Savvy360 Oahu - Summer/Fall 2023

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O‘AHU

CURATED TRAVEL + LIFESTYLE

Oahu Halekulani | Kahala Resort

Maui Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea

Hawai‘i Island Four Seasons Resort Hualālai | Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

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CONTENTS

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Local Vibe

Local lingo ... puffy fish ... night blooms ... lava flows ... state bird ... and fiery nuts.

Lay of the Island

Getting familiar with The Gathering Place.

Mindful Traveler

A few ways to have an impact and give back to O‘ahu during your stay.

Royal Havens

From relaxed beach homes in Waikīkī to open-air palaces the public can still visit, discover where Hawaiian royalty enjoyed spending their time on O‘ahu.

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MĀLAMA O‘AHU
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PHOTO COURTESY: (TOP) KUALOA RANCH; (BOTTOM) BISHOP MUSEUM ARCHIVES
WHERE ROYALTY STAYCATIONED ON O‘AHU
Exclusive Project Broker: Heyer & Associates, LLC RBO-17416, 1288 Ala Moana Boulevard, Suite 108, Honolulu, Hawaii 96814 | Courtesy to qualifying brokers; see Project Broker for details. DISCLAIMER: Alia (“Project”) is a proposed condominium project that does not yet exist, and the development concepts therefor continue to evolve and are subject to change without notice. All figures, facts, information, and prices are approximate and may change at any time. All renderings and other information depicted are illustrative only and are provided to assist the purchaser in visualizing the Project, and may not be accurately depicted, and are subject to change at any time. Visual depictions of the Project are artists’ renderings and should not be relied upon in deciding to purchase a unit, and the developer makes no guarantee, representation, or warranty whatsoever that the Project and units depicted will ultimately appear as shown. The developer does not own or control the land outside of the Project and does not guarantee the current or future use thereof. To the extent permitted by law, the developer disclaims all liability that may arise out of errors or omissions in the content of this ad, including claims for actual or consequential damages. This is not intended to be an offering or solicitation of sale in any jurisdiction where the Project is not registered in accordance with applicable law or where such offering or solicitation would otherwise be prohibited by law. Renderings by Steelblue. Warning: The California Department of Real Estate has not inspected, examined, or qualified this offering.
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CONTENTS

Destination: Kaimukī

One of Honolulu’s oldest neighborhoods, Kaimukī provides a perfect mix of residential charm and modern urban culture.

Shop Local

Get your shopping fix on O‘ahu at some of these chic boutiques and bespoke local brands you'll find around the island.

Aloha De Mele

From a hobby that grew out of boredom, J.T. Ojerio's art captures the beauty, culture and people of her island home.

Good Vibes

Channeling the ‘āina (land) and wisdom of his kūpuna (elders), Pi‘iali‘i Lawson is sharing the power of energy healing

Step Off The Beaten Trail

Take the path less traveled on these under-theradar hikes.

The Hot Spot

Tucked away at Pier 38, Nami Kaze is causing quite a buzz for O‘ahu’s culinary scene.

Culinary Q&A

Chef Keaka Lee of Kapa Hale

What We Love Now

Epicurean finds around the island

Experience O‘ahu

Start planning your trip with our curated guides.

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LOCAL VIBE

Local Lingo

Cruizin’, or cruisin’, is one of the most popular, highly used slang heard frequently throughout Hawai‘i. Mainlanders might think it means driving down a street as a recreational, social activity, but here, it’s the one word that pretty much sums up the laidback vibe here in the islands. Taken from the word “cruising,” to cruise means to have no stress, no worries and nothing to do but hang out. When you are cruizin' in the islands, you are as far from the day-to-day hectic lifestyle as you can get. You are without an agenda and free to live in the moment and just go with the flow—unplugged! While on vacation, kick up your feet and do as the locals—be cruizin’.

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Do I Look Puffy?

Although the pufferfish, or blowfish, swims very slow making them easy targets for predators, they are also highly maneuverable and have unique defense mechanisms. Puffers can fill their extremely elastic stomachs up with water and inflate themselves into a spherical shape to appear larger to the stalking predator, giving the puffers a chance to retreat to safety. Tetraodontidae is the scientific name, which refers to the four large teeth fused into the upper and lower plate used for crushing crustaceans and mollusks.

In Japan, sashimi fugu (raw puffer meat) prepared only by specially licensed chefs is a celebrated delicacy and sought out for the effects of light-headedness, tingling and numbness of tongue and lips from the minute amount of tetrodotoxin intentionally left by the chef. Strict laws in Japan and other countries only allow chefs who have passed rigorous training to deal with the fish served in restaurants since it takes deft skills to carefully remove the toxic parts and to avoid contaminating the meat. While puffer poisoning can be deadly to humans, the neurotoxins can be tolerated by other animals such as tiger sharks and lizardfish.

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LOCAL VIBE
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LOCAL VIBE

Night Blooms

A rose is a rose is a rose, but a tuberose, to clarify all misconceptions, is not. The tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) is a native flowering plant to Central America and is named for the shape of its rootstock. A member of the agave family, the tuberose flower is recognized by the heady effect it has on the olfactory senses. While most flowers tend to lose their scent after being picked, the night-blooming tuberose has a strong, exotic and sweet fragrance that continues to produce itself. The slender stems contain clusters of waxy, white funnelshaped blossoms and grow extremely well in warm climates—especially in Hawai‘i. Tuberose is used in tropical arrangements and are favored by many lei makers. Various beauty products, including perfumes, oils and lotions, are made from the flower’s rich floral scent. Of all the captivating fragrances that may linger in your memories, the tuberose may very well be one that will capture Hawai‘i.

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LOCAL VIBE Let It Flow

Hawai‘i is a well-known destination for an idyllic vacation for couples and honeymooners—and with that comes plenty of tempting libations that looks and tastes like the tropics. The Big Island is famous for the very active Kilauea with dramatic lava flows and dazzles all that has a chance to see the volcano in action. The lava flow is a decadent treat that lacks the burning fury of Madame Pele (Hawaiian fire goddess) regardless of its name and is just as alluring albeit for different reasons.

The lava flow cocktail is a blended mixed drink, which in essence combines the typical piña colada with strawberries (the lava). There are numerous variations, but the traditional cocktail combines light and coconut rums, pineapple juice, coconut cream, banana and blends them all with ice and then poured on top of the pureed strawberries sitting on the bottom of a hurricane glass. Achieving the drink’s namesake visual can be a bit tricky. When poured correctly the bright red strawberry purée will “flow” menacingly up the sides of the glass, contrasting with the white of the banana/coconut/ pineapple concoction. Ironically cool and refreshing, the lava flow is an island favorite.

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OAHU LOCATIONS

Waikiki Beach Walk

808.924.7900

Hilton Hawaiian Village-Tapa Tower

808.942.2829

MAUI OAHU KAUAI HAWAII BLUEGINGER.COM

VIBE

The State Bird

Nēnē, the Hawaiian Goose, is the rarest goose in the world and is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. It evolved from the Canada goose, and most likely arrived around 500,000 years ago. The once almost extinct bird gets its Hawaiian name for the soft honking calls it makes. The nēnē has strong toes with reduced webbings as an adaptation to the rocky lava flows on which it breeds and lives. The nēnē is unique from other waterfowls in that they mate on land. They breed between August and April, the longest breeding season among other goose. The female builds her nests in the concealment of bushy pockets of vegetation and lays one to five eggs. The female incubates her eggs about 30 days while the male is on the lookout for predators such as the mongoose.

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LOCAL
PHOTO
COURTESY: JOHN NAKATA
Jurassic Valley Awaits. Visit kualoa.com to book your adventure today. PRESERVATION • SUSTAINABILITY • COMMUNITY

LOCAL VIBE

Fiery Nut

The ancient Hawaiians had many uses for the kukui nut, notably as a source of light. Commonly known as the candlenut, the seed contains flammable oil extracted for torches or burned whole like a candle. The nut was originally brought to the Islands by early Polynesian settlers aboard canoes, and served as an important source of sustenance and medicine in addition to light. The oil contained in the nut is known to have anti-fungal, antiviral and anti-bacterial properties and is used to treat a variety of skin conditions.

In 1959, the kukui was named the official emblem for the State of Hawai‘i because of its multiple uses and benefits, and its symbolic value. The kukui was significant to early settlers and was considered the symbol for protection and enlightenment. The tree has taken root all across the state and thrives along coastal forests reaching heights up to 80 feet tall. While here, enjoy kukui nut in a lovely lei or in delicious poke (cubed raw fish).

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ALOHA O‘AHU

Despite being the third largest island in the Hawaiian chain, O‘ahu tops the charts for many other reasons. Nearly two-thirds of the State’s population calls the island home, earning the island the nickname “The Gathering Place” and attracting locals and visitors with its wide variety of offerings. So come and discover the many wonders of the island of O‘ahu.

North Shore

O‘ahu’s North Shore spans the north-facing expanse of the coastal area between Ka‘ena in the west and Kahana Bay in the east. Known as the “surfing mecca of the world,” the best surfers in the world descend upon the area each December to compete in the Vans Triple Crown of Surfing. But world-class surfing is not the only allure pulling people to the North Shore.

Ka‘ena Point, on the western tip of the North Shore, is one of the most secluded parts of the island. Driving east, you will pass through Mokulē‘ia, home to Dillingham Airfield, a popular spot for skydivers to depart from.

Continuing east will be the quiet town of Waialua, a residential area with hidden treasures to be found like Waialua Sugar Mill, home to a litany of local vendors, and Pa‘ala‘a Kai Bakery, where people line up to purchase their Snow Puffies.

The neighboring town is the sleepy surf area of Hale‘iwa, which is sprinkled with local coffee shops, art galleries, surf shops and food trucks. One muststop along the way is at Hale‘iwa Store Lots, home to Matsumoto’s Shave Ice.

After departing Hale‘iwa, witness breathtaking beaches before coming upon the towns of Waimea and Pūpūkea, home to the world-famous Waimea Bay, Banzai Pipeline and Sunset Beach.

The topmost part of the island is home to the luxury Turtle Bay Resort and its two award-winning golf courses. As you continue along Farrington Highway, you will be taken through the residential towns of Kahuku and Lā‘ie, home to the Polynesian Cultural Center. After leaving Lā‘ie, you will pass through the smaller residential areas of Hau‘ula and Punalu‘u before entering the serene Kahana Bay, a popular fishing and camping site.

Windward Coast

Lush, green, and fertile are three words often used to describe O‘ahu’s Windward Coast. Spanning from Ka‘a‘awa in the north to Makapu‘u in the south, the area is shaped by gentle trade winds and passing showers blowing from the ocean.

Starting in the tiny town of Ka‘a‘awa you will pass through a mostly residential area before coming upon the area of Kualoa and Kualoa Ranch, a hub of activity with its range of tours, sea adventures and ziplining experiences.

As you continue along Kamehameha Highway, you will enter the rural areas of Waikāne and Waiāhole. Many will pass through this area without a second thought but those in the know will be sure to stop at Waiāhole Poi Factory to experience authentic Hawaiian food.

In ‘Āhuimanu you will pass the Valley of the Temples Memorial Park, just off Kahekili Highway. At the back of the valley, you will find Byodo-In Temple, a nonpracticing Buddhist temple that welcomes guests to walk the tranquil grounds and feed the many koi Immediately after leaving ‘Āhuimanu, you will find yourself in Kāne‘ohe, one of the two commercial areas on the Windward Coast. The area is a blend of residential subdivisions and commercial centers with a large attraction being Windward Mall, an indoor mall with over one hundred stores.

The neighboring town to Kāne‘ohe is Kailua, another one of the commercial centers for the Windward side and home to some of the most sought-after coastlines on the island, walkable shopping centers and bistros.

Once you head out from Kailua, hop onto Kalaniana‘ole Highway for a drive through the countryside of Waimanalo. To end your tour of the Windward Coast, enjoy views of the coastline until you reach Makapu‘u Point.

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LAY OF THE ISLAND

South Shore

O‘ahu’s Southern Shore spans from Makapu‘u in the east to the Daniel K. Inouye airport in the west. Despite being a small area of land the South Shore packs in many sites synonymous with the island of O‘ahu. The range of activities – from outdoor adventures to luxury experiences as well as the island’s nightlife scene –make the South Shore where many people want to be. The South Shore starts in Hawai‘i Kai, a town centered around a marina and home to many well-known outdoor activities including Sealife Park, Makapu‘u Lighthouse Trail, Hanauma Bay and the Koko Crater Railroad Trail.

Continue along Kalaniana‘ole Highway and through the residential towns of Kuli‘ou‘ou and ‘Āina Haina where you will find yourself on the H-1 Freeway that will carry you through the South Shore. You will first enter the Waialae-Kahala region and one of the towns you will want to explore is Kaimukī, an eclectic neighborhood of colorful bistros and niche shops.

From there, head towards the ocean and the Diamond Head-Kapahulu region. Here you will find many spots popular with visitors including Diamond Head Hike, Saturday Farmer’s Market at KCC, and Kapahulu Avenue where you will find Leonard’s Malasadas.

Kapahulu Avenue will lead you to Waikīkī, the hub of island tourism. The area is known for its two-mile stretch of beaches, numerous shopping centers, array of restaurants and shows, all within walking distance.

Waikīkī will lead you past Ala Moana Shopping Center, the largest open-air shopping center in the world as you come upon the historic district of Honolulu. Here, you will find spots like ‘Iolani Palace, Mission Houses and Kawaiha ‘o Church.

Bordering the historic district, you will travel through downtown Honolulu, Chinatown and the art district before coming upon the Kalihi-Palama area which is home to Foster Botanical Gardens and Bishop Museum. The towns of Moanalua and Salt Lake round out the Southern Shore of the island which ends with Honolulu International Airport.

Central O‘ahu

Central O‘ahu encompasses the fertile valley between the Ko‘olau and Waianae Mountain Ranges. Affectionately known as the “Heart of O‘ahu,” the area was home to sugar and pineapple plantations. Today, many O‘ahu residents call Central O‘ahu home. After departing Honolulu and the South Shore, you can continue along the H-1 freeway and enter ‘Aiea, a large subdivision and home to the popular ‘Aiea Loop Trail, a moderate hike good for people of all ages and dog friendly.

The next town is Pearl City, a former site of many rice paddies and now home to the USS Memorial at Pearl Harbor, a resting place for the 1,102 of the 1,177 sailors killed on the USS Arizona on December 7, 1941.

Once you pass through Pearl City, you have the option

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COURTESY: COLIN ANDERSON
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to veer north to the H-2 freeway or continue along the H-1. If you opt to drive north along the H-2, you will first pass through Mililani, a satellite city built to meet the demand for O‘ahu’s housing needs. Farther north, you will find the small, historic town of Wahiawā which boasts attractions like the Wahiawā Botanical Gardens and Dole Plantation.

If you chose to continue along the H-1 freeway, the next major town you will hit is Waipahu, a former sugar plantation. Along with drawing visitors for their delicious mom-and-pop restaurants, Waipahu is also home to Hawai‘i’s Plantation Village, an outdoor museum of historic homes and gardens that tell the story of Hawai‘i’s plantation past.

Continuing along the H-1, you will enter ‘Ewa, another former plantation town and home of white sand beaches and ocean tours to take participants to swim with turtles or scuba diving.

Leeward Coast

O‘ahu’s Leeward Coast is largely undiscovered by many visitors. The sunny, dry landscape makes it a perfect area to spend long days on the beach. For those willing to drive to this part of the island, there are many offthe-beaten-path activities to find.

One of the first towns you will pass through is Kapolei, another planned community nicknamed the “second city.” The area is home to two major resorts, the Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu and Disney’s Aulani Resort, as well as lū‘au shows, watersports and shopping outlets.

Continuing along the H-1 freeway, you will pass through Makakilo, home of the Wet ‘n’ Wild Hawai‘i waterpark that spans twenty-nine acres with many rides and attractions. After passing Makakilo, the freeway will end taking you back to Farrington Highway.

Nānākuli and Mā‘ili, the next two towns you will pass through, remain largely residential and dotted with an errant superette or bakery. Many will venture to Mā‘ili to take part in the “Pink Pillbox” hike, also known as Pu‘u O Hulu Trail.

The ride to the next town bestows visitors with stunning ocean views and multiple opportunities to pull over at one of the many beach parks such as Ulehawa, Mā‘ili Point and Mā‘ili Beach Park.

The next major town is Wai‘anae, another heavily residential area and home of Pokai Bay and Tamura Super Market, which opened in the 1920s and serves the Leeward community.

The last town you will pass through is Mākaha, a place with little development and known for its surfing waves. At the end of Mākaha, you may see cars parked here at the famous Ka‘ena Point Trailhead which will connect hikers with the Ka‘ena Point State Park on the North Shore of the island.

Despite being only thirty miles across and forty-four miles in length, the island of O‘ahu packs in a variety of attractions, outdoor activities, historical sites and luxury accommodations to meet the needs of any traveler.

PHOTO COURTESY: (FOLLOWING SPREAD) COLIN ANDERSON
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27 Welcome to paradise. Help us keep it this way.

MINDFUL TRAVELER

Mālama Experience

For a unique way to learn more about the culture of Hawai‘i and volunteer your time, book an eco-adventure at Kualoa Ranch. Its Mālama Experience tour is an opportunity to get hands-on with the traditional canoe plant, kalo (taro) in a natural, old Hawaiian ahupua‘a (land division). Participants as young as five years old can get a glimpse of the stunning 4,000-acre property on the Windward Side of O‘ahu and also feel good about giving back to the land. Depending on the size of the group and what the needs are, you could end up cleaning, planting and harvesting kalo or other medicinal plants, thatching traditional hale (houses) or tending to an ancient Hawaiian fishpond. Whichever activity it is, you’ll learn about the importance of these plants and places—throughout history and present day. After the service, you’ll be able to rinse off in the ocean or in one of the streams.

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kualoa.com/toursactivities/malama-ka-aina-tour for more information. 49-560 Kamehameha Highway, Kāne‘ohe
Visit

Pō Me Ke Ao

We tell our stories through dance. Our hands create the images. And what we wear shares the beauty of our island home. We welcome you to Helumoa upon which stands Royal Hawaiian Center, the gathering place of Waikīkī. JOIN ONE OR MORE OF OUR COMPLIMENTARY LESSONS AND LET US SHARE HAWAIʻI WITH YOU. HE MAI.

