring)! I am really excited to represent the junior class next fall, and organize class bonding events, as well as organize a commencement speaker search committee, and get student input on who they would like to speak at graduation.

April 12, 2012 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XV •Issue Ten

Alex Frumkin

Mia Pecora

Co-Junior Class Rep I’m so excited to get involved with SAS and represent the Junior class! I am a Biology major and Spanish minor. I love running, baking and being outside; but more than anything I love Scripps and the class of 2014. Julia and I look forward to working together next year to plan class bonding activities and start the search for a commencement speaker.

Sophomore Class Rep

I am planning to major in Environment, Economics and Politics. I’m from New York City and I enjoy long walks on the beach, hanging out with my friends in the Motley and giving campus tours. I’m really excited to be sophomore representative, because I think that it’s a great opportunity to further class interactions and bonding. Community is such an important part of the Scripps experience and I look forward to facilitating [community] within the class of 2015.

April 12, 2012 • The Scripps Voice • Volume XV •Issue Ten

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37. not a fruitful word to use at the end of the first line in a rhyming couplet? 38. 5C go-to for late-night Thai 40. might precede heroic cartoon ant or scary real bomb 42. we Californians wait in it, but New Yorkers tend to wait on it 43. birds __ a feather 44. __ tu, Brute? 45. organization that 64-across might belong to (abbrev.) 48. piratey brew 50. what you might get at a salon 53. be lousy with 55. it contains Rockets, Grizzlies, Kings, Nets and Jazz (abbrev.) 57. what you might get if you drink 48-across instead of the juice of 37-across 59. corrosive cleaning substance

60. _____ IX, of the Education Amendments of 1972 62. thing to break (accidentally) or bite (worriedly) 63. body of water 64. cartoon hunter with a speech impediment

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1. Scripps policy requires each guest have one 2. style of beer (abbrev.) 3. thing to do in the wabe? 4. department that might hire you 5. restorative 6. British stroller 7. Italian quarter note 8. cardinal direction (abbrev.) 9. type of despair for a cow whose nursing calf has died?

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Looking for more new faces of SAS? Catch them all on our website: voice.scrippscollege.edu

Donate your bike to the Tiernan Field House Green Bike Program. All sizes and styles are welcome. Bikes must be in rideable condition. Bring bikes to the Scripps GBP (located in the TFH parking structure) Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday 12-4 p.m.

April 12, 2012• The Scripps Voice • Volume XV• Issue Ten


Arts & Entertainment • 9 Titanic: The Iconic Romance Returns in 3D By Kara Odum ‘15 Staff Writer

While I am not usually one for sappy, tragic, romantic movies, Titanic is something else entirely. Even though the movie has been out since 1997, I had not gotten a chance to see it until it came to theaters in 3D. I was ready for the emotional rush, or so I thought. Seeing the movie in 3D makes everything seem more real, more extreme, more life-like. The beginning scenes with the submarines exploring the ruins are positively ghastly. It seems like fish are swimming right in front of you as you explore the decrepit ship. Also, the 3D was able to convey the sheer size of the ship compared to everything else at the time. Every history book will tell you about how large the Titanic was, but seeing it compared to other vessels in 3D really made me realize the unprecedented scale. The characters are really what make the movie the classic it is. All of the characters are multidimensional, period-accurate, and engaging. Rose (Kate Winslet) and Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) suck you in with their unique chemistry, the fiancée is the face of unredeemable cruelty, Rose’s mother (Frances Fisher) is a concerned parent with a difficult choice. The rest of the cast embraces their roles with authenticity across the board. Jack, a charming, poor guy with plenty of joie de vivre, departs from the cliché of hopeless romantic in his utter selflessness. He was ready to jump overboard to save Rose from the beginning, and he didn’t change his conviction all the way through despite facing some very difficult choices. My only complaint with the couple is that they reverted to the “damsel in distress being saved by Prince Charming” dynamic a few times. Though it is perfectly acceptable to help each other out when necessary, Rose at times was portrayed as a helpless female waiting to be saved. The scene when Rose is having breakfast with her fiancée was particularly unsettling, because instead of standing up to his demeaning comments, she sat back passively. However, in the second half of the movie, I was happy to see Rose become more of a fighter. At one point she yells, “I am through with being polite,” as she fights to free Jack, punches several people who get in her way, and in the end saves herself. While I knew Titanic would be depressing, I was not prepared for the amount of horror involved. Several grisly scenes, countless deaths on screen (and plenty of others suggested off-screen) added up to about an hour of constant dying. Death was definitely a large part of the movie (it is a story about the Titanic after all) but the overriding message was about life and living it to the fullest. As Jack says at dinner with Rose’s family “I figure life’s a gift and I don’t intend on wasting it. You don’t know what hand you’re gonna get dealt next. You learn to take life as it comes at you... to make each day count.” And that is what is so truly incredible about this movie—the way it reminds us to make each day count in 3D.

