Page 1

2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:33

Page 1

Issue 10 | December 2013 - January 2014

PLUS STRIKING ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

Christina St端rmer THE AUSTRIAN POP ICON IS BACK ON TOUR

TOP UNIVERSITIES IN GERMANY GREAT PRODUCTS MADE IN SWITZERLAND


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 2

Discover real Private Banking At SEB Private Banking, we acknowledge that everyone has a unique set of challenges. It’s why we do not oer ready-made solutions, concentrating instead on developing meaningful, long-lasting ďŹ nancial relationships and making the eort to really understand you and your requirements. We look after all aspects of your personal and your family’s business ďŹ nances – from daily transactions to long-term investments. And we oer everything from in-depth ďŹ nancial management to specialist advice on legal and tax matters. As one of the world’s strongest banks and with more than 150 years of experience in private banking, we have just what it takes to ensure your future prosperity. To ďŹ nd out what SEB can do for your personal wealth, contact us in London: Christian A. Hvamstad +44 (0) 20 7246 4307 privatebanking@seb.co.uk

FUCHS

REPORT

VermĂśgensmanagement im Test TOPS 2012

Platz 5 der Gesamtwertung

™‡†‡� Ǘ ‘”™ƒ› Ǘ ‡��ƒ”� Ǘ ‹�Žƒ�† Ǘ —š‡�„‘—”‰ Ǘ ™‹–œ‡”Žƒ�† Ǘ �‹–‡† ‹�‰†‘� Ǘ ‹�‰ƒ’‘”‡ Ǘ •–‘�‹ƒ Ǘ ƒ–˜‹ƒ Ǘ ‹–Š—ƒ�‹ƒ


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 3

Discover Germany | Contents

Contents DECEMBER 2013 JANUARY 2014

68

20 Photo: Ippolito Fleitz Group

COVER FEATURE 6

Christina Stürmer

REGULARS & COLUMNS 10

Austrian pop icon Christina Stürmer chats about life on and off stage, her passion for Flesserl and why it is always best to listen to your heart.

Photo: Austrian National Tourist Office

SPECIAL THEMES

40

Great design has become a bit of a signature look for our magazine and this issue does not fail to impress with a collection of outstanding creative talent from the corporate and industrial design industry.

38

Discover Culinary Germany

44

Great Universities – where tomorrow’s talent is crafted Higher education has never been more valuable, we take a closer look at some brilliant university options.

59

Restaurant of the Month

its cutting edge technology. Breathtaking views complete a unique conference experience.

67

Designed after an aircraft wing, the Upperdeck restaurant at Zurich airport offers a futuristic dining experience featuring a giant media wall and fantastic food.

68

46

Teambuilding is key at Germany’s hôtel schloss romrod between Kassel and Frankfurt. State of the art premises in an idyllic location and with 80 exciting teambuilding activities to choose from, it is the perfect off-site location. In the Austrian Pannonia Tower Hotel Parndorf, conveniently located near Vienna airport, guests are inspired by a luxurious designer interior and

Hotel of the Month Enjoy the arguably unbeatable views over the city from the sophisticated Swissôtel Zurich. A place of indulgence, where even children are treated like royalty.

Conferences of the Month 45

Attraction of the Month Passionate about wine, great architecture and relaxing spa sessions? Then the Austrian LOISIUM Wine & Spa Resorts are just ideal for your holiday as they combine all three of these themes under one roof.

Business Expert legal and tax advice as well as top-notch conference venues. Plus an insider’s view on the German-speaking skilled workforce.

Best things Made in Switzerland An array of high quality produce from the greatest Swiss manufacturers.

Fashion Finds Lovely winter items to wear from office to party.

Beautiful Architecture & Design

It’s what’s inside that counts. German food and wine are full of healthy ingredients and natural goodness.

52

72

All you need for Christmas is here including a sock for Santa.

12 15

Dedicated to Design

CULTURE 70

Wind down and relax during the festive season and read how mindfulness can turn the most stressful time into a moment of calm for all senses. And if you don’t know what to do for New Year’s Eve take a look at our Austrian winter highlights, you may get an idea.

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 3


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 4

Dear Reader,

Discover Germany

Rebecca Schween

Issue 10,

Marilena Stracke

Dec 2013 /Jan 2014

Helena Whitmore

Published 16.12.2013

Sales & Key Account Managers

ISSN 2051-7718

Emma Fabritius Nørregaard Lena Meyer

Published by Scan Magazine Ltd.

Faye Beermann Ariam Bereket Caroline Nindl

Design & Print Liquid Graphic Ltd.

Advertising info@discovergermany.com

Executive Editor Thomas Winther

Discover Germany is published by:

Creative Director Mads E. Petersen

Scan Magazine Ltd. 4 Baden Place Crosby Row London SE1 1YW

Editor Tina Awtani Art Director

Phone +44 (0)870 933 0423 info@discovergermany.com

Svetlana Slizova Copy-Editor

For further information, please visit www.discovergermany.com

Emmie Collinge Contributors

A warm welcome to the most magical season of the year. This month I had the great pleasure interviewing Austrian pop icon Christina Stürmer. The personable singer opens up about her new tour, performing alongside the great John Bon Jovi and which Austrian delicacies she craves while away from home. What’s more, she is a knight in shining armour for those less fortunate. Let’s follow her example and make sure we do our share to support those who are in need this Christmas, whether it’s the lonely old lady next door or the disaster struck regions far away from our home countries. Our December issue is packed with great design and outstanding architecture themes featuring amazing creations from some of the greatest industry talents in the German speaking regions. We also take a closer look at education as this is where the foundation for future talent is crafted. Be it through private or state funded facilities, the German education system is renowned for producing a highly skilled workforce. Human resources expert Rebecca Schween explains why exactly the German speaking skilled workforce is so desirable for employers. Made in Switzerland is the motto for our business section. A whopping 99 per cent of all Swiss companies are small or medium sized businesses, most of them family-owned for generations. You’ll be surprised to find out that the Alpine country has a lot more to offer than just watches, cheese and chocolate.

Emmie Collinge Elisabeth Doehne Phil Gale Barbara Geier Julie Guldbrandsen Jessica Holzhausen Sonja Irani Gregor Kleinknecht Anne Krebiehl Cordelia Makartsev Franziska Nössig Dorina Reichhold

With or without chocolate, Christmas and the NewYear are a very special time to reflect and unwind in the company of loved ones. After the shopping frenzy, the Christmas party marathon and getting the last projects done and dusted in the old year, the time finally comes to sit back, take a deep breath and recharge the batteries. Since this is often easier said than done, we thought it may be a good idea to make you familiar with the term Mindfulness, a simple do-it-yourself approach suitable for all age groups to improve your mental and physical state, lowering stress levels by seizing the moment and fully engaging your senses. Give it a try and enjoy the world around you with all the Christmas sparkle. Enjoy the magazine, Merry Christmas and Happy NewYear 2014!

© All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of Scan Magazine Ltd. This magazine contains advertorials/promotional articles

4 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

Tina Awtani


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 5

Rothenburg ob der Tauber | Romantic but real!

Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a unique experience: a thousand years of history and a fairytale setting, massive fortifications and medieval architecture, the all year round “Christmas Village” of Käthe Wohlfahrt and cosmopolitan hospitality, numerous hiking and cycling trails as well as diversified events. It is safe to say that there is something for everyone in Rothenburg ob der Tauber – guaranteed!

Rothenburg Tourismus Service | Marktplatz 2 | 91541 Rothenburg o. d. T. Tel. +49 (0) 9861 404-800 | info@rothenburg.de | www.tourismus.rothenburg.de

Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/Rothenburg.Tourism

www.tourismus. rothenburg.de

ONLY

SUBSCRIBE TO DISCOVER GERMANY

£40 for 1 0 Iss

Sign up to a year’s subscription and you will

ues

receive each new issue of Discover Germany through your letterbox. The price for 10 issues is £40.00 (Outside UK £75.00) Name: Address:

Postcode

Country

Phone

Email

Occupation

Nationality

Age (optional)

Tick here if you do not wish to receive newsletters from Scan Magazine Ltd. Return with payment by cheque to: Scan Magazine, 4 Baden Place, Crosby Row, London SE1 1YW or pay online at www.discovergermany.com


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 6


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 7

Photo: David Bergman

Discover Germany | Cover Feature | Christina Stürmer

Christina Stürmer Austria’s greatest popstar is back on tour Only 31 years old, Christina Stürmer already has an impressive career in the music industry behind her. 2013 saw the release of her 8th album Ich hör auf mein Herz (I listen to my heart) and she has won several Amadeus Austrian Music Awards as well as a prestigious Echo for her work. TEXT: TINA AWTANI

From an early age her passion for music was undeniable and she was already strutting her stuff in a teenie band by the age of 13. To begin with, music was little more than just a hobby, and after leaving school Christina started an apprenticeship as a bookseller. A chance performance in the Austrian casting show Starmania changed her fate. All of a sudden a broad audience became aware of her unique style, her strong and distinctive voice. Songs like Ich lebe (I am alive) and Wir leben den Moment (We live for the moment) are just two examples of her catchy songs, known and loved across the different generations within the German speaking regions. Her latest release Millionen Lichter (Millions of lights) just won gold after selling a massive 150,000 copies. “I always listened to my heart” When American superstar John Bon Jovi toured Austria, he asked Christina to perform a duet with him in her home country. In front of 200,000 people, the duo wowed the audience with the song Who

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 7


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 8

Discover Germany | Cover Feature | Christina Stürmer

says you can´t go home. When I asked her to describe how it felt to share the microphone with one of the world’s greatest rock stars, Christina remains humble. “It was a really big honour for me to perform with Bon Jovi. The band has been in the music industry for over 30 years. It was a truly once-in-a-lifetime experience,” she says. What is more, the ever-friendly youngster was quite impressed by the fact that Bon Jovi “at the age of 51 could still

8 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

jump up and down the stage looking luscious, fresh and fit.” After a decade on stage and in the public eye she continues:“I always listened to my heart. At the beginning everything was so new and I think I was convinced to do things which didn’t always feel so good after all. But I always try and follow my gut instinct. I do things which are fun. I don’t have to be someone else, I can always be myself. That’s what I’m proud of.”

Always for the good cause - on tour again Behind the scenes there is much more to be proud of as Christina works tirelessly to make the world a little better. During the Iraq War, she stormed the charts with the song Mama Ana Ahabak, which is Arabic for the words“mama, I love you”. She is a member of the Red Cross and serves as an ambassador for numerous charities.“Breast cancer prevention is very important to me. One Euro of every ticket sold during our


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 9

Discover Germany | Cover Feature | Christina Stürmer

Photos: Olaf Rayermann

heart tour, covering Austria, Germany and Switzerland during the next couple of months. Fans can expect a plethora of great songs and a wonderful atmosphere. “We all are very excited about this tour. Being back on tour is one of the most special things for us and to look in the sparkling eyes of the audience every night is fantastic!” While on tour, there are certain Austrian things that Christina confesses to missing: “I really miss our local food. You can get things here which you just don't find anywhere else. Flesserl (bakery product covered with poppy seeds) or really good Schinkenfleckerl (special type of pasta with ham), that is something I can only get at home.” Between studio time and stage performances, the passionate snowboarder likes to wind down by reading a good book or spending time with friends. Talent, weird accents and a BBQ in winter I wanted to know what she thinks about all the reality tv casting shows running today. “Back then it really was a stepping stone for

me, but then the shows were still new and – well – respectable. Today every candidate knows exactly what is expected and many participants adapt themselves to simply deliver a good show.The talent shows are just entertainment and I doubt that it is always about talent.”Fortunately Christina certainly is very talented, so it was tempting to ask if we can expect some English lyrics from her in the future. She had admitted in the past that good German lyrics were quite challenging to write.“When Germans or Austrians sing in English, you very often hear the accent, that doesn’t sound so great,”she once said. However, with a coy smile she adds:“Who knows? Never say never.” Christina will spend Christmas and New Year in a very traditional way. “I always spend Christmas with my family and I enjoy the tranquillity and the relaxed atmosphere. Finally having some me-time is such a treat.”New Year is going to be a bit more on the noisy side, as she reveals:“I always celebrate New Year with friends and because we all love BBQs, it is not seldom that we embrace the New Year with the first BBQ of the season.”

new tour will be donated to Brustkrebs Deutschland e.V. (Breastcancer Germany) and the Krebshilfe (Cancer Aid) in Austria. I think that this field deserves more attention and our awareness so I am happy to help.” Together with her band members Klaus, Oliver, Rue and Matthias, she just embarked on her Listen to your

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 9


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 10

Discover Germany | Design | Dedicated to Design

Dedicated to Design... In need of some Christmas wish list input or seasonal décor inspiration? We have found some imaginative and enjoyable German designs that tick all our Xmas-mood boxes.

1

BY JULIE GULDBRANDSEN

2

The Wesco storage box is available in multiple colours. This month we like ours bright red to match the seasonal mood. £55. www.johnlewis.com.

3

Light up your home or garden with these amusing LED stars and trees by Lumenio. Choose from various sizes and 15 different colours. From £42 to £419. www.lumenio.com.

The sticks Wardrobe by Schonbuch resembles a game of Mikado. Very cool, we approve. £ 255. www.schoenbuch.com.

4

10 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

You can store as well as carry firewood in this award winning design piece by Blomus. Available in black and brown. £99. www.blomus.com.

This Christmas stocking from Reisenthel, with a capacity of 5 kg and 5 litres, will hold even Santa’s larger presents. £8. www.reisenthel.com.

5


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 11

Your Shortcut to Germany Bergen

NORWAY

Oslo Stockholm Bromma

SWEDEN Aalborg bo org

UNITED KINGDOM

G enburg Goth

Aarh A rhu us us

DENMARK K

Billund Manchester

London City

Brussels

BELGIUM BE

Düsseldorf

GERMANY

Munich

WINNER OF DANISH TRAVEL AWARD 2012 “BEST EUROPEAN AIRLINE”

S n acks

Me al s

ba.com

Drinks

Pap ers

Lounges

Smi l e s


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 12

Discover Germany | Xxx | Xxxx

Fashion Finds Winter is upon us and so is the festive season. We have rounded up a little selection of lovely and versatile German fashion finds that work equally well for both parties and daytime outings. Go classic with a twist by adding pink and statement jewellery to your basic wardrobe pieces. Christmas celebrations here we come. BY JULIE GULDBRANDSEN

The design theme of the JOOP! Autumn/Winter Collection 2013 is Soft Protection. Clothing accompanies us in our daily rituals, protects and enfolds us, and gives us the opportunity to express our moods. Coat C549 , blouse C149 , trousers C199. www.joop.com

12 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 13

Discover Germany | Design | Fashion Finds

With an amazing statement knit like this by Lala Berlin you will only need to add a pair of jeans for the ultimate fashion statement. And it’s cosy too. Bonus. £276. www.lalaberlin-onlineshop.de

The leather skirt is a classic wardrobe winner. Try one with a little swing for a more girly look. £193. www.marc-o-polo.de.

This beautiful choker necklace by uncommon matters will lift your outfit in an instant. Made of porcelain and painted with gold – this is a contemporary luxury piece you will cherish forever. £454. www.uncommonmatters.com.

Wear this lovely mohair dress for parties with high stilettoes and a statement necklace, or dress it down by day with flat boots, tights, and a warm coat. The sweater-dress is a truly great day-tonight piece. £210. www.marc-o-polo.de.

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 13


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 14

TYROLEAN FESTIVAL ERL WINTER NTER

Christmas in Erl 26 December 2013 — 6 January y 2014 Festival House

President: Hans Peter Haselsteiner iner General Direction: Gustav Kuhn uhn

OPERA MOZART Don Giovanni PUCCINI Tosca CONCERT Rˇ ÁK · WEBERN · BEETHOVEN · DVOR REGER · SMETANA NEW YEAR’S CONCERT o BACH’S Christmas Oratorio SPECIALS FRANUI-ANNIVERSARY ENSEMBLE RISOGNANZE E e SCHUBERT Die Winterreise 0 20 Tickets: T +43 (0) 53 73 / 81 000 www.tiroler-festspiele.at

ORIGINAL SALZBURGER MOZARTKUGEL In 1890 the Salzburg confectioner, PAUL FÜRST, created the now world famous Salzburger Mozartkugel. He was awarded a gold medal for his product, which had already become famous, at the Paris Exhibition of 1905. Norbert Fürst, the present proprietor of this establishment, still makes these fine chocolates today according to the old recipe and method handed down to him by his great-grandfather. For this reason, these can truly be called "ORIGINAL SALZBURGER MOZARTKUGEL" By using this expensive production process, and with the same recipe, the same "Original Salzburger Mozartkugeln" are still produced by hand in the same house and sold exclusively in our four Salzburg patisseries. Cafe Konditorei Fürst

www.original-mozartkugel.com


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 15

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Special Theme

Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Illustrations: Bengt Fosshag

Making good things better If you ask someone in the world for the smartest engineering, for the best design, for the best products in quality and longevity. What do you think is the answer? The answer will be related to Germany. TEXT: MICHAEL EIBES, PRESIDENT OF THE DEUTSCHER DESIGNER CLUB (DDC) | PHOTO: MAGDA KLUKOWSKI

You can talk no end about big brands, designs, and products that are converted into collectible items but there is no way you can have a serious conversation about design without mentioning Germany and its CODE (culture of design and engineers) of success. If there is one last little thing remaining in order to finalize a product, or to come up with a solution that runs well and looks good in a way of 100 per cent thinking, then German engineers and designers will get it done. And at the end of the day it will be successful in most cases. “The details are not the details. They make the product,”Charles Eames said once. This design thinking came from a design studio in California. But never mind that – the German-American architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe had the maxim of “Less is more” and Dieter Rams, the archetypical German

designer found his own interpretation“Less is better.”Both were influenced by Bauhaus, but this is history for another day.