See Center & Restaurants Hours & Culture Schedule at RoyalHawaiianCenter.com • Open Daily • Kalākaua Avenue and Seaside, Waikīkī • 808.922.2299
culture from night to day I Ka

MINDFUL TRAVELER

Waimea Valley

There are a variety of volunteer opportunities for people of all ages at the awe-inspiring Waimea Valley. Prepare to deepen your connections to the ‘āina (land), holona (animals), lā‘au (plants) and wai (fresh water). Volunteers are also given a chance to learn more about the traditional cultural practices of Hawaiians—something that stewards of Waimea Valley honor and perpetuate. There are a variety of public volunteer days, as well as ‘ohana (family) volunteer days, which are held twice a month. Keiki (kids) and parents can help maintain the botanical gardens by weeding, planting and working with the native plants in the garden. The beautiful botanical gardens are home to more than 5,000 plants from around the world. Just be sure to wear sunscreen and insect repellent, and even a swimsuit since afterwards you’ll get to spend the day exploring the valley—including the waterfall at the top of the trail if conditions are right.

59-864 Kamehameha Highway, Hale‘iwa

Check out the schedule of volunteer days at waimeavalley.net.

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PHOTO COURTESY: (TOP) MICHAEL HEALEY

USS Missouri

Help preserve one of the world’s most famous battleships, the "Mighty Mo"! You can spend an entire day touring Pearl Harbor but giving back for two hours or more can create an extra special experience and is necessary to preserve this floating museum. After all, when the USS Missouri was in service, approximately 2,500 sailors maintained the ship; but today, there are less than 25 staff members in charge of its maintenance. Opportunities include cleaning (where you can see parts of the ship that are not open to the public), sanding, sweeping, painting and more. The iconic ship is just eleven miles from Waikīkī and is one of the most popular attractions on the island. The ship’s history is now a symbol for the start of a new era of friendship and cooperation in the Pacific. By volunteering, you’ll be supporting the overall mission to preserve the Battleship Missouri and share her story. Due to the nature of the work, volunteers must be at least 13 years old with an accompanying adult or 16 without.

Historic Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, 63 Cowpens St., Honolulu

To schedule your volunteer hours, contact the volunteers’ department at (808) 455-1600 ext. 224 or ext. 249, ussmissouri.org/get-involved/volunteer

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ROYAL HAVENS

From relaxed beach homes in Waikīkī to open-air palaces the public can still visit, discover where Hawaiian royalty enjoyed spending their time on O‘ahu

In days gone by, Hawaiian royal families ruled the island chain creating unity and peace. Kamehameha the Great, the warrior chief, established the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1795 and successors of his dynasty ruled the islands until 1874 when the Kalākaua dynasty took reign till the monarchy was overthrown in 1893. With long days and many obligations to meet, members of each dynasty dedicated their lives to public service but worked to balance this by enjoying their time off. The lore of these special places exists to this day and are memorialized as favorite places of the ali‘i (nobles).

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Princess Lili‘uokalani (later Queen), 1886 Photo by Alfred Mitchell, Bishop Museum Archives

Nestled in Nu‘uanu Valley, minutes from downtown, is Hānaiakamalama, Queen Emma’s Summer Palace which served as a retreat for the Queen until her death in 1885. The building frame was built in Boston and shipped to O‘ahu in 1848. The six-room building designed in a Greek Revival style was purchased at auction by Keoni Ana for $6,000 and gifted to his niece, Queen Emma, in 1857. Emma, the wife of Kamehameha IV, spent much of her time at the palace, even adding a large room called the Edinburgh Room in preparation for the visit of the Duke of Edinburgh. Upon her death, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i purchased the palace and it stands today as a museum, historic landmark and tourist site. Guests can visit the museum to view royal coats of arms, diplomatic gifts and many personal items belonging to the royal family. The palace is now preserved by the Daughters of Hawai‘i.

Queen Emma Summer Palace; 2913 Pali Hwy., Honolulu, HI 96817; (808) 595-3167; www. daughtersofhawaii.org/queen-emma-summer-palace; Open Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

34 PHOTO COURTESY: (ALL) BISHOP MUSEUM ARCHIVES
Queen Emma, ca. 1860 Hānaiakalama, Queen Emma's Summer Palace, ca. 1950 QUEEN EMMA'S SUMMER PALACE

Trees and foliage shelter the King’s Cottage from the bustle of the H-1 Freeway, but keeneyed passersby can spot the white structure with teal accents from the road. Constructed in 1850, this was the residence of Prince Lot Kapuāiwa who later became Kamehameha V. The original building was a single-story, wooden structure constructed in a Hawaiian style with a Victorian motif. The original structure consisted of three units—a cooking and eating unit, a living and sleeping unit and an entertainment pavilion. During his time, the Hawaiian art of hula was banned from public performance, but Prince Lot worked hard to bring the art back to life. In honor of this champion of Hawaiian culture, the Prince Lot Hula Festival was established in 1978 and is still held at Moanalua Gardens. Known as “the bachelor king,” Prince Lot did not name a successor, and upon his death, the cottage was transferred to Bernice Pauahi Bishop, the last of the Kamehameha line. She later willed the land the cottage sits upon to Samuel Mills Damon who subsequently renovated and expanded the cottage which still stands to this day.

Moanalua Gardens; 2850-A Moanalua Road, Honolulu, HI 96819; (808) 425-8790; www. moanaluagardens.com

PHOTO
J.
KING’S COTTAGE AT MOANALUA GARDENS COURTESY: (ALL) BISHOP MUSEUM ARCHIVES; (RIGHT) WILLIAMS & CO. King's Cottage at Moanalua, 1899 King Kamehameha V, Date Unknown
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PHOTO COURTESY: (ALL) BISHOP MUSEUM ARCHIVES; (PG 36): J.J. WILLIAMS; (PG 37) FRANK DAVEY) Queen Liliu‘okalani, ca. 1893

QUEEN

LILI‘UOKALANI’S HOME IN PĀLOLO VALLEY

Queen Lili‘uokalani, the only Queen and last sovereign monarch of Hawai‘i, was known for organizing the Lili‘uokalani Educational Society providing schooling for impoverished Hawaiian girls and working to create a new constitution which would have restored powers lost to the monarchy through the Bayonet Constitution. Despite being such a strong public figure, few know of her personal side and her penchant for spending time at her home in Pālolo Valley. Today, the valley is a dense residential neighborhood nestled between two mountain ranges. During the time of Lili‘uokalani, the area was far less populated, providing her a space to retreat from public life and partake in normal activities like quilting and cooking. Her home is lost to modern times, but you can still walk the streets of the valley and stare at the same mountain ranges that the Queen enjoyed looking at during her time away from the public spotlight.

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Aerial view of Pālolo Valley and Diamond Head; 1979
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‘Āinahau, Princess Ka‘iulani's residence, ca. 1890s

Today, Waikīkī is known as a major tourist destination with high-rise buildings decorating the skyline. In days when Hawaiian royals ruled, they too escaped to their beach homes in Waikīkī and took up the sport of surfing. Princess Ka‘iulani, the daughter of Scottish businessman Archibald Scott Cleghorn and Princess Likelike, member of the House of Kalākaua, was one such royal who enjoyed spending time in the waters of Waikīkī. Named “Hawai‘i’s Island Rose” by the Scottish novelist Robert Louis Stevenson, the Princess was known to surf on wooden longboards defying the missionary ban on activities such as surfing. Her family home, ‘Āinahau, once stood at the heart of Waikīkī but it was lost to fire in 1921. Today, the Princess Ka‘iulani Hotel stands at the former entrance to the ‘Āinahau estate paying homage to the “People’s Princess” who died at the age of 23.

Sheraton Princess Ka‘iulani Hotel; 120 Ka‘iulani Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96815; (808) 922-5811; www.marriott.com/enus/hotels/hnlks-sheraton-princess-kaiulani/overview/

Like many, the royals of Hawai‘i sought to find a balance between work and their private lives. They spent time across the island of O‘ahu doing things they loved. Today, you can still visit the areas where royals enjoyed spending time and get a sense of the lives they lived and the legacies they left.

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‘ĀINAHAU AND THE PRINCESS KA‘IULANI HOTEL
Princess Ka‘iulani

DESTINATION KAIMUKĪ

One of Honolulu’s oldest neighborhoods, Kaimukī provides a perfect mix of residential charm and modern urban culture.

Situated between the neighborhoods of Diamond Head, Mānoa Valley and Kāhala, Kaimukī is a neighborhood on O‘ahu that boasts a unique small-town feel. A neighborhood steeped in tradition, Kaimukī was once a farm for King Kalākaua, the last king of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i, as well as the childhood home to one of Hawai‘i’s most notable musicians, the late Israel Kamakawiwo‘ole (aka Bruddah Iz). Its first road, Wai‘alae Avenue, was paved in 1925 and still serves as the main access road to the thriving business district, as well as the adjoining areas of Pālolo

Valley and Wilhelmina Rise.

As many neighborhoods in Honolulu are experiencing complete renovations and overhauls, the heart of Kaimukī still lies in the various locally owned shops and businesses. Many establishments have been around for decades, such as the family owned and operated surf shop Downing Hawai‘i; City Mill, a home and hardware store; Calico Cat, a fabric boutique; and Bead It, an accessories store and jewelry workshop. Perhaps equally important as the neighborhood’s rich past is the excitement of its present and future.

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story JASMINE CHAGNON images CHRIS BERINGER MUD HEN WATER

Thanks to the burgeoning food scene and abundance of mom-and-pop shops, Kaimukī has quickly become the go-to neighborhood to find some of O‘ahu’s top tastemakers, from chefs and restaurateurs. Hawai‘i’s own Ed Kenney and Top Chef fan-favorite Leanne Wong, to name a few—to boutique owners and designers. Kenney is at the helm of Mud Hen Water, which serves an inventive menu inspired by traditional Hawaiian dishes, while Wong stewards Koko Head Cafe, a beloved brunch spot that recently opened an outpost in Japan due to popular demand.

One of the latest restaurants to open is Kaimukī Shokudo—a sister spot to a beloved eatery in the Ala Moana area. The izakaya restaurant’s wraparound bar, moody lighting and trendy music are decidedly chic, yet casual and unstuffy—much like the neighborhood itself. The small plates are perfect for sharing, with seafood and vegetarian options most prominent.

Then there’s The Cutlery, a hybrid steakhouse and barbershop in one. Look past the odd pairing (it’s two separate areas, divided by glass doors, so it’s totally sanitary) and indulge in the simple yet

elevated menu indoors or on the lānai. Fridays and Saturdays, there’s prime rib paniolo (Hawaiian cowboy) style, charred over a kiawe fueled fire. For matcha lovers, step inside the local boutique Ten Tomorrow to find modern resort wear and Daily Whisk Matcha, which is a charming cafe boasting a menu of classics like matcha lattes, of course, but you’ll also find unique tropical flavors that you’d be hard-pressed to find elsewhere, like the Matcha Lilikoi (passionfruit) Soda. There are also espresso options and Japanese-style pastries for those who aren’t yet fans of the potent green tea.

To go with your morning matcha, why not try a vegan doughnut from Little Vessels Donut Co.? The small batch, plant-based confections come in unique ever-rotating flavors meant to rekindle core memories from childhood. Think Peaches n’ Cream, featuring a peachy glaze with vanilla swirl, peaches, vegan vanilla buttercream and cake crumbs; and the KFC (Kaimuki Fried Chicken)—a play on chicken and waffles—features real maple syrup glaze is topped with vegan buttermilk chick’n wings and house-made vegan waffles.

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KOKO HEAD CAF É
KAIMUKĪ SHOKUDO DAILY WHISK MATCHA LITTLE VESSELS DONUT CO. TEN TOMORROW

For lunch, step into Chubbies Burgers for a made-to-order burger made of perfectly seared premium Angus beef that’s been smashed on a traditional griddle. The locally sourced ingredients are then tucked inside a house-made potato bun. In fact, nearly everything—beverage syrups, pickles, onion rings, etc.—is made fresh in-house. The business that started out as a buzzy food truck in 2016 has been a welcome addition to the Kaimukī community. Oh, and though the menu is small and sticks to the classics, there’s even a vegetarian option.

Not to be confused with pau hana which is slang for happy hour, Pua Hana is a flower and gift shop (pua means “flower” in Hawaiian). The quaint 200-square-foot space is brimming with affordable lei—including intricate, beautifully designed ones featuring dried flowers, shells and beads that you can take back home! —and loose flowers for you to make your own bouquet. Plus, there’s a curated mix of locally made gifts including Pegge Hopper prints, vases, greeting cards and the like.

For gifts and home goods, step inside the oh-soadorable Sugarcane boutique that reflects the small town charm of the neighborhood. The off-the-

beaten path shop is worth venturing to for islandinspired items, including locally made accessories, keiki gifts, homewares and more.

Culture buffs may even want to check out the Kaimukī Public Library—which has been serving the community since 1915—for a quiet spot to get lost in tradition. Here, you can comb through the impressive collection of rare Hawaiian books and transcripts.

Kaimukī also has places to get back to nature—to invigorate mind, body and soul. You can hike Pālolo Valley’s Ka‘au Crater for a glimpse at the stunning waterfalls along Wai‘ōma‘o Stream or admire the view of the Honolulu skyline from Pu‘u O Kaimukī Park, for example.

The beauty of this dynamic community is that everything is at your fingertips. From fine dining to trendy gastropubs and unique gift shops, Kaimukī offers a lifestyle that is as culturally diverse as its residents. Though geographically speaking, Kaimukī is not very large—just under two square miles—its prime location, multitude of cultures and true sense of community make it a must-stop when exploring O‘ahu.

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CHUBBIES BURGERS PUA HANA

Mud Hen Water 3452 Waialae Ave., mudhenwater.com

Koko Head Cafe 1120 12th Ave. #100, kokoheadcafe.com

Kaimukī Shokudo 1127 11th Ave.

The Cutlery 3435 Wai‘alae Ave.,#103, thecutleryhnl.com

Ten Tomorrow and Daily Whisk Matcha 1114 11th Ave., tentomorrow.com, dailywhiskmatcha.com

Little Vessels Donut Co. 3458 Wai‘alae Ave., littlevesselsco.com

Chubbies Burgers 1145C 12th Ave., chubbiesburgers.com

Sugarcane 1137 11th Ave., #101

Pua Hana 3434 Wai‘alae Ave., #2, puahanahawaii.com

Kaimukī Public Library 1041 Koko Head Ave. librarieshawaii.org/branch/kaimuki-public-library

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KAIMUKĪ PUBLIC LIBRARY SUGARCANE

SHOP LOCAL

Get your shopping fix on O‘ahu at some of these chic boutiques and bespoke local brands you'll find around the island.

Tropi-Cool

Go to any celebration in Hawai‘i and it’s likely that someone—a teen, thirty-year-old or tutu (grandmother)—will be wearing Fighting Eel, a beloved local label celebrating 20 years this year. It’s common for new collections to sell out faster than Taylor Swift concert tickets and, for locals, it’s not a riddle why. Wahine (women) love to go bold in Ava Sky, an in-house line that’s made for people who love to have fun in everyday life and on vacation. Each flirty style, (think playful jumpers and rompers, relaxed palazzo pants, flowy dresses and tops), is splashed with a vibrant print inspired by Hawaiian florals and foliage. Fighting Eel’s basics appeal to customers who appreciate clean silhouettes in classic and muted hues. Although simple, don’t underestimate how the luxe texture of the fabric feels and falls. It’s like butter. As for gifts to take back home, Fighting Eel is a shopping mecca. There’s a grand selection of lifestyle goodies that, yes, fit in carry-on luggage. In the shops, find kitchen towels, reversible totes, toiletry bags, packing cubes, men’s socks, charms for Crocs, notebook sets and beach towels in prints that mirror the label’s tropi-cool aesthetic. It’s worth noting, the women-run company makes it a point to include keiki and men.The brand’s matching family sets, which include aloha shirts for the guys and unfussy dresses for little girls, are great for vacay snaps that will make memorable holiday cards.

Available at multiple locations across O‘ahu, fightingeel.com, @fightingeel

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Modern Aloha

HIE is a modern Hawaiian jewelry house grounded in tradition, family and love. The pieces are stunning and the story behind the brand is beautiful. Founded by lifelong friends Meleana Estes and Noël Shaw, who were both raised by strong, beautiful, native Hawaiian women, the business centers around heirloom pieces, specifically bracelets. Both women received Hawaiian bracelets with their names engraved at birth and wore them faithfully throughout the years. When Estes lost hers while surfing a couple of years ago, she realized her golden companion was irreplaceable in many ways. Jewelry houses that celebrate Hawaiian heritage in a highly thoughtful manner were far and few. Of course, she shared her loss with gal-pal Shaw and it prompted a conversation about creating their own collection of Hawaiian bracelets honoring inspiring women from their past, as far back as Queen Lili‘uokalani. In fact, HIE’s Li‘ili‘i Heirloom bracelet was inspired by a piece worn by the Queen and features regal Old English emblems that symbolize protection. Another timeless style marries the monarch’s favorite flora, the pua kalaunu, with England’s iconic Tudor rose. Paying homage to their beloved tutus (grandmothers), other offerings showcase modern interpretations of legacy bangles that were passed down. All bracelets come in 14K, 18K or rose gold and select oval silhouettes can be customized with black enamel or engraved. An option to elevate some versions with diamonds ensures a brilliant future for generations to come.