Titanic returns to theaters in all its 3D glory. PHOTO COURTESY OF STARPULSE.COM

Let’s Get Naked “When it comes to condoms, put two on” -Asher Roth “I Love College” PLEASE KEEP YOUR CONDOM-TO-PENIS RATIO AT ONE. -SHE Hello sexy readers! This week, I was going to do a little rant about songs that send horrible messages about sex and/or relationships. But I got distracted by my ire over one particular little gem from a few years back. As much as I’d love to rant about Bruno Mars (Seriously, his songs are like mini PSAs to never date him unless you want to be in some sort of abusive relationship… Listen closely to “Grenade” or “It Will Rain” or “Just the Way You Are” some time, and please explain to me how you could tolerate a relationship with that passive-aggressive crooner…But I said I wouldn’t rant about this, so I will stop), I think there’s a more productive conversation about condom usage to be mined out of Mr. Roth’s song. I know, I know…Asher Roth’s mindless list of reasons he loves college is too easy a target. Of course it’s inane, of course nobody is hanging onto every word of the lyrics for advice. But that doesn’t mean that we should just let it perpetuate this sort of dangerous condom-based myth. In the interest of counteracting the miseducation rampant in today’s music (Does the fact that I frequently shake my head and mumble “Kids these days…” mean I’m old?), I’d like to debunk a couple of condombased myths. You’re welcome.

MYTH 1: “Double-bagging” (AKA taking Asher Roth’s horrible advice and wearing two condoms) is a good idea I’m no scientist, but I know a thing or two about friction. And “doublebagging” creates friction between the two condoms, making both of them more likely to tear. That’s right, your attempt to be extra-safe by putting two barriers between yourself and your penetrative buddy will likely leave you with no barriers at all. And some ripped latex floating around. Not sexy. MYTH 2: Since most sexually active females are on the pill, there’s no need to wear condoms I’m disturbed by how frequently heterosexual men tend to have this mindset about what it means to have protected sex. You’re not just protecting the female from getting pregnant, young men, you’re also protecting yourself from getting an STI (sexually transmitted infection, not slinky testosterone impregnation in case you were confused). Or her from getting one of your STIs. It’s actually more likely for men to unknowingly give women STIs than the other way around, particularly since this whole aversion to condoms thing has been going on for a while. Also, men are less likely to show symptoms for many STIs, and when you go in to get tested for STIs

the really contagious and incurable things (like genital herpes) aren’t part of the standard arsenal of tests they run. Why would you assume that your female partner has been more careful with her previous partners than you’re trying to get her to be with you now? I know the risk of unwanted pregnancy isn’t as immediately scary for male-bodied individuals as it is for us female-bodied individuals (Pregnancy doesn’t happen in a man’s abdomen, after all…), but pregnancy isn’t the only thing condoms protect against. I get that wearing a latex sperm-catcher over your most sensitive of manly appendages can be annoying. Really, I do. But unless and until you’re positive she’s taking her hormonal birth control correctly (You’d be surprised how common it is for young women to forget to take that tiny pill at the same time every day), and you’ve both been tested (thoroughly!) for STIs, it’s worth the extra couple of seconds to roll that protective barrier over yourself. MYTH 3: Condoms are foolproof ways to avoid pregnancy and STIs Not to be an alarmist, but the barrier protection method is not foolproof. The only foolproof method is abstinence, really. Many people don’t use condoms correctly (not leaving room at the tip, not making sure it doesn’t have air bubbles

