__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Watching the whales

Gauchos snap losing streak UCSB women’s hoops dominates Hawaii - A5

Our 165th Year

News-Press travels with Island Packers to Channel Islands - B1

Seven decades of unconditional love Samarkand childhood sweethearts share love story, advice for a long-lasting marriage

COURTESY PHOTO

Jack and Ruth Wilson live at Covenant Living at Samarkand, and have been married for 68 years. They said the key to a successful marriage is falling in love with each other’s weaknesses.

disease that can cause paralysis. The syndrome hadn’t even been named at the time. Ruth lost her ability to walk, and while she gained it back over time, her legs were permanently weakened. To add onto the hardships in the first few years of their marriage, when the Wilson’s second daughter was with a babysitter, she fell down a whole flight of stairs directly onto concrete and fractured her skull. “Those are things that people, when they go through hardships, either disengage because they can’t handle it or they get closer,” Jack said. “God brought us closer together, but it really took a lot of strength to survive all that.” By the time Jack graduated from dental school, the Wilsons had their fifth child, and they moved to Santa Barbara in 1960, where Jack had a family practice for more than 40 years. They had their sixth child in Santa Barbara, and Ruth stayed home with the kids until they were all in school. After that, she went back to school at UCSB and received a BA in psychology and a master’s in counseling psychology.

FOLLOW US ON

0

“You don’t hold anything back, and you tell each other how you feel right down to the core. That’s how you get to know each other more closely and that’s how you can help the other person and the other person can help you.” Jack said that many people ask him how long it takes him and his wife to make up after fighting, and his response is always, “You can get over it if you work on it for seven years.” “You have to have perseverance and know that you picked each other for good reason,” he said. “You have to be totally open with each other. That’s a key — no hidden agenda, no hidden things.” Ruth said she loves her husband because he’s a “can-do guy full of adventure.” “He’s a great provider. He has provided for us and he helps me,” Ruth said. She shared that just the other night, she fell out of her bed at Samarkand and couldn’t get back up. “And there he is, so sweet, bringing me the ottomon to work my way up,” Ruth said. “That’s so Please see LOVE on A6

COURTESY PHOTO

Bernard “Barney” Melekian will serve as the interim police chief of the Santa Barbara Police Department starting March 1.

duty in 1991 during Operation Desert Storm and served in Saudi Arabia. Mr. Melekian served a second tour of active duty in 2003 when he served for eight months in the Pacific area. He retired from the Coast Guard Reserves in 2009, after 26 years of service. After his role with COPS, Mr. Melekian, 71, and his wife moved to Santa Barbara, where he continued to serve as a consultant for law enforcement agencies. He assisted clients around the country, which included working as a liaison for the mayor of Seattle. In 2015, Sheriff Brown approached him about serving as undersheriff, an opportunity he quickly agreed to. Mr. Melekian contemplated retirement before taking the position, which he now describes as the highlight of his career. Please see melekian on A3

Officials urge patience as vaccine rollout continues By MITCHELL WHITE NEWS-PRESS ASSOCIATE EDITOR

As the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department gets set to expand its vaccine distribution this week, health officials are continuing to urge the public to remain patient as supply remains limited. The county receives a weekly allocation of roughly 6,000 vaccines from the federal government, and has thus far administered 61,000 doses — which includes more than 45,500 first doses and 14,000 second doses to residents over the age of 75 and frontline health care workers. While it has taken the county just shy of two months to transition from Phase 1A to Phase 1B of its vaccination rollout, starting Tuesday the county will begin scheduling vaccine appointments for those over 65. Within the next two weeks, the county hopes to begin vaccination efforts for other job sectors within Phase 1B, including childcare and education, food and agriculture and emergency services. For perspective, there are

some 26,000 health care workers and more than 32,000 residents over the age of 75 in Santa Barbara County. Health officials estimate nearly 41,000 residents between 65 and 74, as well as more than 22,500 educators and childcare workers, more than 33,000 food and agriculture workers and more than 5,700 emergency services workers. The county had originally planned to vaccinate all those eligible in Phase 1B, though Health Officer Dr. Henning Ansorg said Friday that opening up vaccines to up to more than 80,000 people could cause the rollout system to crash. “If you look at the big picture, age 65 and older is basically the greatest risk factor regardless of underlying health conditions or chronic health problems to have a poor outcome,” he said. “And that’s why with this incredibly stretched, short supply of vaccine product, we decided that we are going to wait a couple of weeks later for those folks who are in these industries. We’re really talking a couple of weeks.” Dr. Van Do-Reynoso, public health director, said that it would Please see vaccines on A6

LOTTERY

ins id e Classified............... A8 Life..................... B1-2

66833 00150

Ruth began practicing as a marriage family therapist in 1976, and still sees a few clients. “I became a marriage family therapist because we had so much trouble in our relationship,” Ruth joked. “But really, everybody does.” “That was really good because when we had to go through hard times together, we worked it out, and working it out was enough training, so she decided she would become a counselor,” Jack said, chuckling. The Wilsons said that they place God at the center of their relationship, and relied on their faith when the going got rough. Jack said he knows God gave him Ruth, and she showed him a power greater than himself through faith. When asked what advice they would give to young couples for a successful relationship, Jack and Ruth had plenty to offer. “Fall in love with each other’s weaknesses, because we all have weaknesses,” Ruth said. “You have to learn how to argue and fight constructively.” Jack echoed his wife, saying,

By MITCHELL WHITE Bernard “Barney” Melekian has worn many hats in his long career in public service, and he is getting ready to add another. Mr. Melekian, whose extensive career includes more than 40 years in law enforcement, is now preparing to take over as interim police chief for the Santa Barbara Police Department. As the department bid farewell to outgoing Chief Lori Luhnow on Saturday, Capt. Marylinda Arroyo will serve as the acting police chief until March 1. Since September 2018, Mr. Melekian served as assistant county executive officer over public safety alongside County Executive Officer Mona Miyasato. Prior to that, he spent three years serving as undersheriff to Sheriff Bill Brown. His other former roles include 23 years with the Santa Monica Police Department, and 13 years as chief of the Pasadena Police Department. From 2009 to 2013, Mr. Melekian was selected as the director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services by then Attorney General Eric Holder. While serving with COPS, he oversaw the development of the concept of Collaborative Reform, a widely acclaimed alternative to the traditional consent decree. Mr. Melekian said he was able to travel around the country while serving as director, visiting police and sheriff’s departments in 32 states. Mr. Melekian also served in the United States Army from 1967 to 1970. As a member of the United States Coast Guard Reserve, he was called to active

NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

“Ruth, will you marry me and have six children with me?” At merely 18 years of age, this is how Jack Wilson proposed to Ruth, his now wife of 68 years and, indeed, the mother of their six children. The couple grew up in the New York area, Jack in Manhattan and Ruth in Brooklyn. Their families both moved to Long Island, where they fatefully met in high school. Jack told the News-Press the story of how they met, recalling a night play rehearsal in which he kicked over a full bucket of paint. The play director came down and asked what was going on, and Jack quickly asked the other students to help him clean up the mess. He said that everyone disappeared — except Ruth. “She’s been cleaning up my messes ever since,” Jack said. When the couple was asked who made the first move, Ruth told the News-Press, “I think I did, but boy, did he want to marry me. I think I started the relationship cleaning up his mess.” The now 87-year-olds live at Covenant Living at the Samarkand in Santa Barbara, and the Friday before Valentine’s Day, they reflected on their nearly seven-decade marriage and the hardships they’ve endured together. After they graduated high school, Ruth studied for one year at Bucknell College in Pennsylvania, and Jack attended Hofstra College in New York. They struggled with the distance, so they got married at 18 and 19, respectively, after a fourday engagement. It was a family wedding at a simple church. After that, they set their sights on California, but neither had a car, so the Wilsons decided they would hitchhike from New York to California, something Jack said he had done before and his parents were OK with. As expected, Ruth’s father didn’t like the idea of his daughter hitchhiking cross country, so his wedding present to them was a car, and their honeymoon was driving across the United States, a road trip they said holds some of their favorite memories together. Once they made it out west, Jack attended UC Berkeley, but struggled with learning disabilities. “We were going to have six kids, so that determined that I needed to make some money,” Jack said. “I didn’t know what I was going to do, but when I thought about it, I had good hand-eye coordination, and dentistry has that hand-eye coordination.” Therefore, he decided on UC Dental School in San Francisco. However, during this time, Ruth was pregnant with their first child, and they were saddened after the child died after only two days of life. Soon after, Ruth had their second child, but when she was pregnant with their third, she was diagnosed with GuillainBarre Syndrome, a mysterious

Melekian ready to serve as interim police chief NEWS-PRESS ASSOCIATE EDITOR

By GRAYCE MCCORMICK

6

$2.00

S U N DA Y, F E B RUA R Y 14 , 2 0 21

Obituaries............. A4 Soduku................. B3 Weather................A2

Saturday’s SUPER LOTTO: 18-22-38-40-42 Meganumber: 13

Saturday’s DAILY 4: 9-4-5-2

Friday’s MEGA MILLIONS: 5-14-24-25-27 Meganumber: 14

Saturday’s FANTASY 5: 9-10-13-22-30

Saturday’s DAILY DERBY: 02-10-09 Time: 1:43.35

Saturday’s POWERBALL: 20-28-33-63-68 Meganumber: 20

Saturday’s DAILY 3: 2-3-8 / Sunday’s Midday 7-8-2


,OCAL

A2

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

#NEWS /5.49.%73

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

TRAFFIC, CRIME AND FIRE BLOTTER

One critically Forest Service extends injured in rollover crash state-wide campsite and picnic area closures

Chuck’s Waterfront Grill and Endless Summer Bar Cafe close permanently

SANTA MARIA — A person suffered critical injuries in a single-vehicle rollover crash Saturday morning near the intersection of Betteravia and Rosemary roads in Santa Maria, authorities said. The crashWHITTLE was reported By JOSH GREGA CHRISTIAN Brekkies by Chomp, and Mortensen’s Danish Bakery. bara Front Country trails and access roads. aroundSTAFF 9:15 WRITER a.m. Saturday. Santa NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER WS-PRESS The initial lease for the Chuck’s and Endless Sum“What we’re seeing a lot of folks are doing is Barbara County Fire they’re driving up alongside of the road and just gomer property is 10 years with four, five-year options to Department crews and other More than 20 years after they first opened, Chuck’s extend the term of the lease. Developed recreation sites in California will re- ing for hikes up there. That’s ok. There’s not an order emergency personnel responded Waterfront Grill and The Endless Summer Bar Café are in closed through May 15 after the USDA For- against hiking trails,” said Andew Madsen, U.S. ForMr. Petersen is inheriting the existing lease with and it was learned that the permanently closed. On the morning of April 30 the wa- only the four, five-year options remaining, with an Service issued an order extending the closures est Service spokesman. vehicle was traveling at a high terfront restaurant announced its closure with a fare- average seasonally adjusted base rent of $23,585 per ursday. “We just want to make sure if people go out they’re rate of speed prior to the crash. well post on its Instagram account. The order was issued for the entire Pacific SouthThe lone occupant was removed safely spaced between one another. If you get to a month. The post read, “It is with heavy hearts that we anstfrom Region and its 18before National Forests, which in- trailhead and there’s just too many cars there, you the wreckage being Though Mr. Petersen plans to continue running airlifted toPadres Santa Barbara nounce we have closed our doors for good. Thank you Chuck’s and Endless Summer in line with its current des the Los National Forest. should find a different area to go to as opposed to tryCottage for further for your constant support. The memories will never be operation for a time, the restaurant has upgrades The initialHospital closure order went into effect March 26 ing to get in.” treatment, said Capt. Daniel forgotten.” d was set to expire April 30. As state and local responses to the coronavirus planned for around the fall. According to the agenda, fire spokesman. Despite the current economic chaos due to the COV- under Mr. Petersen’s business plan the second floor of t Bertucelli, applied to recreational use areas such as camp- pandemic continue to evolve, the Forest Service felt The cause of the crash is under ID-19 pandemic, the prospect of Chuck’s and Endless the establishment will be converted into a traditional unds, day use sites and picnic areas. that the situation warranted a two week extension of investigation. Summer ceasing operation dates back to before the out- deli café focused on sandwiches, soups, and salads, The order was issued to discourage large gather- the closures, said Mr. Madsen. break. According to the agenda of a March 24 Santa Bar- with a gourmet grocery area selling wine, beer, and s of people and promote safe White social distancing of — Mitchell “At the end of that they’ll evaluate and see where bara City Council meeting in which assignment of the prepackaged foods. For evenings, the second floor will ying more than six feet apart. we’re at and whether or not we’re going to continue restaurant’s lease to a new operator was the first item, have a full bar and a dinner menu focusing on “adult n the Santa Barbara Ranger District, 12 camp- as we need it,” said Mr. Madsen. Chuck’s and Endless Summer co-owner Steve Hyslop food and beverages.” unds and picnic areas will remain closed, includ“This order can be rescinded at any time. If local informed the Waterfront Department of his desire to the Fremont campground and White Rock and health officials say it looks like the sky has cleared up The restaurant’s ground floor is proposed to be simsell the establishment in August 2019. d Rock picnic areas. we can rescind the order tomorrow. For right now, we ilar to Mr. Petersen’s Chomp restaurants. Its menu of CARPINTERIA — A pair After receiving the department’s lease assignment burgers, fries, and shakes will cater to families, young The order Thursday does not add to the closures don’t want to extend it out too far. of women on outrigger canoes requirements, Mr. Hyslop began searching for a new adults, and retirees, and for evenings will be converted eady place for Santa Barbara. While other arwereinrescued by emergency “We just want to make sure in the next couple of buyer and ultimately found it in businessman Aaron to a “dinner type atmosphere.” like the Monterey District have closed weeks as we monitor what’s going on that we are takpersonnel SaturdayRanger after being reported missing the coast Petersen, who operates a number of restaurants in Solilheads and forest off roads, localsofwill still have ac- ing the appropriate steps along with our state and said. vang including Chomp, The Coffee House by Chomp, email: jgrega@newspress.com sCarpinteria, to the manyauthorities Santa Ynez Valley and Santa Bar- local partners.” Around 3 p.m., the Santa Barbara County Fire Department launched its air support unit to assist Carpinteria COURTESY PHOTO Summerland and Montecito fire A person suffered critical injuries in a single-vehicle rollover crash Saturday morning near the intersection of Betteravia and Rosemary roads in Santa Maria. crews after the women were reported missing. The helicopter Drive and North Padaro Lane. LOCAL FIVE-DAY FORECAST located the women off the coast Vegetation clearing will continue of Hobson Beach, a “significant in preparation for upcoming TODAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY distance” away in Ventura improvements. Crews have County, said Capt. Daniel removed old nests, installed Bertucelli, fire spokesman. visual deterrents and will use The county’s air support unit auditory deterrents to discourage maintained CASES visual contact with Times of clouds AGES Cloudy; breezy in Breezy in CA. the COUNTY COUNTY CITIES COUNTY cormorant nesting within the Plenty of sunshine Mostly sunny the p.m. 21 morning the women before becoming low 0-17and sun AT A INLAND construction area. SOUTH UNINCORP. 22 INLAND INLAND INLAND INLAND on fuel. The Coast Guard launched Crews will also continue57 GLANCE 18-29 84 SANTA BARBARA a helicopter to assist, while rescue 62 41 64 43 183 63 38 68 35 69 39 CONFIRMED OVERALL building footings, installing 30-49 GOLETA 7 boats were sent out to assist with COASTAL COASTAL COASTAL COASTAL COASTAL rebar and pouring concrete 50-69 167 ISLA VISTA 1 the rescue. 46 49 43 42 42 65 66 66 66 65 for columns, side supports and 70-PLUS 41 CASES OVERALL / THURS. GOLETA VLY/GAVIOTA 13 retaining walls for the new ANNOUNCED THURSDAY Pismo Beach Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows. — Mitchell White SANTA YNEZ VALLEY 5 bridges in the median at the 59/45 LOMPOC 84 Sheffield Drive interchange. COUNTY STATUS DEATHS OVERALL / THURS. LOMPOC FED. PRISON 106 Over the next few weeks, in Maricopa AT HOME 75 TESTS TO DATE 59/44 compliance with the California SANTA MARIA 135 Guadalupe RECOVERED 376 TOP 3 IN COUNTIES 58/44 Department of Fish and Wildlife ORCUTT 36 HOSPITALIZED Santa Maria 33 LOS ANGELES 23,233 requirements related to bird New Cuyama NORTH UNINCORP. 25 59/43 INTENSIVE CARE UNIT 12 RIVERSIDE 4,031 52/36 nesting, crews will undertake 2021 Ashleigh Brilliant, 117 W. Valerio Santa Barbara CA 93101 (catalog $5). www.ashleighbrilliant.com RATE PER 100,000 PENDING 5 ©©2020 Ashleigh Brilliant, 117 W. Valerio Santa Barbara CA 93101 (catalog $5). www.ashleighbrilliant.com HEALTHCARE WORKERS 66 SAN DIEGO 3,564 Vandenberg pre-construction work to clear Ventucopa Los Alamos CARPINTERIA — Several 56/49 48/34 60/42 trees and vegetation so that lane closures are planned this NICK MASUDA / NEWS-PRESS GRAPHIC construction can begin on the week as work continues on the Solvang Buellton Padaro segment of the project. 61/42 60/42 Linden and Casitas Pass Lompoc The project will add a new, third 56/47 Highway 101 widening project SANTA freeway lane in each direction in Carpinteria. BARBARA and new bridges over Toro and 65/46 From 9 p.m. tonight to 5 a.m. Forecasts and Gaviota Arroyo Parida creeks. Goleta Monday, one northbound lane will graphics provided by 59/50 64/46 At the South Padaro Lane AccuWeather, Inc. ©2021 be closed from Linden Avenue Carpinteria 7%.$9-C#!7  #O 0UBLISHER Undercrossing, the bridge and onto Sheffield Drive, which will 62/50 AIR QUALITY KEY Source: airnow.gov and offramps will be replaced. Ventura also include the offramp at Santa Unhealthy for SG Very Unhealthy !24(526/.7)%3%."%2'%2 #O 0UBLISHER Good 62/48 At the North Padaro Lane Claus Lane and the onramps and Unhealthy Moderate Not Available Interchange, new on and offramp MARINE FORECAST offramps at Evans Avenue, Ortega ALMANAC improvements will be built. There SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL Hill Road and Sheffield Drive. Wind west-northwest 8-16 knots today. Waves will also be three new sound walls Santa Barbara through 6 p.m. yesterday Similar intermittent overnight 5-9 feet with a west-northwest swell 5-9 feet at 7 TEMPERATURE built. YOLANDA APODACA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director of Operations closures are planned Monday seconds. Visibility clear. High/low 68/47 9/,!.$!!0/$!#! The majority of work will occur through Thursday, according to DAVE MASON . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $IRECTOROF/PERATIONS . . . . . Managing Editor POINT ARENA TO POINT PINOS Normal high/low 64/44 in the median and near the South Wind northwest at 10-20 knots today. Wind waves Caltrans officials. Record high 84 in 1943 WS-PRESS STAFF REPORT 6-10 feet with a west swell 6-10 feet at 11-second Padaro/Santa Claus Lane on- and Record low 33 in 1999 From 10 p.m. tonight to 7 a.m. intervals. Visibility clear. offramps. PRECIPITATION Monday, one southbound lane will POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO nbeaclosed dramatic Following construction, 108 new 24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. Trace from change Sheffieldafter Drivea Wind northwest at 10-20 knots today. Wind waves Month to date (normal) Trace (1.75”) dnesday night memo from the oak trees will be planted and the 6-10 feet with a west swell 6-10 feet at 11-second to Linden Avenue, which will (/74/'%453 (/74/2%!#(53 Season to date (normal) 6.23” (10.55”) intervals. Visibility clear. ifornia Police Associacenter median between Santa also include theChiefs onramp at Santa #)2#5,!4)/.)335%3 Claus and North Padaro lanes n Claus indicated that the Gov. Newsom -!)./&&)#% Lane and onramps and TIDES LOCAL TEMPS 3OUTH#OAST   will feature the Blue Star Symbol !NACAPA3T offramps at Evans and Wallace uld be closing all beaches and SANTA BARBARA HARBOR TIDES Today Mon.  3ANTA"ARBARA   and oak leaves as an update City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Date Time High Time Low Similar overnight teavenues. parks, the governor indicated REFUNDS NEWSPRESSCOM Cuyama 52/36/pc 58/37/c to the Memorial Oaks section are planned Monday Feb. 14 10:46 a.m. 4.8’ 4:47 a.m. 1.5’ t closures only beaches in Orange County NEWSUBSCRIPTIONS NEWSPRESSCOM -!),).'!$$2%33 Goleta 64/46/pc 67/49/c 11:53 p.m. 4.2’ 5:26 p.m. 0.0’ to commemorate World War I through Friday.that fate. Lompoc 59/45/pc 61/46/c uld be suffering VACATIONHOLDS NEWSPRESSCOM 0/"OX 3ANTA"ARBARA Feb. 15 11:24 a.m. 4.2’ 5:33 a.m. 1.5’ service. The southbound onramp at Pismo Beach 59/45/pc 61/47/c  none 5:52 p.m. 0.5’ CANCELLATIONS NEWSPRESSCOM Bottom line, that was their Crews will continue work on Santa Maria 59/43/pc 61/45/c Sheffield Drive will be closed for Feb. 16 12:24 a.m. 4.2’ 6:24 a.m. 1.6’ mo. That memo gotwith to Santa Ynez 62/41/pc 64/43/c southbound 101 and various the duration of thenever project, 12:08 p.m. 3.6’ 6:16 p.m. 1.1’ .EWS(OTLINE  564-5277   (OMEDELIVERYOFTHE.EWS 0RESSIS XFFLPSFWFOUXPXFFLMPOHDPVOU Vandenberg 56/49/pc 58/49/c ,”an Gov. Newsom reopening said at his date dailyset ramps. Crews will begin anticipated "USINESS  564-5277   AVAILABLEINMOSTOF3ANTA"ARBARA#OUNTY LAKE LEVELS Ventura 62/48/pc 62/50/c removing old pavement and to ess conference. for 2023. The offramp at Sheffield )FYOUDONOTRECEIVEYOURPAPERBYAM ,IFE   AT BRADBURY DAM, LAKE CACHUMA prepare for ramp improvements -ONDAYSTHROUGH&RIDAYS ORAMON Drive will Santa be closed for upCounto 16 STATE CITIES 564-5112 3PORTS    That allows Barbara At Lake Cachuma’s maximum level at the point WEEKENDS PLEASECALLOUR#IRCULATION for the Carpinteria and Linden Bakersfield 59/43/pc 61/46/c months andofcould reopen by the .EWS&AX   at which water starts spilling over the dam holds and the city Santa Barbara to $EPARTMENTBEFOREAM4HE#IRCULATION Barstow 63/41/pc 67/48/c 188,030 acre-feet. An acre-foot is 325,851 gallons, NBJMJOCBMMPUTXJMMCFESPQQFEPGG avenue southbound offramps. 564-5277 #ORRECTIONS    end of 2021. ntinue to govern the beaches Big Bear 40/23/pc 48/27/c $EPARTMENTISOPENAMTOAM equivalent to the amount of water consumed annuWork will continue on foundation The offramp at Carpinteria Bishop 56/33/pc 64/34/c ng the South Coast, which will ally by 10 people in an urban environment. DAYSAWEEK and posts for new signs, as well Avenue will be closed for up to ‰"MBSHFOVNCFSPGCBMMPUTXJMM Catalina 55/49/pc 57/48/c Storage 123,912 acre-ft. main open, asand long as physical #LASSIlED    Concord 61/52/pc 63/44/c as clearing vegetation on the seven weeks is expected to 35"3#2)04)/.2!4%3 Elevation 727.00 ft. #LASSIlED&AX    Escondido 64/40/pc 64/51/pc tancing followed. northbound side for the next reopenison March 29. The offramp Evaporation (past 24 hours) 17.4 acre-ft. (OMEDELIVERYIN3ANTA"ARBARA#OUNTY Eureka 49/49/sh 54/44/r 2ETAIL    Those that Avenue are doing good work, Inflow 48.7 acre-ft. stage of work. at Linden will be closed PERWEEKINCLUDESSALESTAX DAILY Fresno 59/45/pc 57/44/c 2ETAIL&AX    State infl ow 0.0 acre-ft. want to reward that work,” Gov. Work is also ongoing on the for five weeks as early as Monday Los Angeles 70/50/pc 67/50/c AND3UNDAYS7EEKENDSANDHOLIDAYSONLY Storage change from yest. -23 acre-ft. 4OLL&REE     Mammoth Lakes 37/27/c 37/15/sn approach areas and safety PERWEEKINCLUDESSALESTAX3INGLE through March 22. wsom said. Report from U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Modesto 60/48/pc 57/44/c COPYPRICEOF`DAILYAND3UNDAY barriers near Franklin and Santa Temporary stop signs will Monterey 57/51/pc 58/47/r INCLUDESSALESTAXATVENDINGRACKS4AX Monica creek bridges. be installed at the intersection Napa 61/50/c 64/38/r 6OICESEDITORIALPAGES    SUN AND MOON MAYBEADDEDTOCOPIESPURCHASED anta Barbara County, Oakland 61/54/c 61/48/r of Sheffield Drive and North Also, crews will install Today Mon. ELSEWHEREh4HE3ANTA"ARBARA.EWS Ojai 63/44/pc 66/45/c Lane for the duration of underground supports for new Sunrise 6:46 a.m. 6:45 a.m. 0RESSv5303  #IRCULATION Oxnard 62/45/pc 61/47/c yJameson the numbers Sunset 5:42 p.m. 5:43 p.m. construction of the Summerland wall sections on the south side of #/092)'(4 ¥  REFUNDSFORBALANCESUNDER INACTIVE Palm Springs 72/49/pc 73/53/pc Moonrise 8:42 a.m. 9:08 a.m. The Santa Barbara County Pubsegment. Starting Monday, the 101 between Carpinteria and Pasadena 70/47/pc 67/48/c 3!.4!"!2"!2!.%73 02%33 FORMONTHS WILLBEUSEDTOPURCHASE Moonset 8:45 p.m. 9:41 p.m. KENNETH SONG / NEWS-PRESS Paso Robles 61/40/pc 63/41/c Health Department announced flaggers will direct traffic as Santa Ynez avenues. Work will NEWSPAPERSFORELEMENTARYSCHOOL First Full Last New !LLRIGHTSARERESERVEDONMATERIAL Sacramento 60/51/pc CLASSROOMS Thesoon weather will to bebuilding sunny and this weekend along the60/44/r South Coast. needed duringCOVID-19 the day on cases Via progress the in the 70s new confirmed  San Diego 64/52/pc 64/57/pc PRODUCEDBYTHE.EWS 0RESS INCLUDING Real, between Casitas Pass Road wall footings and rebar Thursday, bringing the county’s San Francisco 59/53/c 60/48/r STORIES PHOTOS GRAPHICS MAPSAND Linden Avenue, and on San Jose 60/50/c 61/44/r installation. areFeb confirmed COVID-19 positive. aland to 495. er than in person. ADVERTISING.EWS 0RESSMATERIALISTHE 19 Feb 27 Mar 5 Mar 13 Cottage Health, San Luis Obispo 62/45/pc 63/45/c Avenue nearnumber the 101 to addition, a landscaping PROPERTYOF!MPERSAND0UBLISHING,,# * Of 16 patients in isolation, 6 pat Linden was the largest in TheIncouple will still have to be Santa Monica 65/47/pc 62/48/c allow crews to transplant palm contractor is working on new 2EPRODUCTIONORNONPERSONALUSAGEFOR Tahoe Valley numbers 40/32/pc 42/21/r by the WORLD CITIES tients are in critical care. $BMJGPSOJBUSVMZNBUUFST BOE re than a week, with all but one physically present within Califortrees. As needed, the northbound irrigation lines and is planting ANYPURPOSEWITHOUTWRITTENPERMISSION 165 No. 246 1R Vol. 6OL Today Mon. A look at the status of Cottage * Cottage has Hi/Lo/W collected 3,577 cuming from theat North County. and southbound provide whatever proof NATIONAL CITIES OFTHE.EWS 0RESSISEXPRESSLY 101 onramp Linden Avenue will niaalong 101 between City Hi/Lo/W Health through Thursday: mulative test samples: The of healthcare worktheLinden county clerk may require. PROHIBITED/THERMATERIAL INCLUDING be number closed between 9 a.m. and 3 Atlanta 48/43/r 53/35/c Beijing 37/16/c 206 resulted 43/22/s Avenue and CasitasThey Pass NEWSSERVICESTORIES COMICS *Boston Cottage Health is caring for a in GPSUIFQVOEJUTBOEUIFDBNQBJHOT 33/29/sn 34/32/sn Berlin 31/28/pc positive, 3,12427/13/s resulted in negainfected with the virus grew must also present photo identificap.m. Road. Chicago 6/-1/pc 10/4/sn Cairo 72/50/s 72/56/s SYNDICATEDFEATURESANDCOLUMNS MAY WWWNEWSPRESSCOM total of 205 patients across all camCrews will install underground tive, and 247 are pending. In most ain on Thursday, moving to 66. tion. Dallas 25/6/sn 14/2/c Cancun 83/75/t 85/71/pc BEPROTECTEDBYSEPARATECOPYRIGHTSAND .EWSPRESSCOMISALOCALVIRTUAL storm drains between Sheffield — Mitchell White puses. ofLondon these tests, patients did 55/47/c not reThe number still recovering at is The license can then be issued Denver 2/-11/sn 24/10/pc 41/40/c TRADEMARKS4HEIRPRESENTATIONBYTHE COMMUNITYNETWORKPROVIDINGINFORMATION 26/10/i Mexicohospital City 72/40/s 72/44/s *Houston 153 are acute 36/20/r care patients; 220 quire admission. w just 75. via email. .EWS 0RESSISWITHPERMISSIONLIMITED Miami 83/74/pc 84/74/s Montreal 21/10/pc 22/17/sn ABOUT3ANTA"ARBARA INADDITIONTOTHE TOONE TIMEPUBLICATIONANDDOESNOT care beds remain Adults who wish to be married acute Minneapolis -6/-22/s available. -2/-17/pc New Delhi 79/54/pc 80/56/pc ONLINEEDITIONOFTHE.EWS 0RESS PERMITOTHERUSEWITHOUTWRITTENRELEASE City planning, 34/30/i capacity 33/27/i is Paris 38/34/pc 47/39/sh *New InYork surge can also conduct a ceremony to BYTHEORIGINALRIGHTSHOLDER Philadelphia 37/32/i 34/31/r Rio de Janeiro 85/74/sh 85/75/sh COVID-19, by the ov. Newsom allows for adding 270 acute care UIFFJHIUQSFTJEFOUTFMFDUFEJOUIF solemnize the marriage, as long as identified Phoenix 66/45/pc 68/50/pc Rome 46/30/s 49/31/s -EMBEROFTHE!UDIT"UREAUOF#IRCULATIONS beds. Portland, Ore. 37/35/i 44/37/r Sydney 76/67/pc 74/68/c AND4HE!SSOCIATED0RESS both parties are present, and have numbers rtual marriages MILLER, Edward: 73; of Santa Barbara; diedwitness Feb. 2; arrangements Louis 6/1/sn 9/0/sn Tokyo 60/55/pc 59/47/r Of the 153 patients, 9 patients   