Available at hiehawaii.com and Ron Herman Waikiki, @hiehawaii

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PHOTO COURTESY: HIE/SURF PLEASE/JENN ELLENBURG

SHOP LOCAL

Modern-Vintage Must-Haves

In the charming, coastal town of Kailua on Kihipai Street lives Oliver Men’s Shop and Olive Women’s Shop helmed by Parker Moosman and Ali McMahon, a stylishly cool husband-and-wife duo. Olive is brimming with easy-breezy, chic clothing for women and delightful home goods that reflect a tropical Anthropologie vibe. Conveniently located two doors down, Oliver offers a marriage of retro and modern surf goods. Inside the quaint space, fellas can find a laidback lineup of aloha shirts and boardshorts from leading off-duty labels including Rails, Rhythm and Banks Journal. A curated collection of vintage tees and vinyls that echo the Hawaiian surf culture of the ‘60s and ‘70s attract locals and visitors alike. Moosman’s affinity for second-hand items can also be found in his edited collection of passed-down army jackets that can be customized with old school embroidered patches. (We love a shop that ups the upcycle game.) Rounding out the store’s Hamptons-meets-Hawai‘i merch is Hula Eyewear sunnies, caps from Thrills and Le Surf. Local’s slippers (flip-flops, the go-to footwear for all islanders), repurposed totes, and housewares and ceramics that feature an iconic aloha symbol: the shaka. -STACY MAKIYA

Oliver Men's Shop, 49 Kihipai St., oliveandoliverhawaii.com, @oliverhawaii

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Beach Chic

Stroll to the edge of Waikīkī for a chance to shop a thoughtfully curated collection of merchandise sourced from local creators, artisans and craftspeople. Friendly staff welcome you to the brightly lit showroom of Sunset Provisions at the Kaimana Beach Hotel where merchandise is artistically displayed, giving guests the space to browse without feeling overwhelmed. Vendors and merchandise are specifically chosen to complement life on the islands for the savvy traveler. For those spending the day at the beach or poolside, Sunset Provisions has a huge selection of bathing suits and bikinis paired with cute coverups, matching accessories and wide-brimmed sunhats to complete your look. For those looking for an outfit for a last-minute dinner date, their team can help you peruse their stunning collection of vintage mu‘umu‘u (a loose dress introduced to Hawai‘i by the Protestant missionaries) from The Kaimukī Lei Stand’s collection. To tie together your outfit, they also have an assortment of shoes, handbags and jewelry that feature locally sourced shells and gemstones. And, if you find yourself searching for something to bring home to family or want to purchase something to commemorate your Hawaiian vacation, the retro prints created by Matias Solario capture the vibe of the islands perfectly. Stop by Sunset Provisions to check out their collection curated with aloha.

Sunset Provisions at the Kaimana Beach Hotel; 2863 Kalākaua Ave., Honolulu; (808) 923-1555; kaimana.com/kaimana-coffee-co; Open daily from 6:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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ALOHA DE MELE

From a hobby that grew out of boredom, J.T. Ojerio's art captures the beauty, culture and people of her island home.

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"I kind of want it to blend in with your life."

“If I can draw, so can you!” declares JT Ojerio, who works under the moniker Aloha de Mele. Her art may be sold in boutiques across the state, and have a distinctive, island style that makes her pieces instantly recognizable, but she still shrinks from the spotlight. Instead, she’s quick to point out this artist thing is a whole new world to her and identifying as a creative has taken some serious getting used to.

Growing up, she was the girl obsessed with judo, not drawing, preferring to spend her time learning about fitness, not frescoes. As a student at Punahou School (a private, college preparatory school in Honolulu), she was a state champ in wrestling, and her post-secondary career went on a similar trajectory: undergrad in Colorado and then earning a master’s degree in exercise physiology and a certificate in pain medicine in Chicago.

Art wouldn’t start to become a significant part of Ojerio’s life until 2017, when she was recovering from reconstructive surgery due to a hip injury. For once, she was forced to slow down; and for someone as active as her, that meant some big habit shifts.

“My body was getting pretty beat up from doing personal group training and fitness. I’ve always had to be busy with my hands, so I was looking for something I could do sitting down in front of the TV and just chilling with my dog,” says Ojerio. “I only started drawing, honestly, out of boredom!” Drawing her pieces, with their subjects of elegant tropical flora and serene islander ladies gave her more than just something to do. It was an opportunity to connect with her home back in Hawai‘i when she was missing it more than ever.

Even though occupying herself with the therapeutic, healing powers of art turned out to be a big personal milestone during her time in Chicago, Ojerio didn’t think to translate it into something more until 2020. The tumultuous onset of covid-19 and being let go of her job created what would turn out to be a huge opportunity.

“I had a couple of drawings I had done just for fun. My coworkers, before I got let go, saw some of my drawings and were like, you should sell these,” remembers Ojerio. “I got a Shopify. And it really blew up from there.”

She speculates the timing could have been a lot of the reason why Aloha de Mele was instantly successful. With everything closed during the pandemic and people socially distancing, everyone was suddenly spending a lot more time at home, with a lot more money to burn. It makes sense that home improvement suddenly shot to the top of the national hobbies list. And Aloha de Mele’s style perfectly lends itself to the laid-back, island, jungalow style that local aesthetes are looking for.

“I kind of want it to blend in with your life,” she explains.

For her, that means a lot of tropical botanicals taking center stage in stripped-down, simple compositions that pop as solo wall art but also as part of a gallery. Some of Ojerio’s most iconic and recognizable works are zoomed-in drawings of ladies’ loose hair buns charmingly disheveled and wild — the quintessential island girl uniform. Adorning these updos are bundles of local blooms fit for a hula performance, from chunky, dramatic orchids to playful gardenias, to sprigs of intricate lehua and pala‘a fern. An ombre glow of sunset shades emanates softly from the background.

Other pieces could be called, simply, studies in flowers: A standalone drawing of a golden yellow dwarf heliconia against a dramatically contrasting deep orange; the perfect monstera specimen, front and center with its Swiss cheese holes making a pretty effect against a white background; one single hibiscus viewed from above, ruffled petals fluttering outward in a breathtaking gradient of purple and vivid magenta, the dusty pinpricks of its yellow pollen so soft-looking you can almost feel it.

Ojerio’s true Hawai‘i roots also come into play,

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part of what sets Aloha de Mele apart from the banal, tourist-targeting “Hawai‘i” art pieces you’ll find from non-local sellers online. Her knowledge of lei, significant local flora and native Hawaiian language and practices shine through in the Aloha de Mele catalog. Her drawing of a pāpale (woven coconut frond hat) is one example, as is her print of a pū‘olo, a bundle wrapped with ti leaves usually intended as a gift or to commemorate a loved one. Ojerio’s quilt drawings, designed as a duo, are nods to traditional Hawaiian quilts, with their iconic symmetry and use of stylized, local plants.

Hawaiian mythology also appears as a theme in Aloha de Mele pieces. In one, the fire goddess Pele sleeps on a pile of her own deep, black hair, playfully arranged to look like a mountain of ridged lava rock. In another piece named Manō (Hawaiian for “shark”— which plays an important role in the Hawaiian pantheon), one of these majestic creatures is shown darting sleekly across the ocean floor.

More than the subjects of each piece, however, are the feelings they evoke: something distinctly Hawai‘i, with its balmy weather, outdoor adventure, lighthearted residents and tropical, beachy lifestyle. In other words? It’s evocative of everything there is to love about this island home. Namely, the beauty, culture and people — just the things Ojerio says inspires her.

That inspiration continues to help her grow as an artist; thanks to the open, supportive creatives she’s met in the local art scene. Recently, Ojerio had a chance to be a part of O’ahu’s World Wide Walls mural festival. Previously known as Pow! Wow! Hawai‘i, the event brings artists from all manner of styles, all across the island, together to create larger than life paintings in Honolulu’s urban spaces. It’s the ultimate

intersection of art and community. And this year was a particularly significant milestone, marking the first time the event traded in its original locale in hip and trendy Kaka‘ako for Kalihi, a historically underserved and overlooked neighborhood that would benefit from the type of positive impact World Wide Walls is looking to make with its public art.

The project was a big departure for Ojeria, who is used to working digitally, and on a small scale. When founder and organizer Jasper Wong initially approached her about participating, “I didn’t have the heart to tell him, ok, but I’ve never painted before,” laughs Ojerio, who turned to another well-known local muralist in the community for help. “So, I got the number of Kamea Hadar, and he was giving me tips on how to blend, and what you should do when you put it on the wall. Thank god the first mural came out, because if not I would have been scarred for the rest of my life!”

The final piece, called “Leiolani”, is a dramatic rendering of a joyful, local woman with long, brown tresses in mid-toss. Her hair streams behind her, blowing in the wind, with one of Ojerio’s signature magenta hibiscus flowers placed in her ear.

Like many of her drawings, “Leiolani” is an homage to the powerful wāhine (women) in our lives. It’s a message that echoes beyond the image, into the work Ojerio does herself, work that is always pushing her to grow and learn as a female creative and entrepreneur. “Definitely, learning new mediums is empowering,” she says. “Being able to do murals is very empowering as well. I’m still going to stay true to my simple, ‘whatyou-see-in-Hawai‘i’ drawings. But you know, coming up, [I’ll be] playing around and just thinking outside of the box too.”

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GOOD VIBES

For Pi‘iali‘i Lawson, a native Hawaiian cultural practitioner, the ability to practice energy healing and the talents of lauhala weaving have coursed through his veins for generations, even before he was aware of his gifts. Along his journey of self-healing, he was able to learn from his kūpuna (elders) and blend this new knowledge with his intrinsic skill creating a unique practice that incorporates the wisdom of the ‘āina (land) with the guidance of his ancestors to harness the power of healing, for both individuals and his community.

Born and raised in Wai‘anae, on O‘ahu’s Leeward Coast, Pi‘iali‘i grew up in a community facing a plague of adversities. From domestic violence to drug use, he saw what happened as people took these paths and

did not want to follow their example. Luckily, as a young adult, he was able to travel to his ancestral land in Waipi‘o Valley on the Hāmākua Coast of Hawai‘i Island. There, he learned about the Hawaiian culture and the arts practiced by his family in a traditional master-apprentice style under the tutelage of his great-uncle. During this time, he gained knowledge of cultural practices such as lauhala weaving, farming, hula dancing and other spiritual practices. Lawson says, “I was very fortunate to go back to my family land and learn from my uncle Kia, a wellknown taro farmer and teacher of Hawaiian culture. For me, learning from him sparked a glimpse into my potential. It gave me a greater purpose and a foundation for what I wanted to do for my culture.”

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Channeling the ‘āina (land) and wisdom of his kūpuna (elders), Pi‘iali‘i Lawson is sharing the power of energy healing
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“There are times when you are faced with something that you are not ready to know or learn and you need to remember that your ancestors are guiding you.”

After graduating high school and later college, he traveled to the continental United States to continue his education but felt a calling to return to the islands to continue sharing his cultural arts and serve his community. Over the coming years, his weaving took center stage and became a method for Pi‘iali‘i to express himself and connect with others. Over time, he developed his own style of weaving which blends traditional techniques with a contemporary flair. When speaking about his weaving, he says, “I really enjoy creating things that are unique and different. I like to create wearable art pieces that utilize the smallest width of lauhala to create an intricate piece and test my boundaries of creation.”

As his weaving skills grew, he eventually began offering workshops to the community. During these workshops, he realized that he was naturally incorporating energy work in his practice as well as other esoteric elements to help attendees broaden their horizons and connect with the ‘āina during their sessions. “I realized that I was infusing different ways of thought and connection to the plant as a medium to explore ourselves and realized I was doing my own type of healing work,” he says. This realization sparked a memory that he had from his 20s in which he knew he wanted to help heal others but did not have the space to explore this at that time. Lawson explains that “for Hawaiians, we live our lives along a journey and sometimes you need to go where your na‘au (instinct or gut feelings) take you. There are times when you are faced with something that you are not ready to know or learn and you need to remember that your ancestors are guiding you.”

His time to walk the path towards energy healing finally arose in 2020 when he found himself presented with an opportunity to dig deeper into these arts and ultimately found himself on a personal healing journey. While the world struggled with the

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weight of the COVID-19 pandemic, he experienced clarity as he accepted his calling to practice the arts of energy re-alignment as his ancestors did. He began making lifestyle changes such as adopting a more healthful diet and exploring lā‘au lapa‘au (traditional Hawaiian practice of plant medicine) while learning the energy healing modalities of Reiki, Limurian Healing and Ho‘ola Loa that helps remove blockages from people’s lives. When asked who good candidates for an energy session are, he explains “most people might have an awareness that something in their life is out of balance, and they know something is not right but are just not sure what to do to fix it. Sometimes, we go through cycles and get frustrated that we cannot end the cycle. With energy healing, it helps you to address what is causing the blockage and to move beyond it.”

Before his energy sessions, Pi‘iali‘i performs a cleanse of his own body and abstains from alcohol to raise his vibrations and clear his own energy. His energy sessions typically begin with conversations with the energy work recipient so he can better understand the underlying causes of their issues. Whether it is an ancestral issue or a past life issue, these root causes can manifest in the body as a mental or physical ailment. To help remove the blockages, there is no script or prescribed schedule for his practice. Rather, he works with the skills of his trained modalities and allows his intuition to guide his actions as he offers chants, prayers and crystal sound bowl vibrations that target specific parts of the body.

The closing of an energy session does not mean the healing journey ends there. Pi‘iali‘i recommends that those who have an energy session with him practice

kindness to themselves over the coming days. He explains “they may experience vivid dreams or have memories that are brought up. You need to remember that what you are experiencing is coming to light to help you ascend into the highest version of yourself.”

Through his partnership with the Naupaka Spa & Wellness Center at the Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina, he offers weekly sound bath experiences. During these sessions, he guides guests to attain a relaxed and meditative state allowing them to connect with their personal energy. Concluding the session, if they were particularly moved or affected during the session, he welcomes participants to enter the ocean to release any thoughts, memories or feelings that they are ready to relinquish and offer a flower to the sea as a way to show their gratitude to the ‘āina.

All the bumps, opportunities and choices along his journey have now led to the present. Pi‘iali‘i notes how appreciative he is for the opportunity to practice his arts and use this as a platform to amplify his message, “I am grateful to be a voice for our community and show people from Wai‘anae or the Hawaiian community the amazing things we can do. One of the most important things for me is to be a bridge between the guests and the community and to help visitors understand the sacred and healing space of the Hawaiian Islands and the healing power held here.”

To learn more about Pi‘iali‘i Lawson visit piialii.com. To experience an energy session with Pi‘iali‘i at Naupaka Spa & Wellness Center at the Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina, call (808) 679-0079 or visit fourseasons.com/oahu/spa/.

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IMAGE COURTESY: (ALL) FOUR SEASONS RESORT O‘AHU
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STEP OFF THE BEATEN TRAIL

Take the path less traveled on these under-the-radar hikes

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The island of O‘ahu comes in at the top of the list in the state for the number and variety of hiking trails. Logging in over 250 known trails, ranging from intense switchback hikes yielding panoramic views to secluded valley trails taking hikers into the heart of the island, it may seem daunting to choose the right hike for you. Following are some O‘ahu hikes that fly under the radar, each with its own unique payoff. >>>

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KALĀWAHINE TRAIL

Named in honor of the Hawaiian deity who guards water sources, the Kalāwahine trail is part of a system of interconnected trails atop Tantalus Mountain known as the Honolulu Mauka Trail System which links eighteen different trails. This 2.5-mile, in-and-out trail is moderate with some slight hills and muddiness after rain being the biggest consideration. The trailhead starts at the junction of Tantalus Drive and Telephone Road (a private road) and takes hikers along a path that embraces the contours of the mountain. Dense vegetation provides shade from the sun along the path. Along the way, spot mamake shrubs, a Hawaiian medicinal plant used in teas to ease sore throats and as a tonic for those feeling “run down.” Ginger plants also grow along the path providing a gentle fragrance for hikers to enjoy. A major draw of this trail is the native snail habitat located about halfway along the trail. Signs are posted notifying hikers of the area and warning them from cutting plants or collecting snails. Nearly extinct, these snails are just the size of pencil tips. To spot a native snail, gently turn over ginger leaves and search for these tiny treasures.

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PHOTO COURTESY: (ALL & OPENING SPREAD) CHRIS BERINGER
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COURTESY: CHRIS BERINGER

HO‘OMALUHIA NETWORK TRAILS

Located in the shadows of the majestic Ko‘olau Mountain Range are a collection of trails located within the Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Gardens. The entrance to the gardens is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. with many visitors heading directly to the visitor’s center to walk along the main walking path. Another option is to drive past the visitor’s center and pull into one of the auxiliary parking lots which connect to well-maintained hiking trails that snake throughout the property, often connecting. Along the Lehua path, you can spot native Hawaiian plants including hala and lo‘ulu palms while the Kukui path offers different plants like kou trees, breadfruit and a bamboo forest. With easy paths to traverse, restrooms, picnic tables and ample parking, the trails of the Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Gardens offer a stress-free, family-friendly day of hiking options.

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KULI‘OU‘OU VALLEY TRAIL

Many are familiar with the Kuli‘ou‘ou Ridge hike which pushes the limit of many hikers along its 5-mile course but fewer know what the gem its little sister, the Kuli‘ou‘ou Valley trail, is. This 1.4-mile, in-and-out hike shares a trailhead with its more popular big brother hike. To access the trailhead, turn onto Kuli‘ou‘ou Road from Kalaniana‘ole Highway and drive through the residential neighborhood until you reach the cul-de-sac on Kala‘au Place. At the top of this cul-de-sac, you will see a bright yellow gate and signage provided by the State of Hawai‘i notifying hikers they are at the right place. For the first one-tenth mile, the two hikes share the same path, but you will see a fork in the trail where hikers opting for the ridge hike will head right, and those wanting to explore the valley will head left. Along this easy valley path, dense vegetation will greet you sprinkled with tiny waterfalls flowing over the side of the rocky mountain. The serenity of the trail is broken only by the sound of songbirds. Lucky hikers can hear the chirps and whistles of ‘Elepaio, an endangered endemic bird to the islands. Known to be the first birds to sing in the morning and the last birds to sing at night, the ‘Elepaio were praised by the Hawaiians as the birds who would lead canoe builders to the best koa trees.

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PHOTO COURTESY: CHRIS BERINGER
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KA‘ENA POINT VIEWS
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An excellent, end-of-day hike is the path along the Ka‘ena Point Trail which takes hikers along the coastline for pristine views of sunsets along the western side of the island. This hike clocks in at 5.4 miles round trip with no elevation gain, and due to the isolation of this hike, you might encounter only a few other hikers or fishermen along the way. To access the trailhead, drive out past Mākaha, take Farrington Highway until it turns into a two-lane road, and then you will see a small parking lot appear on the right side of the road. From here, hop on the path which hugs the coastline from where you can see whales, dolphins and monk seals. As you stroll along, tidepools appear in the dark lava rock and an occasional blow hole can be seen when the surf is high. Trees and shade are two things not common on this hike so do not forget your sunscreen, hat and water.

O‘ahu is a hiker’s dream come true not only for the number of hikes the island offers but also for the variety of types of hikes. From scenic coastal hikes to trails that take trekkers deep into the valleys of the island, the right hike is out there waiting for you to explore it.

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KA‘ENA POINT TRAIL

THE HOT SPOT

Tucked away at Pier 38, Nami Kaze is causing quite a buzz for O‘ahu’s culinary scene.