April 12, 2012 •The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Ten

in it when it’s rolled onto the penis, not taking it off carefully right after ejaculation, not noticing it’s broken or expired before putting it on, using it with an oil-based lubricant which can degrade it or without lubricant which can result in tearing, reusing a condom, trying to put it on insideout and then re-using the precumcontaminated condom anyway…). But even if you do follow proper condom protocol, you can still get plenty of things (including pregnant) having condom-protected sex. Herpes, for instance. Also, the human papilloma virus. Condoms are the best and only method we have for reducing the risk of spreading these viruses through sexual contact, but you shouldn’t think that just having a condom present absolves you of any responsibility to be smart and safe about your sex life. Get tested, everybody. Any more myths? I’m all in a huff about the double-bagging thing… still. And Bruno Mars. I bet Bruno Mars would tell a new sexual partner that he loved her enough to wear two condoms, and go on to cry about how he thought he should get to wear none because he’d proved his love. And it would probably be catchy as all get-out. Just like herpes. CONSTANT VIGILANCE! -SHE


10 • Arts & Entertainment

Is All Biotechnology Bad for Agriculture? By Elsa Hammons Watland ‘13 Contributing Writer

The Green Revolution refers to a period of agricultural transformation between the 1940s and 1970s. During this time, high-yielding varieties (HYVs) of wheat and rice were developed through genetic modification. These biotechnologically-developed varieties seemingly ensured food security throughout Asia and Latin America. However, today crop yields are declining while population is rising. Consequently, there is increasing concern over how to feed the projected global population of 9 billion by 2050. When I studied abroad in Kenya last fall, I researched the adoption of drought-resistant HYVs of the nutritious cereal crop sorghum in a droughtprone agricultural region. My final paper both praised the Green Revolution’s achievements and lamented its lack of effectiveness in Africa; I argued that the only way to feed the worlds’ growing population and those in drought-prone regions is to use HYVs. However, I encountered a very different perspective when I returned to Scripps and enrolled in Professor Auerbach’s Political Economy of Food course. The class emphasizes the adverse environmental and social impacts of the Green Revolution, and the negative role biotechnology plays in agriculture. In class, we watched The Future of Food, a documentary about the incredible political influence multinational, biotechnical agribusinesses like Monsanto, Cargill and Syngenta have. One area of agribusiness influence is through funding university agricultural research. Historically, the U.S. government funded such research, but with recent budget cuts, universities have been forced to seek funding elsewhere. Unsurprisingly, companies like Monsanto have made countless contributions to train plant-

breeding professionals and establish research funds, described articles from Hawaii 24/7 and a news source at North Carolina State University. By accepting these funds, universities are at the mercy of Monsanto. The Future of Food cites the example of a research project that showed inexplicable deaths when rats were fed genetically modified, Bt-corn. But before more research could be conducted, Monsanto pulled funding. Agribusinesses are seeking to “control knowledge itself,” says author Raj Patel. Yet agri-giants are also creating the rhetoric that biotechnology can “feed the world.” This is just another ploy to direct research to the industry’s advantage, while making the world’s rich feel good about it. And they are succeeding: the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, for example, has purchased over $25 million worth of Monsanto shares. I am angry with myself for being so easily persuaded by agribusiness propaganda. Before conducting and writing my research in Kenya, I had failed to inform myself of the different perspectives over biotechnology. It is now clearer to me than ever that it is my responsibility to weigh opposing opinions to formulate my own, and approach arguments critically even if they initially seem compelling. But what is much more important to understand is the complexity of agricultural development in countries like Kenya. The issue of using biotechnology cannot simply be reduced to the polarized arguments: it is the only way to feed the world versus it cannot be used to aid agricultural development at all. Tomorrow’s Table, a recently published book by geneticist Pamela C. Ronald and organic farmer Raul Adamchak, argues that combining biotechnology and organic farming is “key to helping feed the world’s growing population in an ecologically

balanced manner.” I was able to witness the complexity of the situation firsthand in Kenya. The farmers I interviewed were not using agribusiness-owned HYVs but the Kenya Seed Company, which distributes genetically modified seeds to the government. Additionally, Kenyan agricultural researchers I interviewed sought to aim research toward meeting Kenya’s food needs and maintaining indigenous agricultural traditions, such as saving seeds to conserve biodiversity. Where I researched, it was clear that farmers were not being exploited by agribusinesses. But since HYV seeds are considered genetically modified foods, they fall under the umbrella of biotechnology and thus carry with them the negative connotations of the agribusiness industry. Indeed, it seems today that supporting GMOs (genetically modified organisms, often food) is synonymous with supporting big agribusiness because of the monopoly the industry has over biotechnology. And so it seems, like so many other contemporary issues, that the crux of this debate lies within economic power. Agribusinesses have a huge financial stake in controlling agricultural research and knowledge, incentivizing them to take the use of biotechnology too far. The increasingly globalized and economically driven agribusiness industry has obscured the potentially positive aspects of biotechnology application to agriculture. It would be unwise to completely cast biotechnology aside, as some forms of genetically modified products like HYVs benefit agricultural communities across the globe. So the question we should be asking is not whether biotechnology is good or bad, but rather, how can we use biotechnology to the advantage of sustainable agricultural development?