at least one who can joinby *St. A look at nationwide and worldnCoast a move that’s sure to bring Salt Lake City 34/27/c 39/31/c W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, Cities Cremations Ventura & Goleta. areSeattle on ventilators; 66 ventilators the live video conference. 37/35/sh 42/38/r wide numbers through Wednesday: ief PEREZ, to California’s engaged couc-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, 0ERIODICALS0OSTAGE0AIDAT3ANTA Elroy: 64; of Santa Barbara; died Feb. 11; arrangements by Washington, D.C. 39/36/c 36/30/r sf-snow flurries, sn-snow,States, i-ice. available (adult, pediatric The order will last for 60 days remain "ARBARA #!0OSTMASTER3END * In the United there are s,Coast Gov. Gavin signed an & Goleta. Cities Newsom Cremations Ventura "DF4NJUIJTB%FNPDSBUJDQPMJUJDBM ADDRESSCHANGESTOTHE3ANTA"ARBARA is subject the discretion 1,095,210 confirmed cases with ecutive orderJames: Thursday that will anddied RUSTIA, 89; of Carpinteria; Dec. 5;to arrangements by of and neonatal ventilators) .EWS 0RESS 0/"OX3ANTA Publishing LLC * Of the 153 patients, 16 are in isothe county clerk.   63,861 deaths and 155,737 have fulow adults to obtain marriage li- & Goleta. Coast Cities Cremations Ventura "ARBARA #!0UBLISHEDDAILY      lation with COVID-19 symptoms; 7 SARAGOSA, Rodolfo: 79; of Santa Barbara; died Feb. 12; ly recovered. nses via videoconferencing rath DAYSPERYEAR arrangements by Coast Cities Cremations Ventura & Goleta.

Two saved in water rescue

496

50,410 / 1,582

11

2,044 / 90

4,470 Closures planned

for Highway 101 111.8 project

Beaches remain open after all; county announces 11 new COVID cases, largest since last week

!$6%24)3).'

.%732//-

(OWTOMAKEYOUR$EMOCRATIC VOTESCOUNTON3UPER4UESDAY

 





DEATH NOTICES


NEWS

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

A3

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

LEON surprises hundreds of seniors with Valentine’s Day gifts 2QOLQH(YHU\GD\DW QHZVSUHVVFRP

Lic #0799445

PRESIDENT’S BREAKFAST Bestselling Author and Harvard Historian

NANCY KOEHN Courageous Leadership In Turbulent Times

COURTESY PHOTO

The Latino Elder Outreach Network surprised 400 seniors in Goleta, Santa Barbara, Carpinteria, Isla Vista, Santa Maria and Lompoc with goodie bags and Valentine’s Day cards on Thursday.

By GRAYCE MCCORMICK NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

On Thursday, the Latino Elder Outreach Network surprised 400 seniors in Goleta, Santa Barbara, Carpinteria, Isla Vista, Santa Maria and Lompoc with goodie bags and Valentine’s Day cards to share a message of support during the pandemic. Volunteers safely delivered goodie bags to seniors that included donated items from local organizations and information about vital senior services. The event was sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging, Lompoc Valley Medical Center, Mi Vida Mi

Voz, Long-Term Care Ombudsman, a program of the Family Service Agency, and the Santa Barbara County Department of Social Services. “For almost a year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the senior community is more isolated than ever before,” said LEON CoChair Marco Quintanar. “The LEON Caravan Event strives to alleviate that isolation, providing the senior community with small gifts, information on resources available for them, and the assurance that we are here to help.” The surprise was part of an effort by LEON to explore the expansion of its network to North

County. Volunteers used this as an opportunity to introduce themselves to seniors and organizations in Lompoc and Santa Maria. LEON aims to engage and empower the Latino community and all the senior communities by educating the public about the needs of and resources available for seniors in the county. Current membership includes representatives from nonprofit, public and private entities. Visit https://leonsb.org/ member-organizations for more information. email: gmccormick@newspress.com

Interim chief expects to run department for six to eight months melekian

Continued from Page A1

His retirement was again postponed after being offered a position in Ms. Miyasato’s office, and further pushed off when he and Chief Luhnow met for breakfast several months ago. Under the impression they were meeting “just because,” Chief Luhnow mentioned that she was thinking about retiring and asked Mr. Melekian if he was interested in leading the department. “I weighed my answer for about 30 seconds and thought, ‘I would really like to do that,’” he told the News-Press. He then spoke with City Administrator Paul Casey and things came together. Mr. Melekian has known Chief Luhnow since her days with the San Diego Police Department, and had nothing but praise for the outgoing chief. “I have to say, all of the people (in the department) that I’ve had live interactions with are indicative of the whole department,” he said. He described the police department as “incredibly professional” due to its commitment to constitutional policing. “I’ve been favorably impressed with everything I’ve seen,” he said. As he prepares to serve the department on an interim basis, Mr. Melekian acknowledged the “challenging times” in law enforcement, regarding how

Mr. Melekian said he expects to serve a role in the recruitment process for a new police chief. policing should be conducted. “I bring a lot of experience in dealing with issues of race and disenfranchised communities,” he explained. “What I find exciting is — and it’s already been brought to the table by Chief Luhnow — but something I’ve learned in my career is that an individual officer can make a difference in every life they contact. “That philosophy is what I hope to bring, and to help ensure that, as the process goes forward, that the next chief embraces those ideals as well.” Mr. Melekian said he plans on being with the police department for the next six to eight months, and expects to serve a role in the recruitment process for a new police chief. With his many years in law enforcement, Mr. Melekian is no stranger to criminal gang activity, some of which has been experienced throughout the Santa Barbara area so far in 2021. He played a key role in reducing gang violence and gang homicides in Pasadena in the late ‘90s, something he hopes to continue as interim chief. He also hopes to continue the community liaison program created by Chief Luhnow, which features two sworn officers that are assigned to work with various community groups. “I think they will allow us to tap

Trump acquitted in impeachment trial Former president Donald Trump was acquitted Saturday of inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The Senate convened for a weekend session Saturday to deliver the verdict, as National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The verdict vote was 57-43, which included seven Republicans and all Democrats voting to convict Mr. Trump, well short of the two-third threshold required. Voting to find Mr. Trump guilty were GOP Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of

directly into the community and help us take the temperature of things,” he said. He also explained the importance of gang-related crimes resulting in an arrest, which can serve as a resolution to the criminal aspect of the incident. “If you do (make an arrest) … you break that retaliatory cycle,” he said. “If not, the community may feel, or the gangs may feel, that the cops don’t care and that nothing will be done. “The Santa Barbara Police Department has demonstrated, on several occasions, that it has been able to do those kinds of followups and have been very effective at it.” He said he is the “first to admit” he needs to learn more about the gang activity occurring in the city, but said he doesn’t believe it will be a long learning curve. Mr. Melekian said he also hopes to build on Chief Luhnow’s commitment to officer wellness and taking care of the whole person, while also hoping to build bridges with groups who are convinced that police are the source of the problem. He said he feels as if some of the “deep social problems in America” have been placed on police, and he would like to change that narrative. email: mwhite@newspress.com

Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Patrick Toomey of Pennsylvania. Republican leader Mitch McConnell, who voted to acquit Mr. Trump, condemned the former president as “practically and morally responsible” for the insurrection. Mr. Trump could not be convicted because he was out of office, Mr. McConnell contended, according to the Associated Press. The House impeached Mr. Trump on the sole charge of incitement of insurrection one week after the riot, the most bipartisan vote of a presidential impeachment. The delay Saturday came as senators wanted to hear evidence about Mr. Trump’s actions during the riot, after prosecutors said he did nothing to stop it, according to the AP. — Mitchell White

VIRTUAL EVENT Friday, March 5, at 8 a.m. $35 TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 12

WESTMONT.EDU/BREAKFAST THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS Lead Sponsor: Westmont Choir Sponsor: David and Anna Grotenhuis Speaker Sponsor: In Memory of Jim Haslem Virtual Gold Hosts: Davies Public Affairs, HUB International Insurance Services, La Arcada Plaza, MATT Construction, Lindsay & Laurie Parton, Warren & Mary Lynn Staley

E L A S E C CLEARAN STOREWIDE

F F O % 0 6 30%THING IN-STOCK EVERY

UP TO

50

%

OFF

RUGS

Not valid with any other offers or on prior purchases. In stock items only, some restrictions apply.

SANTA BARBARA

design center

YOUR HOME FURNISHINGS SOURCE

THE FINEST ORIENTAL & MODERN FLOOR COVERINGS

410 Olive St • 805-962-8555 Mon-Sat 9:30 - 5:30 • SANTABARBARADC.COM EXPERT ORIENTAL RUG CLEANING & REPAIR • BUY OLD RUGS • RENTALS • PADDING • APPRAISALS


A4

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

OBITUARIES

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

 BELL, Jeanne Marie

Jeanne Marie Bell, our beautiful momma, a longtime resident of Santa Barbara, passed away on January 18, 2021. At her time of passing, Jeanne was surrounded by her family in her daughter’s home. Jeanne was born on January 19, 1935 in Grand Forks, North Dakota to Effie Mokerski Kennedy and William Wellwood Kennedy. Jeanne graduated from nursing school in North Dakota in 1956 and headed west to begin her nursing career. After a short time living in Texas, Jeanne arrived in California in 1959. Once in California she truly established her nursing career and found great joy and satisfaction caring for others, she was very passionate about nursing. Jeanne is survived by her four children: Laurie (Doug) Folden, Dan (Heidi) Bell, Jenny (Brad) Berch and John (Carlye) Bell, her (former) spouse Harlan Bell, her eight grandchildren: Jessica (Steven) McGillicuddy, Justin (Lauren) Bell, Kyle Folden, Kaylee Folden, Daniel Folden, Ryan Bell-MacLaren, Julia Folden, and Nicholas Bell, two great-grandchildren: Jonathan and Jameson McGillicuddy, her sisters, Elizabeth Fossen and Kaye Mason, and many loved ones. Jeanne was a member of Saint Raphael Catholic Church and volunteered for many organizations throughout Santa Barbara. She enjoyed participating in weekly bible studies, Sociable Seniors and women’s groups. Jeanne loved sharing walks around Lake Los Carneros with friends and family, cooking and baking, and working in her rose garden, which was always in bloom. More than anything though, Jeanne loved spending quality time with her family and friends. Beyond being a wonderful nurse, she was a loving and caring mother, grandmother and great-grandmother who will be missed dearly by so many. Jeanne had a close relationship with God and was grateful to her Heavenly Father for her many blessings. In Lieu of flowers, please make donations in memory of Jeanne to the Jeanne M. Bell Compassionate Care in Nursing Scholarship Foundation, which is being established at Santa Barbara City College. SBCC Foundation, 721 Cliff Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109 Attn: Gretchen Hewlett. These donations will help to provide a nursing education to future nurses, allowing Jeanne’s memory to lovingly live on in the Santa Barbara area. A celebration of life will be planned when gatherings are permitted once again.

DONALDSON, Donald

In the wee hours of Christmas Eve 2020, Don Donaldson left us to join the love of his life and wife of 62 years, Mildred, his son Richard, and granddaughter Casey. Born February 10, 1931 in Canada, Don was adopted by Tom and Helen Donaldson and raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba. As winters in Winnipeg can be rather brisk, Don and Mildred decided to look for a warmer area in which to raise their two boys. So in 1960, with a small hand-built trailer and a 1949 Oldsmobile, Don and Mildred packed up all their belongings, 4-year-old Don and 1-year-old Rick and traveled south. The search ended in Santa Barbara and young Don constantly thanked his parents for moving to paradise. Life was not easy though. Don had an 8th grade education and no job prospects on arrival from Canada. He managed to find a position with Jewel Tea, a door-to-door grocery delivery company. After many years, he and Mildred took on the challenge of managing Flamingo Mobile Home Park which led to managing San Vicente Mobile Home Park where they worked until retirement. Don enjoyed playing the jokester. Those who work at Mulligans Cafe, one of his favorite places to eat, call him Sprinkles. You see, Don loved going to restaurants and would order an Irish coffee with whipped cream and sprinkles on top. The restaurant workers would then look high and low only to tell Don they had no sprinkles. Don would then pout and look disappointed. When the Irish coffee arrived at the table, Don would slyly take out a little container and add his own sprinkles to the whipped cream. The waitress/waiter would see the sprinkles when they brought the food and wonder how they came to be. Mulligans Cafe now carries sprinkles. Those of you still reading may remember Don was adopted. After a lot of research, at the age of 82, he found out his biological mother was Florence Marie Hamel. That information led to finding her children. It was Don’s true joy to meet and learn about the siblings he never knew. One of his sisters, Rose, even braved travels with Don after Mildred had passed. We can only imagine what a 28-day round trip voyage to Tahiti with Sprinkles would be like. Travels with Mildred often included a motorhome. This was an upgrade from long trips taken to Canada with young boys, all sleeping in the station wagon. Don and Mildred even toured England, Scotland, and France in a motorhome. Don’s niece, Barb Chrisp, and her husband Dale often joined them on trips to Dodger spring training, Half Moon Bay, and Lake Almanor. Don traveled to Alaska with Dutch and Debbie Hoffmeister in a 22-foot Mini Winnie at the young age of 88. His most recent excursion was to Mount Rushmore with the McGonigle family of Sacramento. For many years the motorhome took Don and Mildred to Falcon Lake, Manitoba. They bought a little cottage on the lake where they fished, fed deer by hand, and shooed ducks off the dock. Friends and family joined often. Don taught his grandsons, Sean and Jason, how to water ski and drive a boat. So many laughs, adventures, and great times were had at the little cottage by the Payne, Malazdrewicz, and Donaldson families. Don was the quintessential immigrant. He came with little, worked hard, became a US citizen, and donated his time to help others. He loved to tell stories, some of them true. As many who knew Don have stories about him to tell, a celebration of life is planned when it is safe to gather. In the meantime Don, Karen, Sean and Jason encourage you to enjoy an Irish coffee, or hot chocolate, with sprinkles and give a toast to Don Donaldson.

POTTER, Nancy C.