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Diners flock to Nami Kaze, the inaugural restaurant of Chef Jason Peel, for an opportunity to experience his dynamic menu which pays homage to local ingredients and producers found in the islands. Raised on the island of Kaua‘i, Peel’s culinary journey began while studying aeronautical engineering and later architecture when he realized his urge to tap into his creative side. Following this passion, he enrolled in the Kapi‘olani Community College Culinary Arts program and met Ian Russo, former Executive Chef at Michel’s at the Colony Surf, who became Peel’s mentor. While at Michel’s, Peel worked his way up, becoming the acclaimed restaurant’s sous chef. When Russo departured to New York, Peel’s path led him to the kitchens of Roy’s Restaurants and working beside famed celebrity chef, Roy Yamaguchi. His time at Roy’s took him across the globe where he expanded his palate. Eventually, he was named an Executive Chef at Roy’s Restaurants and helped to

open Roy’s Waikīkī. Despite the demanding schedule, Chef Jason returned to Kapi‘olani Community College as an instructor in their Culinary Arts program where he taught a variety of courses, including the culinary competition course.

Nami Kaze emerged during the pandemic and quickly became a bright light for the O‘ahu culinary scene. First offering pre-ordered okazuya-style bentos (Japanesestyle packed lunches), the second phase introduced Chef Jason’s stellar brunch menu. The final phase, launched in the fall of 2023, unveiled his much-anticipated dinner menu that did not disappoint. The restaurant is currently open for brunch and dinner and presents guests with Chef Jason’s take on a modern izakaya (informal Japanese bar). Chef Jason drew inspiration for Nami Kaze from his observations and attempts to understand his surroundings, “[I tried] to create a vision of what I would appreciate this industry to be … to reach out to farmers like family, using our platform to help

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them in whatever way we can.”

For guests enjoying brunch at Nami Kaze, one signature dish is the Custard French Toast which begins with a thick slice of freshly made Japanese milk bread soaked overnight in custard. The French toast is topped with mango lime coulis tapioca, toasted coconut flakes and candied walnuts. To balance the sweetness of the dish, hand-torn basil finishes the French toast making for a stunning start to the day. Other sweet staples include their Kulolo Caramel Apple Pancakes and Honey Walnut Shrimp Waffles.

For those craving a savory breakfast, Nami Kaze offers stunning benedicts, sandos, and salads but one menu highlight is their omelets that begin with a Chinese-style steamed egg topped with fresh seafood and vegetables. One favorite is their Mentaiko Omelet, flavored with the delicacy of mentaiko, the uniquely slightly salty, spicy roe of Alaska pollock and tomatoes. The omelet is topped with ikura zuke (marinated salmon roe) and micro greens and served with thick slices of toast meant to dip in the decadent sauce.

Their dinner menu reinforces their focus on local ingredients by emphasizing the specific local produce and products used in each dish, even indicating where items are sourced. Guests can start their meal by sharing a sushi roll that blends the freshest seafood with playful layers of flavor. An excellent roll is their Hamachi Roll which starts with a lobster mix and spears of crisp cucumber. Yuzu (Japanese citron) gel decorates the roll bringing a bright acidity to the sushi while charred green onions and Jalapeno ume (Japanese pickled plum) salt add an earthy umami flavor.

Chef Jason’s passion for local ingredients is clear through the understated yet impactful preparation and seasoning of his vegetable dishes allowing the

unique flavor of the vegetables to shine through on his hot and cold “Farmer Focused” menu. This is exemplified in his Lettuce of the Day dish featuring locally grown lettuce from Mari’s Garden located in Mililani on O‘ahu. Tender lettuce leaves are topped with an onion crema and chili tapioca before being finished with a pepper vinaigrette. The weight of the crema is countered by the crispness of the lettuce while the heat of the chili and pepper is offset by the sweetness of the greens.

Another must-try vegetable dish is Chef Jason’s ‘Ulu Tots. In this play on the Spanish tapa, Patatas Bravas, Chef Jason fries his ‘ulu mousse and tops the crispy squares with Hide’s sticky sauce and Sweetland Farm’s goat cheese tomme

At Nami Kaze, Chef Jason has seamlessly integrated the many elements of his culinary journey while continuing to innovate. He hopes that the restaurant can “be a place for people to reunite, feel at home, and enjoy each other’s company. The food, drinks and service should be second to the company you bring. But when it is time to indulge, we hope to give a unique flavor profile that lingers on your palate.”

When asked what he hopes the future holds for Nami Kaze, Chef Jason said they are also looking to open a commercial kitchen where they plan to do catering and open a Japanese-style bakery. He notes that his wife, Beverly Luk “is the pastry chef for all our ventures [and she] conjures delicious creations in her own style that inspires me every day.”

Nami Kaze; 1135 N. Nimitz Highway Honolulu, HI 96817; (808) 888-6264; namikaze.com; Open Wednesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

76 PHOTO COURTESY: (ALL) NAMI KAZE
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“The menu is a collection of these products that are flavored with hints of nostalgia from my childhood and my journey in the industry.”

CULINARY Q&A

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story MARTHA CHENG images CHRIS BERINGER Chef Keaka Lee

Keaka Lee used to meet his high school sweetheart at the corner of Kīpaholauea and Pāhoa Avenues in the Wai‘alae-Kahala District of Honolulu. Now, a few decades later, they are married, and he is the chef and owner of Kapa Hale, a restaurant he opened in 2020 on the very same corner. So, to say his restaurant is personal is an understatement. “I grew up in this community, right up on the hill,” Lee says. His culinary career eventually took him away and off the island, but Lee returned with Kapa Hale, a restaurant featuring a modern take on Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine that incorporates influences from his career spanning more than a decade working in some of the country’s top kitchens in Honolulu, San Francisco and New York. From his time at Gramercy Tavern, he developed a love for vegetables, manifested in an entire section of Kapa Hale’s menu devoted to vegetables. It includes the Haku Lei Po‘o—a gorgeous circle of vegetables on the plate—“A Hawaiian crown to celebrate the farmers across the Islands,” Lee says. And drawing on his upbringing in Honolulu, with its mishmash of ethnicities, he incorporates twists on favorite local flavors, such as an okonomiyaki omelet and a taro and tahini lumpia. Read on for a conversation with Lee on his journey to opening Kapa Hale.

How was food a part of your life growing up?

I was the pickiest eater, just like my daughter now— she doesn’t like anything green. Whenever there’s

fried rice at the table, I was that kid that picked out all the peas and green onions. There was a point where my mom said if you’re not going to eat what’s at the table, you’re going to have to make your own food. Making my own food as a kid was making saimin or cooking something from the freezer. But I would always watch my mom and popo make homemade stuff like wontons and jook. A lot of Chinese influence and stuff.

After being such a picky eater, I think what drove me into the industry was that I played a lot of sports in high school and was competitive. It was the competitiveness of the cooking industry that intrigued me. I wanted to keep pushing myself to become better, train myself to taste everything, to challenge myself to eat stuff I never tried before.

How did you decide to go into the culinary industry?

In college I didn’t really know what my major was. I thought I wanted to be a medical technologist or scientist. But after I took a couple of classes in the culinary field, it really pulled me in. I was already cooking at Red Lobster, though I didn’t really see it as a career. But after the classes, I thought maybe I can make something of myself in this. The culinary arts are not the most sought out career based on stress, hours and pay, but it really pulled me in because there was always something new to learn, something new to taste, or a different cuisine or different chef to learn from.

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What are some of your favorite dishes at Kapa Hale?

I Love You A Laksa. We love the punny names in our food. When I eat a bowl of laksa, there’s always noodles, seafood, broth. I love the flavor; but every time I finish the bowl of laksa, I’m always left with that broth. It’s such a good broth but I don’t want to just eat it. So, we decided to make our own Malaysian curry and make it into a risotto. Instead of using cream and butter, we cook the arborio rice in the curry. It’s a non-dairy dish served with Kaua‘i shrimp, clams and scallops. It’s just a fun take on laksa. I love the chili, coconut and lime—the citrus flavors.

Another dish is called Where’s the Beef? This is our house tagliatelle noodles and we make a vegetarian bolognese. We use Small Kine Farms mushrooms and when they’re in season, we use Kolea Farm cauliflower. We roast it super, super hard and we chop it up. And then the same traditional techniques for bolognese: you deglaze with red wine, add carrot, celery and tomato. When making the pasta, we add a little bit of cream, butter and basil to it. What’s fun about it is people who love meat, they love this dish because they can’t tell there’s no meat in it. I tell my

guests, we’re not here to trick you. We’re here to offer you a nice vegetarian dish that can be very familiar to someone with a palate for eating meat all the time.

How did you come up with the name of the restaurant?

Kapa was once used throughout the entire Pacific for clothing. The patterns on it told a story, and the techniques used in making kapa all remind me of cooking techniques: you pound it; you ferment it; you dry it. So, when I see a blank plate, it reminds me of a blank piece of kapa. And when I think of kapa, I think of stories being told. I wanted to tell my story through the restaurant patterns on the plates. I wanted to share my vision for my food. So, we decided to call the restaurant Kapa Hale, house of kapa: A Hawaiian storytold in a modern way through food.

Kapa Hale is located at 4614 Kīlauea Ave., Honolulu. Open for lunch Wednesday-Friday from 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m., weekend brunch from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. and dinner from 5 - 8:30 p.m. on Sunday - Thursday and until 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Call (808) 888-2060 or visit kapahale.com.

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WHAT WE LOVE NOW

Local Comfort

When solidifying your list of must-hit restaurants while in Hawai‘i, one way or another you will be pointed to Helen Cook’s traditional Hawaiian eatery—and based on the James Beard Award won in 2000, you better believe a visit will be well rewarded. Opened in 1964 with the same preparations, the same traditions, and the same simplicity, this is authentic Hawaiian food at its finest. Kālua pig cooked in imu, an ancient cooking procedure that involves an underground oven demanding TLC all the livelong day. Short ribs pipikaula style, meaning salted and semi-dried then charred for a sweet, juicy, lickyour-fingers delicacy. Lomi lomi salmon made with chopped tomatoes, salted salmon, and onion for a delightful taste of the sea. As a fixture of the community with success echoing around the world, you’d be surprised to find original pricing lending an order-one-of-everything approach that equates to long lines—but long lines that are worth every moment spent waiting.

Helena’s Hawaiian Food; Open Tuesday - Friday from 10- a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; (808) 845-8044; 1240 N. School St.

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PHOTO COURTESY: CHRIS BERINGER

Artisan Chocolate

What could make island-inspired flavors like coconut, guava, Hawaiian sea salt, Kona coffee and liliko‘i (passionfruit) taste even better? Pair them with locally grown chocolate. That’s exactly what KOHO does, and the result is truly sweet. Perhaps you're not familiar with the brand name yet, but the luxury chocolate brand is the brainchild of a more household name: Hawaiian Host Group. Since its debut in 2021, KOHO has been offering jewel-like confections using Hawai’i-grown ingredients, including cacao grown on the North Shore of O‘ahu and macadamia nuts from Hawai‘i Island. Other ingredients are locally sourced whenever possible too. The bon bons are particularly stunning, not to mention downright delicious. They’re filled with flavors such as Kona Coffee Caramel and Macadamia Praline—to name just a few—and enveloped in chocolate and dynamic colors, then finished off with an artsy speckled design. If you’re looking for a beautifully packaged gift or just a little something to treat yourself, KOHO is your best bet.

KOHO; 2335 Kalākaua Ave. on ground floor of the Outrigger Waikīkī, (808) 966-8119; kohochocolate.com, @kohochocolates

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PHOTO COURTESY: KOHO; (TOP) JOHN HOOK; (BOTTOM) RIK NOYLE

WHAT WE LOVE NOW

Turkish Delight

Take your taste buds on a trip to Turkey while you bask in the tropical air at Istanbul Hawai‘i.This chic restaurant is helmed by a mom and daughter duo and pays homage to the Ottoman cuisine they grew up with. You can experience the delightful fare inside the beautiful space—one that’s meant to feel like a modern home in Turkey—or on the outdoor terrace under a canopy of flora and fauna. Popular dishes for dinner include the Meze Platter—a variety of vegetarian appetizers—Levrek (Mediterranean sea bass), Pirzola (aged lamb chops) and of course, the classic dessert, Baklava. For weekend brunch, there are sweet and savory options fit for a King (or Queen, or, in this case, Ottoman sultans). Think Shakshuka, a tomato sauce and egg dish that originated in North Africa in the 16th century; Spanakopita Eggs Benedict; and Rose Cardamom French Toast. Wash it all down with a Big Island Lilikoi Turkish Saffron Mimosa. -JASMINE

Open Wednesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; 1108 Auahi St., Ste. 152, Honolulu; (808) 772-4440; istanbulhawaii.com; @istanbulhawaii

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Chefs' Counters

For those craving an original, innovative and invigorating dining experience, Chef Anthony Rush and his culinary team at Senia are opening their doors for an intimate, behind-the-scenes look into their kitchen at their Chefs’ Counter Tasting Menu dinners. The highly anticipated restaurant opened in 2016 and quickly became one of the hottest spots on O‘ahu’s culinary scene with diners flocking to their Chinatown location. Senia’s premise centers around artistically plated creations that utilize the highest quality ingredients prepared in imaginative techniques. Chef Rush’s attention to detail is shown with his delicate and dramatic plating that encourages diners to first eat with their eyes before taking a single bite. Now, Chef Rush offers eight lucky guests the opportunity to partake in an immersive experience as they witness the orchestrated magic of his kitchen during the coursed meal which is offered Fridays and Saturdays during a single seating at 6:30 p.m. The Chefs’ Counter incorporates a variety of products from mauka (the mountain) to makai (the sea) encouraging guests to experience a full expression of the taste of the ‘āina (the land). Guests can also indulge in an optional wine pairing that presents flawless matches with nearly every course to enhance the ingredients and preparation styles.

Senia; 75 N. King Street, Honolulu, HI 96817; (808) 200-5412; restaurantsenia.com; Open Tuesday to Saturday from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.; Chefs’ Counter Tasting Menu available Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m.

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PHOTO COURTESY: SENIA; RYAN YAMAMOTO/MIDDLE MANAGEMENT
Download the Savvy360 app and get more out of your O‘ahu experience. Scan to get the SAVVY 360 app Or visit SAVVY 360.com PLAN YOUR PERFECT TRIP
87 SEE + DO BEACHES GOLF EAT + DRINK SHOP + STYLE ISLAND LIVING MAPS TRAVELOGUE DOWNLOAD THE SAVVY360 APP This link will take you to the appropriate app store to install the app, where you can create a trip, start building your itinerary, collaborate with friends, and more... 89 105 115 121 141 155 161 169 EXPERIENCE THE ISLAND OF O‘AHU

SEE + DO

Experiences

KUALOA GROWN TOUR nature + cultural tour

JURASSIC ADVENTURE TOUR movie tour

BEE FARM TOUR & HONEY TASTING apiary tour

CLIMB WORKS KEANA FARMS ZIPLINE TOUR zipline GRAND FARM TOUR farm tour

KŌ HANA RUM TOUR & TASTING tasting tour

E-MOUNTAIN BIKE TOUR bike tour

BISHOP MUSEUM museum + cultural experience

‘IOLANI PALACE museum + cultural experience

Sights

LĒ‘AHI (DIAMOND HEAD) state monument + sightseeing + hiking

PALI LOOKOUT sightseeing + hiking

NU‘UANU
HĀNAIAKAMALAMA
PU‘U
MAHUKU HEIAU cultural
PEARL HARBOR national memorial + historic site ULUPŌ HEIAU STATE HISTORIC MONUMENT cultural site 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 100 101 102 103 89 Snap the QR code to download the Savvy360 app to plan your trip. More at Savvy360.com
cultural site
O
site

Kualoa Grown Tour

The Kualoa Grown Tour at Kualoa Ranch allows guests to see the beauty and tranquility of one of O‘ahu’s most well-preserved ancient Hawaiian fishponds (Mōli‘i), which is carbon-dated at between 800 and 1,000 years old. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior, you’ll get to learn about early Hawaiian aquaculture practices and how fish was farmed in this 153-acre actively farmed fishpond, still standing with much of the original stonewall infrastructure in place. Mōli‘i fishpond has been continually used as a food source for the last 800 years! Guests will also travel on a trolley to explore the tropical fruit and flower gardens of Mōli‘i along the shores fronting their “Secret Island.” Admire the accomplishments of the early Hawaiians as the rich stories of the voyaging canoe and ancient fishpond unfold; and as an added bonus, see several of the Hollywood movie site locations along Kualoa‘s coastal shores.

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Kualoa Ranch (808) 237-7321 • Kualoa.com 49-560 Kamehameha Hwy., Kāne‘ohe (Map A, PG 163) ›
NATURE & CULTURAL TOUR on WINDWARD COAST 90-MINUTE TOUR IN OPEN-AIR TROLLEY UNASSIGNED SEATING, FIRST COME GIFT SHOP OPEN DAILY

Jurassic Adventure Tour

The deluxe, 2.5-hour Jurassic Adventure Tour at Kualoa Ranch will take you to iconic film sites in Kualoa, Hakipu‘u and Ka‘a‘awa Valleys. Buckle up and enjoy this bumpy rainforest trek to visit filming locations from the original “Jurassic Park” film, as well locations and sets from “Jurassic World” and “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.” Relive the excitement of the Indominus Rex paddock with its 60-foot walls, the bunkers and authentic dinosaur cages used in the movies and visit the most famous field of all in the Jurassic franchise: where the “Gal... uh... uh, Galli... uh, Gallimimus … are flocking this way!” You’ll be driven in open-air custom safari vehicles which will give you the best panoramic views! Afterwards, stop by their gift shop for Kualoa Ranch branded t-shirts, hats, shorts and more, as well as Hawaiian crafts, tasty treats and many other surprises!

Kualoa Ranch

(808) 237-7321

• Kualoa.com

49-560 Kamehameha Hwy., Kāne‘ohe (Map A, PG 163)

› MINIMUM AGE 3 YRS OLD

› ADVANCE RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

› OPEN-AIR GUIDED TOUR

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MOVIE TOUR on WINDWARD COAST

Bee Farm Tour & Honey Tasting

This family-owned Hawaiian honey and pollination company offers raw honey and bee removal services to the community. When guests join them on their hands-on apiary tour and honey tasting, they go behind the veil for a deep dive into the entire program the company is running on the North Shore of O‘ahu. After gathering to learn about the farm and the fascinating world of bees and how honey is made, guests suit up in bee protection gear before walking to the apiary. During this interactive and educational portion of the tour, staff does their best to point out the queen in the hive, share the birth of a bee, and help guests hold their frame of raw honeycomb. Once the tour is done, everyone will head back to sample the farm’s raw honey as well as some infused honey varieties, depending on the season.