The Playful Plateful By Kate Pluth ‘12 Copy Editor

“Hello sir, would you like to participate in a one-time-only game show called ‘Where in the World Did My Cookie Come From?’’ hollered Naomi Bosch (PO ’15) to a passerby on the Pitzer mounds last Sunday. Bosch, along with Ray Serrato (PZ ’12), Jessica Ng (’15) and Mariel Dunietz (’15), hosted this theatrical, interactive event as a project for the Pitzer course Resistance to Monoculture. Presenting the public with containers of fresh-baked cookies, they invited people to answer questions about where the cookies’ ingredients were produced, as well as questions about organic, fair trade and free-range food certification. Whether or not they answered correctly, participants were awarded a cookie to eat. An unconditionality of reward which was necessary— a lot of their questions were tougher than one might think. The ingredients, all of which were from Trader Joe’s and many of which were organic, came from all across the world. The vanilla harvested for the extract was harvested in Madagascar, and the cocoa in the chocolate chips traveled all the way from the Ivory Coast. As participants made their guesses, Serrato marked the actual locations on a map to illustrate the incredible distances that some of them travel. Other ingredients were sourced much closer to home. The butter, eggs and flour came from Wisconsin, California and Colorado respectively. The group performed all the research to figure out the locations of these ingredients. They told me how it was extremely difficult to find out more background information on the ingredients than what their labels stated. Ng contacted a manager from Trader Joe’s who had a reputation for product knowledge, yet when she pressed him on the exact location of the products, he often could not be more specific than the country. She said he once shrugged and replied, “Well, it

says here [on the label] that it’s from the United States, so… that’s where it’s from.” Dunietz also described how processing and packaging make the task event more daunting. “It was impossible to track the brown sugar,” she said, “because brown sugar is white sugar plus molasses,” meaning that the molasses could be from somewhere entirely different from the white sugar, and process of blending the two could be in yet another place. Despite these difficulties, the students were able to make some encouraging discoveries. Trader Joe’s brand white sugar, a product of Paraguay, came from a fair trade organization that not only ensures certain conditions for the workers who harvest the sugar, like adequate shade, water and pay, but also dedicates a portion of its proceeds to education cooperatives in Paraguay. Ng found out that C&H sugar (one of the most widely available brands of sugar in the country) tries to source as much of its raw sugar from Hawaii as possible, because research indicates that “that’s where it was first grown.” “Food is a good way to get people interested in what you’re saying,” said Bosch, “And [we wanted to] make people think about their food.” Bosch described how issues of food globalization overlap a lot with issues of monoculture. While a number of deeper questions were left unanswered for some players in the game show, such as ‘Why might food from far-flung distances be a bad thing?’ or ‘How does monoculture fit into all of this?’, the group’s project did manage to educate people on the basics of food globalization and to get people interested in learning more about the food they consume. All with a bowl of chocolate chip cookies. “They’re cookies,” Serrato said, “They’re so simple.” Or so we think.