Each is a science in itself but only together will it become a process of mutual enrichment. Good Design. Good Business.

Dieter Rams is currently thinking about the possibilities of designing human interfaces, as are many other designers. New territories for product designers. Welcome to the flatland of design. But this particular point shows the limits. There is a“Less is better”product but the attraction stems from the functionality. The form is the entrepreneur of it and content is the added value. But in this flow – to reach the final purpose to get some information about the next corner restaurant – you will cross several design, engineering and publicist disciplines.

Michael Eibes, President of the Deutscher Designer Club (DDC)

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 15


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 16

“Think global, act local, be national” Corporate brand solutions made by wirDesign Berlin and Braunschweig-based wirDesign have been creating corporate brand solutions for 30 years. Experts in Marketing, Design and Communication, the creative team has established an impressive track record and serves clients even beyond the German borders and as far as Amsterdam, Beijing or Seoul. Tailor-made client solutions include Brand Concept, Brand Design, Brand Management, Brand Communication and Annual Reporting. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: WIRDESIGN

Design is the heart and soul of wirDesign and it comes in various facets. Brand strategy solutions, corporate design development or corporate design optimization on a national level as well as communication solutions for trade fairs or international campaigns are all part of the portfolio. wirDesign is the expert when it comes to the all-important brand optimization and CEO Norbert Gabrysch puts it in a nutshell:“Those who are not perceived in the right manner, those who do not make themselves stand out from the crowd, won’t be successful in any market.”Together with founding partners Andreas Schuster, AndreasViedt and Michael Rösch, Gabrysch

16 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

is spearheading the wirDesign offices in Berlin and Braunschweig. More than 50 brand specialists, communication experts and highly skilled designers are constantly striving to make some of the greatest names listed on the German stock market become ever more successful and competitively viable on a global level. This makes wirDesign one of the largest and most experienced corporate design agencies in Germany that is still run by its owners. Three keys to success When it comes to new projects wirDesign focuses on three key issues. Clearly de-

fined market positioning and a unique visual performance are required to establish long-term communication and advertising strategies in order to secure a prosperous corporate design project. However, in today’s globalised world, the consideration of local particularities plays an important role. “In one of Europe’s most significant markets – Germany – wirDesign is well versed due to decades of experience. Via international partneragencies, especially in China, we can serve clients both ways. Think global, act local, be national,“ Gabrysch reveals his recipe for success.


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:22

Page 17

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Left: Key-visual for the Summer Opera Festival Braunschweig “La Traviata”

Close client relationships “Successfully operating corporations, both national as well as international ones, excel not only through good products, but through one thing in particular: They are extremely recognisable and distinctive through well-planned and long-term clear market positioning, a consistent visual performance and an attention-grabbing communication strategy,”Gabrysch says. Clients come from a variety of industries such as automotive, energy, financial, health and others including large corporations like Commerzbank, Deutsche Börse Group, Deutsche Bahn, Volkswagen or energy provider E.ON. But also small and medium-sized businesses such as B. Braun, automobile industry supplier Hella or logisitics supplier GLS lay their brands in the capable hands of wirDesign. Just as impressive as the client list reads the list of accolades and industry awards Gabrysch and his team have been honored with. One of the Corporate Design projects just scooped the German Design Award 2014 Special Mention and was created for the technical service provider TÜV NORD Group. “wirDesign developed the market positioning for the global operating German TÜV NORD AG, we created the Corporate Brand TÜV NORD GROUP and the entire brand architecture in order to specify further growth,”Gabrysch explains.

The name wirDesign literally translates into “we design” and the term we always includes the client as every single project is regarded as teamwork with the client, who is carefully coached through the whole process. wirDesign understands the importance of close client relationships and their clients are very appreciative of this. “The understandable action in every phase offered by wirDesign throughout the project corresponds completely to the philosophy of the TÜV NORD and increases the internal acceptance of the compiled results,“ says Kai Schubert, Head of Corporate Strategy at TÜV NORD GROUP. But there is more to be proud of as Gabrysch illustrates: “wirDesign revised the market presence and the German market advertising for the US American power plant manufacturer SPX. And for the multinational automobile industry supplier Hella from Lippstadt (Germany), we created the entire global Corporate Design. Currently we are working on Hella’s all-important trade fair presence.”

know exactly why it is successful now and in the future. Often this DNA for success is not carved into precise words, not everyone knows about it or it simply gets lost in the daily business. That’s why we are often like treasure hunters. Together with the responsible corporate leaders, we dig deep to discover and identify the brand story and essential parameters for success, which make the brand unique and sustainably successful.” www.wirDesign.de n.gabrysch@wirDesign.de

Seeking treasures Despite all the meticulous analysis included in every single project, good instinct and passion for the job is what all team members at wirDesign share.“At the end of the day we are treasure hunters,“ Gabrysch explains and he carries on: “It is vital that a corporation and especially its employees

Above: CD-Update for Fressnapf/Maxi Zoo, the new pictograms Below, left: Brand positioning, architecture and design of corporate brand, honoured with the German Design Award Below, right: International Corporate Design for automobile industry supplier Hella Report and communication for Deutsche Börse Group, Frankfurt, Germany

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 17


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 18

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Aesthetic functionalism and innovation created by at-design Inspiration can come from anywhere. A single thought or an object can trigger design innovations that can be applied to real world industries. The German industrial design agency at-design has excelled at encapsulating innovative ideas in their award-winning industrial design solutions, combining real-world functionality, aestheticism, and usability. TEXT: ELISABETH DOEHNE | PHOTOS: AT-DESIGN

It takes a vision to develop a project. It takes redefined skills to use both art and applied science to improve the aesthetics, ergonomics, functionality, and usability of a product. “We are driven by our desire to combine both worlds: design and functionality. The result is an inspired symbiosis of cultural, ecological and economic factors ranging

18 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

from the concept of a concrete corporate identity to the layout of functional and aesthetic products, up to product innovation,” states the management of at-design.

Main image, top: Design study “Aircraft Tug” Above: Design study “E-Mobility Charging Column” SIMOTICS M-1PH8 Motor Below, left: Siemens Computertomograph “SOMATOM Perspective“. © Siemens AG, München/Berlin “Pure White"- Endoscopy Instruments Bottom: The at-design awards

Located in the Bavarian city of Fürth, one of Germany’s most forward-thinking industrial design agencies employs five certified design specialists. Since 1999, the team, led by Managing Directors Jan Andersson and Christoph Tomczak, have successfully completed large corporate and project-based assignments. With more than 15 years experience in Industrial Design for healthcare, consumer and investment goods, consumer electronics and packaging, clients can expect custom-tailored and cost-efficient advice. The agency understands that product design is an integrated process of product development, and their ideas are incorporated seamlessly into the final products.“Our core competence is an integrated design support that stretches from initial concepts to series production. Creativity, innovation and constructive thinking are our daily business,” highlights the company. A strong emphasis is placed on customer service and designing solutions to complex

real-world problems by breaking them down into smaller parts of successful design – functionality, cost efficiency, sizing, and project management. Their wellknown customer base includes clients in automation engineering, e-mobility and medical technology, and projects in consumer products and corporate design work. Notable partners are Siemens AG Industry Sector and Health Sector. In the future, at-design is seeking to expand its services internationally, and continue to embrace the creative stimulation that derives from their excellent teamwork, flexibility, and the adaptability to work across all industry sectors. www.atdesign.de


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 19

Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Classic branding done creatively “To achieve commercial success, you have to touch people,” begins one of Paarpiloten’s two Creative Directors, Nanni Goebel matter-of-factly, “feelings travel faster than any word ever can.” TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: PAARPILOTEN

“Of course we have strategic branding and design tools,” explains Goebel, “these are important for positioning any communication design within the market and setting the strategy direction. But to have real success, it’s about emotions: Finding the way to people's hearts is what we try every time anew. It's hard work but that's what also makes it fascinating.”Goebel’s passion for intelligent design and great value for quality is shared by business partner and Paarpiloten’s founder Christopher Wiehl. Paarpiloten has dedicated itself to ensuring that your brand gets the attention it deserves in today’s complex landscape. “We believe that design can make the difference: a design that reflects the core of the company, as well as hitting the nerve of the market, is a business tool that will create added value,”continues Goebel. Many of Paarpiloten’s projects have been awarded international awards and have resulted in tangible success for companies – higher visibility, more market share, bigger profits. The multi-disciplinary design studio Paarpiloten concentrates on design: sussing out your communication needs, preparing a suitable strategy and coming up with the best possible creative solutions. Goebel explains: “We develop effective and creative

solutions that meet all commercial requirements. Our clients come from sectors right across the board. They include global corporations, cultural institutions and also local organisations.” Paarpiloten offer solutions which“can be used across the entire application spectrum: analogue, digital and in 3-D space.” Success for Paarpiloten means long-term clients growing more and more successful thanks in part to Paarpiloten’s contribution.“We’ve been working with the strategy consultancy firm Stratley AG since the very beginning and now they’ve just become “Hidden Champion”(best consulting company for the chemical industry, awarded by WGMB). We have helped Stratley strategically position their brand in the market and build it up bit by bit.”Paarpiloten thrive on the challenges posed by each new project, producing work which Goebel defines as “functional, often innovative and unconventional, but always appropriate.”And certainly, judging on previous success stories, the creative solutions presented by Paarpiloten function, and they function creatively. www.paarpiloten.com

Main image, left: Creative Directors Christopher Wiehl & Nanni Goebel Right, from top to bottom: Stratley web appearance Overlack web appearance Fey corporate design Rennecke corporate design Stratley advent calendar

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 19


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 20

Ippolito Fleitz Group Stuttgart’s solution for building business identities An identity is at the heart of any modern business, but building one is a huge task. Discover Germany speaks to the Ippolito Fleitz Group, identity architects, who are using their vast knowledge to bring you award-winning designs for your business. TEXT: PHIL GALE | PHOTOS: IPPOLITO FLEITZ GROUP

“Identity is always related to the perception of others and self-reflection,” begins Peter Ippolito with a knowledgeable smile. Working with his partner Gunter Fleitz and the rest of their Ippolito Fleitz Group, they have been designing and creating award-winning identities for businesses worldwide, in the fields of architecture, product design, and communication. Identity architecture is an area of design not often heard by Anglophones. It is the principle of designing all the necessary parts which combine to form the whole of your business; from your office building, through to how your brand is communicated, what your brand is, or even a specific product for it. No mean feat, but Ippolito

20 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

has been calling on his top team of designers since 2002 to work closely with his clients so that they get what they want, he explains:“We develop our projects from the perspective of the user. Since we are always very close to their perception, we are always very close to their concept.”With 39

minds at both Fleitz and Ippolito’s disposal, they always have the right experience and expertise to get the job done, Ippolito continues:“We develop products and communications measures. We conceive and construct buildings, interiors and landscapes. We do not think in disciplines. We think in


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 21

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany Left: DER SPIEGEL canteen. Bottom, left: Ippolito Fleitz Group Office, Stuttgart. Photos: Zooey Braun

works perfectly for their design. For example, many times we use small batches of flooring so that we can get the grain of the wood perfect for the needs of the project.”

solutions. Solutions that help you become a purposeful part of the whole, yet distinctive in your own right.” With three offices worldwide, the Ippolito Fleitz Group are in huge demand. Their ability to work closely with their clients is not the only reason for this demand; they are also valued for their keen eye for every detail, making the end product something which is not only bespoke and well designed, but functional. One example of this detailing was their recent design of the staff restaurant for DER SPIEGEL in Hamburg, Ippolito recounts the process:“Even if a strong idea is central to our design, some projects require us to make sure that they function. This staff restaurant was one example. We had to meet very strong acoustic requirements for the project, since it had sound reflective surfaces on five sides. Our solution was to make the ceiling space capable of compensating for this, whilst allowing DER SPIEGEL the freedom and high degree of flexibility for using the space.” It was through the correct choice of materials that this was possible. Materials are at the forefront of the design process for Ippolito. His team has one dedicated member who not only looks after their vast library of samples, but is also constantly looking for new products to use in their designs, Ippolito explains: “We work with other industries, textile and material, to be able to think outside of the box. With this wider knowledge of materials we are able to break away from convention so that we can offer our clients something that

With many renowned clients the designs of the Ippolito Fleitz group are sometimes challenging, Ippolito expands:“The Palace of International Forums in Uzbekistan was one of our greatest challenges. It was a 40,000 square metre structure that we had to design, build and complete in five and a half months. Being able to strike the balance between design and function making for a multi-layered design process, which was very complex. But the end result is something that we are very proud of.” Business identities surely have to be contemporary, but often high design can become dated, Ippolito concludes: “A good project will always be a good project. We work hard to make sure that our designs strike the balance between the current trends but still remain appealing down the

line. If something is well designed, it is capable of withstanding the test of time. Our aim is to achieve just that. This is central to our design process. Ultimately there are no limitations to what we can do, except for the client’s budget.” www.ifgroup.org

Above: Armstrong Fair Stand BAU 2013 Below: Palace of International Forums Uzbekistan


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

6/12/13

10:06

Page 22

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Revitalising buildings in style ”Regardless of the purpose of the building,” explains the esteemed architect Sandra Oheim from her office in Magdeburg, “the chemistry between the architects and the builders is of the utmost importance.” TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: ARC ARCHITEKTURCONZEPT

This positive attitude is held in high regard by the celebrated architectural firm arc architekturconzept, and it goes a long way to ensure that the finalised buildings look exactly like how they were envisioned. Thuringian native Oheim joined arc architekturconzept in 2005, eight years after completing her Architecture studies in Erfurt. The management now consists of four people: the two founders, Frank Schaper and Steffen Lauterbach, along with Oheim and husband Frank. Working in unison with these four highly talented individuals is a team of 24 young architects and engineers. Oheim is understandably thrilled by the growth of the company: “As the number of staff grows, so too do the projects. Now we’re taking on much bigger and much more exciting projects which take a longer amount of time but are ultimately more rewarding.”

22 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

The design process begins with a collaborative mind-mapping session, explains Sandra:“As we’re a young team, there are so many ideas springing up between us. We have to discuss them all in depth and make a shortlist. The other bosses and I do give the decisive impulse but it’s definitely a team effort.”The excitement in the architecture firm’s office is palpable as each project takes off and begins to take form.

From left to right: Sandra Oheim, Frank Oheim, Frank Schaper, Steffen Lauterbach

“We end up working through the nights, sitting in the kitchen here debating the pros and cons until the early hours. I do love the pressure though. Of course, there is a lot of it but we thrive off it. I think that pressure is unavoidable for architects.”She would ideally love to design her own house as hers is far too small but admits with a smile that the task would be“pretty tough” as there are so many choices, resulting in indecision. Fortunately for Oheim and arc architekturconzept, opportunities in Magdeburg are rife for both the creation of new buildings as well as the renovation of old buildings. For Oheim, the pleasure of working where she lives is nothing short of brilliant.“It’s fantastic to be able to leave our mark behind. Walking along the street and seeing our creations is great and receiving feedback from the local population is so rewarding and


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 23

windows. The concept behind the curved, undulating geometry of the renovated block of flats in the Regierungsstrasse was inspired by the idea of dissolving the monotony and replacing it with lively structure.The building has achieved rave reviews from both the press and the Magdeburg locals, much to Oheim’s delight.