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APIARY
SHORE HI Honey Farm (808) 462-6911 • HiHoneyFarm.com 66-1128 Kaukonahua Rd., Waialua (Map A, PG 162)
STORE
HIVE"
CORPORATE TOURS & PRIVATE EVENTS
TOUR on NORTH
› BE SURE TO VISIT THEIR
› ASK ABOUT THE "HOST A
PROGRAM ›

CLIMB Works Keana Farms Zipline Tour

Create the stories your family will always talk about at CLIMB Works Keana Farms. Their world-class zipline tour on O‘ahu’s North Shore is a three-hour guided tour that includes O‘ahu’s longest ziplines ranging from 500 feet to nearly half a mile long. Participants explore a working agricultural farm on eight dual lines, two rappels, three sky bridges, a fun ATV adventure to the ridgetop and other unique surprises. Along the way you’ll learn about Hawai‘i’s rich history and culture while taking in panoramic ocean and mountain views of O‘ahu’s famous North Shore. The long, high and extraquiet O‘ahu ziplines are designed so you can see the North Shore’s famous beaches, farms and lush mountains with the person of your choice right next to you.

› ADVENTURE PACKAGES AVAILABLE

› MUST BE AT LEAST 7 YEARS OLD

› SCENIC NORTH SHORE LOCATION

CLIMB Works

(808) 202-2711 • ClimbWorks.com

1 Enos Rd., Kahuku (Map A, PG 162)

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ZIPLINE on NORTH SHORE

Grand Farm Tour

This fourth-generation owned and operated family farm started as a small, roadside fruit stand and has evolved into a 140-acre operation. They continue to sell their fresh fruits and vegetables but have expanded to a farm-side café that features their locally grown products and a wagon tour that takes guests through their fields for a one-of-a-kind experience. The hour-long tour highlights the seasonal crops of the farm showing how each crop is grown, the challenges that face the plants, and tastings along the way. The tour ends in their cacao fields where guests taste cacao in the raw to roasted versions to understand how the fruit evolves. After the tour, guests can refuel at their farm café specializing in smoothies and acai bowls with acai grown on their property.

94 SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES
Kahuku Farms (808) 628-0639 • KahukuFarms.com 56-800 Kamehameha Hwy., Kahuku (Map A, PG 162) › VISIT
› A TRACTOR
› OFFERED FRI,
AT 1PM
FARM TOUR on NORTH SHORE
THEIR FARM CAFÉ
PULLED WAGON RIDE
SAT, SUN

Kō Hana Rum Tour & Tasting

Join Kō Hana Distillers, a boutique distillery and home of Kō Hana Hawaiian Agricole Rum, for an exploration through their garden of native Hawaiian sugar canes and a unique tasting experience. Kō Hana Agricole Rum is meticulously crafted from single varietals that are hand harvested, pressed to juice and then distilled to perfection — resulting in one of the world’s finest pure cane rums. Learn the history of native Hawaiian sugarcane (kō) that thrived 800 years before the plantations even existed, see how a true farm-to-bottle operation works and stand in front of their custom rum still to learn how native Hawaiian sugar cane is distilled into one of the finest agricole rums in the world. Visit the resting warehouse where all of Kō Hana Rums’ aged stock lives and talk story on the process that matures this unique boutique rum. Finish at the tasting bar to sample an array of their locally grown rums and compare the flavors to the fresh sugarcane juice from the start of the tour.

Kō Hana Distillers (808) 649-0830 • KohanaRum.com

92-1770 Kunia Rd., #227, Kunia (Map A, PG 162)

› PRIVATE TOURS AVAILABLE

› VISIT THEIR ONLINE STORE

› JOIN THE ‘OHANA RUM CLUB

95 SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES
TASTING TOUR in CENTRAL O‘AHU

E-Mountain Bike Tour

Cruise through Kualoa’s valley roads, pastures and trails on an e-Mountain Bike. These state-of-the-art e-Bikes have a small electric motor that gives you a boost up the hills and throughout the ride, making for a fun, active and eco-friendly experience getting out into nature. The novice tour travels approximately six miles through Kualoa and Ka‘a'a‘wa Valleys, making four to five stops along the journey, providing great photo ops and beautiful views. Before starting the tour, your guide will adjust your bike for comfort and begin with a safety assessment and short practice ride. The Experienced e-Bike Tour is for ultra-athletes only as it’s a much more grueling course and goes up to 16 miles roundtrip in the two-hour tour time with just a few stops.

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BIKE TOUR on WINDWARD COAST Kualoa Ranch (808) 237-7321 • Kualoa.com 49-560 Kamehameha Hwy., Kāne‘ohe (Map A, PG 163)
MINIMUM AGE 10 YEARS OLD
HELMETS PROVIDED
› TWO HOUR TOUR ›

Immerse yourself in Hawai‘i’s rich culture and heritage at the premier natural and cultural history museum in the state. Located in the Kalihi district of Honolulu, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum inspires the community and visitors through the exploration, celebration and perpetuation of the extraordinary history, culture and environment of Hawai‘i and the Pacific. The Museum was founded in 1889 by Charles Reed Bishop in memory of his wife Bernice Pauahi Bishop, a royal descendant of King Kamehameha I. Today, the Museum houses over 25 million historical, cultural and natural treasures, is an educational center for the community and widely regarded as the world’s premier institution for Hawaiian and Pacific content. Explore and engage with Hawai‘i’s living culture, unwind with your ‘ohana, and activate your mind—all at Bishop Museum! Open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., except on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

(808) 847-3511

• BishopMuseum.org

1525 Bernice St., Honolulu (Map A, PG 162)

Bishop Museum

› CHECK THEIR SITE FOR UPCOMING EVENTS

› DISCOVER THE HISTORY, CULTURE & NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF HAWAI‘I

97 SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES
MUSEUM & CULTURAL EXPERIENCE in HONOLULU Located near downtown Honolulu in Kalihi

‘Iolani Palace

‘Iolani Palace in downtown Honolulu is the only official state residence of royalty in the U.S. and a national historic landmark. Built in 1882, it was the residence of the last two monarchs of the Hawaiian Kingdom, King Kalākaua and Queen Lili‘uokalani. This American Florentine-style palace features a beautiful Koa staircase, royal portraits and a rich interior. The palace fell into disrepair after the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy and was eventually renovated and opened to the public in 1978. Visitors can take guided or self-guided audio tours of the palace to learn about its rich history and see its throne room, living quarters and ancient regalia. The palace is also located in the center of a vital area that is worth exploring, with historical sites, museums and financial and arts districts nearby. Tour options vary based on the day of the week and the time.

98 SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES
Located in Hawai‘i Pacific University (808) 522-0832 • IolaniPalace.org 364 S. King St., Honolulu (Map C, PG 165)
Credit: Richie Chan-stock.adobe.com
MUSEUM & CULTURAL EXPERIENCE in HONOLULU
SPECIALTY, GUIDED & SELF-LED TOURS
IMMERSE YOURSELF IN THE RICH HISTORY OFHAWAI‘I

Lē‘ahi (Diamond Head)

The iconic silhouette of Diamond Head State Monument can be found along the Honolulu skyline, just beyond Waikīkī. This 760-foot tuff crater is a famous Hawaiian landmark and is known as Lē‘ahi in Hawaiian, meaning the "brow of the tuna." The crater was named Lē‘ahi Head by 19th-century British sailors who thought they had discovered diamonds on its slopes, but they were shiny calcite crystals. The crater has a rich history, including being used as a military lookout in the early 1900s and becoming a National Natural Landmark in 1968. Today, it is a popular hiking destination offering breathtaking views of Waikīkī and the south shore of O‘ahu. The hike is moderately challenging and includes two sets of stairs, tunnels and old military bunkers. The Diamond Head State Monument is open daily from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. with a $10 admission fee per vehicle and $5 per pedestrian.

› NON-RESIDENTS NEED RESERVATION

› CHECK IN AT VISITOR CENTER, OPEN DAILY FROM 7AM-3:30PM

99 SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES
Located just south of Waikīkī (808) 954-8759 • PacificHistoryParks.org/Diamond-Head-State-Monument Diamond Head Rd. at 18th Ave., Honolulu (Map A, PG 163)
STATE MONUMENT & SIGHTSEEING in HONOLULU

Nu‘uanu Pali Lookout

A five-mile drive from downtown Honolulu, Nu‘uanu Pali Lookout offers stunning views of the Ko‘olau cliffs and Windward Coast. The drive up the Pali Highway takes you through lush forests to a stone terrace in the Ko‘olau Range 1200-feet above the O‘ahu coastline, with panoramic views of Kāne‘ohe, Kailua, Coconut Island and more. After admiring the views, continue through the Pali Tunnels to Windward O‘ahu and choose between visiting the beach town of Kailua or O‘ahu's North Shore. The Pali Lookout is also a site of historical significance, as it was the site of King Kamehameha I's victory in the Battle of Nu‘uanu. Expect strong winds but enjoy the breathtaking views of the Windward Coast. Open daily from 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. Non-resident parking fee of $7 per vehicle.

Hānaiakamalama

(808) 587-0300

dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/parks/oahu/nuuanu-pali-state-wayside Nu‘uanu Pali Dr, Kāne‘ohe (Map A, PG 163)

Discover the hidden gem of Hānaiakamalama, located in the picturesque Nu‘uanu Valley, just a short drive from Honolulu. This secluded summer retreat was once home to Queen Emma, King Kamehameha IV and their son, Prince Albert. Hānaiakamalama, which means "house of divine guidance" in Hawaiian, is now a museum listed on the National Historic Registry and offers visitors a unique insight into the life of the royal family. Explore the collection of Queen Emma's personal belongings, as well as royal antiques, furnishings and memorabilia. After visiting the museum, make sure to take a scenic drive up the Pali Highway to enjoy the breathtaking views from the Nu‘uanu Pali Lookout. Immerse yourself in the rich history and cultural heritage of Hawai‘i at the Hānaiakamalama.

(808) 595-3167

DaughtersOfHawaii.org/queen-emma-summer-palace 2913 Pali Hwy, Honolulu (Map A, PG 163)

100 SEE + DO | SIGHTS
SIGHTSEEING on WINDWARD COAST
HONOLULU
CULTURAL SITE in
Credit: Eric BVD-stock.adobe.com

Pu‘u o Mahuku Heiau

Pu‘u o Mahuka Heiau is the largest religious temple on O‘ahu, spanning nearly two acres. It played a significant role in the political, social and religious system of Waimea Valley in the pre-contact period. Constructed in the 1600s and possibly expanded in the 1700s, it consisted of three walled enclosures with interior structures made of wood and thatch. The high priest Ka‘opulupulu oversaw the heiau (temple) in the 1770s during a time of political turmoil, and it may have served as a sacrificial temple. The heiau was used until 1819, when the traditional religion was abolished. Pu‘u o Mahuka Heiau offers a commanding view of Waimea Valley and the northern shoreline and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1962 to preserve its importance to Hawaiian culture and history. Visitors are asked to observe the site from outside the walls to avoid damaging the structure.

(808) 587-0300

dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/parks/oahu/puu-o-mahuka-heiau-state-historic-site

59-818 Kamehameha Hwy., Hale‘iwa (Map A, PG 162)

› NO ENTRANCE FEE

› OPEN DAILY FROM 8AM-5PM

› AMAZING VIEWS OF WAIMEA VALLEY

101 SEE + DO | SIGHTS
CULTURAL SITE on NORTH SHORE

Pearl Harbor

On December 7, 1941, a surprise air attack by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor plunged the United States into World War II and claimed thousands of lives. At Pearl Harbor, visitors can immerse themselves in five historic sites that make up the National Memorial. The Pearl Harbor Visitor Center is the gateway to the USS Arizona Memorial, USS Oklahoma Memorial, and USS Utah Memorial, among others. The USS Arizona Memorial is a place of somber beauty and reflection, the final resting place for over 900 sailors and Marines. Pearl Harbor is also home to the USS Oklahoma Memorial, which tells the story of rescue and survival, and the USS Utah Memorial, which is the final resting place for 58 men and offers a deeper understanding of Pearl Harbor. Reserve a time slot for the boat tour to the USS Arizona Memorial, which is free, but you must reserve it in advance.

102 SEE + DO | SIGHTS
(808) 422-3399 • nps.gov/perl/index.htm 1 Arizona Memorial Place, Honolulu (Map A, PG 162) › OPEN DAILY FROM 7AM-5PM › PARKING FEE OF $7 PER VEHICLE › AVIATION MUSEUM ON FORD ISLAND
NATIONAL MEMORIAL & HISTORICAL SITE in CENTRAL O‘AHU

Ulupō Heiau State Historic Monument

An exciting and historic destination located in Kailua, this site is home to one of the most well-preserved Hawaiian temple complexes, making it a must-visit for history enthusiasts. As you explore the temple grounds, you'll be transported back in time to ancient Hawai‘i and learn about the unique cultural and spiritual practices of the Hawaiian people. The heiau (temple), which was used for religious ceremonies and offerings, is surrounded by lush vegetation and breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape. Not only will you discover the rich history of this special place, but you'll also be able to enjoy a variety of outdoor activities, such as hiking, picnicking and bird watching. Whether you're a local resident or visiting from abroad, Ulupō Heiau State Historic Site is an unforgettable experience that you won't want to miss.

(808) 587-0300 • dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/parks/oahu/ulupo-heiau-state-historic-site 1200 Kailua Rd., Kailua (Map A, PG 162)

103 SEE + DO | HIKING
CULTURAL SITE on WINDWARD COAST
NO ENTRANCE FEE
OPEN MON-FRI 7AM-7PM, SAT 8AM-3PM
PARK CLOSED ON SUNDAYS

Please wear reef-safe sunscreen. Respect the ocean and sea life. Leave these beautiful places better than you found them.

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IMAGE COURTESY: COLIN ANDERSON
ALA MOANA BEACH PARK honolulu WAI‘ALAE BEACH PARK honolulu WAIKĪKĪ BEACH waikīkī KAIMANA BEACH waikīkī KEAWA‘ULU (YOKOHAMA) BEACH leeward coast MOKULĒ‘IA BEACH north shore HALEIWA BEACH PARK north shore SUNSET BEACH north shore ‘EHUKAI BEACH north shore KAHANA BAY BEACH PARK windward coast LANIKAI BEACH windward coast KAILUA BEACH windward coast 106 106 107 108 109 110 110 111 112 112 113 114 Snap the QR code to download the Savvy360 app to plan your trip. More at Savvy360.com 105 BEACHES

Ala Moana Beach Park

One of the most popular parks in Honolulu, Ala Moana Beach Park is a 100-acre, free public park located between downtown Honolulu and Waikīkī. The white sandy beach is slightly over a half mile long with calm water and a shallow outer coral reef, making it ideal for swimming, stand-up-paddleboarding and snorkeling—where you can observe tropical fishes, corals and turtles. The far western end of the beach is a favorite with families, especially small children, with its calm, waist-deep water. For the surfing enthusiasts, head over to the south side of Ala Moana and paddle out past the reef to catch the swells coming in from the open ocean. Beach facilities include concession stands, shady trees, tennis courts, picnic tables, plenty of restrooms, outdoor showers, lifeguards on duty, barbecue grills and a large parking lot. Located across the street from the Ala Moana Center, a shopper’s dream come true with 400 shops and restaurants.

Wai‘alae Beach Park

This beautiful beach on O‘ahu’s south shore lies adjacent to The Kāhala Hotel & Resort, and about three miles from Waikīkī. The Wai'alae Stream flows through the beach park and into the ocean, forming a wide channel through the reef and dividing the park into two sections with a stone bridge connecting them. Because coral and rocks from the protected reef offshore are interspersed with sand, both on the beach and in the water, it is recommended to wear water shoes when walking on the beach and entering the water. The shallow reef is not ideal for swimming, but it is for surfing, wind- and kitesurfing, sailing, and spearfishing. A well-known surf site named Razors is on the west side of the channel and a small man-made beach can be found at the east end of the beach.

106 SEE + DO | BEACHES
BEACH in HONOLULU Located near Waikīkī 1201 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164) BEACH in KĀHALA Located near The Kāhala Hotel & Resort 4925 Kāhala Ave., Honolulu (Map A, PG 162)

Located on the south shore of Honolulu, iconic Waikīkī Beach fronts O‘ahu’s main hotel and resort area, where you’ll find world-class shopping, dining and entertainment. Once a playground for Hawaiian royalty and considered one of the most famous beaches in the world, it is composed of eight sections, each with their own activities, amenities and vibes. Waikīkī is also renowned for surfing and Hawaiian waterman Duke Kahanamoku, who was an Olympic gold medalist in swimming and taught visitors how to surf its waves. Today, his statue is located at Waikīkī Beach, which has become an iconic symbol of Hawai‘i’s surf culture. Views of the city skyline and Lē‘ahi (Diamond Head) are in the background with local attractions like Honolulu Zoo, Waikīkī Aquarium and Royal Hawaiian Center nearby.

Waikīkī Beach

› LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY

› PARKING IN THE AREA IS LIMITED

› ENDLESS AMENITES NEARBY

107 SEE + DO | BEACHES
BEACH in WAIKĪKĪ Located in the heart of Waikīkī Kalākaua Ave, Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

Kaimana Beach

Also known as Sans Souci Beach (“without worry / a care” in French), this small, quiet beach is just south of the War Memorial Natatorium and fronts the boutique Kaimana Beach Hotel, with views of iconic Lē‘ahi (Diamond Head). This family-friendly south shore beach is wider than other beaches that make up the famous 2-mile stretch of Waikīkī Beach, and has calm, gentle waves that are ideal for snorkeling, swimming, fishing, boogie boarding, stand-up-paddle boarding and kayaking. To the east of Kaimana is an access point for the popular surf spot Old Man’s. Keep an eye out for the occasional monk seal sunning on the beach and remember to keep your distance. Amenities include restrooms, showers, parking and lifeguard on duty. Grab your morning coffee at nearby Kaimana Coffee Co.