Nancy C. Potter sadly passed away on February 6th, 2021, at Cottage Hospital. She was born Nancy Bettridge, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1926, and spent her young childhood in Hinsdale, Illinois, while her father John Bettridge commuted to an insurance company in Chicago. Nancy grew up in the town of Hinsdale, with her brother Bob and her mother, Jeannette. After the death of her father, her mother remarried Frank Crum, when Nancy was 12 years old, and he adopted Nancy and her brother. She later attended the private boarding schools, Dana Hall, in Wellesley, Massachusetts, and Kingswood, near Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. She went on to art school at Finch, in New York, after which she married Camille M. Shaar, a Lt. Commander in the Navy, at the end of W.W. II. They had two daughters and moved to South Bend, Indiana, until the late 1950s , where her husband worked as an engineer for Bendix. When he was hired by GM, they moved the family to Ann Arbor, Michigan, and finally in 1960, the family arrived in Santa Barbara, where he worked at Delco. While in South Bend, Nancy and a friend enjoyed creating a small business called Naneen Crafts, which sold many items to major department stores in Chicago. Nancy also joined a local community theater. In each town, she returned to take college classes, while her daughters were in school. In Santa Barbara, she also became involved with the Assistance League and Transition House charities. She enjoyed volunteering and playing bridge and continuing her artistic pursuits. In 1979, she later remarried David S. Potter, a VP at General Motors, and moved to Bloomfield Hills, Michigan for a few years, eventually returning to Santa Barbara, where Nancy and Dave retired to their home in Montecito. They often treated his grown children and grandchildren, as well as hers, to big family reunions in interesting places. They both loved to play bridge, golf, read, work on their crossword puzzles, and make unique wooden hand painted toys and gifts for their children and grandchildren. They traveled the world together and had wonderful stories to tell. After Dave passed away, Nancy continued to paint her lovely oil paintings at The Portico Gallery in Montecito, and gift many of them to her family. She still loved her bridge games with friends and her puzzles, as well as books, and visits from her grandchildren and great grandchildren, who called her “Gigi.” She is lovingly remembered as a warm and caring mother, a very special and generous grandmother, an elegant great grandmother, a tireless community contributor and friend, as well as a wonderful artist, with a curious mind. Her creativity and loving spirit will be missed and yet always with us. She is survived by her daughters, Jeannette DeConde and Camille Segna and Cami’s husband Dan Segna, her grandsons, David DeConde and Benita Tsao, Rob DeConde and Anna Kirby, their two daughters, Alexandra and Quinlan, Adam and Jenny DeConde and their son Owen and daughter Violet, Ken Segna and his wife Laura and daughter Rowan, and Brian Segna. She will be remembered by Dave’s four children: Bill, Tom, Diana, and Janice and their families, as well as her good friend Don Bowles. All of us will miss her and fondly recall our many family trips together and our happy years enjoying dinner and games at her home. Those sweet memories and her kind and loving nature are forever in our hearts. There will be a deferred Celebration of Life for family and friends, when it is safe to gather once again. In lieu of flowers, any donations will be gratefully accepted by the Assistance League of Santa Barbara, and Transition House.

COFFEY, Helen

Helen Coffey beloved aunt and family member passed away at the age of 99. Helen was born in Santa Barbara, CA to Josephine and Osborne Coffey. Helen is pre-deceased by her cherished brother William (Billie) Coffey (2018). Both Helen and Billie grew up in the Goleta Valley. Their first home was in the back of the Coffey’s Grocery Store located on Hollister Avenue in downtown Goleta. They frequented and spent much time at the homestead of the Coffey Family Ranch where they grew walnuts, lemons and later avocados. Helen graduated from Santa Barbara High School, she then attended and graduated from Woodbury University in Fashion Design. Her thoughts of working in the fashion industry changed when she was called back home to do the bookkeeping in the family business and volunteer for the wounded, because it was the height of World War II. After the War ended, Coffey’s Grocery Store was sold and Osborne built a comfortable home for the family on the Coffey Family Ranch and concentrated on growing lemons and avocados. Helen went to work for The Hughes women’s clothing store, as their bookkeeper and credit manager for 30 years. Helen spent many years volunteering at the courthouse for Fiesta. She enjoyed the costumes, food and traditions that the Fiesta spirit brings to Santa Barbara. She was an exceptional baker and enjoyed reading and finding new and different recipes to try and add to her extensive collection. She loved animals and supported the Humane Society, and she was a huge advocate to keep the memory of the Goleta Valley alive by supporting The Stow House and The Goleta Depot. Helen is survived by her many nieces Brenda Castillo (Rudolph), Diane Coffey (James), Vicki McMurray, Michelle Gasser, Angelina Stupak (Brian) and Helen’s shining star, her one nephew Dylan Rhoads. Helen had a sharp wit and could really throw out an opinionated observation, but she was generous and held a genuine concern for her family, friends, animals and community. She will be greatly missed. In honoring health and safety standards, a private burial will take place at the Goleta Cemetery.

COYNE, Roberta

June 10, 1940-February 6, 2021

Roberta Ann (Barry) Coyne was born June 10, 1940 in Cambridge, Massachusetts to parents Wilbur and Marie Barry. She passed away peacefully at the age of 80 with her family at home in Santa Barbara after a short battle with cancer. She graduated from Natick High School and Chandler School for Women in Boston, MA. Roberta met the love of her life, Paul H. Coyne Sr. at St. Zepherin’s Church in the youth choir. She grew up in a large, loving family and had a special connection to her sisters Joanmarie (Gorman) and Cheryl (Almeida) and her twin brother Bill Barry. Marrying at the age of 20, Roberta and Paul started their family in Holliston, Massachusetts which includes their children Diane McClenathen (Mark), Paul Jr., Michael and Donna. Roberta and Paul were active in the Jaycees for many years before moving to Santa Barbara, CA in 1973, when Paul transferred with Raytheon. She then secured a position with The Building Trades Council, retiring in 2000. With her husband Paul, Roberta loved traveling, being Eucharistic Ministers at St. Raphael’s Parish as well as Docents at the Santa Barbara Mission for over 20 years. She also volunteered her time at Goleta Valley Hospital for many years and served as President of the Cottage Health Auxiliary. When her husband was Grand Knight of the Knights of Columbus she was recognized as “Lady of the Year” for 1986-87. She was an active member of the Woman’s Service Club of Goleta, also serving a term as President. One of her many passions was playing bridge with several groups and had many special friends. Roberta’s loving devotion to her family, her strong faith in God, and her undeniable sense of fashion will be missed by her many friends and family. Roberta is survived by her loving husband of sixty years Paul, her four children, and five grandchildren. Michael (Jenny) & Matthew (Katie) McClenathen, Cameron, Meagan and Henry Coyne. A Funeral Mass was held for Roberta on Friday, February 12, 2021 at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church, and is now interned at the Santa Barbara Mission.

FLOWERS, Robert Thomas February 1, 1942 to February 6, 2021

Bob Flowers was born in 1942 in Long Beach, California. He was the first born of two expatriates from Ohio’s farm country, seeking relief from the cold winters and hot humid summers in Ohio by moving to golden California. After Bob gained a sister and a brother, the family relocated to the beautiful forests of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to such small towns as Johnsondale, Bass Lake and Oakhurst, all having to do with the logging industry. Here Bob began his education in a 1-room schoolhouse. Also here, Bob acquired his love of the great outdoors; exploring through the woods, climbing trees and rock outcroppings, catching snapping turtles in the creeks, fishing in the ponds and lakes. After a few years of what for Bob must have been an idyllic lifestyle, his parents decided that the kids should have better educational opportunities than those available locally and moved to San Bernardino and later to Rialto, California, where Bob grew up and two additional sisters arrived. Like a lot of other Southern California boys of driving age, he enjoyed working on and drag racing cars. His first, a 1940 Ford coupe, he kept and more recently rebuilt. It will remain in the family, hopefully, long past it’s century mark, by Bob’s son Michael (Mick). After graduation from San Bernardino High School in 1959, Bob commuted to what is now known as California State Polytechnic University at Pomona, working nearly full-time but still graduating in four years with a B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering. He spent the next decade working for a civil engineering firm and later, a soil (now geotechnical) engineering firm, serving San Bernardino County. Bob had always had a love for the Central Coast area of California. So, in 1972 he relocated to Santa Barbara having gained employment with the firm of Schmandt and Lenvik. At the time, in addition to much local work, the firm was responsible for the architecture and engineering for all restaurant sites nationwide for the exploding Sambo’s Restaurant chain. He later went to work for Les Grant at U.S. Grant & Son, a firm that already employed Bob’s younger brother Steve, also a civil engineer. In 1978 Bob and Steve established Flowers & Associates, Inc., a consulting civil engineering firm. Bob was capable of addressing any engineering challenge and did so throughout his career, both in the public works arena and, more often, in the planning and design of private infrastructure and land development. Of note is Bob’s design of the Mission Canyon Sewerage Project which extended public sewers into the rugged Mission Canyon area, allowing abandonment of septic tanks and mitigating the perennial groundwater and creek contamination issues. It was in Santa Barbara that Bob began and continued training in martial arts, earning his black belt in Koei Kan Karate. Throughout his life, Bob maintained his connection with the great outdoors. He was frequently hiking the local trails and into the Sierra Nevada Mountains. When time permitted, Bob went on extended and much more rigorous and challenging trekking and mountaineering forays to many parts of the world including Europe, Asia and South America. Bob was most proud of his trek through the Annapurna Circuit in central Nepal, of climbing Mount Aconcaqua in Argentina, and his climbs on the Alps in Europe. Bob’s involvement in engineering, development and community issues went beyond just his business interests. He was always willing to participate on public/private sector committees or otherwise provide his insight on matters affecting local planning and development or redevelopment, when solicited by government agencies. He was a board member with the California Council of Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors for many years. He sat on the Elings Park Board of Directors, providing input to the planning for development of this valuable community resource. It was at Flowers & Associates’ 40th anniversary celebration in 2018 that Bob announced his decision to retire. Sadly, he was unable to enjoy a lengthy retirement, being stricken by a stroke in December 2019. He battled to recover from the effects of this stroke for over a year, but finally succumbed to them this last week at his home in Orcutt, California. Bob is survived by his wife of 33 years, Cindy; his sons Thomas (Heidi) and Michael (Mick) and daughter Stephanie Nelson (Tim); his sisters Jean Anderson (Ken), Mary Pebworth (Mike) and Carol Lorenz (Alan); his brother Steve (Ellen); his nephews Mark Anderson (Alicia), Robert Gamage, Steve Gamage (Monique), Brian Gamage (Rose), Joel Allen (Kim), Craig Flowers, Jason Flowers (Kaylin); his nieces Denise Housatchenko (Walt), Erin Flowers, Kristin Flowers, Kerry Lorenz and Kelly Lorenz; and his grandchildren Marcus Flowers and Mae Flowers. Bob was a good, fun loving, gregarious man. He made innumerable friends and colleagues throughout his life, and not just in Santa Barbara. He will be greatly missed! After the COVID19 Virus risks have been resolved, the family plans to hold a celebration of Bob’s life at Elings Park.

RIOS, Edward J.

Edward J. Rios, age 86 passed away peacefully at Serenity House on January 20, 2021. Ed, as he was known, was born in Santa Maria, California to Manuel and Carmen Rios on December 5, 1934. The family moved to Santa Barbara where Ed attended Franklin Elementary School, Santa Barbara Junior High and graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1953. Ed went on to serve his country in the U.S. Air Force for four years and then went on to attend Cal Poly San Luis Obispo where he graduated Summa Cum Laude as a Mechanical Engineer. After graduating, Ed moved to Sacramento, California and started his own prosperous business. Being an avid golfer, he sponsored several golf tournaments for charity. Ed was able to travel all over the world before settling in Santa Barbara. Ed was preceded in death by his parents and one son. He leaves behind one son Edward Rios, Jr., his sisters Adeline Rios Ratliff and Virginia Rios Booth, his nieces Marina Ratliff and her children Aaron Ratliff and Ashley Kurth (Sean) and their children Lorin Blakely (Jeff) and their children Kyser and Teale and his nephew Alex Anderson. Services are private because of Covid.

CHURCHILL, Peter F. May 1, 1938 - February 5, 2021

Peter was born in Santa Barbara, to Gladys (Irvine) and Franklin Churchill. He attended local schools Goleta Union for 1st through 7th, Santa Barbara Jr High for 8th & 9th and Santa Barbara High, graduating in 1956. Peter was in the army and the army reserves from 1956 1962. He married Helen Zozara in 1957 and had daughter Terry and son Patrick. He worked at the family business Churchill Heating and Sheet Metal for 42 years, retiring in 1997. Peter married Sherrill McLachlan in 1973. For over 50 years Peter enjoyed sailing on his Geary 18 “Citation” and sailboat “Primetime” and being a member of the Santa Barbara Yacht Club. He was the commodore in 2003. He was also a member of the local Elks #613 for over 30 years. He really enjoyed camping with the Caravaneers! Throughout the years travels to Europe, Mexico and Hawaii were the best. Peter is survived by his wife, Sherry Churchill, daughter Terry Graf (Eric), son Patrick Churchill (Kerri) and step-daughters Heather McLachlan, Shawn Dyer (Drew) and Angela Thompson (James). He had eight grandchildren Brennon & Jordon Dyer, Stuart & Reese Moulton, Karly & Erin Graf and Alec & Ian Churchill. A Celebration of Life will be held at Santa Barbara Yacht Club in the spring. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to: Santa Barbara Youth Sailing Foundation C/O SBYC 130 Harbor Way SB, Ca 93109

PEREZ, Katrina Kay Brugmann Feb 6, 1961 – Jan 28, 2021

This past week we lost Katrina - dear wife, mother and friend - to metastatic breast cancer. She was just shy of celebrating her 60th birthday. Katrina was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Jean and Bruce B. Brugmann. In 1964 the Brugmanns moved to San Francisco where they founded and published the San Francisco Bay Guardian. During her high school years, Katrina worked at the newspaper doing entertainment listings and design in the art department. She attended Bradford College in Bradford, Massachusetts and graduated from Cornell University with a major in Political Science. She moved to Santa Barbara in 1982. She met and married David Perez, an electrical engineer in 1988. They raised two children, Madeline and Nicholas. Madeline is a student in Yale University’s Physician Associate Program and Nicholas is an engineer in Ventura. Katrina’s professional career included time working in marketing at KBLS 990 Radio, an education coordinator at Educational Foundation (known as EF) working with foreign exchange students, Santa Barbara Designs, and most recently at Trinity Episcopal Church in Santa Barbara, CA. At Trinity, she was an office administrator. This recent position at Trinity is what she loved the most. It was often said that the Trinity office was the heartbeat of the church. Katrina loved the staff and members of the church. She made everyone feel comfortable whenever there was a request for services or help. Homeless would often show up outside her office window and she would provide food, money or referral to a local shelter for those who needed it. As a result, she had many repeat customers. She loved working with the Santa Barbara Warming Center to provide Trinity’s space for those who would otherwise be in the inclement weather for the night. She also volunteered at the Transition House where she would prepare meals for unfortunate families in need of assistance. Katrina loved to travel. Among the many places that she traveled to were Kenya, Tanzania, Chile, the Galapagos Islands, Trinidad and Tabago, Brazil, Germany, England, France, Italy, Croatia, Canada, Hawaii, Honduras, Belize, Mexico, Ecuador, Turkey, New Caledonia, and Peru. Of these, the safari in Africa was the most memorable. She enjoyed the giraffes, white rhinos, lions, elephants, and zebras. She fondly remembered the Maasai people with their colorful robes of bright red and beautiful beaded jewelry. She created photo albums of each of these trips so that she could re-live them over and over. The day before she died, knowing the end was near, she told her mother and father with whom she traveled extensively, “We had fun, didn’t we?” Katrina was a prodigious reader, and her children loved her to read to them from the plethora of children’s books she acquired or borrowed from the Goleta Library. While her kids were attending La Patera Elementary School, she dedicated much of her free time to the La Patera Book Fair where she helped raise money for the school’s library. One of her favorite monthly gatherings was with the members of her book club to which she belonged for more than 27 years. She was also a member of the San Francisco Bay Guardian Board of Directors. Katrina loved to walk around Lake Los Carneros’ numerous paths and marvel at the flora and fauna. The view of the Santa Ynez Mountain Range was one of her favorites while on those walks. This was her daily routine rain or shine. Her family has created a Go-Fund-Me page for donations that will be used to place a bench in her honor at Lake Los Carneros. Please go to this link if you’d like to contribute: https://www.gofundme. com/f/katrina-perez-memorial-bench-at-lake-los-carneros qid=5ee943dfd81409dd1e126 630705adce4 She is survived by her loving husband David, daughter Madeline and son Nicholas of Santa Barbara, CA and her parents Jean and Bruce, and brother Dan Brugmann of San Francisco, CA. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Trinity Episcopal Church 1500 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

In Memory Theodore MalcolM BeST

It is with great sadness that the family of Theodore Malcolm Best announce his passing last year on February 14, 2020 at the age of 78. Ted will be lovingly remembered by his children, Leslie, Kelly, Kristin, and Kimberly, and by his grandson, Benjamin. Ted is also survived by his brothers Trevor and Richard. His brother Gordon preceded him in passing. Ted was born to Sydney and Dorothy Best in Chungwei, Ninghsia, China, living there until he attended high school in Los Angeles. Ted attended Westmont College in Santa Barbara and graduated in 1961. The summer before he graduated he met and fell in love with his wife and soul mate Marilyn who precedes him in death by thirteen years. Immediately following his graduation from Westmont he began teaching at La Colina Junior High School. He would remain at La Colina for the next 40 years. Ted’s passion and dedication for teaching was expressed in the student programs offered throughout the years. He began as a Physical Education teacher and coached the basketball team for several years. Later, he began teaching history. He particularly enjoyed taking students to Washington D.C. each spring. Mr. Best, as his students knew him, made a lasting impact on them as well as the faculty he worked with until he retired. It was common to have a former student approach him to say hi and share with him how much they admired and remembered him from their Jr. High days. This happened quite frequently considering his teaching career lasted four decades. Ted will be forever in our hearts and minds and his family is eternally grateful for the care he received from the Visiting Nurses Home Care prior to his death. A celebration of life was held at the Beachside Café, his favorite place to eat and hang out, right before COVID hit.

Obituary notices are published daily in the Santa Barbara News-Press and also appear on our website www.newspress.com To place an obituary, please email the text and photo(s) to obits@newspress.com or fax text only (no photos) to (805) 966-1421. Please include your name, address, contact phone number and the date(s) you would like the obituary to be published. Photos should be in jpeg format with at least 200 dpi. If a digital photo is not available, a picture may be brought into our office for scanning. We will lay out the obituary using our standard format. A formatted proof of the obituary and the cost will be emailed back for review and approval. The minimum obituary cost to print one time is $150.00 for up to 1.5” in length -- includes 1 photo and up to 12 lines of text, approximately 630 characters; up to approximately 930 characters without a photo. Add $60.00 for each additional inch or partial inch after the first 1.5”; up to approximately 700 characters per additional inch. All Obituaries must be reviewed, approved, and prepaid by deadline. We accept all major credit cards by phone; check or cash payments may be brought into our office located at 715 Anacapa Street. *Early Deadline for Presidents’ Day, Thurs., Feb 11 - Obituaries publishing Saturday, Feb. 13 thru Tuesday, Feb. 16, deadline is Thursday, Feb. 11 at 12 noon. The deadline for Tuesday through Friday’s editions is 10 a.m. on the previous day; Saturday, Sunday and Monday’s editions all deadline at 12-noon on Thursday (Pacific Time). Free Death Notices must be directly emailed by the mortuary to our newsroom at news@newspress.com. The News-Press can not accept Death Notices from individuals.


NEWS

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

PAGE

A5

sports@newspress.com

Sports

A5

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

S U N DA Y, F E B RUA R Y 14 , 2 0 21

UCSB takes Big West basketball lead after ninth-straight win By MARK PATTON NEWS-PRESS SENIOR WRITER

JaQuori McLaughlin overcame a cold shooting night to score eight of his 14 points in the final six minutes as UCSB pulled away for a 59-50 men’s basketball victory at Hawaii late Friday night. The win was the ninth in a row for the Gauchos (13-3), putting them in sole possession of first place in the Big West Conference with a 7-2 record. UC Irvine fell out of a tie with UCSB by losing at UC Riverside on Friday. The winning streak is the Gauchos’ longest during Joe Pasternack’s four seasons as head coach. His 2017-18 team had an eightgame streak, all in Big West play. UCSB’s last nine-game streak came at the end of the 2015-16 season when it won its final eight

regular-season games and then its Big West Tournament opener. The longest winning streak for the Gauchos came when they opened the 1988-89 season with an 11-0 record to crack the NCAA top 25 poll. UCSB used a 12-0 run in the first half to turn a 12-10 deficit into a 22-12 lead. Jean Pierre-Louis scored seven of the points, which included a slam dunk, a gliding layup and a three-pointer at the 10:15 mark. He finished with 11 points and a game-high three steals. Amadou Sow, who shared team scoring honors with McLaughlin by scoring 14 points, added a layup during the run. He made 6-of-9 shots. A three-pointer by McLaughlin extended UCSB’s lead to 28-20 at halftime. A runner by Pierre-Louis gave the Gauchos

their biggest lead, 37-24, early in the second half. The Rainbow Warriors had drawn as close as four, 41-37, when a put-back by Robinson Idehen, a driving three-point play by McLaughlin, and a jumper by Destin Barnes put UCSB ahead 48-38 with 5:08 left. The Gauchos shot just 36.7% (22-of-50) overall and 18.8% from the three-point arc (3-for-16), but they also held the Rainbow Warriors to 33.3% shooting. Miles Norris blocked three Hawaii shots. He also led UCSB with seven rebounds. The Gauchos committed a season-low seven turnovers and scored 16 points off Hawaii’s turnovers. The two teams played the second game of their two-game series on Saturday night. For full coverage, see Monday’s News-Press. email: mpatton@newspress.com

Volleyball upstart wins Womble Ethics Award for Laguna Blanca By MARK PATTON NEWS-PRESS SENIOR WRITER

Coach Jason Donnelly knew he had a special player by the reaction of Frances Carlson’s Laguna Blanca teammates when he moved her into the starting lineup midway through last year’s girls volleyball season. “As Frances’ confidence and ability in the volleyball world grew, her teammates just continued to love seeing her do well,” Donnelly said. “That’s a sign to me of a really highcharacter kid when even people that she might be playing in front of are rooting for her to do well. “All Frances wants to do is help the team in any way she can.” Carlson, now a junior at Laguna, was recognized for her high character this week when she was presented the Phil Womble Ethics in Sports Award by the Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table. The ceremony was conducted virtually on the organization’s web site, sbart.org, since its weekly press luncheons have been put on pause by the COVID-19 pandemic. Womble, who died in 2017 at age 80, gained induction into the Round Table’s Hall of Fame in 1994 for his contributions to local sports. He created an ethics award for student-athletes at each of eight area schools, making the first presentation in 2002. “The recipient must be a junior, that way they can carry on as leaders,” Womble said at the time. “They must be someone who consistently displays virtues of honesty, respect, loyalty, reliability, teamwork and good sportsmanship.” Carlson, the daughter of Ashley Tidey and Tom Carlson, fits the definition well, Donnelly said. “Frances is the kind of kid that everybody roots for,” he said. “She is a tenacious competitor who is universally respected by her teammates and coaches. She is of the highest character and does everything with a huge smile on her face. “She is extremely respectful to everyone, and constantly puts others’ needs before her own. She is a joy to coach.” Donnelly said Carlson was surprised when informed that she had made the varsity as a sophomore last year. “At the time, I told her that she probably wasn’t going to be playing a whole lot because we

UCSB’s JaQuori McLaughlin, front, and Amadou Sow, shown here in action earlier this year, each scored 14 points in Friday’s win over Hawaii.