Above & left: Elbbahnhof Magdeburg terraced flats Bottom, left: Before shot of Rejuvenation project Regierungsstrasse Magdeburg Bottom, middle & right: Rejuvenation project Regierungsstrasse, Magdeburg Photos: Adrian Schulz

compensates for all those long hours we put in.”Most recently the firm completed one of the largest renovation projects ever undertaken in Saxony-Anhalt: the transformation of a huge residential block housing 140 flats over 7 stories into an incredible wave-like building. This renovation did not only improve the building’s structure, it also vastly improved the quality of life of its residents by introducing generously-sized balconies and

Oheim explains that a key concern for architect firms lies in their use of materials. “Our mission is to always use materials which have two great features: one is that the material is durable and long-lasting, the second is that this material will definitely still look good in ten or twenty years. We will never choose a quick-fix - that goes against everything we stand for.”Buildings that grow old gracefully? “Yes, that’s exactly it,”says Oheim triumphantly. Another principle that the company holds fast to is to never underestimate the importance of the architects’ involvement in every step of the process: from the initial design sketches, right through to laying the last brick and fixing the final window panel. “We always send the project leaders to any relevant meetings and discussions with the builders. Builders tend to work quite independently so it’s vital that we help to steer them to create our vision. Sometimes the designs need explaining or even altering

Above: Rejuvenation project Kornmarkt

so our presence on the building sites is certainly necessary.” The hard-work and dedication shown consistently by arc architekturconzept has earned them national and international respect; buildings of theirs are springing up all over the federal state of Saxony-Anhalt, as well as in other locations such asVenice. The firm create buildings for a huge array of purposes: government buildings, schools, hospitals, power stations to name but a few. They take great pride in creating liveable residential buildings where the residents’ basic needs are met. Sunlight, open space, a contemporary style and functionality combine to ensure each building receives its own unique, authentic touch. www.arc-architektur.de

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 23


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 24

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Struppler Industrial Design Experts in comfortable workspace design TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: STRUPPLER INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

At Struppler Industrial Design creative skills and technical comprehension go hand in hand. Experts in industrial and interface design work closely together with technical consultants – both with lifelong experience and expertise. This cooperation enhances the team’s flexibility and creativity. Intelligent design for workspaces with a comfortable touch is Struppler’s main focus. The internationally-orientated design studio Struppler Industrial Design is headed by its owner Andreas Struppler himself and has its headquarters in Munich. Andreas Struppler has been designing and supervising product development for more than 20 years, working together with medium-sized firms as well as big corporations. The products created by him and his

team have been awarded various design awards, among them Red Dot and IF Awards. Their main focus lies on furniture, bathroom interiors and sports equipment. But Struppler also creates intelligent design for workspaces such as offices, medical treatment rooms and industrial workstations. The objective is to create a space in which one feels comfortable.“An office should be equipped with furniture that enhances communication and strengthens the ability to concentrate,”says Andreas Struppler.“Machines in production processes require optimal usabil-

stengele+cie creating identities in architecture, design and exhibition spaces TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: STENGELE DESIGN

The design office stengele+cie, located in Frankfurt, develops precise and strong design solutions. stengele+cie is a multidisciplinary design studio with experience in architecture, interior design, industrial design, and communication. For the office’s head,Volker Stengele, aspirations of producing consistently accurate designs is a Below, left: Striking Interior Design Below, right: Distinctive identities through architecture

24 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

result of his time spent studying architecture in Stuttgart followed by a postgraduate course in Conceptual Design at the Städelschule Frankfurt. “My work is my passion,”he says. After four intensive years in brand communication and staging of topics, he branched out and set up his own office in 2002. For him, two aspects of his job are essential: working in a team and ensuring his and his associates’ works are the best possible. “Speaking of architecture, we do not only conceptualise a house but create distinctive identities.” Stengele was once responsible for the interior design of a dentist practice in Frankfurt, where he integrated the rooms of a former hair salon and gave them a modern and geometrical identity using the scarce space most effectively. The overall concept is part of the architectural and interior design as well as the creation of exhibition stands. For Stengele the different disciplines are not confined within clear boundaries.

ity and good acoustic shielding, while in medical surroundings it is confidence-building and positive products and interior designs which are essential.” Researching the context, the market, and the potential for innovation, is the initial step for all their design processes. Struppler Industrial Design does not only create the design but also supervises the technical implementation right up to the product’s market maturity. www.strupplerdesign.de

From left to right: Altendorf F45 elmo high-tech saw Haworth table system Duravit bathroom furniture series with optional LED mood lighting

“Not only is my everyday life influenced by the design of rooms, products and staging,”saysVolker Stengele.“Everyone moves in designed spaces.” Among stengele+cie’s clients are Heidelberger Druckmaschinen, Toyota, the German Design Council and Leica Geosystems. The designers have been working for Leica for eight years now and recently created an exhibition stand for them. www.stengele-cie.de Below: Exhibition Space Leica Geosystems exhibition space


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 25

Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Main image, left: Light and video installation, new Duravit Design Center opening, Hornberg. Left: All communication to and from your business forms part of your identity. Bottom: meerdesguten founders Joe Kaiser and Gerald Jude.

Effective brand communication lifts you from obscurity In the mid-1990s as the internet boomed, two small German companies became active in the field of interactive communication. Today, they work as one under the very apt name meerdesguten BRAND IDENTITY, providing more of the good stuff for your brand identity. TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: RUI CAMILO | MEERDESGUTEN

While the importance of brand identity may seem pretty self-explanatory, establishing it can be quite an overwhelming task. A fancy logo is certainly one aspect, but as meerdesguten’s Creative Director and one of the owners Joe Kaiser explains, behind all the fancy design work must be a solid, well thought-out foundation:“It’s about extracting the core values of each company, sussing out their direction, what drives them and their market, and communicating this in the best way possible.”

shops and interviews, drawing out the essential characteristics and, together with the company, develop their brand identity – planning and designing for every aspect of the company where communication is, or might be, relevant.” Business partners and consumers have become far more critical with the rise of the internet.“There is a more conscious perception of brands now – your promises come under more scrutiny and comparisons with your competitors are simpler.”

meerdesguten delve feet first into your company.“We love working with every level of each company. Getting to know the company through interactive identity work-

Areas in which meerdesguten excel in range from simply choosing a colour scheme and sketching a logo, right up to a complete corporate website design, even

going as far as to stage events and produce interactive films to guide customers through your business.“Most importantly for us is that we listen to the client’s needs. There is no one correct path to brand identity,” says Kaiser. Founding partner and CEO Gerald Jude chimes in:“We have special techniques and tools but we vary them from company to company. So every company gets its unique brand identity and finding process.” The team certainly has the recipe for success as they have received over 40 design awards, gracing the stage both nationally (Deutscher Designer Club) and internationally (iF Design Award, New York Festivals and the World Media Festival). The rigorous but rewarding process of creating, amending or improving a brand’s identity takes anywhere from 3 months to a year and the company are always keen to follow up on their collaborative projects. Their belief: “Successful brand communication is distinguished by the fact that your brand touches, moves, and ultimately triggers an action pulse in the spectator.” www.meerdesguten.com

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 25


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:23

Page 26

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Architecture & Design Guide Germany

Striking features and outstanding user-friendliness Braake designers turn functionality into beauty Stuttgart-based agency Braake Design has quickly become a household name in the capital goods design industry due to their passion for technology and innovative design, and the fact that they are always on the look out for the latest formal design trend. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: BRAAKE DESIGN

Industrial designer Knut Braake graduated with distinction from Folkwang University Essen and worked for some of the most respected agencies before establishing Braake Design. Capital goods are not the first thing to spring to mind when thinking about design, although this industry is one of Germany’s strongest export sectors. In the past year, Braake and his team have scooped eight coveted industry prizes such as the Red Dot Design Award and the iF Design Award. “It really fills me with joy again and again that we receive awards for product developments, which in general aren’t associated with design or which have been regarded as unimportant in terms of design,” Braake rejoices. Award-winning designs include the ZF Transmis-

sion Test Rigs, which are not only beautiful on the eye. Noise protection, user friendliness and the highest safety requirements were carefully taken into consideration while developing their now perfect appearance and functionality. "The complexity of each machine’s design is immense. Intuitive user concepts, simple assembly solutions, new materials and a long-term high-end appearance, sometimes within quite rough production environments, need to be blended,”Braake explains. Another successful example of Braake design is the Wolff Floor Cutter. Offering several perfectly ergonomic handle positions, a great cutting depth, a good view of the cutting joint and dust-free cutting provide the ideal working conditions for craftsmen. It is very important to Braake that their designs appeal to the people

who will actually come into regularly contact with and work with the final product on a daily basis. For the world's leading technology solution partner W+D, Braake designed the W+D TIMOS (Totally Integrated Mail Output Solution). Intended for the personalized production of envelopes, printings and inserting on the fly, the machine has a capacity of 15,000 mails per hour, while still looking stunning.“Inspection systems, production plants, and tools are products, which have been solely defined by technical functionality for a long time. More and more corporations realise that their products are essential, long-term image carriers for the company and the brand, especially in the B2B area,”the Braake design founder concludes. www.braake.com

Top, left: ZF Friedrichshafen AG Transmission Test Rig © Braake Design 2013 Top, right: Wolff Floor Cutter EF 135 © Uzin Utz AG Bottom, left: Industrial designer Knut Braake Bottom, middle: The Braake design awards

26 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 27

ADINA . EU | T OGAH OTE L S .CO M ADINA.EU TOGAHOTELS.COM

APARTMENT SPACE HOTEL SERVICE ADINA STYLE

HOTEL DESIGN HOTEL DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT HOTEL H OTEL INVESTMENT INVESTMENT HOTEL H OTEL OPERATION OPER ATION

BERLIN | FR BERLIN FRANKFURT ANKFURT | HAMBURG HAMBURG | BUDAPEST BUDAPEST | COPENHAGEN COPENHAGEN SYDNEY ADELAIDE CANBERRA WOLLONGONG S YDNEY | MELBOURNE MELBOURNE | BRISBANE BRISBANE | PERTH PERTH | A DELAIDE | C ANBERRA | DARWIN DARWIN | W OLLONGONG


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 28

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Design Special Austria

Special Theme

Design Special Austria

Designing Desire

KISKA: Your one-stop-design-shop For more than 20 years, Salzburg-based KISKA design studio has been co-creating desirable brand experiences through an interdisciplinary approach, serving some of the most prestigious clients in its home country of Austria, as well as far beyond the nation’s borders. Consulting, design, and communication solutions are developed in co-operation with the client resulting in award-winning products that are ready to face competitive markets. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: KISKA

Managing Partner Gerald Kiska founded the KISKA design studio in 1990, when he literally started as a one man show.Today a multinational team of 110 highly skilled creative design specialists ensure that even the most challenging projects turn into a design success story. “KISKA has created such a unique way of approaching design that it resonates with the world’s best creatives and entices them to work here, which is an extraordinary achievement. Nevertheless, the individuality which each of our team members brings to the table, in terms of nationality, culture and experience, plays

28 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

a significant role in our clients’ successes too,”Kiska says proudly. “Childlike curiosity”is what drives Gerald Kiska again and again on his quest for the perfect design.“Great design is reflected in products that tell real stories about a brand. It should stir emotion by differentiating a brand, setting the bar for all the others in its class to aspire to. Great design results in solutions that are authentic to the needs of the user and has the capacity to move markets,” he explains.

But what exactly does,“co-creating desirable brand experiences through an interdisciplinary approach,” really mean? “In essence, we put the brand at the centre of the product, and the product at the centre of brand. Every project, whether it is focused on consultancy, design or communications, is addressed this way and it is the key to our clients’ success. This integrated approach makes KISKA a“one-stop-shop” because we can work on all aspects of a brand with equal expertise,” Kiska reveals and he adds:“Branding has the capacity to attract attention, stir emotion and spark


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 29

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Design Special Austria

Left: KTM 1290 Super Duke

loyalty. This is what we call Designing Desire and it is the brand promise we live up to everyday.” KISKA digs deep into the heart of its clients’ brands. Stories are defined and consistent design ensures that exactly these stories are transmitted to the user. Consistency is key at KISKA because the studio defines itself through its clients success, rather than making its own mark on the products it designs .“KISKA creative specialists think a lot about the brand, the market, the user (and so many other factors) before we even put a pencil to paper. We ask our clients a lot of questions and challenge assumptions. Frankly, we‘re not always an ‘easy’ partner to work with, but clients thank us for this because the final product is always better as a result,” says Kiska and an impressive client portfolio proves him right. High profile clients include Adidas, AKG, Atomic, Audi, HILTI, Husqvarna, Kettler, KTM, Opel, Osram, Paulaner and Zeiss. The client list literally goes from A to Z!

lengthy partnership is KISKA’s work with the Austrian sportmotorcycle brand KTM. Over time the values of the brand were defined as,“purity, performance , adventure, and extreme,” and the design language was defined as reduced , aggressive and functional. KTM’s new Naked Bike, the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R, known as“The Beast”oozes testosterone and is seducing riders with pure“Ready to Race” excitement. Designing Desire. Mission accomplished.

German Zeiss Sports Optics (Germany) is one of the world’s market leaders for high quality binoculars, riflescopes and spotting scopes. Meticulous analysis led KISKA to identify three key brand values:“customer driven, strong optical performance and premium quality”. The creative process required designs that were progressive, ergonomic and precise.

KISKA was also the driver of the new Frauscher 858 FANTOM motor yacht aesthetic. With this sleek 28-foot day cruiser KISKA took boat design to new heights.Together with the high-end Austrian boat manufacturer, KISKA identified Frauscher’s brand values, as well as market and product positioning. The brand values were defined as,“handmade, premium quality, and fun to drive”. On the design side, the luxury yacht needed to appear performance driven, elegant and as a luxury for every day use. The result: a boat ready to star in a Bond movie.

Another perfect example of achieving a desirable brand experience throughout a

The future looks bright as an array of exciting new projects is already in the pipeline.

Most of them are confidential, but let’s just reveal that the Paulaner beer brand is going to be revamped, Zeiss is launching a new product range, and Stannah and Ottobock are developing new mobility solutions for their customers. www.kiska.com Above: Frauscher 858 Fantom Below left: Zeiss Victory binoculars Below right: Zeiss Victory riflescope

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 29


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 30


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 31


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 32

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Design Special Austria

More than meets the eye Vienna-based product designer Hedwig Rotter is a true expert in hand-crafting beautiful design objects fit for everyday life. However, thanks to her wicked sense of humour, what you see is not always what you get. TEXT: SONJA IRANI | PHOTOS: MANO DESIGN

Porcelain is her passion. And finding innovative, surprising product solutions using this traditional material has become Hedwig Rotter’s daily challenge. Her label name “mano design” deriving from the Latin word“manus”, reflects that the handmade aspect is equally important. All of Rotter’s high-quality products, which range from tableware to home accessories and light objects, are manufactured in her own studio in Vienna.“Our business structure and the close contact with our clients allow for a greater flexibility concerning the production and the wishes of our clients,” says Rotter about her small porcelain factory. “mano design works primarily with museum shops, design shops and furniture stores that put a special emphasis on having an individual and extraordinary range of products. My clients appreciate the diversity

32 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

in my designs. My work is very much based on themes, sometimes with a sense of humour, sometimes with surprising functional solutions.” This sense of humour and the surprising features of her designs are attracting interest far beyond the borders of Austria.“I was particularly happy to see our ‘Netzwerkbowl’ entering the product range of the MoMa store in New York because I know that new products for these shops are always selected by a committee of experts,”remembers Rotter,“and today the bowls are even available in the MoMa shops in Japan and Korea.”So what is the secret that makes her“Netzwerk-bowl”so popular?“It looks like it is made out of porcelain, but in fact it is soft and unbreakable,”reveals Rotter.“It is handmade from a thermoplastic material.”

Rotter’s personal highlight from the collection is the so-called“Just”-range.“It is a complete assortment for tables, light objects and vases,”says the skilful designer.“They are made out of the finest bone china porcelain, extremely thin, transparent and sophisticated. Feeling these objects is a sensation, looking at them a delight.” www.manodesign.at

Hedwig Rotter


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 33

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Design Special Austria

Baffling paintings take corporate art to a new height Graphic concept artist Wonderwazek creates stunning designs by blending geometry with the colour schemes of company logos. Conventional guidelines and rules are broken in order to create unique and eye-catching artworks which represent his clients in a most comprehensive manner. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: WONDERWAZEK

After graduating from engineering college, Jürgen Wazek turned his creativity towards the challenges of corporate design and founded the Wonderwazek design agency and art gallery in 2009. Located inVienna’s third district, Wonderwazek specialises in corporate art, but also offers conventional graphic design services including layouts, final artwork, logo and packaging design as well as illustration. Wonderwazek clearly understands today’s complex corporate design requirements and his services go far beyond the creation of logos and matching stationary.“A business deserves unique images for its premises. A corporate identity image belongs to a really complete corporate appearance,” he says and describes corporate art as“the icing on the corporate identity.”His works are bursting with colour, allegedly random details and striking patterns. Viewers are tempted to loose themselves in the extraordinary paintings. Almost chaotic at first sight, Wonderwazek’s masterpieces resemble the path of human life. Clients include PR agency Strass-Wasserlof, polymer processor GOP Kunststoffverarbeitungs GmbH and GartenZauner landscape architects. One of Wonderwazek’s clients

once asked: “Why is it possible that I lose myself in these paintings? Is that what makes it so magically appealing to me? – This complexity, this colourful chaos that is often so similar to human lines of thought, and perhaps precisely why they engender this feeling of intimacy and closeness in me.” And the maestro himself explains: “My paintings shall baffle and fascinate the viewer so that they are carried off into my world and engage in the game of discovering my paintings. The greater the accuracy of perception is, the more they will discover in my paintings.”Wonderwazek is an artist in constant progression.“My art style changes just as I myself develop. I am constantly looking for refinements and other possibilities of expression within my painting style.The first glance surprise is just as important to me as the subsequently resulting immersion from newer and newer perspectives,” he concludes. www.wonderwazek.com

From top to bottom: Ants; 70x100cm Corparte Art: Wasserlof; 70x100cm Kreiswelle; 50x60cm Corparte Art: Strass-Wasserlof; 100x100cm Left: Wonderwazek

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 33


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 34

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Design Special Austria

Left: LOOPA Below: Mirror Table & Picture Table Bottom: Rocking Zoo

Making the most of it Product designer Verena Lang created the ultimate solution for small flats: a table that tucks away neatly on the wall after eating. TEXT: SONJA IRANI | PHOTOS: IVY DESIGN

“At IvyDesign, we aim to produce cool, young designs, primarily in cooperation with regional companies in Austria”, explains Graz-basedVerena Lang about her label IvyDesign.“Our products are made according to high quality standards with a special emphasis on sustainability due to long product lifecycles and natural materials.” Sustainable materials, a high-quality production process and outstanding ideas seem to be a winning combination forVerena Lang. The product she is best known for is her previously unheard-of folding table. Whilst it appears to be nothing more than a regular yet stylish dining table, the design object carefully crafted from strong beech tree wood metamorphoses into an elegant, plain picture frame when folded up. Fixed on the wall, it allows for all kinds of personal favourites to be displayed be-

34 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

hind Perspex. Alternatively, IvyDesign offers this design with a large mirror – The Mirror Table. Up to five people can sit at the table – an ideal solution for any small flat or pop-up dining room in the hallway! “The Picture and the Mirror Table are attractive products for expensive cities like New York, Singapore, London or Paris, where people like to make optimal use of their rooms,” says Lang about her clever idea. Aside from the space saving features, her clients appreciate the personal touch they can add to IvyDesign products.“Most of our products can be painted in the client’s preferred colour and made to fit their personal furniture taste,” explains Lang.“The Picture Table allows our clients to put their own photos or posters into the frame. Thus, every product becomes a unique specimen.”