108 SEE + DO | BEACHES
fronting Kaimana Beach Hotel 2863 Kalakaua Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164) › LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › PARKING AVAILABLE › GRAB A BITE AT HAU TREE RESTAURANT
BEACH in WAIKĪKĪ
Located

Keawa‘ulu (Yokohama) Beach

Known by the locals as Yokohama Beach or Yokes, Keawa‘ula Beach is the northernmost beach on O‘ahu’s west shore, next to the the Ka‘ena Point Trail, which leads to the Ka‘ena Point Bird Sanctuary and the Ka‘ena Point Pillbox Bunker & Cave Trail. This remote, curvy, beautiful beach is truly off the beaten path with turquoise water and is never crowded. The waves tend to get high, especially in winter, so, it’s not ideal for swimming or snorkeling, but sunbathing and watching surfers, bodyboarders and the occasional dolphin in the distance are common past times. Lifeguards are on duty, so make sure to ask one about the water conditions. With the strong currents, high waves and rocky ocean bottom, it can be dangerous for the inexperienced. If you enjoy hiking, the Ka‘ena Point Trail offers a rigorous out-and-back hike with spectacular views of the ocean and Wai‘anae Mountain Range.

109 SEE + DO | BEACHES
LEEWARD
BEACH on
COAST
› LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › HIKING NEARBY AT KA‘ENA POINT › NO SHADE, TAKE AN UMBRELLA
Located near Ka‘ena Point End of Farrington Hwy. (Hwy 93), Wai‘anae (Map A, PG 162)

Mokulē‘ia Beach

Located on Oahu’s North Shore between Wailua and Ka‘ena Point, Mokulē‘ia is a a small, secluded oceanfront park with a long white sand beach and pristine, blue waters. The beach is the perfect place to get away from the crowds. Mokulē‘ia attracts surfers, snorkelers, spear fishermen, kiteboarders and windsurfers, but is not a top attraction for swimmers due to the shallow reef. Winters have perfect wind conditions for kite and wind surfing but there are also strong swells and rip currents which can be dangerous if you are inexperienced. Sunbathing is a favorite past time on this secluded beach, but if you want some shade, there are plenty of trees to shield you from the suns rays. Keep an eye out for honu (sea turtles) swimming close to shore and watch the display of surfers and wind- and kite-surfers taking advantage of the windy conditions. Amenities include parking, picnic tables, outdoor showers, portable restrooms and water fountains.

No lifeguards on duty

Open daily from 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. 8568 Farrington Hwy, Waialua (Map A, PG 162)

Hale‘iwa Beach Park

Hale‘iwa Beach Park is in the small town of Hale‘iwa on the North Shore of O‘ahu and adjacent to the Hale‘iwa Boat Harbor with the beach located near the parking area and lifeguard tower. This spacious 19-acre park is fronted by a narrow sandy beach with calm waters perfect for stand-up-paddle boarding close to shore and surfing farther out. The park is dotted with large monkeypod trees for shade and popular activities include surfing, fishing, boating, kayaking, and scuba diving, and you may even see canoe paddlers training. Because of the rocky ocean bottom, this is not a popular swimming beach, but it offers beautiful views of Waialua Bay and a large grassy area for picnicking and people watching. Amenities include parking, restrooms, showers, picnic tables, and lifeguard on duty.

Lifeguards on duty

62-449 Kamehameha Hwy, Hale‘iwa (Map E, PG 166)

110 SEE + DO |
BEACHES
BEACH on NORTH SHORE
BEACH on NORTH SHORE

This two-mile stretch of sand is known for big wave surfing during the winter season and is one of the three surf breaks where the famous Vans’ Triple Crown Surfing Contest is held. While the beach is famous for surfing in winter (October – April), there are plenty of activities for non-surfers to enjoy, especially in the summer months. The calm waters in summer are ideal for swimming, snorkeling and bodyboarding, and viewing amazing sunsets are always a must do at this beach. Amenities include restrooms, outdoor showers, picnic tables, shaded areas, free parking (across the street and beside the beach park), and a lifeguard on duty from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily.

› LIFEGUARD ON DUTY 9AM-5:30PM

› FREE PARKING NEARBY

› BEWARE OF RIP CURRENTS

111 SEE + DO | BEACHES
NORTH SHORE
Sunset Beach BEACH on
Located just outside Hale‘iwa
59-104 Kamehameha Hwy., Pūpūkea (Map A, PG 162)

‘Ehukai Beach Park (Banzai Pipeline)

‘Ehukai Beach Park is one of the most famous surf spots on O‘ahu’s North Shore, with daredevil surfers traveling from all over the world to take on waves reaching heights of over thirty feet during surf season (October to April). Also known as the “Banzai Pipeline,” the massive, barreling waves seen in winter make it a wonderful place to watch adventurous surfers brave enough to ride these waves. Surfing contests are commonly held here, such as the Billabong Pipeline Masters and Da Hui Backdoor Shootout. During the summer (May to September), the water is calmer, where swimming is possible. But it's recommended to ask the lifeguards on duty if the water conditions are safe for swimming. This is the perfect beach for a day of sunning and a picnic under the canopy of trees lining the shore. Amenities include picnic tables, limited parking, showers, restrooms and lifeguard on duty.

Kahana Bay Beach Park

Lifeguard on duty

59-337 Ke Nui Rd, Hale‘iwa (Map A, PG 162)

This small beach is one of the best-kept secrets and worth a stop if you are sightseeing on this side of the island. Surrounded by the majestic Ko‘olau Mountains, the crescent shaped Kahana Bay Beach is great for kayaking (if you bring your own kayak), fishing, swimming and snorkeling (especially in summer on a cloudless day), paddleboarding and sunbathing. On the south end of Kahana Bay Beach Park is Huilua Fishpond, an ancient Hawaiian fishpond that is a National Historic Landmark and no longer in working condition but still worth visiting as it is one of only six remaining fishponds on the island and gives insight into Hawaiian people’s aquafarming practices. Amenities include picnic tables, outdoor showers, restrooms, boat ramp and parking.

dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/parks/oahu/ahupuaa-o-kahana-state-park/ 52-222 Kamehameha Hwy., Hau‘ula (Map A, PG 162)

BEACH on NORTH SHORE BEACH on WINDWARD COAST
112 SEE + DO | BEACHES

Ranked one of the best beaches in the world and one of the most beautiful beaches on Oahu, Lanikai (“heavenly sea”) Beach, also known as Ka‘ōhao Beach, offers mesmerizing and endless vistas of soft powdery white sand, clear azure blue wate, and calm surf. Located in the town of Kailua, this beach is popular with local families and is an idyllic spot for swimming and relaxing. This isn’t an ideal spot for snorkeling though, with its minimal reef patches. There is no public parking, but during the week, neighborhood parking is open, and street parking is free. Because parking is scarce, it’s better to park at Kailua Beach’s parking area, which is a short 10-minute walk away. From Lanikai, you can see Nā Mokulua in the distance. Known locally as “the Mokes,” these islets are protected seabird sanctuaries with access allowed only on the Northern Moke which is usually accessed by kayak or outrigger canoe.

Lanikai Beach

› NO PUBLIC PARKING AREA

› BEAUTIFUL WHITE SAND BEACH

› NO LIFEGUARDS OR FACILITIES

113 SEE + DO | BEACHES
BEACH on WINDWARD COAST Located off Kawailoa Rd. Best to park at the lot at Kailua Beach along Kawailoa Road and walk along the shoreline toward Lanikai (Map G, PG 167)

Kailua Beach

Ranked as the second most beautiful beach on O‘ahu, Kailua Beach Park exemplifies the idyllic Hawai‘i beach with its turquoise blue ocean waters and pristine, soft, white sand stretching along the eastern shore of O‘ahu for two and a half miles. Situated just north of the number one beach on O‘ahu, Lanikai, Kailua Beach Park is one of the largest and prettiest beach parks on the island, and offers lots of shade, restrooms, showers, picnic pavilions and tables, beach volleyball courts, barbecue pits and lifeguards on duty. Because of the calm waters and small shore break, this beach is popular for activities such as boogie boarding, swimming, kayaking, stand-up-paddle boarding, kitesurfing and windsurfing. And every year the beach lights up with spectacular fireworks display on the annual fourth of July event.

114 SEE + DO | BEACHES
BEACH on WINDWARD COAST
Located on Kailua Rd. about 2 miles from Pali Hwy. in Kailua. (Map G, PG 167)
ON DUTY
› LIFEGUARDS
ON SITE
› FACILITIES
FOR WATER ACTIVITIES
› GREAT BEACH
GOLF PXG golf clubs + apparel HAWAII PRINCE GOLF CLUB golf course KAPOLEI GOLF CLUB golf course KO OLINA GOLF CLUB golf course 116 117 118 119 115 Snap the QR code to download the Savvy360 app to plan your trip. More at Savvy360.com

Let’s set the record straight: You don’t have to be a great golfer to get custom fitted for clubs. In fact, beginners often have the most to gain from playing clubs that are properly fitted. PXG Fittings are immersive, data-driven, fully personalized, and totally fun, focused on maximizing your performance, whether you are a novice or a scratch golfer. Once you are fitted by a Master Fitter for the right club heads, shafts, loft, lie and grips to suit your specs, these are the benefits can you expect from a PXG Fitting: Increased confidence on every shot from tee to green; longer distance and improved trajectory off the tee box; greater accuracy and consistency, even on mishits; improved short game on and around the green; and more enjoyment of the game!

Schedule your PXG club fitting now at PXG.com or by calling 844.PLAY.PXG.

(844) 752-9794 • PXG.com

Fittings locally at: Hoakalei Country Club (Map A, PG 162)

Anderson Golf Academy at Bay View Golf Course (Map A, PG 163)

Pro-AM Golf Shop (Map C, PG 165)

116 SEE + DO | GOLF PXG
GOLF CLUBS on O‘AHU
› SCHEDULE A CUSTOM FITTING TODAY! › THE GEN6s ARE GAME-CHANGERS › CHECK OUT THE PXG APPAREL LINE

Hawaii Prince Golf Club

On the ‘Ewa Plain of O‘ahu, Arnold Palmer and Ed Seay were given land that was once waving fields of sugar cane. Redesigned into the Hawaii Prince Golf Course, today this land features 27 holes offering unique challenges for golfers of all levels. The course features 270 acres offering stunning views of the rain carved Wai‘anae Mountains, long verdant fairways lined with numerous white sand bunkers and 10 strategically placed lakes. Join them for a challenging play on this unique course and experience unparalleled golf at its finest or invest in your game with lessons from their friendly and experienced golf professionals.

› PLAY AN ARNOLD PALMER/ED SEAY DESIGN

› STUNNING VIEWS OF SURROUNDINGS

› THREE INTERCHANGEABLE NINES

Located in ‘Ewa Beach

(808) 944-4567

• HawaiiPrinceGolf.com

91-1200 Fort Weaver Rd., ‘Ewa Beach (Map A, PG 162)

117 SEE + DO | GOLF
GOLF COURSE in CENTRAL O‘AHU

Kapolei Golf Club

A golf journey designed by architect Ted Robinson, who is best known for his use of water features and referred to as the “King of Waterscapes,” this 18-holes, par 72, 7001-yards layout offers well-groomed fairways and greens that keep Kapolei Golf Club difficult yet friendly. The elevated greens, 80 bunkers and five lakes provide delightful tactical challenges, with all the greens visible from the teeing ground, while Kapolei’s wide fairways and generous greenside chipping areas deliver a high level of overall playability for golfers of all levels. Kapolei Golf Club offers a full-service driving range equipped with state of the art LED lighting fixtures and features 30 stalls with high-end artificial turf mats, along with one of O‘ahu’s largest putting greens. The range is the perfect place to bring friends and family that want to get in some practice time or learn about the game of golf.

118 SEE + DO | GOLF
Located in Kapolei (808) 674-2227 • KapoleiGolf.com 91-701 Farrington Hwy, Kapolei (Map A, PG 162)
GOLF COURSE in WEST O‘AHU ROUNTRIP TRANSPORTATION FROM WAIKĪKĪ HOTELS FOR NON-RESIDENTS 4.5 STARS ON GOLF DIGEST'S PLACES TO PLAY

Listed in Golf Digest’s “Top 75 Resort Courses in U.S.,” the Ko Olina Golf Club is a challenging 18-hole course built in 1990 by renowned golf course architect Ted Robinson. Typical of Robinson’s designs, the Ko Olina Golf Club offers exceptional water features, multi-tiered greens, large landing areas and a moderate length which makes it perfect for beginners and experts alike. The Ko Olina Clubhouse features an award-winning and internationally recognized golf shop, rental equipment, range balls, locker room facilities and the incomparable Roy’s Ko Olina restaurant, featuring Hawaiian fusion cuisine for lunch and dinner. The Ko Olina Golf Academy offers state-of-the-art facilities, including a grass driving range, putting green and the finest short game practice area on the island, coupled with fun, personalized golf instruction by an award-winning PGA Professional teaching staff.

Located in Ko Olina Resort

(808) 676-5300 • KoOlinaGolf.com

92-1220 Ali‘inui Dr., Kapolei (Map D, PG 166)

Ko Olina Golf Club

› COMPLIMENTARY INTRA-RESORT SHUTTLE FOR KO OLINA RESORT GUESTS

› PRACTICE FACILITY & GOLF ACADEMY

119 SEE + DO | GOLF
GOLF COURSE in WEST O‘AHU

tast e

The Spirit of Aloha

Rum was distilled and bottled in 2009. Crafted from pure cane sugar and rainwater from Mount Wai'ale'ale, our products are a testament to the long and colorful history of commercial sugar production in Hawai'i and the abundant natural resources that make Kaua'i - The Garden Isle!

@koloarum
Please enjoy Kōloa Rum responsibly ©2023 Kōloa Rum Company Kalāheo, Hawaii 4.5-124% Alc/Vol
TM

EAT + DRINK

MW RESTAURANT regional cuisine

HOUSE WITHOUT A KEY regional cuisine

MOMOSAN WAIKIKI ramen & japanese cuisine

MORIMOTO ASIA WAIKIKI pan-asian cuisine

MĀNALO LOUNGE asian + hawai‘i regional cuisine

MINA'S FISH HOUSE seafood

HAU TREE seafood + american cuisine

DECK. hawaiian + american cuisine

DUKE'S WAIKIKI hawaiian cuisine + seafood

HY'S STEAK HOUSE steak house

FÊTE new american cuisine

MOKU KITCHEN new american cuisine

LA VIE french cuisine

QUIORA italian cuisine

EATING HOUSE 1849 BY ROY YAMAGUCHI hawaiian + asian fusion

ROY'S® hawaiian fusion

GOEN DINING+BAR BY ROY YAMAGUCHI hawai‘i regional cuisine BEACH HOUSE BY ROY YAMAGUCHI hawai‘i regional cuisine

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122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 Snap the QR code to download the Savvy360 app to plan your trip. More at Savvy360.com

MW Restaurant

› DINNER SERVICE MON-SAT 5-8:30PM

› LUNCH (TO-GO ONLY) TUE-FRI, 11AM-2PM

› VALET PARKING ONLY

While concerts ensue across the street at the Neal S. Blaisdell Center Arena, husbandwife team Michelle Karr-Ueoka and Wade Ueoka emerge above the noise strumming sweet symphonies on porcelain plates with local ingredient instruments. Located in the Symphony Honolulu building, the magnetic “intuition” Karr-Ueoka felt upon entering this soon-to-be-hers-and-his restaurant was right on the money. MW’s Pacific Rim cuisine—in other words: the harmonious cacophony that is Hawaiian fusion food—crusts kampachi in mochi for a house favorite and bouillabaisses Kona-, Kauai-, and Bristol Bay-sea dwellers for a brothy bounty in the Seafood Paella. Whether you choose the five-course tasting menu or decide to pave your own way, the cocktails are not to be missed. This team seems to have a knack for doing just that with ingredients of familiarity and not, resulting in daily menu changes introducing new full of potential bites that make loyal follower after loyal follower.

122 EAT + DRINK
Located in the Velocity Honolulu building (808) 955-6505 • MWRestaurant.com 888 Kapi‘olani Blvd., Suite 201, Honolulu (Map C, PG 165)
REGIONAL CUISINE in HONOLULU

House Without A Key

Renowned as the local gathering spot with the backdrop of Lē‘ahi (Diamond Head), the Pacific Ocean and an over-century-old (136 years to be exact) kiawe tree, House Without A Key is still the ultimate place to experience sunset cocktails with signature mai tais and other delectable favorites. If you’re the bookworm type, fate may have you familiarized with a Hawai‘i-inspired Charlie Chan novel that now serves as the namesake of this oceanfront destination. While the 1920s story immortalized the beloved mai tai, the restaurant one-upped its predecessor by boasting arguably the finest mai tai on O‘ahu alongside a variety of equally endeared craft cocktails and island-inspired dishes. Everything—from the historical landscape to the nightly Hawaiian music and traditional hula performances to the celebration of local ingredients—is steeped in vibrant Hawaiian culture. This iconic poolside restaurant offers all day dining featuring local style comfort food from various cultures—just like Hawai‘i itself—with its diversity of ethnicities and experiences.

Located at Halekulani

(808) 923-2311 • Halekulani.com

2199 Kālia Rd., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

› LIVE MUSIC & HULA PERFORMANCES

› OPEN DAILY FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER & SUNSET COCKTAILS

123 EAT + DRINK
REGIONAL CUISINE in WAIKĪKĪ

Momosan Waikiki

As much ramen is slurped up state-side, there’s always a lingering thought that knows we haven’t been inaugurally ramen-ed until we’ve tasted an authentic brothy bowl straight from its place of origin. Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto transports the iconic broth and noodles from his childhood home and place of culinary maturity in Japan to Waikīkī Beach with Momosan. It’s a craving that cannot be denied—savory bone broth, thick and toothy noodles and fatty toppings of the eggy and pork belly sort. This beachfront eatery hand-stews and -shapes the base components for a richness and complexity of flavor replicating what you’d find in a Tokyo street market. Regardless of O‘ahu’s south shore heat, Momosan manages consistently long lines with guests hungry for soul-warming bowls of the Iron Chef’s authentic ramen.

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Located at ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach (808) 922-0011 • MomosanWaikiki.com 2490 Kalākaua Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)
RAMEN & JAPANESE CUISINE in WAIKIKI
EAT + DRINK
› RAMEN SPOT BY MORIMOTO WITH AN ARRAY OF JAPANESE NOODLES & MORE › OPEN DAILY FROM 11AM - 9PM

Morimoto Asia Waikiki

As an honored Iron Chef, Chef Masaharu Morimoto sets the bar high on expectation and manages to deliver with Morimoto Asia Waikiki, the signature restaurant of the ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach. This Pan-Asian, dinner-only experience emphasizes the food cultures of China, Korea, Japan and Thailand while tapping into the abundant bounty of Hawai‘i’s native contributions. A glassencased kitchen puts on a nightly performance, expertly serving up elevated umami-packed dishes. Along an exclusive A5 wagyu menu of equally enticing options, Morimoto’s also adds some zest to routine Asian classics including orange chicken, bbq black cod and shrimp pad thai. Everything from the whole Peking duck hand-carved at the table to the anchovies, fermented sauces and sweet-spicy combos throughout promises thoughtful bites to relish and savor while enjoying sweeping views of the world’s most celebrated beach.