KENNETH SONG / NEWS-PRESS

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

Gauchos take down Hawaii to snap losing streak By MITCHELL WHITE NEWS-PRESS ASSOCIATE EDITOR

COURTESY PHOTO

Frances Carlson, a three-sport athlete at Laguna Blanca School, was awarded the Phil Womble Ethics in Sports Award by the Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table.

had a pretty good team with a lot of experience,” he said. “And yet, Frances showed up every single day and played her role perfectly in practice. “In about the middle of the season, she found herself serving and passing and defending in critical league and playoff matches.” Carlson, who also plays on Laguna’s beach volleyball and soccer teams, received AllFrontier League honorable mention as a sophomore while helping the Owls win all 10 of their conference matches. They finished with an overall record of 18-5. “I didn’t know Mr. Womble personally, but from what I’ve heard and from what I’ve read, he was a really incredible person,” she said. “I’m so honored to be receiving this award in his name, and of course a huge thank you to all of my coaches at Laguna: Mr. (Kevin) Shertzer for

“Frances is the kind of kid that everybody roots for,” he said. “She is a tenacious competitor who is universally respected by her teammates and coaches. She is of the highest character and does everything with a huge smile on her face.” Jason Donnelly, Laguna Blanca volleyball coach

soccer, Jordon (Dyer) for beach volleyball, and of course Mr. Donnelly for indoor volleyball, but also as a life coach. “He’s seen me grow since I was very young. He helped me grow as a player and as a person, both on and off the field. “And of course my parents, my family. I’m so grateful to them for the constant support, driving me to practices and to games. They’re just always there for me.” Carlson’s attributes go way beyond the playing court. She’s maintained a grade-point average of 4.23 with Advanced Placement courses in English, U.S. History and Latin. She was inducted into the Santa Barbara Literary Society. She is also a Scholastic Writing Gold Key member who has earned a national silver medal for her writing. She serves as the creative director and as a contributing author for the school’s magazine, The Fourth Estate. Carlson, who has logged more than 300 hours of community service, has volunteered at homeless shelters and with Laguna’s Sock Club, which organizes projects to help at-risk communities in Santa Barbara. She’s also participated in the Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership Seminar and has served as junior executive for Laguna Blanca’s TEDx program. “Frances is the kind of studentathlete that every coach dreams of working with,” Donnelly said. “She has an outstanding work ethic and plays whatever role is needed to help the team succeed.” email: mpatton@newspress.com

The UCSB women’s basketball team was able to avenge Friday night’s loss to Hawaii, dominating the Rainbow Wahine in a 72-50 victory at the Thunderdome. The Gauchos (3-12, 3-8 Big West Conference) squandered an eight-point halftime lead Friday night, but seemed destined to reverse course on Saturday. UCSB outscored Hawaii 27-6 in the third en route to the win. UCSB’s win came despite a cold shooting night, as the Gauchos made just six of their 27 attempts from distance and shot just 38% overall in the game. Hawaii (5-6, 4-4 Big West) was plagued by 17 turnovers, which UCSB was able to convert into 23 points. UCSB only turned the ball over 10 times, allowing just eight points by the visitors. UCSB led by six points at the half, blowing the game open in the third to snap its six-game losing streak. UCSB’s Doris Jones led all scorers with 23 points, adding six rebounds and three assists. Alyssa Marin added 12 points, five assists and four rebounds. WESTMONT 91, SIMPSON 47 The Warriors led wire-towire in their lopsided win over Simpson on Saturday. Westmont (5-1) jumped out to a 19-point lead in the first quarter and never looked back. They led by 30, 56-26 at the half, and kept their foot on the gas pedal throughout. The Warriors largest lead was 46, and they never trailed. As a team, Westmont dominated in the three-point shooting category, sinking 14 of its 37 attempts compared to just 4-22 for the Red Hawks, while also holding a 51-27 edge in rebounding. Lauren Tsuneishi led all scorers with 20 points, including six threepointers. Iyree Jarrett added 16 points and 11 assists, and Stefanie Berberabe added eight points, 11 rebounds and six assists. MEN’S BASKETBALL

WESTMONT 79, VANGUARD 78 Abram Carrasco didn’t have his best night on Saturday, but the senior saved his best for last. Carrasco’s layup with two seconds remaining lifted the Warriors (4-4, 1-2 in Golden State Athletic Conference) to a onepoint victory over the Lions at Murchison Gym. After surrendering a five-point lead down the stretch on Friday night against Vanguard, Westmont again found its backs against the wall in the game’s final minutes. Vanguard’s Garrett White knocked down a pair of free throws with 1:14 left in the game to give his team a one-point advantage, a lead that held until Carrasco’s late-game heroics. Vanguard’s Isaac Davis left the door open for the hosts, missing the front end of a one-and-one, which gave Westmont a chance to

KENNETH SONG / NEWS-PRESS FILE PHOTOS

UCSB Doris Jones, shown here in action on Friday night, scored a game-high 23 points on Saturday helping the Gauchos snap their six-game losing streak as they defeated Hawaii 72-50 at the Thunderdome.

win the game. Coming out of a timeout, Carrasco was able to blow by the defense on his way to the hole for the bucket. He finished with just 10 points, none bigger than the final two. The Warriors trailed 31-28 late in the first half, only to go on a 13-0 run to take a 10-point lead. Westmont led 45-36 at the half, with Jared Brown and Ajay Singh each scoring nine points in the first 20 minutes. Ahead by two, 46-44, with 17:45 left in the second half, Westmont went on a 20-3 run in the next four-plus minutes of game time. The scoring spurt included a dunk by Cade Roth and five buckets by Singh, who finished with a teamhigh 21 points. Trailing by nine with 7:13 left, Vanguard went on a 9-3 run to make it a one-possession game. Westmont had lost the two previous matchups against Vanguard, including a 87-73 loss in Costa Mesa on Feb. 9 and Friday’s 64-62 loss. The Warriors will be back in action Feb. 23 when they host Hope International. COLLEGE BASEBALL

WESTMONT 17, SIMPSON 1 WESTMONT 10, SIMPSON 0 The Warriors broke out the bats in a major way on Saturday, taking both games of their double header against Simpson in dominating fashion. In Game 1, Drew Bayard and Alex Stufft provided the offensive punch, as both seniors hit grand slams en route to the lopsided victory.

The Warriors (5-3) notched 13 hits in Game 1, 10 of which went for extra bases. They were also assisted by eight walks from the visitors. Westmont scored in bunches in the opener, with four runs in the first, four in the second and six in the third. Former Bishop Diego standout Gabe Arteaga got the start for the Warriors and allowed just three hits over five innings of work. The sophomore struck out three and walked none picking up the win. Game 2 was much of the same, as Westmont jumped in front from the start and never looked back. Stufft went 3-3 at the plate and had three RBIs in Game 2. John Jensen also went 3-3 with a pair of RBIs. Ryan Humphreys allowed just one hit after five, with Cameron Phelps and Carlos Moreno helping secure the seven-inning, onehitter, with scoreless innings in relief. MEN’S SOCCER

The Westmont men’s soccer game against Fresno Pacific was canceled due to COVID-19 protocols. The Warriors are scheduled for an exhibition game at UCLA on Tuesday, and hope that test rules on Monday will clear the way for that contest. Westmont will begin Golden State Athletic Conference Play on Feb. 25, hosting Vanguard at Thorrington Field. No spectators are permitted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. email: mwhite@newspress.com


A6

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

NEWS

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

Gray whale calf spotted in Santa Barbara’s Harbor By GRAYCE MCCORMICK NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

Friday afternoon was “shore”-ly an exciting day, as a gray whale calf was spotted unusually close to various parts of the harbor area in Santa Barbara around noon and throughout the day. The baby whale was seen both along Stearns Wharf and inside the harbor. It wasn’t spotted on Saturday according to Harbor Patrol, so it is assumed that the baby whale headed back toward the open ocean, perhaps back to its mother. “It’s unusual, but it’s not unheard of this time of year to see that, and they usually end up finding their way out,” Harbor Patrol Officer

Nathan Alldredge told the News-Press on Saturday. He said that a whale coming that close to land is a rare occurrence, and Harbor Patrol only sees one that close maybe once or twice every few years. “We see whales all the time outside the harbor, but for them to come in close, they could be following food trying to eat or kind of confused,” Officer Alldredge said. Harbor Patrol works with the Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute when things like this occur, so CIMWI staff members came Friday afternoon to monitor the whale for its safety. Harbor Patrol officers also monitored the situation to ensure boaters and other people

in the area didn’t bother the whale or interfere with its normal feeding and behavioral patterns. Other than that, officials simply let the visitor roam around, to the delight of viewers. The good news is the young mammal didn’t show any signs of illness or distress — it’s possible that he or she was just popping in to say hello to the humans of Santa Barbara, many of whom lined up along Stearns Wharf Friday afternoon to catch a glimpse. While no one is sure if the curious whale will make another appearance, it sure was a “whale”-come surprise. email: gmccormick@newspress.com

‘Every day is a celebration for us’ ���������������� ����������

'($'/,1((;7(1'(' ��We����������������� ��������������������

                       

            

+

E #J-JOHVBM

FREVIP Concierge

Customer Service

 

www.sCIFBMUIJOT.com 3412 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

2021 LOYALTY PROGRAM

Advertisers, ask about this cost saving program. Call today! 564-5230

LOVE

Continued from Page A1 typical of him. He’s always there for me.” Jack said he loves his wife because she’s “so understanding” of him and “so steady.” He shared that Ruth was always patient if he canceled on their dates and understanding of his family’s different background, especially as she helped him convert to Christianity. Now, the Wilsons enjoy facetiming their five children, all of whom are married, 14 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Since 1977, they’ve been taking a trip to Maui every year and staying for sometimes up to four weeks, snorkeling and simply enjoying the tropics. However, they’re unsure if they’ll be able to make the trip again, as Ruth suffered from an aneurysm two years ago, making traveling more difficult. That being said, when the couple was asked if they had any plans for Valentine’s Day today, their answers exemplified that

&RXQW\RI6DQWD%DUEDUD &RXQW\3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQ  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress Report :HGQHVGD\)HEUXDU\ +HDULQJEHJLQVDW$0

 2Q)HEUXDU\WKH&RXQW\3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQZLOOFRQGXFWDSXEOLFKHDULQJDQGFRQVLGHUWKHIROORZLQJLQRUGHUWR SURYLGH E\ $SULO   WKH 2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress Report WR WKH %RDUG RI 6XSHUYLVRUV %RDUG  *RYHUQRU¶V 2IILFH RI 3ODQQLQJ DQG 5HVHDUFK 235  &DOLIRUQLD 'HSDUWPHQW RI +RXVLQJ DQG &RPPXQLW\ 'HYHORSPHQW +&' DQG&LW\RI6DQWD%DUEDUD  x 5HFHLYHDQGILOHWKH&RPSUHKHQVLYH3ODQ$QQXDO3URJUHVV5HSRUW  x 'HWHUPLQHWKDWWKH&RXQW\3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQ¶VDFWLRQVUHJDUGLQJWKH2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress ReportDUHQRWVXEMHFWWRWKH&DOLIRUQLD(QYLURQPHQWDO4XDOLW\$FW &(4$ SXUVXDQWWR&(4$*XLGHOLQHV6HFWLRQV  F  DQG E  DQG  x $XWKRUL]H VWDII WR SURYLGH WKH 2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress Report WR WKH %RDUG *RYHUQRU¶V 235 +&'DQG&LW\RI6DQWD%DUEDUD  7KH&RXQW\3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQKHDULQJEHJLQVDW$07KHRUGHURILWHPVOLVWHGRQWKHDJHQGDLVVXEMHFWWRFKDQJH E\ WKH &RXQW\ 3ODQQLQJ &RPPLVVLRQ 7KH VWDII DQDO\VLV RI WKH SURSRVDO PD\ EHYLHZHG DW WKH 3ODQQLQJ DQG 'HYHORSPHQW 'HSDUWPHQW ZHEVLWH ORFDWHG DW KWWSVZZZFRXQW\RIVERUJSOQGHYKHDULQJVPSFVEF SULRU WR WKH KHDULQJ )RU IXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQDERXWWKHSURMHFWSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHSODQQHU&RULQD9HQHJDVDWFYHQHJDV#FRXQW\RIVERUJ

of nearly seven decades of true, unconditional love. “You know what,” Ruth said. “Every day is a celebration for us. We love each other so much that every day is special, and of course on Valentine’s Day, everybody will do something, but not us.” “We probably won’t,” Jack

agreed. “We’re going to stay home on Valentine’s Day, but I might take Ruth out to Chuck’s a day or two after so we can enjoy it without the crowd.” Ruth added, “But I’m sure we’ll have chocolate!” email: gmccormick@newspress.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Jack and Ruth Wilson always enjoy their annual vacation to Maui, something they said has been a highlight of their marriage.

Taubman Symposia to host author Ilan Stavans ISLA VISTA — The Taubman Symposia in Jewish Studies at UCSB is hosting a discussion today with travelogue author Ilan Stavans of Amherst College. Mr. Stavans will discuss “The Seventh Heaven: Travels through Jewish Latin America” (2020), where he talked with families of the desaparecidos in Buenos Aires, “Indian Jews” and people affiliated with neoNazi groups in Patagonia. He also visits Spain to understand the long-term effects of the Inquisition, the American Southwest habitat of “secret Jews,” and Israel, where immigrants from Latin America have reshaped the Jewish state. “The Seventh Heaven” details Mr. Stavans’s ongoing quest to find a convergence between the personal and the historical. The discussion will take place at 3 p.m. today via this Zoom link: https://ucsb.zoom. us/j/84547231386. In addition, copies of “The Seventh Heaven” are available for purchase from Chaucer’s Books. — Grayce McCormick

Preparing for Valentine’s Day

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¶V([HFXWLYH2UGHU1LVVXHGRQ0DUFKZKLFKVWDWHV x

3URYLGLQJ DQ RSSRUWXQLW\ WR ³REVHUYH DQG DGGUHVV WKH PHHWLQJ WHOHSKRQLFDOO\ RU RWKHUZLVH HOHFWURQLFDOO\´ DORQH PHHWVWKHSDUWLFLSDWLRQUHTXLUHPHQWDQG

x

³6XFKDERG\QHHGQRWPDNHDYDLODEOHDQ\SK\VLFDOORFDWLRQIURPZKLFKPHPEHUVRIWKHSXEOLFPD\REVHUYHWKH PHHWLQJDQGRIIHUSXEOLFFRPPHQW´

7KHIROORZLQJDOWHUQDWLYHPHWKRGVRISDUWLFLSDWLRQDUHDYDLODEOHWRWKHSXEOLF  <RX PD\ REVHUYH WKH OLYH VWUHDP RI WKH &RXQW\ 3ODQQLQJ &RPPLVVLRQ PHHWLQJV RQ   /RFDO &DEOH &KDQQHO    RQOLQH DW KWWSZZZFRXQW\RIVERUJFHRFVEWYOLYHVWUHDPVEF RU   <RX7XEH DW KWWSVZZZ\RXWXEHFRPXVHU&6%79  ,I \RX ZLVK WR PDNH D JHQHUDO SXEOLF FRPPHQW RU WR FRPPHQW RQ D VSHFLILF DJHQGD LWHP WKH IROORZLQJ PHWKRGV DUH DYDLODEOH x 'LVWULEXWLRQWRWKH&RXQW\3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQ6XEPLW\RXUFRPPHQWYLDHPDLOSULRUWRSPRQWKH 0RQGD\ SULRU WR WKH &RPPLVVLRQ KHDULQJ 3OHDVH VXEPLW \RXU FRPPHQW WR WKH 5HFRUGLQJ 6HFUHWDU\ DW GYLOODOR#FRXQW\RIVERUJ<RXUFRPPHQWZLOOEHSODFHGLQWRWKHUHFRUGDQGGLVWULEXWHGDSSURSULDWHO\ x 9LGHR DQG 7HOHFRQIHUHQFH 3XEOLF 3DUWLFLSDWLRQ ±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¶VUXOHVRQKHDULQJVDQGSXEOLFFRPPHQWXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHGLUHFWHGE\WKH&KDLUUHPDLQ DSSOLFDEOHWRHDFKRIWKHSDUWLFLSDWLRQPHWKRGVOLVWHGDERYH  Attendance and participation by the public is invited and encouraged. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Hearing Support Staff (805) 568-2000. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the Hearing Support Staff to make reasonable arrangements. If you challenge the project in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence to the Planning Commission prior to the public hearing.

KENNETH SONG / NEWS-PRESS

Charlotte Andersen, an owner of Andersen’s Danish Bakery & Restaurant on State Street, finishes assembling a Valentine’s Day gift basket, which includes baked goods, bottled beverages, and a small chocolate fondue set. Serving Danish cuisine since 1976, Andersen’s will be open for baked goods and outdoor dining today.

154 new COVID-19 cases reported Saturday vaccines

Continued from Page A1

be an “impossibility” to vaccine all those in Phase 1B simultaneously due to the lack of supply. She stressed that planning efforts are continuing in the meantime, and that the county is poised to roll out more vaccine doses once the supply allows. By mid-March, Blue Shield California will become the thirdparty administrator for the statewide vaccination rollout and will manage the allocation and determine priorities. For more information on the county’s vaccination efforts, visit https://publichealthsbc.org/ vaccine/. The county Public Health Department reported five additional COVID-related deaths on Saturday, as well as 154 new cases. The county has now reported 372 total deaths and 30,728 total cases.

Four of the decedents were over 70 and one was between 50 and 69 years old. All five had underlying medical conditions and all were associated with an outbreak at a congregate living facility. Four resided in Santa Barbara and the other in Santa Maria, officials said. The city of Santa Maria reported 45 new cases on Saturday, and has now reported 10,419 total cases. Of those, 165 remain active. A total of 31 new cases were reported in the city of Santa Barbara, which has now reported 5,632 total cases, 155 of which are still infectious. Some 24 new cases were reported in the city of Lompoc, which has now reported 3,230 total cases, including 95 that are still active. Other daily totals from Saturday included: Isla Vista, nine new cases (1,146 total, 43 active); South County

unincorporated areas including Montecito, Summerland and the city of Carpinteria, eight new cases (1,236 total, 33 active); federal prison in Lompoc, seven new cases (1,086 total, three active); unincorporated areas of Sisquoc, Casmalia, Garey, Cuyama, New Cuyama and the city of Guadalupe, seven new cases (1,195 total, 29 active); Goleta, four new cases (1,594 total, 63 active); Orcutt, three new cases (1,603 total, 27 active); unincorporated area of the Goleta Valley and Gaviota, three new cases (1,044 total, 20 active); and Santa Ynez Valley, two new cases (895 total, 29 active). The geographic region for 11 cases was pending on Saturday. A total of 129 people are receiving treatment at local hospitals, including 28 in the Intensive Care Unit. The county’s ICU availability was 31.6% as of Saturday. email: mwhite@newspress.com


ADVERTISING

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

A7

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

2021 SAVINGS

Kia OF VENTURA

1 VOLUME KIA DEALER IN TRI-COUNTY

#

2020 Kia Niro

2020 2 020 Kia Sportage

2020 Kia Sorento

75

*Sales claim based on CA DMV retail registrations from January-December 2020.

0%

APR

FOR

MONTHS!

$13.33 per mo. per $1,000 financed. Available on select models, subject to credit approval through Kia Motors Finance to well qualified buyers.  Take delivery by 2/28/2021.  May not be combined with other offers.  See dealer for details.

New 2021 Kia Forte LXS

145

$

/MO

36 MONTH LEASE

+ TAX

$2,499 Due at signing*

*MSRP $20,355. $2,995 Due at Signing. Price excludes government taxes and fees. 12,000 miles per year. 15 cents per mile penalty fee and $400 termination fee. No security deposit required. On approved Tier 1 Credit through KMF. Must take delivery stock 2/28/2021.

New 2021 KIA Seltos S

149

$

/MO

24 MONTH LEASE $2,995 Due at signing*

+ TAX

*MSRP $23,240. $2,995 Due at Signing. Price excludes government taxes and fees. 12,000 miles per year. 20 cents per mile penalty fee and $400 termination fee. No security deposit required. On approved Tier 1 Credit through KMF. Must take delivery stock 2/28/2021.

New 2020 Kia Niro LX

149

$

/MO

24 MONTH LEASE $2,995 Due at signing*

+ TAX

*MSRP $26,240. $2,995 Due at Signing. Price excludes government taxes and fees. 12,000 miles per year. 20 cents per mile penalty fee and $400 termination fee. No security deposit required. On approved Tier 1 Credit through KMF. Must take delivery stock 2/28/2021.

New 2021 Kia K5 GT

189

$

/MO

36 MONTH LEASE $3,164 Due at signing*

*MSRP $25,042. $3,164 Due at Signing. Price excludes government taxes and fees. 12,000 miles per year. 15 cents per mile penalty fee and $400 termination fee. No security deposit required. On approved Tier 1 Credit through KMF. Must take delivery stock 2/28/2021.