By developing variations and using alternative materials, Lang is now aiming to expand her table concept to other target groups such as students or young families. In addition, IvyDesign offers a further range of stylish space saving solutions such as the modular partition “Vivid” or the glowing lamp partition “Loopa”. Quirky children’s toys such as the “rocking polar bear”complete the collection of this truly outstanding design studio. www.ivydesign.at


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 35

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Design Special Austria

Timelessly elegant, technologically innovative TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: RDD DESIGN NETWORK

"It’s irrelevant whether it’s fashionable or not,“ begins Rainer Atzlinger, one of the three founders of the Austrian Linz-based RDD design network, "our objective has always been to develop products that impress people with their innovation. Products that even in 10 to 15 years people will wonder whether they have just been made." RDD design network is a network design firm based in Upper Austria specialising in industrial production, capital goods, corporate design and recycling plants.The intimate team draw on their collective, varied experiences and position themselves today "in the space between art and technology, between handcrafted traditions and technological innovation.“ Most recently the team developed the Hitzlinger Jetpower, thereby revolutionising the ground power supply for

aeroplanes in terms of efficiency and total cost of ownership. "Our design network develops functional and highly aesthetic products,“ says Atzlinger with a modest nod to the countless international design prizes and accolades lining the wall behind him. "Our projects are crisp and futuristic yet timeless and emotional. We see ourselves as travellers, traversing the continents, our finger constantly on the pulse.“ RDD design network is far more than just hot air as the company ensures that you are

Above: Hitzinger Jetpower - presentation at Interairport 2013 in Munich. Photo: qzwei.com Below left: Rainer Atzlinger and Dominik Hartl Below right: Hartl HBS 750

accompanied every step of the way. From market research, initial sketches, to the building of the prototype, right up to the serial production, even taking care with implementing the corporate design, Atzlinger and his strong team will guide and develop with a steady hand, ultimately providing a product that is well thought-out, logical, and easy to use. www.rdd.at www.qzwei.com

Shake it baby A pen with a twist and more TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: TECHNOART

Austrian inventor and designer Michael Hirschmann turns ordinary objects into sophisticated designer goods. Innovative writing utensils, secure living space and even a mobile networking device have been developed in his TechnoArt studio. Since 1995 Hirschmann has been working as a design consultant. He established TechnoArt in 2008 and together with his team he creates individual and economically affordable design solutions for high end products.“Quite often I visualised things in the past that turned into reality much later in time and I realised that I had been ahead of the times back then. I would say that this skill makes a good designer, to purposely dream about the future and grasp what may turn into reality,” Hirschmann says. The catastrophe proven house is a new con-

cept study featuring the ultimate level of security against the forces of nature. Resistant against tornados, earthquakes and floods, the construction is made of metal tubes. All doors can be sealed off completely and the windows are made of bullet-proof glass. Hirschmann’s latest invention is the Shayu ballpoint pen featuring a ground-breaking new writing technique.The Shayu will be available in 2014 and further details are yet to be revealed. If you are looking for the perfect Christmas gift, check out the Schüttelkugelschreiber (shakeable pen). Shake it to start writing and twist it with an elegant wrist movement to close it. A refined mechanism turns the use of this ballpoint pen into a stylish little boardroom adventure.

From top to bottom: Catastrophe proven house

www.technoart.at www.schuettelkugelschreiber.at

New 2014 Shayu pen The Schüttelkugelschreiber

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 35


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 36

Winter warmers from Germany and Austria Full-bodied, winter-warming red wines – with this aim in mind, your thoughts would rarely turn to Austria or Germany, would they? Yet these two countries have a grape variety in common that delivers exactly that: smooth, rounded and enticingly peppery Blaufränkisch, as it is known in Austria, or Lemberger, the same grape called by its German name. TEXT: ANNE KREBIEHL | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

Hans Nittnaus, prize-winning winemaker from Burgenland who grows vines on the shore of Lake Neusiedl, thinks the variety is “perched somewhere between Pinot Noir and Syrah.” This is an initially confusing but actually very observant juxtaposition of a very delicate and a very powerful grape

36 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

variety: Blaufränkisch or Lemberger, when treated right and grown at restricted yields, has a fullish, rounded body with fleshy, powerful berry fruit – often reminiscent of crushed blackberries and red and black cherries and a pepperiness that is very similar to Syrah, along with the elegance and

Hans Nittnaus


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 37

Discover Germany | Dine & Wine | Party Sparkle

aromatic lift of Pinot Noir.The tannic structure is also somewhere between those two. Felix Graf Adelmann, who vinifies smooth Lembergers in Kleinbottwar in Württemberg, loves the variety: “Lemberger is our most important grape here, for the very simple reason that it has incredible potential: there is a certain density, it has a certain kind of fruit that can deliver anything between cassis and cherry and, what is very important to me, even when you vinify these wines into age-worthy, grand cru styles, despite all its power, it never loses its elegance.”Closer to Stuttgart, the Ellwanger family are specialising in red wines: amongst Samtrot, Spätburgunder and Trollinger, they also grow Lemberger. Felix Ellwanger points out another facet of Lemberger: „Few grape varieties have such ageing potential: I am always impressed, tasting old Lembergers is gigantic, this usually only happens in Bordeaux or Piedmont.” Since it is a variety that breaks bud early and ripens late, it needs a fairly warm climate: in Austria it is thus at home in Burgenland in the deeply continental climate of the far east of the Alpine Republic, where the heat of the Pannonian Plain that stretches across Hungary ensures steady ripening – Burgenland only became part

of Austria in 1921. The variety’s origin, its exact genetic history, is lost in the mists of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, somewhere in those foothills warmed by Pannonian heat. In Germany the grape is almost exclusively confined to Württemberg: to the outskirts of Stuttgart and the slopes of the Neckar near Heilbronn – in both places steep vineyards provide excellent exposure to the sun. It came to Germany – only to Württemberg – with Austrian migrants just after the 30Years’War who had been called to the area to repopulate villages and towns decimated by the enduring conflict. The dark, powerful wine was prized in the past: it was what was drunk on feast days, the everyday wine in Württemberg was Trollinger. In the post-war years and still today, the two grapes are often vinified together, from over-cropped vines with little love: this indifferent way of treating Lemberger gave it a bad name and many Germans do not think highly of it – that’s understandable but a huge mistake: when freed from mediocre viticulture and vinification and given its due, it makes excellent, structured and delicious wines that always bring some of that summer warmth to the table. The best show smooth tannins from judicious oak ageing, that enticing pepper note and often even floral overtones. Great

Württemberg producers to try, apart from those named above, are Aldinger, Schnaitmann, Dautel, Weinmanufaktur Untertürkheim, Haidle, Neipperg and Wachstetter. The choice of Austrian quality producers is larger and the list of names is endless: Hans and Anita Nittnaus make elegant, sleek styles, Ernst Triebaumer makes incredibly pure and ageworthy wines, while Birgit Braunstein makes touching, ethereal Blaufränkisch of the highest order. Other equally impressive names are Krutzler, Moric, Umathum and Wohlmuth. All of these winemakers produce immense quality and at that level the differences are no longer about determining who is best – they are all excellent – but about savouring different soil structures and winemakers’ styles. Württemberg’s heavy Keuper soils give power and density, Burgenland’s Leithagebirge, a ridge of shell limestone, makes incredibly elegant wines while wines grown on slate are more brooding and mineral. The south of Burgenland boasts iron-rich soils enshrined in its Eisenberg DAC, these wines are savoury and layered. All of the wines have a fresh seam of acidity – and this makes them winners at the table. They are versatile and different. For once, the winter warmers may actually come from wintry Germany and Austria.

Above, from left to right: Graf Adelmann, Der Loewe von Schaubeck; Nittnaus Leithaberg; Schnaitmann Laemmler Bergmandel Lemberger 2011; Schnaitmann Simonroth Lemberger 2011

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 37


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 38

Restaurant of the Month Switzerland

Sit back, relax, and enjoy the culinary journey Above the Zurich Airport Centre, the recently opened restaurant Upperdeck merges a passion for flying with fabulous food in a fantastic environment. No matter what the occasion is, this is the perfect pit stop on your journey. TEXT: MARILENA STRACKE | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

A joint venture by Zurich Airport and the world’s leading provider of food and beverages for travellers Autogrill Restaurant Management Company, the new restaurant Upperdeck is wowing its customers with its unique concept and quality food. Designed for a variety of travellers, as well as for the 24,000 employees of Switzerland’s largest airport hub, the innovative, tailor-made concept with an aeronautic focus has already proven to be a success. Beat Grau, CEO of Autogrill AG Switzerland says: “Airports represent the biggest

38 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

daily challenge for the catering industry. The requirements in terms of quality, flexibility, logistics and finance are incredibly demanding for everyone involved. So when you finally see the result of all the hard work, like here at the Upperdeck, it makes you even happier!” An open glass gangway leads to a stylish, open-plan dining room with 230 seats and a sophisticated lounge area. The interior design concept, developed by renowned architect Bert Haller, is entirely focused on flying and resembles the layout of an air-

plane’s wing. The whole room gives the impression it is somehow floating above

A gangway leads to the stylish restaurant


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 39

Discover Germany | Restaurant of the Month | Switzerland

Left: The giant multimedia screen measures 20 metres in length Bottom: Freshly prepared food in the open kitchen

The international vibe is also reflected in the restaurant’s menu. The open plan grill forms the heart of the Upperdeck. Tasty Angus steak is prepared á la minute on an open gas flame right in front of the guest’s eyes. Norwegian salmon, whole dorade fish and tiger prawns also find their way onto the impressive grill. Swiss classics such as Zuricher Zunft-Bratwurst but also original Italian pasta with homemade sauces or more innovative creations such as the JapaneseYuzo tuna tartar are on the menu. Whether guests choose to indulge in great American Burgers or opt for a light, healthy NewYork Style Caesar Salad, the menu offers the right culinary adventure for everyone. Families travelling with kids do not need to worry as there is a children’s menu that even comes with a little gift.

the airport centre. A huge screen, measuring 20 metres in length, highlights this passion for the skies and takes guests on journeys around the world. Naturally, the screen also displays live flight information to and from Zurich as well as custom-made films about interesting destinations.

Daily, monthly, or seasonal specials such as Autumn’s Game Season add to the menu’s variety. The chefs at Upperdeck truly know how to prepare high quality meals and delight their guests’taste buds. It goes without saying that the wine and drink menu is equally impressive and completes the culinary experience. The daily happy hour between four and seven in the afternoon invites travellers to share a cocktail with friends or colleagues and simply unwind a little. One of the restaurant’s strengths lies in its versatility. Be it a quick Early Bird breakfast, an important lunch meeting, or a romantic dinner for two, the restaurant can cater to

anyone’s needs. Equally great for a festive family dinner, just as much as for after-work cocktails with colleagues, the Upperdeck opens its doors as early as seven in the morning and serves up until eleven o’clock at night. A special three-course business menu and free Wi-Fi makes the classy restaurant ideal for business meetings. With its cosy, inviting bar and lounge area, where guests can order international dips and snacks as well as a great range of cocktails and drinks, the entire space (366 square meters) can be booked for big or small events. For music lovers, the Upperdeck provides the Smooth Sounds live music sessions every Friday and Saturday between four and eight in the evening. “The Upperdeck is a home from home for everyone! Our restaurant has the right offerings for international travellers, businessmen and women, families and airport enthusiasts or our many employees here at the airport,”assures Schiedt, who is responsible for the Upperdeck marketing concept. Visiting Upperdeck does not only involve a fantastic culinary adventure but combines a genuine fascination for flying with international cuisine. An all-round high quality experience. www.upperdeck-zrh.ch Below: Yuzo tuna tartar

“Our mission was to develop a high class but casual restaurant that equally impresses everyone with its food quality and architectural design while still meeting all the challenges that airport restaurant businesses have. The positive responses from customers that we receive on a daily basis and the growing numbers of diners are even more encouraging,” says Maximilian Schiedt, Marketing Director at Autogrill AG Switzerland.

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 39


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 40

Mini Theme

Culinary Germany

Food made in Germany

A high quality affair Germany doesn’t necessarily have the reputation of France or Italy when it comes to food, but if you dig a little deeper you will be surprised what culinary Germany has to offer in terms of quality.

Top, left: Fresh local produce Above: Neuhaus am Rennweg pastry, local delicacy. Below: Ilse Aigner, Former German Minister of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection. Photo: BMELVM/Leis

TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: GNTB

According to The Federation of German Food and Drink Industries (BVE)“with about 550,000 employees in 5,960 companies, the German food and drink industry belongs to the four biggest industries in Germany. It makes an important contribution to welfare, growth and employment and represents a continuously stable and resistant sector of the economy. Germany is also the largest food and drink producer in the EU in terms of sales. Acknowledging the fact that the European food and drink industry is the single largest manufacturing sector in terms of turnover and employment in the EU and the second leading in terms of value added and number of companies underpins the role of the German food and drink industry as a pillar of the economy.”

40 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

German food standards are extraordinary and the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (BMELV) is constantly“promoting a balanced, healthy diet and safe foods, ensuring that everyday goods are safe, assisting in the development of clear consumer rights and helping to ensure that the agricultural sector is strong and able to perform the duties required of it.” Ilse Aigner has just resigned from office as Federal Minister, but she and her team have accomplished great results. On her leaving day she said: "Together we have risen to countless challenges. We have achieved a great deal with our agriculture and fisheries policy, as well as in consumer protection, and we can be proud of that." The IN FORM campaign is just one of these

achievements. This German national initiative to promote healthy diets and physical activity is aimed at bringing about lasting improvements in diet and exercise habits in Germany by 2020. And healthy food starts with outstanding food producers who make sure that nothing gets into our food that isn’t good for us. Just like these fine producers presented in the following pages of this magazine.


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 41

Discover Germany | Mini Theme | Culinary Germany

Above: Josephshöfer

World class Riesling from the family -owned Weingut Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt The Weingut Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt, dating back over 650 years, produces excellent Riesling Wines on the steep banks of the rivers Mosel, Saar and Ruwer. The estate owns 13 different Grand Cru vineyards along these rivers including Scharzhofberger, Kaseler Nies'chen and Piesporter Goldtroepfchen, all considered to belong to the region’s finest sites. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: WEINGUT REICHSGRAF VON KESSELSTATT

In the 19th century the counts of Kesselstatt purchased four monasteries. One of these former monasteries came with some land, the 4.8 hectares south facing Josephshöfer Mosel vineyard. The Josephshöfer holds a monopole and has been in the hands of Weingut Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt for more than 150 years. It yields full-bodied spicy wines with incredible aging Annegret Reh-Gartner potential. Only

Josephshöfer wines bear the historical label which goes back to 1870.Today the estate is owned by the Reh family and run by Annegret Reh-Gartner who discovered her love for wine as early as 1978 when her father acquired the Weingut Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt. When Annegret Reh-Gartner took over in 1983, it was far from normal that a woman headed a vineyard as the profession was entirely dominated by men. Her devotion to wine-making and her regional roots secured her success. In 1989 and 2011, Reh-Garnter was named vintner of the year, a title she was also nominated for in 2001 and 2005.

A mineral-rich and filigree style is typical for wines of this region. “I am convinced that no other region can compete with this delicacy and mineral character,” explains Annegret Reh-Gartner. For years she and her team have dedicated their days to creating top-quality, grand cru dry wines with ageing potential that are highly ranked by Wine Spectator and Parker. To further enhance the wine’s quality, Annegret RehGartner reduced the size of the estate to 36 hectares; three steep sites of 12 ha each in the Mosel, Saar and Ruwer valleys. This down-sizing has enabled the estate to work more selectively in its vineyards. Ripened in traditional oak casks and stainless steel the Riesling wines produced here can compete with the finest wines of the world. While climate change may upset a few wine regions in the future, it may be a blessing for wines from Mosel, Saar and Ruwer. “The valleys have a chance to produce excellent dry wines whose brilliance lies not in their alcohol content, but in their elegance and mineral structure,” concludes Annegret Reh-Gartner. www.kesselstatt.com

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 41


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:24

Page 42

Discover Germany | Mini Theme | Culinary Germany

Right: From left to right: Helma Detmers, partner Mestemacher group, Albert Detmers, managing partner Mestemacher group, the artist Shirin Donia, Fritz Detmers, managing partner Mestemacher group, Prof. Dr. Ulrike Detmers, partner and member of the management Mestemacher group.