April 12, 2012 •The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Ten


Student Life • 11

5C Dance Concert Showcases Spring Talent By Leah Soffer ‘14 Contributing Writer

As spring rolls around and Jacqua Quad is filled once again with sunbathers, the dancers performing in the Scripps Spring Dance Concert are putting the finishing touches on the pieces they have been rehearsing all semester. As always, the show will include the theses of many senior Dance majors and some works by professors. This year, there is a remarkable amount of innovation in dance, including dances with live musicians and extensive props. Ronnie Brosterman, chair of the Scripps Dance department and Scripps faculty member for 30 years, is choreographing an especially innovative piece. The piece, “The Cracked Kettle,” is set to music written by Harvey Mudd Professor of Music, Bill Alves. The music is sung a cappella and will be performed live by the Claremont Chamber Choir with direction by Charles Kamm. Brosterman and Alves have been speaking about this collaboration since the summer. They agreed that he could create whatever music he wanted and Brosterman began choreographing the piece without having heard the music. She strung together movements that reflected her interpretation of the basics of language and built upon each phrase to convey a loose sense of linguistic development. The dancers worked with a recording of the Chamber Choir, but the Choir will be performing live onstage with the dances for all three performances. Another Scripps Professor of Dance, Joel Smith, built upon a work he choreographed as part of his performance duo casebolt and smith. Smith, along with artistic partner, Liz Casebolt, adapted a duet seated at a table into a work with six performers using a table 45 feet long. Dance major Victoria Wolfe (PZ ’12) also worked with large props on stage. Her dance reflects various properties of water. On stage, Wolfe’s dancers interact with a series of cubes that has allowed them to explore more movement. Dance minor Sara Cronin (‘12) also has a work presented in the concert. Her dance is based on the concept of fear, and she plays with various ways to cope with fear. In addition to traditional choreography, she also includes segments created by her dancers and sections of improvisation, so every performance will be unique. She chose to blend multiple pieces of music together to create a final piece of music that would not be easily recognizable to the audience. It was also important to Cronin that her dance not be pretty. “I wanted to make just an absolutely disgusting dance,” she mentioned. “Ironically, parts of it really came out quite nicely and could be called ‘pretty.’” The show will be Friday, April 13 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, April 14 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m in the Scripps Garrison Theater. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. for the 8 p.m. shows and 1:30 for the 2 p.m. shows. Students, faculty, staff and senior admission is $5 and general admission is $10.

U

d e t i ne d

Uncensored opinions, straight from the Editors-in-Chief themselves. The Toll Alarm

Dear Scripps Administration: I get it, I really do. Alarms are supposed to keep stalkerish creepers out. But the Toll alarm just gives the poor Tollians massive headaches and keeps us Clarkians up until 3am. Some Scripps students have clearly failed to understand that an alarm on a door means don’t touch the fucking door. But please, Scripps, don’t punish the rest of us. Fix it. Sincerely, the Clark residents.

What not to type into Google images

It. Weird. …ah screw this. Any word you type in will show at least one kinky/ weird/slutty/dehumanizing image. Ain’t that great?

Seniors

and

Thesis/Post-Graduation Plans

Don’t Ask. Don’t Tell.

Power to the Peeps! (Not)

Creepiest (and still cutest) bunnies on the block. Search “WaPo Peeps Diorama” for more information.

Bounce Mushroom at Pomona on Saturday Night Thank you, Pomona, for indulging our childish urges.

TED.com

A wonderfully useful, educational procrastination method. As members of the Claremont Colleges, we’re all really intelligent people. But it doesn’t hurt to get smarter in different ways; if the long-overextended premise (and title) for How I Met Your Mother has taught us anything, it’s that we all have gaps in our knowledge. Let’s fill those gaps with some really cool new information. The best part is that the TED talks are shorter than a television show. So for this time of year when we all get stressed out, we can take a short break but it doesn’t have to be 22 or 44 minutes! It can be 5 or 11! Ideas worth spreading!

Class Registration

My registration time is 4. So, Fuck that, let’s drink. ... tea.

Relay for Life Plug

I’m sorry; I have to. Relay for Life is a fabulous cause. Everyone has been or will be affected by cancer. So if you don’t want to sign up because you’re “too busy,” you can still send like 5 emails to your family or at least donate like 5 bucks. Seriously. The more we fix now, the better life will be when cancer starts affecting us more personally. Get your shit together, Claremont! ALL PHOTOS BY MICHELLE NAGLER

April 12, 2012 • The Scripps Voice •Volume XV • Issue Ten


12 •Student Life Congratulations to the winners of the first ever Scripps Voice Photo contest!!

Kiley Lawrence: Best Spring Break

Winona Bechtle: Cutest Animal

yo

Liz L

siest

ripp n: Sc

Anonymous: M

ost Outrageous

This is not your Mama’s Pilates. All students = 15% off Earn PE credits and your guaranteed results!!

L eah Mortense

n: Study Abrod

iest

wundabar.com

claremont@wundabar.com • 201 N Indian Hill #101, Claremont CA

April 12, 2012 • The Scripps Voice •Volume XV •Issue Ten

April 12, 2012  

Volume XV, Issue Ten

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