New 2020 KIA Niro EV

249 805.585.3640 $

/MO

24 MONTH LEASE $2,995 Due at signing*

*MSRP $40,345. $2,995 Due at Signing. Price excludes government taxes and fees. 12,000 miles per year. 20 cents per mile penalty fee and $400 termination fee. No security deposit required. On approved Tier 1 Credit through KMF. Must take delivery stock 2/28/2021.

kirbykia.com In the Ventura Auto Center • 6424 Auto Center Drive


A8

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS/ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

To place a Classified ad call 805-963-4391

Classified To place an ad please call (805) 963-4391 or email to classad@newspress.com

, ,1/ /

 ,  -

PUBLIC NOTICES

Advertise Here For As Low as

$5.97*

VVœÕ˜Ìˆ˜}É œœŽŽii«ˆ˜} `“ˆ˜ˆÃÌÀ>̈Ûi }i˜Vˆià ÀÌÉÀ>«…ˆVà Õ̜“œÌˆÛi

iÀˆV>É"vwVi

œ“«ÕÌiÀ

ÕÃ̜“iÀÊ-iÀۈVi

ˆÃÌÀˆLÕ̜ÀÃ

œ“iÃ̈V ˜}ˆ˜iiÀˆ˜}É/iV…˜ˆV> ˆ˜>˜Vˆ> œÛiÀ˜“i˜Ì ˜`ÕÃÌÀˆ>É>˜Õv>VÌÕÀˆ˜} i}> >˜>}i“i˜Ì i`ˆV>É i˜Ì> *iÀܘ>Ê-iÀۈVià *ÀœviÃȜ˜> ,iÃÌ>ÕÀ>˜ÌÉœ`}ˆ˜} ,iÌ>ˆÉ-̜Ài ->ià -iVÀiÌ>Àˆ> -iv‡ “«œÞ“i˜Ì -Žˆi`Ê>LœÀ ˆÃVi>˜iœÕà *>À̇/ˆ“i /i“«œÀ>ÀÞ œLÃÊ7>˜Ìi` ,iÃՓiÃ

>ÀiiÀÊ `ÕV>̈œ˜ “«œÞ“i˜Ìʘvœ 7œÀŽÊ>ÌÊœ“i

˜ÌˆµÕià ««ˆ>˜Vià ÀÌ ÕV̈œ˜Ã Õ`ˆœÉ-ÌiÀiœ Õ̜Ê*>ÀÌà ˆVÞVià Ո`ˆ˜}Ê>ÌiÀˆ>

œiV̈LiÃ

œ““Õ˜ˆV>̈œ˜Ã

œ“«ÕÌiÀà >À“Ê µÕˆ«“i˜Ì ii`ÉÕi ÕÀ˜ˆÌÕÀi >À>}iÊ->ià i>Ì…Ê-iÀۈViÃÉ-Õ««ˆià œLLˆià iÜiÀÞ ˆÛiÃ̜VŽ >V…ˆ˜iÀÞ ˆÃVi>˜iœÕà ˆÃV°Ê7>˜Ìi` ÕÈV> ÕÀÃiÀÞÊ-Õ««ˆià "vwViÊ µÕˆ«“i˜Ì *iÌà *…œÌœ}À>«…Þ ,i˜Ì>Ã ,iÃÌ>ÕÀ>˜ÌÊ µÕˆ«“i˜Ì -i܈˜}Ê>V…ˆ˜ià -«œÀ̈˜} -̜ÀiÊ µÕˆ«“i˜Ì -Ü>«Ã /6É6ˆ`iœ 7>ÌiÀÊ œ˜ÃiÀÛ>̈œ˜

FINANCIAL Bicycle & ACADEMIC SERVICES MANAGER New/Used/Rentals (Day Wk Mo) South Hall LOW PRICES! Isla Vista Bikes • 805-968-3338 Administrative Services Responsible for providing high-level management, executing professional judgment, and a full range of management functions and services for the Department of Philosophy, English, Linguistics, English for Multilingual Studies Program (EMS), & the Writing Program (WP). This includes in-house research Centers, labs, & programs. SASC provides administrative support for over 100 faculty (ladder rank, and temporary appointments), 1,100 majors and minors, 170 graduate students, 620 classes, & manages a budget of over $12.4M annually. Forms the full administrative services management complement, with the intention of an equitable workload distribution among the co-managers, requiring “back-up” support to each other and staff subordinates, & cross-training opportunities within each distinct Service Unit (i.e., Academic Services and Student Services) within the SASC. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Possess significant knowledge of UC policies and procedures and the ability to implement them effectively. Requires broad knowledge and functional understanding of all academic personnel policies e.g., APM, Red Binder, Unit 18 Lecturer, ASE, Graduate Division, Academic Senate, immigration/visa, etc., and procedures and the ability to apply and interpret these regulations on an on-going basis. Intermediate knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Must possess a strong knowledge of UC and departmental policies and procedures as they relate to business operations and financial services. Working Knowledge of financial policies, practices, and systems. Ability to gather reasonably retrievable information to organize, and perform basic financial analysis assignments. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $69,000- $73,000 yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/24/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 15262

The Montecito Sanitary District is seeking to recruit a full-time General Manager to lead the 18employee Independent Special District and oversee its daily operations and maintenance of the Wastewater Treatment Plant and Collections Divisions. Please visit https://www.montsan.org/job-opportunities to read the job description, and to submit your resume and completed application.

Per-Day! *Rate Based on 30 day consecutive run.

Service Directory Gardening EXPERIENCED GARDEN SERVICE Hedge & Shrubs Trimming Cleanups, cultivation, & hauling Full yard care. 805-770-7229 or 805-403-4551

Hauling %XPRESS(AULING

&2%%%34 !.9$!9 *5.+

"253( #,%!.9!2$'! 2!'% 42)-42%%3 #%-%.4

-%4!, $)24 *!#5::) ,)&4 '!4% (!.$9-!. 636 573

Irrigation and Landscaping

sofas & sectionals for far less than retail store prices. Styles inspired by Pottery Barn, Rest. Hardware & Sofas U Love. Buy FACTORY DIRECT & save 30-50%. Quality leather, slipcovered & upholstered styles. Call 805-566-2989 to visit Carp. showroom.

Please register using one of the following links or by scanning the QR code below: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_9zcH6QZLRKqR6roaZKcQZA

If you have any questions regarding this meeting, please contact Housing Authority Administrative Specialist Celia Wright at Cwright@hacsb.org. We look forward to hearing your feedback. Feb 14, Mar 7 / 2021 ---56785

Are you Moving?

Clear the clutter!

To place your garage sale ad today

For As Low As

$

5.97

*

Per Day!

*Based on a 30 day rate

Email: classad@newspress.com or for additional information call 963-4391

To Place Your Ad Today!

We have established alternative methods of participation in the Santa Barbara County Planning Commission hearings, pursuant to the California Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20, issued on March 17, 2020, which states: • Providing an opportunity to “observe and address the meeting telephonically or otherwise elec tronically,” alone, meets the participation requirement; and • “Such a body need not make available any physical location from which members of the public may observe the meeting and offer public comment.” The following alternative methods of participation are available to the public: 1. You may observe the live stream of the County Planning Commission meetings on (1) Local Cable Channel 20, (2) online at: http://www.countyofsb.org/ceo/csbtv/livestream.sbc; or (3) YouTube at: https://www.youtube. com/user/CSBTV20 2. If you wish to make a general public comment or to comment on a specific agenda item, the following methods are available: • Distribution to the County Planning Commission - Submit your comment via email prior to 12:00 p.m. on the Monday prior to the Commission hearing. Please submit your comment to the Recording Secretary at dvillalo@countyofsb.org. Your comment will be placed into the record and distributed appropriately. • Video and Teleconference Public Participation – To participate via Zoom, please pre-register for the meeting using the below link. When: February 24, 2021 09:00 AM Pacific Time (US and Canada) Topic: County Planning Commission 02/24/2021 Register in advance for this webinar: vhttps://countyofsb.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_lyQCJdINS66OBGaBbLWXMQ After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. OR PARTICIPATE VIA TELEPHONE: Dial (for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): US: +1 213 338 8477 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 720 928 9299 or +1 971 247 1195 or +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 602 753 0140 or +1 312 626 6799 or +1 470 250 9358 or +1 646 518 9805 or +1 651 372 8299 or +1 786 635 1003 or +1 929 205 6099 or +1 267 831 0333 or +1 301 715 8592 or 877 853 5257 (Toll Free) or 888 475 4499 (Toll Free) or 833 548 0276 (Toll Free) or 833 548 0282 (Toll Free)

The Commission’s rules on hearings and public comment, unless otherwise directed by the Chair, remain applicable to each of the participation methods listed above.

NOTICE OF VIRTUAL PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DISTRICT HEARING BOARD Based on guidance from the California Department of Public Health and the California Governor’s Stay at Home Executive Order N-33-20 issued on March 19, 2020, to protect the health and well-being of all Californians, and to establish consistency across the state to slow the spread of COVID-19, the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District Hearing Board will temporarily provide a virtual-only option for participation in hearings. Notice is hereby given that the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District Hearing Board will hold a REMOTE VIRTUAL public hearing to consider the following matter on Wednesday, March 3, 2021, at 9:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, via Zoom.

PC, Laptop or Phone: https://tinyurl.com/MarchapcdHBLink Password: 750640 Telephone: US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 408 638 0968 or +1 346 248 7799 Webinar ID: 848 9944 7699 Passcode: 750640 Public participation details will be included in the agenda.

Case No. 2021-02-R (Regular Variance) –

Beacon West Energy Group, LLC 1145 Eugenia Place #101 Carpinteria, CA 93013

Hearing – To consider a Petition for a Regular Variance from District Rules 331, 325.D.1, 325.E, 359.D.2.b. 206, Part 70 Permit to Operate 9109-R4, Conditions 9.C.1.b.v, 9.C.1.b.vi, 9.C.1.c.i, 9.C.2.a, 9.C.2.b, 9.C.2.c, 9.C.2.d, 9.C.6.b.ii, 9.C.6.b.iii, 9.C.6.b.iv, 9.C.9, 9.C.14, and 9.C.15, submitted on January 8, 2021, for emission controls, maintenance, monitoring, and source testing requirements. This item is continued from the February 3, 2021, Hearing Board Meeting. The Petitioner recently assumed oversight of Platform Houchin operations after the platform was not operated or adequately maintained by the previous owner/operator for approximately 1 year. As a result, the conditions on the platform have significantly deteriorated creating an unsafe work environment. The platform is not operational and is idle at this time, awaiting platform decommissioning. Due to the unsafe work conditions and inoperable equipment, the Petitioner is unable to conduct required maintenance, monitoring and source testing as required. In addition, the Petitioner is unable to operate the control device for venting well head gas and fugitive emissions from associated components. As a result, the Petitioner requested variance coverage. The Petitioner operates the equipment described in the Petition at Platform Houchin, located on offshore lease tract OCS-P-166, approximately 7 miles southeast from the City of Santa Barbara. The Petitioner applied for an Interim Variance concurrently with the Regular Variance petition. As of February 11, 2021, Interim Variance Order 2021-02-I has not yet been heard. If granted, said order would remain in effect from January 8, 2021 through April 7, 2021, or the date a decision is made on this Regular Variance, or the date compliance is achieved, whichever occurs first. The Regular Variance, if granted, will allow the Petitioner enforcement relief from the date the decision is made on the Regular Variance, through January 7, 2022 or the date compliance is achieved, whichever occurs first. At this time, excess emissions associated with the granting of this variance are unknown.

Case No. 2021-03-R (Regular Variance) –

Beacon West Energy Group, LLC 1145 Eugenia Place #101 Carpinteria, CA 93013

Hearing – To consider a Petition for a Regular Variance from District Rules 331, 325.D.1, 325.E, 359.D.2.b, and 206, Part 70 Permit to Operate 9108-R4, Conditions 9.C.1.b.v, 9.C.1.b.vi, 9.C.1.c.i, 9.C.2.a, 9.C.2.b, 9.C.2.c, 9.C.2.d, 9.C.6.b.ii, 9.C.6.b.iii, 9.C.6.b.iv, 9.C.9, 9.C.14, and 9.C.15, submitted on January 8, 2021, for emission controls, maintenance, monitoring and source testing requirements. This item is continued from the February 3, 2021, Hearing Board Meeting.

Provost Benefits Specialist Assistant Director of Residence Life Head Coach, Men’s and Women’s Golf Information Systems Assistant, Admissions Administrative Assistant, Provost Office Business Process Analyst and API Programmer Technology Support Specialist Campus Safety Officer: 12 months Custodian Apply online at www.westmont.edu/_offices/human_resources Westmont is an EEO employer, seeking to be diverse in people and programs consistent with its mission.

Based on guidance from the California Department of Public Health and the California Governor’s Stay at Home Executive Order N-33-20, issued on March 19, 2020, to protect the health and well-being of all Californian’s and to establish consistency across the state in order to slow the spread of COVID-19, the Santa Barbara County Planning Commission hearings will no longer provide in-person participation.

Webinar ID: 990 3950 4492

REMOTE VIRTUAL PARTICIPATION INFORMATION TO JOIN THE ZOOM MEETING

ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE

DATE OF HEARING: FEBRUARY 24, 2021 IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

T O A DVERTISE IN THE C LASSIFIED EMAIL : CLASSAD @ NEWSPRESS . COM

Irrigation installation. Fall preparation. Free estimates. References. Get it done right the first time. Have a woman do it! Greencardlandscaping.com 505-310-0045

Call 805 963-4391 to place your home or business service listing.

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

JAN 24, 31; FEB 7, 14/2021--56747

Call 805-963-4391 • or email classad@newspress.com

OAK FIREWOOD

LOCAL CARP. SOFA FACTORY SHOWROOM Affordable custom made & sized

Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021 Time: 5:30 PM Location: Zoom

Residential & Commercial FREE EST. 805-448-7177 Mention this ad get 10% off

Irrigation

Furniture

The Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara cordially invites all community members to a virtual outreach meeting regarding the redevelopment of 200 North La Cumbre Road into an affordable apartment complex for families. Housing Authority staff and our collaborating organizations, including architectural firm Cearnal Collective, will be available to provide information about the project, answer questions, and receive feedback.

J.W.’s Landscape & Gardening Services

Feed/Fuel 234-5794. Quality, well slit, dry oak 1/2 cords $245 plus delivery. Full cords avail.

200 N La Cumbre Road Development Virtual Community Outreach Meeting

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT, FBN No: 20210000148. First Filing. The following person (s) are doing business as: MARIJUANA DISPENSARY DELIVERY TRY DOOBIE WEED, 27 E VICTORIA ST. SUITE B, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101, County of Santa Barbara. MAILING ADDRESS: 1801 S LA CIENEGA BLVD, SUITE 301, LOS ANGELES, CA 90035. Full Name(s) of registrants: DDS CA LLC, 1801 S LA CIENEGA BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90035. STATE OF INC.: CA. This business is conducted by: A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. This statement was filed in the office of JOSEPH E. HOLLAND, County Clerk-Recorder of SANTA BARBARA COUNTY on 01/19/2021 by: E993, Deputy. The registrant commenced to transact business on: Jun 08, 2020. Statement Expires on: Not Applicable. NOTICE: This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the County Clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (See Section 14400, ET SEQ., Business and Profession Code). (SEAL)

The Petitioner recently assumed oversight of Platform Hogan operations after the platform was not operated or adequately maintained by the previous owner/operator for approximately 1 year. As a result, the conditions on the platform have significantly deteriorated creating an unsafe work environment. The platform is not operational and is idle at this time, awaiting platform decommissioning. Due to the unsafe work conditions and inoperable equipment, the Petitioner is unable to conduct required maintenance, monitoring and source testing as required. In addition, the Petitioner is unable to operate the control device for venting well head gas and fugitive emissions from associated components. As a result, the Petitioner requested variance coverage. The Petitioner operates the equipment described in the Petition at Platform Hogan, located on offshore lease tract OCS-P-166, approximately 8 miles southeast from the City of Santa Barbara. The Petitioner applied for an Interim Variance concurrently with the Regular Variance petition. As of February 11, 2021, Interim Variance Order 2021-03-I has not yet been heard. If granted, said order would remain in effect from January 8, 2021 through April 7, 2021, or the date a decision is made on this Regular Variance, or the date compliance is achieved, whichever occurs first. The Regular Variance, if granted, will allow the Petitioner enforcement relief from the date the decision is made on the Regular Variance, through January 7, 2022 or the date compliance is achieved, whichever occurs first. At this time, excess emissions associated with the granting of this variance are unknown. Said Petitions are on file with the Clerk of the APCD Hearing Board and available for public inspection. Interested persons may submit written evidence, arguments concerning this matter, or make arrangements to view said Petitions before the hearing by contacting the Hearing Board Clerk at: variance@sbcapcd.org, or 260 North San Antonio Rd., Suite A, Santa Barbara, California 93110. FEB 14 / 2021 -- 56814

The Planning Commission hearing begins at 9:00 a.m. The order of items listed on the agenda is subject to change by the Planning Commission. Anyone interested in this matter is invited to appear and speak in support or in opposition to the projects. Written comments are also welcome. All letters should be addressed to the Santa Barbara County Planning Commission, 123 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara, California, 93101. Letters should be filed with the secretary of the Planning Commission no later than 12:00 P.M. on the Monday before the Planning Commission hearing. The decision to accept late materials will be at the discretion of the Planning Commission. Maps and/or staff analysis of the proposals may be reviewed at https://www.countyofsb.org/plndev/hearings/ cpc.sbc a week before the hearing or by appointment by calling (805) 568-2000. If you challenge the project(s) 17TRM-00000-00002, 17DVP-00000-00009, 17CUP-00000-00025, 17CDP-00000-00056, or 17RDN 00000-00003 in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence to the Planning Commission prior to the public hearing. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the Hearing Support Staff (805) 568-2000. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable the Hearing Support Staff to make reasonable arrangements. 17TRM-00000-00002 17DVP-00000-00009 17CUP-00000-00025 17CDP-00000-00056 17RDN-00000-00003 20NGD-00000-00001

Santa Barbara Polo Villas Carpinteria Tess Harris, Supervising Planner (805) 568-3319 Ciara Ristig, Planner (805) 568-2077

Hearing on the request of Neil Botts, 3250-3282 Via Real, LLC, owner, to consider the following: a) Case No. 17TRM-00000-00002, Vesting Tentative Tract Map: A Vesting Tentative Tract Map (TM 14,831)to subdivide the 11.48 acre lot into 31 lots consisting of the following: • 25 lots for single family dwellings, ranging in size from 0.15 acres to 0.65 acres; • One condominium lot of 1.58 acres for 15 condominiums; • One 1.05-acre open space lot, containing the creek corridor; • One .28 acre open space lot; • One 1.13-acre private road lot; • One 0.61-acre water feature and bio-retention lot; andA second bio-retention lot of 0.61 acres. The Tentative Tract Map also includes an easement to be dedicated to the County for a multi-use public trail along the east side of Garrapata Creek and along the north and north-east property lines. b)

Case No. 17DVP-00000-00009, Final Development Plan: A Final Development Plan for the future development of approximately 106,276 gross square feet as follows:

40 single family dwellings, including 25 market rate detached single family dwellings, and 15 for-sale condominiums units (nine market rate and six affordable); Associated infrastructure including open space, access drives, and onsite detention areas; Development of the tract including associated residential accessory development, a preliminary grading and drainage plan with roads and utilities, landscaping plan, lighting plan, and a public trail easement to be dedicated to the County; Demolition of all existing on-site structures, including 10 apartments on the west side of Garrapata Creek, horse corrals, three residences, and an accessory structure on the east side of Garrapata Creek. Modification to the Development Plan to allow height of structures that exceed the 25 foot height requirement

• • • • c)

Case No. 17CUP-00000-00025, Minor Conditional Use Permit: A Minor Conditional Use Permit is required to authorize the construction of sound walls of up to 10 feet in height within the front setback along Via Real Avenue both east and west of Garrapata Creek. The walls will be concrete with stone veneer.

d) Case No. 17CDP-00000-0055, Coastal Development Permit: A Coastal Development Permit is required as a concurrent permit for the Development Plan to allow for the construction of the development proposed through the DVP. e) Case No. 17CDP-00000-0056, Coastal Development Permit: A Coastal Development Permit is required as a concurrent permit for the Minor Conditional Use Permit, to allow for the construction of the development proposed through the CUP. f)

Case No. 17RDN-00000-00003, Road Naming: A road naming application is required for approval of the naming of the private road located east of Garrapata Creek. The proposed road name is Polo Drive.

g)

Mitigation Negative Declaration 20NGD-00000-00001: Adoption of the Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) pursuant to the State Guidelines for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). As a result of this project, significant but mitigable effects on the environment are anticipated in the following categories: Aesthetic/Visual Resources, Air Quality, Biological Resources (including wetland/riparian), Geologic Processes, Land Use, Grading, Noise, Public Facilities, Traffic/Circulation, Recreation/Parks, and Water Resources / Flooding.

The Draft MND and all documents are available for review online at: https://cosantabarbara.app.box.com/s/ o9fp2865sykaqn98s0702plaa96xj7t5/folder/102430413943. The revised Final MND is included as Attachment C to this staff report. The application involves Assessor’s Parcel Numbers 005-270-017, 005-270-019, 005-270-029, 005270-033, and 005-270-034, located at 3250-3282 Via Real in the Carpinteria area, First Supervisorial District. Long Range Planning Division Fiscal Year 2021-2024 Work Program Countywide Exempt, CEQA Guidelines Section 15378(b)(5) Dan Klemann, Deputy Director (805) 453-4803 Hearing on the request of the Planning and Development Department Long Range Planning Division staff to have the County Planning Commission (1) receive and file a report regarding the Long Range Planning Division’s FY 2021-2024 Work Program; and (2) direct staff to forward any recommendations that the County Planning Commission might have regarding the Work Program, to the Board of Supervisors (Board). 2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress Report Countywide Exempt, CEQA Guidelines Sections 15378(b)(5) David Lackie, Supervising Planner (805) 568-2023 & 15060(c)(3) Corina Venegas, Planner (805) 884-6836 Staff is requesting on February 24, 2021, that the County Planning Commission receive and file the 2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress Report. Staff recommends that the County Planning Commission follow the procedures outlined below in order to provide by April 1, 2021, the 2020 Comprehensive Plan Annual Progress Report to the Board of Supervisors (Board), Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR), California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), and City of Santa Barbara. SANTA BARBARA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION RECORDING SECRETARY (568-2000) FEB 14 / 2021 -- 56795


page

B1

Managing Editor Dave Mason dmason@newspress.com

Life

INSIDE

UCSB professor receives Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering - B3

S U N DA Y, F E B RUA R Y 14 , 2 0 21

Look! There’s the whale!

KENNETH SONG/NEWS-PRESS PHOTOS

An older Pacific gray whale makes its presence known near the Channel Islands as seen from the Islander, an Island Packers boat, on Feb. 5.