Mestemacher A lifestyle bakery with social responsibility Mestemacher has been a specialist bread maker for more than 140 years – pumpernickel or whole grain breads, sliced or in small round forms as a base for canapés. The bakery is also a pioneer in promoting gender equality in the workplace. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: MESTEMACHER

Mestemacher was founded in 1871 as a small village bakery in Gütersloh (North Rhine-Westphalia). Since then, the bakery has achieved acclaim for its Pumpernickel and wholegrain breads as well as for its international bakery products. The bakery takes responsibility for the entire baking process, working directly from the grain right up to the packaging of the freshly baked bread. For the wholegrain rye bread, the rye grains are grinded in the bakery’s own mill. The dough is filled into long metal forms for baking and after cooling the bread is cut into slices and packed into special airtight foil to be pasteurised under a low temperature.This meticulous process ensures that the bread, when unopened, stays fresh for half a year without needing to add any preservatives.

42 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

The Pumpernickel, a speciality from Westphalia, is baked in a special steam cabin for at least 20 hours. Pumpernickel is possibly the most well-known German bread speciality, but it is not the only Mestemacher product which is sold internationally. Baked in a steam cabin, just like the traditional Westphalia wholemeal bread, it has an aromatic and nutty taste and is served without a crust. Other crusty breads have additional ingredients like pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds or almonds. Mestemacher produces wholewheat rolls as well as pita breads, kebabs, naan and pizza breads that can easily be heated up in a toaster. Mestemacher’s business success can be put down to its wide variety of products on offer. In 2012 Mestemacher generated 128 million Euros in sales and 24 per cent of their products are exported.

Currently there are 523 people employed by the bakery. Quality and partnership are highly respected values, and the equality of men and women is of the utmost importance. “We encourage and promote the compatibility of family and career. 40 per cent of our top managers are women,”says Prof. Dr. Ulrike Detmers, shareholder and member of Mestemacher’s executive board. To meet their aims, Mestemacher decided to honour fathers for their outstanding work in childcare and household management because“children, kitchen and career are a man’s business,”and so they created an award. Besides this fathers’ award, Mestemacher has introduced awards for top female managers and the company donates money to childcare centres with a gender-democratic approach. www.mestemacher.de


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 43

Discover Germany | Mini Theme | Culinary Germany

Left: LEUPOLDT-gingerbread with gift box Below: Fränkisch Vollkorn bread Bottom: ROGG-IN, an information centre for rye cultivation

PEMA A tasty passion for whole grain In Tibetan, PEMA means Lotus Flower, a symbol of purity. A perfect name for a bread which maintains all of the nutrients nature intended and abandons low quality grains, genetic modification, chemical additives, baking improvers and preservatives. And the taste? Simply delicious!

PEMA plays a significant role in the region and actively supports the ROGG-IN, a multimedia information centre about the“Gold of the region”, the rye cultivation, which will open in Weissenstadt in June 2014.

TEXT: CORDELIA MAKARTSEV | PHOTOS: PEMA

Heinrich Leupoldt was a pioneer in German bread baking. He developed his successful recipe for wholegrain bread in the small town of Weissenstadt. Today, PEMA has grown from a small craftsman-company into an internationally successful corporation and it is now the third generation of the Leupoldt family who own the business. “It is our sophisticated production process that makes our bread so special and sets it apart from other wholegrain breads,”explains Dr Laura Krainz-Leupoldt who manages the company together with her husband Franz H. Leupoldt. “We use only grains from our regional farmers who we have known for a long time and regularly control. The rye is cleaned with pure spring water from the Fichtelgebirge before the swelling process biologically activates the grains. And the gentle wet milling guarantees that no oxygen or unnecessary heat can spoil the valuable nutrients.”

Every step of the production process at PEMA is determined by accuracy and slowness. Specially designed ovens allow for a longer baking time at a lower heat resulting in a hearty, full-flavoured taste. Diet-conscious customers appreciate the extra portion of fibre, vitamins, and minerals in every slice of PEMA bread. PEMA’s bestseller is the authentic wholegrain rye bread made solely with rye, water, and salt. PEMA constantly develops new recipes and offers a diverse selection of tasty and healthy breads. Italian herbs lend a Mediterranean touch to the award-winning product-of-the-year Genussbrot (indulgence bread) which is great for barbecues. PEMA Cranberry bread has a light sweet taste and is particularly suitable for breakfast or a packed lunch. PEMA provides gluten-free bread as well as specially developed bread for children. In the UK you find PEMA bread as“Bavarian Organic”in whole-food shops.

Every year since 1905, from September to January, they bake the famous LEUPOLDT gingerbread for the festive season. “People love that we stick to the old traditional recipes especially when it comes to their favourite Christmas treat, the gingerbread,” says Dr Krainz-Leupoldt. LEUPOLDT gingerbread specialties are available at Harrods in London. www.pema.de

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 43


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 44

Discover Germany | Business | Helena Whitmore

Thinking of bringing money to the UK for a business investment? BY HELENA WHITMORE, SENIOR WEALTH STRUCTURING ADVISER, SEB PRIVATE BANKING UK

The UK tax system is widely seen as generous to wealthy foreign nationals who live in the UK, known as non-domiciliaries or ‘non-doms’, because they are able to use the remittance basis of taxation. Unfortunately, these rules also discourage investment into the UK, because of the potential tax loss on the way in. With effect from 6 April 2012, the UK Government has attempted to address this problem by introducing a new Business Investment Relief. This can potentially be very valuable, particularly when combined with other tax incentives such as the Enterprise Investment Scheme, entrepreneur’s relief and business property relief. As the Business Investment Relief is now only in its second tax year, so far its uptake has been limited, and it remains to be seen if it will give the UK economy the desired boost. However, those who are thinking of investing in a UK business, or raising money for a new business venture, may well find that it is worth looking into.

private limited company which carries on a commercial trade or is preparing to do so within two years, alternatively an eligible holding company. All or substantially all of the company’s activities must be trading, which in this context includes a business of generating income from land. The investment may be in the form of shares or loans, and must be made within 45 days of bringing the foreign income or gains to the UK. No ‘relevant person’ may receive a benefit directly or indirectly linked to the investment. The relief may be lost if certain events occur. Potentially

chargeable events include disposing of the investment, the company ceasing to be eligible, the company breaching the two-year start-up rule, or a breach of the extraction of value rule. If any of these occur, appropriate mitigation must be taken; otherwise the remittance will become taxable. The extraction of value rules can be particularly troublesome, so it is essential to read all the small print. ing@seb.co.uk 020 7246 4307

The effect of a claim for the relief is that a qualifying remittance of funds to the UK can be made tax free. The relief is uncapped, so can potentially create a tax saving at up to 45 per cent on very large amounts. A number of conditions must be satisfied in order for the relief to be available, and a breach can lead to the complete withdrawal of the relief, leaving the taxpayer with an unexpected tax bill. Professional advice should therefore always be taken before deciding if using the relief would be appropriate. In brief, the main conditions for the relief are as follows: The investment must be made in a qualifying company, broadly a

44 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

By Helena Whitmore, Senior Wealth Structuring Adviser, SEB Private Banking UK


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 45

Discover Germany | Conference of the Month | Austria

Rooms with a view and conferences with a vision The Pannonia Tower Hotel Parndorf offers a luxurious designer interior complete with stunning views in a key location TEXT: DORINA REICHHOLD | PHOTOS: PANNONIA TOWER HOTEL

"Our guests are always surprised when they first enter the hotel," comments Christian Kühnelt, General Manager of the Pannonia Tower Hotel Parndorf. "It is a luxuriouslydesigned hotel with a high-quality interior." In addition to the superb sound system, the hotel has installed a newly-developed LED lighting system throughout, and the lifts are the most modern in Austria.They even have their own scent conduit system. Equally as impressive as the hotel's interior is the view offered from the rooms; the hotel is located in the stunning Lake Neusiedl region with its many picturesque vineyards. A further reason for holding a conference or meeting at the Pannonia Tower Hotel Parndorf is due

to its easily-reached location. The hotel lies in close proximity toVienna airport and both Vienna and Bratislava are a stone’s throw away. Savvy shoppers will appreciate that the hotel is situated in Austria's biggest outlet centre. The conference space is highly flexible as the rooms have partition walls. In total, 460 square metres of floorspace is available to accommodate up to 250 people. In addition, the restaurant, lobby and large 500 square metre bar area are available for a variety of bookings such as private parties, weddings, or business events. The prime location of the hotel attracts not only guests

Conference of the Month Austria f ro m Austria and Germany, but also those from various other countries including Hungary, Romania and the Ukraine, and the number of visitors from Russia and Asian countries is rising. "Guests from Dubai for example love our hotel due to its closeness toVienna and the airport. First class shopping opportunities and the breathtaking scenery culminate in a great overall experience," explains Kühnelt. "Our highlight is the“Tower Lounge” with a panoramic view all the way to Lake Neusiedl. It is very popular for press conferences, celebrations and meetings, where guests get the chance to appreciate a spectacular view." In fact, the vision both of and from the Pannonia Tower Hotel Parndorf is indeed spectacular. www.pannoniatower.at

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 45


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 46

Discover Germany | Conference of the Month | Germany

Conference of the Month

Hôtel schloss romrod Everything you need for successful teambuilding

Germany

Planning your next conference and keen to get everything right this time? Look no further as hôtel schloss romrod offers an idyllic setting, state of the art premises and over 80 exciting teambuilding events to choose from. TEXT: CORDELIA MAKARTSEV | PHOTOS: HOTEL SCHLOSS ROMROD

Even with the busy Frankfurt-Kassel A5 motorway a mere 3km away, nothing disturbs the peace within the solid, old walls of hôtel schloss romrod (‘Hotel Castle Romrod’). “The extraordinary setting of hôtel schloss romrod in the centre of Germany, close to the motorway but away from the hustle and bustle of city life is one of our strongest selling points,”says Eva Gärtner, Event Manager at the hôtel. But there is a lot more to the old castle than its prime location. In recent years the hôtel has won countless awards and these tell a story of excellent service and innovative ideas.

46 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

Step inside and history can be felt from the first minute you enter the reception area. The architecture is a perfect blend of the original building, which dates back to the 12th century, and contemporary functional design. 27 cosy rooms are equipped with a multi-media platform on the basis of an Apple 27" iMac computer. High speed WiFi, DVD, CD and TV facilities make sure the guests have every opportunity to relax or work during their stay. This inspiring atmosphere lends itself perfectly to brainstorming during meetings.The former Great Hall of the castle, the“Rittersaal”, has been

converted into a conference room for up to 110 people, equipped with the latest high tech equipment. Four other rooms cater for between 10 and 40 people.

The creative event team at schloss romrod are dedicated to providing an unique conference experience.The clients can choose from 80 different incentives, teambuilding or kick-off events. “As we specialise in small conferences, we are able to provide each customer with a tailor-made package. The latest trend is geocaching. People just love to do it on our segways,”explains Eva Gärtner. Be it a game of human table football, archery, or a fire show in the castle court yard, there are endless possibilities to treat your team to a special conference experience. It is not just business clients that frequent the hotel; this romantic, old castle has seen many couples tie the knot. With the church handily located next door, exquisite food directly from the castle restaurant and a creative event service on hand, hôtel schloss romrod is a great choice for the special day. www.schloss-romrod.com


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 47

Discover Germany | Business | Solicitor Column

Not so taxing times TEXT & PHOTO: GREGOR KLEINKNECHT

Being posted to the UK as an expatriate, or moving here to start a business, will for most people be an exciting prospect but at the same time it requires some forward planning and invariably raises the most dreaded issue of all: tax. Tax planning has recently received some negative press but nobody is required to structure his or her personal affairs in such a way as to maximise the tax payable. Even without recourse to aggressive tax avoidance schemes, there are rules available that can be used entirely legitimately to structure personal financial affairs in a tax sensible manner so as to ensure that the right amount of tax is paid in the right place. Some of these rules aim, for example, simply at avoiding income or capital gains being taxed twice when people retain links with their country of origin at the same time as forming links with their new home country – socalled double taxation. The first important message is that tax planning, with the help of a qualified and experienced tax expert, starts well before your move to the UK. This is to ensure that offshore assets and income can be structured efficiently and you are placed in the best possible position to take advantage of available tax reliefs. Upon arrival in the UK, you will need to register with the UK tax authorities (HM Revenue & Customs), obtain a National Insurance number, and then you will become subject to tax withholding from your wages (PAYE) and be required to start submitting tax returns. The part of your income which will be subject to taxation in the UK will depend on two core concepts; namely, residence status and domicile.Tax residence does not simply depend on the number of days spent in the UK during a tax year but also on a range

of additional factors, such as the purpose of your presence and connections with the UK. Non-residents will normally only be taxed on their UK income. Most foreign nationals will (at least initially) be regarded as non-domiciled when they first come to the UK. If you are non-domiciled but tax resident in the UK, you can elect annually to be taxed only on income earned in the UK or remitted to the UK from overseas. Making this selection effectively protects offshore income from UK taxation and means that you will not be taxed on your world-wide income. If you are employed in the UK, and also in certain other circumstances, you will in addition have to pay National Insurance contributions. Share related income, such as share options awarded as a bonus, are subject to different treatment depending on the scheme rules. Additional income derived in the UK from investments, such as interest on savings, dividend or rental income, and capital gains, is normally always taxable in the UK, regardless of residence status, and (lower rate) tax will be deducted from investment income at source. Higher rate taxpayers will therefore have additional tax to pay on their investment income later on. Finally, don’t forget to tell the tax authorities when you are leaving the UK again to work full-time abroad so that they can update their records and you will become a non-resident for tax purposes again. One very attractive and hitherto widely used tax planning device is, however, no longer available: Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) on real estate acquisitions can no longer be avoided by transacting through a corporate vehicle. Well, into each life some rain must fall, even if the UK does otherwise have quite a beneficial tax regime for expatriates.

Gregor Kleinknecht LLM MCIArb is a German Rechtsanwalt and English solicitor, and the founder and managing director of Klein Solicitors, a successful independent boutique law firm in Mayfair in the West End of London. Klein Solicitors, 42 Brook Street, London W1K 5DB, E-mail: gk@kleinsolicitors.com www.kleinsolicitors.com

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 47


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 48

Discover Germany | Business | Pädagogium Bad Sachsa

First class education and social responsibility in the heart of Germany The Internatsgymnasium Pädagogium Bad Sachsa offers high-quality teaching in a welcoming family atmosphere. TEXT: DORINA REICHHOLD | PHOTOS: PÄDAGOGIUM BAD SACHSA

To prepare young people for life, solely imparting academic knowledge is insufficient. This is something which the governing body of the Internatsgymnasium Pädagogium Bad Sachsa is very clear about; they place their emphasis on providing an education which includes a variety of group activities in which the pupils acquire strong social skills and an awareness for social responsibility. "We are a small boarding school with a family-like atmosphere," explains deputy headmaster Sido Kruse. "There is a very close relationship between the boarding and the non-boarding pupils and their families. The school is co-educational and offers an education that leads to the Abitur, the German qualification that enables stu-

dents to attend university. Alongside a broad curriculum covering the sciences, languages, humanities and social sciences, the school emphasises humanistic values and challenges its pupils to think critically. A vast array of extracurricular activities is offered to support this approach such as music tuition, sports, and weekend programmes. These also enable each pupil to organise their leisure time as they please. Situated in the southern part of the Harz mountains in Lower Saxony, with Hanover an hour and a half’s drive away, the Päda, as it is known, is right in the heart of Germany. Kruse extols the picturesque landscape of the Harz Mountains and the outdoor activities the school offers: "It is so pleasant here and we have such scenic countryside with rolling valleys and hills up to 700 me-

tres. You can go skiing, cycling, walking, rowing, sailing, or horse riding." 370 pupils are currently attending the Päda, with roughly 45 of them boarding. Most of the pupils are from Germany, but other nationalities are also represented by young people from other European countries including nations of the former Soviet Union, South America, and Asia. "We have an international focus and are experienced at dealing with a multinational mix of young people at the school," explains Kruse. Living and learning together and thereby gaining the skills that are needed later in life is the approach of the Päda in Bad Sachsa. www.internats-gymnasium.de


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 49

What language will you speak today?

Did you know‌ There are 6500 languages spoken in the world. The predominant language for business is English. LETAŽ prepares businesses across the globe to excel in their English communications.

You choose your access to English www.leta.co.at

info@leta.co.at | +43 1 892 19 42


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 50

Discover Germany | Business | Expert’s View on German Workforce

Why do employers place a premium on German speaking talent? Recruitment expert Rebecca Schween takes a closer look at the Dual System and beyond TEXT: REBECCA SCHWEEN | PHOTO: STEPHANIE ANDREI

50 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 51

Discover Germany | Business | Expert’s View on German Workforce

Main image, left: Recruitment expert Rebecca Schween

One of the big success stories in Germany has been the‘Dual System’which has been responsible for developing some of the regions most skilled workers via apprenticeships. One of the programme pillars is the balance between hands-on learning and a formal education. Students spend a certain number of days per week with a company and the rest in a vocational school. The ability of the regions in producing highly skilled apprentices has underpinned the huge success of the manufacturing industry. A well implemented process can only take some of the credit for the success of the Dual System as many other countries aiming to emulate the success of the apprenticeship system are finding out.The process has benefited from the hard work ethic, determination, and focus on quality that appears to be so ingrained in the DACH region. The financial crisis and subsequent German economic success in recent years has highlighted that cultural differences can have a significant impact on the economic development of a country. It is this mix of highly trained specialists coupled with a focus on working hard to produce quality output that has sent the stock of German speaking professionals soaring in the international marketplace.