› DINNER NIGHTLY FROM 5-9PM

› OVERLOOKING OCEAN AT WAIKĪKĪ

› RESERVATIONS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

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at ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach (808) 922-0022 • MorimotoAsiaWaikiki.com
Kalākaua Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)
PAN-ASIAN CUISINE in WAIKIKI
Located
2490

Mānalo Lounge

Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina has launched its all-new Mānalo Lounge, named after the Hawaiian term for “sweet water.” Inspired by O‘ahu’s natural resources— where the fresh water of the mountains harmoniously merges with the salt water of the ocean—the cuisine pays homage to the mix of cultures found in Hawai‘i, as well as Asian and Pacific influences. Led by Executive Chef Michale Arnot, the vibrant menu is composed of dishes featuring locally sourced and seasonal ingredients, with signature dishes that include Stone Pot Bibimbap, Steamed Bao and the Yakitori Trio. The lounge also boasts a selection of sushi and sashimi alongside an extensive Japanese whisky and saké selection. Standout cocktails include The Wagyu Old Fashioned, the Neko Neko and the Matcha Aloha. Promoting a sense of community, the venue has a friendly atmosphere that encourages guests to “talk story” while enjoying their meal. No reservations are needed.

126 EAT + DRINK
ASIAN & HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE on LEEWARD COAST
Located at Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina (808) 679-0079 • FourSeasons.com/oahu/dining 92-1001 Olani St., Kapolei (Map D, PG 166)
AN AMAZING FUSION OF LOCAL HAWAIIAN & ASIAN FLAVORS OPEN DAILY FROM 5-9PM

For James Beard Award winner Chef Michael Mina, lackluster descriptors such as “flakey” and “white” weren’t going to cut it when a fish house boasting his name opened in the Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina. And so, the natural solve: establishing the very first fish sommelier. With the Pacific Ocean as his backyard and a bounty of sea life at his fingertips, Chef Michael Mina granted Hawai‘i’s flourishing fish population with the storytelling each and every species deserves. Whether the story is straight up—char-broiled lobster direct from the Big Island— or nuanced—seared yellowfin paired with foie gras—this chic fish house levels up the typical seafood offerings our palettes tend to anticipate. Surrounded by rattan, nautical rope, and pristine turquoise waters, Mina’s modernizes the line-to-table experience with a contemporary homage to the traditional Hawaiian fish house of years past.

Located at Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina

(808) 679-0079

• FourSeasons.com/oahu/dining

92-1001 Olani St., Kapolei (Map D, PG 166)

Mina's Fish House

› A LINE-TO-TABLE DINING EXPERIENCE

› PANORAMIC OCEAN VIEWS

› OPEN DAILY FROM 3-11PM, DINNER 5-9PM

127 EAT + DRINK
SEAFOOD on LEEWARD COAST

Hau Tree

› OPEN DAILY 8AM - 10PM

› DINNER RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

› OCEANFRONT SETTING AT KAIMANA BEACH

Hau Tree's casual beach-centric menu offers Honolulu's best beachside brunch (Saturdays and Sundays), lunch and casual dinner offerings. Hau Tree is also the best spot in Waikīkī to enjoy sunset cocktails by the sea. The Hau Tree cocktail menu is designed for the liquid traveler whether they are visiting the hotel or just stopping in for a quick pau hana drink; there is a cocktail for every person, from the sometimes forgotten vodka soda fan to the nerdy cocktailian. The drinks are designed to excite and pique conversation with nods to the classics and reworks of some favorite beach cocktails.

Located in Kaimana Beach Hotel (808) 921-7066 • Kaimana.com 2863 Kalākaua Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)
SEAFOOD & AMERICAN CUISINE in WAIKĪKĪ
128 EAT + DRINK

Situated on the 3rd floor rooftop pool deck of the Queen Kapi‘olani Hotel, DECK. features panoramic views of the iconic Diamond Head steps from world famous Waikiki Beach! This open-air venue provides a stunning backdrop for the unique American Pacific inspired menu, fresh handcrafted cocktails, locally brewed beers as well as a vast selection of wines. DECK. is thoughtful in the selection of ingredients for both the menu as well as the handcrafted cocktails. DECK. keeps it fresh, incorporating locally sourced and sustainable ingredients wherever possible through partnerships with local farms, ranches, distilleries and breweries to create a dining experience that is fully immersed in the beauty of Hawai‘i. Open daily serving breakfast, brunch, happy hour and dinner.

› OPEN DAILY FROM 6:30AM-11PM

› GREAT VIEWS OF LĒ‘AHI (DIAMOND HEAD) & WAIKĪKĪ BEACH

Located at Queen Kapi‘olani Hotel (808) 556-2435 • DeckWaikiki.com

150 Kapahulu Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

129 EAT + DRINK
DECK.
HAWAIIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE in WAIKĪKĪ

Duke's Waikiki

This famous beachfront hot spot commemorates the iconic Waikīkī surf legend Duke Kahanamoku with a lively atmosphere of joyful vacationers snacking on poke nachos, sipping on umbrella-topped cocktails and mingling with fellow patrons. The vibes at Duke’s are top notch—watching the famed waves and booze cruise attendees roll in one after the other—and the food is craving-approved— macadamia nut hummus and crispy coconut shrimp with sweet-and-spicy lilikoi chili water. Almost as notorious as Duke’s cocktails is the salad bar equipped with locally-sourced fruits and veggies, filling grains and warm bread to accompany. On theme with delivering the essence of Hawai‘i’s bests, mai tais, mojitos, lava flows and POG (passion fruit, orange, guava) decorate the cocktail menu and never fail to complement the off-shore breeze and Waikīkī Beach energy. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

130 EAT + DRINK
Located in Outrigger Waikīkī Beach Resort (808) 922-2268 • DukesWaikiki.com 2335 Kalākaua Ave., Suite 116 Honolulu (Map B, PG 164) › LOCATED ON WAIKĪKĪ BEACH › LIVE MUSIC DAILY › OPEN DAILY FROM 7AM - 12AM
HAWAIIAN CUISINE & SEAFOOD in WAIKĪKĪ

Since 1976, Hy’s Steakhouse has been a celebrated fixture in Honolulu’s fine-dining scene. Located at the Waikiki Park Heights Hotel, Hy’s offers an elegant, tranquil ambiance with leather booths in a regal setting, top-notch customer service and an allaround five-star experience. Known for their superior USDA prime beef, their steaks are aged and trimmed on site to create tender, flavorful steaks cooked over fragrant Hawaiian kiawe wood. The native Hawaiian kiawe wood cooks with a more intense, even heat and complements the flavor of their fine beef. Long known for its table-side preparations, Hy’s offers such classics as Caesar Salad, Warm Spinach Salad and many flambé items such as Bananas Foster and Apple Streusel, all prepared at your table. Hy's also holds a Wine Spectator "Best of Award of Excellence" and is ready to serve their timeless collection of wines to accompany their flame-grilled steaks.

Hy's Steak House

› RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

› TRY THEIR CHAUFFEURED STEAK HOUSE DINNER PACKAGE

131 EAT + DRINK
Located in Waikiki Park Heights (808) 922-5555 • HysWaikiki.com 2440 Kūhiō Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)
STEAK HOUSE in WAIKĪKĪ

With watercolor radishes and oysters decorating the margins and an extensive “community partners” list ruling footer real estate, Fête’s menu immediately makes apparent the farm-to-table ethos upon which they rely so devotedly. Executive Chef Robynne Maii opened this part-Hawai‘i, part-Brooklyn hotspot alongside husband Chuck Bussler in 2016 with the intent of paying homage to all of their favorite eats and drinks. Every dish feels like a complete curation in and of itself—Rocky Road with local chocolate and mac nuts or Basil Caesar with tomatoes two ways—living true to “fête” meaning celebration or festival. Within this historical Chinatown building of wood and bricks with thousands of stories to tell, Fête delivers perfectly plated narratives of the chef’s world and Hawai‘i’s defining influence in it.

132 EAT + DRINK Fête NEW
Located in Chinatown (808) 369-1390 • FeteHawaii.com 2 North Hotel St., Honolulu (Map C, PG 165)
AMERICAN CUISINE in CHINATOWN
› NATIVE HAWAIIAN CHEF ROBYNNE MAII WON A 2022 JAMES BEARD AWARD › OPEN MON-SAT FROM 11AM-9PM

When a Saturday night rolls around, the easy and rightful answer is Chef Peter Merriman’s Moku Kitchen. Anchoring Kaka‘ako’s trendy retail center, SALT, this upcountry-inspired concept brings the customs of O‘ahu farmers and ranchers to urban Honolulu. It’s no secret that Chef Merriman has a knack for romanticizing the power of local ingredients and this restaurant is no exception—at Moku, the idea is to recreate the same pride and value of simpler times when food was harvested steps away from the open fire upon which it was cooked—organic kale salads as green as they are satisfying. Day boat fish and hand cut chips. Local apple banana cream pie with Laie vanilla pastry cream and whipped cream. Between the craft cocktails, the playful yet finessed food, and the good times heard over the noise of Ala Moana Boulevard, Moku lives up to its “throw a party every night” mentality—handcrafted, local-dependent and a staple of the Honolulu dining scene.

Located in SALT at Our Kaka‘ako (808) 591-6658 • MokuKitchen.com

660 Ala Moana Blvd., #145 (Map C, PG 165)

Moku Kitchen

133 EAT + DRINK
NEW AMERICAN CUISINE in KAKA‘AKO › ENJOY CRAFT COCKTAILS, LOCAL INGREDIENTS AND A LIVELY AMBIANCE › LIVE MUSIC NIGHTLY

La Vie

› RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

› COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING

› WALK-INS WELCOME IN THE BAR ROOM

Bienvenue à La Vie—a contemporary French-inspired restaurant with a modern approach to multicourse dining. Inspired by local ingredients and collaborations with the community, through the tradition of French cuisine, they strive to give the diner a sense of place and appreciation of Hawai‘i and its bounty. Views of the Pacific Ocean set the scene for their enigmatic, open-air restaurant sitting high on the eighth floor of The Ritz-Carlton Residences on iconic Waikīkī Beach. La Vie offers an award-winning wine list with unique and innovative pairings to enhance each course, and their menu caters to all guests’ tastes and dietary preferences including pescatarian and vegetarian dishes. Feast on French-fusion preparations of fresh seafood, duck and beef in their main dining room. The open seating Bar Room offers an à la carte menu with equally tantalizing options. Dinner seatings from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. with live piano daily from 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

134 EAT + DRINK
Located in The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Waikīkī Beach (808) 729-9729 • LaVieWaikiki.com 383 Kālaimoku St., 8th Floor, Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)
FRENCH CUISINE in WAIKĪKĪ

Overlooking the vibrant streets of Waikīkī and the Pacific Ocean, Quiora brings its own perspective to rustic Italian cuisine in a relaxed, al fresco dining experience. Showcasing Italian and Mediterranean-inspired cuisine, the core of their menu revolves around fresh artisan pastas made by hand every day, steaks, seafood and seasonal ingredients that are thoughtfully sourced from local farmers, fishermen and purveyors throughout Hawai‘i. The open-air dining room offers beautiful views complemented by live music in the evenings, Monday through Thursday; and you can even catch the Hilton Hawaiian Village fireworks show on Friday evenings from any table in the restaurant and stunning sunset views any day of the week. Lunch seatings are from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; and dinner and bar seatings are from 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Located in The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Waikīkī Beach (808) 729-9757

• QuioraWaikiki.com

383 Kālaimoku St., 8th Floor, Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

Quiora

135 EAT + DRINK
ITALIAN CUISINE in WAIKĪKĪ
RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED
COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING
LUNCH & DINNER SEATINGS DAILY

Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi

› WEEKEND BRUNCH FROM 10:30AM-2PM

› HAPPY HOUR DAILY FROM 4-5PM

› DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY FROM 4-9PM

When Roy Yamaguchi decided to push his limits beyond his claim-to-culinaryfame Roy’s franchise, Eating House 1849 was the move. The first location in Kōloa on Kaua‘i and now a second on the breezy top floor of International Market Place in Waikīkī. Inspired by a man name Peter Fernandez—who legend says opened Hawai‘i’s very first restaurant in (you guessed it) 1894—this alfresco retreat mirrors the menu of its muse concept that showcased an era in which Hawai‘i food depended heavily upon trades and imports. At this time, plantation workers, who, like Roy’s grandfather, came to the islands to work also brought with them their unique food culture. This cuisine amalgam paired with the quintessential Roy je ne sais quoi synergizes into a restaurant highlighted by mellow ambience, traditional flavors, contemporary twists and a vintage plantation town feel.

136 EAT + DRINK
Located in International Market Place (808) 924-1849 • RoyYamaguchi.com 2330 Kalākaua Ave., Space 322, Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)
HAWAIIAN & ASIAN FUSION in WAIKĪKĪ

Roy Yamaguchi continues to deliver inspired eateries that serve as the core of whichever neighborhood is lucky enough to host. A spot to gather with long-time friends over cocktails, meet and greet with colleagues and partners, or have some good ole-fashioned, special occasion family time. From Roy’s® Hawai‘i Kai, or more proudly known as the “Original Roy’s®,” to its Waikīkī and Ko Olina outposts, Roy’s® harnesses the same aloha-feel that boosted its success over 30 years ago while serving up the iconic Pacific Rim cuisine locals and visitors adore. On par with Yamaguchi's usual and praised routine, a three-course prix fixe menu is offered for those wanting some direction from the James Beard Award winner. Or, if dining off-the-cuff suits you, menu classics like Misoyaki Butterfish, Blackened Island ‘Ahi or the Frying Dragon Roll shouldn’t lead you astray. While the ask is to allot 30 minutes for the Melting Hot Chocolate Soufflé or Pineapple Upside Down Cake, most diners happily wait for the signature sweets.

RoyYamaguchi.com

(808) 396-7697

(808) 923-7697

(808) 676-7697

Roy's®

› THREE LOCATIONS ON O‘AHU

› MENU SPECIALTIES VARY BY LOCATION

› LOCAL CUISINE FROM A CULINARY LEGEND

• 6600 Kalaniana'ole Hwy., Ste. 110, Honolulu (Hawai‘i Kai) (Map F, PG 167)

• 226 Lewers St., Honolulu (Waikīkī) (Map B, PG 164)

• 92-1220 Ali‘inue Dr., Kapolei (Ko Olina) (Map D, PG 166)

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EAT + DRINK
HAWAIIAN FUSION on O‘AHU

GOEN Dining+Bar by Roy Yamaguchi

› OPEN FOR DINNER DAILY FROM 4-8PM

› LUNCH SERVED 12-3PM, FRIDAY-SUNDAY

› EXCELLENT CRAFT COCKTAILS

Roy Yamaguchi is big on community. Hence why majority of his restaurants inhabit close-knit suburban neighborhoods in order to serve as a hub for get-togethers to remember. Goen Dining + Bar in the heart of Kailua Town is no exception. This contemporary, half-indoor, half-outdoor restaurant fuses chef-driven finesse with the everyday-eater’s capital cravings: a must-order Fry Basket with steak-cut portobello mushroom fries and a like-gold dipping sauce, a simple but effective Ahi Tataki with sesame crusted tuna and spice ponzu and Truffled Gnocchi with Garlic Shrimp. The craft cocktails are as effective and curated as the meal. Both in name and taste profile, the “Howzit… Goen” bears a spirited sip with tequila and house made Hawaiian chili syrup. While the long waitlist prevents it, Goen provides an environment meant for camping out, ordering a drink and bite every half hour and soaking in windward side bliss from sun-up to sun-down—it looks like Roy is fulfilling his mission.

138 EAT + DRINK
Located in Lau Hala Shops (808) 263-4636 • RoyYamaguchi.com 573 Kailua Rd., Kailua (Map G, PG 167)
HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE in EAST O‘AHU

Beach House by Roy Yamaguchi

Attached to the iconic Turtle Bay Resort on the North Shore of Oahu, Beach House by Roy Yamaguchi hosts an oceanfront dining experience — and “oceanfront” should be edited to “on-beach” as your table resides a half-effort rock's throw distance from the shoreline with only a wooden deck between your feet and the sand. This open-air restaurant reflects the upscale family-oriented atmosphere of its home resort through a menu reminiscent of Roy’s familial potluck gatherings and my-great-grandmother’s-famous-(fill in the blank) style dishes. The mission here: guests should eat and feel like ‘ohana. Local farmers, fisherman and ranchers from a long line of familial craft fuel each selection—North Shore Harvest bowls, Misoyaki Deepwater Black Cod and Cabernet Beef Short Ribs to warm the soul and transport home to the beach.

Located on the North Shore (808) 293-7697

• RoyYamaguchi.com

57-091 Kamehameha Hwy., Kahuku (Map A, PG 162)

› LUNCH DAILY FROM 11:30AM-2:30PM

› DINNER DAILY FROM 4:30-9PM

› RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

139 EAT + DRINK
HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE on NORTH SHORE Ala Moana Center | International Market Place | Hilton Hawaiian Village | Pearl Harbor | Dole Plantation | Hale‘iwa | Honolulu Airport Maui Divers Jewelry Design Center | MauiDivers.com | 808.946.2929

SHOP + STYLE

ROYAL HAWAIIAN CENTER shopping center BEN BRIDGE TIMEWORKS fine jewelry + luxury timepieces ALA MOANA CENTER shopping center NOA NOA boutique LUXURY ROW shopping center MAUI DIVERS JEWELRY jewelry HILDGUND JEWELERS jewelry BIG ISLAND CANDIES gift shop + confections BLUE GINGER boutique + accessories 142 144 145 146 147 148 150 152 153 141 Snap the QR code to download the Savvy360 app to plan your trip. More at Savvy360.com

Royal Hawaiian Center

› OPEN DAILY, 10AM-9PM

› COMPLIMENTARY CULTURAL CLASSES AND ENTERTAINMENT

Located in the heart of Waikīkī on the iconic Kalākaua Avenue, Royal Hawaiian Center stands as a premier destination for shopping, dining, entertainment and culture. Spanning over three city blocks, seamlessly connecting over 90 unique shops across four levels, visitors enjoy shopping at internationally renowned, luxury brands and local boutiques featuring Hawai‘i-made products, as well as a diverse array of over 30 dining experiences. With a rich heritage spanning over four decades, Royal Hawaiian Center remains committed to showcasing the authentic spirit of Hawai‘i through cultural events and genuine hospitality. Enjoy free live entertainment at The Royal Grove, Waikiki’s gathering place. From hula lessons and authentic Hawaiian performances to ‘ukulele lessons and classes just for keiki (kids), Royal Hawaiian Center offers an exciting array of cultural activities and experiences throughout the year.