Island Packers resumes trips to Channel Islands as the boat cruised along the channel to the shocked gasps and happy shouts when a dolphin shot out of the water or a whale oat trips are back sprayed a geyser in the air, the on the Central trip provided what many needed Coast, which means during the pandemic — an that animal lovers, escape. Strangers chatted about seafaring residents the weather, parents spent quality and curious visitors can leave time with their kids, and friends their pandemic stresses on land delighted in the thrill of seeing and venture out on the Santa animals in the wild. Barbara Channel. Island Packers resumed the On Feb. 5, 30 travelers and trips once again Jan. 29 after locals did just that, hopping off being closed for over a month due the Ventura Harbor and onto the Islander, a 64-foot long catamaran to the state’s stay-at-home order. For the current journeys, boat that took to the sea in search of riders must wear face coverings whales, dolphins at all times and any other and maintain marine life. The social News-Press distancing. Visit islandpackers.com to reserve a joined the trip The boats can during what crew whale watching trip or learn more only fill up to members referred about excursions. 50% capacity. to as a nearHowever, perfect whale watching day — without a cloud in guests can enjoy food and drinks from the galley throughout the the sky or a swell in the water. trip as long as they consume them Those onboard the Island outside. Packers boat saw thousands of Cherryl Connally’s father dolphins, hundreds of California founded Island Packers, and she sea lions and, to everyone’s has been with the family business delight, the stars of the show. for 47 years, now as a co-owner Two gray whales. and manager of the office and Passengers of all ages were marketing. She told the Newsonboard the vessel. As they lined Press that since reopening, there up along the rails of the bow have been more local whale or rushed to the stern to catch watchers than ever. a glimpse of the dolphins or “We’re getting a lot of travelers, whales, the mood was filled with people that are driving and anticipation and joy. visiting in RVs, but most of our Kids peered excitedly through business is local now, which was binoculars. Adults recorded always hard to get the local travel videos on their smartphones. business before because it’s in And photographers gazed out at your own backyard,” Ms. Connally the dark blue water, longing for said. “We’re getting more of a chance at the perfect shot of a that now because they can’t go whale. From the crisp ocean breeze Please see WHALE! on B4 By GRAYCE MCCORMICK NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

B

FYI

Passengers aboard the boat wait for a gray whale to surface.


B2

PUZZLES

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

JUMBLE PUZZLE

No. 0207

By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

RDENOV 2$)705 CIRWEK ADRISU ;(7(71

ACROSS

1 Mannerly 6 Philippine currency 10 Just open 14 Second socks, say 19 Offer a judgment 20 Thing with tags 21 Fruit-salad fruit 22 Sound of exertion 23 Huge celebration after L.A.’s football team wins the Super Bowl? 26 Nice nicety 27 Great shakes 28 Oldest tech sch. in the U.S., founded in 1824 29 Bygone royalty 31 Oodles and oodles 32 Besmirch 33 Big fuss 35 With 1-Down, address ender 37 Schlep 38 Reason that the prestigious scientific journal refuses articles from President Herbert’s relatives? 45 Power symbol? 46 Senate support 47 ____ gras 48 Restorative indulgence 50 Kind of bookstore

Download the free JUST JUMBLEDSS‡)ROORZXVRQ7ZLWWHU@PlayJumble

LNHECC

‹7ULEXQH&RQWHQW$JHQF\//& All Rights Reserved.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

PRINT YOUR ANSWER IN THE CIRCLES BELOW

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

51 Oil-field sight 53 It’s symbolized by an elephant, for short 55 Theater seating option 56 Japanese honorific 57 Apology from a musician to the other band members? 64 Best Picture winner that was banned in Vietnam 66 Lena of ‘‘Chocolat’’ 67 1957 Jimmy Dorsey hit 68 ‘‘Lonely Boy’’ singer, 1959 69 Stiff 71 Morally uncompromised 72 Many a summer position 74 Like writing about how to write 75 Epitome of herd mentality 79 Volunteered at a nursery? 83 General practice? 84 Idle of Monty Python 85 ____ Lou Who of ‘‘How the Grinch Stole Christmas’’ 86 Elton John or Mick Jagger 87 District on Hawaii’s west coast 88 Volcanic substance 91 Person fluent in Quechua 94 Et ____ (footnote abbr.)

96 Fool 97 Adding a historic ship as a deal sweetener? 101 Campaign guru 102 Super Bowl played in 2020 103 Past 104 Get hold of 105 Dry 107 Hiker’s snack 110 Article from U.C.L.A.? 112 Vatican ambassador 115 Small versions 117 Story about a drinking binge? 121 Frost lines? 122 Awards feat, for short 123 Puccini piece 124 Really lift 125 Ed of ‘‘Elf’’ 126 Movement based on deliberate irrationality 127 Be really impressive, informally 128 Procrastinate

Horoscope.com Sunday, February 14, 2021

12

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

20

23

32 39

40

50

42

64

65

66

68

69

72 79

73

80

89

90

97

105 115

116

71 75

76

82

92

93

109

117

94

95

96 100

104 110

111

118

112

113

119

122

123

124

125

126

127

128

78 Gloomy, weather-wise 79 Place to surf 80 Haydn’s ‘‘The Creation’’ and others 81 Step on a ladder 82 The Berenstain Bears live in one 87 ‘‘A merry old soul,’’ in a nursery rhyme 89 Crack up, in textspeak 90 Bit of kindling 92 U.S. counterpart to Britain’s MI6

93 ____-Norman French 95 Common call on a 3rd-and-1 96 Not black-and-white 98 Sticker worn in November 99 How some practical jokes go 100 Burden 101 Prairie east of the Andes 106 Two-fifths of one quarter 108 Sitar selection

114 120

121

60 Supergiant in Orion 61 Hall of Fame quarterback for the Colts 62 More balanced 63 In ____ way 65 Rail container for liquids 70 Bakery buy 72 Cloth woven from flax fiber 73 So last year 76 ‘‘You can’t make me!’’ 77 Female goat

78

83

99

108

77

87

103 107

63

86

102 106

55 62

70

98

101

49

54

74

91

37

67

85

88

18

44

61

81

84

36

43

53 60

17

48

52

59

16

31

35

47 51

58

30

34

41

46

15

22

29 33

57

14

26

28

56

13

25

27

45

12

21

24

38

11

109 Move laboriously 111 Houston M.L.B.’er 113 Stressed, in a way: Abbr. 114 Multiple of tetra116 Union member of the 20th century, for short 118 Concern for one catching a connection, briefly 119 Sound from a drunk 120 ‘‘Stop right there!’’

SOLUTION ON D3

CODEWORD PUZZLE 24

1 19

8 State symbol 9 Sound from a marching band 10 Pseudonym lead-in 11 Ditch at the last moment 12 Leatherwork tools 13 Largest city on the Arabian Peninsula 14 ‘‘Lionized’’ studio 15 Neighborhood 16 Gift in ‘‘The 12 Days of Christmas’’ 17 Push 18 Trap, of a sort 24 Sheikh’s peer 25 Free from 30 Aussie animals 34 Medal above plata 36 One-up 38 ____ cavity 39 Bowl, e.g. 40 Prefix with nautical 41 One temporarily entrusting property to another 42 Ink 43 Units in the life span of a galaxy DOWN 44 Ad ____ tax 1 See 35-Across 45 Brink of transition 2 Uber and Lyft had 49 Folksy possessive theirs in 2019, for short 52 Wilt 3 Tarzan’s transport 54 Magazine whose crossword is always 4 Didn’t just request accompanied by a 5 Is dismissed, as a class photograph 6 On a Seder plate, 57 Rigged card game it represents the arrival of springtime 58 Hooked up, as oxen 7 Port. is part of it 59 Wolfs (down)

SOLUTION ON D3

HOROSCOPE

2/14/2021

Jim Hilger, of Amarillo, Texas, is a retired computer analyst and educator. Besides making crosswords, he enjoys collecting 45 r.p.m. records (he has more than 10,000 of them), cartooning and watercolor painting. “Most of my paintings end up looking like cartoons, however,” he says. The starting point of this puzzle was 38-Across. Jim apologizes in advance to the maker of every product he has “misplaced” herein. — W.S.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form six ordinary words.

PRODUCT MISPLACEMENT BY JIM HILGER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

4

1

16

16

19

20

10

24

22

17

12

19

11

12

16

26

10 9

23

SUNDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1

15

22 12

15

1

15 1 11 26 23 19 22 1 12 1 ARIES — Cautious isn’t exactly your middle name, Aries. You’re more 1 20 18 9 16 24 12 15 1 of an act fast, take chances type of sign. However, you’ll need to practice 23 12 23 1 14 18 1 15 1 25 caution when Mercury in Aquarius squares Mars in Taurus this week. 19 1 7 5 15 11 TAURUS — Stay on high alert this week, Taurus. When Mercury in 20 2 1 21 20 12 17 18 8 1 Aquarius squares Mars in your sign, Impulsive decisions could negatively 16 6 1 1 24 20 4 4 22 affect your reputation and public image. GEMINI — Adventure is on your 12 2 17 18 13 1 22 1 16 16 agenda this week when the sun conjoins Mercury in Aquarius and your 12 25 18 19 2 10 17 23 18 sector of philosophy and travel. This is an excellent opportunity to step outside 1 18 26 18 9 4 your comfort zone and expand your intellectual horizons 12 16 10 23 18 3 1 22 18 1 10 1 CANCER — Intimacy intensifies this week, bringing a time of A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z transformation in a relationship that could strengthen your bond or create 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 a change within yourself. Either way, A K this marks a cycle of growth and adjustment for you, 2021-02-14 LEO — You’ll get by with a little 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 help from your friends (and lovers) X this week, Leo. It all starts when the sun conjoins Mercury in Aquarius and your sector of partnerships. If you How to play Codeword have tasks that need to be done, ask Codeword is a fun game with simple rules, and a great test of your knowledge of the English language. for help. Every number in the codeword grid is ‘code’ for a letter of the alphabet. Thus the number 2 may correspond to the letter L, for instance. VIRGO — Your week starts on a All puzzles come with a few letters to start you off. Your first move should be to enter these letters in the puztense note this week when Mercury zle grid. If the letter S is in the box at the bottom of the page underneath the number 2, your first move should +*#!2+1$)"$  in Aquarius squares Mars in Taurus. be to find all cells numbered 2 in the grid and enter the letter S. Cross the letter S off the list at the bottom of New information and ideas could clash the grid. Remember that at the end you should have a different letter of the alphabet in each of the numbered with your preexisting opinions, and boxes 1 - 26, and a word in English in each of the horizontal and vertical runs on the codeword grid. you might be reluctant to change your mind. LIBRA — Continue to get creative with your love life when Mercury conjoins Venus in Aquarius this week. By FRANK STEWART With this aspect in your pleasure sector, this is a great day to try new Tribune Content Agency things and find innovative ways to get 6XQGD\)HEUXDU\ Since 1981 I’ve written a monthly left, opens one heart. Your partner pleasure. &\ WKH PH D magazine. ULGH WR EXW :HVW KDG OHG D GDQJHURXV doubles, and the next FOXE player passes. column for&\QLF the JDYH ACBL’s SCORPIO — The week starts with IURP 4[[[:HVW ZRXOG QRW KDYH WKH FOXE$W D UHG OLJKW ZH VWRSSHG What do you say? Many have been “over-my-shoulder” a little push and pull when Mercury in EHKLQG D FDU WKDW ERUH WKLV EXPSHU OHG D KHDUW IURP 4[ EXW LI KH Aquarius squares Mars in Taurus and  This is close. In style. You listen in on my thoughts KDG D ZRUWKOHVV KROGLQJ LQ case VSDGHV VWLFNHU old traditional methods get in the way theory, your 11 points are during a deal. ´,I \RX FDQ UHDG WKLV  ,·P QRW RUGLDPRQGVKHZRXOGKDYHOHGWKDWenough for of innovation. However, don’t make Ninety of the best of these appear LPSUHVVHG0RVWSHRSOHFDQUHDGµ VXLW a jump to two spades, inviting game, any sudden decisions just yet. yourSXW king in “Play Bridge With ³ Me,” my 23rd &\but VKRXOG XS of KLVhearts, DFH RItrapped in 5HDGLQJ WKH FDUGV GUDZLQJ SAGITTARIUS — The week starts GLDPRQGVDWWKHHQG+HVKRXOGUHDG ORJLFDO LQIHUHQFHV IURP The WKH ELGGLQJ front of the opening bidder, may be book, just published. deals are on a very creative note when the sun :HVWworthless. IRU DOO IRXU Many PLVVLQJexperts TXHHQV WR DQGSOD\³LVNQRZQDVDPDUNRIDQ would jump intermediate level; the focus is on H[SHUWGHFODUHU,QIDFWPRVW´H[SHUWµ H[SODLQWKHRSHQLQJOHDG conjoins Mercury in Aquarius. This anyway. I would reluctantly logical thinking. FDUGSODFLQJLVVLPSOHLQSULQFLSOH aspect happens in your sector of downgrade the hand and settle for a At today’s four spades, I win the 6RXWKGHDOHU 16YXOQHUDEOH communication, making it an excellent first,ZDWFKHG&\SOD\WRGD\·VVODPLQ response of one spade. heart in dummy and lead a DSHQQ\JDPH$IWHUDOLWWOHWKRXJKW day for brainstorming new and exciting diamond. East dealer IWKH can’t riskRIlosing an early  1257+ :HVW OHG GHXFH FOXEV DQG ideas. N-S vulnerable trump finesse; I need a quick pitch &\ SOD\HG ORZ IURP GXPP\ DQG  {- CAPRICORN — Aquarius brings x. forFDSWXUHG(DVW·VQLQHZLWKWKHMDFN&\ my heart loser. East wins the  attention to your sector of value this z. QH[WOHGDKHDUWWRGXPP\·VNLQJDQG  second diamond and returns a heart, week. This can manifest as a fresh start WULHG D KHDUW WRdiscard KLV MDFNdummy’s :HVW ZRQ last  y.    and I win to for your finances and self-worth. This DQGOHGDVHFRQGFOXEWRGXPP\     heart on my high diamond. When I is a great opportunity to brainstorm &\WKHQOHGDKHDUWWRKLVDFH+H :(67 ($67    finesse in trumps, East wins and exits ways you can make more money or FDVKHG WKH$. RI VSDGHV DQG ERWK {4 {   with a trump. save money for future purchases x GHIHQGHUV SOD\HG ORZ &\ WKHQ WRRN x4 AQUARIUS — This is a very big z WKHDFHRIFOXEVSLWFKLQJDGLDPRQG z4   week for you with a lot of energy IURP GXPP\ +H OHG D GLDPRQG y4 y  

WR WKH NLQJ DQG FDVKHG WZR KHDUWV happening in your sign. You feel more     Now I must guess in clubs. But      GLVFDUGLQJVSDGHV 6287+ powerful, energized, and ready to {$.     East,:LWKWZRWULFNVWRJRGXPP\KDG a passed hand, had the ace of      take on the world. Basically, you’re an x$- WKH MDFN RIqueen VSDGHVofDQG D GLDPRQG   diamonds, hearts and king     unstoppable force at the moment. z$- PISCES — Your sector of privacy of7KH&\QLFKDGWKH$-RIGLDPRQGV spades. He won’t have the ace of  :HVW so KDGI NHSW WKH RI VSDGHV y$- this week comes with weird energy. On clubs, leadTXHHQ to TXHHQ the king, making  DQG WKH EDUH RI GLDPRQGV the one hand, this brings opportunities the game.   1RUWK (DVW $W 7ULFN  &\ OHG WKH GLDPRQG 6RXWK :HVW for karmic returns and inner feelings,    $OO3DVV  For a postpaid to U.S. copy of 17 3DVV 17 IURPGXPP\WKRXJKWIRUHYHUDQG but on the other, it can also bring up    “Play Bridge With Me,” send $23.95 ILQHVVHGZLWKWKHMDFN'RZQWZR some past heartbreak and the urge to 2SHQLQJOHDG³y  to PO Box 962, Fayette AL 35555. 6KRXOG&\KDYHNQRZQEHWWHU" self-isolate. GHIHQGHUV SUHIHU Tell*RRG me how you’dJHQHUDOO\ like it inscribed. !./ +0/& $./ +-/& D SDVVLYH RSHQLQJ OHDG DJDLQVW 17 ‹7ULEXQH&RQWHQW$JHQF\//& Profits donated.

Daily Bridge Club

Sunday, February 14, 2021

SOLUTION ON D3

‘Play BRIDGE Bridge With Me’ PUZZLE

Sunday, February 14, 2021


PUZZLES

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

NYT CROSSWORD SOLUTION C I V I L O P I N E M O N S T E S E I S M S O I N A T U R C A R E T U S E D S A N M Y P L A T O O A N K I N T E W O R K E D E R I C B A S A L T T H R O W P O L L I A R I D G M I N I S P O E M S A S N E R

P A R S L E Y

E S O U T O R A M R R P I A D A B H O E A F R I G O L O R O L I R I G N M E O R P L T U I N C A N G I N A G R P L A L E O G O T A D A

S N A R F S I V O T E D

A J A R K I W I A L L Y T S A O D R S A H O I E G O P U N N E N S O I D P T A L A N T E S I R S E Q T H E B O S O S N F T H E A R I A R O C K

R O O S T R U E R O N U S

M A T E G R U N M E R C A T O T L U O V E R P A D A L O G H O V E A R E R E M M I N S W A K O N N I N N U N T Y A G N C I O C O T C E L A T D E L A

G R A Y

H E Y

CROSSWORD SOLUTION #2/337/2$3/,54)/.

Sunday, February 14, 2021

© 2021 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS

CODEWORD SOLUTION

I

D

L

N

Y

O

D

W L

E

R

L

I

E

T

T

C

F

R

I

A Z

R

C

I

N

S O

M

2

3

S

4

P

E

U

M L

C T

R

E

G

Q

H

U

U

I

B

P O

8

D

9

J

B

A

10

O

K

W 11

W

R L

L

O

S

7

B

A

E

X

6

R I

D

H

C

A

T

A

E

H B

O

I

O

C

B I

O

T

I

U

S

5

Y

I

C

M

L

A

L

E

E

E

V

S

J

W

U

L

R

I

T

T

A

1

E

Y

E

T

D

K

T

C

I

F

R

I

P

E

U S

E

E 12

15

M

16

I

17

E

18

N

19

T

20

Q

21

V

22

Z

A

23

F

24

U

25

Three members recently joined the Santa Barbara City College Foundation: Graciela Montgomery, director-at-large; Joyce Coleman, vice president of the college’s School of Extended Learning; and trustee Robert K. Miller. Ms. Montgomery is a human resources consultant with a wide range of clients. She has led initiatives focusing on diversity and inclusion, workplace transparency, gender balance and pay equity. She previously worked for Deckers Brands and NPR as chief HR officer and led human resources teams at AECOM, Nortel Networks and ABC/Disney. In these roles, she has seen how access to education has transformed careers. She takes her expertise to numerous Santa Barbara nonprofits. Ms. Coleman has enjoyed being a community college educator and administrator for more than 28 years, with a majority of her career in California. She keeps a focus on equity in her leadership and management positions. She has served as dean of students at Bakersfield College, dean of Community Learning

G P







 



 

 

'LIILFXOW\/HYHO

 



&RQFHSWLV3X]]OHV'LVWE\.LQJ)HDWXUHV6\QGLFDWH,QF

 

 



 





Solutions, tips program at

Fill the grid so every row, every column and every 3-by-3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

Sudoku puzzles appear on the Diversions page Monday-Saturday and on the crossword solutions © Puzzles by Pappocom page in Sunday’s Life section.

        

        

        

        

         

&RQFHSWLV3X]]OHV'LVWE\.LQJ)HDWXUHV6\QGLFDWH,QF

        

lighting for the developing world.” Steven DenBaars, a fellow engineering professor at UCSB, said in a statement that Dr. Nakamura’s accomplishments have resulted in a “10-fold” increase in energy-efficient lighting and are helping to pave the way to a significant drop in U.S. energy consumption. The winners of the Queen Elizabeth Prize will be honored in a ceremony later this year and will be awarded a monetary prize of 1 million pounds. “This year’s prize winners have not only helped humanity to achieve a greater degree of mastery over the environment, they have enabled us to do so in a sustainable way,” Lord Browne of Madingley, chair of the Queen Elizabeth Prize Foundation, said in a statement. “They have created a product which we now take for granted, but which will play a major role in ensuring that humanity can live in harmony with nature for many more centuries to come.” email: mhirneisen@newspress.com

COURTESY PHOTOS

From left, Graciela Montgomery, Robert K. Miller and Joyce Coleman.

Programs at Mt. Hood Community College in Greshman, Ore.; vice president of Student Services at Umpqua Community College, and vice president of student affairs and enrollment management at Century College. Ms. Coleman seeks to lead by example and “provide others with an awareness and knowledge of cultural humility with a major aspect being self-exploration.” She is a first-generation college graduate and studied at Sam Houston State University before

earning a master’s degree from the University of Houston. Mr. Miller was elected to the City College Board of Trustees March 2018 to fill a vacancy and was re-elected for a full term in November 2020. He was appointed to the SBCC Foundation Board of Directors December 2020. He worked at a national litigation law firm until his retirement in 2015. He volunteers for the Santa Barbara County Superior Court. Mr. Miller received a bachelor’s degree from Iowa State University

OTIV !$UEATLOERM $IRECTORY Bunnin Cadillac

Bunnin Chevrolet

(805) 898-2400

(805) 898-2400

301 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara www.bunninchevroletcadillac.com

Jaguar Santa Barbara

401 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara

CLENCH VENDOR

Answer: FORMAT WICKER

(805) 682-2800 1 (800) 676-1595 www.sbautogroup.com

Alfa Romeo of Santa Barbara 300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

(805) 845-9610

and a juris doctorate from the University of Minnesota. Before law school, he did a stint in the Peace Corps in Morocco, worked as a congressional assistant, managed a U.S. Senate campaign, was the chief political aide for a senator and served as deputy assistant secretary of refugee affairs at the State Department. Visit sbccfoundation.org to learn more about the board and the foundation. — Annelise Hanshaw

Audi Santa Barbara

BMW Santa Barbara

(805) 682-2000 1 (800) 676-1595

(805) 682-2000 1 (800) 676-1595

402 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara www.sbautogroup.com

301 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Fiat of Santa Barbara (805) 845-9610

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Fiat of Santa Barbara

(805) 845-9610

(805) 845-9610

300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

www.bunninchevroletcadillac.com

300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Fiat of Santa Barbara

www.santabarbaracdjrf.com

www.santabarbaracdjrf.com

Kia of Ventura

Land Rover Santa Barbara

6424 Auto Center Drive Ventura

(805) 585-3640

www.santabarbaracdjrf.com

300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

www.kiaofventura.com

401 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara

(805) 682-2800 1 (800) 676-1595 www.sbautogroup.com

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Fiat of Santa Barbara 300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

(805) 845-9610

www.santabarbaracdjrf.com

Maserati of Santa Barbara 300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

(805) 845-9610

www.maseratiofsantabarbara.com

RADIUS EXTENT

After Cupid shot his arrows at the couple, they —

WERE LOVESTRUCK

Santa Barbara Nissan

02/14/21

'LIILFXOW\/HYHO

        

“I think engineering is very important to improving human life because in engineering you have to make some sort of project,” Dr. Nakamura said. “It brings great improvement to human life.” A number of Dr. Nakamura’s colleagues commended the engineer for receiving the Queen Elizabeth Prize this year, reflecting on his revolutionary discovery that illuminated the world in ways never before seen. “Our campus is overjoyed that Professor Nakamura, along with four other colleagues, has received this international prize that is among the top engineering awards in the world, recognizing their transformational innovation that is of monumental benefit to humankind,” UCSB Chancellor Henry T. Yang said in a statement. He added, “LED-based solidstate illumination is now widely deployed and realizing huge energy savings, (like) reducing greenhouse gases that are impacting climate change and helping to create sustainable

402 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara www.sbautogroup.com

INSTRUCTIONS

www.sudoku.com

        

happy,” Dr. Nakamura told the News-Press, adding that he felt honored to be recognized by such a famous international figure. “It’s the most popular name all over the world, and I became so excited and so happy because this is a very prestigious award.” Dr. Nakamura, alongside LED pioneers Isamu Akaski, Nick Holonyak, Jr., M. George Craford and Russell Dupris, were awarded “not only for the global impact of LED and solid-state lighting but also for the tremendous contribution the technology has made and will continue to make, to reducing energy consumption and addressing climate change,” the QEPrize Foundation said. According to the foundation, LED lighting is 75% more efficient than traditional fluorescent bulbs and lasts 25 times longer than traditional bulbs. Currently, Dr. Nakamura is a materials professor in the USCB College of Engineering. Advances in engineering are a driving force for the improvement of human life, Dr. Nakamura said.

www.alfaromeoofsantabarbara.com

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S PUZZLE

        

COURTESY PHOTOS

At left, Shuji Nakamura pioneered the creation of the blue LED light, which forever altered the future of solid-state lighting and paved the way for the creation of the white LED light. At right, Dr. Nakamura is a materials professor in the College of Engineering at UCSB.