German schools do not appear at the top of global league tables, yet German speaking specialists are in demand worldwide, and not only for their language skills. It is interesting to examine some of the factors that accelerated the development of careers to the extent that German speaking professionals command a premium in the marketplace.

The success of the 'Dual System' has not been lost on universities in the region who have increasingly begun to recognise the value of practical experience during the course of study. Students are, at a minimum, encouraged to seek practical experience in their field during their studies. In the more vocationally-orientated universities, practical experience is formally incorporated into the course schedule.The widespread efforts to promote a culture of practical experience is another ingredient responsible for the success of German speaking professionals in the workplace.

Recent years have seen employers place a premium on German speaking talent for a number of reasons. Companies feel they are getting highly trained professionals whose employment DNA includes hard work, quality focus, efficiency and respect for the contract of work. Companies around are very keen to access the estimated 100 million German speakers in the DACH region. Germany in particular has performed very strongly since the financial crisis and is a target market for companies across a range of industries. Companies are encouraged to have German speaking capabilities as part of the team when entering the German speaking markets. The development of enough skilled professionals to meet future demand is an ongoing process which must adapt. One potential headwind is German demographics. A low birth rate could mean the number of students opting for apprenticeships could decrease in the coming years, and this may have a negative impact on the economy. This is something that has to be addressed at government level to safeguard the longterm economic future of the region. In the meantime, other countries aim to emulate the Dual System as they develop their own apprenticeship programmes. Designing the process may prove easier than cultivating the necessary intangible ingredients necessary to be successful. www.worldkonnekt.com

Rebecca Schween is a German recruitment expert and founder and director of Worldkonnekt, an international recruitment firm that specialises in connecting employers with highly qualified German speaking professionals. Worldkonnekt, 3 Hay Hill, London W1J 6AS

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 51


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 52

Special Theme

German Universities

The private university sector in Germany “Studying in Germany is for free!” This is one of the many prejudices about German education. Besides the fact that studying never comes for free, but does not happen to come with a price-tag at state-owned universities, there are a huge number of private universities in Germany where tuition fees are a substantial part of the revenue stream. TEXT: PROF. DR. PETER THUY, MEMBER OF THE BOARD VPH (ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE UNIVERSITIES) | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

Today we have 148 private universities, 40 of which are operated by ecclesiastic owners. The church was the first institution to establish private universities in this country. But until 1969, the number of institutions was only 23. A further 35 universities were set up before 1990. Ever since then there has been tremendous growth in private

52 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

university education.Today, more than one third of all German universities are private, hosting approximately 110,000 students. That is 8 per cent of the country’s student population. And these numbers continue to grow. Moreover they do not even represent the students of foreign institutions, which have set up franchise agreements

Prof. Dr. Peter Thuy


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 53

Discover Germany | Special Theme | German Universities

with German partners or own branches.Thus, a market with more than 720 million Euro revenue has developed, saving the state approximately 550 million Euro. This is the amount that regional governments have to spend in order to provide places for more than 100,000 students. In so far the private university sector is an important part of the German tertiary education system. But what is the difference? First of all we have to admit that German private universities can be successful only in market niches - places that are not yet filled by their state-owned competitors with one of their free-of-charge programs.Therefore it is not surprising that only very few private institutions follow the role model of traditional, selective research universities. Universities like WHU inVallendar or Bucerius Law School do so, but differently from the large, prestigious public universities and like most of their private competitors, they concentrate on only one discipline. Most of the private universities differentiate from

the public sector to a much higher extent and are innovative in many different ways. Distance Learning programs are one of these formats, enabling people who cannot afford to study full-time on campus to earn an academic degree. Together with dual studies, which combine academic teaching with practical experience and other types of extra-occupational part-time programmes, private universities are contributing massively to the expansion of student numbers in Germany. They often address students who did not follow the traditional path to university and offer opportunities to target groups which cannot be reached by the traditional German universities. FOM in Essen with approximately 22,000 students or HFH Hamburg with more than 10,000 students are the biggest players in this field. Both institutions are educating one third of all students at private universities while the majority of these places are small and highly focused. Many of them are following a labour market-orientated strategy. They specialize in a specific industry and often cover fields that have not been offered at university level before, especially in the field of business, health care or social services. Sometimes this fact is named as “cherrypicking“, because it results in cheap, profitable programmes. But if we look closely at fields like engineering or informatics, it is clear that there is an excess supply of places at state-owned universities, so that there is no niche for the private competitors. Nevertheless there are programmes in natural science and engineering, but they are usually very specialized or tailor-made for the needs of the labour market. Other programmes like medicine or dentistry are very expensive and consequently are only seldom offered by private universities like at the University Witten/Herdecke. The second growth driver for private universities besides innovation is quality. It is difficult to measure the quality of universities because commonly accepted criteria are not available. But the low drop-out-rate of 7.8 per cent in comparison to 21 per cent in state-owned universities and small sized classes including a low student-lecturer-

ratios are strong indicators for the quality delivered at private universities. www.private-hochschulen.net

Left: HSBA (Hamburg School of Business Administration) From top to bottom: ESCP Europe, Berlin IUBH - International University Bad Honnef SRH Hochschule Heidelberg


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 54

Campus Main image/photo: Erik Hartmann Below/photo: Sebastian Reuter

Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences Jena

A perfect combination of scientific excellence and a practical approach As we all know, an investment in knowledge pays the best interest. A degree from the Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences in Jena makes sure young people get the best qualifications in engineering, business administration or social sciences for a successful professional life. TEXT: CORDELIA MAKARTSEV | PHOTOS: ERNST-ABBE-UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES

As early as the 18th century, Jena and its university already formed an intellectual and cultural centre: Goethe, Schiller, Fichte, Hegel, and the circle of Early Romantics who lived and worked in the Thuringian town, had a major influence on German culture and intellectual development. Internationally lesser-known but hugely important for

54 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

Jena was the German physicist, entrepreneur and social reformer Ernst Abbe who rose to prominence about a century later. He laid the foundations for modern optics and introduced an eight-hour working day at the Carl Zeiss company in Jena.“Last year we had the honour of renaming the University of Applied Sciences in Jena after Ernst

Abbe because this mix of entrepreneurship, scientific research and social commitment that determined his life is perfectly reflected in the three branches of the university - engineering, business administration and the social sciences,�explains Prof. Dr. Prof. h. c. Gabriele Beibst, President of the Jena University of Applied Sciences.


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:25

Page 55

Discover Germany | Special Theme | German Universities

A young university with modern facilities for an ideal learning environment Since its inauguration in October 1991, the Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences has developed at a rapid pace. Currently, 4,700 young women and men are studying here on a wide range of attractive Bachelor and Master courses in eight departments: Business Administration, Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Fundamental Sciences, Mechanical Engineering, Medical Engineering and Biotechnology, SciTec, Social Work, and Industrial Engineering. The profile of the university is increasingly defined by interdisciplinary cooperation thus creating the optimal synergistic effect. Professor Beibst is proud of the ideal learning environment the university provides for the young people: ”We do not have a problem with overcrowded lecture halls like the big universities. The professors know their students personally and are always ready to answer questions.”An extensive refurbishment programme transformed the old and listed industrial buildings into a modern campus with 124 laboratories, seven lecture halls, and 52 seminar rooms. The technical equipment is state of the art, the rooms and halls full of light.

neering and automotive industry. That is why I decided to complete my education here. I wrote my dissertation at Daimler AG and now I work there as a designing engineer.”

From top to bottom: Laser lab. Photo: Jan-Peter Kasper, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena Furnace. Photo: Katharina Heidecke Flight experience as part of the Engineering Degree. Photo: Tino Zippel, Ostthüringer Zeitung Flight experience as part of the Engineering Degree. Photo: Marlene Tilche

A students’ paradise 9 per cent of the students at the university come from abroad.They appreciate the low studying fees and cheaper living costs in Germany. The Ernst-Abbe-University charges only a small administration fee of 174.40 Euros per term which includes a public transport pass. A room in a flat share is 250 to 350 Euros per month, so students will be able to get by on a monthly budget of 600 to 700 Euros. Apart from that, the city of Jena has a lot to offer. A quarter of the 100,000 inhabitants are students so a lively club and cultural scene is guaranteed. The enchanting countryside in Thuringia is ideal for outdoor sports or a relaxed picnic on the weekend. The university acknowledges UK Bachelor degrees so that young people from the UK can directly apply for a Masters course. Scientific Instrumentation is read in English. For all other courses in German, students need to prove their German language skills with a certificate (called DSH 2 or 3, Test DaF at the Goethe Institut) when applying.

The practical approach Unlike the traditional universities in Germany, the relatively newly established Universities of Applied Sciences are characterised by a greater emphasis on practical experience.

www.fh-jena.de

The Ernst-Abbe-University has a strong list of partner-companies like Carl Zeiss AG or Daimler Chrysler AG who supply internships and research projects.“The students write their dissertations in cooperation with one of our partner companies and institutions. Afterwards, most of them get a job offer from that company, especially the young engineers,” states Mrs Beibst. Jiesheng Zhu from China was attracted to the university and after graduating in China he applied for a Master course here.“Germany is famous for its Mechanical Engi-

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 55


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 56

The small but mighty pathway to industrial success Germany is a country revered for its industry. Through hard work and determination, the German industry has boomed. Daimler, Porsche, and Siemens are just a few of the industrial giants to emerge from Southern Germany. Today, their former stomping grounds remain a cradle for the engineers of tomorrow, most of whom are to be found at the Esslingen University of Applied Sciences. TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: HS-ESSLINGEN

“Keeping abreast with modern developments,” explains Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Weise, Dean of the Esslingen Graduate School,“it was clear in the late 1990s that industry was looking for highly-qualified, internationally-orientated engineers from all over the world who could either take a position in Germany, or return to their country and

56 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

build bridges between the German industry and that of their home country.” The university, which dates back to the middle of the 1800s, recognised that they could secure a prominent role in this by tailoring their courses to meet the needs of industry. Weise continues: “We responded to this challenge and created the Esslingen MBA

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Weise, Dean of the Esslingen Graduate School


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 57

Discover Germany | Special Theme | German Universities

Main image: The Graduate School in the Neckar Valley. Left, from top down: Students who choose to study the MBA in Germany benefit from lower fees and an engaging atmosphere. Transferable skills such as communication, teamwork and project management are central. Students getting to grips with automotive engines.

in International Industrial Management in 1998, which was so successful that it was closely followed by two engineering masters programmes, which are now the MEng in Automotive Systems and the MEng in Design and Development in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering.” Aside from these three fully accredited English-language international Masters programmes, this German state university, situated in the Neckar valley some 15 km from Stuttgart, also offers 25 Bachelor degrees and 10 Master degrees. The interdisciplinary nature of the courses taught at the Graduate School is highly beneficial for its graduates, Weise highlights:“Our aim is to educate young engineers for a successful place in the industry,” and as today’s employment market becomes increasingly more competitive, it is the broad and practical education that students receive at Esslingen that enables them to compete for the best jobs.“The strength of the MBA programme is that it boosts the international career of engineers who wish to go into management, while the MEng programmes qualify young engineers for a broad spectrum of challenging positions in international corporations.” Such a balanced combination of studying both management skills and engineering simultaneously ensures that the students leave as fully-employable graduates with transferable skills that allow them to meet the workplace demands of today.

motive Systems its strongest course, and rightly so as it has just been rated the DAAD’s most popular international programme in Germany. Even the Ministry for Education has declared it exemplary for other courses in Germany. According to Weise, this accolade exemplifies the strengths of Esslingen UAS, aided in part by“its history and development in close proximity to Germany’s greatest automotive companies.” The ties between the university and the local businesses go back decades and their close cooperation with many large companies, for example Daimler, Bosch, BMW, Porsche and more, is something that the university management team pride themselves on.“Beside those esteemed, internationally-respected companies, we also cooperate with almost all the SMEs in the region,”Weise reels off an impressive list of names: “Festo, Eberspächer, Mahle, Modine Europe, Schuler and a lot of engineering service companies such as the Star corporation, Bertrandt and Frech, to name but a few.”It is thanks to these strong relationships that“an integral part”of the Esslingen MBA, a three-month corporate project in the industrial or service sectors, is possible. Weise nods agreeably:“We have always set great value on three things: firstly on hands-on learning, secondly on a diverse,

highly-qualified teaching faculty that is close to the industry, and lastly on learning through practical exercises that exemplify the subject matter.” Tight-knit community spirit The Graduate School’s deliberately small class sizes lend themselves to a far higher level of interaction between student and professor than you would expect during your studies. Weise smiles warmly as he explains how the counseling and advice of the professors and lecturers greatly enhances the students’ experiences. The student is central to the school’s ethos and the Graduate School office works very hard to“greatly ease students into their new life during their time in Esslingen. With students coming to us from all over the world, we recognize the need to help students overcome their initial sense of strangeness in a foreign land, and to increase their sense of community and belonging.” “Even though,”concludes Prof. Dr. Weise, “we are perhaps not quite as well-known as the big American colleges when it comes to MBAs, we are small but mighty and definitely comparable to the larger MBA institutes.” www.hs-esslingen.de

Entering the automotive industry “The university was originally part of the Royal School of Construction (KöniglichWürttembergischen Baugewerkschule), conceived to educate top engineers for the local industry,” clarifies Weise, “and this history continues to influence our university today.” The university considers the MEng in Auto-

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 57


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 58

Discover Germany | Special Theme | German Universities

Ruhr-Universität Bochum Excellent opportunities for young academics Set amidst the dynamic and cosmopolitan Ruhr region, the Ruhr-Universität Bochum provides a unique research environment for its 41,000 students. Two international and interdisciplinary postgraduate programmes – ‘Master 2.0’ and the RUB Research School – are designed to provide extensive training and support for budding academics. TEXT: FRANZISKA NÖSSIG | PHOTO: RUHR-UNIVERSITÄT BOCHUM

The label ‘Master 2.0’ is assigned to a number of bilingual Master’s programmes which focus on creating strong bonds between studying and research. Being able to choose from nine courses ranging from Stem Cell Biology and Cognitive Science to Performance Research and Theology, the prospective academics are encouraged to ‘think outside of the box’ and to add to interdisciplinary research with their own projects. A team of dedicated scientists and scholars will foster each student’s work and help them integrate into an international academic community.

58 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

Similarly, the university’s Research School RUB-RS for doctoral students supports a seamless transition into the job market within and beyond academia. One of a kind within Germany, the graduate school offers above all well-structured supervision as well as skills and research training, and gives general advice to every student planning or undertaking a doctorate. It thus functions as an academic umbrella institution for all 20 faculties, offering PhD and doctoral programmes with added value. Students may perhaps choose to present their research live on stage during a Science

Slam in the city of Bochum, or contribute to the university journal as a trainee science journalist. Both opportunities are allocated to the ‘Science goes Public’ scheme which, together with conferences and a summer programme, forms part of the Research School’s event culture. To this day, 300 institutional fellows have completed their doctoral programme since the RUB-RS was established in June 2011. An additional scheme called ‘Research School plus’is now offered to those candidates who propose a highly competetive and particularly creative research subject. The programme is co-funded through the government’s Excellence Initiative and provides extra financial support, for instance, for research involving travelling abroad, for international conferences – and for student parents. www.rub.de/young-academics


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 59

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Switzerland

Special Theme

Made in Switzerland

Main image, left: The Lindt Bear. Photo: M. Schmitter Above: Tête de Moine AOP, Bellelay cheese. Press Image

Made in Switzerland Fine products made in Switzerland have long conquered the world. Who could imagine a life without culinary treats such as delicious Swiss chocolates or aromatic cheese varieties from the country everyone associates with breathtaking mountain panoramas and crystal clear lakes? TEXT: TINA AWTANI

According to www.swissworld.org, Switzerland's official information portal run by the Federal Department Foreign Affairs,“Swiss companies are extremely competitive in world markets. In some branches, more than 90 percent of goods and services are exported.The best-known export items are watches, chocolate and cheese, but in fact mechanical and electrical engineering and chemicals together account for over half the Swiss export revenues”.This is quite remarkable given the fact that according to the 2008 business census, more than 99 per cent of Swiss enterprises employed less

than 250 full-time workers. Of course, the watchmakers play a vital role among these small and medium sized businesses.“Pünktlich wie ein Schweizer Uhrwerk”(punctual as Swiss clockwork) is a frequently used German saying hinting at the quality of Swiss-made timepieces. With regards to chocolate manufacturers, I must confess that I am a bit of a chocoholic myself and resisting the omnipresent golden Lindt bears and deers turns into quite a challenge at this time of the year. But it is worth a little sin as it is all for a

good cause; Lindt is donating 10 percent of the profits of every Lindt Bear 10g sold in the UK to the BBC Children In Need fund this winter. Winter is also the perfect time for a Swiss cheese fondue or raclette evening with friends or family. Gruyère, Tête de Moine and many other delicious cheese varieties are produced under strong quality control standards in the alpine regions. In short, Swiss products are simply irresistible, extremely well manufactured and offer a quality standard of vertiginous height. Some are innovative newcomers, others are defined by long history and tradition. The famous Victorinox Swiss army knife was invented 125 years ago. In our special Made in Switzerland theme you may read all about the iconic cutlery producer, wonderful woodcarvers, intelligent game developers, traditional cheese makers and how to get your hands on real Swiss alpine herbs. I guess there is no harm in nibbling some Swiss chocolates while reading.