SHOPPING CENTER in WAIKĪKĪ
2201 Kalākaua Ave., Honolulu (Map B,
(808) 922-2299
RoyalHawaiianCenter.com
PG 164)
142 SHOP
143 SHOP

Ben Bridge Timeworks

Ben Bridge Timeworks is the premier destination for luxury timepieces and exquisitely crafted fine jewelry. Stop by to speak with a Personal Jeweler and discover an incredible selection of world-class watches from the top luxury brands along with a curated selection of heirloom quality fine jewelry. As a fifthgeneration family-run business, Ben Bridge has over 110 years of experience building lasting relationships with customers and will be honored to welcome you to Timeworks.

144 SHOP
TIMEPIECES & FINE JEWELRY in HONOLULU ›
› WIDE
JEWELRY Located in Ala Moana Center (808) 951-5600 • BenBridge.com 1450 Ala Moana Blvd, Suite 2700, Honolulu (Map C, PG 165)
LUXURY
OPEN DAILY
SELECTION OF WATCHES & FINE

Located steps away from the world-famous Waikiki Beach, Ala Moana Center is the world's largest outdoor shopping center featuring a diverse collection of stores, from national retailers and local favorites to high-end boutiques. The selection of brands includes Hawai‘i’s only Nordstrom, Neiman Marcus and Bloomingdales, in addition to luxury retailers such as Chanel, Gucci, Hermes, and many more. With over 350 retail and dining options and an array of entertainment opportunities including a multi-million-dollar art collection, a 20-foot climbing structure for kids, and live music and hula performances, Ala Moana Center is the primary shopping, dining, and leisure destination for island locals and visitors.

Ala Moana Center

SHOPPING CENTER in HONOLULU

› OPEN DAILY FROM 10AM-8PM

› TAKE THE WAIKĪKĪ TROLLEY HERE

› DAILY HULA SHOW AT 5PM

(808) 955-9517

• AlaMoanaCenter.com

1450 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu (Map C, PG 165)

145 SHOP

Noa Noa

Noa Noa presents a profusion of patterns and colors in traditional Hawaiian and Pacific island tapa and ethnic designs from around the world. Hand-batiked all natural fabrics include cottons, rayons, silks and linens. As you walk through their stores you will notice that the displays include many interesting and unique pieces. These artifacts include 12th to 19th century Chinese and Thai ceramics, Ikat weaving, ceremonial masks from Borneo, Java, Papua New Guinea, Sumatran Batiks, baskets, drums, an extensive collection of tapa cloth from Fiji, Samoa, Borneo, Toraja, Papua New Guinea and Irian Jaya. Noa Noa jewelry is exclusive and one-of-a-kind. Noa Noa jewelry has been hand-selected from Indonesia, Thailand, Burma, Mexico, Morocco and Africa and are made of gold, silver and a variety of other natural materials.

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BOUTIQUE in HONOLULU NoaNoaHawaii.com (808) 913-1757 • 2330 Kalākaua Avenue #134 (International Market Place) (Map B, PG 164) (808) 593-0343 • 1200 Ala Moana Blvd. #250, Honolulu (Ward VIllage) (Map C, PG 165) › ONE-OF-A-KIND JEWELRY › HAND-BATIKED NATURAL FABRICS › HAWAIIAN TAPA & ETHNIC DESIGNS

Embrace the art of shopping at Luxury Row—Honolulu’s premier, luxury shopping and lifestyle experience that draws style devotees from near and far. Located in the heart of Honolulu’s Waikīkī Beach Resort and Urban Retail District, Kalākaua Avenue’s “Luxury Row” is a renowned international travel destination and houses the beautiful sales office for the Mandarin Oriental Hotel and Condominiums. Totaling over 100,000 square feet, the experience of shopping is as exquisite as the products sold by Luxury Row’s revered fashion tenants, which include Chanel, Dior, Gucci, Moncler, Miu Miu and Bottega Veneta. Complimentary valet parking at the Porte Cochère entrance on Kalaimoku Street is available from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily and self-parking at the King Kalākaua Plaza from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. daily.

Located in the heart of Waikīkī (808) 922-2246

• LuxuryRow.com

2100 Kalākaua Ave., Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

Luxury Row

› COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING

› OPEN DAILY 10AM-10PM

› A LUXURY SHOPPING DESTINATION

SHOPPING CENTER in WAIKĪKĪ
147 SHOP
148 SHOP (808) 946-2929 • MauiDivers.com Ala Moana Center | Maui Divers Jewelry Design Center (Map C, PG 165) International Market Place | Hilton Hawaiian Village (Map B, PG 164) Pearl Harbor | Dole Plantation | Hale‘iwa | Honolulu Airport (Map A, PG 162)
149 SHOP

Hildgund Jewelers

Founded in 1873, Hildgund is the ultimate in fine custom designs and handcrafted jewelry—every piece unique by its elegance. Hildgund is locally owned and operated in Hawai‘i, celebrating 150 years of business in the state. They have a wide selection of precious and semi-precious colored stones plus many varieties of fine jade. The almost unlimited choice of their diamond collection is only of the highest quality. Customers worldwide have returned to a Hildgund location time and again, convinced that they have found one of the finest jewelry boutiques anywhere. And for the man who has everything, be sure to check out the exclusive knife collection for Hildgund by William Henry, who creates a range of tools so perfectly conceived and executed that they transcend superlative function to become superlative art. The typical knife takes more than eight months from conception to completion, like this custom design shown.

150 SHOP
FINE JEWELRY in HONOLULU Hildgund.com (808) 923-8777 • 2199 Kālia Rd., Honolulu (Halekulani) (Map B, PG 164) (808) 737-8663 • 5000 Kahala Ave., Honolulu (The Kahala Resort) (Map A, PG 163) › EXTENSIVE DIAMONDS & STONES › HAWAIIAN HEIRLOOM BRACELETS › BESPOKE WILLIAM HENRY KNIVES
151 SHOP

Big Island Candies

For over 40 years, Big Island Candies has been creating mouthwatering treats. Stroll and shop for gifts, featuring an assortment of individually wrapped goodies in exquisite, limited edition packaging that celebrates the joy of the seasons and the natural beauty of Hawa‘i. Their Chocolate Dipped Macadamia Nut Shortbread Cookies, brownies and chocolates are world renown. All products are made with the finest quality ingredients, such real butter, 100% Kona Coffee and highgrade chocolate. With so many innovative indulgences to choose from, their representatives are happy to answer questions about products and even make a few suggestions to help you find the right item. Come in and you’ll experience why Big Island Candies has been the go-to destination for Hawai‘i’s finest cookies, chocolates and confections since 1977. Open daily 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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Located in Ala Moana Center (808) 946-9213 • bigislandcandies.com 1450 Ala Moana Blvd. #1230, Honolulu (Map C, PG 165)
GIFT SHOP & CONFECTIONS in HONOLULU
THE GIFT OF HAWAI‘I
› GIVE
FRESH, LOCAL PRODUCTS
› FEATURING
THE HIGHEST GRADE INGREDIENTS
› ONLY

Blue Ginger

Live the aloha lifestyle in tropical resort wear from Blue Ginger. Perfect for any island occasion, Blue Ginger offers colorful, timeless resort wear sure to bring smiles and warm memories of the islands. Original batik prints inspired by the beauty of the Hawaiian Islands are available in comfortable clothing for all ages. A family run establishment, Blue Ginger has long been an island favorite with kama‘āina and visitors alike. With eight locations throughout the Hawaiian Islands Blue Ginger has something for everyone, from the youngest keiki on up. Colorful sundresses, caftans, aloha shirts, accessories and more. Celebrating 39 years of living the aloha lifestyle these exclusive prints and fashions continue to delight multiple generations.

› LIVE THE ALOHA LIFESTYLE

› MATCHING FAMILY PRINTS

› TIMELESS RESORTWEAR

blueginger.com

(808) 924-7900

(808) 942-2829

• Waikiki Beach Walk, 227 Lewers St. #130, Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

• Hilton Hawaiian Village, 2005 Kalia RD Unit #TT 7-01, Honolulu (Map B, PG 164)

BOUTIQUE & ACCESSORIES in WAIKĪKĪ
153 SHOP
ISLAND LIVING ALIA 888 ALA MOANA resort living & real estate NICK KUCHAR ART & DESIGN CO. art gallery INDICH COLLECTION fine rugs 156 158 159 155 Snap the QR code to download the Savvy360 app to plan your trip. More at Savvy360.com

Nestled within the heart of Kaka‘ako, Ālia is a true testament to inspired luxury, combining stunning design with the unparalleled beauty of Hawai‘i’s natural environment. Brought to life by Kobayashi Group, a thoughtful collection of amenities awaits, including two infinity pools, spa and wellness areas, game room, gymnasium/ basketball court, bowling alley, karaoke room and lounge. Incorporating sustainable principles, this development features thoughtfully designed one-, two- and threebedroom residences in an abundance of layouts. Floor-to-ceiling windows allow natural light to fill the residence while the home’s windows and lānai capture the natural flow of the tradewinds. Boasting a collection of luxury Gaggenau appliances, European white oak wide-plank wood flooring and carefully considered home layouts, Ālia captures the best of contemporary luxury. An inspired living experience that blends the natural environment with the wellbeing of residents, Ālia is a true oasis of comfort, beauty and sophistication.

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LUXURY LIVING in HONOLULU Sales Gallery located at Ala Moana Center (808) 466-1890 • Alia888AlaMoana.com/Savvy360 1450 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 3860, Honolulu (Map C, PG 165) › LUXURIOUS DETAILS & AMENITIES › SALES GALLERY OPEN 11AM-5PM DAILY › URBAN OASIS LIVING IN A PRIME LOCALE
Ālia
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Nick Kuchar Art & Design Co.

O‘ahu based artist Nick Kuchar creates surf and travel art inspired by the early days of surfing and beach culture, including the vintage color palette, typography and nostalgia that goes with it. Looking for inspiration paddling out at surf breaks and going on hikes, his creative process spans favorite locations and activities around the Hawaiian Islands and the ‘āina he has called home since 2005. Taking onsite sketches and photographs into his studio, Kuchar uses a mix of acrylic washes and digital illustration to bring his vision of these locales to life. Recent collaborations with Hurley, Hawaiian Airlines, Kahala Shirts, All Nippon Airways and Jamba Juice have introduced his vintage-inspired, retro Hawaiian travel prints and designs to the world. Most recently, he was the official artist for the 2022 Hurley Pro at Sunset Beach and also created a large wall illustration for the lobby of the newly remodeled Queen Kapi‘olani Hotel.

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Located in Kailua Town (808) 744-0777 • NickKuchar.com 629 Kailua Rd., Ste. 120, Kailua (Map G, PG 167)
RETAIL STORE OPEN DAILY FROM 10AM6PM (CLOSES AT 5PM ON SUNDAYS)
CHECK OUT NICK'S ONLINE STORE ISLAND LIVING
ART GALLERY & RETAIL STORE in KAILUA

Indich Collection's unique designs are inspired by the casual elegance of the island lifestyle. As designers and manufacturers of Hawaii Rugs®, Indich uses traditional oriental carpet weaving techniques and materials to create some of the most artful rug designs found anywhere. Celebrating 42 years in Hawai‘i with the largest selection of area rugs in the Pacific Basin, and with their Custom Design Program, Indich offers clients virtually unlimited design, color and size options. Traditional, contemporary and tropical designs stir your imagination as you enter the "Art Under Foot" gallery. Free drop shipping island-wide and to the mainland with minimum purchase. Open Monday to Friday 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Indich Collection

HawaiianRugs.com • indichcoll@aol.com

(808) 524-7769

(808) 596-7333

• 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Honolulu (Map C, PG 163)

• 550 Ward Ave., Honolulu (Map C, PG 163)

› THESE HAWAIIAN HEIRLOOM RUGS ARE DESIGNED BY LOCAL ARTISTS

› CREATE YOUR OWN CUSTOM RUG

159 ISLAND LIVING
FINE RUGS in HONOLULU

RAISE YOUR CONSCIOUSNESS. REDUCE YOUR IMPACT.

We hope that you enjoy this very special place. Help us preserve its beauty as you explore with a heightened level of awareness, intention and respect.

Mahalo nui loa. Learn more at Savvy360.com/kuleana

Image by Natalia Mastrascusa
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ISLAND MAP O‘ahu, the Gathering Place WAIKĪKĪ Honolulu KAKA‘AKO & DOWNTOWN Honolulu KO OLINA Leeward Coast HALE‘IWA North Shore HAWAI‘I KAI East Honolulu KAILUA Windward Coast 162 164 165 166 166 167 167
MAPS
162 MAP A 1 2 3 4 6 8 10 23 24 22 12 13 14 15 17 19 21 26 20

18 24

9 11 16

O‘AHU SHOP LIVE

Kualoa Ranch

HI Honey Farm

Kahuku Farms

CLIMB Works

Kō Hana Rum Distillers

Hānaiakamalama

Lē‘ahi (Diamond Head)

Pu‘u o Mahuku Heiau

Ulupō Heiau State Historic Monument

Pearl Harbor

Wai‘alae Beach Park

Keawa‘ulu (Yokohama) Beach

Mokulē‘ia Beach

‘Ehukai Beach Park (Banzai Pipeline)

Kahana Bay Beach Park

Hanauma Bay

Hoakalei Country Club

Bay View Golf Course

Hawai‘i Prince Golf Course

Kapolei Golf Course

Beach House by Roy Yamaguchi

Maui Divers Jewelry (HNL)

Maui Divers Jewelry (Pearl Harbor)

Maui Divers Jewelry (Dole Plantation)

The Kāhala Hotel & Resort

LEGEND 6 7

163
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
Turtle Bay Resort SEE + DO BEACHES GOLF EAT + DRINK STAY

Honolulu Zoo

Waikīkī Aquarium

Waikīkī Beach

Kaimana Beach

Ala Wai Golf Course

House Without A Key

Momosan Waikiki

Morimoto Asia Waikiki

Hau Tree

DECK.

Duke's Waikiki

Hy's Steak House

La Vie

Quiora

Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi

Roy's® Waikiki

Royal Hawaiian Center

Tiffany & Co.

Louis Vuitton

Maui Divers

Luxury Row

Chanel

Dior

Gucci

Miu Miu

Bottega Venata

Moncler

Golden Goose

International Market Place

Noa Noa

Maui Divers Jewelry

Maui Divers Jewelry (Hilton Hawaiian Village)

Blue Ginger

Halekulani

Halepuna Waikīkī by Halekulani

Hilton Hawaiian Village

Kaimana Beach Hotel

Queen Kapi‘olani Hotel

The Laylow, Autograph Collection

Sheraton Waikīkī

Hyatt Regency Waikīkī Resort & Spa

The Royal Hawaiian

Hyatt

Hyatt

The Ritz-Carlton Residences Waikīkī Beach

164 MAP B
Wayfinder Alohilani Resort
Hotel Waikīkī
Princess Ka‘iulani
Vive
Sheraton
Beach
Centric Waikīkī
Place Waikīkī Beach
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 18 18 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 16 15 17 16 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 11 33 34 33 36 37 18 19 20 20
WAIKĪKĪ

KAKA‘AKO + DOWNTOWN

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Hawai‘i Convention Center

‘Iolani Palace

Ala Moana Beach Park

Pro-AM Golf Shop

MW Restaurant

Fête

Moku Kitchen

The Pig and The Lady

Bar Leather Apron

Ala Moana Center

Ben Bridge Timeworks

Big Island Candies

Louis Vuitton

Maui Divers

Tiffany & Co.

Maui Divers Jewelry Design Center

SALT at Our Kaka‘ako

Ward Village

Noa Noa

Aloha Tower Marketplace

Indich Collection (Nā Lama Kukui)

Indich Collection (Ward)

Kaka‘ako Farmers Market

Whole Foods Market

Prince Waikīkī

The Modern Ālia Sales Gallery at Ala Moana

165
MAP C
10 10 10 10 10 10 11 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 1 3 4 5 2 7 6 12 13 8 9 10 21 11 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

KO OLINA

Paradise Cove

Ko Olina Golf Course

Mānolo Lounge

Mina's Fish House

Noe

Roy's® Ko Olina

Monkeypod Kitchen by Merriman

Ko Olina Center & Station

Honolua Surf Co.

Mahina

Pineapples Boutique

Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina

Aulani, A Disney Resort

Beach Villas at Ko Olina

Marriott‘s Ko Olina Beach Club

HALE‘IWA

Hale‘iwa Beach Park

Waialua Bakery and Juice Bar

Hale‘iwa Bowls

Hale‘iwa Seafood & Grill

Jar'd Co.

Jax Wood Fired Pizza

Island Vintage Coffee

Matsumoto Shave Ice

Maui Divers Jewelry

SoHa Living

Surf N Sea

Hawaiian Island Creations

166
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 MAP D
1 2 3 3 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 7 8 9 10 MAP E 1 2 3 7 4 5 6 8 9 10 10 1 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 11 11 12

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 MAP

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 MAP G 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 6 4 5 7 8 9 10

Makapu‘u Point Lighthouse

Hanauma Bay

Sandy Beach

Wawamalu Beach Park

Makapu‘u Beach Park

HanaPa‘a Market

Kona Brewing Co.

Roy's® Hawaii Kai

Koko Marina Center

KAILUA

The Bike Shop

Kailua Beach

Lanikai Beach

GOEN Dining+Bar by Roy Yamaguchi

Easy 'Cue

Kailua Farmers Market

Manoa Chocolate Hawaii

BookEnds

Oliver Men's Shop

167
1
Nick Kuchar Art & Design Co. F
Sea Life Park
HAWAI‘I KAI
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TRAVELOGUE

170

NOTES + SKETCHES document your travel adventures, the places you visit, experiences you encounter, or something weird you saw at the pool.

172

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O‘ahu MY SKETCHES

170

O‘ahu MY SKETCHES

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