SBCC Foundation board gains three members

S

%\'DYH*UHHQ



In a Japanese lab nearly 30 years ago, a revolutionary innovation was born. After years of trial and error, Japanese engineer and current UCSB professor Shuji Nakamura developed the blue LED light, a highly sought engineering development that would forever change the future of solid-state lighting. It was lighting that did not require the electrical filaments found in incandescent lights for power. Using gallium nitrate (GaN) crystals, Dr. Nakamura’s 1993 discovery paved the way for the development of not only blue LEDs, but the creation of the revolutionary white LED that now powers society’s high-tech lighting and displays. LED light is utilized in a number of ways in the modernday, from powering Christmas lights to illuminating computer screens and iPhones. Since the creation of the first red LED (light-emitting diode) in the 1960s, LED lights have been largely regarded as the future of energy-efficient lighting. LEDs produce light by passing energy through a semiconductor (like a diode). When powered by electricity, the LED emits light. In comparison to traditional light bulbs, which utilizes electrical wiring and heat to produce light, the white LED remains cool and uses less energy. Dr. Nakamura’s invention earned him many accolades and rewards since its initial creation in the early 1990s. In 2014, Dr. Nakamura and his colleagues were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for the invention of the blue LED. And just recently, Dr. Nakamura and other LED pioneers received the 2021 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. “I was so surprised and so

NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

SUDOKU  

NEWS-PRESS CORRESPONDENT

By ANNELISE HANSHAW

26

X

By MADISON HIRNEISEN

S

2021-02-13

14

USCB professor Shuji Nakamura wins Queen Elizabeth Prize

E

13

H

Illuminating the future

S T I N G Y E R

B3

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

425 S. Kellogg Ave. Goleta

(805) 967-1130 www.sbnissan.com

Porsche Santa Barbara

402 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara

(805) 682-2000 1 (800) 676-1595 www.sbautogroup.com

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Fiat of Santa Barbara 300 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara

(805) 845-9610

www.santabarbaracdjrf.com

Kirby Subaru of Ventura

Toyota of Santa Barbara

(805) 700-9197

(805) 967-5611

6404 Auto Center Drive Ventura www.kirbysubaruofventura.com

5611 Hollister Ave. Goleta www.toyota-sb.com

Infi niti of Oxnard

1701 Auto Center Drive Oxnard Auto Center

(805) 485-9998

www.infinitioxnard.com

Mercedes-Benz Santa Barbara

402 South Hope Ave. Santa Barbara

(805) 682-2000 1 (800) 676-1595 www.sbautogroup.com

To Advertise in the Automotive Dealer Directory call 805-564-5200!


B4

NEWS

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

whale!

Continued from Page B1 anywhere else. They’re so happy — it’s just a thrill for them to get out of the house and go.” Island Packers Cruises is the official boat concessionaire for the Channel Islands National Park. The company offers yearround transportation to Santa Cruz and Anacapa Islands, along with summer and winter whale watching, birding excursions and harbor cruises. The business also takes boats out to Santa Rosa, San Miguel and Santa Barbara islands during certain months. From December through midApril, Pacific gray whales migrate annually from the feeding grounds of Alaska to the feeding grounds in Baja California. Winter whale watching trips last between three and three and a half hours, and passengers get to see Anacapa Island up close. From mid-June through midSeptember, Island Packers offers summer trips to see blue and humpback whales. Crew members are trained to spot wildlife on the trips by looking for whale spouts, tail flips and, if they’re lucky, whales breaching through the water. Luke Dutton was the captain of the boat on Feb. 5. He’s been working at Island Packers for 11 years now and driving the boat for seven of them. “It feels really good to be back,” he told the News-Press as he navigated the passengers through the Santa Barbara Channel. “It’s always nice to be on the water. My job is finding whales and dolphins and spending time at the islands, so it’s always nice to be out here.” Mr. Dutton had only taken two whale watching trips since the reopening, and on one of them, he said he and everyone onboard saw nine gray whales. On Feb. 5, whale watchers saw two whales spout and flip their tails, along with thousands of dolphins. The captain told the passengers that for every one dolphin they saw hop out of the water, seven more dolphins were swimming underwater right alongside it. “The vibe has been really, really good,” he told the NewsPress. “I think everyone’s really appreciative and just happy to have somewhere to go and something to do that’s outside. “We’re lucky that here in the channel, we see almost a third of the world’s entire species, so there’s many things that we can see all year round. It’s just all

KENNETH SONG/NEWS-PRESS PHOTOS

At left, the Island Packers boat approaches Anacapa Island. On top of the island is a lighthouse. At right, Luke Dutton, captain of the boat, told the passengers that for every dolphin they see, seven more dolphins were swimming underwater right alongside it.

At left, the sun shines in the horizon above the Channel Islands as seen from the stern of an Island Packers boat during the whale watching trip. At right, an Island Packers boat is docked at the Ventura Harbor before the start of a whale watching trip.

around a great experience, and I think it’s just a really nice time to be out here.” Pedro Vasquez of Redondo Beach was onboard the Island Packers trip, along with a few of his friends from the Los Angeles area.

He expressed his excitement as he stood outside on the deck as the Islander left Ventura Harbor. At this point, no one knew for certain if whales would be spotted. “We came here to enjoy the opportunity to experience life as we back away from COVID and

to meet such wonderful people. You can see from the people on the boat that that’s what they want to do, to exercise being out here in the ocean,” he told the News-Press. “It’s a whole human element.” Much like the whales came up to

5LFN*DUFLD ³6DQWD&UX],VODQG5RFN&RQFHUW´ WULSW\FK [2LO

breathe fresh air on Saturday, the passengers on the Island Packers boat got a breath of fresh air too. “It’s not about the whales,” Mr. Vasquez said as the trip began. “It’s about us going out and enjoying life and meeting people. We’re meeting people — that’s

5LFN*DUFLD ³2MDL$SSOHV´[2LO

great, isn’t it? “Look out there, it’s just gorgeous. So what if we don’t see them? What if we don’t see one whale? Well, we’re just going to have to try again.” email: gmccormick@newspress.com

5LFN*DUFLD ³+LOOVDW&DPS5REHUWV´[2LO

5LFN*DUFLD ³&DPEULD&RYH´[2LO

6WHYH&XUU\ ³:HWODQGV´[2LORQ/LQHQ &XVWRP'HFR)UDPH

6WHYH&XUU\ ³2DN/RUH´[2LORQ/LQHQ &XVWRP'HFR)UDPH 6WHYH&XUU\ ³-HQQHU6SOHQGRU´[2LORQ/LQHQ

Steve Curry & Rick Garcia

([KLELWLRQ2SHQV)HEUXDU\WK ZLWKPDVNV 6RFLDO'LVWDQFLQJ ZZZZDWHUKRXVHJDOOHU\FRPHYHQWV

: *

Waterhouse Gallery

6WDWH6WUHHW6XLWH6DQWD%DUEDUD  HPDLODUW#ZDWHUKRXVHJDOOHU\FRP


page

Voices

C1

voices@newspress.com

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

IDEAS & COMMENTARY

guest opinion ANDY CALDWELL: Keep conflicts of interest out of redistricting/ C2

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

DID YOU KNOW? Bonnie Donovan

Another attempt to recall Newsom

C

historian Johan Norberg. “Businesses moved headquarters and investments to more hospitable places. IKEA left for the Netherlands ... Bjorn Borg and other sports stars fled to Monaco.” Sweden recovered only when it ended its socialist experiment. The nation cut taxes and government spending, and sold state-owned businesses. After economically ignorant politicians like Bernie Sanders called Scandinavia “socialist,” Denmark’s prime minister even came to America to say: “Denmark is far from a socialist planned economy. Denmark is a market economy.” In fact, in rankings of economic freedom, Denmark ranks as more free market than the U.S. Myth No. 5: Socialism is completely different from

alifornia ranks No. 1 — in having the highest gasoline taxes. New Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg proposes to raise the gasoline tax, which will increase costs across the board, leaving California to continue to have the highest priced gasoline tax in the United States. Remember you are taxed to maintain the roads and bridges. We understand the constant maintenance to keep the roads and bridges safe. However, does our tax money get spent on what we are told — or for what? On Monday, as costs and schedules continue to grow, Gov. Gavin Newsom asked for an additional $4.1 billion to complete construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley. This high-speed rail only goes from Merced to Bakersfield, 164 miles. The dream is to finish the 171-mile link to Los Angelea. But that time frame is projected to be another decade and after tens of billions of tax dollars have been procured for tunneling through mountains. As of late, Gov. Newsom has been the subject of many conversations, one being the recall to remove him from office. He is well-known for his arrogance and incompetence. Due to COVID-19, he ruled that Californians must stay at home and could not gather during any of the holidays, yet his own winery was open for business during the July Fourth weekend. Besides his government overreach, he has cost the state $2 billion by sending unemployment checks to prisoners. $2 billion! The (laundry) list goes on; and with that, 15,000 businesses have moved out of state and 3.8 million jobs have been lost. California has 34% of the nation’s welfare recipients. It is no wonder that we have a burgeoning homeless population. The recall currently has all of the 1.5 million signatures needed to put the recall on the November ballot. However, the goal is two million to make allowances for the signatures that are not “counted” as valid. Numerous attempts have been made to recall Gov. Newsom. The signatures needed for this present recall must be collected between July 2020 and March 10. If you have not signed during this time frame, and/or you signed online, your signature is still needed on paper! Download Petitions/ Instructions at recallgavin2020.com. Today, signatures are being collected from noon to 3 p.m. at the city parking lot at State and West Gutierrez streets. Petitions will be at tables at the Santa Barbara site, and volunteers will assist you from your car. For the love of freedom, sign the recall petition. In November, Kathy JanegaDykes of Visit Santa Barbara acknowledged in a letter to the hospitality industry how critical it is that Santa Barbara “... presents a welcoming, clean and safe environment for visitors.” She said the visible homeless camps have been counterproductive to efforts to make the tourists feel safe and comfortable. We are told that due to

Please see stossel on C4

Please see donovan on C4

JUSTIN MERRIMAN PHOTO

Lena Carson, 14, sits in front of her home in Pittsburgh. She is eager to go back to school for in-person instruction.

The kids aren’t all right Lena Carson is among students who miss their classrooms

Editor’s note: Columnist David Limbaugh has taken some time off. The following is a column by Salena Zito.

O

ne year ago, Lena Carson was pulling straight A’s at Pittsburgh’s Creative and Performing Arts magnet school, located across the river from her parents’ home. The 14-year-old student also swam at the local YMCA every day in preparation for the annual state competition and enjoyed the everyday social life of a teenager. Today, she is sitting at home. Again.

L

It has been nearly a year beginning, I was like, I have this since she was able to walk into time off, it’s going to be so fun, CAPA, to which she had to earn and now going to school is all I admission through a want,” she said. portfolio of her work, and The hardest part for interact with her teachers Lena is all of the false or friends. starts. “Four times over Her daily swims are the past year, we’ve been gone, along with her told we were going back, social life. Her outside given a date, and then activities have diminished a few days before, and to walking the dog around sometimes a day before, Salena Zito the block. we are supposed to get In the beginning, like to the classroom, they most teenagers, she thought of it abruptly change the rules,” she as an extended snow day. When said. days turned into weeks, what It tugs at her emotions. started as an escape from school “They’ve told us four different went from fun to dread. “In the times that we are going to go back

to school, and I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh, I get to see my friends. I get to wear my clothes to school. I get to learn with my peers. Then I’ll get to go to swim practice,’” Lena explained of the routines of her young life that she has lost. “It is really disappointing whenever they say, ‘Oh, never mind,’” she said. “And I understand that there’s risks, and there’s dangers, but it’s also, just, it really takes away your motivation.” A bright student who skipped a grade, her straight A’s have dipped to D’s, and Lena said she struggles to complete assignments, not because she

can’t but because of the lost will. “I have nothing to look forward to.” The Pittsburgh Board of Education recently announced that Pittsburgh public school students will not return to buildings until at least April, marking the fourth time in 12 months the district announced students would return to classes, only to rescind the opening just before the doors were set to open. The board voted 7-2 for the plan, with the members citing health and safety for students and staff. The Pittsburgh Federation of Please see zito on C4

Stick with capitalism; socialism never works

ast week, I reported on two myths about socialism. My new video covers three more. Myth No. 3: Socialism works if it’s “democratic.” As the Democratic Socialists of America put it, “Society should be run democratically — to meet public needs, not to make profits for a few.” Sounds nice. If socialists are elected, then we’ll have a more just society. But Venezuela’s socialists were elected. “They can start off democratically elected,” says economist Ben Powell, director of the Free Market Institute at Texas Tech, but “once they centralize control over the economy, it becomes impossible to ‘un-elect’ them.” Hugo Chavez was elected but became an authoritarian who

chose his successor, Nicolas the needs and wants of millions Maduro. Maduro now gets of people in different places. No “elected,” by having opponents politician can match the wisdom arrested and “ordering state of decentralized entrepreneurs employees to vote for him making subtle or they lose their job,” said adjustments constantly. Dr. Powell. Celebrities such as “Socialism always Rosario Dawson, Susan becomes authoritarian?” I Sarandon and Danny asked. DeVito star in videos “Everywhere you try selling “democratic” socialism, that’s what socialism as “public you get,” he replied. “It’s schools” and “interstate John Stossel hard to exercise political highways.” freedom if you don’t have They are not economic freedoms. If you’re wrong. “Some industries are dependent upon the state for government-owned,” replied your livelihood, you lose your Dr. Powell, but added, “When ability to use your voice to oppose you look at things that are (the state) because you can be inefficiently done — public punished. education, our congested streets And if the state directs the — (it’s clear) socialized industries economy, some government don’t work well.” department must manage “They do in Scandinavian millions of production decisions countries!” say socialism’s and prices. That never works. promoters. No bureaucrat can anticipate That’s myth No. 4.

Scandinavia does have big welfare programs, but capitalism pays for them. The socialists call Sweden socialist, but that’s just wrong. “Volvo is a private company,” said Dr. Powell. “Restaurants and hotels are privately owned. Markets organize the vast majority of Swedish economic activity.” Sweden did once try socialism. The result was high taxes, inflation and economic decline. It’s an example of how people in prosperous places often don’t know what made their lives better. In 1950, Sweden was the world’s fourth-richest country. Then Sweden tried socialism. Suddenly, once industrious Swedes started taking sick days. Wealth creation stopped. “Talent and capital stormed out of Sweden to escape taxes and red tape,” writes Swedish


C2

VOICES

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

Henry Schulte

The author lives in Solvang

Wendy McCaw Arthur von Wiesenberger

Welcome to America

Co-Publisher Co-Publisher

(within reason)

I

guest OPINION

Redistricting Commission falls prey to intrigue

letters to the news-press

E

very 10 years, other jurisdictions. Moreover, after the census, Nielsen’s bid came in $100,000 the boundaries less than the attorney the that determine activists wanted, Mr. Fred elected officials’ Woocher. districts are drawn, including What both Mr. Seymour that of city councils, boards and Mr. Woocher failed to of supervisors, the state disclose is that they were the Legislature and Congress. attorneys on record for a court In the old days, this was the case representing county means by which politicians, Supervisor Doreen Farr, who were in charge of drawing since retired, that certainly the lines of their own districts, fell within the eight-year picked their voters. In the case prohibition. The case ran up a of the state and congressional legal bill in excess of $500,000, district boundaries, the which Supervisor Farr’s districts are now drawn by a campaign was required to pay state-appointed independent unless the attorneys decided commission. to donate their time. This case As a result of a ballot clearly falls within the eightinitiative approved year prohibition. The by voters, county truth is, Mr. Seymour supervisor electoral was attempting to clear boundaries are now the field for his former being drawn by a co-counsel. local independent So, why all the redistricting intrigue? Many of commission. The the issues that come ordinance, drafted before the board Andy Caldwell by Santa Barbara of supervisors are County Supervisor Das decided on a 3-2 vote. Williams, requires that anyone The partisan activists’ goal is who has worked for a county to keep Isla Vista placed in the supervisor or a candidate’s county’s 3rd District, which election in the past eight years is otherwise a North County can’t be a member of, or a district, keeping the deciding consultant to, the redistricting vote in all matters in the pocket commission. The purpose of of South County progressives. this requirement is to preserve In that regard, nothing much the independence of the has changed in the past 30 commission from partisan years as this boundary line political interference and any incongruity has led to two form of “electioneering.” attempted county splits. Predictably, the The North County, despite independence of the the fact that it is more commission is under siege by populous than the South progressive activists. County, is dominated by These include activist the South County by way of progressive attorney Phil this Isla Vista machination. Seymour, Santa Barbara This is by virtue of the fact County Democratic Party the students in I.V. vote organizing director Spencer in a monolithic block that Brandt, and Lee Heller, who overwhelms the rest of the is a consistently large donor voters in the district they to local Democratic Party share. candidates. (She recently So how does hiring donated $11,000 to support Mr. Woocher fit into this the re-election of Supervisor narrative? Well, 20 years ago, Williams.) COLAB sued the county over This group relentlessly redistricting because of the pressured the redistricting Isla Vista machination. Who commission to forego hiring did the county hire to defend the firm of Nielsen Merkasmer the IV-centered map? Fred to serve as its legal counsel Woocher! The progressives are based on a very nebulous counting on Mr. Woocher to accusation that company was work his magic again. in violation of the eight-year Awarding Mr. Woocher the prohibition. That had to do contract violates the spirit and with the firm simply filling out the letter of the ordinance a report indicating that one of and calls into question the its clients had donated $1,000 ability of the commission to to Supervisor Bob Nelson. withstand partisan political Nonetheless, Nielsen was influence disguised as legal recommended by county staff counsel. because it is the only firm in the state that specializes in Andy Caldwell is the executive drawing political boundaries, director of COLAB and host having provided services to the of “The Andy Caldwell Radio cities of Santa Maria and Santa Show,” weekdays from 3-5 p.m., Barbara, among hundreds of on News-Press Radio AM 1290.

NEWS-PRESS FILE PHOTO

Gov. Gavin Newsom

Let’s say goodbye to Newsom

F

or the love of freedom, liberty, business, schools and your future, join us to sign a recall Gov. Gavin Newsom petition. What better way to show your love for California this Valentine’s Day! Today from noon to 3 p.m. at Gutierrez and State streets, local business owners, educators and volunteers will have petitions, clipboards with petitions, and pens ready for your signature. There will be no need to even leave your car. Simply drive into the parking lot off Gutierrez, roll down your window and sign. There will also be a table for Sunday pedestrians along State Street. Prefer to stay home? Visit https://recallgavin2020.com/ volunteer-signup/sign-a-petitionor-circulate-petitions. My great-grandparents moved here starting in the 1870s. Politicians are destroying California. Had enough? Denice Spangler Adams Santa Barbara

Well-oiled machine!

T

hank you to all the personnel at Wake Campus, where COVID-19 vaccines were distributed Feb. 2. Everyone did a splendid job directing traffic. I was on time for my appointment and home in an hour. Directions for shot No. 2 were given, recovery tents were spaced, and there were lots of goodlooking, young firemen. All was an enjoyable experience. Judy Burtsfield Santa Barbara

would overuse them? Republican legislators are being labeled as white supremacists, as well as all Trump voters. (What about the growth of minorities voting Republican last year?) Connect all Trump voters with domestic terrorism, and you create a pretext for seizing guns. (What about the illegal guns that will be used by released prisoners/ criminal illegal aliens crossing over the southern border?) What about the importance of law-abiding citizens using the Second Amendment to defend themselves, knowing that their homes/communities are going to be increasingly unsafe? It’s time to cut out the extremist labeling and nonsense going on in Congress, including the impeachment. Why aren’t the National Guard all going home? Do the majority of Americans support the executive order sending tax money to Planned Parenthood and paying for abortions overseas? What about defending our Constitution, which defends life, freedom of speech and the right to bear arms? 2022 will be here soon, and Democratic Party representatives, such as U.S. Rep. Salud Carbajal of Santa Barbara, will have a lot to answer for.

any soldiers are remaining in our national Capitol. Why is there a new fence around the Capitol building? Democrat legislators are saying that they feel unsafe with their Republican colleagues. U.S. Rep. Alexandria OcasioCortez, D-New York, went so far implying that Rep. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is an attempted murderer. The National Guard was mostly ignored or spoken against last year when rioting/looting took place. Where are the specific threats from intelligence requiring these troops to remain in Washington D.C.? Are these soldiers being used for political purposes? Where is the dialogue and compromise in Congress? The Keystone Pipeline, stopped by executive order, actually had many Democrat legislators voting for it. Why are there so many executive orders when President Joe Biden admitted, during the campaign, that only a dictator

John Hammerel Santa Barbara

Gene E. Ahlstrom Santa Maria

Killers should be in jail

D

ear President Joe Biden, We do not live in a violent country. We should not see killings on TV every night. People who shoot people should be in jail! Cops who shoot people should be in jail! FBI agents who shoot people should be in jail! CIA agents who shoot people should be in jail! We have plenty of jails for them. I am sick and tired of seeing cops, FBI and CIA getting off with administrative leave for killing people. Anyone who kills should be in jail! You should outlaw killing. One more thing: You must save the poor 600 children caged at the southern border. They are innocent of all charges. Another thing: We need you to write an immigration law today. We must be helpful to the ones stranded at the border. Please grant asylum to those people and allow them to come to this country. Help DACA recipients avoid deportation. Jerry McGovern Buellton

Congress, cut out the nonsense

M

to command a higher wage. The lessons that can be taught by a job, any job, are important life lessons. When entry-level and minority job hunters are able to find work, they earn more than just a paycheck. They learn valuable life skills like the importance of meeting deadlines, how to report to a manager and how to get along with coworkers. These are lessons that are not taught in a classroom setting, and the job experience young employees acquire sets them up for future success with promotions and raises well beyond the minimum wage. Flipping burgers or mopping the floor at your local Wendy’s is not supposed to be a career choice. The proposed policy is particularly bone-headed due to its universality. Most states have already increased their wages well above the $7.25 federal level. For example, many locations in California are now above $15 an hour. Let every state set its own minimum wage level. Economic conditions in New York or California are much different than those of small mid-western states. Let the individual states make this decision – not the mindless federal elites.