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 59


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 60

Victorinox, the multi-faceted producer of knives, conquers fashion and design The Victorinox Original Swiss Army Knife stands for long-lasting quality and 125 years of cutlery. Today, the red handle pocketknife with the typical Swiss cross signet exists in about 300 varieties. But the brand has broadened its product line in recent years and is now also producing high-quality watches with timeless design, travel gear, and functional fashion. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: VICTORINOX

For the past 125 years, people all around the world have shared a passion for the Original Swiss Army Knife made byVictorinox. In 1884 Karl Eisener established himself as a cutler in Ibach in the Canton of Schwyz. Only a short time later, he developed the now legendary Original Swiss Army Knife, it was the starting point of a successful business. The knives’ owners often hold it in high esteem passing it on for example as a gift from grandfather to grandson. In 2013, Victorinox continued its retail expansion in Europe and opened a flagship store in Cologne as a third establishment in Germany.

fessional knives, today the independent family-run company Victorinox has broadened its product variety.Victorinox also produces timepieces, travel gear and luggage, fashion, and even fragrances expressing Swiss quality and pioneering spirit within every product. The timeless design of Victorinox watches can easily be compared to the quality of the Original Swiss Army Knife: Fabricated in self-owned ateliers in the Swiss Jura and containing high standard Swiss clockworks, these precision devices easily become a companion for life. The multi-functionality and the timeless design leave a mark onVictorinox fashion and travel gear as well – whether you are talking about the hard protective cases or travel blazers and coats made from waterproof materials.

In addition to pocket, household, and pro-

A special treat – perhaps as a Christmas present – is the knife assembling set, a do-

Founder Karl Elsener

60 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

it-yourself kit for handcrafting an Original Swiss Army Knife. It comes in a specially designed box and has every component that has made the knife so famous all around the world.The knife can be ordered with a personal engraving and assembled under professional instruction in one of the Victorinox stores. The Victorinox Assembling Set can exclusively be bought in the stores in Düsseldorf and Cologne (Germany), Geneva and Brunnen (Switzerland) and London (UK). www.victorinox.com Exclusive Victorinox Assembling Set


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

SWISS CHAMP

5/12/13

18:26

Page 61

DIVEMASTER

EXPLORER JACKET

SPECTRA 2.0

FRAGRANCES

LONDON I DÜSSELDORF I COLOGNE I GENEVA I ZURICH AIRPORT I BRUNNEN SWISS ARMY KNIVES CUTLERY TIMEPIECES TRAVEL GEAR FASHION FRAGRANCES I WWW.VICTORINOX.COM


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 62

Traditional woodcarvings flourish in the 21st Century The small, centrally-located Swiss village of Brienz is home to a mere 3,000 residents yet is internationally renowned for its woodcarving. Little over 150 years ago there were no fewer than 2,000 active woodcarvers found brandishing their tools in the region and this legacy continues today with Huggler Woodcarvings. TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: HUGGLER

62 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

Brienz, the birthplace of woodcarving, came to the fore in the early 19th century and today Huggler Hozbildhauerei keeps Brienz on the map as a prominent force in this field. Led by the stable hand of the young Markus Flßck, Huggler Woodcarvings is paving the way in the world of modern wood-carving, whilst ensuring that it does not forsake tradition. The village, rich in the art and tradition of woodcarving, is home to Switzerland’s only educational establishment dedicated to wood-carving and it is in this cradle that


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 63

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Switzerland Left, main image: The centrepiece of the roundabout by Markus Flueck Left, bottom: Huggler sculpture on the shores of Lake Brienz; This season's most popular products, the nativity candles; A sculpture like this one of the mountain goat takes a lot of concentration; One of Markus Flueck's favourite sculptures - the three monkeys of wisdom.

the next generation of passionate woodcarvers are fine-tuning their skills. Huggler Woodcarvings has been running for over a century and its nativity figurines are still created following the original designs; testament to its commitment to wood sculpting heritage in Switzerland. The name Huggler is synonymous with the highest quality woodcarvings in Switzerland, as Hans Huggler-Wyss, the founder of Huggler Woodcarvings was a direct descendent of one of the founding fathers of woodcarving. Perfecting their technique over the past century The ardent woodcarver Huggler-Wyss originally set up the company to pursue his passion of producing one of Switzerland’s most popular exports: wooden nativity scenes. These traditional carvings, says Flück, are still “the foundations on which the company is based.” Flück’s passion is unbridled as he outlines his beginnings in wood-carving: “On the one hand I would say that I’ve been gifted with talent and on the other hand I was perhaps born to work with wood as my great-grandfather was a wood-carver himself.” Flück has been working with wood for the past 17 years and has quickly earned the respect of his peers, exhibiting his work internationally. Today, thanks to the newer part of the company, Huggler Designs, he is free to design and create as he will. However, he also takes care to guide the younger generation in his company. The traditional flat-cut technique, once carried out by candle-light by Hans Huggler-Wyss, says Flück, “is a very complex skill to learn and it’s one that takes a lot of time and effort so we like it when our apprentices remain with us. Just last year, a wonderful man celebrated 40 years woodcarving with us.” “Wood-carving is still a very traditional art; everything, absolutely everything is done by hand. Our sketches, our preliminary moulds in plasticine, and then the 2D sketches, right up to the actual carving itself,” explains Flück. Although each mem-

ber of the Huggler team is encouraged to come up with their own designs, it is Flück who really excels with modern wood-carvings.“We often get requests to design and create large sculptures for public spaces or private gardens. Sometimes we’re approached with just a vague idea of what the customer would like and then it’s up to our creativity.” The largest undertaking by Flück was at the request of the village of Brienz to design the centrepiece of a roundabout; a commission that he is understandably proud of. “I designed a sculpture with 4m high wooden planks with wild animals carved out of these, it makes for an eye-catching roundabout.” Flück’s designs, in particular the 4-hand relief jigsaw-style piece, have proved to be highly popular and sold well globally.

stroke of the artist’s tools is visible, giving a purposeful yet fragile effect.The selection of wild animals and human figures are so intricately detailed and authentic that it is nigh on impossible not to be astounded by the sheer concentration that surely goes into making these products. The highly skilled team use linden wood for the majority of their realistically-constructed, hand-made pieces. Fortunately for them, Linden wood is one of the main tree type present in the region and the village’s location on the shores of Lake Brienz at around 600m above sea level guarantees that Huggler Woodcarvings will long be able to make good use of the wood for in the future. www.huggler-woodcarvings.ch www.huggler-design.ch

Woodcarving in action For visitors to Brienz, Flück recommends a visit to the workshop of the woodcarvers as it is “an incredible opportunity to experience the art first-hand”and a chance to get to know the woodcarvers.Visits to the workshop must be made in advance but the onsite shop and exhibition hall always have two woodcarvers carving. The exhibition area itself is the chance to see the designs in person, ranging from the traditional nativity figurines, to chic, minimal lampshades, from children’s toys to stylish wall hangings that would not be out of place in any hip design store. With such fine detailing every

Below: Putting the final touches to a nativity character Bottom: Huggler Woodcarvings


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 64

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Switzerland

Fromagerie Amstutz remains true to nature to produce a fine cheese In the middle of the Bernese Jura in Switzerland lies the small village of Fornet-Dessous. It was here on a mountain pass at a height of 1,002 metres that the Amstutz family chose to establish their cheese dairy in the 1950s. Owners and employees work with delight, commitment and knowledge for cheese production. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: FROMAGERIE AMSTUTZ

The parents of today’s owner bought the enterprise in 1956 and began to produce cheese – Gruyère and Tête de Moine were the first sorts they manufactured. Even half a century ago, Fromagerie Amstutz was known for having the skills and the location to produce a true-to-nature, high quality product. Historically-speaking there are few cheeses which can compete with the Tête de Moine (AOC) cheese. It has been produced in Fornet-Dessous for centuries, with its first mention found in a medieval document. It had its renaissance approximately 100 years ago and is today just as popular. The semihard cheese is made from natural and untreated cow’s milk and its production is exclusive to the three districts in the Cantons of Berne and Jura. Traditionally, the cheese is not cut but rasped in thin layers. The Gruyère (AOC) is made from raw cow’s milk as well and is often called a mountain cheese – a little piece of the Jura willows on the plate. As it ripens for up to 24 months, its aromatic taste outshines other cheeses, especially when grated.

64 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

Amstutz has a close and caring bond to the region. Staying in close contact with the region’s culture is of the utmost importance and this includes nurturing their raw material producers, more precisely their milk suppliers.The cheese makers use fresh mountain milk from local cows who spend their summers grazing outside on the mountain pastures come rain or shine. These mountain pastures are home to edible wild herbs which give the milk an aromatic flavour. This taste finds its way into the cheese that later ripens in the dairy’s own cellars where the cheese takes a breath of fresh mountain air.

The knowledge of cheese-making is passed on through the generations. When the sons took over they established a second brand with a focus on pure organic produce. Produced using milk from organically certified suppliers, the Moron Bio ripens on Jura fir wood under the watchful eye of the Amstutz cheese master. Fromagerie Amstutz sells its cheeses nationally and internationally. www.fromagerieamstutz.ch


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 65

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Switzerland

Swiss Alpine Herbs – Indulge naturally Similarly, the brand Swiss Alpine Herbs is a delicate homage to the stunning and beautiful Swiss countryside, lush meadows and mountain slopes in the heart of the Swiss Alps. “We specialise in gentle drying and processing of fresh, aromatic Alpine herbs from controlled organic farms in order to make wonderful herb blends and herbal salt mixtures, syrups and infusions,” says the management. Naturally, no artificial pesticides or fertilizers are used but farmers trust the natural and harmonious growth of the plants, allowing the herbs their time to build their incomparable and aromatic flavor. All products are subject to conditions of BIO SUISSE (Association of Swiss organic farming organizations). By respecting the sensitive Alpine ecology, both brands support the work of local farmers cultivating the Swiss Alps, contribute to meaningful landscape maintenance, and promote healthy nutrition.

Narimpex AG

www. www.swissalpineherbs.ch

For the love of health and nature The belief that what we eat, do, and how we respect nature - matters, is an integral part of a holistic and sustainable philosophy. The two Swiss brands Alta Terra and Swiss Alpine Herbs, are particularly representative of this commitment to using fresh, aromatic, and organically sourced herbs and ingredients. TEXT: ELISABETH DOEHNE | PHOTOS: NARIMPEX AG

Both Alta Terra and Swiss Alpine Herbs are synonymous with quality, authentic flavours, intense aromas and 100 per cent natural products.The brands are passionate about producing the best natural products possible and employing innovative production techniques while maintaining the Swiss Alpine landscape. Alta Terra - True-to-nature products for an authentic taste The brand Alta Terra stands for Swiss quality, exquisite pleasure and traditional values: “We combine our passion for good food with strong traditions. Our goal is the

preservation of unique flavors, working with regional producers and small familyrun businesses, and using traditional recipes to make true-to-nature products,” states the management. Only carefully selected, top-grade raw materials sourced from environmentally friendly farms in Switzerland are used and these are then processed by ecologically and commercially sound technologies. The product palette includes premium products that advocate a lifestyle founded on sustainable values. www.altaterra.ch


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 66

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Switzerland

The marble track system of a lifetime made by cuboro Winding tunnels and a three dimensional world at your finger tips – these marble tracks let your creativity blossom. The products of the Swiss company cuboro Ltd explore ways to boost creativity in kids and further creative play, early learning, and childhood development. TEXT: ELISABETH DOEHNE | PHOTOS: CUBORO

Hoping to harness the creativity and ingenuity of children and parents by appealing to their imagination, these wooden marble track systems encourage experimenting with shape and form.They activate the discovery of spatial, physical, mathematical as well as aesthetic aspects of the mind; all in a fun way. More than 27 years ago, Mr Matthias Etter, author and designer, first founded the company cuboro Ltd, based in the town of Hasliberg Reuti (BE) in the Swiss Alps. His vision was to stimulate dexterity and creativity as well as encourage existing talents with the help of his games.

66 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

“It is a wonderful game.Young and old enjoy experimenting and letting their creativity flow in terms of how the system will be stacked together,”states a spokesperson for the company. The games are challenging and promote experimentation, spatial ability, logical thinking, and concentration. For more than a quarter of a century, the processing of the wood has been in the capable hands of a highly specialized, familyrun joinery in the Swiss area Emmental/Oberaargau. All toys are manufactured with FSC accredited beech wood, meaning wood which solely comes from exemplary cultivated forests.

Moreover, cuboro’s games grow with the requirements of the child. Suitable for children aged three and upwards, the various games have been called ‘Toys for generations’. Complementing the creative and aesthetic components - the didactic impacts of cuboro’s products are stunning. Today, cuboro games are not only played for fun but also used as a teaching tool, in occupational therapy or team training, for fitness tests and advertising concepts. Several cuboro books offer exciting mental exercises for the cuboro marble track system, highlighting how creative thinking can be paired with fingertip finesse and luck. cuboro’s products are distributed in more than 35 countries worldwide and available in many specialist toy shops. www.cuboro.ch


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 67

Discover Germany | Attraction of the Month | Austria

The perfect destination for the design - and wine-savvy in Austria

Attraction of the Month Austria

LOISIUM Wine & Spa Resorts spoil their guests’ senses with a splendid offer of sensual pleasures through its architecture, food, wine and spa. TEXT: DORINA REICHHOLD | PHOTOS: LOISIUM WINE & SPA RESORT

“Our special approach is already reflected in our name LOISIUM Wine & Spa Resorts, which is distinctively embedded in the romantic landscape of Austria’s finest wine regions,” explains Susanne KrausWinkler, managing partner of the LOISIUM resorts. The hotel group currently manages two resorts. The first one LOISIUM Wine & Spa Resort opened its doors close to the Danube River in Langenlois, Lower Austria, one of the country’s most renowned wine regions. In 2006, the hotel won the European Hotel design award for its striking, newly-built

architecture.The resort unites the design of a floating hotel with a wine spa, a gourmet restaurant and a wine centre with a labyrinthine cellar in which the guests can experience a staged “World of Wine”. The second resort is a 30 min drive away from Graz in the small town of Ehrenhausen, southern Styria, known as the “Austrian Tuscany”offering the most sunshine in the country and world famous vineyards.“The locations with their century-old tradition of viniculture offer an outstanding world of life’s gustatory and oenological pleasures as well as spa treatments that are specifically designed to fit into this experience,” says Kraus-Winkler as she summarises the concept of LOISIUM Wine & Spa resorts. The contemporary architecture and design of the hotel reflect the wine-related themes of sensuality and mysticism. Experiencing Austria in this unique way is attracting

many guests from Austria and abroad who are looking to unwind and spoil their senses with distinguished food, the excellent choice of wine and high-quality spa treatments. LOISIUM Wine & Spa resorts tailor their offers depending on the season. Kraus-Winkler highly recommends having a 50 min Hot Fusion Stone Massage after a hike through the snow-covered vineyards during the winter months. The concept of the LOSIUM Wine & Spa Resort is certainly highly successful and its success at home has encouraged the hotel group to takes its concept further into Europe: the opening of a LOISIUM Wine & Spa Resort in Alsace in France is planned for the near future and further projects across Europe are taking shape. www.loisium.at

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 67


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:26

Page 68

Discover Germany | Hotel of the Month | Switzerland

Comforting elegance in the heart of Zurich

Hotel

of the Month Switzerland

The Swissôtel Zurich appeals through its comforts, urban chic and supreme location. It includes everything from a newly designed urban restaurant concept and exquisite bar, to exclusive spa amenities, excellent service, spacious rooms and suites, and sweeping views of Zurich. TEXT: ELISABETH DOEHNE | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

This is what it feels like to be cosmopolitan. At Swissôtel Zurich, guests enjoy the sophisticated life the citizens of Zürich cherish. The modern and comfortable rooms are equipped with all amenities and wide panoramic city views. Business travellers will appreciate the Swiss Business Advantage rooms, which have large working desks with an ergonomic chair and concierge services. All 347 rooms and suites are non-smoking, wheelchair accessible and reflect the elegant yet upbeat style that defines this city. A perfect stay for business or pleasure Whether it’s for business purposes, a longer holiday or a romantic getaway, the city’s tallest hotel is the ideal destination in which to unwind from the exciting and glamorous

68 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

city life. In recent years Zurich has enjoyed a period of change, from its rather staid appearance associated with banking to adopting a more vibrant and exciting atmosphere. A trip into town or to the airport is an easy ride as the hotel is conveniently located opposite the Oerlikon train station, and in reach of many restaurants, coffee, bars, shops and entertainment.

excellence and attention to detail have elevated it to one of Zurich’s premium addresses. Operated by the award-winning and distinctive group Swissôtel Hotels & Resorts, this hotel strikes the balance between renowned Swiss hospitality and urban, fresh, contemporary design, personalized service, charm, and efficiency.