Another way to kill jobs

P

resident Joe Biden has already cost America plenty of jobs with his radical climate policies. Now his proposal to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour is set to add even more job losses. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the proposed wage increase would cause a net loss of 1.4 million jobs. It’s likely that those 1.4 million people would rather make $7.25 an hour than nothing at all. To increase the minimum wage during our current pandemic will sound a death knell to even more small businesses. The proposal is highly inflationary. Employees who are now above the $15 floor will now demand more wages, creating a wage spiral. President Biden’s minimum wage proposal hurts the very people he is trying to help: the minority worker. Low-paying jobs can serve as an entry point for unskilled workers to develop the work habits and skills necessary

Convict Trump

I

cannot imagine anyone loyal to our Constitution and nation who thinks that there is another answer to the choice before us but to convict Donald Trump as a terrorist and insurrectionist. He is the Midas of U.S. destruction! Luke Roberts Goleta

Bad things on the horizon

W

ell, it looks like the Deep State is back in charge in D.C. and showing its disregard for the safety of Americans by opening the walls that kept us safe and favoring illegal aliens, foreign drug runners, sex traffickers and other criminals, to enter and stay in this country to prey on Americans and Latino communities. Santa Barbara County can expect boat landings on the beaches by UCSB to unload their cargo. They will find a way to make their entrance into the local population and ply their wares. The president will help them succeed as there will be no ICE to speak of enforcing anything except making women third-class citizens in sports and Americans in general to pay for the medical and living benefits for this new hoard of freeloaders. Expect the petty crime rate to rise and drug use to multiply. Ted Solomon Santa Barbara

Don’t let Trump run again

M

y name is Van, and I am a security consultant here in Santa Barbara. Donald Trump must be barred from ever taking office again because of his crimes — and to send a message to the next wouldbe dictator that tries to take his place. His role in inciting the insurrection is plainly obvious, and because of this, our senators must act, or I cannot in good conscience vote to keep them in office. Van Arant Santa Barbara

’ve been farming in Goleta since 1977. I started in my 20s, and now I’m in my 60s. Like most of us along in years, we ask ourselves where did the time go? My father tried to instill some work ethic in my brother and me in our early teens and made us work the summers on the ranch. Here we were, a couple of skinny guys spending all day with grown men who teased the hell out of us. Good-natured, of course. And we learned a little Spanish in the process from the Mexican workers: Every single swear word there was. Even though we didn’t even make $1 an hour, it did give us an appreciation of what it’s like to get up every day and work in the heat of summer, drag garden hoses up the side of a mountain to water trees and dig holes to plant more trees that were going to need more water. I hated it, and I’m grateful my father made us do it. When we got older, my brother went off doing other things, and I ended up managing the farms for the next four decades. My father took a chance with me. I had zero knowledge how to manage a ranch and handle employees, all of whom had entered the country illegally from Mexico. In those days, ranch workers still feared immigration. But as time went by, that fear faded because eventually deportations became rare. I’ll admit that without the Mexican labor force, no California farmer could have made it. Still can’t. The work is hard from bending over picking strawberries or carrying an 80pound bag of avocados down the side of a mountain. Because I had worked with these field workers many years earlier, I had come to appreciate how tough it really was. I made many friends and long-term relationships that still exist today. As our ranch operations grew, so did our dependence and survival on this illegal labor force. A lot of my employees have now aged out, but most stayed with me for those three to four decades. So what’s the point of what I just shared? Well, one of my younger employees who has been with me for 26 years recently lost his sister and father in Mexico to COVID-19. He went back for the first time in those 26 years to visit what was left of his family. He said his mother couldn’t stop crying for an hour. He also said Mexico was bad before, but it’s beyond words now. He said he feared for his life, and he’s Mexican. No one goes out at night. He said the news was filled with nothing but shooting and killings. He said trucks full of oxygen tanks for virus patients are stolen daily and put on the Internet. People with severe cases of COVID are left to die in the ambulance because they simply can’t be treated. His witnessing the death and hardships had a significant impact on him. His mother begged him to stay, but he said he couldn’t. He had built a life in America, and he told me he would never go back to Mexico. He appreciates his new home more than ever before. He said even the homeless have it better here. My heart breaks for him and people like him. Millions come to America for that dream of a better life. And even the worst life here is better than Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and all the rest. But we can’t take them all. If we open the doors like President Joe Biden is doing, entire countries will flood America. And you can’t blame them, but the sad reality is, it’s not our problem. It’s a South American problem. And they’ve turned their problem into our problem, which has now become Please see schulte on C4


SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

W

hat a sick joke. U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, one of the loudest mouths leading the impeachment circus against former President Donald Trump over the events at the Capitol on Jan. 6, is a brazen racial insurrectionist. The 16-term Democrat from South Central Los Angeles has been pouring verbal gasoline and tossing rhetorical Molotov cocktails into the public square since the 1992 L.A. riots. Now she’s the arbiter of civility and keeper of social order? LOL. Rep. Waters blasted Donald Trump for telling his supporters on Jan. 6 to “be tough” and “take back their government” — standard, peaceful stump speech fare. She blames our 45th president for the actions of a few who ignored his explicit call to remain “peaceful,” while

VOICES

C3

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

Muddying up the Waters denying that her own fighting “And you push back on them. And words and direct embrace of riots you tell them they’re not welcome have contributed to decades of anymore, anywhere.” violent incitement. Mr. Trump’s That’s exactly what left-wing impeachment trial lawyers professional agitators, from rightly allude to her instigation Occupy ICE to antifa to Black of mobs formed against Lives Matter to Smash Racism administration officials D.C. to the Sunrise at restaurants and public Movement, have done spaces. over the past two years, In its trial brief, Mr. targeting prominent Trump’s team contrasted Republicans and the president’s anodyne conservatives and their encouragement for families on the streets conservative activists to and in their own homes. “fight like hell” for their But the fact is that Michelle Malkin country with Rep. Waters’ President Trump endorsement of physical lawyers only scratched harassment against Mr. Trump’s the surface of Rep. Waters’ cabinet members: divisive and destabilizing “If you see anybody from that diatribes. cabinet in a restaurant, in a I first began covering department store, at a gasoline “Turbulent Waters” in the station, you get out and you create early 1990s as an editorial a crowd,” Rep. Waters shrieked writer and columnist at the Los in 2018 at a rally in Los Angeles. Angeles Daily News. Let me

remind you that newfound antiinsurrectionist Rep. Waters is the very same bloodthirsty opportunist who whitewashed the deadly L.A. riots as a “rebellion,” excused the weeklong shooting, looting and arson orgy as “a spontaneous reaction to a lot of injustice and a lot of alienation and frustration,” and coddled Crips and Bloods gang members — with whom she performed the Electric Slide as part of her “fearless support and understanding of young people and their efforts at selfexpression.” Rep. Waters made common cause with her neighborhood gangsta rappers who stoked the violence, calling them “poets” and “children” expressing their “pain.” I remind you that shortly before the 1992 L.A. riots, rapper Ice Cube (a denizen of Rep. Waters’ district and a member of

DRAWING BOARD

the cop-killing glorifiers at rap group N.W.A.) had penned the hate-filled song “Black Korea” for his best-selling platinum solo album, “Death Certificate.” He seethed against law-abiding immigrant entrepreneurs in his ‘hood and threatened to burn their stores “right down to a crisp.” Rep. Waters told the Los Angeles Times in May 1992 that “riot is the voice of the unheard.” She openly embraced the term “insurrection” as a substitute for “riot” in a 1992 interview with Katie Couric. A quarter-century later, in an anniversary interview with the Huffington Post, she again used the term “insurrection” to celebrate the implosion of L.A. and stoking of anti-white, antiAsian violence as a “defining Please see malkin on C4

Thomas D. Elias

The author is a longtime observer of California politics.

Can state end vaccine trouble?

E

verything went smoothly the other day at a mass vaccination center in the parking lot outside The Forum, the Inglewood arena kitty-corner from modernist SoFi Stadium, new home of the Los Angeles Rams and Chargers football teams. Lines of cars were long but manageable as they moved slowly and steadily. Nurses checked on the newly vaccinated recipients of first doses of Pfizer-BioNTech inoculations against the dreaded COVID-19 virus, found to be at least partly effective on every mutation yet discovered. Folks were free to go after a 15-minute waiting period to assure they were having no immediate serious side effects. Staffers and nurses were competent, kind and friendly, some having come as temporary workers from points as distant as Louisiana and Ohio. The mix of cars inching forward ran from shiny new Range Rovers to ancient, oxidized Honda Civics. But some things were dreadfully wrong behind this pleasant, well-managed scene where health care workers and folks over 65 got their shots in the arm. The same flaws applied to other public and private vaccination sites in most California counties. For one thing, there was dreadful inconsistency in the vaccine rollout. Some hospitals served everyone on their patient roster over 65. Others vaccinated only seniors who were also among their most immune-compromised patients. Shots were available at county sites to anyone over 65 who could book one, which proved no simple matter for many. The inconsistency applied in almost all California counties as vague state guidelines left institutions to interpret local rules according to how much Please see elias on C4

Have your say Your opinions are valuable contributions to these pages. We welcome a variety of views. Letters must be exclusive to the News-Press. In most cases, first priority for immediate publication goes to those submitted by 6 p.m. Tuesdays. We encourage brevity, and shorter letters have a better chance of being printed immediately. We edit all submissions for length, clarity and professional standards. We do not print submissions that lack a civil tone, allege illegal wrongdoing or involve consumer complaints. We also may decide not to print letters or op-eds for other reasons. Limit your letters to one every 30 days. All letters must include the writer’s address and telephone number for verification. We cannot acknowledge unpublished letters. We prefer e-mailed submissions. If you send attachments, please send word documents. We can’t guarantee that we can open a PDF. Send letters to voices@ newspress.com. Writers also may fax letters to 805-966-6258. Mail letters to P.O. Box 1359, Santa Barbara 93102. The News-Press reserves the right to publish or republish submissions in any form or medium. Direct questions to Managing Editor Dave Mason at 805-5645277 or voices@newspress.com.


C4

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS

VOICES

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

Big advantages went to those with fast computers elias

Continued from Page C3 vaccine they had in their freezers. Confusion piled atop even bigger problems. A principle inequity was that almost no walkup vaccination sites accepted people lacking previously arranged appointments. It took computer savvy and equipment to make those appointments. Nothing in the state’s series of vaccination plans aimed to fix that problem. This left the entire enterprise looking like an exercise in economic discrimination and classism. There appeared to be only two ways to get appointments: go online and fight through ever-jammed websites where getting any response could seem miraculous, or go in person to a site and prevail on agreeable staffers to use their smartphones to get you an appointment. Big advantages went to those with fast computers and strong

Wi-Fi. Anyone lacking either commodity would need lots of help getting the vaccine unless they were on the patient roster of a system like Kaiser Permanente’s, where phone calls went to all patients over 75 as soon as Kaiser got permission to vaccinate them. If you were a patient of other medical groups and did not check email or your personalized app from those systems, you would not learn appointments were available unless someone else told you. Then there was the matter of getting there. For the immobile, stranded at home with caregivers who might not have cars, there was no one bringing vaccines regardless of how many COVID

risk factors they might have. The fact is that the poorer folks are the less likely they are to have reliable, strong Wi-Fi even when they have computers. They were not doing well in this system. As for getting to one of the large, mass distribution sites generally located in the large parking lots of places like Disneyland, Dodger Stadium and CalExpo, getting there took a car. Yes, processing and injection generally took only 45 minutes after arrival at The Forum, but some folks squirmed as long as five hours in their rest-room-free vehicles at other big sites. It added up to discrimination against the poor and uncybernetic, especially folks

lacking both computers and smartphones. “We know about the problems,” said Darrel Ng, senior advisor to the state’s COVID task force. “There will be more outreach. But we will need larger supplies of vaccines to make really big improvements.” For now, this means poor planning has created discrimination by economic class, since the poor are far more likely than others to lack needed skills and equipment. The bottom line: It should have been simple to get vaccinated, especially in California, whose governor has spent years preaching equal opportunity. Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@ aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough, The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more of Mr. Elias’ columns, visit www. californiafocus.net.

‘Roiling Waters’ excused the violence repeatedly “Resistance”? Sixty people were killed, 2,000 injured, $1 billion in damages inflicted, and $700 million in federal aid injected to quell the arsonists, looters and shooters simply expressing their “pain.” “Roiling Waters” excused the violence repeatedly by defending the “righteous anger” of the rioters against police, innocent white bystanders like trucker Reginald Denny (nearly beaten to death by Rep. Waters’ gangsta buddy Damian Williams) and the Korean shop owners (forced to take up arms and take to their rooftops to defend their lives and livelihoods when the cops yielded to the mob). Now, nearly 30 years later, the wealthy and powerful congresswoman whose rise to power is defined by violenceinducing and violence-excusing racial demagoguery, demands “accountability” for words to remove a president no longer in office. Clown Congress. Clown country.

Continued from Page C1 Teachers president said keeping the students out of the schools is the wise thing to do until the whole teaching staff has gotten the COVID-19 vaccine. The roller coaster of openings and closures is also the most challenging part for her parents, said Lena’s father, Dr. Paul Carson, a hospitalist who spends his days and nights in the COVID19 ward at a local hospital. The frontline worker said he knows it is not just his 14-year-old daughter and 11-year-old son who are flailing during this isolation. “Kids need to be in school, and parents need to speak up about this for no other reason than the sake of their education and

Continued from Page C2 more political than ever. Since former President Donald Trump’s departure, the flood gates are reopening. Border crossings are soaring, and that is bringing more COVID-19 to America. Texas has opened hotels to house migrants with COVID with tax dollars. President Biden has built his own new set of cages for the kids. Does this get media coverage? You think it would have if Mr. Trump did it? Compassion comes with a huge price. There is no way we can manage the influx of millions more to America. We can’t even figure out how to distribute a vaccine or open our schools. What makes us think we can properly deal with millions more

fascism. In Congress, Rep. Louie Gohmert called Hitler a “socialist.” Rep. Steve Cohen took offense, shouting, “It’s the Nazis that were terrible, not the socialists!” But Nazis were “national socialists.” There are differences between fascism and socialism, but “both replace market decision-making with command and control,” Dr. Powell said. Fascism “leaves private ownership in nominal terms,” but neither system allows individual freedom. “You lose... control over your own future,” Dr. Powell explained. “Only under capitalism do you have the freedom to say, ‘No.’” Socialism appeals to people today because it promises “equality and social justice,” but look at its track record. In Russia, Cuba, North Korea,

Continued from Page C1

NEWS-PRESS FILE PHOTO

U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters

mental health,” he said. CDC data shows that beginning with the closings last spring, emergency rooms across the country experienced a spike in the number of visits from children under 18 for mental health needs. Dr. Carson is frustrated with the school board’s and teachers unions’ mangling children’s lives. He is even more frustrated because as a physician, he sees the CDC head counts confirm what he already knew. It is possible to get children to school safely without hinging the return on vaccines. “My kids are flailing,” he said sadly. Dr. Carson is also frustrated that many parents remain silent because of the social outcasting that happens when you speak out.

When he posted his frustrations with the school system on the neighborhood Facebook page, few agreed with him in public. “People are unwilling to get in the crosshairs publicly of something that has nothing to do with politics, but they are afraid it might appear political,” explained Dr. Carson, adding that his Facebook direct messages told a different story. “Overwhelmingly, people agreed with me,” he said. Dr. Carson was willing to put his neck out there because he cares about not only his children but also this whole generation of students. And different political perspectives should never be part of the equation. “This isn’t a left-right problem,” he said. “It’s a unilateral problem.

This is our children. They need to go back to school. We need to follow the science. That’s my main point, and I am unwilling to have my children’s education held hostage any longer.” Regarding online school, Lena said, “It’s not pushing me at all the same way that regular school does.” Her voice dropped when asked how much she wants to go back to school. “Very badly,” she said. “That’s the main thing I want. I think it would make things a lot better. I think I would just be happier in general, probably.” Salena Zito is a CNN political analyst and a staff reporter and columnist for the Washington Examiner. To read her past columns, visit www.creators.com. Copyright 2021 by Creators.com

Work permits would allow farmers to get the help they need schulte

Continued from Page C1

donovan

‘Kids need to be in school’ zito

stossel

Nicaragua, Vietnam and China, socialism has meant a loss of freedom. Socialist experiments also failed in Israel, India, Great Britain, Afghanistan, Syria, Algeria, Cambodia, Somalia, etc. There are no socialist success stories. Only capitalist countries create real wealth. “The history of humanity is poverty, starvation, early death,” Dr. Powell pointed out. “In the last 20 years, we’ve seen more humans escape extreme poverty than any other time in human history. That’s because of markets!” Yet millions vote for socialism. John Stossel is author of “Give Me a Break: How I Exposed Hucksters, Cheats, and Scam Artists and Became the Scourge of the Liberal Media.” For other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators. com. Copyright 2021 by JFS Productions Inc.

How will we ever conquer this transient situation?

malkin

Continued from Page C3

Michelle Malkin’s email address is michellemalkinInvestigates@ protonmail.com. To find out more about Michelle Malkin and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit t www.creators.com. Copyright 2021 by Creators.com.

Only capitalist countries create real wealth

of an undereducated population who are nearly 100% reliable on some form of subsidy, who utilize free education, overload our medical services, get free lunches, government benefits and pay no taxes? We’ve never been able to do it right, and we never ever will be able to do it right. As a suggestion for a possible cure: Instead of using tax dollars to subsidize abortions, why don’t we figure out a way to send those billions to help these impoverished nations who really do need it? And not through their governments but through organizations who will distribute the money and put the help directly into the mouths and hands who need it. We’ll never fix the massive corruption in those countries, just like we can’t even fix it here at home, but we can make a difference.

It isn’t really our problem to do this, but then again it is. The most humanitarian thing we can do is help those people in their own countries, where they’d prefer to live anyway with their families. And as for getting farm help, we modernize the bracero program. Work permits would allow farmers to get the help they need, provide legal jobs to our southern friends and manage our border. It’s absolutely mandatory we maintain our sovereignty. If Democrats have their way and South America gets to freely overflow our country, the list of devastation is too long to write here. And one more thing. I know this isn’t politically correct, but Santa Barbara County has been hit with an influx of murders and shootings lately. Most if not all those involved have Hispanic surnames. These gang members

are products of the huge inflow of illegal aliens into California, the entire country. These are facts, and yet everyone wants to bury their heads to avoid speaking up for fear of retribution in this PC world. We are silenced to admit the truth. If you add millions more of these immigrants, this problem will only worsen exponentially, especially since these days no one goes to jail anymore. Democrats have to stop exploiting human beings for political gain. They like to pander how much they care about the immigrants, but their actions create even more hardships. And just because they say they care, doesn’t mean others don’t. The issue is complex and simple at the same time. Everyone who comes into the United States does it legally. Done.

COVID-19 the homeless cannot be moved. However if it works for the city to relocate the homeless camps, the city does move them. Here are just two recent examples. A woman was removed from the Moreton Bay Fig Tree for vandalizing the park and for her ever-increasing campsite that daily covered one third of the lawn. In fact, the city fenced the entire property to keep her out. (She is now across the street). The city also received numerous complaints made by the tourists to the hotel industry regarding their safety due to the transients camping in tents on the waterfront. The city’s position is it cannot relocate the transients unless there is a bed to offer them at a shelter. How will we ever conquer this transient situation if the city does not stop the other counties from exporting their homeless here? It is apparent to anyone that we have mastered the art of welcoming transients to our town. Assuming branding is the modern marketing tool, Santa Barbara appears to have strayed from the American Riviera to the land of graffiti, trash and homeless camps. In response to the tourists’ complaints, the city embarked in a 90-day pilot program that is a combined effort of City Net, the park rangers, code enforcement and the police. City Net was offering services and housing to campers. We wonder where the housing is that City Net offered to the campers? We are aware that City Net received from the city in 2019, $62,476. In 2020 combined with SBAct, City Net received $624,270. And in 2021 with SBAct, City Net received $836,235! For this money, we hope to see visible results of homeless people off the street and on the road to recovery. Otherwise, another avenue or agency should be explored. On that note, the Army Reserve Building at State and Las Positas is being purchased by the American Indian Health Services. We suggest that the organization operate its medical clinic in the historic Army Reserve building that was an Army Hospital and that the large “outback” building be converted to a shelter for housing the homeless. Why not have personnel from the Father

Virgil Cordano Center operate the shelter? They are already in the business of charity. Imagine what this group could do for this population, with the medical facility on the premises. Since the homeless cannot be taken off the street unless a bed is provided, this is a win-win situation with something for everyone. If the city can afford to give City Net more than $1.5 million since 2019 to alleviate transient issues, doesn’t it behoove the city to partner with the Indians and find them $1 million, which is half of the cost of their $2 million property? This seems a better venture than the $2 million Heap Grant for 20 temporary tiny homes that was planned for the Carrillo lot. And to decrease blight, the Santa Barbara City Council has announced it is addressing the shopping carts that are abandoned after the pedestrian trip from the grocery store. The city proposes an ordinance to make the store owners at fault for people stealing their property. The store owners and the shoppers will suffer the cost. Is the city heading off an unfortunate fallout of housing without parking and people without cars? Our hats are off to Architecture Board of Review’s David Watkins, who after five years, resigned in disagreement for the direction/preferential treatment that is given to special projects and darlings of the city in the realm of signatures, and timing of building permits, etc. Some get special meetings, but most wait their turn at the back of the line, spending dollars endlessly for an empty building. Mr. Watkins has been invaluable with his insights, fairness and his gentlemanly steadfast approach when he disagreed. He did not back down. He said he loved being part of the ABR. Perhaps his attributes would be better served as a member of City Council. With hat in hand, we ask him to please stay involved in some manner for the citizens of Santa Barbara. “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.” — Mother Teresa

Bonnie Donovan writes the “Did You Know?” column in conjunction with a bipartisan group of local citizens. It appears Sundays in the Voices section.

Profile for Santa Barbara News-Press

Santa Barbara News-Press: February 14, 2021  

Santa Barbara News-Press: February 14, 2021