Swiss hospitality at its finest The attentive staff are eager to provide a memorable stay; Swissôtel Zurich’s Emotion Managers Service will be happy to make any arrangements for guests to discover Zurich’s vibrant blend of culture, cuisine and arts.Through personal contact before and after arrival, the personal needs of all its guests will be met.The hotel’s service

Sophisticated dining Swissôtel Zurich’s innovative kitchen and restaurant Le Muh offers European dishes reinterpreted for today’s healthy lifestyles, all cooked with local and fresh ingredients. The interior of the restaurant is an homage to the blend of modern sophistication and timeless materials like steel, wood and leather.


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 69

Discover Germany | Hotel of the Month | Switzerland

bar Le Muh extends an invitation to all cocktail lovers, night hawks and connoisseurs of wine and spirits. Spa, Sport and Wellness at your fingertips At Swissôtel Zurich, guests will be awed by the plethora of activities and treatments offered. “We provide alpine-inspired solutions to promote the health and well-being of our guests,” emphasizes the hotel.Most guests are enthusiastic about taking a swim in Zurich’s highest pool at morning glory, offering“stunning views of the sunrise, the strong light of midday, and a fabulous sunset.” The wide range of leisure and spa facilities are complemented by signature and special treatments including: Arnica sports massage, chair massage, anti jet-lag massage, facial and collagen treatments, stress relief and healing arts.“Unwind and energize in perfect surroundings: cutting-edge gym facilities, a Bio Sauna and steam bath as well as treatment rooms where you can enjoy an Alpine-inspired massage,”explains the hotel management. Meetings & event spaces to impress Swissôtel Zurich’s convention centre is the perfect setting for any event and caters for up to 1000 participants. Comprising a total of 19 rooms, including 8 large boardrooms, which are among the largest and most renowned in Zurich, modern technology, daylight, decorative lighting and air-conditioning ensure a smooth and successful meeting.The hotel’s Meeting Planner Officer will assist clients with the planning.

The daily breakfast buffet offers a wide range of hot and cold dishes and delicacies. Business lunches, a la carte menu, traditional Zurich classics, and health-conscious meals are covered by the hotel’s gastronomy. A special treat is the ‘Sweet Afternoon’ at Swissôtel Zurich, an opportunity to kick back and enjoy homemade cream cakes and excellent coffee. Lastly, the illuminated

A Seasonal Savers discount allows guests to save up to 20 per cent on their stay (minimum two night stay), and is valid from November until February 24, 2014. Conveniently located, Swissôtel Zurich is accessible by air, train or by car on one of the several motorways within easy reach. www.swisshotel.com/zurich zurich@swissotel.com

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 69


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 70

Discover Germany | Feature | Wellbeing in Winter

'Tis the season for wellbeing -mindfullness made easy Hibernating and over-indulging have their place in the winter timetable, but, if you want to boost your wellbeing, so does doing something. Abi Jackson rounds up five festive spirit-lifters TEXT: ABI JACKSON | PRESS ASSOCIATION | THE INTERVIEW PEOPLE | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

Mindfulness has become a bit of a 'buzz' word in the world of wellbeing lately. From yoga gurus to meditation masters, all the experts are evangelising about how to improve your mental and physical state, about lowering stress by learning to be more present and in the moment and to fully engage your senses; that is, to be more 'mindful'. It might sound a little too New Age to some but, fancy words aside, mindfulness is all about really embracing the opportunities around you. Slowing down, switching off the 'distracted' button, and allowing yourself the chance to savour something. "Being more mindful is almost too easy," says Steven Tromans, a hypnotherapy and NLP

70 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

expert and founder of Justbewell (www.justbewell.com). "All you need to do is become aware of what is going on through your senses. So when you're really engaged in the activity, allow your mind to go a little quieter and then really use your eyes to see what's going on around you.� Notice the colours, the shapes, the 3D-ness of the environment and take in the smell of your environment, whether it's the lavender in an oil-burner, the warm smell of baking, or the freshness of the air when you're ice-skating. Ice-skating: Just picture yourself gracefully gliding around the rink, hand in hand with your friend or beloved, laughing merrily at

the sheer joy of it, warming up with a steaming mulled wine afterwards... Now go and do it! Ok, so in reality it's probably going to be a far clumsier scene, but it's a great chance to reconnect with your inner child and have some festive fun. Even if you do come home with a few bruises, you'll be glowing with endorphins. In addition to leaving you high on the feel-good factor, as personal trainer George Coote (www.coote-fitness.co.uk) points out, ice-skating is also a good form of exercise and can help improve co-ordination and balance. "Take the opportunity to try something new, and it's a great work-out, toning your legs, bum and abdominals due to the instability of being on the ice," he says.


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 71

Discover Germany | Feature | Wellbeing in Winter

Sledging: "If the snow comes down, don't just send the kids off to play - get out there and do some sledging as well," suggests Coote. "You'd be amazed at how much energy you use up running up a snowy hillside and sliding down on an old dinner tray. No one said that exercise can't be fun." Of course, it goes without saying that you should only sledge in a suitable spot; a safe, open area which doesn't run into any roads, fences or walls. But a memorable family day out - that'll get all your hearts pumping. All you need is a little imagination, a sense of adventure, some warm gloves and boots, and off you go. Walking: When the temperatures plummet that spot on the sofa is becoming ever more tempting. But the great outdoors is a thing of beauty during winter too - you just have to get out there and appreciate it. When the nights draw in early, an afternoon walk is a great way of factoring in some daily exercise and getting some oxygen into your lungs. "Don't let the winter blues interrupt your ability to stay fit; make your winter activities count," says Coote. "Why not go for a

walk over the Christmas period with the family? Add short bursts of jogging every minute, to raise the heart rate and get the blood flowing. It's great for the heart and lungs and will burn the few extra calories you may have consumed over the festive season." Even a gentle 15-minute stroll could significantly reduce stress levels in the run-up to Christmas. Baking: The Great British Bake Off effect is still in full swing, with baking officially enjoying an ongoing revival as a rewarding and stress-relieving pastime, and in today's 'hectic' world, retreating to the peaceful haven of the kitchen, pummelling your frustrations into a ball of dough or batter has never been so appealing. If you're a baking beginner, the festive season is the perfect opportunity to get involved; mince pies and Christmas cake taste much better made with love. While Mary Berry and co might make it look easy, banish thoughts of being a domestic goddess and leave the competition for TV contestants. In real life, the joy is in the doing, not the winning. Just savour the opportunity to forget whatever

else is going on in the world and engage your senses in the process - this is what mindfulness is all about. Gift wrapping: Wrapping that mound of presents is often a dreaded chore. But, approached in the right way, there's no reason it can't be turned into an enjoyable event and a chance to unwind. It's all about making an occasion of it. Why not set aside an afternoon or evening for your wrapping? Light a scented candle, put some music on (festive or otherwise), pour yourself a glass of wine or a mug of hot chocolate, and give the job in hand your full attention. Even an hour or two of your undivided attention could turn this annoying task into something far more rewarding.

Top, from left to right: The famous “Alstervergnügen” - ice skating on the frozen Outer Alster lake in the north German city of Hamburg. ©Deutsche Zentrale für Tourismus. Photo: Ralf Brunner Enjoy a mountain bike ride in the snow in the Black Forest. ©Deutsche Zentrale für Tourismus. Photo: Daniel Geiger Winter fun in North Rhine-Westphalia’s Southern Sauerland. ©Südsauerland Touristik e.V.

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 71


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 72

High time for an Austrian winter holiday Whether your idea of winter is fast, fun, and free-spirited, or one with a more gentle, relaxed approach to appreciate the essence of the season, Austria is unsurpassable in its opportunities for skiing and snowboarding, family-friendly resorts, genuine culture of hospitality and a foodie scene that stretches from valley to mountain top. British visitors will also appreciate the outstanding value for money that a winter holiday in Austria brings, whether booking an attractive package or deciding on a self-chosen itinerary. TEXT & PHOTOS: AUSTRIAN NATIONAL TOURIST OFFICE

Austria, twice an Olympic Winter Games host (Innsbruck 1964 & 1976), certainly puts on a spectacular show during the snowy season. Ski and board on an incredible alpine terrain, with snow sure resorts and an après-ski scene consistently ranked top in Europe. Some numbers to get you thinking winter fun – Austria’s largest in-

72 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

terconnected ski area, SkiWelt Wilder Kaiser-Brixental offers 279km of piste, 90 modern cable cars and lifts, 70 ski huts, and 13 ski schools. A 100 per cent snow guarantee in the holiday region of Zell am SeeKaprun, where the majestic peak of the 3,000m Kitzsteinhorn offers real winter highs amongst a landscape of glaciers,

mountains and lakes. The Kitzbüheler Alpen, comprised of the regions of Brixental, Hohe Salve, and St, Johann offer one AllStarCard valid in ten of Tirol’s top ski areas, including the newly linked Ski Juwel Alpbachtal Wildschönau (with its 145km of slopes and 47 lifts), combining for a total of 1,088km of slopes and 356 lifts and cable cars! Whether fulfilling your inner athlete or simply in search of some of the finest ski and boarding opportunities in the world, Austria is your winter ticket. Family ski With children as young as two years old welcomed at many Austrian ski schools, this is clearly a culture where winter sport is a family affair. For an authentic winter ex-


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 73

Discover Germany | Feature | Winter in Austria

friendly accommodations offer superb value for money packages. In Bad Kleinkirchheim, for example, home of national hero Franz Klammer, who won downhill gold in 1976, kids under 12 can ski for just one Euro a day with the ‘Family Euro’weekly package. Another‘sure to impress the kids’destination is the family fun spot of Skicircus Saalbach Hinterglemm Leogang. Some 200km of diverse slopes (some floodlit), board and skicross fun parks (even a night park), tubing slopes, toboggan runs, and a zip wire that at more than 80mph is one of the fastest steel cable slides in the world! Book the ‘Family Hit Package’ and accommodation and ski passes are free for two kids sharing with parents. A long tradition of hospitality

perience, but with a bit of a slower pace and milder temperatures, Austria’s southernmost province of Carinthia offers the ideal location to learn to ski. Here, on the sunny side of the Alps, some 1,000km of slopes cater to all abilities, and a host of family-

Whether the fourth generation owners of your family-run accommodation, the friendly ski instructors ready to ease any worries, or the serving staff at a mountain hut where you’ve stopped to refuel, the warm authenticity of every interaction will leave you with a real joie de vivre and memories of a truly unforgettable holiday. As the old adage goes:‘practise makes perfect’, then why not begin where it all started. Alpine skiing was‘born’in the Arlberg region of Vorarlberg, Austria’s westernmost province, some 100 years ago, and in the following century, Vorarlberg has been attracting visitors due to the distinctive character of its holiday regions, compelling architecture, its fresh, regional cuisine, and an abundance of natural snow as a result of its well-positioned location on the northern rim of the Alps. Also, if, in

addition to fine snow sports, it’s a culinary experience you’re looking for, delve into the foodie scene in Tirol’s Zillertal, a real treat for visitors. The ‘softer’ side of winter For those less keen to conquer the mountains, Austria offers plenty of slower paced alternatives that celebrate winter and promise an equally thrilling experience. Many of Austria’s lakes offer vast natural ice surfaces for skating, curling, ice hockey, ice diving, and ice golf (no white balls on these courses!). Limitless kilometres of winter hiking trails showcase the beauty of the season all around, so how about snowshoeing to the top of a natural toboggan run that stretches an impressive 5.5km? Warmed up to the idea of a winter holiday yet? Don’t forget that Austria is also a top destination for spas, with award-winning spa hotels found throughout all the holiday regions. It’s winter, relax.

www.facebook.com/visitaustria treasures.austria.info

Left, main image: Hallstadt. © Austrian National Tourist Office / Popp & Hackner Left, from top down: Cross-country skiers in Seefeld (Tyrol). © Austrian National Tourist Office / Ascher Children’s ski school. © Austrian National Tourist Office/ J. Mallaun Mountain hut in Flachau. © Austrian National Tourist Office / Peter Burgstaller Below: Vienna Ice Dream, City Hall Square. © Austrian National Tourist Office / Wolfgang Zajc

Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014 | 73


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 74

Discover Germany | Culture | Barbara Geier

What are you doing for New Year’s Eve? “So, what are you doing for New Year’s Eve?” Isn’t this just the most dreaded question ever? Throughout my teens and into my twenties, I used to fret no end about this evening, touted as the most important evening of the year. It was difficult to know what to do and if to say yes to a party or no because maybe something better might still be waiting round the corner. Then, thank god, all this stopped and now I just take it as it comes. TEXT: BARBARA GEIER

However, it’s obviously not the purpose of this column to enlighten you about my very personal“Silvester”plans as 31 December is called in Germany but to ponder a bit about how Germans celebrate the end of the old year and start of the new one. Well, I won’t be able to provide you with the ultimate description of the German Silvester but instead will list a few components that in one way or the other belong to New Year’s Eve in Germany and/or are important for a lot of Germans when seeing out the year: Silvester is a popular time for private parties. Invite your friends, dive into the buffet and get in a silly mood. Carnival decorations such as paper streamers, confetti or little party hats are not uncommon. A bit old-fashioned but still a quite popular thing to do is “Bleigießen” (literally, lead pouring), a New Year’s custom in Germanspeaking countries: First you melt the lead over a flame, pour it into cold water and one’s future can then be told from the shapes which form in the water. After a few glasses of bubbly, fantasising about oddly shaped little things can actually be quite funny and lead to all kinds of weird and wonderful conversations. By the way, drinks. Arguably the most important ingredient for any proper New Year’s celebration is “Sekt”, Champagne’s cheaper sibling. If you go out on the street just before midnight in order to see the fireworks, it’s paramount to have a couple or more at hand to be opened. Which leads

74 | Issue 10 | December 2013 / January 2014

me to the next topic: fireworks. Unlike in some other countries where it’s forbidden, Germans can buy their own “Böller”, as they are known, and get cracking. And they do so in large quantities which is not without controversy.“Brot statt Böller”, for example, is a yearly initiative of a German charity asking people to donate money to development aid instead of buying firecrackers and the like. In recent years, I have also heard more and more Germans describing the streets of their cities as “war zones”because of the noise level and reckless handling of fireworks. I tend to agree since I had a hole burned in my sleeve once after the remains of a firecracker or whatever it was that someone threw ended up on me. But that’s another story. However, one thing that virtually every German agrees on is that New Year is not New Year without “Dinner for one”. The line “The same procedure as every year, James.” from the 14-minute British stage sketch from the 1920s has become a familiar catchphrase since it was introduced to German TV in 1963. The black-and-white English-language version with English comedian Freddie Frinton and his partner May Warden is broadcast repeatedly throughout 31 December each year and has become iconic. Which is somewhat bizarre since the sketch is virtually unknown in the English-speaking world, including the UK. Germans are always surprised to hear that since they find the whole thing“so English”.

Anyway, to round this off: should you spend NewYear’s Eve in Germany, be prepared to watch an English sketch, grab a glass of Sekt when the countdown starts and then simply shout the words “Prost Neujahr!” (Cheers to the New Year) once the clock strikes twelve along with everyone else. That’ll do.

Barbara Geier is a London-based freelance writer, translator and communications consultant. She is also the face behind ww.germanyiswunderbar.com, a German travel and tourism guide and blog that was set up together with UK travel writer Andrew Eames in 2010.


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 75

There is a place where art, culture and academic studies find space to develop between tradition and innovation.

2

GRAPHIC DESIGN & PRINT MANAGEMENT

Specialists in design and print of: • Corporate Identity • Conference documentation • Reports • Magazines • Brochures • Books

Liquid Graphic Ltd. London www.liquid-graphic.com

Phone +44 (0) 8709 330 324 E-mail info@liquid-graphic.com

www.mdw.ac.at


2_0_DiscoverGermany_Dec/Jan_Issue10:Scan Magazine 1

5/12/13

18:27

Page 76

Dieter Grundmann

Christmas Charm in Leipzig Give in to the magic of a wonderful travel motive: The opening of the famous Leipzig Christmas Market means the beginning of the enchanting Advent season in Leipzig. Unique cultural and culinary delights await the visitors. The boutiques and top-class department stores welcome Christmas gift shoppers. The historical “Old Leipzig” Christmas market on Naschmarkt square introduces above all Leipzig’s artisan and handicrafts traditions. Abandon yourself to the sound of the trombones, the singing of St. Thomas Boys Choir, the traditional delicacies or mouth-watering Leipzig dainties: 250 stalls in the middle of the inner city turn Leipzig into one big Christmas fairytale.

from

€ 125,00

, price per person double room

,00 harge from € 35 single room surc 2013, subject to availability

Dieter Grundmann

Dirk Brzoska

Dirk Brzoska

Contact us for more information on bookings and travel packages:

t 2 nights including breakfast in one of our partner hotels t Ticket for the public guided tour through the Christmassy Leipzig t 1 traditional St. Martin’s goose for lunch or dinner at Leipzig’s historic “Thüringer Hof” restaurant t Touristmap for each room

v.-22.Dec. ival Offer valid: 26.No eks prior to arr adline: four we de n tio tra gis Re

Leipzig Tourismus und Marketing GmbH phone: +49 (0)341 7104-275 email: incoming@ltm-leipzig.de www.leipzig.travel

Profile for Scan Group

Discover Germany | Issue 10 | December 2013 - January 2014  

Discover Germany promotes German, Swiss & Austrian Design, Tourism, Food, Culture and Business.

Discover Germany | Issue 10 | December 2013 - January 2014  

Discover Germany promotes German, Swiss & Austrian Design, Tourism, Food, Culture and Business.